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FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 2014|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 83 VOL. 95

TODAY IS THE FINAL DAY OF A THREE-DAY SERIES DELVING INTO THE SUSPENDED DELTA CHI FRATERNITY AND CMU GREEK COMMUNITY.

A lesson learned?

GONE GOOD?

Justin Hicks Editor-in-Chief

Delta Chi suspension period halted until fraternity ‘leaves quietly’

Family means sticking together, no matter what. Then again, maybe there is an exception. If there’s a lesson to be learned from Delta Chi, it’s when to exercise that exception. The unbreakable bond of brothers and sisters in the Greek community can also be its Achilles’ heel. When the integrity of the entire group is in jeopardy, it’s time to kick the trash to the curb or stink up the entire house — and in this case, the community as well. Instead, Delta Chi never made the decisions it needed to avoid exile. It didn’t take responsibility for its behavior. It didn’t make a proactive effort to protect the organization. It still hasn’t — hence the reason for our investigation. During this week’s coverage, members took to social media to claim innocence and suggest the stories were fabricated. They attempted to hide the coverage by removing stacks of newspapers from newsstands and businesses around Mount Pleasant. Now their actions are receiving national attention. Even more repulsive are the attempts to joke about a situation that stems from a sexual assault report. I would like to offer an apology to the women who were negatively affected both by the Delta Chi violations and our continued coverage this week. What happened to you is inexcusable. As for the “underground fraternity,” society loves a sincere, honest apology. Such acknowledgement shows maturity and a dedication to improvement. Instead, they continue to play the victim card.

By Ben Solis | University Editor

A

s the brothers of the nowdefunct Delta Chi fight their

four-year suspension by continuing to function as a fraternity, they might be doing more harm to their future than they are aware of.

The group does not recognize Central Michigan University’s sanctions, which calls for a cease of any and all operations as a registered student organization. Delta Chi continues to recruit, members still wear their letters, and these actions have been encouraged by their supporters and national office. According to university officials, their actions could be preventing them from ever returning to CMU’s Greek community. “The four years hasn’t started yet,” said Tom Idema, director of student conduct. “Until they’re in compliance with what they’re supposed to do, I don’t know if they’ll ever be back.”

A LESSON LEARNED? | 5A

GONE 4 GOOD? | 5A

SUBJECTIVE JUSTICE Investigating the exile of a renegade fraternity MONDAY

CLEANING HOUSE LIFE IN GREEKTOWN MAP: VIOLATIONS BY HOUSE

TODAY t t t

WHERE WAS THE ALERT?

WEDNESDAY t t t

LIFE AS A DELTA CHI COLUMN: GUILTY OF SILENCE SUBJECTIVE JUSTICE

GONE FOR GOOD? GREEK LIFE COLUMN: A LESSON LEARNED?

1A 4A 1A

UC food service shut down due to water supply, safety issues By Ben Solis University Editor

Central Michigan University maintenance crews worked to restore the Bovee University Center water supply after it was shut down Thursday morning. Steve Lawrence, associate vice president of Facilities Management, said the water supply in the U.C.

looked cloudy, prompting concern from facilities management that the water might not be safe. The exact cause of potential contamination was not identified, as the initial “cloudy water” sample could not be tested. “I’ve been here for 10 years and doing a chlorination (flush) on an existing system, that just doesn’t

happen very often,” Lawrence said. “We’re going to do everything we can to make sure it’s safe.” University officials do not have the equipment available to test the water. Lawrence sought counsel from the Isabella County Health Department on where he could send samples of the water after they properly flushed and chlorinated the system. The closest

water supply testing lab Lawrence knew of is in Lansing. Lawrence added that as of 11 a.m. Thursday, no students, faculty or staff reported feeling ill. All food service centers in the U.C. were shut down for the day. An additional email announcement sent out shortly after 2 p.m. stated bathrooms in the U.C. were closed as well.

No other buildings on campus showed signs of potential contamination, according to a CMU press release issued via email. To make sure the water supply was safe, Lawrence said crews would flush the entire system, then pump chlorine through the pipes to kill any potenw UC | 2A


News

2A | Friday, April 25, 2014 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

EVENTS CALENDAR FRIDAY w A Revolution of Thought: Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the Pursuit of Peace 8 a.m. – 9 p.m. Anspach Hall first floor CMU’s Center for Professional and Personal Ethics is hosting an educational poster exhibition on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, courtesy of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. The exhibit is free and open to the public. w CMU Surplus Sale Noon – 2 p.m. CMU Surplus Sales Building, 275 West Bellows The University is selling surplus and slightly damaged equipment to make room for new equipment. Everything sold is “as is” and all sales are final. For any questions call (989) 774-3917. w Comedian Mark Lundholm Noon – 1 p.m. Bovee U.C. Auditorium, 302 The College of Health Professions is hosting comedian Mark Lundholm to perform on campus. The show is free.

SAMRC hosts panel discussion ‘Tell the Truth About Marijuana’ By Andrea Peck Staff Reporter

NORML affiliate and activist Adam Brook told students the federal government has no right to tell people what they can or can’t put in their bodies at a marijuana panel Wednesday. Central Michigan University students discussed medical marijuana use with leading experts at a panel hosted by the registered student organization Students Advocates for Medical and Recreational Cannabis. “Tell the Truth About Marijuana,” took place Wednesday evening at the Bovee University Center Auditorium. Panelists for the event were Brook, Matt Abel, the director of Michigan NORML, and Heidi Parikh, president of My Compassion. The discussion began with a recap of the panelists’ backgrounds, and their perspective when it comes to the use of medical marijuana. Abel offered the lawyer’s perspective for the panel, while Brook offered the activist’s perspective and Parikh, the patient’s perspective. “For me it was a civil rights issue,” Brook said. “Certainly the government shouldn’t tell you what you can or cannot do to your body.” Topics discussed during the event included Michigan marijuana laws, options for

UC |

CONTINUED FROM 1A

CORRECTIONS A production error Wednesday resulted in an incorrect placement of Greek houses on a map of city code violations. We regret the error. © Central Michigan Life 2014 Volume 95, Number 83

tial bacterial infestation. The chlorine sat in the pipes for an estimated three hours before crews attempted another system flush. Lawrence hopes crews only need to chlorinate and flush the system one time. Samples of the water supply

medical marijuana patients who prefer not to smoke and ways to become active about education having to do with cannabis. Abel said individuals have the power to influence politics. “The politics of it is fluid,” he said. “We can make a difference as individuals.” Parikh, the president of My Compassion, said access to “medibles” is important for medical marijuana patients who prefer not to smoke, and stressed the importance of having all options available for a patient’s recovery. “Not everyone smokes,” she said. “If you’re just starting out for medical use, you’re not going to want to smoke.” Parikh, who is a patient herself, said while smoking cannabis is the fastest way to feel the effects of marijuana, medibles have a longer-lasting effect. The Michigan Medical Marijuana Act was passed in 2008. It provides a system where certain patients can qualify and obtain cards that allow them to legally consume marijuana as a medicine. Brook said for those who are passionate about the issue, it is easy to become an activist. “The culture has definitely changed, and, nowadays, it’s much easier to become active,” Abel said.

WHAT’S ON CM-LIFE.COM w

COLUMN: Visit our voices section to read a column on the Best Buddies program.

w

PODCAST: Nate and Adriana debate whether cats or dogs are better for college life.

w

BRIEFS: Union Township are adding inspection vehicles and tablets. Andraya Croft Videographer

The Regnier brothers prove to be a onetwo punch as one is a talented hitter and the other is an excellent base runner.

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Inside Life

BEN SOLIS | UNIVERSITY | university@cm-life.com ADRIAN HEDDEN | METRO | metro@cm-life.com NATHAN CLARK | STUDENT LIFE | studentlife@cm-life.com

cm-life.com

life in brief

Public Safety

Student Life

OWLS to march on campus for SlutWalk

Shannon Millard | Staff Photographer Mount Pleasant firefighters investigate a fire Thursday evening at the home of Hudsonville senior Olivia Deters on Crosslane Road in Mount Pleasant.

Duty Calls U.S. Rep. Kildee tackles issues in Congress at College Democrats By Megan Pacer Senior Reporter

Congressman Dan Kildee stressed the need to make definitive decisions about the U.S. Congress to Central Michigan University students and members of the Mount Pleasant community Thursday. Kildee addressed the students on issues of economy, equality and innerCongressional operations at 7 p.m. in the Lake Superior Room in the Bovee University Center. Following video of his interview with political satirist Stephen Colbert, Kildee opened up about issues that plague Congress and keep it from effectively moving bills onto President Barack Obama’s desk. “I don’t believe in the term dysfunctional,” said Kildee, who serves the 5th District. “This is the least productive Congress in recent history.” A CMU alumnus, Kildee took his position on the Budget Committee about a year and a half ago. He warned students that issues they might believe were laid to rest long ago are still very much alive and well in politics today. Questions of immigration policies, equal opportunities for women and civil rights have simply morphed over the years to take on different forms in today’s political game. “I’ve come to Congress at a pretty interesting time,” he said. “When I finally did get a chance to get involved with politics, I kind of felt as if maybe it was as if the big questions we had to answer as a nation had already been answered.”

Arin Bisaro | Staff Photographer Congressman Dan Kildee speaks to the CMU College Democrats about his experience as a congressman. He talked about the difficulties being faced by Congress in recent years trying to pass bills.

Kildee said he hopes Congress can find a way back to its basic level of functioning, in which bills were crafted through cooperation and moved to the president’s desk in a timely manner. He said the influence of Wall Street has allowed a select few with large pockets to bring the production of Congress to a grinding halt in recent years.

The meeting continued with the parting speeches from College Democrats President Taylor Gehrcke and Vice President Candace Grooms as they made way for new members of the executive board. Reflecting on his years with the group, Gehrcke said the connections he made along the way and the power of having his named recognized in

political circles will do the most for his future career. “I currently serve as the Michigan Federation of College Democrats programs coordinator, Gehrcke said. “So I will be working a lot with planning events across the state for the federation.” studentlife@cm-life.com

SAPA hosts annual anti-victim blaming program By Sienna Monczunski Staff Reporter

Members of Sexual Aggression Peer Advocates performed skits and held various discussions about victim blaming in the French Auditorium on Wednesday during their program, “That Slut Asked for It, Right?” Before the event began, audience members were informed they could leave the room at any point during the program if things got uncomfortable. The first skit included a robbery situation, in which a “detective” asked a victim of robbery an assortment of questions about their attire, previous reputation and whereabouts during the robbery. The detective ended the barrage of questions with the statement: “If we didn’t know any better we were thinking you were asking to get mugged that night.” Royal Oak freshman Alexis Slade first heard about the program in her sociology class and attended the event for an assignment. “The thing that stood out the most to me was that consent is the presence of a ‘yes’ and not the absence of a ‘no,’” Slade said. After the mugging skit, audience members were asked to analyze questions that seemed to be a part of the investigation and questions that seemed to place blame on the victim. In the next activity, a SAPA mem-

ber drew a table on a marker board, separating men and women and asked audience members to identify what both genders can do to avoid sexual assault. At the end of the activity, the side of the board labeled “women” had 10 more statements than the male side. Some of the statements contained on the side labeled women included walking in groups and carrying a weapon. SAPA members then explained the various reasons why it would be impossible for a survivor to prevent their attack – one of the biggest reasons being most assailants are someone close to the victim. The group then showed a YouTube clip titled, “John McKay ‘Skirt’ Rape Crisis,” and held a short question and answer segment. Every SAPA member in the room donned red t-shirts which read: “Ask Me Why I’m Wearing Jeans Today.” April 23 is “Denim Day” in honor of Sexual Violence Awareness Month. A ruling by the Italian Supreme Court, where a rape conviction was overturned, inspired the day. According to the judge, the survivor’s jeans were “too tight,” and therefore she must have helped her rapist remove her jeans, implying consent. Since then, wearing jeans on Denim Day has become a symbol of protest against victim blaming culture. “We subconsciously distance

Courtesy Photo | Cortney Bos

ourselves to make ourselves feel safe,” said Troy junior Gabrielle Sorge. “No matter what a woman does, a majority of society will think it’s her fault.” There are 50 members on SAPA and two 24-hour chat services available to survivors. SAPA members receive more than 50 hours of training in order to facilitate the proper ser-

vices for survivors of sexual assault. “If anyone ever needs us, we’ll be there and if anyone wants us to put on a program for their classroom, contact us,” said Plymouth junior and SAPA member Kerry Macdonald. studentlife@cm-life.com

For the second consecutive year, the Organization of Women Leaders’ protest will march through campus Saturday to raise awareness of sexual assault and victim blaming. Registration for the SlutWalk starts at 1 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Auditorium located on the third floor. The march starts at 2 p.m. and will be followed by a speech from Andrea Bredbeck, a public speaker and author who spreads awareness of sexual assault. Korrin Jones, St. Clair Shores senior and secretary of OWLs, said SlutWalk will be a wonderful event meant to support survivors of sexual assault. “Survivors of sexual assault and aggression often have no one to turn to so we are trying to show them that they do have people advocating for them,” Jones said. “Anyone who wants to help us provide that support should come and help us to spread awareness and to stop victim blaming.” Anyone interested in participating in the event can preregister on a Google document available on the SlutWalk Facebook event. -Arielle Hines, staff reporter

Metro

Middle schoolers assault staff member during recess Five seventh grade boys at West Intermediate Middle School were involved in the assault of a staff member Wednesday during their lunch break. Injuries sustained by the staff member were not reported by police, per the ongoing investigation. The middle school, located at 440 S. Bradley Road, is conducting its own investigation alongside the Mount Pleasant Police Department. School liaison officer Tim Standen responded to the call, and continued interviewing witnesses over the next day, according to Public Information Officer Jeff Thompson. “We just want to make sure we have all the facts,” Thompson said. “Now that the excitement has died down, we have a few things to get straight.” Thompson said police received several accounts of the assault from witnesses, but some of the stories are conflicting. He explained the investigation could take longer than most, due to the age of the boys. The boys’ parents were notified and are taking part in the investigation. “We want to treat it the same way we treat any investigation,” Thompson said. “Because of their age, there are a couple additional steps we have to take to protect the boys’ privacy.” Police are unsure at this time, Thompson said, if the staff member did anything to provoke the students. He said once the investigation is complete, the case will be forwarded to the county prosecutor who will determine if any charges should be filed. West Intermediate Middle School notified parents of the incident in an email written by Principal Dana Calkins and sent out Thursday. Calkins said the School District Administration and the Board of Education have been kept abreast of the investigation, and have provided guidance along the way. “This has been a very emotional situation for us all,” Calkins wrote. “It is also a sad reminder that we need to remain vigilant regarding school safety. We are very lucky to have the personnel who will risk their own safety to ensure the safety of our students.” Calkins said she has been in touch with families to provide support and address any rumors. “We are confident the situation is now under control, as it has been taken extremely seriously and has been dealt with swiftly,” she wrote. “Such behaviors are not acceptable in any Mount Pleasant Public School.” -Adrian Hedden, metro editor


INVESTIGATING THE EXILE OF A RENEGADE FRATERNITY

4A | Friday, April 25, 2014 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

GREEK LI BREAKING DOWN STEREOTYPES, BUILDING COMMUNITY, PHI By Justin Hicks | Editor-in-Chief

G

reeks at Central Michigan University are a family.

When an individual or group faces sanctions or is booted from the kin, the effects span further than just the violators. “We’re very tight-knit and it’s always sad when something happens to another chapter,” said Farmington Hills senior Hannah Keshishian, a member of Phi Mu. “We take care of each other and no one wants to ever see anything happen to a fellow Greek.” When a handful of members provide the community with negative exposure, disciplining them can be vital to the community and campus. News regarding the four-year suspension of the Delta Chi fraternity has taken the bulk of the headlines surrounding the Greek community at CMU this year. The chapter was booted from campus after allegations arose of an alcohol violation, sexual assault, theft and the taking and sending of lewd photos after an April 19, 2013 post-Greek Week party. Interfraternity President Casey Lang said he understands looking at the big picture when it comes to the sanctions of violators for the common good. “A lot of times, when a chapter gets kicked off, it needs to be kicked off because it’s doing something either unsafe or doing something harmful to Greek Life,” Lang said. “It doesn’t mean the organization is bad, it just means some people in that chapter made bad decisions.”

GOING GREEK Lang’s path to Greek Life at CMU wasn’t the common route. Originally an ROTC cadet, the Florida senior sought out a change of scenery and support after tragedy struck during his sophomore year. “One of my best friends and fellow cadets took his own life a few years back,” Lang said. “After that, I went searching for a new sense of meaning and belonging. The people I hung out with before didn’t seem to fit as well without (him).” Joining Pi Kappa Phi, he was surrounded by exactly what he needed. “I found a place where people really help each other, who were there for each other, and who help you take what life throws at you and make a better person of yourself,” Lang said. The Greek community consists of about 43 social, academic, honorary, multi-cultural and service fraternities and sororities. Each group has varied traditions and characteristics, all focusing on education, character development and charity. Its familial nature attracts students of all backgrounds and disciplines, seeking a home away from home during their college years. Roughly 1,300 students make up the 30 social organizations at CMU. “There are the people who come for the party, and there are the people looking for a home,” said Grass Lake junior and Phi Kappa Tau member Nick Waskiewicz. “People have various reasons (for joining) and Greek Life allows you to grow and build your own experience.” Waskiewicz’s social personality left him wanting more after his first two years at CMU. Although he built up his friend group as a resident assistant in Woldt Hall, he wanted more. “Being an RA, lots of people know me, which is great, but opening myself up to Greek Life, I have met so many more people,” Waskiewicz said. “It’s wonderful because it’s what I’m passionate about. I joined because I was looking to build deeper relationships with people.” Though a happy member of Phi Kappa Tau today, Waskiewicz was hesitant to rush his first two years because of the negative stereotypes associated with Greek Life.

OVERCOMING STEREOTYPES Years of hazing and alcohol-related stories have paired with films like “Animal House” to paint a negative portrayal of Greek Life nationally. The stereotypes aren’t going away anytime soon, Lang said, but they don’t fit the entire community either. “They portray fraternity men as drunken fools to some extent, who care far too much about drinking than they do their grades and their community,” he said. “From what I’ve seen, I don’t think that’s the case.” Like other registered student organizations, Greeks require a 2.5 GPA to retain membership. Some groups raise the bar higher when it comes to academic standards, and many require logged study hours. All social sororities also prohibit drinking in their main houses and many don’t allow alcohol consumption while wearing Greek letters. Strict rules to eliminate underage and excessive drinking are put in place by both CMU and each Greek group to prevent trouble. Having to pay dues to their national chapters cause groups to receive another negative perception. While some suggest Greeks “purchase” their friendships, Keshishian challenged that idea. “I can assure you that if that was true, then I definitely did not pay enough,” she said. “You join other RSOs on campus, you pay dues, you have bylaws and constitutions that you follow. You have GPA requirements, and above all, you

Andrew Whitaker | Assistant Photo Editor MAIN: Sorority members cheer on other Greek members during the athletic games on April 9 in McGuirk Arena. Andraya Croft | Staff Photographer LEFT: Phi Sigma Sigma and Beta Theta Pi are named the 2014 Greek Week winners in McGuirk Arena on April 11. The Greek community raised more than $30,000 for Special Olympics Michigan.

RIGHT: Greeks perform in the mock rock competition during Greek Week on April 11 in McGuirk Arena.

“IF IT WEREN’T FOR THIS COMMUNITY, I WOULD HAVE TRANSFERRED TO (MICHIGAN STATE) OR (UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN). I LIKE THAT I’M A PART OF SOMETHING BIGGER THAN MYSELF ... THIS COMMUNITY ADDED THE FEELING OF HOME THAT I WAS SORELY MISSING.” HANNAH KESHISHIAN, PHI MU

(make) bonds and (become) friends with those people.” Partying is often the first thought associated with sororities and fraternities. Although social functions are commonplace, Waskiewicz said partying is only a small part of Greek Life. “The partying, it happens, but it’s not the reason we’re here,” Waskiewicz said. “We’re here to get to know one another, to leave this campus better than how we found it.”

PROVING THEIR WORTH Greek Week 2014 exemplified the accomplishments of fraternities and sororities in the Mount Pleasant community. In five days, the groups worked tirelessly to host events on campus and raised more than $30,000 — a Greek Week record. Outside the annual fundraising week, each group has an associated philanthropic organization and raises money year round to provide for people in need. Zeta Tau Alpha raises an average of $20,000 annually for breast cancer research. Alpha Sigma Tau raises about $3,000 each year for Pine Mountain Settlement school in Kentucky, according to Panhellenic Council President Veronica Meadows. Other philanthropies include Children’s Miracle Network, Habitat for Humanity, Victims of Domestic Violence, Big Brothers Big Sister and the National Kidney Foundation. “I think our role in the community is something that we have been working on,” Meadows said. “A lot of Greeks volunteer at the Soup Kitchen, food pantry and animal shelter. As far as campus, we’re involved in a lot of RSOs outside sororities.” Greeks are also widely represented throughout orientation and Leadership Safari staffs each year, as well as Sexual As-

sault Peer Advocates and Student Government Association. Through these programs, individual members gain campus leadership experience and professional networking, Meadows said. Many groups are required to be a part of at least one organization outside their fraternity or sorority. Having a support system in place also helps the university with retention, Keshishian said. “If it weren’t for this community, I would have transferred to (Michigan State) or (University of Michigan),” she said. “I like that I’m a part of something bigger than myself ... this community added the feeling of home that I was sorely missing.”

CLEANING UP In October 2013, Delta Chi was kicked off campus for three violations and a failure to take corrective action after years of previous sanctions. Lambda Chi Alpha and Alpha Chi Rho are both serving suspensions from 2011 for alcohol and hazing violations, respectively. In the last 10 years, six groups have received two-year or four-year suspensions, according to Office of Student Conduct records. When groups feed the negative stereotypes associated with Greek Life, they further hinder the community’s ability to grow past them. “When things like that happen, people don’t associate our letters with our fraternity, but with Greek Life as a whole,” Waskiewicz said. “So, any time something like that happens, if you’re not trying to fix it for the better, you’re not keeping up to date.” The negative light often overshadows the projects that benefit the community. While Lang said the community will always have men and women who overstep boundaries, the rest of the Greek community is responsible for keeping focused on their goals. “To better the image Greek Life has, the rest of us really have to act our values and the things we claim to believe, doing things like the philanthropy events and getting out in the community,” he said. “That’s all we can do.” editor@cm-life.com


INVESTIGATING THE EXILE OF A RENEGADE FRATERNITY

IFE

LANTHROPY, CHARACTER

“TO BETTER THE IMAGE GREEK LIFE HAS, THE REST OF US REALLY HAVE TO ACT OUR VALUES AND THE THINGS WE CLAIM TO BELIEVE, DOING THINGS LIKE THE PHILANTHROPY EVENTS AND GETTING OUT IN THE COMMUNITY. THAT’S ALL WE CAN DO.” CASEY LANG, INTERFRATERNITY PRESIDENT

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Friday, April 25, 2014 | 5A

GONE 4 GOOD? CONTINUED FROM 1A

A component of their sanction is a call to stop all recruiting efforts, holding social functions as Delta Chi, holding rush periods, or meeting under the name of the fraternity, as well as pulling the letters down from the group’s house. These conditions were outlined in the final sanction letter sent to the fraternity by Steven Johnson, vice president of enrollment and student services. The letter was dated October 11, and was part of the notice sent to Delta Chi informing them of their final sentence. The four-year sanction also mandates that the group cannot receive the slightest consideration of a return from CMU’s Office of Student Activities and Involvement until 2017. Even then, the group is not guaranteed a right to return. Zachary Ernat, president of Delta Chi, said the group did receive the letter informing them of the final ruling. However, he said the group was not made aware that there were conditional restraints put on their suspension other than taking the Greek letters off of their house. Ernat said he was made aware of the conditions and the fact that CMU had not started to mark its suspension time after a conversation with Central Michigan Life reporters in March, five months after the final ruling was issued. According to Idema, Delta Chi has not been in compliance with any of these measures, though they were made aware of what they needed to do. “They’ve pretty much ignored the sanctions (and the requirements),” he said. In the past, other groups who have been sanctioned with two- or four-year suspensions “went away peacefully,” Idema said. He added that there has been no official recognition of the sanctions from the national office, which still recognizes the Delta Chi chapter at CMU. “In Greek Life, you’ve got the university, the national office and the local chapter. You’ve got to have a working relationship to have it work right,” Idema said. “Right now, with the Delta Chi situation, we’ve got this group of guys doing whatever they want. And then we’ve got the national office that’s pretty much ignoring the university, saying ‘We support this chapter.’” As time moves on, the officials in the Office of Student Conduct have uttered a collective sigh of relief that the decision regarding Delta Chi’s return doesn’t rest on their shoulders. “I’ve done my part and whatever happens now is between the Greek Life office and their national office,” Idema said. “It’s not my decision when they come back, but if I were the Greek Adviser, I’d be concerned.”

WHY WAS THE SANCTION JUSTIFIED?

A LESSON LEARNED? CONTINUED FROM 1A

Members complain their punishment isn’t fair. They continue to reject the sanctions given to them by the university. From the beginning, the fraternity has received bad guidance. Their advisor, Todd Levitt, assured them they were victims in a broken, corrupt system. Their national chapter told them to keep quiet and lay low, avoiding any responsible effort to salvage the fraternity at Central Michigan University. While members were fending off criticism alone, the opportunity to take responsibility for their violations, own up to their troubled past and offer a public apology came and went. Although some Greeks stand by members of the exiled fraternity, many have distanced themselves in hope of moving past the negative attention. Several groups have expressed appreciation for the public separation from those soiling the Greek name. They have requested their organizations be left out of stories involving Delta Chi to avoid affiliation. So, can Delta Chi be a lesson learned at CMU? Can it be the last member removed from the Greek family portrait? The ousted fraternity does not reflect Greek life. When I look at the Greek community, I see lasting relationships, tireless fundraising and young adults trying to make the most of their college years. More than anything though, I see the ability to better CMU and the city of Mount Pleasant. This year’s Greek Week showed the amazing feat fraternities and sororities can accomplish when they work together. In a matter of five days, the group raised more than $30,000 for Special Olympics Michigan. Meanwhile, Pi Sigma Epsilon was down in Florida claiming first place in a national sales competition for the second consecutive year. Imagine a future where this is the only kind of news surrounding Greek Life. Where “Animal House” stereotypes take a backseat to professionalism, philanthropy and a fun, yet safe, community. Take pride in the accomplishments of your brothers and sisters, but also take responsibility when someone steps out of line. Likewise, when you jeopardize your group’s name, both on campus and nationally, take responsibility and any consequences for the sake of your family. Initiative breeds transparency. Transparency breeds trust. Trust breeds community.

Idema understands the responsibility placed on a Greek Life adviser because he once held the position. “Before 2013, I had three jobs: I was student conduct, I was doing all registered Greek organizations and I was also the Student Life adviser,” he said. “If there was a Greek Life issue on campus, I was in the middle of it. I helped get the Greek Circle out here in Warriner Mall, all of those types of things. I was there supporting, but I was also there doing the conduct piece.” Idema said it was difficult balancing his roles. For 12 years, the conduct director saw the best and worst CMU Greek Life had to offer. His view of Greek Life from each angle gave him a singular insight when it came time for him to take on the full-time role as the head of student conduct. He said he brought up Delta Chi’s history as a small measure of support for his imposition of a higher, more sever punishment on the fraternity, as they in turn appealed the original sanctions of a dry house and suspended recruiting. Idema went back 15 years into Delta Chi’s history to show Johnson and the appeals board that all past remedies were not effective in stopping them from making poor decisions. That means Idema, in various roles, saw the good deeds and the misgivings of Delta Chi firsthand for at least 12 of them. Of all the violations listed in his letter to the appeals board, one incident is particularly nasty. In 2002, a group of Delta Chi brothers were engaged in a hazing ritual during that year’s rush period. A group of rushes were taken to a field and told it would be wise if they drank a certain amount of alcohol before they returned to the house. The incident ended with Mount Pleasant police arresting the rushes. After taking them to the police department, one rush was transported to the hospital with alcohol poisoning. Ernat told CM Life reporters that he and other Delta Chi members didn’t condone the act, but, because they were practically children in 2002 — and not members of the fraternity — this hazing incident has nothing to do with them. The charges against the 2002 group were alcohol and hazing violations, and they were sanctioned with a ban on recruiting. While the most recent list of offenses carried with them higher caliber charges than simple hazing and alcohol violations, including allegations of theft and sexual assault, Ernat said they shouldn’t have been punished for actions of past members. Idema regrets not taking stronger action against Delta Chi in 2002, the same way he did in 2013. “Looking back, I think we missed the ball on that

one,” he said. “As you work in the Greek Life field, you can pretty much sanction a group any way, but one of the things you don’t do is take away their right to recruit. That’s just like the lifeline for the group. “It was really the first time we have come across one of those sorts of things. If I had to do it all over again, I would have done it much differently. I would have come down much harder because that was a pretty bad situation.” That sense of remorse led his judgment in calling for a more severe punishment in 2013. While Delta Chi members felt blindsided by the move, Idema said it was needed to keep order within the campus and Greek community. “They were saying that the sanction was wrong, and we were saying the sanction was wrong because of their past history and they have already been sanctioned for these things,” he said. “We’re saying this is why these sanctions won’t work. “They have a pattern of that. We tried it before, and it didn’t work.”

FOUR YEARS IS NO DEATH SENTENCE Delta Chi and its various supporters have characterized the four-year sanction as a death penalty. The complaint is that the sanction effectively wipes the fraternity from Greek Life’s institutional memory. The sanction also prevents those men who recently rushed and joined Delta Chi from being able to officially affiliate themselves with the group. In many ways, that’s what Idema said he was going for. “We get to a point where we say, ‘Hey, guys, we need to take a break and restart, and to really move forward,’” he said. The Delta Chi situation is an anomaly because of their unwillingness to cooperate, not in the fact that they were kicked off campus. To the contrary, use of two-year and four-year sanctions has been a more frequent weapon employed by the Office of Student Conduct since the late 2000s. According to the office’s records, six Greek Life organizations have been sanctioned with two-year or four-year suspensions within the last 10 years. These organizations include Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Chi Rho, Lambda Chi Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Pi and Delta Chi. In Idema’s opinion, suspensions are effective because they send a message and give those organizations kicked off campus an opportunity to reinvent themselves. “There are groups that have come back and done so well and been successful. That’s what we want,” he said. “That’s the reason why we sanction in the first place.” One fraternity that faced a suspension and is back better than ever, Idema said, is Pi Kappa Phi. The fraternity was suspended four years in 2008 for hazing. It was charged with making associates haul bricks around as part of a hazing ritual. “(Pi Kappa Phi) went away quietly. They did exactly what they were supposed to do. When we were ready, we said come back,” Idema said. “They brought their national office, they trained the guys and now they have a fabulous group.” Matt Berlin, president of Pi Kappa Phi, said they have done everything they can to reinvent the fraternity. “It takes a lot of hard work and perseverance,” Berlin said. “It’s not something that’s easily done. It’s more than just being an average member of a fraternity.” To come back, Berlin said the old group had to cease all operations. When the suspension was over, the national chapter came back to recolonize. Berlin was a part of that original recruiting class. He said the institutional memory of the group had in fact been erased. This didn’t cause many problems in terms of poor perception of the group, but did handicap the group when they went out to build their membership. “A lot of it was internal issues,” he said. “Guys in the group had doubts that we were even going to come back and keep the charter. It was hard to keep the guys together.” When they did have a base of brothers that Berlin thought were in it for the long haul, he said they just focused on why they signed on to the fraternity in the first place. “We had to be successful in every area you can be” he said. “Whether that’s in school, intramural sports or fundraising, everyone in the group sees that and pushes to be motivated and involved. We do it so we can make sure that everyone involved gets what they want out of it.” Berlin added that recruiting the right kind of guys was paramount to maintaining the new reputation they have built for themselves. The Pi Kappa Phi slogan is “Men of class.” Berlin said he believes they are living up to that ideal. “We’ve been incredibly successful,” he said. “We’ve done that by being pretty selective about the guys we want to bring in. The one downfall is we have a lower number, but we focus on quality over quantity.” Berlin understands why Delta Chi members have been acting out in the way they have. “The fraternity is a cherished thing by most guys,” he said. “They see it as being unfair. They think they were wrongfully punished. The reason our guys didn’t push back was because they knew they deserved it. They might not think they deserve it.” As the clock ticks forward, Delta Chi has not given the campus community, university officials or their Greek brothers and sisters any indication that they’ll stop acting as the “underground fraternity” any time soon. university@cm-life.com


Voices

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Justin Hicks | editor@cm-life.com MANAGING EDITOR | Tony Wittkowksi | news@cm-life.com VOICES | Kyle Kaminski | voices@cm-life.com UNIVERSITY | Ben Solis | university@cm-life.com METRO | Adrian Hedden | metro@cm-life.com SPORTS | Malachi Barrett | sports@cm-life.com VISUAL DIRECTOR | Mariah Prowoznik | design@cm-life.com

cm-life.com

MANDATING INEQUALITY United States Supreme Court’s validating of ban on affirmative action backtracks decades of social progress

D

iversity is always desirable. In an ideal society, it would be an accepted

staple to daily life. However, it won’t always occur on its own. On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s right to ban preferential treatment to minorities in university admissions. This is a mistake. Although a 2006 Michigan voter referendum called to end affirmative action within public entities, a federal appeals court invalidated the ban in 2012. The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals found the ban unconstitutional because it halted minorities’ social progress. While the ruling focused on who had the authority to legislate a ban on affirmative action, it carries an unintended consequence. Banning affirmative action specifically makes it more difficult for minorities to obtain university acceptance. It perpetuates discrimination and is a step away from true equality. In an ideal society, discrimination and preference to the white, upper-class majority would not exist. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Although progress has been made since segregation and the Civil Rights movement, disadvantaged minorities still need the rule to level the playing field and avoid discrimination. With respect to the democratic right of a voting majority, enforcing a ban on affirmative action will ensure that prejudice remains embedded in our American way of life. It reverses years of social change and cannot be allowed.

The ruling allows states the authority to ban affirmative action. While the voice of the people should hold the most influence in politics, it implies that voters have a right to create discriminatory practices. While the appeals court was protecting our constitution when it invalidated the ban, the Supreme Court is dismantling it. The court has a right to interfere when it comes to discriminatory practices, regardless of voter approval. In the 1920s, courts interfered when voters approved an initiative that only whites would be able to vote in primary elections. In the 1950s, the court stepped in when Alabama abolished Tuskegee County due to the high number of blacks registering to vote. To imply that the court cannot interfere in this instance is preposterous. Universities are able to admit athletes for their athletic abilities, and legacy students because of their parents. Institutions like Central Michigan University can admit students based on area of study or geographic origin. Denying affirmative action programs and eliminating race from the admissions process eliminates diversity from the picture, while still allowing other similar factors to play a part. While students should be admitted largely on merit and academic ability, the idea is to embrace multiculturalism – not to create a color-blind society. Minorities should be proud of their heritage, and know that in the United States, they will receive the same level of treatment as their peers. Eliminating policies designed to give fair treatment are the antithesis of equality. Affirmative action has gone a long way toward alleviating preferential treatment, but it is not time to end it just yet.

Alert system is effective, despite concerns Central Michigan Life’s April 14 article that identified the Central Michigan University student arrested earlier that week for allegedly sexually assaulting a young woman on campus on three separate occasions caused some interesting reactions on social media. On CM Life’s Facebook, some said they wished CMU’s alert system would have notified them about the incident right after it was reported and not 12 hours later. Though many of those Facebook comments appear to have been deleted, they still ask an important question. Does the university or CMU Police have an obligation to notify students through the alert system as soon as a crime has been reported? I can see both sides to this issue. Say a robbery, physical assault, or sexual assault were to occur on cam-

pus. Would you want the CMU alert system to inform you immediately or after the perpetrator was found? On one hand, people deserve to be informed. Hopefully if all students were informed immediately on what crime occurred and where it happened, students would be able to relocate to a safer area. In a best case scenario, maybe at least one nearby student saw the crime occur and could provide CMUPD with more information on how it happened. It also doesn’t inspire confidence in CMU’s alert system if students are left in the dark on a crime against one of their peers until hours after it transpired. More importantly, being briefed immediately to a situation could also help students feel more safe. On the other hand, there is a chance alerting all

Kelly Rocheleau Staff Reporter students of a crime could simply cause panic instead of calming anyone’s fears. With the image of panicked students in mind, one could see why being informed of the situation after the perpetrator has been arrested might be the best course of action. The people might not want to worry students with news of an ongoing crime without all information about the crime available. Spreading information without knowing all of the facts is rarely a good idea. The best course of action is to alert students to a crime and the details surrounding it once the suspect has been found. While I understand concerns about the university not giving information to those under its care, keep in mind that if every student were to receive a notification immediately, the perpetrator could also be notified. Releasing all available information

once the dust clears also keeps information about the crime as accurate as possible, reducing rumors. CMU Police Chief Bill Yeagley said the department is federally required by the The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act to follow certain guidelines regarding when details of a campus crime can be released to the public. Yeagley said the specific information of each case affects if and when information is released. “It really does boil down to each individual scenario (having) enough issues of its own,” he said. “I firmly believe that the more information you have as a member of this community, the better position you’re in to make decisions to keep yourself safe.” With these kinds of crimes, no solution is going to satisfy everyone. At the end of the day, the best way to help the campus community in these situations is to release information once the proper precautions have been taken and the perpetrator has been apprehended.

Readers share views on Wednesday’s Delta Chi coverage

Anthony Rizzo This series of articles is simply not newsworthy. It, in my opinion, is a waste of time and resources for one of the country’s “top” college newspapers.

Brad What’s the purpose of this article? Are you trying to say that Greeks are out of control and party too hard in the nicest way possible? Do you mean the community as a whole only tolerates Greeks because of their charity donations? When you write an article make it clear and concise.

Kyle Breitinger I do enjoy the comparison of cleanliness between Fraternity and Sorority houses.

it’s me Read before you panic. This story seems to be saying that Greeks aren’t all bad and that people shouldn’t punish all of them because of one former fraternity.

@bradjlake Your articles never express the good side of Delta Chi. I just want to see journalism that is fair and positive. It seems like a tabloid more than a newspaper.

@Ashlea_Phenicie Happy to see CM Life is committed to uncovering and reporting the facts despite backlask.

Central Michigan Life EDITORIAL Justin Hicks, Editor-in-Chief Tony Wittkowski, Managing Editor Mariah Prowoznik, Visual Director Kyle Kaminski, Voices Editor Ben Solis, University Editor Nathan Clark, Student Life Editor Adrian Hedden, Metro Editor Malachi Barrett, Sports Editor Dominick Mastrangelo, Assistant Sports Editor

Samantha Madar, Photo Editor Andrew Whitaker, Assistant Photo Editor Morgan Taylor, Assistant Photo Editor Luke Roguska, Page Designer Kayla Folino, Page Designer Colton Mokofsky, Multimedia Editor James Wilson, Social Media Coordinator ADVERTISING MANAGERS Julie Bushart Daniel Haremski Gabriella Hoffman

PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGERS Kaitlyn Blaszczyk Kelsey McConnell PROFESSIONAL STAFF Rox Ann Petoskey Production Leader Kathy Simon Assistant Director of Student Publications Dave Clark Director of Student Publications

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member

of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The

GU EST COLU M N

Transitioning into next year By Charles Mahone II SGA President Fellow Chippewas, I am truly thankful to be able to address you all for the first time as your student body president. Mariah Urueta and I want to thank the editors at Central Michigan Life for affording us the opportunity to reach out to our peers for the first time going into our term. These first few weeks have been filled with transition into our positions through meeting with administrators and our advisors, looking to recruit a great group of student leaders to work with us throughout the 2014-15 school year, and of course meeting with many RSOs and working toward individual student initiatives. Already students have approached us to field their questions, hear their concerns and see how SGA can aid them in their efforts. Although it has been a busy time, it has also been extremely exciting. When Mariah and I were campaigning throughout these last few months, we were very intentional in assembling a platform that came organically from the conversations that we were able to have with students. After we get fully transitioned into our positions, our very first priority will be to work toward the student concerns that we chose to highlight in our platform. Even though we are in the midst of transition, we have already started working our specific platform points. Throughout the summer I will be actively meeting with administrators, faculty, students, community members or any individual who can help progress any student-centered issues. One specific platform initiative that we plan on having accomplished by the start of the fall semester will be our local business partnership. My summer will be filled with collaborating with local businesses around the Mount Pleasant area and looking to receive tangible deals for the student body. In addition, just last week CM Life was gracious enough to run an article about the tax assistance program that Mariah and I plan on instituting next year. These are but two of the many ways we are hoping to positively affect the student body. While we are newly elected, Mariah and I truly do have a passion for representing the many voices of the student body and we are extremely excited to do so in this capacity. We know that we are not alone in this pursuit and there are many others that would love to help represent our student body. For any of you that would love to take up that call, please keep in mind that SGA is looking for bright, passionate student leaders to help comprise our executive council and legislative branch positions. Anyone is welcome to apply; the deadline for applications is May 1. If you ever have questions about what SGA can do for you, need assistance on a student issue, or if you are interested in being a part of our organization, please feel free to contact us at cmusga@cmich.edu. Mariah and I appreciate all the hard work of everyone who helped us get to this position and we have never been more excited and ready to serve you all.

Mail | 436 Moore HallMount Pleasant, MI 48859 Voices Editor | Kyle Kaminski Phone | (517) 294-3705 | Email | voices@cm-life.com All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer, guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication. newspaper’s online provider is Wordpress. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital

copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


News

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Friday, April 25, 2014 | 7A

Grandparents U provides bonding for old, new generations By Anamaria Dickerson Staff Reporter

Andrew Whitaker | Assistant Photo Editor Phi Alpha Delta brothers and sisters are brought together in a debate on raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 Thursday at the U.C. Auditorium.

Phi Alpha Delta debates Michigan issues By Katherine Ranzenberger Senior Reporter

A good lawyer has to be able to make compelling arguments, so members of the prelaw fraternity Phi Alpha Delta practiced those skills debating each other on current topics Thursday night. “Wanting to be a lawyer, it’s essential (that) I’m good at oral arguments,” said Madison Tyler, a Pinckney freshman and member of the fraternity. “I’ve been debating competitively since fifth grade. It’s great to get back into it. It’s a rush.” Tyler debated on the merits of raising the federal minimum wage. During President Barack Obama’s most recent State of the Union speech, this was one of his main points for helping low-income families. “It could help increase the quality of life,” she said during the debate. “It would give those living on minimum wage more buying power. While $15,000 a year is above the poverty threshold for one person, it’s not for a family.” Tyler’s arguments, along with fellow fraternity members Hunter Reams and Stephanie White, won the debate for their team. Samantha Heuring, a Stanton senior and law and school

“I think that regardless of your profession...it’s important to be aware of the issues around you.”

While many students graduate and leave Central Michigan University for good, some return later in life to encourage relatives to consider enrolling in classes. The CMU Alumni Association is hosting its 7th annual Grandparents University this summer. The event, scheduled for June 18-20, is an opportunity for CMU alumni and their grandchildren to experience all campus has to offer. Associate Director of Alumni Relations Anne Sanders said the event was created to bring alumni back to campus. “It began in 2007 when we started researching the idea followed by our first actual event in 2008,” she said. “We visited Michigan State University who was conducting a Grandparents University event prior to us and talked to them and got ideas on how we could make something similar successful here at CMU.”

The three-day event is a time for grandparents and their grandchildren to have hands on educational sessions conducted by faculty members along with other activities, according to the Alumni Association website. Participants live like college students, dining and sleeping in the residence hall and attending classes. The fun doesn’t end after class either. “In the evening the participants utilize the student activity center for bowling. swimming, watching movies and playing games,” Sanders said. “We try to make this a full college experience and showcase all that CMU has to offer.” Classes are chosen based on order of preferences provided by the participants. All classes are taught by CMU faculty and professionals. According to the Alumni Association website, classes offered include: “Paws in Action”, “Bug Eyed: Things in the Scanning Electron Microscope,” “Back-

stage at Bush Theater” and more to be announced as the event gets closer. Executive Director of Alumni Relations Marcie Otteman said the event is a wonderful bonding experience for the different generations. “We hope the grandparents enjoy the experience of being back at their alma mater and sharing that with their grandchildren,” she said. “I’m not sure who has more fun, the kids or the grandparents.” Participants interested in attending can register online at CMU’s Alumni Association website and clicking on the Engage tab. Registration costs $175 for adults and $150 for children ages 8 to 12, and is open until April 30. “It is wonderful to see the joy both in the grandparents and grandchildren as they leave the event,” Otteman said. “You can tell they have created memories that will last a lifetime. studentlife@cm-life.com

Samantha Heuring, Stanton senior preparation committee chair for Phi Alpha Delta, said the idea for debates was suggested by a former member. “We wanted to do something that was outside of LSAT preparation,” she said. “We wanted to pick something that was a current issue. I wanted an issue that wasn’t religious related either.” The debate teams also discussed Michigan’s standyour-ground law, an issue that became widely known after the Trayvon Martin shooting in Florida as well as many other events around the nation. Heuring said the committee chose these two topics because they would help with research skills and add to their professional development. “We wanted something that will be professionally enriching,” she said. The fraternity plans to hold debates at least once a semester. They hope to continue with other current events to draw more students and

faculty members in to listen to both sides of the arguments while members grow their skills. Heuring said she hopes more students come next time so they can learn more about social issues surrounding them. “I think that regardless of your profession ... it’s important to be aware of the issues around you,” she said. “You have to be aware of the culture and the state of the economy.” Heuring said she also hopes to get more students involved, especially since the fraternity has moved to an open membership policy. “We welcome anyone who has any type of interest in law,” she said. “We’re the only law (registered student organization) on campus.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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Sports

ROAD TRIP

cm-life.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 2014|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH|ISSUE NO. 83 VOL. 95

Solid defense paving the way for softball this season »PAGE 4B

Run, Regnier, Run Photo Illustration Samantha Madar Junior outfielder Nick Regnier practices on Thursday at Theunissen Stadium. Reginer has 22 steals this season, placing him in the top 10 in the country.

| Photo Editor | Arin Bisaro | Staff Photographer

Speed, precise timing puts junior among nation’s top base stealers By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

The pitcher winds up and delivers home. As the ball smacks the catcher’s mitt, Nick Regnier is barreling down to second base. To prevent the junior center fielder from stealing, the catcher needs to make a perfect throw in a split second. Only two have stopped him this year. Regnier has 22 stolen bases this season, putting him in the top 10 in the nation coming into this week, an accomplishment that was news to him. When asked how many bases he has stolen or where he ranks in the nation, Regnier said he didn’t know. What he does know, is when to steal a base. “You’ve got to take in (to) consideration the situation of the game,” Regnier said. “You have to gauge the pitcher and how fast he is to home, his pick-off move, and then you just try to steal the base. Anytime I can, I go.” A player with Regnier’s skill set can drive a pitcher crazy. When he’s on first, the pitcher’s mind goes into frenzy. For one, he has to keep an eye on him while his brother, sophomore outfielder Logan Regnier, is at the plate. Logan brings his team-leading .338 batting average to the equation. “Anytime the opponent knows you have a guy who can run, it w REGNIER | 3B

“Anytime you can take a base and get a runner in scoring position is huge.” Nick Regnier, junior center field

Cooper can carry the Chippewa offense By Taylor DesOrmeau Staff Reporter

Sophomore quarterback Cooper Rush probably isn’t the next Dan LeFevour. But we won’t know unless head coach Dan Enos gives him another shot to show us what he’s got. Rush needs to be the guy under center come fall. Some argue senior Cody Kater should be the guy, but Kater is even less experienced than Rush, who entered the 2013 season third in line at quarterback.

Just look at the numbers without the names attached. Quarterback A has completed four of his 10 career passes for a total of 25 yards. Quarterback B has completed 177 passes for 2,349 yards. I don’t know about you, but I’m taking Quarterback B. And that’s Cooper Rush. I understand the argument about statistics from Saturday’s spring game. It’s safe to say Kater had a better outing, going 16-for23 with 257 passing yards compared to Rush’s 16-for-23 mark

Greg Cornwell | Staff Photographer Junior Nick Regnier slides home to score against Buffalo on April 6 at Theunissen Stadium.

with 232 passing yards. Rush even admitted himself that Kater “made more plays.” Yes, Kater’s been on the team longer, he won the job last year before getting injured in the season-opening embarrassment against Michigan and can argue seniority. I just think it’s too late for Kater. Last season was rough, considering all three Chippewa quarterbacks had essentially zero college football experience entering the season. Why should we put ourselves through that uncertainty again by handing the inexperienced Kater the reins? Rush helped the Chippewas become bowl-eligible by winning five of the team’s last seven games, including a rivalry-game

in Kalamazoo against Western Michigan and a last-minute upset victory on the road at Ohio. He also won the hearts of many Chippewa faithful in his first collegiate game by saving the team from embarrassment, engineering a come-from-behind victory at Kelly/Shorts Stadium against New Hampshire. This was after replacing the struggling Alex Niznak in the second half. Another plus for Rush is that he has already developed chemistry with senior superstar wide receiver Titus Davis, who figures to be a large part of CMU’s offense again in 2014. The best two quarterbacks in Chippewa history, LeFevour and Ryan Radcliff, had one thing in common: They started in at least three of their four seasons. If

Taylor DesOrmeau Staff Reporter

Rush is going to be considered with the likes of these two, he needs the experience now. Rush has more experience. Rush has the grit to win games he shouldn’t. Rush is the future of CMU football. Chippewa fans can only hope that they’ll see number 10 on the field by the time Chattanooga rolls into Kelly/Shorts Stadium on August 28. sports@cm-life.com

CMU football alum Maddux’s journey to professional football By Cody DeBona Staff Reporter

Dealing with a lockout, an injury and a team that collapsed around him, Jeff Maddux never gave up. The 2010 Central Michigan alumni has had a roller coaster journey in his professional football career. From the Detroit Lions to the Arena Football League, to playing on a back-to-back AFL champion team, Maddux has experienced it all. “All I can do is work hard and hope for something to happen, but if not I’m okay with that,” he said, “I’ve played a lot of football.”

At CMU, Maddux played guard on the offensive line. He was a three-time Mid-American Conference champion, Motor City Bowl winner and a GMAC Bowl Winner when the team was ranked No. 25 in the nation. After graduating, Maddux pursued his dream of playing in the National Football League. In a stroke of poor timing, the Monroe native graduated into the 2011 NFL lockout. “We couldn’t report to camps or anything; no one could pick us up, so I entered the Arena Football League for a couple (of ) months,” Maddux said. “I was on the Cleve-

land Gladiators until the lockout ended. I played six games and then I got picked up by Detroit.” The lockout ended the night before NFL training camp was supposed Jeff Maddux to start. Maddux reported to Detroit to start training camp with the Lions. In training camp, Maddux reinjured an ankle he had surgery on as a Chippewa. The ankle was rolled on by a defensive lineman at

camp but did not require surgery. The alum was released and took the fall off to regain his health. He was told the Lions would call him back when his injury healed. The following spring, Maddux returned to the Gladiators in the Arena Football League. After his season in Cleveland, he had still not heard back from the Lions organization. Instead, he moved to a neighboring AFL team, the Chicago Rush. Maddux transitioned well to the more untraditional rules of arena football. “It’s different (in the AFL) – a lot smaller and there’s a lot of great

athletes,” Maddux said. “I play next to a starter from (University of ) Nebraska and a starter from (University of ) Texas. (The AFL has) a lot of pass blocking for the most part but the game is a lot faster on the small field.” The AFL field is the exact dimensions of a National Hockey League ice arena. The boards from the ice rink are heavily padded. A player is not considered out of bounds unless they are knocked into or over those padded barriers. “The small field helps a lot with pass blocking, which we did a lot w MADDUX | 3B


Sports

2B | Friday, April 25, 2014 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

MAC RANKINGS Central Michigan baseball and softball stand at the top of the MAC West Division as conference play enters its most vital games.

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Friday, April 25, 2014 | 3B

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Enjoy a nice game of green at this Central Michigan course!

STALK THE CAT Morgan Taylor | Assistant Photo Editor Reese Michigan doctoral student Abbey Harrington sets the ball to a teammate during an intramural volleyball playoff game in the SAC on Thursday. Harrington plays on the team “Trust Us We’re Doctors.”

CONTINUED FROM 1B

makes them take notice,” said head coach Steve Jaksa, who pitched at CMU from 1977-79. “He gets on first, (and) now the pitcher is thinking about him and not the hitter, which helps us at the plate. He gets down in the count; now he’s focusing on the batter and forgets about him on first.” Jaksa doesn’t need to tell Nick when to steal; he has the green light to go whenever he feels fit.

MADDUX | CONTINUED FROM 1B when I was up at Central. Ninety-five percent of the plays are passing,” Maddux said. In the middle of Maddux’s 2013 season with the Rush, the team folded, but was able to finish its season. “By the fifth week, we noticed something wasn’t right,” Maddux said. “Bills weren’t getting paid and we came home one day and all of our TV’s were shut off.” In the AFL, housing and most meals are taken care of by the owners. The coaches broke the news to their players first. “It’s a long season in arena, 18 games played without playoffs,” Maddux said. “It actually made us come together as a team because we’re all just playing for ourselves at that point. We ended up making playoffs.” The Rush organization

Nick can change a game at the snap of a finger. On the first movement of the pitcher, Nick snaps to advance into scoring position. That way, a simple single into the outfield scores a run and the game changes in an instant. “Anytime you can take a base and get a runner in scoring position is huge,” Nick said. “We’ve got some guys in the middle of the order who can drive us in and that’s huge.” He might not know it, but he’s chasing down the record books with each base

“All I can do is work hard and hope for something to happen, but if not I’m okay with that.”

he swipes. With 22 steals this season, he is eight shy of tying Denny McNamara, who stole 20 in 1989. He has 51 stolen bases in his three seasons, nine away from Ed Papes, who stole 60 from 1968-70. “I’m not really thinking about that right now,” Nick said. “If I got that, looking back on it would be a nice accomplishment.” sports@cm-life.com

college teammates. “I keep in touch with Collin Miller, a lot of the guys. I was in (Dan) Lefevour’s wedding,” Maddux said. “My quarterback out here is one of coach Enos’ old quarterbacks from Cincinnati. I was messing around with coach the other day, messaging him pictures. I love coach Enos – such a good guy.” Jeff Maddux lives in Phoenix pursuing his football dream of eventually making it back to the NFL. In the meantime, he works hard and is content with making it on a great team in the second biggest football league in the United States.

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Jeff Maddux, CMU alum was taken over by the league after bills weren’t paid. Members of Maddux’s team – as well as a second folding team, the Utah Blaze – were entered into a draft at the 2013 season’s conclusion. “I was going out to visit my brothers in Cleveland and I got a call from one of my buddies,” Maddux said. “He was like ‘Hey you got picked up by Orlando?’ and I didn’t even know. He declined a contract to play for the Orlando Predators, and was considering ending his football career when he received a call from the defending champion Arizona Rattlers. Today, Maddux plays center for Arizona. He still keeps in contact with many of his

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Jaksa trusts the older Regnier to make the 90foot dash on his own free will – a trust which only came after the two built a strong repertoire with one another. “Nick knows how to read a pitcher and get a good jump,” Jaksa said. “That’s a continued working relationship between him and the coaches to get him to learn. It’s not just a snap of the finger and you’re allowed to do that. We work on it in the fall and in the previous season and we’re on the same page.”

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Sports

4B | Friday, April 25, 2014 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

READY FOR THE ROAD

CMU softball travels to Bowling Green this weekend By Joe Judd Staff Reporter

Greg Cornwell | Staff Photographer Sophomore outfielder Evelyn Lorimer throws in an outfield hit April 16 at Margo Jonker Stadium. The Chippewas faced a nationally ranked Michigan team and lost, 11-0.

Chippewa pitching backed by strong defense this season By CM Life Staff Reports

If a batter is lucky enough to make contact with a pitch against Central Michigan, they won’t be so lucky when it enters fair territory. Coupled with a strong lineup in the circle, softball has a tough defense backing up its pitching corps. “We pride ourselves on our defensive performance and we have some outstanding defensive players who have made great plays, especially in the infield,” said head coach Margo Jonker. “All of our infielders have made great plays and our outfielders have done better than anticipated, so it’s been a good year for us defensively so far.” Defense, when properly executed, is not flashy by nature but Jonker’s team isn’t trying to impress with style. “We talk all the time about how our defense wins games and our pitching wouldn’t be as good as it is without our defense,” she said. “The two totally rely on each other.” Statistically, the Chippewas have remained near the top of the Mid-American Conference in defensive rankings. CMU ranks second behind Akron in the MAC with a .966 fielding percentage and its defense has been able to accompany its stellar pitching performances this season, setting the team up for big offensive innings. The Chippewas have committed 42 errors through 44 games, the third lowest in the conference. In addition to playing close to mistake-free softball, CMU has also turned 12 double plays this season, tying Akron and Toldeo for fourth best in the MAC. “It’s our defense that wins games for us,” said second basemen Raechel Zahrn. “With the pitching and defense on point, it allows our hitters to relax, which helps us score runs and win games.” Defense is the backbone of Jonker’s team, maintaining its ability from the onset of the

Greg Cornwell | Staff Photographer Sophomore second baseman Chelsea DeLamielleure throws to first base at Margo Jonker Stadium on April 19. The Chippewas split the weekend series against Western Michigan.

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Greg Cornwell| Staff Photographer Freshman pitcher Rachael Knapp pitches to a Western Michigan batter April 19 at Margo Jonker Stadium. Knapp pitched seven innings in the 4-1 Chippewa victory, splitting the weekend series with the Broncos.

“We talk all the time about how our defense wins games and our pitching wouldn’t be as good as it is without our defense.” Margo Jonker, softball head coach season to this pivotal point in time across the MAC as the conference tournament approaches. “I think we’re always confident in our defense, it’s definitely high right now but

we’ve been confident all year long,” Zahrn said. “It’s something we pride ourselves in and as long as we keep it up, we should be fine.” sports@cm-life.com

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The Falcons haven’t been soaring this season. Bowling Green enters Friday’s double-header against Central Michigan tied for last place in the Mid-American Conference East Division with a 6-8 conference record, while the Chippewas come in fresh off of a victory at Michigan State ranked second in the West. The series begins at 1 p.m. “It’s always fun to go into someone else’s place and take over,” said junior third baseman Trista Cox. It will be the first time CMU will take on the Falcons this season, as the team tries to end the MAC portion of its schedule strong. “We don’t know too much about (Bowling Green) right now because we haven’t seen them, but we know they’re a conference foe,” said head coach Margo Jonker after Wednesday’s victory against Michigan State. The games against the falcons are a continuation of CMU’s streak of away games to end the regular season. CMU last played at home on Easter Sunday against Western Michigan, and would much rather stay at home. Regardless, the Chippewas face eight road games before the MAC tournament beings May 7. The tournament games will inevitably be held away from home, forcing CMU to get used to playing in enemy territory. Jonker will not make excuses on behalf of the team’s schedule. “Our schedule isn’t favor-

able to us and it’s unfortunate how ours has played out, but we’ve played 90 percent of our games on the road this season and we know what playing on the road is like,” Jonker said. CMU’s schedule has not changed the way it have gone about its business. Cox said being on the road to finish the season is not a disadvantage for the team. “We have an amazing fan base when we’re at home but a lot of our fans travel

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with us,” Cox said. “We have such a great support system on the road and we usually have more fans than the home team so I don’t think (being on the road) really affects us too much.” After the Chippewas play their two games Friday, they will remain in Ohio to play Toledo for a two-game series starting Saturday. The first pitch against the Rockets is scheduled for 2 p.m. sports@cm-life.com


Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Friday, April 25, 2013 | 5B

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Andrew Whitaker | Assistant Photo Editor Left-handed pitcher Adam Aldred pitches against Ball State’s first baseman Ryan Krill April 25 at Theunissen Stadium. Central Michigan beat Michigan State, 7-5.

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Best of the Mid-American Conference to compete at home this weekend By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

It’s No. 1 versus No. 2 in the Mid-American Conference this weekend when baseball hosts a three-game set against Ball State. Central Michigan has held the top spot overall in the MAC from the beginning with an 8-0 start to conference play and has not dropped a MAC series since May 2013 against Akron. CMU will put its first-place overall record and a six-series winning streak in the MAC on the line against the top competitor in the standings, the Cardinals. “This is going to be a turning point in the season,” said junior outfielder Nick Regnier. “If we

win this series, we’re sitting good to try to win out the MAC. I’m sure they are just as ready as we are, so we have to put pressure on them first.” Ball State has won ninestraight MAC series since April 2013. Pressure will be on the MAC’s best pitching staff. The Chippewas feature a league-best 2.97 team ERA, while Ball State is either No. 1 or No. 2 in batting average, slugging percentage, on-base percentage, runs scored, hits, RBI and home runs. “We haven’t talked about that,” Jaksa said. “I always thought good pitching beats good hitting. We just have to go and do what we do well.” With a big weekend like this,

it is important to set the tone. That job will go to junior right-handed pitcher Jordan Foley (5-2, 2.77 ERA), CMU’s ace. “If you look at a game as a must win, then you’re approaching it wrong,” Jaksa said. “The cream always rises to the top and if Jordan’s in a good place then we’ll be in a good place.” The Cardinals will send out senior right-handed pitcher T.J. Weir (5-1, 3.61 ERA) who came into this week leading the conference in strikeouts with 80. CMU will have to improve on its 250 strikeouts, ranking third in the MAC. sports@cm-life.com

Pitching Lineup Friday CMU junior RHP, Jordan Foley (5-2, 2.27) vs BSU senior RHP, T.J. Weir (5-1, 3.61)

Saturday CMU senior RHP, Pat Kaminska (6-1, 2.10) vs BSU junior RHP, Scott Baker (5-4, 4.69)

Sunday CMU freshman LHP, Nick Deeg (3-4, 4.14) vs BSU freshman RHP, Scott Plesac (7-2, 2.73)

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Sports

6B | Friday, April 25, 2014 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

MICHIGAN’S JORDAN MORGAN GOES FROM HARDWOOD TO THE DIAMOND, THROWS OUT FIRST PITCH AT TIGERS’ GAME By Mark Snyder Detroit Free Press (MCT)

Jordan Morgan knows the pitcher's mound well. He just didn't know it recently. But, with little preparation, he was able to call on his high school pitching days at U-D Jesuit and toss the ball near

the plate Wednesday at Comerica Park before the Tigers faced the Chicago White Sox. "It was a little bit different, I just wanted to make sure I got it over the plate," the former Michigan basketball center said. "We didn't want any Shoelace episodes out there." While he was joking about former U-M quarterback De-

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nard Robinson bouncing his attempt last year, he appreciated the opportunity. "It was cool, I'm a big Tigers fan, my hometown, I love the Tigers," he said. "Just coming to a game and being a part of it too is a blessing." Morgan shared first-pitch duties with Olympic shorttrack speed skater Jessica Smith, a Melvindale native.

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Morgan said on the field while watching batting practice. "Nobody would have believed that would have been the outcome, not even me. But that's what happens when you just have faith." Morgan wasn't sure how his minutes would shake out as a senior, despite being one of the team's three captains and the only senior.

Once Mitch McGary's season ended with January back surgery, Morgan continued to build, peaking late in the regular season with 15 points and 10 rebound against Indiana. "It had to be Senior Night, at home in front of everybody, raising the (Big Ten) Trophy," he said. "(You) can't beat that."

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It was the latest highlight moment and a remarkable turnaround for Morgan, who went from considering not playing his fifth year at Michigan to becoming U-M's primary center -- his double-doubles in the NCAA tournament helped lead the Wolverines to the Elite Eight. "The way everything worked out, it was amazing,"

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Friday, April 25, 2013 | 7B

ONE-AND-DONE GREAT FOR PLAYERS, LEAVES FANS WANTING MORE By John Clay Lexington Herald-Leader (MCT)

In they come, out they go. One year still seems so short. We are used to this, of course. In John Calipari’s five years as Kentucky’s head basketball coach, 12 of his players have now put in their one season before moving on to the NBA. Calipari is re-branding this as a “succeed and proceed” scenario. The rest of the world refers to it as “one-and-done.” This is not to in any way knock No. 12, Julius Randle, the UK forward who after completing his freshman season announced Tuesday he is placing his name into the NBA Draft. No surprise there. The mock drafts project Randle as a certain top-10, possible topfive pick. No one can criticize Randle’s career path. We just wish we could have gotten to know him better. And longer. He seemed like a fine young man with a great

support group. The basketball world now knows his mother after Carolyn Kyles was forced to leave the Midwest Region finals at halftime to catch a plane back to Texas to be at work the next morning. He has a great role model and hoops mentor in Jeff Webster, the former Oklahoma basketball player. He has a terrific benefactor in Kenny Troutt, the WinStar Farm owner who financed Randle’s AAU team back in Texas and was on hand for Tuesday’s announcement. In our one year together, Randle was never arrogant or cocky. At times he appeared weary of the constant media attention, but what 19-yearold wouldn’t grow tired of answering questions from prying adults with cameras and tape recorders and iPads. The Texas native also had to tire of the constant doubleand triple-teams brought by college defenses. It would have been fun to watch Randle further develop the skills necessary to burn such schemes.

That’s the thing with Randle. Even with his 24 double-doubles, we only saw a shadow of the player he can ultimately become. He can/ must develop a perimeter game. He can/will continue to improve as a passer. He has the tools to be a better defender. Randle used the term “adversity” several times Tuesday. He wasn’t referring to injuries or illness. He meant the team’s nine regular-season losses before UK’s deep post-season run. He meant the scrutiny and criticism that came when the team wasn’t living up to the excessive expectations. “We know he still has some growing to do,” Carolyn Kyles said. “He’s just 19 years old and he’s going to be playing with grown men.” We’ll witness the growth from afar. We’ll read the box scores. We’ll scan the web for feature stories. It won’t be the same. For one thing, replacements are on the way. Always. Calipari’s tremendous success with the “succeed-and-

proceed” business model has relied on his amazing ability to refill the coffers. Recruiting rules college basketball. Tuesday highlight: Randle himself said next year’s UK team will be “amazing.” And yet, last summer especially, many UK diehards admitted one-anddone fatigue. They missed a longer-term connection with the players. They yearned for the days when relearning the roster was not an annual fan requirement. Much of that sentiment continued into this past season when matters were wobbling. Tournament success erased much of that, but I’m not sure it erased it all. Good news: Change is coming. New NBA commissioner Adam Silver wants to raise the NBA age limit. That requires approval of the NBA Players Association. ESPN’s Brian Windhorst reports sources inside the players union say they favor the Major League Baseball model _ one Calipari doesn’t support _ in which

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We’re all for Julius Randle and the previous 11 living their dreams, after all. We just wish they were required to delay them a bit longer.

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players can be drafted out of high school. Those who opt for college must remain in school at least two years. That seems both fair and preferable to the current system.

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7B | Friday, April 25, 2014 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Vernon Bryant | Dallas Morning News | MCT Kentucky Wildcats head coach John Calipari calls to players during the first half as the Kentucky Wildcats faced the Connecticut Huskies in the NCAA Final Four championship game at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, Monday, April 7, 2014.

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April 25, 2014