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[ S P ECI A L E D I TIO N : I N SI D E YO UR GUI D E TO FINA LS »SECTION B ] NFL DRAFT: Fisher expected to protect Chiefs QB Alex Smith, one side or the other » PAGE 7A

VIDEO:

Students discuss Fisher’s NFL Draft, what it means for CMU» cm-life.com

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Friday, April 26, 2013

1ST PICK

NFL DRAFT

FIRE UP FISHER Eric Fisher highest MAC player ever drafted

VICTORIA ZEGLER /PHOTO EDITOR

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, left, and Central Michigan University left tackle Eric Fisher, right, hold Fisher’s new Kansas City Chiefs jersey after being selected as the number one pick Thursday night during the 2013 National Football League Draft at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. Fisher will join San Francisco 49ers Pro Bowl tackle and CMU alum Joe Staley as the only players in school history to be selected in the first round of the NFL Draft.

‘Honestly, I had no idea I was going to Kansas City’

Stay up to date with Eric Fisher’s NFL journey on »cm-life.com

JOE STALEY SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS CHRIS KAMAN LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS CHRIS KNAPP CHICAGO WHITE SOX

NEW YORK — Eric Fisher said on Wednesday he thought he had a “really good chance of going No. 1 overall” to the Kansas City Chiefs. On Thursday night, it became a reality, being the first player to hear his name called at the 2013 NFL Draft at Radio City Music Hall. “I’m really excited to be a Kansas City Chief,” Fisher said, trying to hold back his excitement. “What a dream come true and what an amazing opportunity this is for me. It’s hard to process right now what just happened, but I’m so excited to be a part of this organization.” The 6-foot-7, 306-pound offensive tackle said he was unaware the Chiefs would be drafting him until he received the phone call. “I think a lot of people knew more than I did,” he said. “When that phone rang, it was just so surreal. But, honestly, I had no idea I was going to Kansas City.” His mom, who has never fallen short of giving him full

support, could not hold back the tears when she heard her son’s name called. “I think I saw some tears there,” Fisher said. “I knew she was probably going to cry, but she’s been my biggest supporter for everything in my life. She’s been behind me in everything I wanted to do in life and sacrificed so much to help me get here. She’s worked for 33 years, so hopefully she’ll retire now.” Fisher said he cannot wait to be able to help her out and return the favor. “She’s getting up at five in the morning to go to work and coming home at four,” Fisher said. “I’m so happy to have the opportunity to let her just enjoy the rest of her life.” Fisher is the first Mid-American Conference player to be drafted first overall and only the second Chippewa to go in the first round. “Not only for CMU, but for the whole MAC conference, I think it shows we’re making a name for ourselves,” Fisher said. “Central Michigan has a lot of guys in the league right now, and I’m the next one. I just hope the program can grow from all of this.” A FISHER | 7A

DAN MAJERLE PHOENIX SUNS

By Ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

ALL-TIME TOP CMU PROFESSIONAL DRAFT PICKS w NFL - JOE STALEY, OFFENSIVE TACKLE 2007 FIRST-ROUND 28TH OVERALL, SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Staley was the first CMU football player selected in the first round of the NFL draft. He has helped lead San Francisco to the 2012 NFC Championship game and 2013 Super Bowl. w NBA- CHRIS KAMAN, CENTER 2003 FIRST-ROUND SIXTH OVERALL, LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS Kaman is the highest-drafted basketball player in CMU history. Picked by the struggling Clippers, Kaman has had a successful NBA career, named to the 2010 Western Conference All-Star and helped lead the Clippers to the postseason in the 2005-06 season. w MLB - CHRIS KNAPP, PITCHER 1975 FIRST-ROUND 11TH OVERALL, CHICAGO WHITE SOX Knapp is the only pitcher taken in the first round of the MLB draft in CMU history. In his career, Knapp had a 36-32 record with an ERA of 4.99 in 604.1 innings pitched. His career finished in the minor leagues in 1983. w NBA - DAN MAJERLE, SMALL FORWARD 1988 FIRST-ROUND 14TH OVERALL, PHOENIX SUNS Majerle had a career in the NBA that culminated in his No. 9 being retired by the Suns, who he played for from 1988-95 and again 2001-02. During his professional career, Majerle 10,925 points (11.4 per game) and played on three all-star teams.

On

Twitter Joe Staley @jstaley74 So pumped for @Big_Fish79 right now. Congrats big man now get to work!! Jamaal Charles @jcharles25 Nice to have @Big_Fish79 blocking for me! Good pick #ChiefsNation JJ Watt @JJWatt Fire Up Chips #CMU

Jeff Daniels @Jeff_Daniels Congratulations to fellow Chippewa Eric Fisher! #CMU #DraftDay Antonio Brown @AntonioBrown84 CMU #1 added to fye ! #fb Dwayne Bowe @DwayneBowe82 Congrats to Eric Fisher @Big_Fish79 newest member of the KC Chiefs ... Lets do work #kcchiefs #nfldraft


2A || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY

w The softball team takes on

Ball State in a doubleheader beginning at 1 p.m. at Margo Jonker Stadium.

TODAY THROUGH SUNDAY

w The baseball team takes

on Eastern Michigan at 3 p.m. today, at 2 p.m. on Saturday and at 1 p.m. on Sunday at Theunissen Stadium.

SATURDAY

w Trap Door Improv will

host its final shows of the school year at 6 p.m., 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. in the Moore Hall plarform theater. Seating is limited.

SATURDAY & SUNDAY w The softball team hosts

Miami in conference play at 2 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday at Margo Jonker Stadium.

SUNDAY

w The Winter Concert Series

continues at 4 p.m. at the Art Reach of Mid-Michigan, 111 E. Broadway St., featuring bassbaritone artist Eric Tucker. Tickets are $5 for students and $10 for the general public.

TUESDAY

w The 2013 Spring Retirement

Ceremony will take place at 1:30 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Rotunda.

WEDNESDAY

w Let’s Do Lunch, featuring

visual and performance artists, takes place at noon at Art Reach of Mid-Michigan. The event is free for the public and everyone is encouraged to bring lunch.

MAY 4

w Commencement ceremonies will begin at 9 a.m., 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. in McGuirk Arena.

cm-life.com

[NEWS]

PHOTO OF THE DAY

Maroonziee Music and Art Festival to return Gentle Friday to its roots By Ryan Fitzmaurice Senior Reporter

Program Board plans to revamp Gentle Friday with the Maroonziee Music and Art Festival. Free and open to the public, the event will be held from 1 to 7 p.m. at Finch Fieldhouse and will include two stages of music, featuring bands and acts including Air Dubai, TwentyForSeven, Moon Taxi, Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers, Fish ‘N Chips and Mike Burgess. The event will also include an art exhibit from Mount Pleasant and Central Michigan University artists, free 10-minute massages by BodyWorks Natural Health Center of Mount Pleasant, 400 S. University Ave., and catering from Pixie Pizza, 302 N. Mission St., The Flour Uprising, 112 N. Main St., and Dharma Mojo Tea Bar and Grill, 210 W. Pickard St. Program Board Vice President Mark Fairbrother said Gentle Friday has a prestigious and valuable history within the CMU community. The day originated from student opposition to the Vietnam War, and he said past Program Board events have not always lived up to commemorating its history. “What we would do in the past few years was fairly low-key,” the Shelby Township senior said. “We’d hold an event in Warriner Mall or next door to the library, for no more than four hours there wasn’t much reason to stick around. This year, I wanted to make it bigger and better and blow every Gentle Friday out of the water. I wanted to embrace the roots of the program again.” Brianna Fitzsimons, a Vanda-

CORRECTIONS Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2013 Volume 94, Number 87

lia senior and public relations director for the event, said the event’s aim was to shift the culture of Gentle Friday back to its roots. “We really wanted to bring back the history of Gentle Friday,” Fitzsimons said. “It’s all about embracing our history and our culture.” Fitzsimons said there truly is something for everyone at the event. “Even if I wasn’t a part of it, the free ten-minute massages would be enough to bring me in,” she said. Fairbrother said Program Board is expecting to bring in upwards of 2,000 people. “We think students have so much power and talent,” Fairbrother said. “... We want to showcase it. We want to recognize it.”

CHUCK MILLER /STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Clawson graduate student Lee Herteg throws his hand in the air in celebration as former Central Michigan University offensive lineman Eric Fisher is selected as the number one overall pick in the 2013 NFL draft. Fisher is the highest picked player to come from CMU since Joe Staley was selected by the 49ers with the 28th pick in the 2007 draft. Many came to the viewing party at O’Kelly’s Sports Bar and Grill, 2000 S. Mission St., to watch as Fisher was selected.

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INSIDE LIFE

John Irwin, Managing Editor..........................989.774.4343 .......... news@cm-life.com Leigh Jajuga, Student Life Editor.................. 989.774.4340 studentlife@cm-life.com Hailee Sattavara, Metro Editor .................... 989.774.4342 .........metro@cm-life.com Catey Traylor, University Editor ................... 989.774.4344 . university@cm-life.com

3A

cm-life.com

RHA:

Community awards ceremony ensures hard work doesn’t go unnoticed» PAGE 5A

Friday, April 26, 2013

SEXUAL EDUCATION:

‘The Condom Fairy,’ ‘Sextival’ promote sex ed. in Finch Fieldhouse» PAGE 6A

Student media director finalists lay out plan, vision for Central Michigan Life Keith Gave stresses trust, content at open forum

Dave Clark suggests commuterstyle’ paper By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

Keith Gave, a finalist for the Director of Student Publications position, said trust with the Central Michigan Life newspaper staff is the most important part of the job. The Director of Student Publications advises the staff of Central Michigan Life and The Central Review. “I feel like I’ve been preparing for this job for a long time,” Gave said during his Wednesday afternoon open forum before a crowd of CM Life staff members and university faculty and staff. Gave said his role as an adviser is to teach students the skills they need to be successful. “(The role is to) be available in any way I can,” Gave

CHARLOTTE BODAK/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Keith Gave, one of three candidates running for Director of Student Publications speaks to faculty members and members of Central Michigan Life Wednesday afternoon in the Central Michigan Life Conference Room.

said. “Basically, (to give students) all the tools I know how to give them, all the guidance and advice I know how to give them, and then get out of their way.” Gave said trust is a key component of advising and working on a student newspaper. “It takes a lot of courage to walk into a newsroom and do what (reporters) do,” he said. “You need to know somebody is there who has your back at all times.” He said his goal is to make the newspaper as relevant

and topical as possible. “Content is king,” Gave said. “If we do our jobs as reporters, photographers, graphic designers and so on and put together a newspaper people cannot help but pick up ... that’s my goal. That’s where I want to get.” Gave’s journalism career, which spans 30 years, includes various stints at the Dallas Morning News, the Associated Press, the Lansing State Journal and 15 years at the Detroit Free A GAVE | 5A

Director of Student Publications finalist Dave Clark ZACK WITTMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER doesn’t think he’ll win a Pulitzer prize, but he knows he can Dave Clark, one of the three candidates for Director of Student Publications, interviews with journalism faculty members and Central Michigan Life staff members while Neil Hopp, help students. Clark, the Editor-in-Chief of the current director, watches over his shoulder in the CM Life conference room Wednesday. The Pioneer in Big Rapids and if it were for a commuter audia CMU graduate, has previous- role of an adviser to a paper ence?” Clark said. like this,” Clark said. “Somely served as former assistant He said this commuter-style body needs to be able to say to metro editor and business layout would focus on publisha professor or someone who editor at the News-Sentinel ing shorter, summary-style leads a student organization, in Fort Wayne, Ind., and as an stories and fewer long-form ‘You can come into our office.’” editor at The Daily Telegram stories, while still emphasizA goal of Clark’s is helping in Adrian. ing the news students want to students get the most out of “My policy as an editor, and read. their time at Central Michigan certainly as an adviser, would “Quality must always be Life and The Central Review, always be an open door,” Clark maintained,” he said. “(But, the two student publications said. this could) make (the paper) the director oversees. He said being an adviser more of a compelling read.” Clark provided many sugmeans serving as a resource Clark also suggested changgestions about how to improve to students and as an ambasing the layout of the newspaand to make changes to the sador to the campus commuper from its current broadnewspaper. nity, including the journalism “What if you decided to department. A CLARK | 5A write and design (the paper) as “I think that’s part of the

GRADUATE STUDENT UNION

OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS

Campbell: All issues laid out

CMU names 3 finalists for open director job

By Annie Harrison Staff Reporter

Graduate Student Union President Michelle Campbell said all bargaining issues are now on the table. Campbell said the GSU introduced language on health care in bargaining on Monday. The GSU began bargaining Feb. 15 on the smaller issues of its platform, and she said, by April 15, the university had responded to most of the proposals. Campbell said the GSU and the university have reached agreements on the arbitrator process and necessary materials. She said the issue of necessary materials assures that if graduate assistants are expected to meet with students in private and if space is available, GAs have a right to have access to that space. “We do have 24 issues out on the table, and we only have two issues signed as far as a tentative agreement,” she said. “We are 1/12 of the way there.” Campbell said most of the issues have been brought A GSU | 5A

By Samantha Smallish Staff Reporter

are to improve traffic flow on campus. Proposed changes include expanding several campus parking lots and constructing roundabouts on main streets and busy intersections. “One thing we hope to do in the long run is put in some roundabouts,” Associate Vice President of Facilities Management Steve Lawrence said. Other proposed changes to campus to enhance walkability include the addition of a “green spine,” or green space which would be bike and pedestrian friendly, and would run the length of campus.

Three finalists have been named for the position of Director of the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equality. The candidates will hold open forums next week at Central Michigan University. Jeannie Jackson, who has served as director of the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equity since 2008, announced her plans to retire effective May 17. Matthew Olovson, director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and staff attorney at Ferris State University, will be coming to CMU Monday for his open forum from 1:45 to 2:30 p.m. in the Lake Michigan room of the Bovee University Center. He has been in the director position at FSU since October 2012. Katherine Lasher, the assistant director of the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equality at CMU, has an open forum scheduled for 1:45 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Lake St. Clair Room of the Bovee UC. Lasher has been in the assistant director position since August 2012. The final candidate is Francisco Gonzalez, dispute prevention and resolution specialist at the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry. Gonzalez has been in the position since July 2006. His open forum is scheduled from 1:45 to 2:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Lake St. Clair Room of the UC. The director of the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equality is responsible for the application and overview of the university’s affirmative action programs. Leadership of other campus administrative offices to assure compliance with applicable laws, regulations and university protocol is necessary. The Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equality could not be reached for comment.

university@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

MELISSA BLOEM/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Michael Gealt tells about his experience as Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics and as a Biology professor at University of Arkansas during the Provost Forum Wednesday afternoon in the Ausable room of the Bovee University Center.

‘We really are a team’ Gealt stresses communication, retention at provost forum By Kyle Kaminski | Senior Reporter The selection process for replacing Provost Gary Shapiro is nearing a conclusion after the final open forum for the third finalist for the position, Michael Gealt. Gealt is the dean of the

College of Science and Mathematics at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock and offers nearly 40 years of academic experience at both the faculty and administrative level. “I think I’ve had a sig-

nificant impact at the universities I’ve been involved with,” Gealt said during Wednesday’s open forum in the Ausable room of the Bovee University Center. The forum opened with Gealt discussing his back-

ground and his interest in Central Michigan University, but the latter portion was left largely to a question and answer session. During the Q&A sesA PROVOST | 6A

Master plan draft reviewed again at open town hall By Andrea Peck Staff Reporter

The public had the chance to offer input about the future of the university when the 2013 Central Michigan University Draft Master Plan was presented at a town hall meeting Wednesday. The campus master plan was first released in 2001 and was updated again in 2003. The plan focuses on space utilization, facilities condition assessment, infrastructure assessment, land use and the CHARLOTTE BODAK/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER development of a 10-year Dave Rose, a member of the SHW Group, an architectural and planning firm, capital plan. unveils the campus master plan Wednesday afternoon in the Mackinaw Room in “This is happening at a rethe Bovee University Center. ally good moment,” said Dave

Rose of the SHW Group. “We were very aggressive in getting your input about the plan and tried to accommodate your thoughts, suggestions and comments.” SHW Group is an architectural and planning firm that has done previous work for CMU. Thoughts, suggestions and comments from the public were collected during the data collection and discovery parts of the planning process. “It has been exceptionally inclusive,” Rose said. More than 3,200 people took a survey about the proposed master planSome of the focuses of the new master plan

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VOICES

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

cm-life.com

Friday, April 26, 2013

4A

EDITORIAL BOARD | Aaron McMann, Editor-in-Chief | John Irwin, Managing Editor | Kristopher Lodes, Sports Editor | Hailee Sattavara, Metro Editor | Catey Traylor, University Editor

EDITORIAL | Search for student media director fell short

Sam Easter Staff Reporter

Goodbye, Central Leaving high school was easy. I’d been preparing for it mentally for 13 years. When I walked across the makeshift wooden stage at H.H. Dow High School, I knew it was time to go, because the public school circle of life had been whispering it in my ear since kindergarten. I shook hands, pocketed my diploma and promptly left town. College is a different bird entirely. Though a new beginning is just past next Saturday, it brings with it a very self-conscious end. For us seniors, life will irreversibly be changed. No longer will we wake up for class, but for work with a boss to please and payday in mind. This is a tough pill to swallow. Here on campus, there’s so much more to do, see and explore. I’ve done so much, but leaving college makes me feel that I’ve left the lion’s share of it untouched; never have I published a poem or joined a fraternity. Never have I jogged with the running club, worked in a laboratory or pulled an allnighter. How that last one slipped past me, I’ll never know. This results in some bizarre cases of nostalgia. I’ve only now noticed how many books there are in the library, how the pavement feels by Brooks and how the sun looks shining into the SAC. I’m living the last two weeks of my undergraduate career in a full, five-senses technicolor, baby, because I’ve only just realized that I’ll never get a moment of it back. I am a seaman who has only ever thought about shore leave. All this time, I’ve been peeping over the rail, never setting foot ashore. And now, my ship is sailing. The whistle is blowing, and the crew is casting off. Don’t get me wrong. I’ve seen a lot of campus life, and after I’ve left, there will still be time for me to explore the world. I’m sure that sooner or later, I’ll get to the bottom of my bucket list. But, it won’t be here, because, right now, it’s time for goodbye and good luck. So, if I could say anything to the incoming freshmen, I’d tell them to seize more of it all. Go out on Saturday nights. Speak your mind in class, and work hard for the things you want. Paint your chest for football games. Be proud of your university—I know I am, and I always will be. Goodbye, Central. I’ll miss the hell out of you.

Central Michigan Life EDITORIAL Aaron McMann, Editor-in-Chief John Irwin, Managing Editor Leigh Jajuga, Student Life Editor Hailee Sattavara, Metro Editor Catey Traylor, University Editor Mariah Prowoznik, Lead Designer Kristopher Lodes, Sports Editor Victoria Zegler, Photo Editor Brooke Mayle, Assistant Photo Editor Seth Newman, Video Editor Evan Sorenson, Online Coordinator ADVERTISING Becca Baiers, Julie Bushart, Megan Schneider Advertising Managers PROFESSIONAL STAFF Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University. The Director of Student Media advises the newspaper, and the self-governing Student Media Board of Directors oversees operations. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.

F

A jumbled mess or a group of journalists who have been trained to live deadline to deadline, the

selection committee for the new director of student publications has come up short.

Since Director of Student Publications Neil Hopp announced his retirement in November, the committee has been dragging its feet in making any decision. An advertisement for the position wasn’t posted until January, and we wouldn’t have even known the search was underway had we not repeatedly asked. A few weeks ago, the committee selected five finalists. One dropped out after being told she was a finalist because she didn’t want her name publicized, and the other, former Associated Press Director of Career Development and News Robert Naylor, dropped out shortly after. That left three finalists: Dave Clark, editor-in-chief of The Pioneer in Big Rapids; Keith Gave, adviser to The Washtenaw Voice, a community college bi-weekly newspaper; and James Knight, manager of human resources communications at the University of Michigan, who has excellent journalism experience, but a not-so-excellent conflict of interest.

And unfortunately, Knight’s conflict of interest dominated his open forum in the Central Michigan Life conference room Tuesday afternoon, evident by the large turnout. So, after sitting down with each of these candidates, it became clear the search for the director of student publications was poorly conducted. And for such a crucial position as it relates to CM Life, it is disheartening the board has botched this search worse than any of us could have possibly imagined. The search has taken far longer than anyone could have reasonably expected. The board has been disorganized at best, and the process has lacked any sort of transparency or accountability. In fact, the board was supposed to recommend two of the three finalists to Provost Gary Shapiro by Wednesday evening (we think – it’s not like they ever announced an official deadline), but, when we inquired about the results of their decision, both

reporters and staff members were met with responses varying from “an official decision is yet to be made” to “no comment.” Here’s the bottom line: If you say you’re going to do something, do it. If you say you’re going to announce candidates, make it public. And, if you claim you can conduct a search in a timely, fair and professional manner, you’d better make sure your ducks are in a row before you string people along with indecisiveness and confusion. The manner in which the search has been conducted has been unreasonable, not only considering issues of transparency and accountability, but also for the prospective candidates, the staff of CM Life and their readership. While arguably qualified candidates are unclear about their potential employment opportunities, the end of the spring 2013 semester has been left without resolution or inclusion of any parties in the decisionmaking process. And that leaves us with even less faith in the selection committee than before. It almost seems as if the board isn’t sure who to choose, which wouldn’t be surprising. In fact, after the way this search has been conducted, it’d even be expected.

[ EDITORIAL CARTOON ]

[ LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ]

Stop demonizing the poor I would like to add and expand to the recent letter published in the Mt. Pleasant Central Michigan Life by a CMU social work student advocating drug testing for welfare clients. CMU receives about $70 million each year in state revenues provided by “hard-working taxpayers.” This figure does not include monies provided by federal tax dollars and tax-supported tuition grants and subsidies. Michigan taxpayers support each CMU student’s education with approximately $3,500. I believe that those students receiving taxpayers-supported education should be randomly drug/ alcohol tested. As with drug testing of welfare recipients, such a policy would make sure tax dollars do not go to support individuals who misuse our tax-supported services. I have visited the local Department of Human Services office and have seen no indications that those

waiting for services are under the influence of drugs or alcohol. I wish I could say the same after attending CMU sporting events or just walking on Main Street on a Thursday night. I wonder how many “hard-earned taxpayer” dollars are wasted by these students’ missed or dropped classes. As the letter writer notes, why should we support those who use drugs/alcohol? I suggest that we take drug testing one step further. All state employees are subject to random drug testing; why should not the Directors of State Department/Agencies be held to the same standard? And why not require random drug test for tax-supported state legislators? Have we not over the years read stories about numerous elected officials and the drug/alcohol-related problems. Oh wait, the State House voted that proposal down. Perhaps it is time to stop demonizing the poor, to stop caricaturizing them

as dope-using layabouts. Forty six-million Americans are now living below the poverty level, most of whom are employed at minimal-wage jobs. The Bible teaches us much about the poor, “When you reap the harvest of your land, do not reap to the very edges of your field or gather the gleanings of your harvest. Do not go over your vineyard a second time or pick up the grapes that have fallen. Leave them for the poor and the alien” Leviticus 19:9-11. God did not mention drug testing. Let’s take a stance and make a change. The poor deserve our support and compassion — not our scorn. And, as an aside, perhaps the drug testing advocate “social worker” might want to rethink her career choice. She has clearly failed to meet the “non-judgmental” standard for social workers. Alan J. Kilar, Mount Pleasant

Arielle Breen Staff Reporter

Minimize refrigeration Americans are over-refrigerating. Between 1925 and the 1940s, Americans started to use what we call the refrigerator. It wasn’t until the ‘40s that use was actually widespread, but now we’re obsessed with it. Ever since then, I would argue we have been overusing the contraptions and have started to behave like nervous consumerists, obsessively and compulsively overdoing it. Before commercialized refrigerators, Americans used various methods of keeping food from spoiling. Preservation methods such as salting and canning were common, especially for meats. However, people didn’t really eat as much meat as what we typically eat today. Nowadays, we have readilyavailable supplies of mass-produced meats such as chicken, pork and beef. Since the perishables were typically eaten right away if they weren’t preserved, a lot of people didn’t have or need a refrigerator. Many Amish and other American sub-cultures still rely on variations of these food preservation methods in lieu of electric-powered refrigeration units today. Ice boxes, which were literally just insulated boxes that held ice and refrigerated foods, were much more common. Some were simply kept below the ground covered with moss, while others were kept in the house. The types of ice boxes were really dependent on where you lived, what kind of lifestyle you had and how affluent you were. This is a completely different perspective to what nearly all college students may be accustomed to. If you really stop to think about it, people got along fairly well without those hulking refrigeration units humming along in our kitchens. Yes, they kept certain foods cool and preserved and canned others, but they didn’t have the space or need to put nearly every food in the ice box, or even in refrigerators once they came into everyday life. Since companies like General Electric Co. really pushed the importance of refrigeration in food stability, America has become a nation filled with scared, germophobic conformists as far as our food is concerned. If you take a look at many other cultures, even those as developed as the United States, you can see that not everyone is so obsessed with keeping it all cool. There are plenty of examples of food that we aren’t supposed to refrigerate; peanut butter, butter, bread and a whole host of others that Americans routinely refrigerate. Even many meats don’t have to be put in the fridge right away. Sure, they won’t last quite as long. But, hey, we have some weak immune systems around here, and it’s about time we fixed that. I’m not saying everyone should attempt to break the norm, but perhaps not being as obsessive could be helpful. Actually thinking about what you’re doing, rather than simply being a blind follower of the culture, might yield some interesting results. Furthermore, I would add that refrigerators are not technically a necessity. They’ve helped in aiding a culture of laziness and one that often lacks forethought and planning. While I love to constantly challenge my immune system and feel it’s good for me, maybe you just can’t handle it, and this may not be for you.

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hal Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Proud of CMU, community CMU Community: I would like to take a moment to congratulate studentathlete Eric Fisher and the CMU football program. This is a significant moment for Central Michigan University and its students. Eric is your champion! He is like so many of you — past and present — who came to CMU with the dream of discovering what this great University can do for you. He represents the values, work ethic, determina-

tion, and dreams of our studentbody. He is the product of great faculty, staff and coaches who sacrifice and invest much to develop the next generation of leaders, thinkers, artists and teachers. Like many former proud Chippewas have learned through life, CMU is a special place with great people who will prepare you for life and success. Dick Enberg, one of our greatest alum, said at a CMU graduation ceremony, “Like many of you, CMU accepted a perfect

nobody and allowed him to be somebody. And so it is and will be for many of you today. Oh My!!” I am honored to be a part of a great community that is rich in people, tradition, values and dreams. Fire Up Chips! Dave Heeke Associate Vice President/ Director of Athletics

Ce n t r a l M i c h i g a n L i f e we l co m e s l e t te r s to t h e e d i to r a n d co m m e n t a r y s u b m i s s i o n s . O n l y co r r e s p o n d e n c e t h a t i n c l u d e s a s i g n a t u r e (e - m a i l e xc l u d e d ), address and phone number will b e co n s i d e r e d . D o n o t i n c l u d e attached documents via e-mail. L e t te r s s h o u l d b e n o l o n g e r t h a n 3 0 0 wo r d s a n d co m m e n t a r y s h o u l d n o t e xc e e d 5 0 0 wo r d s . A l l s u b m i s s i o n s a r e s u b j e c t to e d i t i n g a n d m ay b e p u b l i s h e d i n p r i n t o r o n c m - l i f e . co m i n t h e o r d e r t h ey a r e r e c e i ve d .


cm-life.com

Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 5A

[NEWS]

Union Township approves additional funding for 2013 road projects By Wyatt Bush Staff Reporter

MELISSA BLOEM/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Residence Hall Association E-board President Alyson Cole, a senior from Grand Rapids, presents next year’s E-board President Eric Ostrowski, a junior from Northville, before passing the gavel down to him at the Bovee University Center Rotunda on Wednesday night.

RHA community awards ceremony ensures hard work doesn’t go unnoticed By Ryan Fitzmaurice Senior Reporter

The Residence Hall Assembly celebrated what many inside the organization consider one of the most successful years in its history. The RHA held the RHA Stars of the Community awards ceremony at the Bovee University Center Rotunda on Wednesday night to recognize outstanding individuals throughout the organization. Bo Parker, Sweeney Hall adviser, was recognized as Hall Adviser of the Year. Grand Rapids freshman Susan McManus won Resident of the Year. Hudsonville junior Taylor Guss won Residential Assistant of the year, Union City sophomore Molly Slocum won Desk Associate of the Year, Bellaire sophomore Tayler Watrous won Hall Council President of the Year and Livonia freshman Lauren Pennington won Hall Executive

GSU | CONTINUED FROM 3A to the table by the GSU. She said the university has brought a couple of issues to the table, mostly concerning certain language in the contract. She said one of the main issues for the university is putting language into the GSU contract to help solidify the right-towork law. “From the GSU’s point of view, many of those requests are not things that we find appropriate to put in our contract, and we will continue to seek as much autonomy and as many rights for our employees at CMU as we are able to fight for,” she said. The union will be negotiating as it sees new leadership take power. Pennsylvania graduate student Erin Lewis will succeed Campbell as president on May 1, while Sandford graduate student Benjamin Fortin will take over as vice president and Olaseni Fadipe will

GAVE | CONTINUED FROM 3A Press, spent primarily covering the Detroit Red Wings. Gave said he can handle the change in pace that would come with advising CM Life ahead as opposed to The Washtenaw Voice, the Washtenaw Community College student publication he advises. “I wish (CM Life) were a daily newspaper,” he said. “I’m ready, and I think it’s exciting we can write and break news and write it in a timely manner.” At WCC, Gave said he helps reporters find other students and faculty for help with multimedia projects such as video packages and photo slideshows and can bring this helpfulness to CM Life and The Central Review. “They find these good students for us, and we do a lot of team reporting,” he said. “News reporters, photographers and videographers go out and all do a story together, and we have a great story, great pictures and a video to go with it.” Gave is the only candidate of the three who did not graduate from CMU and

Board Member of the Year. Watrous said the accomplishments recognized at the banquet reflect the new attitude instilled within the RHA this year by President Alyson Cole. “She’s instilled so much passion and energy within this organization, which hasn’t always been there,” Watrous said. “It’s a more organized and efficient organization, and people have carried that passion throughout the year. She’s the face of this organization, and that’s what the president needs to be.” Watrous said the RHA contains some of the most important individuals on CMU’s campus. “These people change students’ lives and make this campus a better place,” Watrous said. “We’re here to recognize that.” Guss said the banquet recognizes work that the RHA performs throughout the year that would often go unrecognized.

“There is so much hard work that goes on that normally isn’t seen or highlighted,” Guss said. “Nobody sees it, and this allows it to be seen.” Guss, who will be the president of RHA’s sister organization on campus, the National Residence Hall Honorary, said the awards mean a lot, but the words that go with them mean much more. “It’s the words and the recognition that mean something,” Guss said. “That’s what I’ll carry with me.” Cole said this year’s individuals within the RHA are a distinguished group. “Our team this year worked incredibly hard and were passionate about the student body,” Cole said. “... They all bring so many different talents and projects; it’s hard to describe how important they’ve been.”

become the GSU’s new treasurer. Health insurance is one of the larger issues of the GSU platform. The GSU does not have health insurance under its current contract. The 2010-13 bargaining agreement states that CMU will provide a wellness allowance of $175 during the academic year 2012-13. As previously reported by CM Life, the GSU platform states on the issue of healthcare: “We believe that it is imperative to have reasonable employer-sponsored health insurance to guard against catastrophic health emergencies that could endanger a graduate assistant’s educational endeavors. We believe graduate assistants should have health care coverage beyond the wellness allowance, and we support health care coverage that extends to spouses, civil partners and children.” One of the issues the GSU and university keep going back and forth over is leave time, Campbell said. She said the GSU’s stance on leave time is that the expectation for women to be back

teaching in a classroom one week after giving birth is “ridiculous.” “One of the things that we’re making sure is that people with conditions that require long-term leave time have that protection in our contract,” she said. CMU’s GSU was recognized in 2009, and the threeyear contract from 2010-13 expires this summer. Campbell said she can’t comment on whether the GSU expects to reach an agreement before the contract expires, but she said the university has expressed hope at a tentative agreement by the end of May.

does not have direct ties to the university. “All I can say to that is you won’t find a bigger fan of this place than me,” he said. The two other candidates for the job are 1984 CMU alum and current Manager of Human Resources Communications at the University of Michigan Jim Knight and current Editor-in-Chief of the Big Rapids Pioneer and CMU alum Dave Clark, who held open forums Tuesday and Wednesday afternoon, respectively. He said he was unsure if Knight should be a candidate for the job because of his marriage to Associate Vice President of University Communications Sherry Knight. “I don’t have the answers to that (question), and that’s a tough call for whoever has to make it,” he said. Gave worked with Knight at AnnArbor.com and said he is a good judge of character and a quality journalist. The Student Media Board will choose two finalists from the three remaining, and Provost Gary Shapiro will decide the new director of student publications. It is unclear when Shapiro will make his decision. university@cm-life.com

The Union Township Board of Trustees permitted an additional $138,453 in funding for its 2013 road projects Wednesday. This funding comes in addition to the $450,000 previously budgeted for road maintenance and reconstruction. Both sets of funding are not yet contracted and are rough approximations of the final costs. Township Manager Brian Smith said $20,000 budgeted toward patching Meridian Road is a temporary fix to smooth out potholes before a more permanent repair can occur in 2015. “There are so many numerous potholes on that road that it’s just not able to keep up with anything,” Smith said. “(The patching) is not going

CLARK | CONTINUED FROM 3A sheet style to a smaller, more portable tabloid-style paper. He praised the CM Life mobile application, including its notification of specials and deals, but said there is a challenge in monetizing the app.

to produce a perfectly smooth surface, but it’s going to be 100 times better than what we have now.” Other projects include chip seals on Isabella Road from Preston Street to Remus Road in addition to Broadway Street to Pickard Road, a crack seal on Baseline Road from Mission Street to Bamber Road and a one-inch patch overlay on Meridian Road. Crack sealing and chip sealing are essentially temporary fixes where cracks in the road are sealed through various methods to prevent water from entering the pavement. Both are expected to delay, if not prevent, the emergence of potholes. The controversy of the evening was the $55,610 budget for the blacktopping of Ruby Street from Broadway to Bertshire Drive. Though the

motion passed with a 4-3 vote, concerns were raised about whether residents of the street should contribute to a portion of the project’s funding. Treasurer Pam Stovak said homeowners on the road would receive an increase in their property value and, therefore, should contribute to some degree toward the project’s funding. Other members, including Trustee Roger Hauck, supported the measure due to safety concerns in addition to effectively charging residents of a connector road to a nearby subdivision for repairs, which he said might set a dangerous precedent. “Should we tax those people just because they happen to live on the road, a short road that’s bad?” Hauck said.

He said the path CM Life takes and the mission statement it establishes is up to its editors and reporters, but he wants the job to help steer students in the right direction. “It’s not my role to chart that. I think it’s (the editor’s) job to decide that, and I think it’s my job to help them make it happen,” he said. “That’s the epiphany I had. I’m not going to win a Pulitzer Prize,

but I can help you, and that’s enough for me.” Being the director of student publications keeps someone in charge of the newspaper’s traditions and legacy, he said. “Part of what I should do as the adviser is to protect the brand and to protect the legacy (of CM Life),” he said.

metro@cm-life.com

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6A || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com

[NEWS]

‘The Condom Fairy,’ ‘Sextival’ promote sexual education in Finch Fieldhouse By Katelyn Sweet Staff Reporter

“There’s nothing wrong with sex,” Adrian sophomore Ashlea Phenicie said. Phenicie has been dressing up and visiting residence halls around Central Michigan University’s campus in a tutu, wings and headpiece, all decorated in condoms to promote Thursday’s Sextival. Sextival took place Thursday afternoon in Finch Fieldhouse, where there were games set up to increase education about sex. Voices for Planned Parenthood has presented the idea of sending around the condom fairy as a way to promote sexual education and safety and to also approach students in an unexpected and exciting manner. VOX member and Brighton sophomore Dana Frank dressed as a condom fairy for Halloween, and then the idea of Sextival developed. “I went to parties and handed out condoms to my friends,” Frank said. “It was

PROVOST | CONTINUED FROM 3A sion, Gealt focused specifically on the importance of collaboration between departments on campus and working toward a unified university. “We really are a team,” he said. “It’s important to connect faculty throughout campus so they can work together. We need to make sure we learn the intersections, because it can be difficult to get a collaboration.” Gealt cited his experiences at ULAR, where he worked to connect the communications with the College of Science and Mathematics to assist with technical writing instruction. Like Karen Schmaling, another finalist for the position, Gealt doesn’t have any hands-on experience working with faculty unions.

“I think people would be surprised to know that stores are allowed to sell expired condoms.” Rachel McDaniel, VOX President really fun, and I figured VOX could use the costume as a new way to get publicity.” VOX President Rachel McDaniel, an Allegan senior, said she is shocked that most people don’t have the correct knowledge about condoms. “I think people would be surprised to know that stores are allowed to sell expired condoms,” McDaniel said. “There’s so little that people really know about condoms, and we want to make it fun; who doesn’t like something that’s fun?” The condom fairy is intended to present matters like this in a cheerful way that is targeted at getting students engaged in conversation about sexuality. “Some people slam their doors in my face or don’t want to take the condoms, but others get excited,” Phenicie said. “It’s

been a mainly positive thing.” Phenicie said a Twitter account has been made for the condom fairy where she can get tweets and then deliver condoms to students. Ortonville sophomore Hannah Mollett said learning facts about sex is something that students tend to shy away from. Mollett said, even if students just jokingly take the condoms, they are still happy to see people taking the steps that are necessary to prevent STIs. In the past, VOX has simply tried giving out condoms at tables, which Mollett said makes students feel awkward at times. “Students aren’t that comfortable when it comes to topics with sexual education, but it is important,” Mollett said.

“I’ve never been at a university where the faculty was unionized,” Gealt said. “I have had a lot to do with faculty governance, particularly at Purdue-Calumet.” When asked about his administrative style, Gealt focused largely on communication. “I talk to a lot of people,” Gealt said. “It’s a democratic way to deal with problems and issues. I try not to form an opinion until I’ve talked to at least three people about any one particular issue. Sometimes, different versions of the truth tend to arise.” Gealt also emphasized the importance of speaking with students. “Sometimes, the discussions are formal, and, sometimes, they’re less formal,” Gealth said. “I routinely talk to students in elevators.” A question came up discussing the importance of shared governance on campus. Gealt said that it’s more about communication

than governing. “It’s not a shared governance,” Gealt said. “It’s a shared community. That’s how to go forward; as a shared group. I do know how to make hard decisions, and I also know how to move them forward.” When addressing the issues that CMU will face in the future, Gealt stressed the importance of recruitment and retention among both undergraduate and graduate students. “We’ve had problems bringing students in,” Gealt said. “It needs to be on a university level. Growing the university is everyone’s concern. But once students are on board, we need to be able to retain them.” Gealt joins both Schmaling and Alan White as the final three finalists to be completed with their open forums. It is unclear when the final decision will be made.

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 7A

[SPORTS]

Eric Fisher’s rise representative of MAC

PHOTOS BY VICTORIA ZEGLER/PHOTO EDITOR

Central Michigan University left tackle Eric Fisher answers questions in a press conference after being selected as the number one pick by the Kansas City Chiefs Thursday night during the 2013 National Football League Draft at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. “It’s hard to remember what just happened,” Fisher said. “It’s every young boy’s dream to stand up there with the commissioner, I feel so blessed.”

Fisher expected to protect Chiefs QB Alex Smith, one side or the other By Ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

NEW YORK — Nobody could be happier with Kansas City drafting Eric Fisher than newly acquired quarterback Alex Smith. The Chiefs could possibly have both tackle positions solidified heading into training camp, depending on what happens with current left tackle Branden Albert. Kansas City placed the franchise tag on Albert earlier this off-season, but he is still searching for a new contract, and it appears the Chiefs are willing to trade him. But, whatever happens, Smith should be excited to have Fisher protecting the edge-rush, especially after former Central Michigan offensive tackle and San Francisco 49er Joe Staley pleaded his case to Smith on why Fisher

FISHER | CONTINUED FROM 1A Fisher said he could only imagine what the atmosphere was like in Mount Pleasant and his hometown Rochester

should be No. 1. Fisher has also been the beneficiary of Staley’s guidance throughout the draft process. “Joe Staley has been a huge mentor for me,” Fisher said. “He’s someone that’s been there and done that. He’s just played in the Super Bowl, so you really can’t do much more than that.” If they do decide to trade Albert, Fisher will likely fill the left tackle position. If not, Fisher will likely man the right side. Fisher’s rise to the top has been nothing but extraordinary. Despite being a three-year starter, he did not receive any prestigious individual accolades until his senior season. Earning First-Team AllMAC honors, Second-Team All-America by SI.com and Third-Team All-America by the Associated Press began to put him on the map, along with a bowl victory over Western

Kentucky in December. He was initially thought of as a first-round selection after his senior season, but, after a dominant performance at the Senior Bowl in January, scouts were beginning to project him as a top-10 pick. His showing at the NFL Combine put him in the discussion to be the top overall pick, bettering his main competition for first overall and eventual No. 2 selection, left tackle Luke Joeckel, in three of the six drills. They tied in two others. Now, he will go up against some of the best defensive

ends in the league. “There are a lot of great defensive ends in this league,” Fisher said. “They’re so athletic, so fast. That’s just going to push me harder and push me to be a better player. There are just so many names out there that I hoped to get the opportunity one day to play against them, and I now get that opportunity.” The Chiefs have not taken an offensive tackle in the first round since they drafted Albert 15th overall in 2008.

Hills when he walked across the stage. “I bet they are going pretty wild right now,” he said. “It was kind of frustrating because so many people were texting me when I was waiting for the call, but, I’m sure everyone is going wild. The fact that Mount Pleasant

has a first pick coming out of there, it’s got to be going crazy right now.” Just minutes after the draft, the Stoney Creek graduate already set lofty goals for himself. “My goal now is to be a Pro Bowler my rookie year,” Fisher stated.

Fisher is the fourth offensive tackle to go No. 1 overall. Michigan’s Jake Long went first in 2008, Orlando Pace went No. 1 in 1997, and Hallof-Famer Ron Yary was the first pick in the 1968 draft.

Central Michigan University left tackle Eric Fisher answers questions on the red carpet before the 2013 National Football League Draft Thursday evening outside Radio City Music Hall in New York City.

IN THE NEWS

BYU’S EZEKIEL “ZIGGY” ANSAH TO THE LIONS By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

Many thought the Lions would draft either an offensive linemen or cornerback as the 2013 NFL Draft approached. Instead, they went with defensive lineman Ezekiel Ansah from BYU, with the fifth overall pick. “Ziggy Ansah is a guy who fills a big need for this team,” Lions General Manager Martin Mayhew said. Ansah might have the least amount of experience out of all the players in the 2013 NFL Draft class, but he has skills and an upside that is rarely seen. Ansah’s rise to stardom and life story is unique. He never played football before 2010. In Ghana, he grew up playing soccer and actually tried out for the BYU basketball team

in 2008 and 2009 before being cut. Ansah started nine games in 2012 for the Cougars. It was during a unique situation in 2010 when Ansah was introduced to football for the first time. Learning how to put on the pads and understanding football terminology were just a few things he had to adapt to. In 2012, Ansah took over for injured teammate Eathyn Manumaleuna in the fourth game of the season. Over the final nine games of the season, Ansah was third on the team in tackles with 48, second in sacks with 4.5 and first in tackles for loss with 13. BYU finished the season with the best red zone defense in the country. Many national analysts like Ansah’s raw talent and see him as a difference maker for

any NFL team. “That physical and athletic prowess he brings to a defense is why he went in the top five overall,” ESPN analyst Mel Kiper Jr. said. The Lions coaching staff coached Ansah during the Senior Bowl in January and had a good idea of his strengths and weaknesses coming into the draft. “This guy has a chance to be a big time difference maker,” ESPN analyst Todd McShay said. Although the experience might not be there, he showed a lot of potential in the nine games he played this past season for the Cougars. He is 6’5’’, 271 pounds and has a 35 1/8’’ arm length. “His upside? Can’t even limit it,” NFL Network’s Mike Mayock said. “His movement skills are scary.”

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sports@cm-life.com

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With the first pick of the 2013 NFL Draft, the Kansas City Chiefs select Eric Fisher, offensive tackle, Central Michigan. It actually happened; Fisher, a two-star recruit from Rochester Hills Stoney Creek coming into Mount Pleasant, was picked No. 1 overall. I’m from Mount Pleasant and never would I have imagined someone from CMU going No. 1. I’ve seen first round, but never No. 1 overall. I saw Chris Kaman play in person and watched on TV when he was the sixth overall pick in the 2003 NBA Draft. I also saw Joe Staley in person in 2007 and then watched when he was the 28th overall pick that year in the NFL Draft. But, this just happened to be Fisher’s year. Even more impressive, he did it in a year where the lineman class is strong. He emerged the strongest, most athletic and the one with the most potential. The draft class was lacking star power: no quarterback, no running back, no wide receiver; the stars just simply were not shining this year. That gave way to one of the most important, but unheralded, positions in the NFL; left tackle. Why is left tackle so important? Well, simply because he is the man who keeps the quarterback upright and healthy, he protects the side of the line the quarterback normally can’t see, thus the term ‘blind side.’ That isn’t the only thing that turned Fisher’s way this season. If you think about it, the whole season has been leading up to this. Don’t forget, CMU was 3-6 and staring down another losing season — that is until the team ended the regular season on a threegame winning streak to become bowl eligible. But, that doesn’t mean anything — it has been eligible before and not made a bowl game. But, this happened to be a weak year for some BCS conferences, which created a technicality that allowed fellow MidAmerican Conference

Kristopher Lodes Sports Editor member Northern Illinois into the Orange Bowl. And with some bad planning of wait-and-see by another mid-major, the Chippewas were able to slide into an opening for the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl, giving Fisher a chance to show what he has on national television. The game was the only one televised that night, so everybody had their eyes on the game and on Fisher. CMU won, and Fisher received an invite to the Senior Bowl, where he hit the scene. Coming in as a late first-round pick, Fisher stole the show at the Senior Bowl, dominating offensive line drills against players from bigger schools, proving he could hang with the big boys. He left Alabama as a mid-early first-round pick. Next came the NFL combine in Indianapolis, where he beat fellow offensive tackle from Texas A & M Luke Joeckel in many of the drills. After that, Fisher saw his name fly into the top-10 in almost every mock draft. Then came pro day, and, a few weeks later, Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid visited Mount Pleasant and personally watched Fisher. By then, Fisher saw his name at No. 2, with some even having him No. 1. It was Wednesday, the night before the draft when everyone started putting Fisher ahead of Joeckel — and now it’s official. Eric Fisher is the No. 1 pick, not only the highest CMU player picked in history, but the highest MAC player in history. What a journey — one that is representative of the season, for Fisher, CMU and the MAC.

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8A || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com

[SPORTS]

BASEBALL

SOFTBALL

CMU hopes to snap EMU’s four game streak

Team with opportunity to take first place in MAC By Ryan Solecki Staff Reporter

By Emily Grove Staff Reporter

Baseball head coach Steve Jaksa said games against Eastern Michigan have always been competitive, and he expects this weekend to be no different. At 3:05 p.m. today, CMU will start a three-game series against EMU at Theunissen Stadium. “Eastern is a natural instate and conference rival,” Jaksa said. “We played them five times last year, and they were all great games. They’re in a place now we want to be, winning four in a row, but we feel good about our preparation.” The Eagles extended the streak after shutting out Western Michigan last weekend and defeating Michigan 15-10 in Tuesday’s mid-week game. Earlier this season, the Chippewas fell 7-0 to the Wolverines. Last weekend at Toledo, CMU dropped two of the three games and struggled to put runs on the board, scoring just five all weekend. Jaksa said his guys just need to take care of business. “Yeah, EMU’s done a nice job so far, and I’m sure they’re feeling good and confident right now,” Jaksa said. “Their starting pitching has been good, and they had that slugfest there the other night against Michigan. But, now is our opportunity to go out and do what we need to capture these games.” While the Regnier brothers continue to lead the team at the plate, sophomore Cody Leichman and redshirt freshman Neal Jacobs also are contributing significantly to the team’s offense. Leichman, who often serves at the team’s designated hitter, posted a .273 batting average with 27 hits. Jacobs has the most home

FILE PHOTO BY TAYLOR BALLEK

Sophomore pitcher Jordan Foley throws a pitch during the Feb. 4 game against NIU at Theunissen Stadium. CMU won 6-3.

runs on the team, with five, and has the second most RBIs on the team at 24, right behind sophomore Nick Regnier’s 26. Sam Ott leads EMU offensively with a .362 batting average. Ott has 54 hits in 149 at-bats, including 17 doubles, three triples and two home runs with 35 RBIs. Adam Sonabend also has piled on hits for the Eagles this season, with 43 in 136 at-bats, nine doubles, a home run and 28 RBIs. Sophomore Jordan Foley will be the starting pitcher in game one.

“Eastern is a natural in-state and conference rival. We played them five times last year, and they were all great games. They’re in a place now we want to be, winning four in a row, but we feel good about our preparation.” Steve Jaska, head coach Foley is 6-2 on the season with a 1.78 ERA. He’s pitched 65.2 innings, allowed 50 hits, 13 earned runs, 26 walks and has 72 strikeouts. Freshman Taylor Lehnert

will start Saturday’s game, and senior Rick Dodridge will be on the mound to start on Sunday. sports@cm-life.com

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The softball team has the opportunity this weekend to take first-place in the MidAmerican Conference at Margo Jonker Stadium. If the team can sweep Ball State today starting at 1 p.m., and Miami (Ohio) on Saturday and Sunday, it will be in first place overall. After suffering an extrainnings loss against Toledo last Sunday at home, the team then had to travel to Ann Arbor to face the No. 9 Wolverines. The Chippewas would suffer an 11-0 fiveinning loss, in which the team was held to only two hits on the day. “It’s a totally different game. It’s a new day. You have to come back the next day and win,” head coach Margo Jonker said. “We just go on and try to get better in practice.” Looking ahead to today’s doubleheader, the Chippewas have the edge over the Cardinals all-time, 66-24. However, the Cardinals took last year’s doubleheader match-up with a combined score of 13-6. This year, the Cardinals stand in the way of firstplace in the MAC West with a record of 13-1 in the MAC, while the Chippewas remain two games back at 11-3. “We need to do all the little things right,” senior pitcher Kara Dornbos said. “We don’t need the big hits; we just need to string hits together. As a pitcher, my job is to place my pitches

and go out and do my best.” Following the doubleheader against Ball State, the team will then take on Miami (Ohio), who is in first-place on the MAC East with a conference record of 10-4. CMU looks to improve on its 62-27 all-time record against the RedHawks, who won last year’s MAC East. After splitting last year’s match-up, the Chippewas need these two wins to take first place in the MAC. “We need to come out strong this weekend, because we’re playing two of the best teams in the conference,” Jonker said. “The key is to win. That’s the bottom line.” Before these past two losses, the team was on a seven-game win streak while going 8-2 on its home field. Dornbos had her own winning streak snapped, but her and the rest of the pitching staff look to lead the team to a 4-0 weekend. Going into this weekend, the Chippewas have the bottom part of the lineup, adding up hits led by senior outfielder Brogan Darwin, who is hitting .308 in the past ten games. At the top of the lineup, senior leadoff hitter Macy Merchant leads the team with a .455 batting average and 15 hits in the past 10 games. The seniors look to gain a spot at the top of the MAC this week as the regular season begins to wind down.


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Across 1 __ squad 5 Sharp fasteners 10 Line of movement 14 In a while 15 Go back to the beginning, in a way 16 Spread unit 17 One lingering in Edinburgh? 20 Hoglike mammals 21 “I could __ horse!” 22 Touch 23 Stravinsky’s “The __ of Spring” 25 DX ÷ V 26 “__ a rip-off!” 27 Some Athenian physicians? 32 Black gold 33 Big Bird buddy 34 DOD subdivision 35 Really feel the heat 37 Plus 39 Carpenter’s tool 43 CD conclusion? 46 Charge carriers 49 Fury

50 Berlin sidewalk writing? 54 Valiant son 55 Heavenly altar 56 Hockey Hall of Famer Mikita 57 Sum (up) 58 Personal time? 60 Some govt. investments 64 Fancy singles event in Stockholm? 67 New coin of 2002 68 One may work with a chair 69 Vivacity 70 Church section 71 Angling banes 72 Oh’s role in “Grey’s Anatomy” Down 1 Humongous 2 Worshipper of the Earth goddess Pachamama 3 Condo cousin 4 Complete 5 British university city 6 Legal issue 7 “Off the Court” author

8 Separate 9 Post 10 Links standard 11 Like citrus fruit 12 They might make cats pause 13 Chef’s array 18 57-Across’s wheels 19 Military surprises 24 First name in humor 27 Tar 28 Sea inlet 29 One who observes a fraternal Hour of Recollection 30 Source of invigoration 31 One leaving a wake 36 Mess up 38 Self-recriminating cries 40 Have a health problem 41 Hindu title 42 Sweetie 44 Muscat native 45 Some Roman Catholics 47 Babbles 48 Perspective 50 Mature 51 Adds to the database

52 __ Detroit: “Guys and Dolls” role 53 Like some tree trunks 54 Having no clue 59 Peel on “The Avengers” 61 King who succeeded 59-Down 62 Swedish model Nordegren in 2004 nuptial news 63 Tough going 65 Buck’s mate 66 Hosp. test


10A || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

www.cm-life.com


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Friday, April 26, 2013

INDEX Final exam schedule............. 3 All-Nighters Are they reall worth it?.......... 3 Top 10 signs it’s exam week..................... 5

Dog Tales to visit campus to help relieve finals stress........ 8 COLUMN: It doesn’t matter to me how you do on finals....... 8

Brain Games......... 3, 5, 8, 10 Baby Graduates...............6, 7


Inclusion and

Diversity

2B || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

www.cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 3B

[FINALS]

fi n a l e x a m s c h e d u l e The examination time is determined by the lecture time of the course. w Examinations in classes which begin on the half hour will fall in the same time period as the examinations for those classes beginning on the hour. For example, classes meeting at 09:30 - 10:45 a.m., TR, will have examinations at the same hour as classes meeting at 09:00 - 09:50 a.m., TR , classes meeting regularly at 12:30 - 01:45 p.m., TR, will have examinations at the same hour as classes meeting at 12:00 - 12:50 p.m., TR (EXCEPTION: Classes meeting regularly at 07:30 - 08:45 a.m., TR, will have examinations at the same hour as classes meeting at 08:00 - 08:50 a.m., TR.) w MWF combinations refers to MTWRF, MTWR, MTWF, MTRF, MWF, MWRF, MW, WF, M, W, and F. w TR combinations refers to TR, TW, T, R, etc Monday, APRIL 29

w 9 a.m. MWF class exams are from 8 to 9:50 a.m. w 10 a.m. MWF class exams are from 10 to 11:50 a.m. w Noon MWF class exams are from noon to 1:50 p.m. w 2 p.m. MWF class exams are from 2 to 3:50 p.m.

Tuesday, APRIL 30

w 8 a.m. TR class exams are from 8 to 9:50 a.m. w 9 a.m. TR class exams are from 10 to 11:50 a.m. w 2 p.m. TR class exams are from 2 to 3:50 p.m.

Wednesday, MAY 1 w 8 a.m. MWF class exams are from 8 to 9:50 a.m. w 11 a.m. MWF class exams are from 10 to 11:50 a.m.

w 1 p.m. MWF class exams are from 12 to 1:50 p.m. w 3 p.m. MWF class exams are from 2 to 3:50 p.m.

Thursday, MAY 2

w 11 a.m. TR class exams are from 10 to 11:50 a.m. w Noon TR class exams are from 12 to 1:50 p.m. w 3 p.m. TR class exams are from 2 to 3:50 p.m.

Friday, MAY 3

w 10 a.m. TR class exams are from 8 to 9:50 a.m. w 1 p.m. TR class exams are from 10 to 11:50 a.m.

Evening Classes w M, MW 4 to 6 p.m. class exams are at regular meeting time Monday, April 29 w M, MW 6:30 or 7 p.m. class exams are from 7 to 8:50 p.m. Monday, April 29 w T, TR 4 to 6 p.m. class exams are at regular meeting time Tuesday, April 30 w T, TR 6:30 or 7 p.m. class exams are from 7 to 8:50 p.m. Tuesday, April 30 w W 4 p.m. or after class exams are at regular meeting times Wednesday, May 1 w R 4 p.m. or after class exams are at regular meeting times Thursday, May 2 w F 4 p.m. or after class exams are at regular meeting times Friday, May 3

ARGYLE SUDOKU Sudoku - also known as “Number Place” - is a logicbased, combinatorial numberplacement puzzle. The aim of Sudoku is to enter a number from 1 through 9 in each cell of a grid, most frequently a 9×9 grid made up of 3×3 subgrids. Each row, column and region must contain only one instance of each number. This Sudoku variant is called “Argyle Sudoku”. It contains additional marked diagonals that must also contain the digits 1 through 9 exactly once.

WEEKEND CLASSES

w Weekend class exams will be held at last regular

meeting time

ALL-NIGHTERS: By Krysta Loftis Staff Reporter

Are they really worth it? In the workplace, its effects can be seen in reduced efficiency and productivity, errors and accidents,” a Harvard Medical School study said. Central Michigan University students have mixed feelings about pulling allnighters, many saying they see both positive and negative aspects. “I feel more confident after pulling an all-nighter because the information is so fresh in my mind,” Traverse City sophomore Gabrielle Davidson said. However, this is not the Davidson’s preferred way of studying, as she said taking exams on little to no sleep affects her memory and quickness. “I think it is a much better idea to break up the studying into chunks that you study throughout the week before the exam,” she said. Jennifer Doyel has similar feelings about staying up all night to study. “I think that sometimes they are necessary evils,” the Onsted senior said. “They definitely help when cramming, but honestly, it is way better to study gradually and get some sleep.” Not all students have had successful experiences when staying up to study.

Just about everybody has experienced the panic that sets in the night before a big exam. Many have tried to combat this panic by staying up and cramming in a few more hours of studying. This is especially common when it comes to final exams, which can be worth up to 30 percent or more of a student’s final grade for a class. By skipping those few hours of sleep, students think they will be more prepared for exams; however, this is not always the case. According to a University of California study, giving up sleep to do extra work has an adverse effect on academic performance. The study found a strong connection between extra studying in place of sleeping and poor marks on exams – exactly what students try to avoid. Harvard Medical School has also done extensive research on the effect of sleep on memory, further illustrating that sacrificing sleep to study could lead to worse results on exams. “Lack of sleep exacts a toll on perception and judgment.

BINARY

Ryan Nagi tried to pull an all-nighter once, and it did not go exactly the way he had hoped. “I’ve only pulled an allnighter once in my four years of college,” the Commerce Township senior said. “I ended up falling asleep around 6 a.m. and slept through my chemistry final exam.” Countless students have suffered through all-night study sessions, but very few will recommend them to other students. “I would not suggest allnighters to other students, unless they will have time to give their body extra rest within 24 to 48 hours of pulling an all-nighter,” St. Clair Shores sophomore Ian McCain said. “They are not worth it and are simply a procrastinator’s way of getting by in college.” The bottom line is that finals are important and individual students need to find what is best for them. Start studying early and do not risk having a bad allnighter experience. Grab some friends, hit the books and get some sleep so those final exams do not stand a chance. studentlife@cm-life.com

Binary - also known as “Takuzu” or “Tohu wa Vohu” - is a logical puzzle played on a square grid. The objective of Binary is to fill the grid with the numbers 1 and 0. Each row and each column must be unique. In addition, there have to be as many “1” as “0” in every row and every column (or one more for odd sized grids) and no more than two cells in a row can contain the same digit.

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4B || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 5B

[FINALS]

CENTER DOT SUDOKU

Sudoku - also known as “Number Place” - is a logic-based, combinatorial number-placement puzzle. The aim of Sudoku is to enter a number from 1 through 9 in each cell of a grid, most frequently a 9×9 grid made up of 3×3 subgrids. Each row, column and region must contain only one instance of each number. This Sudoku variant is called “Center Dot Sudoku”. The central cells of each region form an extra region that must also contain the numbers 1 through 9.

Top 10 signs it’s exam week By Adriana Cotero | Staff Reporter

1

4

The library is open extra late.

The library is flooded with students.

All-nighters spent studying.

Coffee craze – long lines at Java City and Starbucks.

EASY AS ABC

People are more irritable and tired.

5

2

Easy as ABC - also known as “ABC End View” or “Last Man Standing” - is a logical puzzle played on a square grid. The objective of Easy as ABC is to fill the grid with the letters A through G (or whatever the grid dimension is). Each row and each column must contain only one instance of each letter. The clues outside the grid show which letter comes across first from that direction.

8

6

Students are actually doing extra credit and filling out reviews.

Professors cram in extra information.

3

Classes are actually filled with no open seats.

9

7

Sweatpants.

10

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6B || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

www.cm-life.com

Look Who’s

GRADUATING! Goodbye CMU. Hello World!

Andrew Paul Cabaj

Matthew Moses Brooks

Samantha Nicole Jones

Andrew,

Matt,

Samantha,

Words cannot express how proud we are of you, how filled with joy! Wishing you continued success.

Congratulations (Son) You have reached the highest goals and exceeded our hopes and dreams for you.

Congratulations!!   We could not be more proud of you and we love you very much.

Love always, Mom, Dad and Melinda

Love, Mom, Dad and Lucas

Theresa Lynn Clift

Stacy Nicole Coon

Theresa,

Stacy,

You found your passion in Journalism at CM Life. There’s no telling how far you’ll go with it as you follow your dream!

Congratulations! Your academic achievements, spiritual growth and generosity to others is amazing and so are you! Depher’s Rock!

Love, Mom, Dad and Laura

Nicole Maria Crafton

Love, Champ, Dad, Mom, Bobo and family

Cameron Julian Ernst

Love, Dad, Mom, Chelsea and Zackary

Megan Kate Corey Meg, When you were little, you put your cowboy hat on and packed a holster full of laughter, fun and wonderful memories that Dad and I hold dear to our hearts.  We are so proud of you!  Now it’s time to put your big girls boots on and show the world what you have to offer!  Congratulations! Love, Mom and Dad

Ericka Kathryn Fasse

Nicole,

Hi Cam,

Ericka,

Congratulations! We want to tell you how proud we are of you, not only for your academic accomplishments but also for being an amazing person.

Many years of hard work have finally paid off. Keep aiming higher! You are an inspiration!

Congratulations! We are so proud of your achievements at CMU. We know you will be successful in whatever you choose to do.

Love, Mom, Taylor and Uncle Joe

Love, Mom, G.W. and Kaylee

Rachel Louise Frost

Connor Brian Gallagher

We love you, Mom and Dad

Katherine Christine Gibson

Rachel,

Connor,

We are so proud of you.

Watching you grow up has been a gift! Congratulations baby girl!

We are very proud of your accomplishments at Central and more importantly at the young man you have become. Congratulations!

Another chapter of your life is behind you.

Love, Dad, Mom and Aylysh

Love, Mom and Dad

Love you always, Mom, Dad, Megan, Kevin, Joe, Ricco, Liam and Donni

Claire Hamill Claire, You’ve been a true Chippewa since you were 2 years old. Congratulations on achieving your goal of finishing on schedule!  We’re very proud of you and know that you’ll be one of the most caring and effective Social Workers in Michigan!

Nicolas Howard Herrild Nick, We are so very proud of your accomplishments at CMU. Congratulations! Love you so much, Mom, Nate, Alicia, Evan and Dad in spirit

Love, Dad, Mom & Wil

Jeffrey David Kitchen

Ashleigh Michele Kline

Jeff,

Ashleigh,

You deserve everything you have worked so hard for.

You did it!  We never doubted your talents or success. Always be true to yourself and know your family loves you very much!

I am so very proud of you. All my love, Mom

Love, Tal, Mom, Jeremy, Anne, Hunter, Chase & Myleigh

The best is yet to come.

Chelsea Elizabeth Jacobs Chelsea, We are amazed by your accomplishments at CMU. Congratulations! God has a plan…continue to listen to his voice. Love, Mom, Dad, Ashley and Emily

Brittany Ann Kuhn Brittany, Congratulations! We are so very proud of your success at CMU! “She knows who she is in Christ and she dares to dream BIG” Love, Mom and Dad


Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 7B

cm-life.com

Look Who’s

GRADUATING! Goodbye CMU. Hello World!

Kyle Clifford Liwak

Brittany Marie Morrill

Kyle,

Brittany,

“Congratulations!”

Congratulations on your accomplishments at CMU! We are so proud of you and the person you’ve become.

We are so proud of your success! Love, Mom, Dad, Joe and Lindsay

Scott Dwane Myers, Jr. Scottie, Nothing great you do is a surprise to us as parents we are so proud of all you have accomplished and excited about your future. Love, Mom and Dad

Chelsea Lynn Pine Petunie, Congratulations! You have met one of many goals in life. Now go live out your dreams! We love you, Mom, Dad and Sammy. xo

Michael Ryan Sawka

CONGRATULATIONS from your family and friends!

We love you! Mom and Dad

Eric Osborne Eric, We are so very proud of you and your accomplishments.   You have grown up to be a wonderful person. Stay true to your goals and your values, as they have served you well so far.  In every ending, there is new beginning.  One Degree down and one to go !!! Fire Up Chips (Again !). All our love,  Dad, Mom, Barry and Steven.

Ashley Rachelle Renard

Allison Marie Pavloff Allison, We are so proud of your accomplishments, your hard work paid off! Congratulations on your CMU Graduation! The future is yours! Love, Mom, Dad and Melinda xo

Kegan Wesley Rivers

Congratulations Ashley!

Congratulations Kegan!

We are so very proud of you and all you have accomplished! Awesome job!

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.”

We love you! Dad, Cathie and Brady

Ashleigh Joyce Tweedie

– Henry David Thoreau –

Love, Mom, Dad, John and McKenna

Andrew Eduardo Valdespina

Congratulations!

Ashleigh,

Andy,

You have accomplished your goal and made us so very proud. Let your wisdom and great sense of humor guide you through life.

Cute baby girl our 1st born. We are proud of all you have accomplished! Best wishes for an exciting future.

Love, Mom and Dad

Love, Mom, Dad and Brandon

You are a true champion… and it’s something deep inside you – the desire, the dream, the vision. We are proud of who you’ve become, and are so excited to see what’s next in your future.

Dave Coulton Vance

Margaret Rose Vote Maggie,

You have made us proud! With goodbye to the CMU years, God Bless you on your next educational path toward your career.

We are all so very proud of you.  We know you will make a difference in the world.

Love, Mom, Dad and Cody

Love, Mom, Dad, Jimmy, Rachel, Katie, Mike and Lukas

Autumn Warman Bo, Congratulations to our #1 superstar!   You’ve worked so hard and we are so proud of what you’ve accomplished. Amor, Mamá y Papá

Ashley Lauren Zonca Congratulations Ashley! May your future hold many adventures, rewarding moments, much love and great successes. Love, Nana, Mom, Joe, Courtney

Love, Your Family

Corey Mark Waite Corey, We are so very proud of your achievements at CMU! May your journey continue to be as successful! Love, Mom, Dad, Nathan and Tyler

Eric Daniel Zwintscher Eric, It’s hard to believe almost 23 years have gone by!   We are so proud of you. Always keep your great sense of humor and wit.    Love, Mom and Dad


8B || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com

[FINALS]

Dog Tales to visit campus Sunday, Monday to help relieve finals stress By Krysta Loftis Staff Reporter

For 13 years, Dog Tales have been helping students relieve the stress that comes with finals by bringing in therapy dogs to the Central Michigan University residence halls. Dog Tales is a literacy program on CMU’s campus. They group often visits schools and libraries in Clare, Isabella and Gratiot counties for the program that helps children read one-on-one with the dogs. Dog Tales participates in activities on campus with the dogs, such as Relay for Life, Special Olympics and Girls on the Run. The group also visits classrooms and takes part in several student conferences. Around finals time, Dog Tales brings a group of trained therapy dogs into several residence halls for the students to play with and

help relieve stress. “It seems the crowds get bigger each year,” Elizabeth Lewis, a director of the Dog Tales literacy group, said. “Word has gotten around, and the students love the time with the dogs. It truly does work in reducing stress and giving the students a great break time from the studying and the stress of it all,” There are a minimum of eight dogs at each event; however, for larger groups of people, the coordinators try to have up to 12 dogs around. Each dog is properly trained and tested by the guidelines of Therapy Dogs International and registered as therapy dogs. The dogs belong to the the volunteers of Dog Tales and surrounding cities. Countless studies have been done since the 1980s that show that pets have enormous health benefits. Pets have been shown to re-

duce stress and anxiety, lower blood pressure and help people recover from physical injuries faster. In a study conducted by the Maryland School of Nursing in 2008, animals trained in therapy can have positive effects in both mental and physical ways. Each year, the crowds get bigger as students take a break from their intense studying and hang out with the dogs. On Sunday, April 28, the dogs will start at Campbell Hall at 6 p.m., then head to Calkins Hall at 7 p.m., followed by Thorpe Hall at 8 p.m. The dogs will finish up at Wheeler from 9 to 10 p.m. On Monday, April 29, Dog Tales will be at Robinson Hall at 7 p.m., followed by Trout Hall at 8 p.m. The last spot the dogs will visit is Larzelere Hall at 9 p.m. studentlife@cm-life.com

THE TV CROSSWORD

Ryan Fitzmaurice Senior Reporter

It doesn’t matter to me how you do on finals I remember when I was a kid, I constantly felt like I was in a James Bond film. I would quietly sneak down the stairs, glide along the kitchen walls, tiptoe through the living room, softly gracing the floors of our computer room, when the large booming voice of my mother would ring throughout the entire. “Ryan Karl Fitzmaurice, what could you possibly be doing other than studying for your math test right now,” she lectured venomously. “I don’t have to tell you about how you did on your last exam.” There have been times in the last several weeks where I was beginning to

think that some of the fantastic columnists we have at Central Michigan Life were my mother. I think readers need a break from being berated by reporters demanding that they study more and watch “Mad Men” reruns on Netflix less. I’d have you know that I’ve learned much more from Mad Men than I have from any time studying. If it wasn’t for Don Draper, I’d have no idea how to hold my liquor. An April 22 column, “Finals Will Kill You,” finished by demanding that then reader stop reading and start studying. Well, I say if you enjoy it, don’t put down CM Life. Spend the entire day memorizing every carefully thought out word of prose. Frame it on your bedroom wall next to your autographed photo of Brad Pitt. I’m honestly indifferent to the fact that you might not study enough for your finals. I’m a senior reporter who flunked intro to media writing because it took place at 8 in the morning. Like I’m the one to talk. An April 12 column, “Three Weeks To Freedom,” contained the hellish advice to download an app which actually blocks you completely from Facebook until you’re done studying. How horrifying. Imagine that: Complete detachment from civiliza-

tion just because you have to answer a few multiple choice questions about amoebas and Joseph Stalin. There is something backwards about our society when we suggest that five sheets of stapled paper are more important than a social life. Readers, I honestly couldn’t care less about how well you do on your exams. If you decide to forego all your exams and go to Colorado, where you climb mountains, rent out shady hotels and watch “SpongeBob SquarePants” for 13 hours straight, I honestly would only stand up and applaud. I mean, really guys, I’m not that stuck up. I’m the guy whose biology grade dropped 2 and a half letter grades because I overslept the 11 a.m. final. I’m really not the one to talk. I think it’s important to remember there are more important things in life than finals such as spending time with friends or looking at the stars, hearing a good joke, exercise, spirituality, hobbies, or, you know, experiencing life. Face it. You went to college for the parties, the friends and the ability to order pizza at 2 a.m. without getting weird looks from your parents. But finals? They’re just needed for small things. Like getting a job and stuff.

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 9B

cm-life.com

ward: Mann king News A Hearst Brea Abduction by Aaron Mc nt CMU Stude

Thank You. The student and professional staff at Central Michigan Life and cm-life.com, would like to take this opportunity to thank our thousands of readers, and hundreds of advertisers who faithfully support our efforts each year. Because of your loyalty, we can produce a newspaper and website that is recognized on a state, regional and national level annually. This year was an exceptional year for our journalists. We couldn’t have done this without you, and for that we are truly grateful.

2012-2013

National Awards Hearst Foundation National Competition 11th Place Breaking News: CM Life, CMU Student Abduction coverage, Aaron McMann

2013 College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers 2nd Place 1st Place 1st Place 1st Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 3rd Place 3rd Place 3rd Place

Overall - College Newspaper of the Year: Central Michigan Life Advertising Manager of the Year - Megan Schneider Social Media/Phone/App Strategy Sales Incentive Program Digital Rate Card/Media Kit Group promotion - Free Standing Section Display Ad / B&W Sales Promotion Materials Sales Increase of a Special Section Sales Pitch Proposal Training Program

1st Place: Investigative Stor y: Events Center Inve stigation by Catey Traylor, Justin Hicks, Lonnie Allen, Aaro n McMann, and Eric Dresden

Pi Sigma Epsilon National ProAm Sales Competition 2013 1st Place Mark Gustin 2nd Place Adam London

Nationwide Regional Awards

Mark Gustin w ins 1st Place in the Pi Sigm a Epsilon ProAm Sales C ompetition Phot o compliments

of PSE

2012 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence - Region 4 1st Place 1st Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 3rd Place 3rd Place

Best All-Around Non Daily Student Newspaper: CM Life General News Photography: CM Life - Adam Neimi Editorial Writing: CM Life - Eric Dresden, Andrew Dooley, Aaron McMann, Mike Nichols General News Photography: CM Life - Jake May Sports Photography: CM Life - Libby March Breaking News Photography: CM Life - Jeff Smith Photo Illustration: CM Life - Victoria Zegler

Megan Schnei der wins 1st Place Adve rtising Manager of th e Year

National CNBA

M Competition

2013

State Awards 2012 Michigan Press Association College Newspaper Contest News/Editorial - Division 1 1st Place 1st Place 1st Place 1st Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 2nd Place 3rd Place 3rd Place Hon. Men. Hon. Men.

2nd Place Digital

Media Kit

CNBAM 2013

General Excellence: CM Life Staff (9th time in the past 11 years) Investigative Story: CM Life - Events Center Investigation Catey Traylor, Justin Hicks, Lonnie Allen, Aaron McMann, Eric Dresden Sports News/Feature: CM Life - CMU’s Football Pretendance, Matt Thompson Multimedia Reporting: CM Life - Remembering 9/11, Jackie Smith, Adam Kaminski, Matt Thompson, Ben Harris, Mike Nichols, Annie Harrison. Multimedia Reporting: CM Life - Student Overcomes Coma, Near Deadly Fall, Mike Nichols Sports News/Feature: CM Life - Flipping Roles, Seth Newman Front Page Design: CM Life - Amelia Eramya Feature Story: CM Life - Dagorhir at CMU Puts the Fighter in Fantasy, Connor Sheridan Editorial: CM Life - Long‐Term Misrepresentation, not Miscommunication Aaron McMann, Mike Nichols, Connor Sheridan, Eric Dresden Investigative Story: CM Life - CMU’s Football Pretendance, Matt Thompson Original Cartoon, Editorial or Entertainment: CM Life King of Cartoons: George Ross, Kim Patishnock

2nd Place Best Black and White Display Ad CNBAM 2013

2012 Michigan Press Photographers Association Awards 1st Place 1st Place 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place

College Photographer of the Year: Zach Wittman Feature Picture Story: Zack Wittman News Picture Story: Jeff Smith College Photographer of the Year: Mike Mullholland College Photographer of the Year: Ashley Miller

cm-life.com

1st Place Best Social Media/ Phone App Strategy CNBAM 2013


10B || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com

[FINALS]

CMU professors’ summer plans include traveling, teaching

THE TV CROSSWORD

By Andrea Peck Staff Reporter

While on summer vacation, many students will be going on study abroad trips, relaxing and taking time off or taking classes. It turns out many Central Michigan University professors will be doing much of these same things. Many professors in the biology and chemistry departments will be going to Beaver Island this summer to teach classes. The CMU Biological Station is located on Beaver Island in northern Lake Michigan and offers many summer biology and chemistry courses, as well as the chance for hands-on field experience. Assistant Professor of Biology David Zanatta will be teaching BIO 218: General Zoology on the island this summer. It will be his first

time teaching at the biological station. “In 2009, I spent several weeks at CMUBS doing research on the freshwater mollusks of Beaver Island. I am looking forward to the small class size and opportunities for field trips to introduce the students to animals in their natural habitats,” Zanatta said. Professor of Fiber Design Sally Rose said Beaver Island is a wonderful place for faculty and students to build a strong sense of community in a short amount of time. “It is a great place to cross-pollinate with the arts and sciences,” Rose said. Professors of Human Environmental Studies Jeffrey Angera and Ed Long will be leading a study abroad trip to Oaxaca, Mexico. The trip will take place from May 6 to May 27. In Oaxaca, Long and Angera

will work with students in two orphanages, including one that houses many students with special needs. Other professors will travel on study abroad trips for classes, such as for PHL 397: The International Criminal Court and The Hague Tradition. Hope May, the director for the Center of Professional and Personal Ethics, will be leading the trip. This study abroad course is six weeks long. The first two weeks of the class will be held at CMU and the last four weeks will be held in the Netherlands. According to the webpage for the class, May’s background in philosophy and law, and her commitment to her students and to excellence in teaching will provide a great experience for students in the class. university@cm-life.com

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CELEBRATING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AND RESEARCH

Congratulations

MAY & AUGUST 2013 GRADUATES OF THE CMU HONORS PROGRAM!

Megan Bauerle

Sam Easter

Angela Hollis

Stephanie McConkie

Rebecca Sarkozi

Emily Beuschel

Laura Eickhoff

Colleen Hoy

Colleen McNeely

Emily Scheffler

“The Psychology of Morals in Relation to Disgust and Cognitive Loading” Advisor: Dr. Reid Skeel

“The Constitutional Ramifications of Modern and Postmodern Language and Author Intent” Advisor: Dr. Ronald Primeau

“Assisted Living Facility Layout: A Comparison between Residence Types” Advisor: Dr. Jeanneane Wood-Nartker

Xiaochen Bi

Brianna Farrell

“An Enforcement Action Study: An Analysis of Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Disciplinary Orders” Advisor: Dr. Thomas Weirich

“You’re not Cancelling MY Show: A Study of Self-Initiated Fan Activism” Advisor: Dr. William Anderson

Georgia Farrell

Tiffany Binno

“Relationship of Blood Glucose Levels to Physical Activity and Body Composition in Children” Advisor: Dr. William Saltarelli

Myles Boothroyd

“Ineradicable: The Persistence of Jazz in the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, 1918-1945” Advisor: Dr. Keith Clifton

“The Effects of Telomerase Inhibitors on Pancreatic Cancer” Advisor: Dr. Rebecca Uzarski

Emily Forgrave

“Perception of Speech from Speaker and Listener Perspectives” Advisor: Dr. Mark Lehman

Emily Franckowiak

“Silver Carbonate-promoted Glycosylation Polymerization of 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-a-DGalactopyranosyl Bromide” Advisor: Dr. Wenjun Du

George Bork

“A Comparison of the Effects of Antioxidant Dendrimers on Breast, Pancreatic, and Prostate Cancer Cell Growth” Advisor: Dr. Rebecca Uzarski

Taylor Funk

“Analysis of Behavioral Assessment Techniques in Special Education Assessment Textbooks” Advisor: Dr. Dawn Decker

Jacob Burkhart

“Influence of Arctic Islands on the Dispersal of Ringed Seals (Pusa hispida) in Hudson Bay” Advisors: Dr. Bradley Swanson

Caitlin Cheevers

“Past, Present and Future Relativity: Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale” Advisor: Dr. Nicole Sparling

Taylor Galmarini

“An Analysis of United States Legislation Affecting United States’ Involvement with the International Criminal Court” Advisor: Dr. Hope May

“Creation and Implementation of a Nutritional Program for Elementary Students” Advisor: Dr. William Saltarelli

Katherine Gibson

Chelsey Colston

“Therein the Patient Must Minister to Himself’: The Psychology of Melancholy in Hamlet and Macbeth” Advisor: Dr. Nathanial Smith

Boyu Dang

“The Influence behind the Words: A Case Study of Gubernatorial Rhetoric in Ohio” Advisor: Dr. Cherie Strachan

“Leadership vs. Management: Which Style Dominates in the Public Relations Workplace” Advisor: Dr. Elina Erzikova “Future’s Sustainable Temperature and Energy Project (S.T.E.P.)” Advisor: Dr. Tolga Kaya

Megan Gill

Dustin Goncharoff

“Characterization of Tau 17 Mutants and Associated Toxicity in Drosophila Melanogaster” Advisor: Dr. Michelle Steinhilb

”Creating a New Transgenic Strain of C. elegans to Determine the Localization of K08F4.” Advisor: Dr. Jennifer Schisa “Is Video Self-Modeling an Effective Technique to Teach an Adolescent with a Cognitive Impairment an ADL?” Advisor: Dr. Suzanne Woods

Jacob Jordan

“Genetic Variation among Organisms along the Antarctic Coast” Advisor: Dr. Andrew Mahon

Ashleigh Kline

“Uniting a Non-Unified Europe: A Case on Regional Integration” Advisor: Dr. Sterling Johnson

Rachel Kuchta

“The Physical Benefits of Yoga” Advisor: Dr. Mary Lou Schilling

Kasey Kushion

“Evaluation of Brachial and Carotid Artery Function as an Emerging Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor in Children and Adolescents” Advisor: Dr. William Saltarelli

Amanda Laberdee

“The Long Term Effects of Antioxidants and Essential Fatty Acids as Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease in the 5xFAD Mouse Model” Advisor: Dr. Gary Dunbar

Zachary Lizenby

“Transport and Metabolism of Deoxypyrimidines in Isolated Mitochondria” Advisor: Dr. Edward McKee

Marina Maraskine

“Characterization of Novel Antioxidant Dendrimers” Advisor: Dr. Ajit Sharma

Courtney Maurer

“An Investigation into Tax Fraud and its Implications” Advisor: Dr. Debra Mcgilsky

Erica Maylee

“Discovering the International Criminal Court” Advisor: Dr. Hope May

“The Effects of Cognitive Style and Assertiveness on Emotional Intimacy Perception” Advisors: Dr. Justin Oh-Lee “Rome’s Space in the Medieval Intellectual Revolution” Advisor: Dr. Carrie Euler

Thomas McVay

“The Interconnectedness of Adult and Larval Dragonfly Populations” Advisor: Dr. Bradley Swanson

Samantha Meadows “Bayesian Estimation for Semiparametric Model” Advisor: Dr. Chin-I Cheng

Justin Mendoza

“Determining Subcellular Locations of Pathologically Active Proteins in the Tissues of Drosophila” Advisor: Dr. Michelle Steinhilb

Jennifer Messing

“Effect of Vitamin D on Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans” Advisors: Dr. Jennifer Schisa & Roschelle Heuberger

Kelly Mytinger

“Burnout in the Social Work Profession: A Theoretical Investigation” Advisor: Dr. Merlyn Mowrey

Samantha Paszkiewicz “Parental Perceptions of Infant Temperament and its Relation to Parenting Outcome among College-Student Parents” Advisor: Dr. Tierney Popp

David Peacock

“Oscars, Emmys and Grammys: A Statistical Examination of the Arts” Advisor: Dr. John Daniels

Alexandra Reischman

“The Effect of Levodopa Treatment on Motor and Anxiety Behavior of the Pitx3-deficient Aphakia Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease” Advisor: Dr. Justin Oh-Lee

Mattina Rosinski

“The Effect of Secondhand Smoke on Vascular Endothelium in 6th Grade Children” Advisor: Dr. William Saltarelli

“Sugar Harvesting From Great Lakes Algae for Biobased Chemical Production” Advisor: Dr. Dale Lecaptain “Dwell” Advisor: Dr. Johanna Paas

Matthew Schloop

“Characterization and Transplantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into an R6/2 Model of Huntington’s Disease” Advisor: Dr. Gary Dunbar

Shannon Schmutz

Kristin Turbiak

“The Relationship of Carotid Intima-Media Thickness with Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome in 6th Grade Children” Advisor: Dr. William Saltarelli

Malorie Urda

“When Apparel Goes Zen: Specialty Apparel for Yoga and Meditation” Advisor: Dr. Shermane Fouche

Krista Voss

“The Value Of Social Media: Are Universities Successfully Engaging their Audience?” Advisor: Dr. Anil Kumar

“A Phenomenological Look at Social Change Leadership Development Following a Week Long Service Project” Advisor: Dr. Eric Buschlen

Kevin Whalen

Benjamin Schuller

Kelsey Whing

Joseph Shirely

Jacob White

“Taking the Music Industry by Storm: The Complete Production of an Original Album” Advisor: Dr. Heather Polinsky “The Ethnic Chinese and Their Role in Singapore’s Business Success” Advisor: Dr. Michael Pisani

Adriane Shorkey

“The Evolution of Biodiversity in the Fuireneae (Cyperaceae)” Advisor: Dr. Anna Monfils

Stacy Siereveld

“Examining the Influence of Tribal Casino Revenues” Advisor: Dr. John Daniels

Sean Soard

“The Power of You “The Use of Games in Spreading Environmental Awareness: Charles S. Mott Foundation Grant Proposal” Advisor: Dr. James P. Hill

Rachel Stanley

“A Challenge to Hope: Shinning a Light on Disabilities” Advisor: Dr. Kevin Corbett

Steven Talsma

“The Cloning of Dictyostelium Copine Gene cDNAs.” Advisor: Dr. Cynthia Damer

Kayli Trusty

“Developing an International Program” Advisor: Dr. Ignacio David Acevedo

Celebrating Academic Excellence and Research in Honors

“Everyone’s Doing It”: The Effect of Social Pressures on Suspects’ Willingness to Waive Their Rights” Advisor: Dr. Kyle Scherr “The Potentials and Problems of the Establishment, Creation, and Publication of the Honors Platform” Advisor: Dr. Joseph Sommers “Evaluating a Communityacademic Partnership to Prevent the Emergence of Conduct Disorder in Latina/o Families” Advisor: Dr. Ignacio David Acevedo

Justin Wigard

“It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s… Edward Cullen?” Advisor: Dr. Joseph Sommers

Drew Wydendorf

“The Unintended Consequences of Minimum Wage Legislation: Historical Evidence and Recent Data Regarding Minorities and Teens” Advisor: Dr. Jason Taylor

Xicheng Yu

“Tax Incentives and Disincentives for Start-Up Entrepreneurial Ventures” Advisor: Dr. Debra Mcgilsky


Central Michigan Life || Friday, April 26, 2013 || 11B

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12B || Friday, April 26, 2013 || Central Michigan Life

www.cm-life.com

Champions! SPRING 2013 CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL SPORTS

INDOOR SOCCER

Sigma Chi

Scoregasms

Scoregasms United FC

FRATERNITY

CO-REC

Larzy Lightning

Alpha Sigma Tau

MEN’S

WOMEN’S

SORORITY

WRESTLING

Austin Deacons 125 lbs

Andre Sanders

Andrew Barrett

Nick Barnhill

141 lbs

Stefan Saffian

Cory Krings

157 lbs

149 lbs

Alex Good

184 lbs

165 lbs

Timmy Stanisz

197 lbs

Heavyweight

BASKETBALL

Sosa Baby (Bang Bang)

Sigma Chi

CO-REC

B.I.T.E.

FRATERNITY

BENCH PRESS

Kevin Freeman

OVER 225 - MAX LIFT

Troy Klingler

BJ Ivey

Ben Raven

Double Trouble

Beta Theta Pi

CO-REC

Vickie Baldyga

WOMEN’S NCAA BRACKETS

NFL PICK’EM

Dirty Mike and the Boys

FRATERNITY

MEN’S

Golden Geese

Alpha Chi All-Stars

America

CO-REC

MEN’S

America

5-Hole Finders

MEN’S

CO-REC

Phi Kappa Tau FRATERNITY

WIFFLEBALL

Jon Hevron

Take A Wiff Of This

Jordan Union

INTRAMURAL SPORTS! 2-BALL

3-PT & LIGHTNING

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P 0 0 2 74-3

WOMEN’S

WALLYBALL

Alpha Sigma Tau SORORITY

Super Novas

MEN’S

PG CHALLENGE

u d e . h c i m c . c e r u . w w w 7

SORORITY

FLOOR HOCKEY

all-star skills

Taylor Desormeau Tyler Allen & Sean LaForge NFL PICK’EM

Team BA

VOLLEYBALL

ncaa bracketology

MEN’S NCAA BRACKETS

OPEN

CO-REC

WOMEN’S

dodgeball

Jackmerius Tacktheritrix

Strikes & Spares

UNDER 200 - MAX LIFT & REPS

The First Years

SORORITY

BOWLING

CMU COMBINE

CMU COMBINE

Sigma Sigma Sigma

MEN’S

Delta Phi Epsilon

WALLEYBALL


Eric Fisher Special Edition