Page 1

Fashionable Philanthropy NO. 44 | VOL. 98

Community members raise more than $7,000 for breast cancer research efforts Thursday | 10 Editorial

#MeToo

We must hold accountable those who sexually assault, harass | 6 Sports

30 games, 30 losses

Following another defeat, women’s field hockey is on track to be worst in league | 17 News

In the zone

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Planning Commission receives backlash from vote on zoning ordinance Thursday night | 3

OC T. 23, 2017 

| 

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI


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OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

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Fall 2017

NEWS

Griffin Policy Forum

Researchers and policy-makers from across the state met Oct. 20 to discuss Michigan’s Great Lakes.

Off the Record, On the Road

Borders, Boundaries & Migration

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OPINION

Mon., October 30th 7:00 p.m. Park Library Auditorium

The #MeToo movement has shown the world how prevalent sexual misconduct is in the U.S. We shouldn’t let this fade away.

Open to the public. General admission seating.

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SPORTS

Forum Moderator Tim Skubick, senior capitol correspondent for WKAR and anchor and producer of the weekly public television series “Off the Record,” will facilitate a panel conversation on borders, boundaries, and migration.

Redshirt junior Megan O’Neil and senior Taylor Aguillon lead the women’s cross country team to MAC Championships on Oct. 28.

Tim Skubick, WKAR, “Off the Record”

NEWS w

Forum Panelists w

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Dogs, owners raise $800 for Pre-Veterinary club Saturday in 5K event Angel Wings Fund head

12 Damon Brown to speak Monday, Oct. 30

STAFF

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JORDYN HERMANI MANAGING EDITOR EVAN SASIELA

Zoe Clark,

Chuck Stokes,

Bill Ballenger,

Michigan Radio

WXYZ-TV, Channel 7

The Ballenger Report

chsbs.cmich.edu/griffin CMU is an AA/EO institution (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo). Individuals requesting an accommodation should contact 989-774-3341. Produced by CHSBS 10/17.

NEWS EDITOR MITCHELL KUKULKA NEWS EDITOR EMMA DALE FEATURES EDITOR PAIGE SHEFFIELD OPINION EDITOR ELIO STANTE SPORTS EDITOR KULLEN LOGSDON ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR DYLAN GOETZ

Robert and Marjorie Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government

PHOTO EDITOR ARIANA STRZALKA

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8

College of Medicine enters partnership agreement with GVSU Broadcast and Cinematic

w

13 Arts faculty member talks film festival experience

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR MACKENZIE BROCKMAN DESIGN EDITOR ALYSSA TEMPLETON

PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER ISABELLA KROLIKOWSKI

PAGE DESIGNER CONNOR BYRNE

STREET SQUAD MANAGER MITCHELL HATTY

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR RILEY BUSSELL

PROFESSIONAL STAFF

MULTIMEDIA ASSISTANT EDITOR GRANT POLMANTEER

ADVERTISING

MANAGER RACHEL RING MANAGER CLARE COX

MANAGER SUMMER VARNER SOCIAL CAFE MANAGER ZACH NOWAK

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS DAVE CLARK ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS KATHY SIMON PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DAWN PAINE


3

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

NEWS

Planning Commission approves new zoning ordinance to city Greg Horner Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Mount Pleasant Planning Commission members looked stunned following a contentious two-hour-long public hearing regarding the city’s new zoning ordinance. Of the 38 people who spoke at the commission’s Oct. 19 meeting — only three were in favor of approving the plan. Despite objections from those in attendance, the commission voted 7-1 to recommend the ordinance to the City Commission. Commissioner Glen Irwin cast the only no vote. Commissioner Tim Driessnack recused himself due to his ownership of property he felt represented a conflict of interest. “I think it’s a little rich for people to say ‘this is crap, you should pull this and we need to get rid of it,’” said Commissioner William Daley. “But I want to remain sensitive to a community that has obviously organized itself — a little late in the game, thank you.” The zoning ordinance was drafted over the past two years with a large amount of input from community members. However, plans to re-zone Lansing and Franklin streets and University Avenue from multipleresident to single-family housing have started to receive pushback from some people in the area. With Thursday’s recommendation, the ordinance has reached the final phase of implementation — approval from the City Commission — which will have a public hearing on the issue Nov. 13. Members of the Planning Commission were conflicted on how they should vote. Commissioner Michael Kostrzewa proposed a motion to amend the plan and keep the area north of campus a multiple-resident zone. The amendment failed in a tied 4-4 vote. Ultimately, commissioners did agree to include a recommendation that the City Commission strongly look at the area north of campus before making its decision. “This is a beautiful, wonderful, hard-worked-on document that has one major faux pas,” Kostrzewa said. “Person, after person, after person (who are) knowledgeable, professional and from every walk of life has told us we have a faux pas in this document and I want to fix it.” Many of those who spoke during the hearing were developers and realtors, noted Commissioner Lesley Hoenig, and they had plenty of time to give input. Commissioner Sue Horgan told the audience the new ordinance was not a secret and received plenty of advertising. She said she wished those in attendance had voiced their opinions sooner. “I loved everything you said, but there were plenty of groups that said equally compelling things about

Maricruz Patino | Staff Photographer Mount Pleasant residents attend the Mount Pleasant Planning Commission meeting on Oct. 19 in Mount Pleasant City Hall.

wanting to build their life in this town,” Horgan said. Someone in the crowd yelled back — “Where are they?”

THE PUBLIC HEARING Spenser Robinson, the director of real estate at Central Michigan University’s Department of Finance and Law, described himself as an objective observer. He clarified he did not speak on behalf of CMU or own property in the area. Robinson said many parts of the ordinance would improve the city, preserve the area’s character and bring opportunities for economic opportunity. However, he disagreed with the proposed changes to University Avenue and Franklin and Lansing streets. The changes would “undoubtedly reduce economic value” in the short term, Robinson said. He acknowledged zoning is not solely about taxes, but he felt the city’s vision for the area prioritized families over students. “I’ve long proposed that economic development

programs designed to keep even a small percentage of students in the area would transform our region into one of Michigan’s most vibrant,” he said. “Right now, students can enjoy the character we have. If our longterm goal is economic vibrancy and we want students to stay, let’s let them enjoy that character as well.” Roger Fultz, a former Planning Commissioner and the landlord of 1000 S. University Ave., spoke about his frustration dealing with the city. He said he kept quiet when the city told him to pay for repaving his alleyway, improving his sidewalks and installing streetlights on his property. “I can’t remain quiet anymore,” Fultz said. “What is happening is crazy. I bought that house for my retirement and now they’re making rules that could easily become punitive toward myself and other landlords. The word ‘landlord’ is not a swear word. (We’re) people who work hard.” Steve Stressman, a real estate agent at Coldwell w ZONING | 4

RESIDENT CONCERNS NORTH OF CAMPUS The new ordinance would rezone north of campus to owneroccupied single-family dwellings. Owners and developers worry the changes will hurt property values, make it difficult to renovate or repair the buildings. and negatively impact students. City officials have said there’s a shortage of housing available for single-family residents.


NEWS

4

ZONING | CONTINUED FROM 3

Banker Mount Pleasant Realty & Associates, has spoken candidly about his feelings toward various commissions in the past. He accused the planning and city commissions of already making their decisions and said the public hearings are a formality. “It’s been interesting to learn how the sausage is being made,” Stressman said during public comment. “I suspect you all came here with a pre-acceptance. The City Commission has been counting on this, and has put a lot of time and money into this. You’re seeing the local community is starting to become aware of one of the best kept secrets in Mount Pleasant.” One of the three supporters for the ordinance, Kristin LaLonde, is also running for a seat on the

OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM City Commission. She said the ordinance will open Mount Pleasant to a growth boom. Student on-campus living is going down, LaLonde said, because more students are taking classes online. She added no one will want to live in a boardingstyle apartment when that population declines. “We really need to focus on diversifying our economic base and we need to make changes now if that’s going to happen,” LaLonde said. “We can’t make changes when we’re absolutely forced to do it. We need to do it now to prepare for the future.”

AFTER THE VOTE Stressman said the decisionmaking process was deplorable and he is certain the City Commission will approve the ordinance without discussion. “They didn’t think they were going to hear that kind of response from the citizenry

and they are shocked,” Stressman said. “As far as they’re concerned, there wasn’t supposed to be this much discussion. This was supposed to be an easy vote where they could punt it up to Mayor (Kathy) Ling and the ‘Ling dynasty.’” City Planner Jacob Kain said the meeting went as expected. “We anticipated there would be a lot of public interest and I’m glad to see that folks came out and gave their input,” Kain said. “We knew this would be a point of conversation. That area has been a point of conversation for decades. “I didn’t expect this to be an easy decision and it shouldn’t be. It’s a complicated issue and there are pros and cons to both approaches. The Planning Commission made the right choice to suggest this needs to be considered closely by the City Commission before they make their final decision.”

What are your arms up to?

Maybe they should be donating plasma. You can help save a life and earn a little money in about an hour. Let’s have our arms work together, so we can provide plasma to someone who needs it. Let’s work Arm-in-Arm to help save a life.

Brooklin White | Freelance Photographer Beal City 5K winner Angela Murphy and Kinley cross the finish line Oct. 21 at the Doggy Dash 5K race.

Dogs in Halloween costumes race through campus, raise $800 for Pre-Veterinary club By Loreal Nix Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Visit your local BioLife center to donate. 4279 E. Blue Grass Rd. Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 989-773-1500 www.biolifeplasma.com

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Dogs dressed as dragons, candy corn and police officers raced through campus Saturday, Oct. 21 for the fifth annual Doggy Dash 5K Race and Fun Walk. More than 30 participants and their furry companions participated in the event, raising more than $800 for Central Michigan University’s Pre-Veterinary Club. Along with the money raised by participants and donations, the event also had multiple sponsors including North River Animal Hospital, Michigan Wireline Oil Company, Bangor Veterinary Clinic and Animal Health Associates. Port Huron senior Calli Morris, president of the Pre-Veterinary Club, said the objective for

the Doggy Dash 5K Race and Fun Walk is to raise money for the Pre-Veterinary Club. The money is used to travel to the American Pre-Veterinary Medical Association and the West Regional Symposium, host outreach activities with Renaissance Public School Academy and the Mount Pleasant Michigan Kennel Club and work with rehabilitation facilities such as the Association to Rescue Kritters and Crossroads Donkey Rescue. The race started on the corner of Ojibway Court and Washington Street, near the Education and Human Services building, where participants either ran or walked with dogs around CMU’s campus. There was some time set aside for participants as well as the public to pet and cuddle with the dogs. Mount Pleasant junior Erin

Horn participated in the event with her own dog, and heard about the event through her roommate, who was involved in organizing the race. “I’ve always adored animals since I was little, and I’ve witnessed my roommate work hard to organize this event and help animals for the present, as well as for the future,” Horn said. “Not only did this event help raise funds for CMU’s PreVeterinary Club, it also brought together a community of people that deeply care about dogs as much as I do, which made for such a wonderful experience.” Registration for the run/walk was $20, and participants had the opportunity to rent trained therapy dogs for $5. Doggy Dash 5K Race and Fun Walk T-shirts were also on sale to the public for $15.


5

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer

Three-month-old Dexter receives attention from participants at the Doggy Dash 5K on Oct. 21 near the Education and Human Services Building.

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer Cheboygan junior Alyssa Campa receives a high-five from her seven-month-old puppy, Koda, at the Doggy Dash 5K on Oct. 21 near the Education and Human Services Building.

NEWS

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer Walkers in the Doggy Dash 5K follow the sidewalk along Washington Street on Oct. 21.

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer Gladwin resident Karyn Tomczyk recieves the runner-up prize for cutest costume from Port Huron senior Calli Morris during the Doggy Dash on Oct. 21 near the Education and Human Services Building. Tomcyzk went to the event dressed as a police officer with her two Pit Bulls, Elsa and Triv dressed as doughnuts.


OPINION

6

OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Graphic by Alyssa Templeton

#MeToo created a powerful way to raise awareness to the pervasiveness of sexual misconduct in the U.S. This is too important of an issue to ignore.

T

en years ago, activist Tarana Burke started #MeToo. She created it to help empower woman survivors of sexual assault, harassment and exploitation. It was a response to her own experience as a youth camp counselor. She was approached by a young EDITORIAL girl who started to tell her about her step-father and the abuse she was enduring. Burke cut her off. She told the girl she would find another counselor who could “help her better.” In a post on the website of JustBeInc, a youth organization focusing on the well-being of women of color, Burke said, ” I could not muster the energy to tell her

that I understood, that I connected, that I could feel her pain. I couldn’t help her release her shame, or impress upon her that nothing that happened to her was her fault.” #MeToo is a rallying cry for survivors. The words give survivors a way to say, “I hear you. You’re not alone.” Here on campus, we hope survivors feel they have the power and the ability to come forward and be heard. To any survivor who doesn’t share her story, know that you’re never alone. There are always places you can go on. On campus, the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equity (OCRIE) is where survivors can report sexual misconduct. The office is in the Bovee University Center, Room 306. Sexual Aggression Peer Advocates (SAPA) is a group on campus dedi-

cated to listening, helping and giving resources to any survivor of sexual aggression. SAPA has a 24-hour confidential support line and a crisis intervention resource. There is also Listening Ear in Mt. Pleasant. Their 24-hour crisis line where professionals will help you explore options and resources to help you, or even just listen to you if you need to be heard. You are never alone. #MeToo goes beyond the computer screen. It is more than internet advocacy. You would be hard pressed to go anywhere on campus and not find a student, staff or faculty member who isn’t a victim of or knows someone who’s been sexually assaulted or harassed. This movement goes out to them: both the vocal and the silent — the person

who is posting their story about being harassed or assaulted and the person who doesn’t feel comfortable coming forward with that information yet. This is for the woman who has her butt slapped walking to class or is catcalled and infantilized at work or on her way home. It’s for all the hey baby’s and much too forward touches we simply excuse as being overly friendly. It’s for the people who feel responsible to explain away another person’s guilt by wondering if they did something to lead their harasser on or if they would have acted another way, would this have happened? We say, enough. We say being complacent and ignoring the issue isn’t enough anymore. And in this newsroom, along with countless others on and around campus, we also say #MeToo.

WHERE TO GO FOR HELP OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS AND INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY: 989. 774. 3253 OCRIE@CMICH.EDU SEXUAL AGGRESSION PEER ADVOCATES: 989. 774. 2255 SAPA@CMICH.EDU LISTENING EAR: 989. 772. 2918


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

OPINION

Letters to the

EDITOR

Central Michigan University needs to focus on student-centered advising TO THE EDITOR: The Central Michigan Life editorial titled “Don’t let CMU overwhelm you” focuses on a central argument that, in my mind, presents a real hurdle to overcome for student success. It is advising. In 2011, a collaborative effort was initiated between Central Michigan University’s Office of Information Technology and the Registrar’s Office to advance advising by establishing a degree audit system. I was an advocate of this initiative and assisted in my role as interim associate dean and, later, a faculty member. The goal was to make transcripts and

degree progress available to students and advisers in real time. For me, the model for this effort was the Banner Advising System, a software program I became familiar with when I taught at the University of Idaho. I found the program to be intuitive and effective, allowing for posting midterm grades, access to a student’s academic history and an adviser approval mechanism for class registration. Why the need for mid-term grades and registration approval? To assure students would meet with their adviser every semester — to discuss progress up to and including the current semester, address chal-

lenges with future course offerings and to demonstrate real, tangible support and concern for student success before they registered for the following semester. What has become the CMU ‘Advising Admin’ was built on Systems, Applications and Products in data processing (SAP). Simply put, it lacks the functionality of a system such as Banner. Whenever I suggest moving to a more proactive advising system, many administrators and faculty colleagues respond with everything from a blank stare, to declarations of walkouts and threats of culture wars.

Not many seem interested in implementing a proven advising system universities in Michigan and throughout the country have been using for decades. Informal discussions with students concerning a more proactive advising approach typically results in a split response. Half see some merit in semester meetings with their adviser and the other half see it as a hassle. It seems to me, increasing face-to-face time with students to discuss their progress, challenges and goals is a great way to nurture student success and increase retention rates. This is entirely in keeping with

CMU’s 2017-2022 Strategic Plan. Students should not be held accountable for every word in the Academic Bulletin and should be guided by the experienced and knowledgeable faculty in their degree majors. Admittedly, high levels of advising occurs in pockets around campus. The fact that advising at large is addressed broadly via an editorial in the student paper is an indication that something significant is amiss. We can do better. For the sake of our students, we must do better. AL WIDLEY Professor, Art & Design

You should care about water privatization — it is a threat to all of us TO THE EDITOR: In Mecosta County, right next door to Isabella County, Nestlé pumps thousands of gallons of water per day out of the local aquifer and sells it for profit. When large companies like Nestlé buy large sums of fresh water and sell it back to us in plastic bottles, it is called water privatization. Companies like this do not believe water is a human right. In 2005, former CEO of Nestlé, Peter Brabeck, suggested claiming water is a human right is “extreme” and then asserted water is a “foodstuff,” a commodity and should be valued and distributed by a free market. Nestlé would argue that public water systems do not need to be maintained, because bottled water is

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Jordyn Hermani MANAGING EDITOR | Evan Sasiela OPINION EDITOR | Elio Stante MULTIMEDIA EDITOR | Riley Bussell NEWS EDITOR | Mitchel Kukulka NEWS EDITOR | Emma Dale FEATURES EDITOR | Paige Sheffield DESIGN EDITOR | Alyssa Templeton

available. These companies do not consider the millions of Americans whose only source of water is from the tap. These companies lobby for lax regulations and try to keep cities from investing in their water systems. When states and people invest in private water companies, they stop investing in public water infrastructure. Water treatment facilities and pipes do not get updated when people believe there is not a need for them. Nestlé and corporations like it, are the biggest threat to our nation’s public water supply. With tap water readily available and accessible to all Americans, no one thinks of the repercussions of what a plastic bottle of water can do to a community.

The water in those bottles becomes a commodity, not a right. As climate change worsens and water pollution regulations are weakened, there will be a continued lack of fresh water. Nestlé will continue buying the remaining sources and selling them to the highest bidder. Central Michigan University invests in companies like Nestlé by allowing them to sell plastic bottled water in campus stores and vending machines. Our tuition funds organizations that are taking away people’s water. Doing so states that CMU does not believe every person deserves access to safe and affordable drinking water. CMU is part of the reason some Americans no longer have safe and affordable drinking water.

CMU needs to be conscious of their actions by understanding exactly what happens when they allow water privatization on their campus. CMU should be ashamed for investing in a company that is destroying our ecosystems and making a human right into a profit margin. Students need to be aware of the consequences buying plastic water bottles out of the vending machine create. Every time you choose a plastic water bottle you take away someone else’s right to water. Take Back the Tap is a registered student organization on campus advocating to end the sale of single-use plastic water bottles on campus. We are competing in a nationwide contest to win $1,500 to build CMU’s public water infrastructure. The

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising

school with the most texts wins. If you believe water is a human right text “I Heart Tap” to 69866 and reply with your full cmich.edu email address. If CMU’s Take Back the Tap campaign wins, it will demonstrate to the administration that students believe our university should not invest in water privatization. Winning would demonstrate that CMU believes water is a human right for all. Students need to fight back against water privatization. Just because you can afford a bottle of water doesn’t mean everyone can. You’ll never know how much you depend on water until it’s gone. ALLISON LAPLATT President of Take Back the Tap South Lyon Senior

Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Nonuniversity subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


7

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

OPINION

Letters to the

EDITOR

Central Michigan University needs to focus on student-centered advising TO THE EDITOR: The Central Michigan Life editorial titled “Don’t let CMU overwhelm you” focuses on a central argument that, in my mind, presents a real hurdle to overcome for student success. It is advising. In 2011, a collaborative effort was initiated between Central Michigan University’s Office of Information Technology and the Registrar’s Office to advance advising by establishing a degree audit system. I was an advocate of this initiative and assisted in my role as interim associate dean and, later, a faculty member. The goal was to make transcripts and

degree progress available to students and advisers in real time. For me, the model for this effort was the Banner Advising System, a software program I became familiar with when I taught at the University of Idaho. I found the program to be intuitive and effective, allowing for posting midterm grades, access to a student’s academic history and an adviser approval mechanism for class registration. Why the need for mid-term grades and registration approval? To assure students would meet with their adviser every semester — to discuss progress up to and including the current semester, address chal-

lenges with future course offerings and to demonstrate real, tangible support and concern for student success before they registered for the following semester. What has become the CMU ‘Advising Admin’ was built on Systems, Applications and Products in data processing (SAP). Simply put, it lacks the functionality of a system such as Banner. Whenever I suggest moving to a more proactive advising system, many administrators and faculty colleagues respond with everything from a blank stare, to declarations of walkouts and threats of culture wars.

Not many seem interested in implementing a proven advising system universities in Michigan and throughout the country have been using for decades. Informal discussions with students concerning a more proactive advising approach typically results in a split response. Half see some merit in semester meetings with their adviser and the other half see it as a hassle. It seems to me, increasing face-to-face time with students to discuss their progress, challenges and goals is a great way to nurture student success and increase retention rates. This is entirely in keeping with

CMU’s 2017-2022 Strategic Plan. Students should not be held accountable for every word in the Academic Bulletin and should be guided by the experienced and knowledgeable faculty in their degree majors. Admittedly, high levels of advising occurs in pockets around campus. The fact that advising at large is addressed broadly via an editorial in the student paper is an indication that something significant is amiss. We can do better. For the sake of our students, we must do better. AL WIDLEY Professor, Art & Design

You should care about water privatization — it is a threat to all of us TO THE EDITOR: In Mecosta County, right next door to Isabella County, Nestlé pumps thousands of gallons of water per day out of the local aquifer and sells it for profit. When large companies like Nestlé buy large sums of fresh water and sell it back to us in plastic bottles, it is called water privatization. Companies like this do not believe water is a human right. In 2005, former CEO of Nestlé, Peter Brabeck, suggested claiming water is a human right is “extreme” and then asserted water is a “foodstuff,” a commodity and should be valued and distributed by a free market. Nestlé would argue that public water systems do not need to be maintained, because bottled water is

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Jordyn Hermani MANAGING EDITOR | Evan Sasiela OPINION EDITOR | Elio Stante MULTIMEDIA EDITOR | Riley Bussell NEWS EDITOR | Mitchel Kukulka NEWS EDITOR | Emma Dale FEATURES EDITOR | Paige Sheffield DESIGN EDITOR | Alyssa Templeton

available. These companies do not consider the millions of Americans whose only source of water is from the tap. These companies lobby for lax regulations and try to keep cities from investing in their water systems. When states and people invest in private water companies, they stop investing in public water infrastructure. Water treatment facilities and pipes do not get updated when people believe there is not a need for them. Nestlé and corporations like it, are the biggest threat to our nation’s public water supply. With tap water readily available and accessible to all Americans, no one thinks of the repercussions of what a plastic bottle of water can do to a community.

The water in those bottles becomes a commodity, not a right. As climate change worsens and water pollution regulations are weakened, there will be a continued lack of fresh water. Nestlé will continue buying the remaining sources and selling them to the highest bidder. Central Michigan University invests in companies like Nestlé by allowing them to sell plastic bottled water in campus stores and vending machines. Our tuition funds organizations that are taking away people’s water. Doing so states that CMU does not believe every person deserves access to safe and affordable drinking water. CMU is part of the reason some Americans no longer have safe and affordable drinking water.

CMU needs to be conscious of their actions by understanding exactly what happens when they allow water privatization on their campus. CMU should be ashamed for investing in a company that is destroying our ecosystems and making a human right into a profit margin. Students need to be aware of the consequences buying plastic water bottles out of the vending machine create. Every time you choose a plastic water bottle you take away someone else’s right to water. Take Back the Tap is a registered student organization on campus advocating to end the sale of single-use plastic water bottles on campus. We are competing in a nationwide contest to win $1,500 to build CMU’s public water infrastructure. The

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising

school with the most texts wins. If you believe water is a human right text “I Heart Tap” to 69866 and reply with your full cmich.edu email address. If CMU’s Take Back the Tap campaign wins, it will demonstrate to the administration that students believe our university should not invest in water privatization. Winning would demonstrate that CMU believes water is a human right for all. Students need to fight back against water privatization. Just because you can afford a bottle of water doesn’t mean everyone can. You’ll never know how much you depend on water until it’s gone. ALLISON LAPLATT President of Take Back the Tap South Lyon Senior

Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Nonuniversity subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


NEWS

8

OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

College of Medicine signs partnership with Grand Valley By Samantha Shriber Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

A new partnership agreement will give pre-medicine students from Grand Valley State University a fast track to Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine. CMED receives more than 7,000 applicants each year and five of the 104 available positions will be reserved for GVSU premedical students. The agreement will provide GVSU students with waived application fees and place them on an earlier admissions timeline. A formal signing of the agreement between the universities took place Oct. 19 in the CMED Building. Provost Michael Gealt said similar plans are in place with Albion College and Saginaw Valley State University. “Our goal is to have a number of these because we really do want to have students that are from Michigan (and) are educated (in) Michigan all the way through their medical learning and residency to be a provider here in the state,” Gealt said. President George Ross said the partnership comes from a shared goal to provide physicians in underserved communities across Michigan. “It’s historic — it’s a continuation of CMU’s commitment to the state of Michigan,” Ross said.

Schyler Boone | Freelance Photographer Left to right, members of GVSU and CMU administration pose for a photo after CMU President George Ross and GVSU President Thomas Hass sign a cooperative agreement that grants early admission assurance to GVSU pre-medicine students to CMU’s College of Medicine on Oct. 19 in the Health Professions building.

Underserved populations reside in both rural and urban areas, Gealt said. “Rural areas tend to have very few choices in medical providers and it’s because the population density is so low,” Gealt said.

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NOV. 6, 2017 • 5 PM The Editor In Chief is expected to work Sunday and Wednesday during the semester. 436 Moore Hall, CMU Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 (989) 774-1678

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is responsible for directing the overall editorial operation of the paper. The editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The editor has final student authority in decisions, is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 to select the Editor in Chief of CM Life for Spring 2018. The editor will interview and hire all other section editors prior to the end of the fall 2017 semester. In order to facilitate electronic transmission of application materials to board members, PLEASE EMAIL a copy of your resume in a PDF format, email a Microsoft Word document answering the application questions at cm-life.com/contact-us and have your letters of recommendation emailed to: clark6da@cmich.edu.

LIFE IN BRIEF

“Underserved populations in urban areas tend to have few providers because the populations tend to not have the dollars that would serve a vast medical enterprise.” Gealt said providing an early assurance program to GVSU students will allow CMED to provide the best medical care for Michiganders throughout the state. GVSU President Thomas Haas said he is thrilled for the new opportunity granted to his students. “I saw that it’d be a good fit,” Haas said in regarding the universities’ compatibility with one another. “We had our faculties and our staffs put together what I think is a really good model of collaboration for creating pathways for students from Grand Valley.” First-year medical student Shelby Falkenhagen, a GVSU alumnae, first visited CMU while touring undergraduate programs with her younger sister. GVSU shouldn’t be punished for not having a medical school, she said, and the new program will provide students like her with a place to continue learning. “Grand Valley really prepared me to come to medical school,” Falkenhagen said. “The classes there are very relevant to what I’m doing now and the professors were amazing.” The partnership also creates opportunities for GVSU pre-med students to interact with CMU medical students. “I am so thrilled we’re providing an opportunity and a pathway for some very, very talented students,” Haas said.

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

PARANORMAL RESEARCHER TO LECTURE AND LEAD STUDENTS ON CAMPUS GHOST HUNT The first 40 people to arrive at paranormal researcher Chris Fleming’s lecture will have the opportunity to hunt for ghosts around campus with him following the event. The event is scheduled for 8 p.m. Oct. 26 in Plachta Auditorium and is presented by Central Michigan University’s Program Board. Fleming will begin with an hour-long presentation about his interactions with ghosts and his experiences on various TV programs. Fleming has been featured on “Ghost Hunters,” “Ghost Adventures” and “Scariest Places on Earth.” The hour-long ghost hunt will take place after the lecture. Attendees are encouraged to bring cameras and phones to record anything that happens during the ghost hunt, said Olivia Franklin, Program

Board’s special events director. Fleming will teach participants how to use flashlights to hunt for ghosts. Franklin believed Fleming would be a great speaker to bring to campus for Halloween. She CHRIS FLEMING expects the event to Paranormal researcher and be popular among ghost hunting students, as Fleming television star came to CMU three years ago and drew a crowd of more than 300 students. The event is free and open to the public.

-Paige Sheffield, Features Editor


9

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

Lead officials discuss invasive species, global climate change at Great Lakes Science in Action symposium By Ashley Schafer Staff Reporter

NEWS

A cappella group reflects on friendships built through music By Lauren Brown Staff Reporter

news@cm-life.com

news@cm-life.com

The greatest time to advocate for the protection of the Great Lakes is from January to March. This was one takeaway offered by research professionals and policy makers who gathered Oct. 20 in the Biosciences Building to discuss the state of the Great Lakes at the fourth annual Great Lakes Science in Action Symposium. “We should do everything we can to introduce people from all over the world to these lakes that we treasure, to help them understand the threats they face,” said U.S. Congressman John Moolenaar, R-Midland, a speaker at the event. “We should do it with facts and frank discussion — without hate.” The event featured speeches by Moolenaar, State Sen. Darwin Booher, and two discussion panels. Topics included the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, issues concerning invasive species in the Great Lakes global warming’s effects on Michigan’s lakes. The Great Lakes region has a $6 trillion GDP, making it the third largest economy in the world. The lakes are a critical resource that provide a unique ecosystem, and one fifth of the world’s fresh water. They form major trade routes and an international border, making the Great Lakes an international concern. Moolenaar started the event with his overview of Great Lake concerns at the federal level. Moolenaar is a member of the House Committee on Appropriations, which earlier this year saw a proposal to cut funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). Protests from several states, including Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan, caused the proposal to be thrown out. The House of Representatives passed an appropriation for $300 million to go toward environmental agencies and the GLRI – $157 million of which goes specifically to Michigan. Moolenaar sees an obvious role for the federal government in managing the Great Lakes region and encourages people to eliminate the idea that the Great Lakes are simply a regional issue.

A NATIONAL EFFORT Darwin Booher, state senator and vice chair of the Great Lakes Legislative Caucus, followed up Moolenaar’s comments with a discussion on the goals of his caucus. One main goal is the communication between the regions that make up the Great Lake Basin, which include: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and

Austin Berghoefer | Freelance Photographer U.S. Congressman John Moolenaar speaks at the Great Lakes Science in Action symposium on Oct. 20 in the Biosciences Building.

parts of Canada like Québec and Ontario. Booher ended his speech with an answer to an audience member’s question about the best time to advocate for issues concerning the Great Lakes. He stressed the importance of advocacy during the months when budgets are being allocated, and policies are being voted on, which is roughly January to March each year. “I tell people, there’s no reason for you to advocate for something in the budget in July, August and September, because no one’s looking at it,” Booher said. After Booher, a panel made of five professionals spoke about current Great Lake issues from the state and federal perspectives. Panel members included: • Danielle Chesky, Enviromental Affairs officer and Canadian Embassy member. • Senior legislative assistant Jordan Dickinson. • Anne Garwood, Great Lakes coastal wetlands ecologist and lead staff on Michigan’s wetland monitoring efforts. • Seth J. Herbst, aquatic invasive species coordinator for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. • Eva A. Vrana, legislative assistant for Congressman Moolenaar. Faculty member Donald Uzarski, director of the CMU Institute for Great Lakes Research, served as moderator. One of the topics discussed in the panel was the issue of aquatic invasive species , such as the four species of Asian carp that have been detected in the Great Lakes basin. These species pose a threat to the ecosystem of the lakes and the economy. Other invasive species include New Zealand mud snails and sea lamprey. Herbst works on implementing the invasive species management plan which is funded

through the GLRI. “Prevention of aquatic invasive species is always the most effective use of resources,” Herbst said. “The next step is early detection, eradication and control.” Last July, Red Swamp crayfish, one of the world’s most widespread invasive species, was detected in Michigan. Since they were detected, there has been active trapping and monitoring to try to reduce any potential negative effects the crayfish may have caused. Citizen science and local groups have been critical to early detection of a species, Herbst said. A second panel, focusing on Great Lakes science efforts, consisted of: • Marcello Graziano, Daria Kluver and Andrew R. Mahon, all members of CMU’s Institute for Great Lakes Research. • Kelly F. Robinson, from the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. • Michael J. Siefkes, Sea Lamprey Control Program manager. Ian Davison, senior vice provost of the Academic Reorganization Initiative, served as the moderator. One highlight was presented through research by Kluver, who looks at temperature and precipitation patterns and how they are affecting the Great Lakes. Last year was the warmest year globally to date, a 150 year record, and Michigan had the fifth driest month in September on record. Studying global patterns, Kluver and her colleagues found what happens in the arctic during the spring impacts precipitation in the Great Lakes region in the following fall months. “This means what happens in the arctic affects us here,” Kluver said. “These global climate problems impact us and we can’t just ignore them. We can’t just not talk about climate change.”

Harmony between members of student a cappella group Central Harmony goes well beyond sound. Music is what brought members of the registered student organization together, but they’ve also developed great friendships. They especially love coming up with jokes and puns involving the group’s initials, CH. Central Harmony has a fall concert, which members refer to as a ‘CHoncert,’ on Saturday, Nov. 11. The time and location are to be determined. “When we want to do a group hug, we’ll call it a ‘CHug,’” said Jackson junior Emily Warriner. Westphalia senior Colton Hengesbach said when the group was discussing a camping trip, they called it ‘CHamping.’ CH is one of three a cappella singing groups at Central Michigan University, along with On the Rox and Fish N Chips. The group is currently compound of 17 members who have a passion for performing, and rehearse intensively for the various performances they put on throughout the year. Hengesbach said he joined the a cappella group because his friend talked him into it. However, he believes it to be one of the best decisions he has ever made. Stevenson senior Kaity Wade, the current president of Central Harmony, said she was involved in an a cappella group when she went to Grand Valley State University. She transferred to CMU her sophomore year, and had no idea there were a cappella groups on campus until her roommate suggested she audition. In order to become part of this RSO, a student must go through an audition process that is only held at the beginning of the year each year. The RSO typically hosts two audition days where prospective members sing a verse and chorus of a song of their choosing, and one day for callbacks. Anyone is eligible to audition, but the selection process is often difficult as they are only allowed 18 members and currently have 17. Although they are full for this year because members are satisfied with their current sound and are not looking for an 18th member, Hengesbach said they encourage new people to come and audition next year. The group picks songs to perform that are special to them, while also staying current. Apart from gaining new friends and spending their time doing what they love, Central Harmony members also perform at different events and competitions throughout the year.


NEWS

10

OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

raises $7,

Employees of Graff Chevrolet cheer on the men modeling bras during Bras for a Cause on Oct. 19 at Hunter’s Ale House.

All the money raised wi By Samantha Shriberw Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

United Way President and CEO Tom Olver takes bids during Bras for a Cause on Oct. 19 at Hunter’s Ale House.

Men strutted in original, handcrafted bras and walked the catwalk at a local bar Oct. 19 to raise money for breast cancer awareness and research. Hunter’s Ale House, at 4855 E. Bluegrass Road, was packed as participants bid on creative, handcrafted bras in the live auction and benefit gala. The event raised $7,010 for breast cancer research. The event was hosted by the radio station WCFX with proceeds going to Community Cancer Services of Isabella County and the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute of McLaren Central Michigan Morey Cancer Center. Sponsors included the Mount Pleasant Area

Chamber of Commerce, STIR Craft Cocktails, the Women’s Medical Center in Mount Pleasant and the Hunter Brands. This was the seventh time Floyd Evans, WCFX director of sales, oversaw a bra auction for breast cancer research and awareness. It was his first time doing it through WCFX. “Everywhere I’ve worked, we bring this event out,” he said. “All the money stays here locally.” Evans said the cause is close to his heart. His mother and sister both were diagnosed with breast cancer. Mount Pleasant resident Luann Baldwin receives chemotherapy from the Karmanos Cancer Institute as a breast cancer patient. She said she attended the event to enjoy a night out with friends.


CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23, 2017

11

NEWS

,000 toward breast cancer research Photos by Alison Zywicki, Freelance Photographer

Central Michigan University senior AJ Firsht, representing “Manpower”, dances for Mount Pleasant resident Chelsea Lynn during Bras for a Cause on Oct. 19 at Hunter’s Ale House.

ill go to cancer services “It’s great everybody (came) out and is trying to get breast cancer awareness out there,” she said. Diane Recker, the designer of the bra for Karmanos, used lemons as inspiration for its design. She titled the bra “Squeeze for a Cause: Make Sure You Get Your Yearly.” “Breast cancer is very important in our lives,” she said, citing her friendship with Baldwin as an inspiration. Megan Bair, president of Community Cancer Services, became involved with breast cancer awareness, research and funding after her mother-in-law passed away after a 13-year battle. WCFX and other key sponsors invited Bair to attend Thursday’s event to represent her organization and to help promote its mission in person. “They approached us wondering if we would

be interested in attending and sharing some of our survivors’ stories,” Bair said. “They did a wonderful job and just asked us to show up. This is a fantastic attendance for their first year.” President Greg “Ryno” Rynearson and Vice President Alan “Bubba” White of Cops & Doughnuts, were featured as two of the 14 male models showcasing bras. Rynearson said he has no problem placing himself in costumes or what some might describe as embarrassing situations for a good cause. He said he always has a fun time participating in breast cancer-related events. “My family’s been blessed, but I know so many that have passed away with cancer and we just got to do everything we can for it,” Rynearson said. “We’re going to find a cure.”

Bras worn during the bidding lay out on a table backstage during Bras for a Cause on Oct. 19 at Hunter’s Ale House.

Zack Nowak representing Central Michigan Life comes backstage after modeling his pink infused newspaper bra during Bras for a Cause on Oct. 19 at Hunter’s Ale House.


NEWS

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OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

LIFE IN BRIEF

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS LECTURE TO BE HELD OCT. 30 Damon Brown, director of Student Activities and Involvement, will give a keynote speech for Breast Cancer Awareness Month at the end of October. This Central Michigan University Program Board event, “Peace Beyond Understanding: A Family’s Journey Through Cancer” is scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 30 in Anspach Hall room 162. Brown will discuss losing his wife, Keisha Brown, to breast cancer, and how her diagnosis in 2007 impacted

his family. He will also discuss the Keisha Y. Brown Angel DAMON Wings BROWN Fund, an organization founded by Keisha. The organization provides financial assistance to children who have lost a parent to cancer, offering scholarships to college students and decreasing

the financial burden placed on surviving parents. The Keisha Y. Brown Angel Wings Fund also focuses on raising awareness about cancer and positively impacting individuals and families who have been affected by cancer. For more information about the Angel Wings Fund, visit angelwingsfund. org or facebook.com/ AngelWingsFund -Paige Sheffield, Features Editor

Courtesy Photo | Naomi Evans David Garcia Project participant completes an activity that simulates having a disability.

Student volunteers lead interactive sessions during Disabilities Awareness Month By Zoe Newmann Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

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This Disabilities Awareness Month, senior Naomi Evans is eager to make a difference for people with disabilities through the David Garcia Project. “(The David Garcia Project) helps students see different perspectives and makes it easier to include others with disabilities in everyday life,” Evans said. The David Garcia Project is a Mary Ellen Brandell Volunteer Center program that provides learning experiences facilitated by students for their peers. The program works to advocate for people with disabilities by educating Central Michigan University students through activities and reflections that simulate what it might be like to have various disabilities. A Disabilities Awareness Month open session is scheduled for 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 23 in the Bovee University Center Lakeshore Room. The session will include an

educational component allowing students to learn how government policies and other factors have helped and impacted students with disabilities. The session will also include conversations on how student with disabilities are taught nationwide and how special education can be improved. Evans, who is a student coordinator for the David Garcia Project, feels these sessions are important to CMU students. It helps create an awareness that allows students to become more inclusive toward students with disabilities, she said. Students on campus who may not usually be able to participate in events could if other students put a greater effort into being inclusive, she added. The program holds open sessions twice a month. When the student facilitators host sessions, they conduct simulations. These include a wheelchair and dyslexia simulation. The wheelchair simulation allows students to go to a ramp in the UC and use a wheelchair to be mobile. The dyslexia simulation requires students to read a piece of

writing that resembles how someone with dyslexia would view words. Students are tested on the information they have retained. The simulations are meant to help CMU students understand how people with disabilities lead their everyday lives. Evans started working with the David Garcia Project as a facilitator. Facilitators are the students involved in the program who lead the activities. Evans is now a student coordinator that oversees the facilitators. She also advertises and holds training sessions with the facilitators. She hopes to help bring awareness to disabilities and create a conducive environment for all to succeed. Zachary Evans, a graduate assistant at the Volunteer Center, said another important event for learning about disabilities is Issue day on Saturday, Oct. 28. Issue Day is an annual social justice conference hosted by the Volunteer Center that focuses on exploring issues that affect the world, including disability awareness. The conference begins at 9 a.m. in the UC.


13

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

NEWS

BCA professor discusses Traverse City Film Festival, student work ry on social justice and design with David Stairs and he’s on sabbatical shooting in Africa right now. In Europe, I believe we were interviewing designers all over the country, as well as in San Francisco and Los Angeles. That’s what I’m doing right now. I believe in the work we’re doing.

By Corey Micho Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Eric Limarenko has been teaching students in the School of Broadcast and Cinematic Arts the intricacies of film making since 2009. He currently teaches three classes on video production, ranging from basic to graduate level. Some of his past work includes editing commercials for companies like Ford and Wendy’s and working with musicians Zac Brown of the Zac Brown Band and Trey Anastasio of Phish. Most recently, his reputation brought him to lead a lecture on low-budget filmmaking at the Traverse City Film Festival this summer. CM LIFE: What did you do at the festival? Limarenko: There’s a program at the festival called “Film School” that allows people to attend a lecture. I believe it’s $5 a ticket and experts speak on different topics. I did one last year and they invited me back again this year to talk about filming video on a budget – mainly about the use of lighting on a budget. What is recruitment like at the festival? People at the lectures tend to be looking to get in the film industry. Having the College of Communication and Fine Arts and BCA attend gets those people excited and helps brand Central Michigan University. Being seen with the same signage that also features Michigan State University and University of Michigan puts us on the same level. What were the specifics on what you spoke about?

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer Broadcast and Cinematic Arts faculty member Eric Limarenko interacts with graduate student Kayla Coonie on Oct. 13 in Moore Hall, Room 185.

We were looking at investing in production gear you’d really need. I can simply buy a $3 piece of poster board and use the white for the poster board to bounce off light, instead of buying expensive lights. When you handle hot lights, you can go to Menards and get gardening gloves that will work just as well for that purpose. We also talked about the recent influx of LED lights. We talked about different time lighting setups like the traditional three-point lighting and using room lighting and sunlight. We also looked at what sort of look you can get from what position the sun is in the sky with the magic hour and sunrise hour. What is the “magic hour?” The “magic hour” is the hour right before the sun’s going down. It gives you a certain look that can’t be replicated. A good example of it in practice is the film “Days of Heaven,” which was shot primarily during the magic hour. Did you show any of your work at the festival? We are able to showcase CMU work, so we played films from the BCA 521 cinematography class. We also showed some collaboration

films with Heather Beardslee’s dance class and Jay Batzner’s music class. The last thing we showed was my short film, Whatnots. It’s made up of 13 music videos based on the album I wrote and performed. They’re linked together to make one narrative, so it’s like my version of Pink Floyd’s “The Wall.” Were there other films from students or professors featured at the festival? We had one of our graduate students, Mason Flick, show his documentary “Ithaca: The Climb,” which was shown at the Opera House in Traverse City. It was sold out and there were people standing in line to see if they could get in. It was an exciting night; there was a great reception and applause. Unfortunately, Mason couldn’t come due to a prior engagement, so myself and CCFA dean Janet Hethorn did a Q&A after the session and we answered the questions we could about the film and specifically the CCFA because this is also a recruiting event for us. What are you working on now? I’ve got three documentaries happening right now.

One is in post-production and that is called “Nor a Drop to Drink” and that’s with a sociology professor, Cedric Taylor, and it’s about the Flint water crisis. Cedric shot it and did all the interviews and he came to me and asked me

if I could edit it. The other one is about women in radio and the challenges they face, specifically on air but all positions in radio, and that’s with Patty Williamson from the BCA department. We are doing a documenta-

Any advice for new filmmakers? The most important advice I’d give is just do it. Don’t be held back by equipment limitations that you think you have, just do it, even if it’s not good. You just have to keep doing it over and over and over again, make all your mistakes and you learn from the last one and you move on.

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SPORTS

14

OCT. 14, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Football builds confidence at Ball State before Western game By Kullen Logsdon Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Coming off a 30-10 defeat to Toledo on homecoming, Central Michigan football head coach John Bonamego expected better results against Ball State on Saturday. He wasn’t disappointed. CMU dominated Ball State 56-9 at Scheumann Stadium — scoring a season-high eight touchdowns. The Chippewas (4-4, 2-2 Mid-American Conference) earned a win they needed to keep pace in the MAC West Division. CMU now has more than a week to prepare for rival Western Michigan on Nov. 1. Bonamego said he was “very pleased” with his team’s response this week. “Coaches and players did a good job of staying together, staying the course and really continuing to grind,” he said. “It’s tough when you come off a loss like we had a week ago. To be able to bounce back this way is good.” The Chippewas tallied 455 total yards on Saturday, including a season-high of 256 rushing yards.

Sophomore running back Jonathan Ward had 99 yards rushing on 13 carries and two touchdowns. Graduate transfer quarterback Shane Morris completed 16-of-21 passes for 199 yards and four touchdowns. Morris found senior wide receiver Corey Willis for three touchdowns against Ball State. Willis, after missing three games with a broken hand, rebounded with five catches for 98 yards. Morris said having a balanced attack allowed the offense to pick apart Ball State’s defense. “It changes the complete outlook of the game,” he said. “We’re not throwing the ball 45-to-50 times a game and that’s what the offense is built to do and we’ve been successful in doing that.” CMU led 28-6 after halftime but didn’t take its foot off the gas after the break — outscoring BSU 31-3 in the second half. Senior defensive end Joe Ostman was in the Cardinals’ backfield throughout the game. He registered a game-high four sacks. Ostman now leads the country with 10 sacks on the season. Ostman said the defense stayed with its game plan because CMU had the lead. “Just playing with the lead kind of forces (the

MORRIS’ BOUNCE BACK GAME At Ball State Saturday

4 Touchdowns 16 Completions 199 Passing Yards 0 Interceptions

IN THE TOLEDO LOSS, MORRIS HAD 182 PASSING YARDS, 1 TOUCHDOWN AND 2 INTERCEPTIONS.

Cardinals) to throw. It puts their back against the wall,” he said. “I think the defensive line, the defense as a whole, played very hard today. We knew that if we kept rushing hard we’d get after them and that’s what happened.

“We know that Western’s next. Western’s a huge game and it goes without being said.” Kickoff against the Broncos is at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 1 at Waldo Stadium in Kalamazoo. The game will be televised on ESPN2.


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

SPORTS

Two cross-country runners draw on unique Volleyball team ends backgrounds for effective team leadership 4-game losing streak with 3-0 home win

By Jake Clark Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Redshirt junior Megan O’Neil and senior newcomer Taylor Aguillon are leading the Central Michigan women’s cross-country team through the first two months. In the season-opening home meet, Aguillon took second and O’Neil placed third. At the Michigan State Invitational, O’Neil finished sixth and Aguillon placed seventh. In her third season with CMU, O’Neil is on the “Leadership Council,” which is a group of the teams’ captains, voted on by the athletes. She’s been competing since her stint as a redshirt freshman at Wisconsin — taking ninth last year at the Mid-American Conference Championships. Aguillon, a recent transfer from Lansing Community College, didn’t pick up running until after high school. “Playmakers, a shoe store in Lansing, has a series of races and different 5Ks over the summer,” Aguillon said. “Most of them are for charities, so I started picking up running from there then running and training on my own.” She joined the running club at CMU last year, and later was recruited to join the varsity team. “It’s been amazing,” Aguillon said. “I never did cross (country) or track in high school, so to be running for a school like Central is just a crazy story for me.” O’Neil said it’s her job to help the newcomers like Aguillon. “We have a lot of new people to this level of cross country,” she said. “That makes it all really exciting.” By using her background in dietetics, O’Neil excels as a team captain. She said knowing about nutrition is very helpful because runners fuel them-

By Avery Jennings Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Senior distance cross country runner Taylor Aguillon and redshirt junior distance cross country runner Megan O’Neil pose for a portrait on Oct. 5 at the Indoor Athletic Complex.

selves before every meet. “It’s thinking about what can I get for not only myself, but for my teammates, too. Being able to spot a budding eating disorder in a teammate is really helpful because that’s probably one of the top things that takes girls down.”

COACHING CHANGE In her first year as CMU director of track and field/cross country, Jenny Sweiton said having a veteran like O’Neil help with the transition has been a blessing. “Megan’s always been one of the top runners on the team,” Sweiton said. “It’s been amazing to have her because I’m new to the program, so I’ve been able to sound off her questions like, ‘how can I make this transition as easy as possible for everybody?’” O’Neil thinks very highly

of Sweiton. “We only have a couple returners,” O’Neil said. “Most don’t know anything other than Jenny. At first, we weren’t too sure about the change in leadership. Then, as soon as she stepped on campus, we were like, ‘Wow, we’re definitely going places.” Aguillon said having a coach to whom she can relate has been very helpful in making a comfortable situation for the both of them. The feeling is mutual, with Sweiton calling Aguillon “fearless.” “For (Aguillon) to have the success she has, being so new to the sport, it’s one of the things you love about cross,” Sweiton said. “Thank goodness she finally found her thing and she’s so good at it. It’d be a shame for her to never compete. When

she goes out into a race, it’s like she’s unstoppable.”

SLOW START In the Greater Louisville Classic on Sept. 30, O’Neil paced the Chippewas with 17:26.43, but Aguillon fell behind. She ran just over 18 minutes, which was 40 seconds slower than her previous 5K time. Aguillon said her time suffered because of a slow start. “It was the biggest run we’ve had this year,” O’Neil said. “We basically had a brawl for the first two miles. We were going too slow with a lot of pushing and shoving in a pack. We’re really good at running, but not into wrestling. “We should work on that. Maybe like get an MMA coach in the weight room or something.”

Central Michigan’s volleyball team rebounded from a errorfilled loss on Friday to top Akron 3-0 and snap a four-game skid. The Chippewas evened their record at 11-11 and 3-7 in Mid American Conference play. CMU led the first set 6-3. It put up four straight points after that, forcing Toledo to call a timeout to regroup. The Chippewas went up 17-10. Akron fought to close the gap to 23-19. CMU would close out the first set with a win, 25-20. In the second set, CMU pulled away 24-19. Megan Kern dove for a save to keep a rally alive and ended with sophomore middle blocker Jayla Wesley and freshman outside hitter Kalina Smith blocking an

attacking Akron spiker. CMU won the second set 25-21 after Akron committed a service error. In the third set, CMU showed no signs of slowing down. The Chippewas quickly led 13-8. After Akron committed a few errors and the Chippewas landed kills and aces, they won the third set 25-15. “I thought we played a great match from start to finish,” Gawlik said. “Coming out of last night’s match against Buffalo, we had some certain goals we talked about (accomplishing) as a team (against Akron) and I think a lot of those objectives we met tonight.” Bueter landed a team-high 15 kills, followed by Smith and Carey with eight. Freshman setter Grace Butler finished with a team-high 33 assists. CMU travels to Ball State at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 27.

Field Hockey loses 30th-straight game By Mitchell Vosburg Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

After a 4-0 loss to Miami (Ohio) on Friday, Central Michigan field hockey extended its losing streak to 30-straight games. CMU now sits at 0-16 overall and 0-5 in Mid-American Conference play. The Chippewas also extended their scoreless streak to 11 games. Miami’s Paula Portugal stole the show with a hat trick in the first half, giving the RedHawks a 3-0 lead at halftime. Miami out shot CMU, 16-1,

and won the corner penalty battle, 12-1, in the first half. Junior goalkeeper Lily Amadio registered eight saves in the half. Alexis Nugent extended the RedHawks’ lead to 4-0 with a goal at the 3:35 mark in the second half. CMU found momentum in the second half, registering five shots and four on goal, but failed to score. Miami outshot CMU 24-7 with 13-4 on goal. Miami also won the corner battle 14-2. CMU will look to end its skid against the University of Michigan at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 24 at the CMU Field Hockey Complex.


SPORTS

16

OCT. 14, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Cody Scanlan | Staff Photographer Junior midfielder Shannon Magnan attempts a pass to the opposite side of the field on Oct. 22 at the CMU Soccer Complex.

The Office of Student Activities & Involvement is looking for students to serve as core committee, mentors, and key team members for IMPACT 2018.

Soccer loses to Western Michigan, falls out of MAC playoff contention By Evan Petzold Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Excellent opportunity for upperclassmen who are passionate about helping new multicultural students transition into CMU!

Applications Available Apply through Orgsync! Core Committee Oct. 23rd - Nov. 1st Mentor & Key Team Nov. 6th - 15th CMU IMPACT Program @impact_cmu @impact_cmu

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CONTACT IMPACT@CMICH.EDU

In a must-win situation, the Central Michigan women’s soccer team was shut down at the CMU Soccer Complex. The Chippewas (7-8-3, 2-6-2 Mid-American Conference) lost to Western Michigan (9-7-1, 4-5-1) on Sunday, ending any chances at making the MAC Tournament. Just 12 minutes into the game, Central Michigan earned its first scoring chance when junior forward Lexi Pelafas made a huge run, got the ball, and fired a shot off the post. Pelafas, who broke CMU’s alltime scoring record and leads the team with 12 goals, finished with five shots. The junior was one of many players who could not capitalize on scoring efforts against Western Michigan. "(Western Michigan) did a great job of dropping back, killing the space, and breaking up the rhythm when it needed to be broken up,”

head coach Peter McGahey said. The Broncos struck first with 42:06 left in the second half. While known for her highpowered shots, sophomore midfielder Grace Labadie trickled the ball passed CMU goalkeeper Zoie Reed to put Western Michigan ahead, 1-0. Five minutes later, Western Michigan found the back of the net again. Senior defender Maria Jaramillo sent a cross into the box, which was received by the head of senior midfielder Kendall Juhnke and put in the back of the net. Down 2-0, the Chippewas gained some momentum back with 16:24 left in the contest, as senior midfielder Savannah Beetcher sent a corner kick in for sophomore midfielder Marle Bringard, who registered her second goal of the season. “I’m proud of the fight in how the team responded to battle back to make it interesting,” McGahey said. CMU had one final opportunity to even the score on a corner kick with 30 seconds left.

With Reed up on the attack, the ball into the box was punched away by Western Michigan goalkeeper Stephanie Heber. With the loss, CMU drops out of MAC Tournament contention. “In the second half, there were just some uncharacteristic errors that suddenly put us down 2-0,” McGahey said. “The hole was too big to dig out. In the first half, we had some chances that we could’ve taken to make it different, but it is what it is and I’m proud of the fight at the end.” Western Michigan holds onto its eighth spot in the MAC, which is just enough to keep them in the playoffs. As for Eastern Michigan, the team is on the outside looking in with 12 points. The Eagles will need a win and a loss from WMU or Ohio next week to make the tournament. Kent State, Ball State, Bowling Green, Toledo, and Buffalo have secured playoff berth, while Northern Illinois and Ohio could still slip below the eighth-spot in the rankings.


17

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23 , 2017

After 30-straight losses, field hockey needs change Central Michigan Athletics need to do something about its field hockey team. After the team’s 30th straight loss to Miami (Ohio) on Friday, it’s time to ask if head coach Molly Pelowski is the right fit. Pelowski was hired before the 2015 season to replace longtime former coach Cristy Freese. Since being hired, Pelowski has won three games in 50 tries. In her last two seasons (201314), Freese was 8-4 at home and 8-3 in the MAC. Pelowski inherited a field hockey team that shared the 2014 Mid-American Conference regular season championship. The 2014 team was the last to have a winning record in the MAC and at home. Four seniors on the current squad who played in 2014 are witnessing a collapse in the field hockey team as they finish their careers. Now in Pelowski’s third year at the helm, the team has failed to even come close to those heights. She turned a MAC regular season championship team into a winless team. Field hockey is on the verge of a winless season, the first to happen to a CMU team since the

Mitchell Vosburg Sports reporter

turn of the century. For reference, CMU lacrosse has registered at least six wins in each of its first two seasons of existence. Pelowski’s overall record currently sits at 3-47, with a 2-12 record in Mid-American Conference play. MOLLY The team is PELOWSKI currently on a 30-game losing streak, as well as dropping 10 straight in the MAC. The Chippewas have also gone 33 straight games since its last regulation win at the end of the 2015 season — a 4-1 victory over Ball State. Since the start of the 2015 season, the Chippewas have been outscored 193-32 and outshot 991-299. The team has also been shut out 28 times under Pelowski’s tenure, including a current 11-game scoreless streak. The team tries to convert poor

passes that are intercepted and struggle mightily in the offensive zone. Opposing players walk into scoring areas and capitalize on easy opportunities thanks to CMU’s poor defense. Pelowski’s squad starts the opening minutes of each game with energy then quickly fades once a defensive breakdown leads to an early deficit. During the losing streak, the CMU field hockey team seems to carry a false sense of optimism. Pelowski and the team are hopeful during postgame interviews for their next opportunity to snap their losing skid. However, their chances to win this season are slim. This play is unacceptable, but Pelowski has shown she cannot turn things around. Whether the problem is lack of attention during practice, a poor game plan or bad execution in games, something needs to change quickly to avoid a winless season. CMU’s Athletics’ Twitter bio endorses “A Championship Culture at Central Michigan University.” Do three wins in three years create a championship culture? Absolutely not.

Mid-American Conference Field Hockey Standings SCHOOL

MAC

OVERALL

STREAK

Miami

5-0

8-7

W2

Kent State

4-1

7-9

W3

Longwood

4-2

11-4

L1

App State

3-3

8-8

W4

Ohio

2-3

4-10

W1

Ball State

0-4

4-11

L8

Central Michigan

0-5

0-16

L16

SPORTS

Toledo, Northern Illinois tied atop MAC West football By Andrew McDonald Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

In a tight game between Western Michigan and Eastern Michigan, Bronco freshman kicker Josh Grant pushed a field goal attempt wide right as time expired for the potential game-winning kick. In overtime, Grant got another chance and this time, he made it count. The 21-yard field goal gave WMU (5-3, 3-1 Mid-American Conference) their second overtime win of the season, a 20-17 victory. Every other game in conference play was decided by double-digits, with Central Michigan, Toledo, Ohio, Northern Illinois and Miami (Ohio) winning.

MAC WEST DIVISION Toledo topped Akron, 48-21. Rockets quarterback Logan Woodside completed 17-of-24 passes for 304 yards and five touchdowns in the win over the Zips. Jon’Vea Johnson was the top-target for Woodside, recording five receptions for 102 yards and a pair of scores. The Rockets (6-1, 3-0) out-gained the Zips (4-4,

3-1) 626-333 on offense, while also getting 35 first downs on the afternoon compared to Akron’s 23. NIU rolled over Bowling Green, 48-17. Marcus Childers led the way for the Huskies’ passing attack, completing 21-of33 passes for 239 yards and three scores while adding 73 rushing yards in the victory over BGSU. Running back Tommy Mister carried the ball 17 times for 115 yards and a touchdown, while wide receiver Chad Beebe snagged six catches for 124 yards and a score in the Huskies victory. NIU (5-2, 3-0) out scored the Falcons (1-7, 1-3) 31-7 in the first half. The win keeps the Huskies tied with UT atop the MAC West.

OTHER MAC SCORES Ohio quarterback Nathan Rouke lifted his team to bowl eligibility with a 48-3 win against Kent State. Rouke had one running touchdown and passing scores. Miami (Ohio) topped Buffalo 24-14 on the shoulders of RedHawk running back Kenny Young’s 125 yards and two touchdowns.

WHERE CMU STANDS With eight touchdowns, CMU blew out the Cardinals, 56-9. CMU had its highest rushing total of the season with 256 yards. Sophomore Jonathan Ward led the pack with 97 yards and two scores on 13 carries. Senior wide receiver Corey Willis scored three touchdowns and caught five catches for 98 receiving yards. This game was Willis’ first back from suffering a broken hand that held him out for three games. The win puts the Chippewas (4-4, 2-2) at fourth place in the MAC West, a game behind WMU who they will play on Nov. 1 in Kalamazoo. Transfer quarterback Shane Morris, who completed 16of-21 passes for 199 yards and four scores on Saturday, said even though he hasn’t been around the rivalry long, he knows what the “vibe” is like around the game. “Really excited to go down there and play in it,” Morris said. “I can’t wait. It’s going to be fun.” Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 1 at Waldo Stadium. Last season, WMU steamrolled CMU 49-10 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

STUTTERING AWARENESS WEEK ANEL P G N I R E T T STU cuss their experts dis

anel of shaped insightful p how it has d n a Listen to an g n ri e with stutt experiences day. o they are to h w to in m e th e: 7PM the KIVA Tim in re o o M : Location For more information contact: Dr. Sue Woods at suzanne.woods@cmich.edu 989-774-7296 Abbey Carlson at carls2al@cmich.edu 708-253-3019

OCT

26 THIS FREE EVENT IS SPONSERED BY:

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders


18

OCT. 23, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 23, 2017

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20

OCT. 23, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

E. Jason Wambsgans

Pulitzer Prize Winner Feature Photography • Chicago Tribune

Karen Johnson

Pulitzer Prize Winner

International Reporting • McClatchy Washington Bureau

The journey to your own

Pulitzer Prize can start here, too! We’re proud of our CM Life family.

For almost 100 years our organization has set a standard of excellence for student media. We help prepare storytellers to cover the biggest news of our lives. To apply for jobs in editorial, advertising, design, photojournalism and public relations, stop by and visit Moore Hall 436 or email publicrelations@cm-life.com for more information.

David Harris

Pulitzer Prize Finalist Breaking News • Orlando Sentinel

centralmediacafe.com

College Media Company of the Year CMBAM • 2013-2017

Pacemaker Award

Associated Collegiate Press • 2013-2017

Newspaper of the Year Jake May

Pulitzer Prize Finalist Feature Photography • Flint Journal

Michigan Press Association • 2015-2016

436 MOORE HALL, CMU • (989) 774-LIFE

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October 23, 2017  

Central Michigan Life