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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Check out the women’s basketball preview for the upcoming season, 1B

Central Michigan University

| Monday, Nov. 7, 2011

Murder mystery dinner raises money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital, 3A

[cm-life.com]

CMU, FA have fewer than four weeks to bargain By Jake Bolitho Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan University administration and Faculty Association have fewer than 20 business days to bargain after the issuance of fact-finding results last week. If no deal is reached within that time frame, it could mean another FA job action in late November. However, labor law experts say such a

scenario is unlikely. “It’s reasonable to say that a well-researched factfinding report will very likely have an impact on thoughtful people,” said Robert McCormick, a labor law professor at the Michigan State University College of Law. “You can’t predict it, but I think thoughtful people will say, ‘I may disagree, but will go forward with the fact-finder’s recommendation.’”

Appointed state fact-finder Barry Goldman issued a report Tuesday favoring CMU’s administration on the economic issues of salary and benefits. However, he sided with the FA on the issue of retirement and promotion increments. Both sides returned to the bargaining table on Friday for seven and half hours with no significant progress made. FA President Laura Frey said

there will be another negotiation session this week. McCormick pointed to a similar situation with Eastern Michigan University’s faculty in 2006 when a state fact-finder was brought in to make recommendations in response to a faculty strike. He said the final report from the fact-finder proved influential in helping the two sides reach an agreement in the weeks following its release.

CMU would also have the option of imposing a contract on the faculty if the two sides remain at a standstill, according to law experts. However, the Public Employee Relations Act does not define a set amount of days after fact-finding in which a unit of government can do so. Rather, it varies from employer to employer. A fa | 2a

[INSIDE] w Health educator to discuss substance use, 4A w Group gives to Mount Pleasant’s in-need, 5A w Football loses in last minute field goal miss, 1B

SGA, Charles V. Park Library agree on extended hours By Logan Patmon Staff Reporter

The Charles V. Park Library will further open its extended study room hours from 2 to 3 a.m. beginning next semester. The change is the result of talks between Vince Cavataio, a Shelby Township senior and Student Government Association President, and University Libraries Dean Thomas Moore. “If students are continuously using the extended study until 3 a.m., the library staff is willing to keep it open until 4 a.m.,” Cavataio said.

The library is also planning to keep the first floor open on a trial bases. “In February, we will keep the first floor open and it will have hours similar to that of the extended study room,” Moore said. ‘This will open up around an additional 130 seats and almost 20 computers.” The first floor trial would keep the entire first floor, including the Baber Room, open later Sunday through Thursday. Students have mixed feelings about the extension of the library’s hours. A hours | 2a

photos by bethany walter/staff photographer

Ypsilanti sophomore Sean Houston pets Vampire during the Doggie Dash put on by the CMU Pre-Veterinary club Saturday morning near Wesley Church. “I’m here helping my twin sister, but I love dogs as well,” Houston said.

a c a d e m i c p r i o r i t i z at i o n

woof! (there it is)

Health professions has least number of program ratings

Pre-Vet Club hosts Doggie Dash, raises money for HATS, conference By Danielle Cywka | Staff Reporter

By Mike Nichols Senior Reporter

The Pre-Veterinary Club finally answered the age-old question Saturday of who let the dogs out. The club hosted the Doggie Dash, which gave students and community members an opportunity to pay a small fee to walk shelter dogs on campus. About 35 people attended the event, raising about $200. Club Vice President Emily Denryter, a St. Clair Shores senior, said she was pleased with the turnout. “We’ve had quite a few people come out and walk dogs, and then donate as well,” she said. “Everyone looks really happy after they’re done and I think a lot of students miss their dogs and are excited to be able to play with the dogs.” Escanaba freshman Heather Beaudoin said it was missing her dog at home that motivated her to attend. “I miss and love my dog so much and I saw the sign and immediately came in here,” she said. Jackson freshman Alyssa Ehlmann said she enjoyed attending because she has also been away from her dog.

Editors note: This is the fourth story in a series about Academic Prioritization.

Ypsilanti sophomore Samantha Houston waves a sign to bring attention to the Doggie Dash put on by the CMU Pre-Vet club Saturday morning at the corner of Wa s h i n g to n and Preston Street by Wesley Church. “Come play with the dogs at Wesley! They will love you!” Houston yelled as she waved the sign.

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The Academic Prioritization report has recommended four programs be eliminated from the College of Health Professions. The college had a total of 31 programs rated — the least of any colleges except the incomplete College of Medicine. Five programs were ranked Priority 1, six programs in Priority 2, seven programs in Priority 3, eight programs in Priority 4 and five programs in Priority 5. Every Health Professions program in Priority 5 is recommended for elimination, with one exception: on-campus Physical Education, Athletic Administration (MA).

Provost Gary Shapiro wrote in his comments on the report he recommends moving the program to the College of Education and Human Services, combined with an MA in teaching and coaching. He said the nutrition and dietetics graduate program, ranked in Priority 2 in CEHS, is recommended to be moved to HP. “Why did we do this? Is it to save money? No,” Shapiro said at the prioritization forum Oct. 31. “I’m assuming every dollar we save will go to our highest priority programs.” However, not everyone agreed programs should be cut. “I don’t think any major should be eliminated,” said Canton junior Jason Oldani.

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Turkey Trot brings friends, families together By Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

Twelve year-old Marcus Jackson chased his sisters around Deerfield County Park on Sunday afternoon while warming up for the big race ahead of them. “I’ll try to do my best,” the Mount Pleasant resident said. He joined his sisters and foster parents for the 37th annual Turkey Trot 6K Trail Run sponsored by the Mount Pleasant Striders Running Club.

Mount Pleasant resident Rob McConnell said he and his wife run a non-profit foster home where children come voluntarily. His four daughters and foster child are all members of Striders. “Some (of the children) like to do it because they like to run, some like to do it because the other kids do it,” McConnell said. Striders President Kennen White said the race is an excuse to run and have fun for the runners, who ranged in age from 9 to 80 years old.

“About 40 to 50 people run the four-mile loop on the trails,” he said. “After the race we have a cookout with hot dogs for everyone.” Striders Treasurer Mike Georgia said there is an overall male winner and overall female. “Each winner gets a can of turkey Spam,” he said. “Every participant gets a little turkey statue as a premium.” Recreation Parks and Leisure Services Professor Patty Janes said the turkey statues are a badge of honor in her

household. “I love the opportunity to run with my children, it is the highlight of my running life,” she said. “This is our second year doing the run and we have statues from past years at home.” As the runners headed off onto the trail when the clock struck three, Janes made a special dart back. “This is our favorite place to run,” she said as she started the race. metro@cm-life.com

Chuck Miller/staff photographer

The McConnell family, front, and other contestants begin the Turkey Trot Sunday afternoon at Deerfield Park, 2425 W. Remus Road.

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

Native American Heritage Month NOVEMBER 2011

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Tatanka Means Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Plachta Auditorium • Warriner Hall • 7:00 p.m.


2A || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || Central Michigan life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY w The Mount Pleasant Housing Fair will take place from 3 to 6 p.m. in the Bovee University Center’s Rotunda. w A weekly meeting for Students for Life will be held from 9 to 10 p.m. in Anspach Hall, room 157.

TUESDAY w Just Talk: Relationship Panel and Discussion will be presented from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Charles V. Park Library Auditorium. w Take Back the Tap presents FLOW: For Love of Water will be held at 7 p.m. in the Bovee University Center’s Lake Superior Room. w Michael Blake presents Equality Without Documents from 7 to 9 p.m. in Anspach Hall, room 155. w A Tuba & Euphonium Ensemble will be presented from 8 to 9 p.m. at the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2011 Volume 93, Number 34

HoUrS | CONTINUED FROM 1A

“It’s about time the library extended its hours,” said Warren sophomore Kenneth Cordry. “I feel as if they should be open 24/7 like other universities, especially during finals week.” Detroit sophomore Nieya Gaston said she didn’t think

Fa | CONTINUED FROM 1A

Steve Smith, director of public relations, did not have a timeline for the case of CMU. “It remains the university’s intent to reach an agreement that is fair and equitable to both parties through collective bargaining, using the fact-finder’s report as a basis for future negotiations,” he said. Frey has said the faculty would consider voting on another job action if such a move were to take place. The previously voted for job action was a work stoppage that lasted for part of the first day of fall semester classes, before administrators gained an Isabella County court injunction to return professors to the classroom.

HatS | CONTINUED FROM 1A

“I miss my dog, but now I’m in such a better mood,” she said. “It was so much fun, and the dogs are so cute.” Club President and Holland junior Angela Miedema explained the idea behind the dog walk. “We usually do a dog wash in the spring, but we wanted something we could do in colder temperatures as well,” she said. It cost $3 to walk a dog for 15 minutes and $5 for 30 minutes. The money collectthe change would make a big difference. “Most people I know just use the computer labs where they live at because they are open 24 hours,” she said. Detroit senior Elizza LeJeune, who works at the library, said most students are unlikely to take advantage of the new hours because they don’t study outside of exam weeks. “The issue with keeping

“The agreement signed by Judge (Paul) Chamberlain is in effect until 20 business days after the issuance of the fact-finding report,” Frey said. “I am hopeful that the administration will show its concern for students by bargaining in good faith with the FA bargaining team.” McCormick said one major benefit of fact-finding is that the results are made public. Opening up both positions tends to speed up the process as both sides feel more pressure to get a deal done. The fact-finder’s recommendations are significant, but not final, he said. “It has the ability to persuade the public that the findings are correct,” McCormick said. “I would assume that the influence is there.”

ViCtoria ZeGler/staff photographer

Milford junior Carrie Pitzer, left, St. Clair Shores sophomores John Schaeffer and Nathan Zinzi play a free show Sunday evening outside the Charles V. Park Library. The members of Moses began experimenting last spring with acoustics which has transitioned into a eclectic mix of experimental folk rock.

ed went toward funding the Pre-Veterinary Club’s trip to the national symposium in the spring, a pre-veterinary conference where students can learn more about the profession. Any donations made went directly to the Humane Animal Treatment Society, 1105 S. Isabella Road, and the group held a raffle from Quilts to the Rescue, an organization that helps to pay for dogs’ large veterinary bills. All of the dogs that were available to walk can be adopted from the Humane Animal Treatment Society.

Hp |

studentlife@cm-life.com

the library or the extended hours study room open all the time is where the money is going to come from. We have to think of how best can we serve the largest amount of students,” Moore said. “The funding to keep the extended study room open is coming from the library student salary budget.” studentlife@cm-life.com

THOUSANDS GATHER OUTSIDE WHITE HOUSE TO PROTEST PLANNED OIL PIPELINE WASHINGTON D.C. — Thousands of protesters encircled the White House Sunday in a show of numbers intended to persuade President Barack Obama to stop a proposed oil pipeline from being built. The Keystone XL pipeline would stretch 1,661 miles from Alberta, Canada, to Texas’ Gulf Coast, and requires presidential approval because it crosses the U.S.Canada border. Environmentalists say the project is a key test of Obama’s environmental credentials. Protesters first heard from prominent environmentalists, a preacher, a Nobel laure-

ate, and a movie star, and then gathered to hold hands in a ring that stretched in front of the White House and several blocks down sidestreets before joining behind the White House lawn. Organizers estimated that the crowd exceeded 10,000 people. “You can’t occupy the White House, but you can surround it,” said environmentalist and protest organizer Bill McKibben, in a reference to the Occupy Wall Street movement. With the failure of climate change legislation on Capitol Hill last year, environmentalists have made stopping the Keystone pipeline their major focus in recent months. They want the president to reject the pipeline because

PHOTO OF THE DAY

university@cm-life.com

IN THE NEWS By Daniel Lippman McClatchy Newspapers

cm-life.com/category/news

[NEWS]

of the risks of spills and what they say is the likely impact on global warming from tapping Canada’s oil sands. The thick crude from the oil sands produces more heat-trapping carbon-dioxide emissions than regular oil because of the extra energy required to extract and process it. “That is the second biggest pool of carbon on the planet. If the U.S. government goes ahead and makes it easier to develop that oil-sands project, then there is no credible way to insist that they’re working hard on climate change,” McKibben said. Many people waved blue signs quoting Obama from 2007: “Let’s be the generation that finally frees America from the tyranny of oil.”

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“It should be your choice.” Oldani is majoring in health administration. His program was ranked as a Priority 2. “Solid program; needs to be proactive in enrollment management consistent with a doctoral program, improvements in research needed,” Shapiro said. Oldani agreed overall with Shapiro’s comments, but feels more is still needed to develop the program. “I think it is a pretty solid program,” he said. “I just wish there was more to it. There’s a lot of students, but not a lot of classes for the students to take.” Oldani said eliminating programs runs a risk of hurting the university in the long run. About one-third of CMU academic programs are ranked in the report to either receive less support or be targeted for elimination. Steve Smith, director of public relations, said the input given before the finalized report could change the results of the prioritization. Shapiro turns his finalized report to University

Low-Rated HP programs Health Sciences (HSC): Exercise Science Minor - BA, BAA, BS - Undergrad standalone minor - 4 School Health Education Major - BS in Ed. - Undergrad major 4 University Program Courses - on campus (HSC 106) - UP - 4 Allied Health Minor - off campus - BAA, BS - Undergrad standalone minor - 5 Allied Health Minor - off campus - BAA, BS - Undergrad standalone minor - 5 Health Promotion and Program Management - MA - 5 Physical Education and Sport (PES): Athletic Coaching Minor - BA, BAA, BS - Unergrad standalone minor - 4 Physical Education Major K-12 Certification - BS in Ed. - Undergrad major - 4 Physical Education, Physical Ed: Coaching - MA - 4 Physical Education, Physical Ed: Teaching - MA - 4 Special Physical Education Minor - BS in Ed. - Undergrad standalone minor - 4 Physical Education Major - nonteaching - BA, BS - Undergrad major - 5 Physical Education, Athletic Administration - MA - 5 *Priority 4: Retained but at a lower level of support. *Priority 5: Candidate for reduction, phase out or consolidation with another program. President George Ross in December. Until then, anyone unhappy with the report can make their voice be heard to Shapiro or their dean. “It’s a basis to start on final-

ization, but there’s another level of input to take place before everything is finalized,” Smith said. university@cm-life.com

Native American Heritage Month NOVEMBER 2011

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Tatanka Means

Tuesday, November 8th Plachta Auditorium Warriner Hall • 7:00 p.m.

Tatanka is an actor, stand-up comedian and motivational speaker from Chinle, Arizona. Means represents the Oglala Lakota, Omaha and Navajo Nations. Tatanka also holds more than six championship titles as a boxer. Most recently Means has been cast to take in a leading role in the feature film, Tiger Eyes. His accomplishments include playing roles such as Oglala Lakota Chief Crazy Horse in the TNT series Into the West, a part in the Disney ABC series Scoundrels, the horror thriller The Burrowers and working with award winning director, Chris Eyre on We Shall Remain.

FEATURED DOCUMENTARIES: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Reel Injun

We Shall Remain

*Approx. 85 min.

*Approx. 90 min.

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

reelinjunthemovie.com

November 2, 2011

After the Mayflower

November 22, 2011

UC Auditorium, Bovee UC UC Auditorium, Bovee UC 12:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4th Annual Environmental Awareness Day

Soup & Substance

Soup & Substance

SPEAKER: Joaquin Guerrero Michigan & Rookie Guardians of the Night

NAISO sponsored event to clean up the CMU campus. Tuesday, November 1, 2011 Center for Inclusion & Diversity, Bovee UC • 12:00 p.m. Dee Ann Sherwood, Lies My TV Told Me - American Indians, Myths, and Truths Thursday, November 3, 2011 Terrace Rooms, Bovee UC • 12:00 p.m.

Artist-In-Residence: Beadwork with Katrina Mitten Instruction on traditional and contemporary beading techniques. November 14-19, 2011 Ziibiwing Center • 5:30 p.m. Register at www.sagchip.org/ziibiwing Cost: $35.00 Contact: 775-4750

Native American Heritage Month Food Taster

A chance to taste traditional and contemporary Native American Foods Monday, November 14, 2011 Rotunda, Bovee UC • 5:00 p.m. $3 Students $5 General Public

John Fierst, The Captivity and Adventures of John Tanner: Editing an Anishinaabe Text Monday, November 21, 2011 Terrace Rooms, Bovee UC • 12:00 p.m.

Retired K-9 Division, Saginaw, MI Assisted in Operation 9/11 Monday, November 21, 2011 Rotunda, Bovee UC • 6:00 p.m.

Tobacco Teachings

Learn about the uses of tobacco in Anishinaabe culture and make a tobacco pouch. Wednesday, November 30, 2011 Center for Inclusion & Diversity, Bovee UC • 5:00 p.m.

SPONSORS: Office of Native American Programs, North American Indigenous Student Organization, Office for Institutional Diversity, College of Fine Communication and Fine Arts, Program Board, Student Budget Allocation Committee, Office of Diversity Education, Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, College of Humanities, Social, and Behavioral Sciences,Residence Life, College of Communications and Fine Arts, Multicultural Academic Student Services

CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity and provide equal opportunity within its community. For more information, or for individuals with disabilities requiring accommodations, please contact the Office of Native American Programs at 989-774-2508 at least two business days prior to the event.


3A

INSIDE LIFE Monday, Nov. 7, 2011

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Theresa Clift, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Half of comparable universities do not have faculty unions By Annie Harrison Senior Reporter

photos by charlotte bodak/staff photographer

Marshall senior Josh Lord discusses who he thinks committed the murder with Ferris State senior Adam Thrush during the end of the Lights, Camera, Murder Mystery Dinner on Saturday night at the Comfort Inn, 2424 S. Mission St.

mind over murder Mystery dinner raises money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital

By Catey Traylor | Staff Reporter

Zeta Theta Pi hosted an evening of schmoozing, secrecy and scandals on Saturday at the Comfort Inn, 2424 S. Mission St. The Hollywood-themed murder mystery dinner served as one of three events hosted by the sorority throughout the year in support of their philanthropy, St. Jude Children’s Hospital. About 70 people came dressed to theme, and each guest received a role to play throughout the evening. The dinner raised more than $1,400. “I absolutely love dressing up, and it sounded like a lot of fun,” said Detroit graduate student Jessica Matyas. “I ended up playing a lead role as an investigator and had a lot of fun with it.” When dinner began at 6:15 p.m., the plot of the mystery was explained. The story featured an actress found dead after being cast in a lead role of a movie. Her rivals and the casting director were the main suspects. At 7:30 p.m, the lights went out, a scream was heard and the actress was dead. The guests used various clues to determine who her assailant was. “Everybody had a lot of fun using clues and uncovering new details,” said Grand Rapids junior Kalee Stegehuis. “We gave out fake money so people could bribe one another to get more information. It was a giant race to solve the mystery first.” “We’ve supported St. Jude since 2007,” Stegehuis said. “All of the money we raise tonight will go to the hos-

pital. It’s for a really good cause and a lot of people are involved.” Throughout the night, raffle tickets were sold and prizes including gift cards to Celebration Cinema, 4935 E, Pickard St., Papa John’s Pizza coupons, 1504 S. Mission St., and gift baskets were given away. “From raffle tickets alone we made $124 for St. Jude,” said sorority sister Katie Kallenbach. “It’s nice to give back to our philanthropy.” At the end of the night, participants guessed who the killer was and had the opportunity to vote for best dressed, best hair, best actor and actress, and funniest character. Winners of each category received a Zeta Theta Pi “Emmy” award. Kallenbach was one of two who offered to run the

The university bargaining team presented a list of tenure salaries at 10 universities it deemed comparable during fact-finding hearings to aid the contract stalemate between Central Michigan University and the Faculty Association. CMU’s comparable universities vary in the status of their faculty contracts, enrollment and studentfaculty ratios. Half of these universities do not have unionized tenure-track faculty. The FA is still in negotiations with CMU after its contract expired June 30. Fact-finder Barry Goldman released his nonbinding recommendation Monday, favoring CMU in economic issues of salary and benefits. Kent State University is in negotiations to approve a contract for their tenuretrack faculty, said Thomas Neumann, KSU’s associate vice president of University Communications and Marketing. Faculty at Bowling Green State University voted last year to unionize, and the university is now in contract negotiations, said David Kielmeyer, senior

communications director at BGSU. The tenure-track faculty contract at Ball State University is renewed every summer, said Joan Todd, executive director of Public Relations at BSU. Eastern Michigan University’s two-year tenuretrack faculty contract expires in summer 2012, said Geoff Larcom, executive director of Media Relations at EMU. Western Michigan University approved a threeyear contract for its tenure-track faculty in May that does not expire until spring 2014, said Cheryl Roland, WMU’s executive director of University relations. WMU is the only comparable university that is developing a medical school. Faculty at Illinois State University, James Madison University, Miami University, Middle Tennessee State University and University of Louisiana at Lafayette are not unionized. Virginia, Tennessee and Louisiana are Right to Work states. Wage increase comparisons vary from university to university and from year to year. Some wage comparisons are increased by

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human rights month

Philosopher to visit, discuss arguments on immigration Marshall senior Josh Lord fills out a card with whom he thinks committed the murder during the Lights, Camera, Murder Mystery Dinner.

“We’ve never done a murder mystery before. It was hectic at times, but it went really well, considering we were new to it and if we were to do it again, we’d know what we were getting ourselves into.” Katie Kallenbach, Freemont junior

dinner that night so their sisters could be in the event. “We’ve never done a murder mystery before. It was hectic at times, but it went really well, considering we were new to it and if we were to do it again, we’d know what we were getting ourselves into,” the Freemont junior said.

The event got a good response from those in attendance. “It was a lot of fun and for a good cause,” said Grandville senior Charlie Timm. “I had a great time and would definitely come back again.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Speaker will appear in Anspach Monday, Tuesday By Ben Harris Senior Reporter

Popular arguments concerning policy toward illegal immigrants will be challenged on Monday and Tuesday night by visiting speaker Michael Blake. As an associate professor in the University of Washington’s philosophy and public affairs department, Blake has done research on dissecting arguments for the obligations of countries to support immigrants and refugees. Blake will speak at two events. The first is a philosophy colloquium, Immigration, Causation and Complicity, running from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday in Anspach 155. The second event, Equality Without Documents, will run from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday also in Anspach 155. “The area of immigra-

tion is an area not paid a great deal of attention to in philosophy, and Blake is focusing on some pretty important topics and ones that are in need of some careful thinking,” said Andrew Blom, an assistant professor of philosophy and religion. Blake’s visit is part of a series of events hosted by the Center for Professional and Personal Ethics for November as Human Rights Month. Blom said the Monday night event will be a colloquium focusing on two questions. The first will address the argument that countries that displace people by ways such as military action have an obligation to harbor them as refugees. The second is whether countries that accept the luxury of cheap goods because of the labor of illegal, undocumented immigrants have have an obligation to let them stay in the country. “By looking at why it A Philosopher | 5A

Annual Issue Day, RSO Fair hosts about 20 student groups By David Oltean Senior Reporter

Students from nearly 20 student groups spoke with passion about social, political and environmental issues Saturday morning in Powers Hall. The 11th Annual Issue Day, sponsored by The Mary Ellen Brandell Volunteer Center, was held to give Central Michigan University student organizations and faculty the opportunity to present on current issues or showcase their cause in the Registered Student Organization Fair. The event consisted of three presentations where 18 different topics were addressed, ranging from America’s involvement in Iraq to prescrip-

tion drug abuse to Autism awareness. A student organization fair was held throughout the day, where students were given the opportunity to become involved with the student groups in attendance and learn more about the causes. Detroit senior Adam Lawrence represented his organization, CMU Society of the United Nations, at Issue Day. Lawrence also gave a presentation with other members of his organization about Palestine’s bid to become the 194th member of the United Nations. “We help draft, organize and create legislation as if we were UN delegates,” Lawrence said. “Last semester, we won

in our first award since 1994 when this was started. It’s very important that we keep the tradition alive.” Illinois junior Taylor Galmarini, the special events coordinator for the volunteer center, helped to plan the event and find passionate speakers that she felt could deliver impacting presentations. “I was so excited to have so many RSOs involved this year,” Galmarini said. “Not only are the students enthusiastic about the subject, but they all seem so well-educated and passionate about their causes.” Detroit sophomore Vincent Thurman attended Issue Day to represent his student organization, Comfort Zone. Thur-

man said Comfort Zone aims to challenge students to talk about and accept each other’s differences. “(Comfort Zone) is a social development group that hopes to get people to learn to interact on a deeper level and see differences as a way to bring us together rather than separate us,” he said. Thurman said that Issue Day was great to showcase his student group, as well as a wide variety of others. “There are political groups, groups concentrating on social issues, Greek life, philanthropic groups and more, so the goals are very diverse,” he said. studentlife@cm-life.com

brooke mayle/staff photographer

Students raise their hands and dace at Project Dance during Issue Day Saturday in Powers Hall.


4A || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || central Michigan Life

Health educator to discuss substance abuse, safety CMU alumnus will speak at UC auditorium By Ben Harris Senior Reporter

Matt Vogel said when it comes to substance abuse, he isn’t interested in preaching to anyone. The Central Michigan University alumnus who works as a health educator at Southern Oregon University will present from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in the Bovee University Center Auditorium. “I try to be very pragmatic. I don’t believe in a lot of the preaching and fingerwagging that we’ve done to college kids about substance abuse,” Vogel said. “I try to be really honest about it, talk about it openly, have frank discussions and give honest information. That allows students to have conversations they don’t normally have.” Vogel said most conversations students have with authority figures about substance use are one-sided and are focused wanting students to not use at all. “Regarding substance use, when we’re overly condoning and/or overly condemning, it leaves

young people at risk,” Vogel said. Program Board Vice President Miranda Endres said Vogel’s presentation will not be the prohibitioncentered talk students are used to. She said he talks more about how and why substances are used. “People might get turned off at the fact that they think the lecture is about drugs and alcohol, but that’s not what his program is about,” the New Baltimore junior said. “We’re trying to spin the part of it that it’s more like awareness and not prohibition.” Endres said Vogel, being a CMU alumnus, was helpful because he is knowledgeable about the area and culture of Mount Pleasant. “He’s all about how you use and why you use,” Endres said. “He’s not going to teach you how to do heroin, but he wants people to be more responsible.” Vogel said he would love to see a full house on Tuesday because students have good things to say about his lectures. “I definitely feel that I consistently get positive feedback from students,” Vogel said. “I feel that in a lot of ways they’re craving this kind of discussion.” studentlife@cm-life.com

“I try to be very pragmatic. I don’t believe in a lot of the preaching and finger-wagging that we’ve done to college kids about substance abuse.” Matt Vogel, alumnus

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

unions | CONTINUED FROM 3A

percentages of the base salary, while others are increased by lump sums. CMU enrollment and student-faculty ratio fall in the middle range of its comparable universities. The universities with the highest student enrollments on the main campus are KSU

with 26,938 students in fall 2011, and MTSU with 26,430 students in fall 2010. EMU has 23,341 students for the fall 2011 semester, followed by WMU with 23,096 students in fall 2010. BSU has about 22,000 students, while ISU has 21,080 students in fall 2011. CMU reported 21,220 students on the main campus in fall 2011. JMU has about 19,600 students, followed by BGSU

phiLosopher | CONTINUED FROM 3A

doesn’t hold up we can figure out how to make the argument a little bit stronger even if it means narrowing the argument a little bit,” Blom said. The Tuesday presentation will address the concept of justice for illegal

immigrants. The argument is that if a country deports someone after they have established roots and connections in a society, it is against their human rights. “It’s not an issue of injustice. Even if we don’t have an obligation to let these

with 17,582 students in the fall 2011 semester. The comparable universities with the lowest student enrollments are University of Louisiana at Lafayette with 16,885 students and Miami with 16,731 students in the fall 2011 semester. According to official university websites and U.S. News and World Report, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has the highest student-faculty ratio of the

comparable universities with 23:1. CMU and MTSU have a 21:1 student-faculty ratio, while BGSU and KSU have a 20:1 student-faculty ratio. WMU and ISU both have 19:1 student-faculty ratios, while EMU and BSU have 18:1 student-faculty ratios. The lowest student-faculty ratios of the comparable universities belong to Miami with 17:1 and JMU with 16:1.

people stay, we actually have a very strong moral reason to do so,” Blake said. “It’s a separate moral category of the indecents. “When someone needs your help and it’s painless for you to help them, you are morally a bad person if you don’t help them, and that shows why we can let some people stay even if they enter without rights.” Blake said he has been in this field of study for about 15

years. He has training in political philosophy with a little bit of a legal background. He became interested in the study of immigration after immigrating from Canada. “I think that what Blake has to say is likely to challenge one’s thinking in a variety of ways no matter where one stands on the political spectrum with respect to immigration,” Blom said.

CAMPUS CASH!

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Central Michigan Life || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || 5A

[News]

Yusef Shakur to deliver speech in EHS Building tonight at 7 Former prisoner tells story of his life, lessons By David Oltean Senior Reporter

charlotte bodak/staff photographer

Fremont junior Katie Kallenbach and Midland sophomore Kendra Engwis hand out breakfast bars at the food pantry Saturday afternoon during Community Day at the Mount Pleasant Community Church, 1400 W. Broomfield St.

Community Days gives back to Mount Pleasant’s in-need By Jordan Oster Staff Reporter

Those looking for a helping hand found many reaching out to them on Saturday. Community Compassion Network donated food to families in need during starting at 8 a.m. Community Days at Mount Pleasant Community Church, 1400 W. Broomfield Road. “It’s an opportunity for us to reach out to the community and to show them love,” said Community Compassion Network Director Brad Stutzman, who got involved with Community Days three years ago as a volunteer and is now in charge of organizing the event. The event featured activities at the church and throughout the community. Activities held at the church included a free pancake breakfast, bingo and free haircuts and manicures. Children’s activities included cookie decorating and Christmas gifts for children to wrap

for their parents. The most emphasis was placed on the food distribution — the event’s main purpose. “Every family that comes through here today will get roughly 50 to 60 pounds of food, which includes produce, baked goods, meats, cans of soup, vegetables and more,” Stutzman said. Groups of Central Michigan University volunteers passed out food for families, raking leaves around the community, chopped wood to help families heat their homes and winterized homes in Mount Pleasant’s mobile home park. Students from the physical therapy school also offered blood pressure checks. “We can’t tell CMU and its students thank you enough for the fundraising efforts and the partnership and the volunteer hours,” Stutzman said. “It’s incredible.” Canton senior Sarah Glunt volunteered with her sorority Zeta Theta Pi. The sorority is a CMU local service sorority

that helps with mobile food drives in Mount Pleasant. “My favorite part of Community Days is getting to know the people in the community and just being able to make their day and see the smile on their face,” Glunt said. CMU Honors Program is Community Compassion Network’s second-largest donor. Grosse Ile junior and Honors mentor Zack Kowalski said participating in Community Days was part of their yearly philanthropy project. “We are coming here to help support the community,” he said. “We did fundraising events and now the students get to see what kinds of things they’ve done and what their money is going to.” Stutzman said the event was about giving back to Mount Pleasant. “We don’t want to be the best church in the community, we want to be the best church for the community,” Stutzman said.

Motivational speaker Yusef Shakur wasn’t always the positive role model he aims to be today. Shakur, who used to be involved in a Detroit gang and served nine years in prison, will speak at Central Michigan University tonight in the Education and Human Services Building’s room 118. Shakur, a former Jackson State Prison inmate, has since dedicated his life to positive change and educating youth about his wrongs in the past. The speech will begin at 7 p.m. and is free to attend. Shakur transformed his life after his stint in prison,

where he met his father for the first time behind bars. Shakur is now an author, business-owner and activist who hopes to make a positive impact in his former neighborhood and on youth throughout the nation. Professor of sociology David Kinney helped to plan Shakur’s presentation at CMU and had the opportunity to meet him when he spoke at Oasis Alternative High School, 3350 S. Isabella Road, last year. Kinney believes Shakur can deliver an inspiring message to CMU students by speaking about his past hardships and experiences. “(Shakur) has been through a great deal of adversity and has overcome a lot of difficult situations in his life,” Kinney said. “Now, it’s all about positive social change for him and he tries to inspire young people by speaking about his experiences.” Mount Pleasant resident

Marsha Biggs, a former teacher at Oasis Alternative High School, has met Shakur multiple times and helped to coordinate his speech at the school last winter. “When he spoke, he talked about his time on the streets of Detroit and his transformation in prison,” Biggs said. “He’s a changed person today.” Biggs said she thought Shakur had an interesting method to delivering his speech. Rather than instructing young people what to do, Biggs said Shakur speaks about his past and lets the students make judgments for themselves. “I think it was different than your average speech,” Biggs said. “He didn’t tell them what to do or not to do. He just spoke about his experiences and let the students ask questions.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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s p o r t s m a n a g e m e n t a s s o c i at i o n

Students will shoot baskets in a 3-on-3 tournament Nov. 13 to support a conference for sports careers. Students in physical education and sport instructor Scott Hirko’s PES 550: Sport Fundraising class are hosting Shooting for Success. The basketball tournament will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Student Activity Center. The goal of the fundraiser is to fund the Sport Management Association’s second Professional Development Conference, which Nathan Kopp described as being “aimed at students who wish to have a career in sports.”

Kopp is the assistant director at the Center for Global Sport Leadership at Central Michigan University. “There are no other events like the Professional Development Conference at CMU,” Kopp said. “Many other premiere sports management programs across the country host similar events. The conference was something I created last year because I felt like there was a need and it would advance our program tremendously.” Oxford senior Nicole Laidlaw, one of the PES 550 students, said the conference is a way for students to learn from professionals in the industry and network with them. The sales pitch created by the students, provided

by Hirko, states supporting the fundraiser “will help with the conference by also welcoming guests from the sports industry to share their knowledge and experiences.” As for the fundraiser itself, the tournament consists of all-male and allfemale teams. These teams are separated by divisions based on age groups. The age groups are middle school, high school, college students and community members. The games will be double elimination, and there will also be raffles to win great prizes. Registration for the event is currently open. Check-in begins at 8:45 a.m. and the games begin at 10 a.m. stud entlife@cm-life.com

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Shoot for Success aims to finance professional development conferences


6A

VOICES Monday, Nov. 7 2011

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Theresa Clift, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Brad Canze, Staff Reporter

Emily Grove Metro Editor

No exceptions for bullying Bullying should be firmly discouraged and punished in all cases, but apparently Republicans in the state Senate would like to leave room for some exceptions to the rules. On Wednesday, the Michigan Senate approved legislation requiring all school districts to have anti-bullying policies. But while the bill should be prohibiting bullying in every instance, it instead leaves large loopholes telling bullies how to avoid punishment. According to an article in the Detroit Free Press, a last-minute addition to the bill states schools cannot make rules that “prohibit a statement of a sincerely held religious belief or moral conviction of a school employee, school volunteer, pupil or a pupil’s parent or guardian.” You want to torment someone and tell them they are going to hell for being gay? Sure, if that’s your religious belief, go right ahead. Do you have a strong moral conviction about how wrong it is to be fat? Feel free to make fun of the kids that are a little chunkier. Sound awful? Well it is. This is not even remotely OK. What are we doing here? Exceptions for religious beliefs? Where is the separation of church and state? And as far as moral convictions, I’m pretty sure anyone who voted in favor of this despicable excuse for “antibullying” law is lacking in the morals department. This is not “anti” anything. This is a pro-bullying law. Imagine a crying child in the principal’s office, sitting next to the kid who has been making their life miserable and all he has to say is, “I said that because the Bible told me so. Can I go now?” Unbelievable. Cloaking hate, intolerance and cruelty in expressions of religious and moral beliefs is deplorable. We should be encouraging kindness and compassion for all children, instead of allowing bullies to get away with bullying if their reasons pass the test. This bill, which now moves on to the state House, is known as “Matt’s Safe School Law.” It’s named after Matt Epling, a 14-year-old boy who killed himself in 2002 after being harassed by anti-gay bullies. His father has been working with Michigan lawmakers for years to establish antibullying legislation, and this is what he gets? I’d ask all who voted in favor of this bill to be required to explain their rationale to the children facing misery in school each day, telling them why a bully is not being punished for their statements of “religious or moral” beliefs. Or better yet, explain to grieving parents why their dead child’s tormentors were allowed to spew vicious, hurtful remarks with no consequences. I’m sure they’ll be so thankful for this new law.

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805 Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cmlife.com in the order they are received.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

EDITORIAL | Unanswered questions remain surrounding CMED

Divided destiny

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.” Abraham Lincoln, and Mark the Apostle before him, may not have been thinking of Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine when they said the famous phrase, but their words ring clear in the predicament surrounding its development. As reported in Friday’s edition of Central Michigan Life, none of the other several Michigan universities developing medical schools have encountered even a fraction of the opposition CMU has from faculty and students. Does this mean we are simply unwilling to see the potential for financial and academic gain from the university, blinded by selfish desires for higher pay, lower tuition and more support for current programs? No. While it is not our intention to put words in the mouth of CMU’s administration, this seems to be its general response to the mounting opposition to CMED: “Look at the big picture.” “It serves a clear need in the community.” “It will be a money-maker.” The administration has to acknowledge the concerns of its students and its faculty, two essential elements the university

cannot exist without. One of Academic Senate’s biggest issues with CMED as it stands was represented by Phil Squattrito, former A-Senate Chairman and current chemistry professor, on Tuesday. “At the heart of this motion is to get the university to be more forthcoming on the medical school,” he said. Senators took issue with a lack of detail and transparency on the costs of CMED. These problems are coming from an administration which refuses to be forthcoming with CMED information while the president vows to fight for transparency. “We must also acknowledge the challenges of access to students, affordability in terms of controlling costs and tuition, ensuring a strong foundation of quality in all that we do, and accountability — being accountable and responsible through transparency in our role as educators,” University President George Ross said in a statement to the university published in CM Life on Oct. 26. While it’s well and good to say the university is committed to being transparent, actions speak louder than words, and A-Senate has a very good point against CMED and the administration.

Furthermore, it is clear the administration has not convinced our alumni of the importance of the venture, as CMED is, of last mention, somewhere around the halfway point of its $25-million fundraising goal, having remained stagnant there for months. Contrast this with the $100 million donation Western Michigan University received for its medical school in March, and the dichotomy of support for each initiative becomes eminently clear. CMED is an outlier in a set of universities happily progressing toward medical schools, and even if it does manage to reach accreditation and completion, it will never be more than an oversized — and empty — trophy case without the support of the students and faculty surrounding it. So if you do not support the College of Medicine, let your voice be heard while it can make a difference. If you are supportive of CMED, then you should speak up as well. Our current system of muffled criticism is finally coming to an end, and it’s time for opinions to be shared openly and honestly. The administration can only bury its head so deep in the sand before the crescendo of opposition reaches it.

KIM PATISHNOCK [CENTRAL SQUARE]

[LETTER TO THE EDITOR]

Decision making shrouded in mystery If there were ever any doubt about campus frustration over the disregard for shared governance by this Central Michigan University administration, the overwhelming Academic Senate vote on Nov. 1 to suspend further academic action involving the CMU College of Medicine ought to put that doubt to rest. However, there is also no doubt that the administration wants a medical school at any cost, despite the concerns expressed by students, faculty, department chairs, academic senators and even Central Michigan Life. Sadly, many students and faculty, including myself, also want a medical school-but not at any cost. We are frustrated by the process by which the medical school proposal was adopted and further frustrated with the fact that after almost three years, we still are not being told how this will be funded and what the real cost will be to the CMU learning environment for our students and faculty. In a university environment where a free exchange of ideas and information ought to flourish, we face a rush to judgment on a medical school decisionCentral Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

making process shrouded in mystery. On Nov. 13-16, a medical school accrediting team (LCME) will visit CMU to explore accrediting the proposed medical school. Examining the tentative schedule for the team, I see virtually no opportunity for students and non-CMED faculty to express their views on the proposed new college. Like every other aspect of this topdown decision-making process, the vast majority of the faculty and students will again be kept at arm’s length. The proposed new medical school will forever change CMU and we all will be in some way paying for this new medical school whether we support it or not. Therefore, I suggest in the interest of fairness and transparency that representatives of the CMU community as a whole (not just those with a vested interest in the proposed medical school) be given a meaningful role in this decision-making process. If the administration does not want to hear from those concerned about the ramifications of the proposed medical school, then those students and faculty Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

should take the opportunity to express their views to the LCME accrediting team. Accordingly, if you have strong views of support or concern regarding the proposed medical school and feel your views need to be heard, you can express them to the LCME accrediting team before they arrive next week for their campus visit. Their email address is: lcme@aamc.org. Both those deeply concerned about and those strongly supporting the proposed medical school want what is best for CMU. However, the CMU community cannot intelligently make such a determination without a free flow of information and dialogue. I would hope the administration would adjust the LCME visitation schedule to create a meaningful opportunity to dialogue with all parts of the CMU community and not just those with a vested interest in seeing the proposed medical school become a reality. If not, a flurry of emails to LCME will have to do. James P. Hill Department of Political Science

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Octavia Carson Staff Reporter

You can look but you can’t judge I cannot help but feel that there are tons of people who continue to judge others based on their appearance. As a young black woman on campus, I have received many comments that I do not appreciate. Why do people think because I am a woman I cannot play sports? When I go to the Student Activity Center to play basketball, I get tons of looks. Then when I ask to play a game with the guys, they look at me as if I am joking. Why do people think because I am black I like fried chicken with hot sauce? A friend asked me the other day why all black people like fried chicken. I told her that I do not know what every black person likes because we all live different lives. Why do people think because I am a freshman I cannot possibly be responsible, level-headed and involved with things on campus? People are shocked when I tell them that I am involved with community service on campus, I write for Central Michigan Life and I have not been to one party. Why do people judge? I wish I could say it does not hurt to be labeled as a stereotypical young black woman, and I wish I could say that it is easy to brush the comments away and forget about them. It does hurt and it is not easy to just forget about the comments. Although it is 2011 and we have a black president, prejudice continues to be an issue. Granted, as Americans, we have made much progress. We are more accepting and diverse than 48 years ago when Martin Luther King Jr. led his March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, but I worry that we have gotten comfortable with stereotyping others. I highly doubt there was a study done to show that the majority of black people eat fried chicken or the majority of freshman are irresponsible. I guess it would be too much to ask that everybody just forget about the stereotypes and start to learn more about an individual before they judge them. At the end of the day, we all live different lives and have different likes and dislikes. When people judge me I feel it takes away from their ability to see me as an individual. India Arie’s song ‘I am Not my Hair’ says it best: “I am not my hair, I am not my skin, I am not your expectation but I am a soul that lives within.”

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Theresa Clift, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lonnie Allen, Designers John Manzo, Sports Editor Matt Thompson, Assistant Sports Editor Jeff Smith, Photo Editor Andrew Kuhn, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Jackie Smith Online Coordinators Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


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VOLLEYBALL | Chippewas lose games against Ohio, EMU, 5B

SPORTS Central Michigan Life

Section B

BASKETBALL | Team faces adversity during weekend exhibition games, despite wins, 4B

| Monday, Nov. 7, 2011

| cm-life.com

Chippewas lose to Kent State on missed last second field goal By Matt thompson Assistant Sports Editor

KENT, Ohio — “Wide left.” Those two words haunt field goal kickers, and they crept up on David Harman as he hooked a 28-yard field goal wide left on the last play of the game Friday night. The kick would have sent the game into overtime, but it didn’t and Central Michigan lost to Kent State 24-21 at Dix Stadium.

“He should’ve probably made that,” said CMU freshman wide receiver Titus Davis. With nine seconds left, CMU head coach Dan Enos decided to play for overtime and not try another pass at the end zone for the win. He had quarterback Ryan Radcliff squirm a few steps to the middle of the field, falling and setting up the kicker. “I wanted to take that shot so bad,” Davis said. Kent State quarterback Spencer

Keith threw for 281 yards and all three of the Golden Flashes touchdowns. He was averaging 106 yards passing a game coming in with only four touchdowns all season. “When you’re winning, it feels a lot better than losing,” Keith said. The Chippewas fell to a 14-0 lead early, but stormed back, finding the end zone on two-straight possessions to tie it before halftime. The Golden Flashes started fast, intercepting Radcliff’s second pass

of the night. Four plays later they scored on a 15-yard pass to Jacquise Terry, taking the early lead. Kent State added to the lead on the first play of the second quarter with an 85-yard pass to Matt Hurdle. It was the Golden Flashes longest pass play since 2003. The Chippewas fought back with their freshman wide receivers. Davis caught two touchdowns and fresh-

Scoreboard

21

24

Current Standing CMU (3-7, 2-4 MAC) Kent State (3-6, 2-3 MAC)

A LOSS| 4B

Depth not an issue for women’s basketball By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

68:01 mark off a corner kick to give the Rockets the only offense they needed, winning 1-0. UT’s defense held WMU to just one shot on goal in the win. This turns out to be a favorable outcome for the Chippewas as their season relies on a possible bid to participate in the NCAA Tournament.

The Central Michigan women’s basketball team has two spots to fill in its starting five with the departure of Kaihla Szunko and Shonda Long. Senior forward Skylar Miller, MidAmerican Conference Freshman of the Year Niki DiGuilio and junior guard Brandie Baker are back. “Our three returning starters (Miller, DiGuilio and Baker) have all been through the ropes,” said head coach Sue Guevara. “They’re stronger, lost weight Sue Guevara and have done a great job leading with their work ethic.” It has been a problem for Guevara to come up with a starting five early in the season, but she said it has been a good problem. “I say that is a good thing because we have 9-to-10 players that could easily start,” Guevara said. “Part of it depends on consistency, the team we’re going to play and that may determine who gets any of the starting spots.” MAC Sixth Player of the Year Taylor Johnson is expected to lead a deep bench, continuing to be that sixth person. “We had role meetings all week and coach (Guevara) sees me as coming in as a sixth player again,” Johnson said. “If she wants me to go out and roll on the ground for a ball, go in and get a foul or get a rebound, then I’ll do it for the team.” Guevara can look for starters in the incoming freshman class. Three freshmen all enter the program out of Inkster High School. Guard Crystal Bradford is rated No. 37 in the nation among freshmen according to ESPN, forward Jas’Mine Bracey is rated No. 9 among freshmen in Michigan according to Michigan Prep News and guard Leah Scott is rated No. 19 with Michigan Prep News. “All three are very different players,” Guevara said. Bradford is the type of player that can come in and be an instant factor with the offense, Bracey is an intimidating and physical player, while Scott reminds Guevara of Long from last season. They aren’t the only freshman joining the roster. Petoskey guard Kerby Tamm and Belleville guard Jessica Green are also a part of the mix. “Kerby (Tamm) is a really good knock-down three point shooter and sees the floor very well,” Guevara said. “Jess (Green) is a really smooth silky type of player and can play any of the guard positions.” Guevara’s depth doesn’t only consist of freshmen. She has plenty of returning players who have had success with the team. Sophomore guard Kylie Welch, who found a lot of playing time at the end of last season, handled the ball well and can shoot if needed. Junior guard Jalisa Olive put up a school record 32 points for a reserve player against North Carolina A & T on Nov. 12, 2010.

A NCAA | 4B

A DEPTH | 3B

andrew Kuhn/ASSiSTANT PhoTo EdiTor

Senior forward Skylar Miller (top, sophomore guard Kylie Welch (middle) and junior guard Brandie Baker (bottom) aim to lead a team that has 10 underclassmen on the roster this season.

Talented Trio Women’s basketball captains guide youthful team

T

By Brandon Champion | Staff Reporter

he makeup of the Central Michigan women’s basketball team has two standout features. Young and talented. The question is which one of those traits will override the other. Leadership goes a long way in helping that youth and talent grow. In 2011, the leadership is expected to be provided by the teams three captains, senior Skylar Miller, junior Brandie Baker and sophomore Kylie Welch. So far, the three have not disappointed as the Chippewas prepare for the season. A TRIO | 4B

Women’s Basketball Preview See more coverage inside,

w Team faces tough season, 4B w Coach hopes freshmen make impact, 4B

CMU junior guard Brandie Baker plays in a Feb. 19 game against WMU. FiLe Photo BY KaitLin thoresen

Soccer eliminated in semifinals of MAC tourney; NCAA Tournament bid still possible By ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

Head coach Neil Stafford stressed the importance of capitalizing on scoring opportunities if his team wanted to have success in the MidAmerican Conference Tournament. On Friday, the Central Michigan women’s soccer team was unable to beat Western Michigan goalkeeper Michelle Watson as the Broncos defeated CMU 1-0 in overtime. “I think we struggled a little big getting going today,” Stafford said. “I thought Western Michigan had great energy and they really controlled parts of the game.”

Junior Anina Cicerone scored 4:31 into the second overtime, heading the ball into the goal off a free kick. “I guess you would like to get beat on another play, but fair credit to Western Michigan,” Stafford said. This time, the Chippewas inability to score proved costly. “It’s one that I felt got away from us with all of the pressure and opportunities we had,” Stafford said. Watson made four saves in her shutout performance, including a key diving save on junior Ashley Mejilla. CMU junior goalkeeper Stefanie Turner made a season-high eight saves in the loss.

“She was fine,” Stafford said. “She didn’t really have to make a big save or anything, but I thought she played good.” The Chippewas were outshot by the Broncos 14-13 — the first time it was outshot by a MAC opponent all season. Both teams received a yellow card foul as emotions were elevated throughout the game. Sophomore Kaely Schlosser had one for the Chippewas and senior Nikolette Rivera for the Broncos. On Sunday, Toledo defeated WMU in the MAC Championship game, claiming the title. Rachel Macleod scored at the

Scoreboard

21

24

Current Standing CMU (3-7, 2-4 MAC) WMU (3-6, 2-3 MAC)

John Manzo, sports editor | sports@cm-life.com | 989.774.5433

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2B || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

WEek 10 Kent State 24, CMU 21 - Final statistics

AROUND THE MAC West Division Team MAC

Overall

NIU Toledo BSU EMU WMU CMU

6-3 5-4 6-4 5-4 5-4 3-7

4-1 4-1 4-2 3-2 3-2 2-4

East Division Team MAC

Overall

Ohio 3-2 Miami 3-2 Temple 3-3 BGSU 2-3 KSU 2-3 Buffalo 1-4 Akron 0-5

6-3 4-5 5-4 3-6 3-6 2-7 1-8

Score by quarters Central Michigan Kent State

1 0 7

2 14 7

3 0 0

4 7 10

Total 21 24

Scoring summary Qtr 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 4th 4th 4th

Scoring play KSU - Jacquise Terry 15-yd pass from Spencer Keith KSU - Matt Hurdle 85-yd pass from Spencer CMU - Courtney Williams 7-yd pass from Ryan Radcliff CMU - Titus Davis 36-yd pass from Radcliff KSU - Chris Gilbert 25-yd pass from Spencer KSU - Freddy Cortez 34-yd field goal CMU - Titus Davis 52-yd pass from Radcliff

Score 7-0 (10:32) 14-0 (14:47) 14-7 (10:59) 14-14 (1:26) 21-14 (13:47) 24-14 (7:27) 23-9 (5:52)

Team totals

CMU

Game leaders KSU

First downs 23 Rushing yards 86 Rushing TDs 0 Passing yards 316 Cmps.-atts.-int 26-42-2 Passing TDs 3 Total offense 402 Gain per play 5.8 Fumbles (No.-lost) 1-0 Punts-yards 5-213 Third-down conv. 7-14 Fourth-down conv. 0 -0 Sacks by (#-yds) 0-0 Penalties (#-yds) 1-5 Field goals 0-1 Possession 31:41

Rushing

18 141 0 281 17-31-0 3 422 7.0 0-0 6-236 7-15 0-0 3-23 7-75 1-2 28:19

Traylong Durham (KSU) 18 carries, 90 yards Passing

Ryan Radcliff (CMU) 26-42, 316 yards, 3 TDs, 2 INT Receiving

Titus Davis (CMU) 10 catches, 192 yards, 2 TDs Defensive

S Leon Green (KSU) 12 tackles, 7 solo

Saturday’s results* CMU 21, KSU 24 Ball State 33, EMU 31 NIU 63, Toledo 60 Miami 35, Akron 3

Who’s next?

vs. Ohio (6-3)

*Home teams in bold

Thurs., Nov. 10

CMU TEAM LEADERS Rushing Player

Att-yds-TD

yard field goal as time expired.

Att-comp-yds-TD

w Ryan Radcliff 211-364-2,69117 Player

47-522-3 33-464-5 29-577-4 22-253-2 15-252-4 12-109-0

Tackles

Player

SS Jahleel Addae FS Avery Cunningham FS John Carr LB Armond Staten OLB Shamari Benton LB Cody Lopez DE Joe Kinville MLB Mike Petrucci

Sacks

Player

Matt Losiniecki John Williams Kenny McClendon Jason Chomic Caesar Rodriguez

Kick returns Player

Ttl

84 65 56 51 48 46 41 40

Ttl

2.0 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.0

No.-yds-avg

18-387-21.5 w Titus Davis w Jason Wilson 9-183-20.3

Punt returns Player

No.-yds-avg

w Cody Wilson

9-47-5.2

Field goals Player

The missed field goal capped another dramatic episode for CMU.

Spencer

Sept. 1 South Carolina State

W 21-6

K e i t h

Sept. 10 at Kentucky

L 27-13

stepped

Sept. 17 at WMU

L 44-14

up for Kent

Sept. 24 at MSU

L 45-7

State in its

Oct. 1 N. Illinois, 3:30 p.m.

dramatic win. He was 17-31 with

Oct. 8 at North Carolina State

L 38-24

three touchdown passes. He also

Oct. 15 EMU (homecoming)

L 35-28

threw 281 yards and completed at

Oct. 22 at Ball State, 2 p.m.

L 31-27

least two passes to five different

Oct. 29 at Akron, noon

receivers. It was his third game

Nov. 4 at Kent State

passing more than 150 yards.

Nov. 10 Ohio

W 48-41

W 23-22 L 24-21 7:30 p.m.

FGM-FGA-Long

w David Harman 12-15-45 Compiled by Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

8 p.m.

The Grades

Rec-Yds-TD

w Cody Wilson w David Blackburn w Titus Davis w Jerry Harris w Courtney Williams w Zurlon Tipton

NG NG DE DE DE

Ohio leads the MAC-East division and is on a two-game winning streak. Running back Donte Harden had 322 all-purpose yards in Ohio’s 35-31 win against Temple.

2011 SCHEDULE

Nov. 18 Toledo

Receiving

w w w w w

nity to save the game when junior kicker David Harman missed a 28-

Passing

w w w w w w w w

CMU failed in a critical opportu-

Anthony Garland 76-365-1 Paris Cotton 52-333-2 Zurlon Tipton 66-296-1 Tim Phillips 54-235-1

Player

The Situation Fourth Quarter 00:05 4th and 5

Offense

C-

Last week: B

Radcliff came up big again for CMU, throwing for more than 300 yards and three touchdowns. However, the offense was onedimensional with just 86 rushing yards. CMU ran a predictable pass-first offense, with 45 passes out of 66 plays. It ran 15 times on first down, and only nine times in the other three downs during the game.

C-

Defense It’s simple — the defense softened up at times. CMU played good enough on defense to keep Kent State from pulling away, but it gave up an early second quarter 85-yard passing touchdown that extended Kent State’s lead to 14.

Last week: D+

Special Teams

D-

CMU’s last hopes rested on David Harman’s leg. Harman didn’t deliver, missing a lastsecond 28-yard field goal that ensured a Kent State victory. A 68-yard punt by Richie Hogan in the first quarter slowed Kent State after its first score.

Last week: A

Overall

D+

Mediocrity plagued CMU’s offensive game. The defense was inconsistent. Its special teams also painfully failed at one of the few chances it gets to win a game.

Last week: C+

TOGETHER WE ARE MAROON

w w w w

GAME BALL

GAME OVER MOMENT

I wanted to take a shot so bad. I thought we had time to take another shot, but whatever coaches’ decision was, I was behind it 100 percent.

— Freshman wide receiver Titus Davis

Central Michigan Chippewas 2011 Football Season

Home Home Football Football vs. vs. Ohiocarolina university south state Thursday, November 10 7:30 p.m. Kick-off Kelly/Shorts Stadium

Admission is FREE for students!1 Thursday, September Tailgate lots open at 4:30 pm!

7:00 p.m. Kick-off Faculty/Staff/Community: Kelly/Shorts Stadium

Bring a non-perishable food item to the ROTC display under Kelly/Shorts video-board to receive a voucher for a $10 ticket! Non-perishable item will be donated to “Hoops for Hunger,” Women’s Basketball’s initiative to ght hunger in Mid-Michigan open atBank 4:00 p.m.! Michigan! area, with Tailgate items being lots donated to Food of Eastern Facebook.com/CMUFootball

Twitter.com/CMU_Football


cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Central Michigan Life || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || 3B

Titus Davis has career day on national TV loss at Kent State By John Manzo Sports Editor

Wide receiver Titus Davis made 10 catches for 192 yards and two touchdowns Friday night. But the effort wasn’t enough to beat Kent State, losing 2421. Still, Davis felt like his team had a chance to go for the win. “I wanted to take a shot so

bad,” he said. “I thought we had time to take another shot, but whatever coaches’ decision was, I was behind it 100 percent.” Head coach Dan Enos had other decisions with nine seconds remaining. Instead of attempting a pass toward the end zone for the win, he called the conservative play, centering the ball, setting up a 28-yard field goal for David Harman.

Harman missed wide left. The miss overshadowed Davis’ performance. He was the go-to guy without wide receiver Cody Wilson, who was limited at receiver because of a foot injury. Davis made three catches on the final drive. Two catches on the drive came on third down, one on a third and 14 from its own 33. “Titus did a heck of a job

today,” said quarterback Ryan Radcliff. “He really stepped up big when we needed him. He had a couple big plays that got us back in it a couple of times.” The freshman clearly wasn’t fazed in the national spotlight. Davis might have had the best game of his collegiate career, a game televised on ESPN 2. “He’s been growing a lot, just like in the mental part of

the game and you see he’s got the physical part, so definitely give him all of the props in the world,” Radcliff said. Davis scored his first touchdown of the game right before the half. He caught a 36-yard touchdown, tying the game at 14. Freddy Cortez added a 34yard field goal, extending the Golden Flashes lead to 10 with 7:27 remaining.

Radcliff and Davis responded, hooking up on a 52-yard touchdown pass, cutting the lead to three, shedding 1:28 off the clock. Davis caught the pass in between defenders and broke it down the left sideline for his second touchdown of the day. “He’s a good player, a very good player,” Enos said. sports@cm-life.com

Enos plays for overtime; plan backfires with loss Kent State coach would have made same call By Matt Thompson Assistant Sports Editor

KENT, Ohio ­— Down three points with nine seconds left and 12 yards from the end zone. Head coach Dan Enos had an important choice to make. The Central Michigan football coach could have: A.) Centered the ball to set up the field goal to attempt to put the game in overtime. B.) Throw a pass in the end zone, trying to win with a touchdown and then call the timeout and kick the next play from a hash for overtime. Enos went with A. The kicker missed a 28-yard and CMU lost 24-21 Friday night against Kent State. “We were trying to get to overtime at that point,” Enos said.

Kaitlin Thoresen/Staff Photographer

Senior line backer Armond Staten tackles Kent State tight end Casey Pierce during the game Friday night at Dix Stadium at Kent State.

Receiver Titus Davis, who had a career day, thought the Chippewas should have tried to win. “I wanted to take a shot so bad,” Davis said. “I thought we had time to take another shot but whatever coaches’ decision I was behind it 100 percent.” Quarterback Ryan Radcliff was also behind the deci-

sion. Although it seemed he thought the decision was made because Enos didn’t think CMU could score in that situation. “If we thought we could’ve won at the end, take another shot, we would’ve done that,” Radcliff said. “I was 100 percent behind whatever coach wanted to do.” Radcliff went on to say

Andrew Huhn/Assistant Photo Editor

Junior kicker David Harman looks to the Kent State sideline after missing a 28-yard field goal as time expired to lose the game. The Chippewas lost to Kent State 24-21.

that CMU would have had the momentum in overtime. CMU’s offense had 12 plays of 12 yards or more on the day. And Radcliff had thrown for three touchdowns. Kicker David Harman had been kicking excellent for the Chippewas. He went into the 28-yard kick, 12-

Now everybody knows John Manzo Sports Editor

F

ire up Chips, smh (shaking my head). Just quit. An angry emoticon. Wow. Those were the text messages I received moments after Central Michigan kicker David Harman missed his 28-yard tying field goal attempt in the Chippewas 24-21 loss Friday Night at Dix Stadium in Kent, Ohio. Normally, I don’t receive text messages after a CMU loss. Mainly because my friends from the student body don’t care about this program anymore (explaining the 9,572 fan decrease from 2009-to-2011’s homecoming game).

But Friday night was special. The game was broadcasted nationally on ESPN2. Only 10,132 fans saw it live at Kent State, but a lot more saw head coach Dan Enos and the Chippewas center the ball — bypassing a throw to the end zone with nine seconds remaining — then botching the field goal, embarrassing the program more than it already has been this season. The Chippewas are the worst Division I football program in the state. Luckily, they don’t play U of M until 2013. CMU lost to the other three Division I teams in the state. I’m not a head football coach and I might be wrong (Kent State head coach Darrell Hazell agreed on Enos’ decision), but why not go for it? Nine seconds to go and only pride and draft stock

left to play for (certainly not a Mid-American Conference championship). Michigan State attempted a play inside Minnesota’s 10 with under 10 seconds remaining. Result: touchdown. Michigan attempted four plays within 16 seconds inside the 10 against Iowa at the end of the game, but failed to score. CMU’s situation was different, but proves a play can be completed in nine seconds from the red zone. GO FOR IT! What do you have to lose Chippewas? What’s the difference between six losses and seven? A six-win MAC team with zero qualities wins isn’t getting a bowl game anyways. Receiver Titus Davis

wanted to go for it. Quarterback Ryan Radcliff said: “If we thought we could’ve won at the end, taken another shot, we would’ve done that.” So Enos didn’t think his team could complete a 12yard pass, with a timeout remaining in case the play broke down. Hilarious. Since the football tradition has been removed from Mount Pleasant because of limited success and lack of Saturday afternoon football games, there is one positive. Money. If Akron can play on ESPN, expect CMU to get its one nationally broadcasted game a year. Cha’ching.

of-14 on the year and both his misses were well further than Friday’s. He hadn’t missed since the third game, making 10 straight. Kent State head coach Darrell Hazell thought Enos made the right decision. “I would have done the same thing,” Hazell said. “I would have kicked the field

Depth | continued from 1b

Senior forward Sarah Huff looks to get more time this season and sophomore forward Lauren Bellamy is coming off a season-ending knee injury and is said to be one of the team’s stronger players. Sophomore forward Jordan LaDuke returns in December

goal, send it into overtime and play it in overtime, for sure.” The play before, Radcliff centered the ball from the right hash. “It happens, just gotta bounce back from it and work hard this week,” Davis said. sports@cm-life.com

against Purdue after she becomes eligible from her Florida Gulf Coast transfer. She is required to sit out an entire year because of NCAA transfer rules. “We are going to be deeper on the bench,” Johnson said. “Last year, we only played about eight players, this year we have a lot more people.” sports@cm-life.com

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4B || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

Women’s basketball team face tough schedule ahead By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

It is a tough road ahead for the Central Michigan women’s basketball team this season. “We’re in a tough conference,” said head coach Sue Guevara. “The West (division) is pretty tough and the East (division), thank goodness we only play them once.” The Chippewas open up their season at home against Big Ten opponent Northwestern. A week later, they hit the road to play Robert Morris and Big East opponent Pittsburgh, who took them out last year at McGuirk Arena, 94-78. “Last year we had a really good chance against Northwestern and we got to get Pittsburgh back,” said senior forward Skylar Miller. “Last year they (Pitt) came into our place and got us pretty good.” After Pitt, the team travels to Anchorage, Alaska to take part in the Great Alaskan Shootout where they will see South Florida, another Big East opponent. A win could possibly set up a game No. 9 Miami in the next round. Wichita State comes after

the tournament, a team that went to the Women’s National Invitational Tournament. CMU then returns home to play Bradley, and then what might be its toughest nonconference opponent of the non-conference season against No. 21 Purdue. “We just have to treat it like another game,” Miller said. “We don’t have anything to lose and hopefully we can get a win and send them back.” After Purdue, the Chippewas hit the road again for a rematch with Southeastern Conference opponent, Ole Miss, who beat them last year at McGuirk Arena, 82-66. CMU ends its non-conference season with two road tournaments at Wright State in Dayton, Ohio, and Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. “The Wright State tournament is an exempted tournament where we play three games and it only counts as one,” Guevara said. “It is a really good tournament right before Christmas.” At Wright State the Chippewas play Southeast Missouri State, Longwood and Wright State, another WNIT oppo-

nent. In Tulane, CMU starts off with a Hampton team that took Kentucky into overtime in the NCAA tournament last season. “Hampton, that is a pretty good basketball team right there,” Guevara said. “They’re big, athletic and they get up and down the court.” The Chippewas finish the non-conference season against either the Green Wave or the College of Charleston. “The tough schedule will get the younger players acclimated to big games,” Miller said. “I really think they can handle it.” With such a tough schedule, CMU should be prepared to face the top teams of the MAC and compete for the conference championship. The Mid American Conference isn’t a pushover conference and the Chippewas have been picked to finish runnerup in the West behind defending WNIT champions Toledo. CMU also faces defending MAC champions Bowling Green one time at McGuirk Arena. sports@cm-life.com

Show more support for women’s basketball team Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

C

alling all Chippewa fans. Central Michigan women’s basketball coach Sue Guevara wants you to come out and support her team as it plays one of the toughest home schedules in recent history. The Chippewas kick off their season in McGuirk Arena at noon on Friday against Big Ten opponent Northwestern, who beat them 92-84 last season. That isn’t the only Big Ten opponent that will make the trip to Mount Pleasant this season. CMU will welcome No. 21 Purdue on Dec. 11 after hosting Bradley on Dec. 3, who is known to be a quality basketball school. The Chippewas want a strong supporting crowd to

Trio | continued from 1b

“The three captains have done a really nice job,” said head coach Sue Guevara. “Whether it’s when they are out on the floor leading by example or talking to the players and making sure people understand what they are doing.” This season the Chippewas must replace Kaihla Szunko and Shonda Long, their captains and top two leading scorers from a year ago. According to Guevara, it will take a variety of players to do this, including the team’s three captains. “There isn’t one player that is going to be able to do a double-double like Szunko,” she said. “Same thing with Long and her ability score, but we have a lot of capable players on this team.” Baker and Miller are both returning starters with Baker being CMU’s top returning scorer. She was third on the team, averaging 13 points a game while leading the team with 156 assists. Miller started every game a year ago and averaged 6.5 points per game. Welch appeared in 21 games in her freshman season, averaging 11 minutes a game. She has a bigger role this season as a sophomore and has been playing a lot of point guard in practice. “Kylie Welch has done a really nice job of running this basketball team,” Guevara said. “When she’s on the floor, she understands the game. Combine her with Baker and I have two point guards on the floor that understand and know what needs to be done.” The youth requires more teaching from both Guevara and the team’s captains. “It’s our job to constantly talk to our team, “Welch said.

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

help this young, but talented team over the hump against some stiff non-conference competition. But the strong competition doesn’t end with the nonconference season. After being on the road for a full month, CMU welcomes Mid-American Conference play with rival Western Michigan on Jan. 11. Guevara wants to have the fans in the stands and is willing to whatever it takes to get a strong crowd in McGurik Arena. One big way to get fans to come is to win, which the team has done, going 19-11 last season with big wins against Ole Miss and Wichita State. Also, taking Iowa and Northwestern to the wire. CMU is fun to watch and averaged 80.8 points a game last season while scoring in the triple digits three times and 90-plus points eight times. It is an exciting team and so were the games last season,

with six games decided by six points or less, including that last-second win against EMU at home. The Chippewas appeared in their first postseason tournament (WNIT) since the 1983-84 season when they got into the NCAA Tournament. The team lost its top two scorers, Kaihla Szunko and Shonda Long, but return three starters, senior forward Skylar Miller, guard and MAC Freshman of the Year Niki DiGuilio and junior guard Brandie Baker. It also returns sixth Player of the Year sophomore forward Taylor Johnson.The Chippewas also added the No. 43 recruiting class in the nation with Inkster High School freshmen guards Crystal Bradford, Leah Scott, forward Jas’Mine Bracey, Petoskey guard Kerby Tamm and Belleville guard Jessica Green. This team will be fun to watch and I would highly recommend going to watch this team as it look for its first MAC title since 1984.

“We have a lot of new players this year. We need to make sure they know what they’re doing on offense and defense.” The captains accept the responsibility of helping the younger players on and off of the court. “On the court we need to tell them over and over what’s going on, things like what defense we’re in and where they need to be on offense,” Baker said. “But just as importantly off the court, we need to make

sure they’re going to class, going to study table and keeping their grades up.” The challenges facing the Chippewas are apparent, however. “I think it’s going pretty good so far,” Welch said. “The new players that we have want to learn and want to get better. They have been asking a lot of questions. I don’t think chemistry will be an issue with this team.”

W o m e n ’ s B a s k etb a l l

Freshmen should make impact for basketball team this season By Brandon Champion Staff Reporter

A major part of the Central Michigan women’s basketball team this season will be its youth. CMU has the 43rd ranked recruiting class in the country, the highest rated class its ever had. The Chippewas are led by guard Crystal Bradford, who was rated the 37th best prospect in the nation. The 6-foot guard from Detroit had offers from Louisville, Marquette and Kansas, but chose CMU. “I could have gone a lot of places,” Bradford said. “Coach Guevara and her assistants had been recruiting me for a long time and when I came up for a visit, I really liked the campus, the team.” Despite the hype, Bradford knows expectations don’t guarantee results and that the college game is a big step up from high school. “College basketball is a lot harder,” Bradford said. “There’s

NCAA| continued from 1B

With the Broncos loss, CMU’s chances of a tournament bid slightly increases because Toledo earned the only automatic bid from the

loss| continued from 1B

man Courtney Williams caught another. Williams went up and over the defending corner to catch a Ryan Radcliff pass in the back of the end zone. It was his fourth touchdown reception of the year. Davis had a career day with 10 receptions for 192 yards

a lot more plays, it takes more discipline and the coaches will sit you down if you don’t listen.” Two of Bradford’s high school teammates chose CMU. Forward Jas’Mine Bracey was rated the No. 9 player in Michigan and guard Leah Scott was rated the No. 19 prospect. The trio won a state championship while playing at Inkster High School last season and looks to continue that success this season. “We have great chemistry,” Bradford said. “We have been playing together for a very long time and coming here is just another step and another level, we’re working on getting better and improving.” The three newcomers are getting most of the attention, but Guevara wants people to focus on the class as a whole. “We have to look at our entire class, not just the three from Inkster,” she said. “I don’t have any higher expectations for someone because there ranked higher.” Jessica Green from Belleville and Kerby Tamm from Peto-

skey are the two who few are talking about, but are players Guevara is very excited about. “Kerby thinks the game very well and is a true playmaker,” she said. “Green is silky smooth and a quick-handed thief on defense. She sees the floor very well and her defense directly leads to a lot of buckets.” The freshman class should have an impact in 2011 and according to Guevara, their addition makes CMU deeper and more athletic than any team she has ever had. “We have a lot of depth, but its inexperienced depth,” Guevara said. “With the talent we have on this team my goal is to play them all.” The freshman class is talented, but even talent makes mistakes. “It great for a program, but you can’t go by the rankings.” Guevara said. “Our freshmen have a lot of talent, but they make a lot of aggressive mistakes.”

MAC. A WMU win, potentially meant the Rockets would receive an at-large bid. Now, the Broncos are most likely eliminated from receiving a bid because both Toledo and CMU have posted better overall records. Boasting a 15-3-3 record with quality non-conference

wins against Wisconsin, Louisville and Pittsburgh, the Chippewas seek to become the only MAC team in conference history to receive a possible at-large bid. The selections will be announced Monday afternoon.

and the two touchdowns. He was starting in place of the injured Cody Wilson, who was limited at wide receiver because of a foot injury. “I knew I had to step up and have a big day,” Davis said. It was the third time this season that the Chippewas had a chance to tie or win on the last play and lost. “Right now, we don’t pick ourselves up. We lick our wounds,” Radcliff said. Wilson snapped his con-

secutive games with a reception streak at 28 games. He wasn’t able to check in at receiver, but he still was the holder for kicks. The Chippewas host the Ohio Bobcats at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. “Very good win for this football team,” said Kent State coach Darrell Hazell. “I’m proud of these guys.”

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CENTRAL REVIEW, 2004

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cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 || 5B

[SportS]

Field hockey ‘bears’ fifth-consecutive loss in semifinals for field hockey By Jeff papworth Staff Reporter

BethanY waLter/STAff PhoTogrAPhEr

Freshman guard Austin McBroom runs the ball down the court away from Northern Michigan University freshman forward Haki Stampley Saturday night at McGuirk Arena. CMU won 90-82 against NMU.

Men’s basketball faces adversity in exhibition finale at home

It was the same tune for the Central Michigan field hockey team that lost in the semifinals for the fifthstraight year Friday. The Chippewas were optimistic with two close losses to Kent State coming in overtime. But the Golden Flashes let their fans’ hearts rest easy with a lopsided 4-1 victory. “The difference in the game was penalty corner execution,” said CMU coach Cristy Freese. “They lift the ball to the far post, just out of (Anastasia Netto’s) reach.” Julianna Makrinos snatched the first lead in the fifth minute for CMU. “We were actually really excited because we scored the first goal and we knew that we started the game off strong,” Makrinos said. “It was pretty disappointing that we did not get a goal soon after.” Kent State followed by

tallying four unanswered goals, including three in a five-minute span in the second half. Missouri State and the Chippewas were going in opposite directions entering Thursday’s first round matchup. CMU had dropped its previous three games while the Bears won their last four. CMU junior Erin Dye began and ended the second half with goals. Both were a result of a play that the Chippewas worked on in their last two practices. “Cayleigh (Immelman) passes the ball a little lower into the circle and Erin onetimes it in and it worked to perfection both times,” Freese said. Dye’s last goal widened the margin to two after Immelman and Bears forward Casey Bayliss traded scores, giving the Chippewas a 2-1 lead. “It was a little scary there, so we knew we needed to get insurance goals,” Dye

said. “We definitely took control of the ball, tried to get them on our end and get some more opportunities that we could finish on.”

RECAPPING THE SEASON Chippewas floor leader Paulina Lee ended her senior season with 10 assists. No CMU player had surpassed nine in the previous two seasons. “Last year after the season, one area that we wanted Paulina to improve in was her vision to see the open player and make the pass,” Freese said. “I think she’s improved on both of them. You got to improve on the skill to make the pass and the vision to see it” Immelman won MAC Freshman of the Year and All-MAC first team as a result of the 33 points she contributed this season. Simone Lazar was also a MAC first-team member. Lee, Dye and Netto were second team All-MAC.

lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi edsClassifi edsClassifi edsedsed

free throw to put CMU up 58-51. Before that he had three points in the first half on 1-4 Head coach Ernie Zeigler shooting. He took off in the secsports@cm-life.com spoke to his team this weekend ond half, scoring 14 points. When the score was 66-60, about how adversity presents itTrey kept pushing the envelope. self in different ways. During Central Michigan’s 90- He got a defensive rebound 82 victory over Northern Michi- and again didn’t pass, going the UP NEXT length floor the CMU, rim gan night McGuirk vs. Central Ferris Life Mt. Saturday Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MIat48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • of 436the Central Moore MI to 48859 Hall, Michigan • www/cm-life.com Life Mt.CMU Pleasant, • 436 Moore MIState 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • w sistent and get healthy again Area, his team had plenty of ob- drawing another foul. By Kristopher Lodes the rest& ofClassifi the way.” ed Ad Policy &Classifi “When they tried to make to overcome. Staff Reporter astacles Classifi edClassifi Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad ed Ad for Policy Rates Rates ed CMU recorded 82 digs and “Tonight we had to deal with a run, I tried to be a little more ept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly because advertising CM up Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CMSophomore Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination 21classifi blocks. libero aggressive and attack aknowingly little bitaccept foul trouble, guys feeling underaccept Junior Olivier Mbaigoto re-accept It Rates: waswhich an and down weekRates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi ed 15 ad word minimum per Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed 15 ad word minimu By Phone: 989-774-3493 Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 tional origin, andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to Jenna Coates led the team with more,” Trey said. the weather and a team that at corded a double-double in his end for the Central Michigan vertising which is discontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is discontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Studen By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic centered Bold, italic Bold, italic centered Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 p 27 digs. Freshman Austin McBroom start ofCM the second half game at McGuirk Arena. team. ethe standards of Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping begave responsible with the standards for of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifein will keeping be responsible with thesecond standards for of CM Board, Life. CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards forvolleyball of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifeincentered will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will$7.75 be respon type typographical are the available along typetypographical are the available along typetypographical are the available along type are the available along eus extent of cancelling thewww.cm-life.com charge errors forsaid. the only space to theused extent of cancelling the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to theused extent The of cancelling charge errors for the only space toof theused extentThursday of cancelling charge errors for the space to theused extent of cancelling charge $7.50 for the spa night it features was aonly difhelped the typographical Chippewas build aper their besttypographical shot,” Zeigler He collected 12Issues: rebounds and Chippewas had one om By Website: By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 issue 3-6 $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: p with other special features with other special features with other special with other special features ch an error. Creditand for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Creditand for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited like ad attractors. ad ferent story. The Chippewas 20-point infipicked the first half. He scored 16 points, but came best all-around matches Sophomore Zeigler, 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall y credit due canthe beTrey fipicked rst date up of at publication. thevotCM Life Any offi credit ce duelead canthe be rst date up of at publication. the CM Life Any offi credit ce due can the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: date up ofhe at publication. the CM Life Any officredit cetheir duelike canad the be fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike can the beattractors. fipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. picked up at the CM L fed theas ad.aIf preseason you find within an error, 30All-MAC days report of termination it to the Classifi the ed ad. Ifayou find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi the edad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination itthreeto the Classifi the edthis ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report ofOhio, termination it to thethe Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an weekend error, 30 days report of termination itat toEastthe Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the C started off the scored game-high 18 points onper through big behind the year against West 13+ Issues: $7.00 issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: p Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 p.m. ya.m.-5 responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. and dropped the shooting from the field. point line.for the three-time defending Mid- ern Michigan starting five, had a cold and a 7-of-10 “They were kind of letting me He was 0-3 before he knocked American Conference champi- match in four games. “huge” blister on his right foot. 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH AT READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH ATthrees READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! ALWAYS They couldn’t find anyOPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF open to drive in make certain down two inALWAYS the final four OPEN ons,AT but the absence of senior Trey led the team inALWAYS scoring last OPEN middle blocker Kaitlyn Schultz rhythm in Ypsilanti. They came change and put the ball in the year, but in the first three halves plays,” McBroom said. “I feel minutes of the game. His first proved too much for them to out slow, getting beat in game court,” Olson said. “Enderle he’d been passive, throwing comfortable with my jumper three doubled the Chippewas one 25-13 and couldn’t find an did a nice job making blocks lead, extending it to 82-76. overcome. around assists and taking few right now.” His minutes were cut short in His coach spoke after the “It could have been a differ- answer to the Eagles serving. shots. and had a lot of nice touches.” “I don’t think any team in the ent story, but we played a solid “I thought in the second half the second half because of foul game how those threes were Schultz was CMU’s biggest match,” said head coach Erik nation could’ve beaten them threat offensively. She had a Trey responded very well,” Ernie trouble. He only played 18 min- huge shots, but his presence re(EMU) tonight with the way game-high 14 kills with a .367 utes with four fouls. bounding may have been more Olson. said. “Two fouls were offensively,” important. Junior outside hitter junior they served,” Olson said. With a 55-51 score, for the first hitting average. Olson went for a big change It was CMU’s second and final Lindsey Dulude was the most time this season, Trey was in at- Ernie said. “He needs to be She didn’t feel her injury more cognitive of gaps closing exhibition game. On Saturday consistent with 18 kills and a in the lineup and saw some during the match, but aftertack mode on offense. good things with junior out- ward did and is hoping to be .405 hitting average. He blocked a shot on defense and stop to read the defenses. the team will play its regular sea“The team stayed aggres- side hitter/ middle blocker back for the MAC Tournament, that could have made it a one- It was his second opportunity son opener against Ferris State sive the whole night and I Katie Schuette and freshman if not next weekend. possession game. He then took (to play). He definitely showed at 7 p.m. at McGuirk Arena. feel we learned a lot,” Dulude middle blocker Hallie Enderle. it the length of the court, was some of the ability he’s going to brought a Mt. possess for us.” “WeCentral justMI need to beCMU, fouled the 48859 lay up and sports@cm-life.com sports@cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, •and 436made Central Moore MI Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt.said. Pleasant, • 436 Moore 48859 Hall, Michigan •conwww/cm-life.com Life Mt. “She Pleasant, • 436(Schuette) Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Pleasant, MI 48859 • w By Matt thompson Assistant Sports Editor

Scoreboard

90

82

Volleyball team loses both games Scoreboard

2

3

1

3

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If you find a Issues: per issue Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: per issuefor thelike Issues: $7.00 p like ad attractors. like attractors. like attractors. attractors. sifi onsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s report insertion. We are it $7.00 toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. We are$7.00 only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5

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Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu sex or national origin, By and Phone: CM Life reserves right to reject discontinue, without notice, By Phone: 989-774-3493 989-774-3493 sex the or national origin,or and CM Life reserves sex or the national rightadvertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue which is in the opinion of the Student Media which Board, is in is the not opinion in keeping of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. notCM in keeping Life will with the standards of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will By Fax: Central 989-774-7805 By•Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p Michigan Life 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. MI • www/cm-life.com be responsible for typographical only the extent of cancelling the charge for 48859 the space and centered type Central Michigan Life 436errors Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, Pleasant, 48859 •used www/cm-life.com beto responsible for typographical errors MI only be to responsible the extent for of typographical cancelling the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for theare space used and omBy Website: centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue www.cm-life.com By•Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the fi rst date of publication. Any available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Creditrendered for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit firstIssues: date for such of publication. an error is limited Any only the first date of publication. Any fied edInAd Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Classifi ed AdtoRates Rates 7-12 $7.25 per issue other7-12 special features Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 credit due can be picked up at theClassifi CM436 Lifecredit offi ceed within 30be days of termination of the ad. Ifdue you find30 andays error, Ad Policy Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: Moore Hall Classifi ed Ad special features due can picked up at the CM Life credit offi ce within can be picked of termination up at the CM of Life the ad. offi ce If you within fi nd 30 an days error, of termination of the ad. If you fi nd an error, ed Adp.m. Classifi edonlyAd Policy Classifi edissue Ad Rates 13+ Issues: $7.00 per like ad Issues: attractors. report it to ed Dept. immediately. Wewhich are responsible for p.m. the fibecause rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 like adIssues: attractors. CM Life willthe notClassifi knowingly accept advertising reflects discrimination of race, religion, report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it tocolor, only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forRates: the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the ed fi13+ rst day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 15 word minimum per classifi ad CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion,

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad sex Life or national origin, and CM Life reserves which the right reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising CM will not knowingly accept advertising reflto ects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad sex or national origin, of and Life reserves the right reject or discontinue, without which is in the opinion theCM Student Media Board, is notto keeping with the standards of notice, CM Life.advertising CM Life will Bold, italic and sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right toinreject or discontinue, without notice, advertising 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, isextent not in keeping with the standards ofthe CMspace Life. CM Lifeand will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue be responsible for typographical errors only to the of cancelling the charge for used centered type are which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue be responsible for typographical errors onlyfor tosuch the extent of iscancelling the charge theofspace used and centered along type are om available with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit an error limited to only the first for date publication. Any 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are om 3-6 per issue available along with rendered by suchup an error. Credit an error is limited to only the of firstthe date Any 7-12Issues: Issues:$7.50 $7.25 per issue other special features credit duevalueless can be picked the CM Lifefor offisuch ce within 30 days of termination ad.of If publication. you find an error, available along with rendered valueless by such anaterror. Credit for such an error is limited to only the fi rst date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue CMof Life willad. notIfknowingly advertising which reflIssues: ects discrimination other features credit be picked up atimmediately. the CM Life offi ceare within days of termination the you find accept an error, $7.25 because per issue Rates: 15 attractors. word minimum 13+ $7.00 likespecial ad reportdue it tocan the Classifi ed Dept. We only30 responsible for the first insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. 989-774-3493 other special features credit due can be picked up at the CM Life offi ce within 30 days of termination ofday’s the ad. If you fisex ndor annational error, origin, and7-12 By Phone: color, religion, CM Life reserves the right to reject or 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fiof rstrace, day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. ept advertising which CM Life refl ects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which refl ects discrimination because discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible forRates: the ed first day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ad 15 word minimum per classified ad

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 32,000 READERS EACH32,000 PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS REACH MORE THAN REACH READERS MORE THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates Classified Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Rates per classified ad

Byorigin, Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered tional andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or Board, isMI not 48859 in keeping • with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for Central Michigan Life •which 436is inMoore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, www/cm-life.com type are available along 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS vertising which READERS is discontinue, in the opinion without of the notice, Studentadvertising Media the opinion of the Student Media typographical errors only toOPEN the extent ofAT cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Bold, italic and centered Bold, italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue e standards of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with thePUBLISHING standards for of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for and rendered valueless by OPEN such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only 32,000 READERS EACH DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS type are available along type are available along 7-12TO Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. eed extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling the chargeed for the Ad space In Ad Person: 436 Moore Hall the date of publication. Any credit due can be SALE pickedClassifi at the CM Life offi ce fich Classifi Policy ed Ad FOR Rates 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per used issue 3-6first Issues: $7.50 per issue FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR WANTED RENT with other special features with other special features NOTICES SALE WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT WANTED NOTICES TOupRENT NOTICES SALE WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT an error. NOTICES Creditand for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error.FOR Credit for such an error is limited to only

within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified like ad attractors. ad attractors. Issues: $7.25 per 7-12 Issues: $7.25 perresponsible issue like y credit due canthe be fipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due can7-12 be picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce Dept. immediately. We are only for the first day’s insertion. CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which refl ects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classifi ed 13+rstIssues: issue 13+without Issues: $7.00 per issue sex insertion. or national origin, and CMforLife the $7.00 right toper reject or discontinue, notice, advertising y responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s We are only responsible the fireserves day’s insertion.

Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue classified ad

AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE OPEN SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND AUTOS SALE AUTOS AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST & LOST &FOR FOUND which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of SALE CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 FOUND Issues: $7.75 per issue

responsible for typographical errors only to the extent OPEN of cancelling theWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS charge for the space used and PUBLISHINGbe ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS AT om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue

centered type are

available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE TO RENT 7-12 Issues: $7.25 perWANTED issue FOR RENT HELP HELP WANTED HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES otherWANTED special features FOR RENT FOR RENT FOR RENT credit due can be picked upFOR at theWANTED CMRENT Life offiRENT ce within 30 daysGARAGE of termination of theSALES ad. If you find an error, FOR SALE WANTED TO NOTICES FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT MIGHTY MINIS FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT! OFFICE ASSISTANT YEAR round HUGE SALE! FRIDAY, November AVAILABLE NOW: APARTMENTS No matter what you are looking for – position. Experience preferred, days 11th! $2.00 VHS MOVIES -SALE 1,000's in near Mt. Pleasant. $350- $450 inSPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR PETS PETS SERVICES SERVICES WANTED TO RENT stock! LOST & trash. FOUND SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION WALK TO CAMPUS PETS PETS a couch, a PETS car, or maybe a pet! and weekends available. smokWANTED TO SALE RENT WANTED TODAY! RENT cludes WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO Non RENT Used DVD 'S2.00SALE off! Used AUTOS FOR AUTOS FOR water and Partlo Prop- OPEN SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES ing. Apply in person Riverwood ReCM Life Classifieds & FOUND Blu-Ray movies!FOR Used GamesPS3, ertyLOST Management. www.partloprop: sort. (989) 774-3493 XBOX, 360, Wii--$5.00 off! Used PlayFREE erty.com 989-779-9886. HELP WANTED HELP WANTED TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES YARD SALE GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES ers: Wii/360/Nintendo! C.D.'s-$2.00 436 Moore Hall HEAT, ELECTRICITY, FOR RENT ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL CM Life Classifieds • 774-3493 MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES YARD SALE HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT BROOMFIELD CLOSE to off! HELP NEW--TV'S!WANTED TV'S! TV'S! $25 OFF www.cm-life.com HELP WANTED WANTED A/C, GAS, & WATER GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES 436 Moore Hall • www.cm-life.com FORVILLAGE RENT campus. 722 W. Broomfield. 3 and 4 HOME SPEAKERS--Paradigm! Surbedroooms. OPENING SECTION DEC. 1ST! round sound systemsALL PRICE SPECIAL SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT Park Place REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS w w w . b r o o m f i e l d v i l l a g e . c o m o r TV'S & STERANGES! Also- USED SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION 15REAL Golf Courses! 7 Days a Week! ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT A P A PETS R T M E N T S SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS 989-779-0410. WANTED TO RENT REOS! Karaoke discs/ equipmentCollege Night is Monday and Tuesday rent/ for sale! Alpine Car stereo/ Rewww.rentparkplaceapts.com $ 10 Off Per Hour FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR WANTED RENT TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL mote Starters/ SiriusSALE radio/ Installation MOTORCYCLES YARD TO SALE 1401 E. BELLOWS ST. TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES YARD SALE WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS available! Free Movie Rental Day! (989) 400-4603 • 2320 Rd. WANTED TORemus BUY WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES YARD SALE 772-4032 Main Street Audio/Video, 701 N. FEMALE LOOKING FOR roommate Mission, Mt. Pleasant, 989-773-7370. AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES for LOST spring term.& 2 ESTATE bedroom apartment FOUND Life Mt. Pleasant, •PERSONALS 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt.Come Pleasant, REAL PERSONALS LAYAWAY for Christmas! in for MI the48859 CFX • www/cm-life.com in a quiet setting. ESTATE Washer/ dryer/ dishREAL PERSONALS PERSONALS Come find all your favorites... PERSONALS PERSONALS w a s hREAL er. $ 3 3ESTATE 5 per month Sunday Movie Policy ed Ad Policy Classified989-772-1061. Ad Rates Classified Ad Rates ntpdev@gmail.com HELP Classifi WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT WANTED TO BUY Spring Semester Leases HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS only WANTED TO BUY discrimination winglyHAPPY acceptbecause advertising of race, which color, refl ects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, ADS HAPPY Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15TO wordBUY minimum GRAFF per classifi ed ad ADS CHEVROLET: PART-TIME $ WANTED HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS ect gin, or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, rightadvertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising FREE Internet, Cable & Shuttle POSITION flexible SECTION hours. Job duities SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT eping on of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM Life. is notCM in keeping Life will with the standards of Life. CM LifeDice!s will computer Bold, italic and italicwork, and taking atCM$7.75 1-2 Issues: per issue 1-2UNWANTED Issues: $7.75 issue minor Bold, Auto Scrap. VEHI-per include

lassifi ifiedseds

UNION SQUARE

1-2 Person 2 Bedroom

*Student ID Required

3.95

cancelling ypographical the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the space used CLES and we buy errands.type Apply in percentered type are centered are them we haul them.per photos, 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 issue running son 7580 Pickard. available along with available along with by limited suchto anonly error. theCredit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of publication.989-772-5428. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of the Life ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, “I’m not Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like ad Issues: attractors. like ad attractors. sifi onsible ed Dept. for the immediately. first We are only responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. • day’s insertion.

TRAVEL

MOTORCYCLES celebrationcinema.com

DOWNTOWN 123 EAST BROADWAY

PERSONALS PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT

We Save HAPPYSOLES! ADS foot lpful 0 care hints .biz !

TRAVEL

REAL ESTATE

Visit our booth at the Housing Fair, enter our drawing HAPPY ADS for a laundry basket of goodies!

WANTED TO BUY

Classifieds: Your system for connections.

Washer & Dryer in Every Unit

Central Michigan LIFE

FOR NOTICES SALE

WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT

1240 E. Broomfield St • (989) 779-7900

PERSONALS

436 Moore Hall • CMU www.cm-life.com • 774-3493

WANTED TO RENT Washer & Dryer • Free Cable / Internet SERVICES

SERVICES LOST & FOUND

www.tallgrassapts.com AUTOS SALE LOST &FOR FOUND

FIND! AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES

GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

HELP FORWANTED RENT

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL WANTED SECTION TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS

PETS

ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL

• Close to Campus • Free Internet & Cable • Washer & Dryer in every unit!

TRAVEL YARD SALE

2-2 BEDROOM NON-SMOKING HOUSES available on attractively landscaped property. Utilities and horseboarding not included. extra.ideas@hotmail.com 248-918-8096. 2012- 2013 RENTAL LISTS Available Now! Partlo Property Management www.partloproperty.com http://www.partloproperty.com 306 E Broadway Suite 2. 989-779-9886

REAL ESTATE

WANTED TO BUY

AVAILABLE NOW: TWO BEDROOM HOUSES. In Mt. Pleasant and near CMU. Starting at $550. Partlo Property Management. www.partloproperty.com 989-779-9886.

Pet Friendly LiveWithUnited.com

used to this much attention.” WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Get noticed with the Classifieds.

Don’t Delay, LEASE TODAY!

FA OF MMIL Y I Visit D MI., P FO O C ou wwwr webs (989)TCA .fam ite for 775- RE 850 ilTO he RENT y WANTED NOTICES

ROOMMATES

772-2222 YARD SALE

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

APPIAN WAY & 1200 W. CAMPUS PERSONALS APARTMENTS

WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS

Office Located at Tallgrass Apartments

Rent a bedroom in my house. You have your own living room. Three hours of babysitting from 6am-7am Wed-Friday is required. For $220.00 a month all utilities paid. No pets. I rent by sememster and it's availabe Jan. 2012. I live 10 miles east of Mt. Pleasant. bluespruceab@yahoo.com

HAPPY ADS M-Th 9-6, Fri 9-5,Sat 12-4

(989) 779-7900

NO $ DUE AT SIGNING!

1240 E. Broomfield St, Mt. Pleasant • Hours: Mon-Thurs 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 12-4

www.tallgrassapts.com • (989) 779-7900

YARDASK SALEABOUT THE TALLGRASS PROMISE

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SUDOKU

SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

PRESENTED BY:

(989)773-1234

Call for today’s specials or order online at: papajohns.com

Trust the Midas Touch MT. PLEASANT 1303 E. Pickard St. (989) 772-2814

Across 1 Magician’s bird of choice 5 Seattle’s Best product, slangily 9 Fall faller 13 Pub picks 14 Special Forces cap 15 Fairy tale starter 16 Strike gold 18 Give __ to: approve 19 Canadian coin nicknamed for the bird on it 20 Hand-waving or finger-pointing 22 For each 23 Mythical Egyptian riddler 25 Cornfield bird 27 Smallest prime number 28 27-Across plus one, in Italy 29 Lines of theater seats 30 Goes down in the west 32 Debatable point 36 Encouragement for a matador 37 Lane straddler

39 LAX hrs. 40 Welsh dog 42 Screwball 43 Dalai __ 44 A bit amiss 46 “Milk” director Van Sant 47 Oval segments 48 Guy “nipping at your nose,” in a holiday song 52 Inquire 53 Rand McNally references 54 Takes home from the pound 57 Yogi, for one 58 Singer of the 1961 #1 song found in the starts of 16-, 23-, 37- and 48-Across 61 Can of worms, e.g. 62 “Drat!” 63 Brooks’s country music partner 64 Sources of immediate cash: Abbr. 65 Mends with thread 66 FBI personnel

–Down 1 Author Roald 2 Assortment 3 President’s weapon 4 Station with game reports and highlights 5 Clampett patriarch 6 Onassis patriarch 7 Brink 8 Declare to be true 9 Despises 10 Boredom 11 Piece of the sky, to Chicken Little 12 Shipping giant 14 “Sayonara!” 17 It’s roughly 21% oxygen 21 Unit of parsley 23 Tinker with 24 Franks 25 Hook nemesis, for short 26 Cylindrical caramel candy 27 General of Chinese cuisine 31 Loud call 33 Auto tune-up item 34 Camp Pendleton

letters 35 LAX incoming hrs. 37 Jazz licks 38 Approves 41 Amusement park racers 43 Longtime Dodger skipper Tommy 45 Brittany brothers 48 Sluglike “Star Wars” crime boss 49 Persistently bothered 50 Allegation 51 Missouri river or tribe 52 Cavity filler’s org. 54 Blissful sighs 55 Camping shelter 56 9-digit IDs 59 Deviate from a course 60 DJ’s stack

Nov. 7, 2011  
Nov. 7, 2011  

Central Michigan Life

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