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NO. 42 | VOL. 98

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

As Homecoming Week continues, we look back at 99 years of events and traditions OO CC TT.. 11 2 , 22 0 0 11 77    | |    M MOOUUNNTT PPLLEEAASSAANNTT, , MMI I Get your tickets at Soaring Eagle Casino or Saganing Eagles Landing Casino Box Offices, ETIX.COM or call 1.800.514.ETIX Performances held at Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.

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OCT. 12, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

On Campus

Student Employment There are 2 types of employment:

Work Study

GSA

(General Student Assistance)

‘Work Study’ isn’t a group where students study. It’s a type of financial aid out of which student employees are paid.

All students are eligible for GSA. GSA is not a Financial Aid award. Are you ready?

Eligibility is determined by the filing of the FAFSA. If you aren’t sure if you’re eligible, contact Student Employment Services at 989.774.3881

Your job search begins here:

http://ses.cmich.edu

$

Although filing the FAFSA is recommended, you do not need to do so to receive GSA.

Either way =

A paycheck in your pocket!

Student Employment Services Bovee University Center Room 121 | 989.774.3881


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

NEWS

File Photo | Clarke Historical Library Cover: The homecoming court

waves to the crowd during the 1985 Homecoming Parade

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Former trustee, husband donate $1 million for library, leadership efforts

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City commission recognizes Indigenous Peoples Day at meeting

Man caught looking at

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13 child pornography in

library, this week in crime

SGA discusses the need

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20 for committee members, upcoming projects

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STAFF

EDITORIAL

NEWS

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JORDYN HERMANI THE OLD MAN AND THE SEAL: A pen, some imagination and $35 was all it took to craft the most iconic part of CMU’s legacy.

MANAGING EDITOR EVAN SASIELA

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NEWS EDITOR MITCHELL KUKULKA NEWS EDITOR EMMA DALE

OPINION FRIENDS FIRE UP TOGETHER: In our editorial, we urge students to look out for one another and be safe this Homecoming Weekend.

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SPORTS

FEATURES EDITOR PAIGE SHEFFIELD OPINION EDITOR ELIO STANTE SPORTS EDITOR KULLEN LOGSDON ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR DYLAN GOETZ

FROM Z TO SHINING C: Players travel from New Zealand, England and Scotland to compete on CMU’s womens field hockey team.

PHOTO EDITOR ARIANA STRZALKA

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR MACKENZIE BROCKMAN DESIGN EDITOR ALYSSA TEMPLETON PAGE DESIGNER CONNOR BYRNE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR RILEY BUSSELL ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR GRANT POLMANTEER

ADVERTISING

MANAGER RACHEL RING MANAGER CLARE COX

MANAGER SUMMER VARNER SOCIAL CAFE MANAGER ZACH NOWAK

PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER SAMANTHA MEYER MANAGER DREW FORREST STREET SQUAD MANAGER MITCHELL HATTY

PROFESSIONAL STAFF DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS DAVE CLARK ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS KATHY SIMON PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DAWN PAINE

The Journey between who you once were and who you are now becoming is where the dance of life really takes place.

Happy 125th Anniversary, CMU! The Tradition Continues Between a University and a Nation.

• Working Together for our Future • www.sagchip.org •


NEWS

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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Academic Senate prepares for computer security updates By Samantha Shriber Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

A policy is in its final stages to safeguard university-affiliated emails and computers in light of the increase in phishing reports and other breachrelated incidents. Mark Herron, chief information security officer, gave a presentation on the Secure Computing Configurations Policy at the Academic Senate meeting Oct. 10. The policy consists of several security strategies that are in strict compliance with university standards. Alterations will be made to the network and technical systems, workstations and digital logins. “It’s an important policy because it affects a lot of people in a way that a lot of

Cody Scanlan | Staff Photographer Chief Information Security Officer Mark Herron gives a presentation on system security and new protocol for CMU technology on Oct. 10 in Pearce Hall.

our technical policies do not,” Herron said. “Normally we would implement these on backhand systems but for a lot of us it affects the workstation that is being used a lot on dayto-day basis.”

One of the changes includes the recent password expiration for university login. “The password change is going to be an annual requirement,” Herron said, saying notifications will appear 30 days

prior to expiration to remind students, faculty and staff to change their password. A Global ID policy is also in draft to change administrative access to a default “User” status. Every Global ID will be restricted to a position of “Least Privilege,” which refers to a common profile without special interests or access rights associated with an account. The strategy will limit malware and ransomware from running without a specific purpose. Exceptions will be available in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), which is legislation made to secure medical information. Accommodations could include using Global ID in non-standard situations such as installing drivers or using advanced scientific devices.

The policy is also being made flexible for lab use in the outdated facilities on campus, Herron said. “Older software needs to run as an administrator,” Herron said, explaining that a built-in flexibility is emphasized in the draft. Network updates also consist of a new firewall along with accessible security tools. Herron said the firewall aims to have a one-size-fits-all compatibility for the various departments, colleges and facilities offered by CMU. “Why would you buy different types of software and antivirus software when you can buy one and get a discount,” he said, adding that the new firewall will reduce spending and make security methods identical across campus. The new firewall will be implemented by the December holidays.

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Other security strategies that will be put in place include stricter monitoring of accounts and locations and an automatic lock system for computers left unattended. Herron said it’s important for students, faculty and staff to bring devices to computer services at the university when they can no longer be used. Computer services will-triple clear device memory to make sure no data can be received by new owners. He said the biggest concern is phishing, an illegal method for obtaining usernames, passwords and credit card details through online disguises. “Phishing is increasing everywhere, and it really comes in rounds,” Herron said, “If you have a compromised account, a lot of protections keep people who are not a part of cmich. edu from sending, protections within are not so well-defined.”

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

NEWS

Mount Pleasant bars personnel excited to welcome back alumni By Greg Horner and Samantha Shriber Staff Reporters news@cm-life.com

Alumni will make their way back to Central Michigan University this weekend to participate in homecoming festivities. With the festivities comes a time to catch up with old friends. Often times those gatherings take place Mount Pleasant bars. Central Michigan Life spoke with bar owners and employees about the history of their bars and their plans to welcome patrons for homecoming.

BARS NEAR BROOMFIELD With a handful of establishments set up in southern Mount Pleasant, the Hunter family provided food, drinks and entertainment for CMU students for years. Since its 1974 opening, Wayside

Central has offered a place for the CMU community to enjoy a variety of DJs, dancing and a variety of concerts from performers Waka Flocka Flame, Blackbear and many more. Featuring pint night on Tuesdays and ladies’ night on Fridays, the club is always bumping with dance music and decorated with leather couches and the famous metal cages. It is the place where Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond holds court the DJ box. John Hunter, owner of Wayside Central, said that the popular gathering site on Mission Street has always been a place for students to come together and have a good time. This week Wayside Central will be kicking off their homecoming festivities with a performance by Slushii, electronic music producer, Thursday night with doors opening at 9 p.m. “We are expecting alumni to be coming in and out throughout this

weekend,” Hunter said, adding that the club is only one of several Hunter family-owned businesses preparing for a successful homecoming. The Paddlebots, a progressive soulpop band from Mount Pleasant, will be performing Friday at the Cabin. “The Cabin is actually one of the oldest bars around since prohibition,” said Hunter, whose family took ownership of the bar in the early 2000s. The Cabin opened in 1934, a year after the Congress ended prohibition. The bar sells pizza, grinders and beer and offers trivia and karaoke event nights on 930 W. Broomfield St. The Hunter family also owns the Hunter’s Ale House and O’Kelly’s Sports Bar and Grill.

THE BIRD Thursday nights at the Bird Bar & Grill are a special occasion. The downtown hotspot, located at 223 S. Main St., has become a staple

for students looking for food, drinks and fun. Opened in 1936 as the Flamingo Cocktail Lounge, the bar took on its new name and reputation for good times in the ‘60s. For 85 years the establishment has been owned by Breidenstein family. Lois Ann Breidenstein is the current owner of the Bird alongside her children Stacy and Ben. Jon Tobias, an employee of the bar, said homecoming is a special and busy time for the, but they don’t offer any unique specials for the celebration. “The things that make the bird good are the things that bring people here anyway,” Tobias said. “We’re an outgoing and accepting group of people here and always offer a good time.” He gave some warm words for alumni looking to head back to the local staple.

Ariana Strzalka | Photo Editor The Bird Bar & Grill is located at 223 S. Main St. in Mount Pleasant.

“Welcome back, strap up and look for your name on the tables,” Tobias said. “We can’t wait to see you in here.”

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NEWS

6

OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Creator of university seal reflects on iconic campus creation By Samantha Shriber Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

It was a student and a pen that would be the cause of an iconic piece of Central Michigan University and they would only receive $35 for it. A young art and design student in the 1950s sat in his dorm room in Barnes Hall and drew the sketches that would soon come to life as one of the university’s most celebrated icons, the official seal. Lyman “Pete” Ketzler was a freshman from Flint during the spring semester of 1953. While studying visual arts, he received news from one of his instructors that he was recommended to President Charles Anspach to design the official seal of Central Michigan University.

“It was very exciting to be meeting with the university’s president when you weren’t in any trouble,” Ketzler said. Ketzler does not receive any money whenever the seal is used in marketing. The design measurements, coordinates and other characteristics were drawn up with just pen and ink. “You would use pencil to begin with and then transfer over to ink. Everything at the time was dependent on hand and skill,” he said. Ketzler said he always carried a very strong desire to solve artistic problems and enjoyed working. He took classes on ceramics, painting and drawing while attending CMU. During his career, Ketzler worked to master his skills with colored pencils, markers, chalk and a paint brush.

He said his devotion to visual arts made it difficult for him to succeed in the other subjects he was required to study by the university. “I was always lacking in academics which really made my time at Central more of a challenge,” he said. “All my life, I always knew I wanted to draw. Quite frankly, that’s all I ever wanted to do.” He designed insignia and promotions for the Ski Club, Barnes Hall Council, Booster’s Club and the Campus Vets. He also crafted posters for the entertainment programs hosted by the student activities committee at CMU. “I love being successful at creating things that are very visually appealing to those that look at them,” he said. Although Ketzler said he does not completely remember his discussion with then President Charles Anspach from decades

ago, he precisely remembers paying close attention to the president’s vision for the seal. He said Anspach wanted the seal to embody the university’s values and character while also having a crisp design that met a certain standard of elegance. Ketzler began putting together sketches after meeting with the president until one of his designs was selected by Anspach and the admissions committee. After being submitted to the State Board of Education, it was approved and archived as the university’s official seal in January of 1954. Sixty-three years after the seal was approved, Ketzler said he would not change anything about it. “I was designing to appeal my employer,” Ketzler said. “Looking back at the experience, I probably

Courtesy Photo | Kristin Ketzler Lyman “Pete” Ketzler and his wife, Marie Ketzler, pose in front of the CMU Seal in 1981.

would do the same thing.” While the construction of the seal was in progress, drafting for the Vietnam War had already begun and the U.S. military was in search of soldiers to send overseas. “I had been looking to transfer to the Art Center College of

Design near Los Angeles. I always wanted to focus on commercial art and major in industrial design, but I didn’t have the money to pursue it,” Ketzler said, explaining he volunteered for the draft to earn the money to attend his dream school.

Teams change. Their history doesn’t.

Sharing CMU’s story since 1919. And not stopping anytime soon.

1953

Central’s football team wins second consecutive IIAC championship

Email editor@cm-life.com or stop by 436 Moore Hall for more information on applying. No experience required. Accepting applications from all majors.


7

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

Courtesy Photo | Kristin Ketzler Lyman “Pete” Ketzler holds a book of his original CMU Seal sketches which were made in the fall of 1953 and poses for a photo on Sept. 23 in front of the seal.

Ketzler was an enlisted member of the U.S. Army from 1954-1956. Afterward, he earned enough money to enroll in the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He graduated with a degree in industrial design and

worked in the design group for General Motors. “After all my design work with General Motors that has been approved and continues to last, there is something so humbling about the seal,” he said. “I can still return

to how significantly exciting it was to be having the experience.” Sherry Knight, the associate vice president of University Communications, said the seal is the most original and celebrated icon at the university. Knight said the seal is the president’s personal insignia and is used during commencement ceremonies, major functions and during select occasions regarding admissions. “It is where students first get their photo taken in the beginning of their freshman year and where they return to for their senior year,” Knight said. “They also take photos there countless times in between to capture very picturesque moments at the university.” Ketzler said he enjoys knowing he created something that will surpass long after his lifetime. “It is very humbling to know that I have design something that will last long beyond my life time,” he said. “That’s very exciting.”

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NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

FORMER TRUSTEE, HUSBAND DONATE $1 MILLION TO CMU A former Central Michigan University trustee and her husband have donated $1 million to benefit the Charles V. Park Library and leadership efforts. The donation from Sarah Opperman and her husband, Daniel Opperman, was announced Tuesday, Oct. 10, according to CMU News, which is published on the university’s website. According to CMU News, $500,000 of the Oppermans’ donation will go toward expanding CMU’s leadership experiences. The main office of the Sarah

R. Opperman Leadership Institute is located in Powers Hall. The other $500,000 will be given to the Park Library. “As a trustee, I was impressed with the leadership CMU students demonstrate as a result of their talent, hard work and commitment,” Sarah Opperman told CMU News. “We hope to expand that part of their education and experience. We hope students leave CMU understanding that leadership isn’t a title. It’s a decision, each day and throughout your life,

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about how you live, about the impact you make and about the stamp you put on the world.” Opperman is a 1981 alumna of CMU. She served on the CMU Board of Trustees for eight years until 2016 — including a twoyear stint as chair, according to CMU News. She served as Vice President of Global Government Affairs and Public Policy at the Dow Chemical Co. She now works as an outside director at Isabella Bank Corp. -Evan Sasiela, Managing Editor


NEWS

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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Have fun this weekend, don’t forget to take care, look out for each other

Josie Norris | Freelance Photographer

Students paint their bodies at the tailgate before the football game against Rhode Island on Aug. 31 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

T

his Saturday is Homecoming, one of the biggest annual events at Central Michigan University. This weekend is one of our last home football games and tailgates. We know that for many students, this is a time for school spirit and hanging out with friends — and yes, drinking. Please, don’t forget to be safe and look out for one another. Every year 1,825 college students die and 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are injured due to “alcohol-related unintentional injuries,” according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reports. We aren’t trying to lecture you. We just want you to be safe. Make sure you regularly throughout the day stay hydrated, charge your phone and check the weather before you head out. Dress appropriately and be aware of your surroundings. Please keep an eye out for anyone who looks

like they may be in trouble or severely inebriated. There are too many stories about college EDITORIAL students not doing anything for someone who is in distress. Let’s not have this weekend be one of those times. If you are at a party or on your way to one and you see someone stumbling home drunk, or hear someone asking for a phone to call their friends — help them. We know there will be underage drinking this weekend. If you choose to drink underage, don’t hesitate to call in emergency situations. There is medical amnesty for minors. If you or a friend are drunk, you will not be arrested if you have to go to the hospital or if you are calling for help. Officers will be around all weekend. Lt. Cameron Wassman of the Central Michigan University Police Department said additional law enforcement will be on-hand this weekend. They are

not trying to write tickets, but want to make sure CMU and Mount Pleasant are a safe campus and city, respectively. Call a cab to make sure your friend gets home safe, take the time to ride with them and then make your way back to the party. There are cab companies in Mount Pleasant running 24 hours this weekend so there is no excuse to drink and drive. For any students on campus there is Safe Rides — a free, 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. van system that will transport students. The vans have scheduled routes for pick up and drop off every 15 to 25 minutes. Drink at your own pace. Don’t feel pressured to drink more than you are comfortable with. Underage drinking is a fact on college campuses, but that doesn’t mean alumni or older students should encourage it. Keep yourself and each other safe. This weekend there should only be one thing on your mind — “Fire Up, Chips.” Have a happy, safe homecoming.

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

OPINION

Weinstein sexual harassment, assault scandal proof no fish is too big to fry I grew up watching Quentin Tarantino films. To this day, “Reservoir Dogs” still remains my favorite and I think “Pulp Fiction” gets praised a little too heavily as Tarantino’s greatest work. I’ve seen all of them — even his hot mess of a directorial four-way “Four Rooms.” I could quote you half his filmography and tell you all about the theory of how Tarantino’s films are all interconnected. I also could probably recognize The Weinstein Company’s logo faster than my own astrological sign. I recognized it immediately on social medial when allegations came out against Harvey Weinstein, the Hollywood mogul who has shepherded films like “Clerks,” “Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” and “Good Will Hunting” to the silver screen.

Jordyn Hermani Editor-in-Chief

It’s now being touted as Hollywood’s worst kept secret — the 65-year-old Weinstein being accused of, at the time of this paper’s publication, the rape of three women and sexually assaulting a number of other women. In the days since New York Times broke the story, Weinstein has been fired by his company’s own board of directors, lost millions of dollars in support, had his name drug through the mud by news stories and actors alike and now his wife is apparently filing for divorce. This is the best possible outcome

someone could hope for in the worst possible situation. Maybe it’s the optimist in me, but the vitriol Weinstein has been met with shows we are moving towards a better future where we are not afraid to call out and punish sexual assault regardless of the person’s stature. Your wealth does and will not absolve your actions. Your resume does and will not absolve your actions. Your powerful friends and connections to high profile lawyers do not and will not absolve your actions. The Weinstein allegations are messy — it’s a horrible monster birthed several years too late. I can only imagine the horror stories actresses, and maybe even actors, will come forward with in the coming weeks. I can’t begin to imagine the number of people who

will remain silent for fear of being shamed or disavowed by close friends and family. And while this is outside of the scope of most students at Central Michigan University, I hope they have something to take away from this too: no matter who you are, no matter what your profession is, if you sexually harass or assault another person you will not walk away unscathed. I’m not naïve — sexual assault, harassment and worse goes unchecked and unanswered for every day. But high-profile proof that our societal expectations and reactions to these allegations show we’re changing as a society. We’re learning. Maybe one day, we’ll finally learn sexual assault and harassment are never justified.

HARVEY WEINSTEIN

Courtesy Photo | Daily Celeb

Letter to the

EDITOR

Who leads the leaders of the Central Michigan University? We all do TO THE EDITOR: Many Central Michigan Life readers commented on my previous letters to the editor published during the 2017 spring semester identifying Central Michigan University’s glaring need for leadership from President George Ross in fundraising and its need to hire a trained university development professional to lead our efforts. While I felt compelled to resign from the university’s Advancement Board last spring, after eight years

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Jordyn Hermani MANAGING EDITOR | Evan Sasiela OPINION EDITOR | Elio Stante MULTIMEDIA EDITOR | Riley Bussell NEWS EDITOR | Mitchel Kukulka NEWS EDITOR | Emma Dale FEATURES EDITOR | Paige Sheffield DESIGN EDITOR | Alyssa Templeton

of service, to call attention to this shortcoming, I have remained engaged and close to Bob Martin, the new Vice President of Advancement hired less than two years ago. Needless to say, it is gratifying to report positive results. Under Martin’s direction energy and focus are sharply up with the largest number of major gift solicitations in history. We are holding our staff and our university accountable while teaching them how to drive us harder into the future. The list

of “most” and “bests” is impressive — most total donors, million dollar donators, online donors, direct mail donors, planned gift dollars raised, highest participation by faculty and staff, total donors in President’s Circle, greatest number of face-toface solicitations, etc. Martin has brought a much-needed new energy and accountability to our efforts. As a direct result, CMU has posted the two biggest fundraising years in its history resulting in over $65 million in

gifts to CMU, including its best single fundraising year ever at $46 million. The “fire has been lit” at CMU. Our “Campaign for Excellence” is now two years ahead of schedule thanks to the decision to seek the help of someone like Martin who is highly trained at leading university fundraising campaigns. President Ross and his wife, Elizabeth, are to be commended, too, as they recently announced an inspiring $1 million gift to CMU — by far the largestever gift from any CMU President.

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising

This is an excellent start — but only a start. We remain years behind where we need to be. We are building something great at CMU. Our university can never again afford to rest. A top priority of our university leadership needs to be ensuring, and sustaining, this new vigilance in our commitment to capital raising. Who leads the leaders of CMU? We all do. TODD J. ANSON, Esq.1977 Alumnus, California

Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Nonuniversity subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


NEWS

10

OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

City Commission recognizes Indigenous Peoples Day By Samantha Shriber Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

OCT 14 6

Ron White

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Mount Pleasant Mayor Kathy Ling recognized a positive relationship with the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe by welcoming members to the Oct. 9 City Commission meeting. Ling opened Monday’s meeting by reading a proclamation of Indigenous Peoples’ Day to residents of Mount Pleasant and tribal members. She said the city desires to continue collaborative efforts with the tribe in a relationship built by mutual respect and trust.  The meeting also covered emergency ordinances that expire in November. Ordinances are centered on waiver availability for

making stormwater compliances for parking lot reconstruction. The ordinances are designed to minimize increased stormwater runoff rates, deterioration of existing watercourses and non-point source pollution, among other strategies made to eliminate flood and other water-related damages.  City Manager Nancy Ridley said emergency ordinances will continue to allow waivers for total reconstructions of the exact same blueprint unless a parking lot succeeds 24 square feet.  Ordinance renewal was unanimously approved and will be initiated immediately after expiration.  A public hearing for comment on the city’s proposed new zoning ordinance is set for Nov. 13, another hearing regarding

Tax Increment Finance Authority changes will also occur. TIFA discussion will be centered on the Building, Fire and Sanitary Board of Appeals that is requesting advancements in fire safety standards for buildings.  Downtown businesses will be handing out treats to children ages 12 and under from 4 to 6 p.m. on Oct. 31 in the annual Pumpkin Promenade event.  The League of Women Voters of the Mount Pleasant Area will host 2017 City Commission candidates 7 p.m. Oct. 17 in City Hall. The league also collected profiles of candidates on www.Vote411.org.  Code enforcement also painted over graffiti at the pump station and train bridge entrance off of High Street.

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

Program Board’s main success lies in concerts By Loreal Nix Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

When Central Michigan University’s Student Activities Board officially began in 1928, its primary goal was to plan elaborate activities and events for the students on campus. Now, the group is called Program Board. It has evolved into one of the strongest programming organizations on campus. Program Board provides live entertainment from musical artists and comedians, to challenging thoughts with lectures. Program Board has brought prominent entertainers and speakers to campus such as musical artists Big Sean and Ludacris and primatologist Jane Goodall. Bringing these figures to campus is a careful and timely process, said Program Board adviser Damon Brown. “We reach out to the agents to negotiate on a fair price, still keeping in mind our goal or providing students entertainment at a low cost,” Brown said. “After that, we have to go through the process of locking down a center or facility, sounds and lights to make sure the event is a success.” Negotiating a fair price for these figures can be challenging and expensive. The most expen-

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Hot Towel Style File Photo | Perry Fish Ke$ha stares into the audience in a break between songs during her concert in McGurik Arena on Jan. 6, 2012.

sive act was the Band Perry for $125,000 in 2015, Brown said. Program Board’s main success lies within concerts. Concert events such as T-Pain and Big Sean have received more than 4,000 attendees and have even sold out. The biggest Program Board event yet was Ke$ha in 2011. “It was so big that some people were hanging from the rafters,” Brown said. “We were nearly the last school to be able to get her at $50,000 and right around the time she debuted with ‘Tik Tok.’” While most of Program Board’s budget revolves around concerts and comedy series, president Marissa Mattioli seeks to focus more on the educational aspect of Program Board. “We have been focusing more

on lecture. In the previous years, it seems to be lacking,” Mattioli said. “We like to do collaborations with other organizations on campus for lectures. For example, last year we worked with other organizations and brought in Laverne Cox.” Program Board meets at 8 p.m. every Wednesday in the Bovee University Center Mackinaw Room. Students plan events and programs to bring to campus each semester. Program Board members also get feedback on events from post-event evaluations. Program Board members take pride in making sure students on campus feel there is something for them, whether it’s a lecture or concert, Brown said.

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

Police: Man views child porn in library, more fake parking permits By Evan Sasiela and Greg Horner Managing Editor and Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

The following incidents were handled by the Central Michigan University Police Department and Mount Pleasant Police Department from Oct. 3-9.

OCT. 9 Mount Pleasant native Kikki Alaniz, 26, was arrested on a charge of fleeing and eluding the scene after he failed to stop for an officer near Washington and High streets around 12:30 a.m. Alaniz drove into Gratiot County and was apprehended at Hubscher Park, said Officer Jeff Browne of the MPPD. He said he fled because he didn’t want to go to jail for driving with a suspended license. He was also charged with driving without a license. His bond was set at 10 percent of 10,000. OCT. 8 A 21-year-old Mount Pleasant man was the victim of car theft after his 2008 Pontiac G6 was stolen outside his house. The theft took place on the 700 block of West Michigan Street. The man said he left his keys in the car the previous night and woke up to a missing vehicle. A man was caught urinating on a building around 12:30 a.m. on the 200 block of West Michigan Street. An officer witnessed the man unzip his pants and begin urinating. He refused a breathalyzer, but admitted to drinking 10 beers. The man was taken to Chippewa Tribal Court.

OCT. 7 Police responded to a credit card fraud incident between two Herrig Hall roommates. Lt. Cameron Wassman of the CMUPD said it occurred between Oct. 5-7. An 18-yearold woman is accused of using another 18-year-old woman’s credit card. There are about $800 worth of charges, Wassman said. Information was sent to the Isabella County Prosecutor’s Office for charges. A 61-year-old Mount Pleasant man was arrested on a charge of domestic violence for pushing his 36-year-old girlfriend around midnight on the 900 block of Center Drive. The man said he had been drinking for most of the day and became angry. No medical treatment was necessary. OCT. 6 A traffic stop led to a search of a vehicle and possible criminal charges around 11 p.m. at Washington Street and Ottawa Court. A vehicle was pulled over for no headlights when an officer smelled a marijuana odor coming from the vehicle, Wassman said. After a search of the vehicle, police found two grams of cannabis and drug paraphernalia. There were five people in the vehicle and it belonged to somebody else. Information was sent to the prosecuting attorney for charges and the incident was turned over to the Office of Student Conduct. OCT. 4 A non-aggravated assault occurred before 9:30 p.m. in

Herrig Hall. A 19-year-old man is accused of pushing an 18-year-old woman out of a dorm room. Wassman said it did not appear to be a domestic relationship. The incident was turned over the Office of Student Conduct and information was forwarded to the prosecuting attorney for charges. A 21-year-old woman had her car keyed stemming from an argument in lot 18. Wassman said there was an argument between the woman and another individual about the woman stealing a parking spot. When she returned to her car, she discovered it was keyed. Wassman said there are no suspects. A 53-year-old man was arrested for obscenity after police say he was viewing child sexually abusive material in the Charles V. Park Library around 4:30 p.m. Headphones and a laptop worth an estimated $1,500 were stolen from an 18-year-old woman in Trout Hall. Wassman said the incident most likely occurred between Sept. 29 and Oct. 2. Police are trying to develop suspects, Wassman said. A 25-year-old Midland man was arrested on a charge of trespassing around 1:30 a.m. after he refused to leave Wayside Central when asked. Police arrived and also asked the man to leave — he refused.

OCT. 3 A fraudulent parking permit was found in lot 62. Wassman said the incident was turned over to the Office of Student Conduct and involves a 21-year-old man.

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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Engineering students prepare for annual ‘rite of passage’ durin By Claire Jones Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

A class of Central Michigan University engineering students is preparing to take part in one of the university’s most entertaining homecoming traditions. The 20th annual Cardboard Boat Race will take place at 1p.m. Saturday, Oct. 14, at the Rose Ponds, located near the Student Activity Center. The Cardboard Boat Race has been a homecoming tradition since the first event in 1998. During the week leading up to the race, engineering students at CMU have to calculate how to create a boat out of cardboard and keep it afloat while transporting three people across the Rose Pond. Students have to use a specific engineering design process in order to keep their boat afloat, said Brian DeJong, engineering professor and race coordinator. “The students must figure out the buoyancy, where the water line is going to be, center of gravity, their drag versus their friction and how you can reduce the drag,” DeJong said.

File Photo | Ariana Strzalka Engineering students race their cardboard boats on Oct. 8, 2016 in Rose Pond in front of the Student Activity Center.

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“(Students) must use calculations to figure out their time and distance to then figure out what their power was, so they have to incorporate engineering design and calculations.” The students in the Engineering 120 class receive $100 to purchase their material, which include cardboard, duct tape and liquid nails.

The items must only be obtained from the engineering department. Students have five days to design and build their boat. DeJong said this ensures every team has an equal opportunity to win. During the race, students must race their boats from the north-end of the pond, across through the portage, through the second pond and all the way around the statue. The race is run in several intervals and is timed. Whoever has the best time wins. Each group consists of four people and three must race in the boat. The races are mandatory for the EGR 120 class, but are still open to other student groups. More than 200 participants and more than 40 boats will be involved this year – 35 boats are

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BOAT RACE 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 14 Rose Pond

from EGR 120 and between five and eight from other student groups. “Students who have participated still talk about it – it’s a rite of passage,” DeJong said. Howell sophomore Brooke Friedman, a student in EGR 120, is excited about her involvement in the event. “It’s a big deal, and it’s a big involvement for Central,” Friedman said. “A lot of former engineering students get excited about it and come support us.”

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

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Onaway sophomore Elaina Madison, left, Yale junior Chris Carabelli, middle, and Howell sophomore Brooke Friedman, right, work on their cardboard boat on Oct. 9 in the hallway of the Engineering and Technology building.

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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Looking back at nearly a century of CMU Homecoming By Mitchell Kukulka News Editor news@cm-life.com

Courtesy Photo | Clarke Historical Library Jean Chisholm, the first Homecoming Queen, poses for a portait in 1946.

Like the university itself, Central Michigan University’s Homecoming celebration has changed and evolved since its origins. Kickoff on Oct. 14 will mark the 99th year that CMU has welcomed back alumni for its annual homecoming celebration. CMU’s first Homecoming took place in the spring of 1918, rather than a football game, the celebration coincided with the commencement ceremony for that year’s graduates. In the earlier days of CMU’s history, the majority of students lived nearby. Hosting a small event for alumni during a graduation ceremony was easy to put together. “In the 1920s, most people coming to (CMU) were relatively local,” said Bryan Whitledge, archivist manager of the Clarke Historical Library. “When I say local, all of them were definitely from Michigan — a lot of people were from surrounding counties, or maybe a few counties away. Travel wasn’t difficult.” Alumni celebrations can be traced back to the late 1890s under university president Charles McKenny. During this era, Alumni Day events took place in May and June. The origin of homecoming as students know it today is hard to pin down, since a number of universities take credit for the idea. The University of Illinois claims to have invented it in 1910; University of Missouri claims it hosted the first homecoming in 1911; University of Michigan hosted a homecoming ceremony in the late 1890s, but only as a one-time event. By the 1920s, homecoming events were a widespread phenomenon. Many universities and high schools around the country celebrated a version of the ceremony. Many festivities which have become synonymous with Chippewa Homecoming can be traced back to as early as 1925. Events included

a parade, a bonfire near Finch Fieldhouse and two dances – one in the gymnasium and another downtown. The first CMU Homecoming associated with a football game was in 1924, when Central defeated Alma College 13-0. During halftime, a group of students took the field in a large dragon costume, which led to the football team being called the Central Dragons until 1926. The mascot was later switched to the Bearcats.

CHANGING WITH THE TIMES As time moved on, Homecoming traditions came and went. “Virtually everything about homecoming has changed since it first started,” said Jay Martin, director of Museum Studies for CMU’s history department. “The way parades have been done, whether there have been parades, the locations for events – all of it’s changed over the years. There have been times when homecoming was extremely formal, and when it’s extremely informal.” One of CMU’s most “formal” traditions can be traced back to the 1940s, when the homecoming court system was introduced. Jean Chisholm was named the first Homecoming Queen in 1946. For nearly 40 years, the Homecoming Queen and her female court were the only homecoming representatives elected. The all-woman tradition continued until 1958, when male students on campus — believing there was a lack of male representation on the homecoming court — began dressing up one male student in women’s clothing to act as an unofficial candidate. The man in costume would go by the name “Elvira Scratch” while campaigning. Martin considers Elvira to be a small but meaningful representation of the many social changes the campus and nation endured during that time period. “(Elvira) fit into the changes that were happening in the 60s and 70s historically,” Martin said. “There were the protests against (the Vietnam


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

NEWS

Courtesy Photo | Clarke Historical Library

Students in a dragon costume rush the football field during halftime in 1924. After this, the football team was known as the Central Dragons until 1927.

War), women’s rights, Native American rights, African American rights – everybody’s rights are finally starting to come up, and it was changing American culture. John Nader was named the first official Homecoming King in 1982. In 1997, the university moved away from the gendered “king and queen” system in favor of the Homecoming Ambassadors. With the ambassador program, 10 students – five male and five female – are nominated by registered student organizations to represent the student body. One male and one female student will be chosen as the “gold” Ambassadors the night before Homecoming Day. Ambassadors are chosen for their work ethic and dedication to the CMU community. Tailgating traces back to the late 1970s, which coincided with the period when people started driving to football games en masse and parking in large lots. Before then, most people would come to Mount Pleasant by train or by car if they lived close enough. For alumni like Mount Pleasant City Commissioner Mike Verleger, tailgating is integral to the homecoming experience. Graduating in 1998, Verleger and his wife Jennifer have hosted their own homecoming tailgate that has annually welcomed receive more than 200 visitors. “The food and the camaraderie are big parts of

Homecoming,” Verleger said. “It’s a great crowd, and while we may only see these folks once a year, it becomes a great reunion.” Traditions like the Medallion Hunt and Cardboard Boat Race, while comparatively new, attract a lot of enthusiasm from alumni, Whitledge said. The first Cardboard Boat Race took place in 1998. Every year at Rose Pond, the event sees student-engineers construct boats using cardboard and duct tape and trying to make it across Rose Pond without sinking. The Medallion Hunt first took place in 2003. For the event, the Office of Student Activities and Involvement hides a medallion somewhere on campus, releasing clues about its whereabouts online for students to decipher. The clues must usually be understood in context with CMU’s history. Whitledge said the Medallion Hunt is among his favorite of the events because it gets students interested in the history of the university. “I’m looking forward to what the 125th (anniversary) Medallion Hunt will include, because this is such a big year for the university,” Whitledge said. “Every year here at the Clarke (Historical Library), we see students coming in and looking for some history information because they’re trying to track down the clues. It’s always a fun event for us.”

HOMECOMING FOR THE MODERN AGE The Homecoming celebration on Oct. 14 will consist of traditions both old and new. Festivities will officially kick off at 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13 in Plachta Auditorium with the annual Rock Rally. The rally includes a pep rally and mock rock contest aimed at getting students excited for Homecoming. This year’s Homecoming Gold Ambassadors will also be announced at the event. Southfield senior Amani Johnson is one of the 10 students nominated as an Ambassador this year. Johnson was nominated by his peers in Wheeler Hall Council after giving a series of interviews and presentations throughout the early half of fall semester. “(Being an Ambassador) is humbling, and honestly it’s really exciting,” Johnson said. “I love CMU and I really enjoy being involved in the things I’m involved with, because I get to provide really great experiences for other people.” As an Ambassador, Johnson will volunteer for the many events and activities of Homecoming Week. Homecoming Day, Oct. 14, will begin with the 5K walk/run hosted by Special Olympics Michigan at 8 a.m., and a coffee and donuts gettogether for alumni at 9:30 a.m. in Powers Hall. The Homecoming Parade begins at 11 a.m. in Parking Lot 22, followed by tailgating in the

south end of campus at 11:30 a.m. Alumni Village will take place near Rose Pond from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. It is a celebration put on by the CMU Alumni Association and typically sees between 3,000 and 4,000 attendees, said Alumni Association executive director Marcie Otteman. Colleges and organizations around campus will set up tents for returning alumni to peruse and see old friends. This year will mark the first time space will be dedicated to “affinity” groups on campus – groups and registered student organizations such as Central Michigan Life, LGBTQ groups and CMU Greeks. “People have been reaching out to (Alumni Association) for years who have really wanted to be able to bring groups together outside of academic affiliation,” Otteman said. “It’s really about the affinity (alumni) had for something they were passionate about when they were in school. (Alumni Association) wanted to give them a chance to come back and connect in that sort of way.” Kickoff for the football game against Toledo is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. Oct. 14 in Kelly/ Shorts Stadium. “When you start putting all of this together, it’s what makes homecoming,” Whitledge said. “As much as it’s an athletic event, it’s really a cultural phenomenon.”


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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Central Michigan Life usually chooses one photo for our weekly #ThrowbackThursday, but we thought we’d do something special to celebrate CMU’s long history of firing up for Homecoming. Below is a collection of photos taken from 99 years of homecoming games and celebrations at CMU, courtesy of Clarke Historical Library and University Communications. Courtesy Photo | University Communications Archives

Students dance in a conga line at the Homecoming Dance in 1954.

Courtesy Photo | Clarke Historical Library

Homecoming Gold Ambassadors pose on the field in 1998, the first year that CMU moved from having a court to having ambassadors.


CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

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Courtesy Photo | Clarke Historical Library Members of the football team sit in the rain during the 1938 homecoming game. The team, then called the Bearcats, won 45-0.

Courtesy Photo | Clarke Historical Library The Homecoming Carnival, which lasted three days, sits in parking lot 20 in 1971.

Courtesy Photo | Clarke Historical Library President Bill Boyd crowns Homecoming Queen Ann Haskel in 1974.

Courtesy Photo | University Communications Archives CMU cheerleaders wave during the Homecoming Parade in 1964.


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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

SGA calls for committee members, discusses projects in development By Quinn Kirby Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

The Vice President of Student Government Association, Derek Sturvist called for his fellow student leaders to participate in committees during the Oct. 9 meeting in the Bovee University Center Auditorium. Sturvist delivered this week’s executive board update in place of President Anna Owens who was absent to participate in homecoming events, representing student government. He called for participants in three internal committees: one that would oversee SGA’s general committees, one that would examine existing course schedules and another that would

focus on general education. Sturvist admitted the descriptions of each committee are “pretty vague.” The positions in these committees are open to any house or senate member, and any interested parties may contact Sturvist by speaking to him at the next SGA meeting, Oct. 16. Closing the General Board meeting, Sturvist said SGA “formally recognizes (Oct. 9) as Indigenous Peoples’ Day,” in respect to legislation passed during the 2016-17 academic year. He added there’s a push for Central Michigan University—as an institution—to formally recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day. “It’s a really important change, and we’re glad we’re

moving forward with it. We hope the university will follow,” Sturvist said. The senate addressed developments in each general committee. Future plans of events were discussed, such as the the “Culture, Not A Costume” campaign set to take place Oct. 25 by the Diversity Committee. During the meeting, the Growth and Development Committee proposed the creation of an educational booklet on registered student organizations for incoming students. Senators also brainstormed projects to be completed by senators within their college. House Leader Drake Smarch closed the session by reminding those in attendance to stay safe during Homecoming week.

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OIT REQUIRES YEARLY PASSWORD CHANGES Central Michigan University’s Office of Information Technology is now requiring Global ID passwords to be reset annually. While the changes began Oct. 9, there is a “grace period” extending to Nov. 8 in which OIT will not force password resets, according to the OIT website. Students can change their password at any time by visiting the “My Account” page on the CMU website. Students with passwords older than 335 days will receive a notification when

logging on to CentralLink saying their password is set to expire within 30 days. Students who allow their passwords to expire will be redirected to the My Account page when trying to log in. The initiative to require password changes has been in planning for years said OIT communication manager Kole Taylor. The decision to move forward with the project was made by OIT staff and Chief Information Security Officer Mark Herron, who was hired a few years ago. “When it comes to

security, there really is no time like the present,” Taylor said. “Since we were able to accomplish something like this, we owe it to the campus community as well as ourselves to do it.” According to the OIT website, the decision to require yearly password changes was made to improve campus-wide account security while minimizing the amount of inconvenience to CMU students and faculty. -Mitchell Kukulka, News Editor

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SPORTS HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE Chippewas attempt to beat Toledo for first time since 2009 and win their fourth-straight homecoming game


SPORTS

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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Field hockey trio moves to U.S. in search of opportunity By Mitch Vosburg Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Many students who come to Central Michigan University have the luxury of driving a couple of hours to be with family and eat home-cooked meals. That is not the case for Harriet Aburn, Georgina Minta and Jasmine Banks. Altogether, the three field hockey members traveled a combined 15,848 miles from their respective countries for an opportunity to become student athletes.

8,536 MILES LATER Harriet Aburn came from Wellington, New Zealand, the nation’s capital that sits at the North Island’s southernmost point. Aburn was contacted by multiple Division I schools early on in the Mid-American Conference and in Pennsylvania. Aburn’s desire to play in America began when she was 15. Her parents were not 100 percent sold on her intentions, but she persisted. “They didn’t believe me,” Aburn said. “I kept on talking about it and they realized I was serious.” Mount Pleasant’s small-town feel was an important factor in her choosing CMU. “I got a good vibe from the school and the atmosphere,” Aburn said. “I really liked the academic focus here.” Although the adjustment from Wellington to Mount Pleasant served as a challenge for Aburn, she always knew she was in the right place. “It was kind of a hard time,” Aburn said. “I’m one of those people that loves to stay busy. I wasn’t too stressed out and I was really happy to be here.” Aburn made a promise to her mother to come home after graduation. She plans on keeping her promise when she graduates in May. ENGLISH CHIPPEWA Forward/midfielder Georgina Minta was

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originally committed to playing field hockey at Monmouth University in New Jersey. After a voluntary leave from the program and a year to regroup, Minta transferred to CMU. Minta grew up in Saxmundham, England, just over two hours northeast of London. She came to the United States because the college athletic system isn’t as supportive overseas. “You get very little scholarship (money) if you’re good enough (in England),” Minta said. “I came for an official (visit) with my father and we thought ‘yeah, why not Mount Pleasant.’” Minta praised the way people act in America. “The U.S. people as a whole are a lot friendlier,” Minta said. “The English people are very stiff off the lip and conceal everything. American people let their emotions out all the time, which is really nice because I’m very bubbly.” When Minta told her parents her intent to continue her education in America, her father, Peter, had mixed emotions. “It was a brave decision,” Peter said. “It’s a life changing experience to go to college thousands of miles away from home. It’s a lot quieter around the house.” Peter was in attendance for this past weekend’s matchups with Appalachian State. He was finally able to watch his daughter play in person. “I’m so proud of her to make that decision and see it through,” he said.

SCOTLAND TO MOUNT PLEASANT Forward Jasmine Banks was on the cusp of committing to another school in America, until one phone call from head coach Molly Pelwoski changed everything. “Molly said they were really interested in me, I said I’d sleep on the decision,” Banks said. “I woke up the next morning, looked into it quite a bit and thought ‘why not, I’m just going to do it.’” Banks’ decision to leave Scotland’s capital city,

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Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Senior back Harriet Aburn, left, sophomore forward Jasmine Banks,middle, and sophomore forward/ midfielder Georgina Minta, right, pose for a portrait on Oct. 10 at the Field Hockey Complex.

Edinburgh, was based on new opportunities that America had to offer. “It’s not like everyone at home goes to (college) and stays in the same country,” Banks said. “Here, I’m playing a Division 1 sport. I can play my sport

every single day.” When Banks made the decision, her parents were left with mixed emotions. “It broke their heart, although they couldn’t be happier at the same time,” she said. “It was bittersweet.”

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

SPORTS

Football aims to blast Rockets, end seven-game losing streak in series By Kullen Logsdon Sports Editor sports@cm-life.com

Malik Fountain visually remembers last year’s game against Toledo. The Central Michigan junior linebacker remembers the 31 points and 404 total yards the Rockets put on them in the 3117 defeat on Oct. 22. Fountain said the CMU defense has moved on and is ready for a new test this week. “Every opponent is faceless to us,” Fountain said. “We just have to go out, play our game and stop what they do.” The Chippewas (3-3, 1-1 Mid-American Conference) host the Rockets (4-1, 1-0) at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Kelly/ Shorts Stadium for the annual homecoming game. It will be

televised on ESPN 3. CMU comes in after a 2623 upset victory at Ohio last Saturday. The Chippewas ended their three-game losing streak and threw themselves back in the West Division race as CMU trails first place Western Michigan (4-2, 2-0) by only one game. The Chippewas have won three straight games on homecoming and are 2-0 on the day under head coach John Bonamego. To build on that succes, CMU will have to do something it hasn’t done since 2009 — defeat Toledo. CMU’s defense will have the advantage of not having to cover the Rockets’ top wide receiver, Cody Thompson. The senior — who caught four touchdowns in last year’s game — injured his leg against Eastern Michigan

last week and will not play. Bonamego said Thompson’s injury just means his defense will have to prepare for a more balanced attack. “They are very talented on both sides of the ball,” he said. “They lose their top wide receiver, but they still have three or four really good football players.” Led by quarterback Logan Woodside, Toledo comes in with the No. 1 total offense in the MAC (50.1 yards per game). Through five games, Woodside leads the conference with 1,635 passing yards and 11 touchdowns. Fountain said disguising blitzes and coverages will be the key to slowing down Woodside and the Toledo offense. “He’s one of the best quarterbacks in the MAC,” he said. “We just have to prepare for

Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Coach John Bonamego talks to reporters after football practice on Oct. 11 at the Indoor Athletic Center.

everything he’s going to bring to us.” On the other side of the ball, CMU’s offense looked re-energized against the Bobcats with the return of senior tight end Tyler Conklin and wide receiver

Corey Willis. Conklin had a career day with 10 catches for 136 receiving yards and two touchdowns after returning from a leg injury. Bonamego said that while homecoming is a special time

with alumni returning to Mount Pleasant, he wants his team’s focus solely on the football game. “The focus is on the execution and what we need to do to win the football game, less than it being homecoming.”

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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12 , 2017

SPORTS

Conklin’s return lifts Chippewas, receives national honors By McKenzie Sanderson Staff reporter sports@cm-life.com

Tyler Conklin was named the John Mackey Tight End of the Week after leading the Central Michigan football team in its 2623 Mid-American Conference victory last Saturday at Ohio. The senior tight end registered career highs with 10 catches for 136 yards and two touchdowns. It was Conklin’s first appearance of the season after recovering from a foot injury during the preseason. “It feels good to be back,” Conklin said. “After the injury, I wasn’t sure if I was going to be able to come back and the timetable kept changing. The fact that it all worked out had to be part of God’s plan to get me back on the

field. It feels great to be back and doing what I love with all my teammates.” In July, Conklin was named to the John Mackey Award Preseason Watch List. The award goes out annually to the best tight end in college football. This is the second time in his career that Conklin has received the weekly award. Head coach John Bonamego called Conklin a “difference-maker” on and off the football field. “That’s why he’s a captain and one of the leaders on this team,” Bonamego said. “He’s a multi-talented, explosive weapon on offense. Having him back in the lineup makes a big difference.” Last week’s win snapped a three-game losing streak for the Chippewas and evened their record at 3-3, 1-1 MAC.

Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Senior tight end Tyler Conklin poses for a portrait on Oct. 11 at the Indoor Athletic Complex.

ing game at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, CMU is slated to face MAC West Division favorite Toledo. The Rockets (4-1, 1-0 MAC) are coming off a 20-15 victory over Eastern Michigan in their MAC opener. While it’s always a better atmosphere playing in front of CMU’s own fan base, Conklin said Saturday will be “just another game.” “It’s good to be back in front of the fans and have the community come out and support you a little more than usual,” Conklin said. “That’s always a plus, but for us it’s just another week. It’s another team we have to prepare for and go out and beat.” Kickoff is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Kelly/ Shorts Stadium. The game can also be viewed on ESPN3.

“That was my test game,” Conklin said. “It was my game to just go out there and see

how it feels on my foot. I’ve just been feeling better and better each day so the recov-

ery process has been good. I feel great.” Heading into its homecom-

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OCT. 12, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

CLASSIFIEDS C M - L I F E . CO M /C LA SS I F I E D S

436 MOORE HALL, CMU, MOUNT PLEASANT, MI 48859 P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805

1-2 ISSUES: $8.50 PER ISSUE 3-4 ISSUES: $8.00 PER ISSUE 5-8 ISSUES: $7.75 PER ISSUE 9+ ISSUES: $7.50 PER ISSUE

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

5 AND 7 bedroom homes next to campus. Leasing 18-19 school year. cmustudenthomes.com _______________________________

LOOKING TO MOVE TO DETROIT? 2 bedroom apartment available for rent. Details: 2 Bedrooms 13x12 Living Room 14x22 Dining Room 13x14 Kitchen 13x15 (automatic dishwasher) Garage parking for one car Security System (Tenant pays) Fireplace, hardwood floors, and woodwork. Features: Private security patrol (Tenant pays) Long term lease preferred 10 Minutes from: Eastland, St Matthews, Detroit Public Schools, St. John Hospital, Cultural Center, Wayne State University, Downtown Theatre and Entertainment District. Tenant pays all utilities. Rent starting at $850.00 per month.Interested? E-mail extra.ideas@hotmail.com _______________________________

FOR RENT 1, 2, 3, 4, AND 5 PERSON Houses, Duplexes, & Apartments Now Leasing for 2018/2019 Close to campus. Locally owned and managed. No hidden fees, No application fee, No utility fees. www.qualityapts.com (989)772-3894 _______________________________ 1-6 BEDROOM APTS FREE WIFI, Cable, Shuttle, and *Gym, Furnished. www.LiveWithUnited. com. (989)772-2222. _______________________________ 4 BEDROOM, 2.5 Bath single family home. Kitchen appliances, W/D included. Ready to move in. Interested? Contact (989)854-9108 _______________________________

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A L L N E W, 4 B E D R O O M , 4 1/2 bath apts. Fireplace, deck, professionally decorated. Call 989-205-4122 to view the Globe apts. at 3700 E. Deerfield. _______________________________ AVAILABLE JANUARY 2018. Wellkept, 2 bedroom, 2 person duplex with attached garage within Mt. Pleasant. $700/pm plus utilities. Call (989)400-3003 or (989)772-5791 _______________________________

LOOKING FOR AN SUBLEASER? Call (989) 774-LIFE to place your ad in the Central Michigan Life Classifieds. In print and online at www.cm-life.com. _______________________________

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HOUSING CLOSE TO CAMPUS!! 1-12 bedroom houses, apartments & duplexes. Available 2018-2019. Call (989)817-4918 or (989)817-4935 www.labellerealty.net

If you would like to make a difference in people’s lives, MMI is hiring! We are looking for part-time and fulltime employees to become part of our team. Please go to our website www.mmionline.com to fill out an application! _______________________________

_______________________________ One 2-bedroom apartment available on attractively landscaped property: 4206 E. Wing Rd. Mount Pleasant, MI. Appliances (washer, dryer, range, refrigerator, and dishwasher) are included. Attached Garage. Utilities and horseboarding not included. Interested? E-mail extra. ideas@hotmail.com or call Mrs. Ann (313)-623-1468 _______________________________

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Office Personnel needed and Sales assistant. The position is parttime with the potential to develop to full-time. Applicant must be available to work for 10 hours a week and sometimes on Saturday with a pay of $370 weekly pay. Applicant will be cross trained as receptionist and customer service sales representative as well as cash handling. As the first point of contact with the public, an applicant is expected to present a friendly, outgoing, energetic attitude both in-person and on the telephone. Applicant must be self-motivating, computer literate, great at multitasking as well as being able to perform basic office tasks and be a team player. Application should be sent to billwilliams0029@gmail.com _______________________________

FOR RENT. Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, and Elon Musk, from Tesla and SpaceX are racing to be the 1st to the moon! You can be the 1st to see the brand new Globe Apts. Call 989-205-4122 to see one today. You’re sure to be the winner!

Live On-Site Auction, Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM, 9956 Beech Tree Lane, Frankenmuth, MI. 4X4 tractors and Equipment; Cargo Trailer; Shop Equipment. Details at SherwoodAuctionServiceLLC.com 989-763-3101. _______________________________

L O O K I N G F O R M AT U R E upperclassmen who desire a deluxe apt. with privae bath, walk-in closet, all new technology, 4 bedroom, at the brand new Globe Apts. of Lexington Ridge. (989)2054122 for appointment.

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_______________________________ SUBLEASE AVAILABLE FOR Arboretum Apartments At last year’s rate!! Spacious 956 square feet 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms. New flooring and fresh paint throughout the apartment, Washer/Dryer in unit. Available as early as November 1, 2017. $870.00 p/m, $40.00 application fee, $435.00 security deposit. Call or text for viewing appointment: Robin (989) 588-1391; or, Courtney (989) 588-1350 _______________________________

AUCTIONS

Live Auction Thurs., November 9, 2017, 1:00 P.M. 109.5 acres of tiled farm land and house. Elvin Brothers, 1569 N. Vandyke (M-53), Bad Axe, MI 48413. Auction by Marsa Auctioneering. 989-269-7227. www. Auctionzip.com ID# 5683 _______________________________

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Amish Log Beds, Dressers, Rustic Table and Chairs, Mattresses for Cabin or Home. Lowest price in Michigan! dandanthemattressman. com 989-923-1278

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 12, 2017

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD

C M - L I F E . CO M /C LA SS I F I E D S

436 MOORE HALL, CMU, MOUNT PLEASANT, MI 48859 P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805

1-2 ISSUES: $8.50 PER ISSUE 3-4 ISSUES: $8.00 PER ISSUE 5-8 ISSUES: $7.75 PER ISSUE 9+ ISSUES: $7.50 PER ISSUE

SERVICES A place for mom. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-520-3521 _______________________________ MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now: 800-993-0464 _______________________________ PAYCHEX. Payroll. Human Resources. Benefits Consulting. More than Half-Million Small & MidSize Business Clients Nationwide! Call Now - One Month of Payroll Processing FREE! New Customers ONLY. Call 1-866-764-0094 _______________________________

FOR SALE FOAM SHEETS: Pole Barn Insulation, Dow Styrofoam, R-Tech, long lengths, Under Concrete foam, foam for under siding, in stock or special cuts. No seconds, delivery, silver sheeting. www. williamsinsulationinc.com 800-2625774 _______________________________ PIONEER POLE BUILDINGS Free Estimates Licensed and Insured. 2x6 Trusses. 45 Year Warranty Galvalume Steel- 19 Colors. Since 1976 #1 in Michigan Call Today 1-800-292-0679 _______________________________

ACORN STAIRLIFTS The AFFORDABLE solution to your stairs! **Limited time -$250 Off Your Stairlift Purchase!**Buy Direct & SAVE. Please call 1-800-280-1897 for FREE DVD and brochure. _______________________________

15 WORD MINIMUM PER CLASSIFIED AD BOLD, ITALIC AND CENTERED TYPE ARE AVAILABLE ALONG WITH OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES LIKE AD ATTRACTORS.

FOR SALE

TV & INTERNET

BUILT BEST BARNS Michigan’s Largest Pole Barn Company. Best Quality, Best Service, October Specials, Order Now and Save! 24’x24’x8’=$7995.00; 24’x32’x8’=$8995.00; 24’x40’x10’=$10,995.00; 30’x40’x10’=$12,495.00; 30’x40’x12’=$13,495.00; 32’x48’x12’=$17,995.00. Completely Built, (Concrete Floor Optional) License/Insured 1-877802-9591 (Office) 989-205-2534 (Cell) _______________________________

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MOTORCYCLES Michigan`s Biggest & Best Motorcycle Swap Meet, October 15th, 2017, Birch Run Expo,10 am-4 pm: Bikes; parts; clothing; accessories; & more! admission only $7.00. For more info 989-8935187 bubbastricitycycle.com _______________________________

TOP CASH PAID! For old motorcycles! 1900-1979. Dead or alive! 920-371-0494. _______________________________

WANTED TO BUY MOTORCYCLES WANTED Before 1985. Running or not! Top $Cash$ Paid Free Appraisals! Japanese, British, European, American, Any Condition! CALL (315)-569-8094 or Email pictures or description to: Cyclerestoration@aol.com We pick up! & Travel to purchase! _______________________________

HughesNet: Gen4 satellite internet is ultra fast and secure. Plans as low as $39.99 in select areas. Call 1-800-491-8935 now to get a $50 Gift Card! _______________________________

NEW AT&T INTERNET OFFER. $20 and $30/mo plans available when you bundle. 99% Reliable. 100% Affordable. HURRY, OFFER ENDS SOON, CALL NOW 1-800-830-3921 _______________________________ DISH TV. 190 channels. $49.99/mo. for 24 mos. Ask About Exclusive Dish Features like Sling® and the Hopper®. PLUS HighSpeed Internet, $14.95/mo. (Availability and Restrictions apply.) TV for Less, Not Less TV! 1-866-950-6757 _______________________________

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MISCELLANEOUS DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855-413-9672 _______________________________

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Across

1. Cyber-opinion letters 5. Actress who played Kevin’s sister on “The Wonder Years” 9. TV honors 14. Daring 15. Wife, to Caesar 16. Bob ___ (onetime costar in CNN’s “Crossfire”) 17. 1987 Kevin Costner role 19. Hang on tight 20. Half a “Star Wars” robot’s name 21. Twisted look 23. Infection fluid 25. Least sloppy 30. Francium’s place, periodically 33. Math branch (abbr.) 35. Little laugh 36. British composer Sir Edward ___ 37. Sud’s opposite 39. Kirsten of film 42. Plastic building block

43. Set to arrive by 45. Wk. day 47. Syr. neighbor 48. Assorted 52. Crux 53. Quayle or Aykroyd 54. “Revenge is ___ best served cold” 57. TV monitor of sorts 61. Hand part 65. Rule for appropriate behavior 67. Roulette device 68. “Curb Appeal” network 69. Silent horror film “The Cabinet ____ Caligari” 70. Reason’s partner 71. Plant starter 72. Basic point

Down 1. 2. 3.

Barney’s Bedrock pal Fabric feature “This ____” (Michael Jackson album)

4. Oprah’s “The Color Purple” costar 5. Grayish brown 6. Cans 7. Popular pear 8. Actors Bean and Welles 9. District 10. Actress Gretchen of “Boardwalk Empire” 11. 1006, to Caesar 12. He can cook 13. DreamWorks ___ (film studio) 18. “Too bad, so sad!” 22. Minute 24. Molt 26. Divulge 27. Communist Friedrich 28. Actor’s milieu 29. Pulsate forcefully 30. Escape hatch 31. Day of the wk. 32. Gossipy type 33. “You ___ both” 34. Bacteriologist Pasteur 38. Carp’s kin 40. Phoenix cager

41. ____ off (angered) 44. Possible to defend 46. Italian white wine 49. Calculator display, briefly 50. Janet and Vivien 51. Remove stoppages 55. Hip-hop’s Knight 56. Author Shere 58. Audio system 59. Swing voters, briefly 60. Impudent 61. Abbr. after Willis or Coit 62. 1968 election monogram 63. Road reversal, slangily 64. 13th letter of the Hebrew alphabet 66. Movie medium


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OCT. 12, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

October 12, 2017  

Central Michigan Life

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