Page 1

Central Michigan University’s premier news source and student voice since 1919.

cm

Life

OUTPLAYED

cm-life.com

MONDAY, OCT. 21, 2013|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 25 VOL. 95

LIFE IN BRIEF UNIVERSITY

Lynch leads NIU past CMU in second half »PAGE 1B

CELEBRATING CMU RIDE ALONG

Homecoming crowds slow to disperse, police press on

CMED VS. WMED As Western Michigan University opens a new medical school, CMED officals note some striking differences between the two schools. w 7A

By Adrian Hedden Senior Reporter

Larry Klaus was ready for the big game. As he gazed across the parking lots outside Central Michigan University’s athletic complex, the CMU police lieutenant was prepared to lead his team through enormous crowds at the university’s biggest event of the year. Saturday’s homecoming football game drew thousands of people to Kelly/Shorts Stadium, and police were tasked with keeping attendees safe amid the mass of tailgating parties. While the festivities remained relatively ordered, that serenity required deep cooperation from 22 officers of Mount Pleasant’s five local police departments.

METRO

4G ON THE WAY AT&T and Sprint are working on getting 4G service to Mount Pleasant. The upgrade would be a boost for university operations. w 6A

1:35 P.M.

SPORTS

Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Central Michigan Skydivers co-owner Scott Schlosser descends upon Kelly/Shorts Stadium before the Homecoming football game against NIU on Saturday.

Initially patrolling the lots to the south of the stadium, Klaus said the area usually holds up to 6,000 people. He said the most common citations were minors in possession of alcohol. Before heading into the crowds, Klaus surveyed the scene to identify certain areas dense with activity. “When we get hot spots where people might start throwing projectiles, we move in,” he said. “Bottles are not permitted, but it’s impossible to police. You’d just be chasing bottles all day.” w PARADE | 5A

Costumed characters add family fun to homecoming By Stephen Cross Staff Reporter

GOING NOWHERE Lavallii, CMU rushing attack shut down by NIU defense w 1B

SPORTS

SNEAK PEEK The men’s basketball team held their annual Maroon vs. Gold scrimmage this weekend. Read about the highs and lows of this season’s team. w 5B

Clowns, zombies, princesses and dancers wandered their way from campus to downtown Mount Pleasant on Saturday as part of the annual Homecoming Parade. Led by police cars and ambulances, the parade began at Lot 22 on west campus and made its way through Main Street before ending downtown. Hundreds of people, many of whom were Central Michigan University students and alumni, partied and cheered as the paraders and floats went by. One of those students was Macomb senior Robert Kirchhoff, who was enthusiastic about the event. “I’m pretty impressed by all of this,” Kirchhoff said. “It’s really cold out, but a lot of alumni showed up, so it’s pretty exciting.” Downtown, families and energetic children who were eager to get candy

that was being thrown into the crowd by parade members. In addition to children, there were many Mount Pleasant residents in attendance. Rozi Saunders has lived in Mount Pleasant for most of her life and has been coming to the Homecoming Parade since 1963. “I’m having a wonderful time today,” Saunders said. “I would like to see more floats, like they used to have.” Many Mount Pleasant businesses and various CMU groups were featured. Ortonville junior Pat Wivo, the president of Theta Pi Iota, said his fraternity was excited and grateful to participate in the parade. “We are very excited to contribute to the tradition,” Wivo said. “This is our third year in a row, and we have a good time.” metro@cm-life.com

Students paddle for 16th annual Cardboard Boat Race

Life inside

By Taylir Emery Staff Reporter

The Student Government Association is looking to address concerns with Student Disabilities Services. »PAGE 3A

Women’s soccer offense finaly finds its footing. »PAGE 4B

ALL NEW

Tianyu Han | Staff Photographer Children on the Saginaw Chippewas Tribe float pose and wave to the crowd of people lined up down Broadway Street in downtown Mount Pleasant Saturday afternoon for the 2013 Homecoming Parade.

Samantha Madar | Staff Photographer Pewamo junior Jeremy Witgen, left, Novi freshman Henry Echelmeyer, back center, Georgia freshman Justin Haag, and East Point freshman Benjamin Lee, right, paddle their cardboard boat “Ships and Giggles” Saturday on Rose Pond.

Central Michigan University students rowed across Rose Ponds in handmade boats to compete in the 16th annual Cardboard Boat Race Saturday. The homecoming tradition included engineering students in the first six heats and opened the competition up to anyone interested in the last heat.

“We focused on building a sturdy and steady boat, not fast, so we stayed up on the water,” Sterling Heights freshman Marcellus Spinks said. Spinks’ boat, ‘Miracle Workers,’ won first place in the first heat. “We tried to get in sync,” he said. “One of my teammates counted one, two, three and then we would all stroke. It helped once we all started getting tired.” w BOAT RACE | 2A

Central Park Apartments www.cmu4lease.com


News

2A | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY w Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Elizabeth Weaver will discuss her experiences on the court as written in her book, “Judicial Deceit,” in the Powers Hall Ballroom at 7 p.m. Political science professor James Hill will moderate the discussion, and a question and answer session will follow.

TOMORROW w A free screening of “Deaf Jam,” a film that follows a deaf teenager who turns to poetry, begins at 7 p.m. in Dow 171. w Financial Services Career Night, featuring representatives from firms including Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Ameriprise, Merrill Lynch and more, begins at 7 p.m. at the Bovee University Center. w The CMU Percussion Ensemble performs at 8 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall. The concert is free and open to the public.

CORRECTIONS

F N S C O R L E A OW H 20 SI O 1 N O 4/ G LY 2 EA 015 R!

Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2013 Volume 95, Number 25

Spanish Writing Center open, GAs ready to help students “Being extremely fluent in the language allows us to help students greatly with their writing skills.” Alejandro Vales, graduate assistant

PHOTO OF THE DAY

By Kelsey Smith Staff Reporter

Central Michigan University students enrolled in Spanish classes now have an extra service available to them. The new Spanish writing center, located in 323 Pearce Hall, opened to students in late September. Run by graduate assistants, the center aims at assisting students with any issues they have in their classes. “This center is designed to help students improve their interpreting and writing in the Spanish language,” said graduate assistant Alejandro Vales, who helped create the center. The center’s hours vary throughout the week, but one-on-one appointments can be easily scheduled through the graduate assistants. “I am from Spain, and we are the first graduate assistants from a foreign country,” Vales said. “I think that gives us an advantage and great opportunity for the students to learn from. Being extremely fluent in the language allows us to help students greatly with their writing skills.” The GAs aim to encourage students to study Spanish as a second language. They want to give students an interactive way to learn material outside the classroom. “We really want them to learn Spanish as a second language as best as they can, especially when it can be very hard,” Vales said. In addition to helping

Emily Brouwer | Staff Photographer Jackson senior Jon Kennedy catches a football passed to him by Livonia junior Tommy Schiffman on Sunday evening behind the Heritage Square Apartments at 628 W. Broomfield Road.

New Venture Competition named Educational Program of the Year students, the graduate assistants document their experiences. They take note of how the students learn, what they struggle with and the techniques that work best for them. “Besides helping students, we are also doing something very cool for ourselves,” Vales said. “We are actually doing research and writing a paper based off of our experiences working with the Spanish students. We are focusing mainly on how students learn and what techniques work best for them. We are also using a variety of linguistic aspects when it comes to helping the students.” Midland junior Katie Hall walked out of the center with a look of relief on her face. She said she was glad she went because of the help she received. “The Spanish writing center is very helpful for my writing,” Hall said. “I went because my teacher assigned us to use the center, but I’m glad I went, it helped me out a lot.” university@cm-life.com

By Rachel Schuit Staff Reporter

Automation Alley, Michigan’s largest technology business association, has named Central Michigan University’s New Venture Competition Program the educational program of the year. More than 200 aspiring entrepreneurs from CMU and Michigan Technological University have participated in the competition over the past three years. Debra Zellner, the director of the Isabella Bank Institute for Entrepreneurship, said she was thrilled that the NVC received the award. “This competition is positioned to build the entrepreneurial network across Michigan and enables student entrepreneurs to be directly linked and exposed to the entrepreneurial system,” Zellner said. The competition awards students $65,000 in start-up capital, as well as awards for other categories such as best overall venture, best social venture, best technology venture, biggest impact on Michigan, highest growth potential and the spirit of entrepreneurship.

Fifteen businesses exist as a result of the competition, according to Automation Alley. “We are quite proud of Debra Zellner and the entire Isabella Bank Institute for Entrepreneurship staff,” said Dean of the College of Business Charles Crespy. “The

award is a strong affirmation of our efforts to provide two distinct career paths: To train students for careers in the private sector and enable would-be entrepreneurs.” university@cm-life.com

Halloween Country Located Inside Black-Tie Tuxedo and Costume Shop

1017 S. Mission St. • Mt. Pleasant, MI (989) 772-1430

To The Best Place Get A Costume!

50% OFF

all retail

halloween costumes Expires 11/2/2013

25% OFF

all retail

halloween accessories Expires 11/2/2013

BLACK TIE

Look for the Hearse!

tHe Costume sHop Hop op tHat’s t at’s H Here all year!

ALL NEW

Central Park Apartments 1308 E. Gaylord St.

at CMU

(Formerly Four Seasons Apartments)

The first suite under construction NOW but will be completed November 1st.

INTERIOR: 4-BEDROOM SUITES TOTALLY REMODELED - UP TO 1200 SF • New high efficiency gas furnace and hot water heater • New kitchen with granite countertops • New appliances including dishwasher, microwave and garbage disposal • TWO FULL private bathrooms • FREE FULL SIZE washer/gas dryer in every unit • New wood grain laminate flooring • Free cable and wireless high-speed Internet access • New central air conditioning • Free 50” flat panel TV with lease signing

EXTERIOR/GROUNDS

• Great location within easy walking distance to campus • New windows, vinyl siding and trim • New insulation – low heating bills • Well lit spacious parking • Lawn and snow plow service • Attractive landscaping • Picnic tables & basketball net

Get a 50” Flat P with signed le anel T V 2014/15 scho ase for ol year!*

18

SUITES UNDER CONSTRUCTION AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 2014 Just $595 Per Person $2,380 Per Suite Per Month

PREMIUM HOUSES IN PRIME LOCATIONS S T IL L E AVA IL A B L

For details and to submit application go to:

www.cmu4lease.com

IL A B L E S T IL L AV-JAU LY 2 0 1 4 Y JA N U A R

5 O R 2 0 1 4 /1 L E A S E DOFO L Y E A R SCH

1032 S. Arnold Street Licensed: 5 *For Apartment Signings Only

1033 S. Arnold Street Licensed: 4


Inside Life

TONY WITTKOWSKI | METRO | metro@cm-life.com KYLE KAMINSKI | UNIVERSITY | university@cm-life.com SAMANTHA SMALLISH | STUDENT LIFE | studentlife@cm-life.com

cm-life.com

Life in BRIEF F i n an c i a l Ai d

Crossing oceans of sound

College Abacus: Lifting the veil off the true costs of college Sun took her music career WASHINGTON _ A new across the globe, is now a online app called College Abacus is making it easier for professor at CMU students and their families to get estimates in advance of how much financial aid colleges and universities will give so that they can compare schools for costs. Until about two years ago, financial aid was a mystery until a student got a college acceptance letter and a financial aid package. Change began in 2011, when the federal government required schools to offer online net price calculators, which compute a school’s full cost of attendance, minus estimated scholarships, based on family income and other information that individuals enter. College Abacus is a free, onestop shop. It taps the net price calculators at three schools a student selects. Then, based on personal information entered once into College Abacus, the site retrieves the estimates. More schools can be entered, three at a time. The federal government’s College Navigator website offers a rougher estimate. For each school, it will give estimated net prices for several income levels. “Even if the government has stopped working, parents still need to find financial aid for their students to go to college,” said College Abacus co-founder Abigail Seldin. And finding out in advance which schools are likely to be affordable can bring peace to households in the spring, when most full-time students get their college decisions, Seldin said. It also can help reduce student debt. Referring to a popular travel accommodations search engine, Seldin calls College Abacus the kayak.com of net price calculators. - Renee Schoof, McClatchy Washington Bureau

Metro

Sober in October hosts ‘I know what you did last night’ Each year during the month of October, residence hall assembly funds various programs as part of ‘Sober in October’ to promote and encourage responsible and safe behavior. One such program, titled “I Know What You Did Last Night,” is being hosted by the Kesseler Hall Council, it will take place at 8 p.m. today in the Kesseler second-floor study lounge. The program will offer students the opportunity to work in groups to piece together a story based on scenarios they will be given. In addition, the movie “HAZE” will be shown. Pizza and fall refreshments will be provided. The program might be a shocker for some participants, but for Grand Rapids senior Alyson Cole, it’s a chance to learn about the dangers of alcohol. “One part of ‘I Know What You Did Last Night’ is the viewing of the movie HAZE, which is about a college student who was left to ‘sleep it off’ after being heavily intoxicated and ended up passing away in his sleep,” Cole said. - Kevin Andrews, staff reporter

By Shawn Tonge Staff Reporter

G

uest Lecturer of Violin Fangye Sun made her life’s passion her work when she and five others were appointed to the Central Michigan University College of Music this semester. “Music just seemed very natural to pick up for me,” Sun said. “I fell in love with it.” Aside from teaching violin in both her home country, China, and in the United States, Sun has collaborated with a number of celebrated orchestras, including the Michigan State University Symphony, the National Repertory Orchestra and the Jiao Tong University Symphony. Sun said live performances are some of the most rewarding parts of being a musician, but her real passion is teaching music to others. After joining the Grand Rapids Symphony in 2011 and performing with them for two years, she decided to switch gears and began looking for academic work. After interviewing with several Michigan colleges, she was hired to the CMU College of Music. Traverse City senior Kayla Priest, who is studying for a music education major with Sun, Spurbeck, who has acted as host for a said Sun’s enthusiasm for music is number of foreign students studying at helpful and inspiring. MSU. In the seven years Sun lived there, “Her energy level is always very the two developed a strong relationship. positive,” Priest said. “She has a very Sun described Mildred as her kind way of pushing her students to American mother. reach the next level at each lesson “She adapted quickly to being an while still emphasizing what needs to American student,” Spurbeck said. be improved upon.” “She amazed me with her ability to Sun began her musical journey at a young age. Several members of her fam- study from English books in her first semester. I’ve never seen her face a ily worked as professional musicians, problem without finding a solution.” including her father, a professor of viola Sun was interested in both studying in at the Xi’an Conservatory of Music. a new environment and in learning more Sun was given a violin for her third birthday and began playing it at the age about life in a different culture. She said that it took time to adjust to American of four. culture and to overcome the language When she was 11, Sun gave her first barrier by learning more English. performance at a youth violin competiAfter she earned her doctorate from tion, where she won the gold medal. MSU, Sun’s career in music almost She continued practicing through her ended in 2006 when she injured a adolescence and attended the Xi’an muscle in her left hand. The injury was Conservatory in China. After receivthe result of too much practice with the ing her Bachelor of Music degree, she violin and it made playing painful. taught at the conservatory for two “After the injury, I was pretty desperyears as an assistant professor. In 2003, Sun met MSU violin profes- ate,” Sun said. “I didn’t think I could do this anymore, that I would have to sor Walter Verdehr during a China choose a new career.” concert tour. After learning about the The physical therapy Sun undermusic program available at MSU, Sun went for two years proved effective, decided to travel to Michigan to earn lessening the pain and increasing the her musical arts doctorate. damaged muscle’s strength. Sun said When Sun arrived in the U.S., she that such an injury never fully heals, stayed with Lansing resident Mildred

Daytona Niles | Staff Photographer Professor Fangye Sun practices her violin, preparing herself for her lessons she gives students. Sun also team teaches a string technique class Monday in the Music Building.

so the muscle now works at around 90 percent of its original capacity. The violin enthusiast sometimes returns to China during summer to perform with concerts and teach classes. She said her busy schedule only allows her to travel home every other year in general.

Sun is currently preparing for an upcoming violin recital. She will be performing on Oct. 29 at the Staples Family Concert Hall in the Music Building. studentlife@cm-life.com

SGA Sens. address understaffing in Student Disability Services By Malachi Barrett Staff Reporter

Student Government Association senators are working toward a proposal that would add 14 new positions to Student Disability Services to combat staffing problems within the administration. “We’ve gotten so much support from so many people,” said Mount Pleasant senior and SGA Sen. Michaela Mack. “I feel like every day, more and more people from SGA are joining on.” Mack and her roommate, Mount Pleasant senior and SGA Sen. Carrie Cloutier, are leading the charge to put more workers in the Student Disabilities Services office to serve two functions. The first is an advocacy group that

can intervene on the student’s behalf to professors and other faculty when the student is experiencing problems. The second group would be a peer-to-peer support group made up of volunteer students, as well as other students with disabilities. Their role would be to provide mentoring, support and monitoring how a student is able to manage their disability throughout the year. “Even with 14 more positions brought in, that’s a ratio of 17 staff to 703 students with disabilities,” Mack said. “So that’s around 41 students per administrator. Grand Valley State University is 17 to one, so while we’re still not great, it’s better.” GVSU served as a model for the sena-

tors, as it offers some of the best student disability services of schools relative in size to CMU, according to Cloutier. The main problem separating GVSU from CMU is the size of the disabled student population. While GVSU only has to contend with around 100 students, CMU has slightly more than 700. “On average, the number of students with disabilities grows between 13 and 20 percent,” said Student Disability Services Director Susie Rood. “Last semester, we had 613. This went up about 100 students, and our numbers keep increasing year to year.” Mack said SDS is fully on-board with their resolution, and has cooperated to get the staffing they need. “If we had more staff and more space

could we do more things? Yes,” Rood said. “Could we be more responsive and more proactive? Yes. Right now we are addressing whatever we can.” Cloutier, who is dyslexic, conceived the project after experiencing some of the challenges students with disabilities face at CMU firsthand. She and Mack are researching and building their case with help from other members of the SGA. Mack and Cloutier are still in the early stages, looking to gather enough information to make a strong argument. They said the next step is to send out surveys through SDS to asses the extent of student dissatisfaction. university@cm-life.com

Free speech wall serves as an outlet for expression By Amanda Brancecum Staff Reporter

The University Libertarians collaborated with Young Americans for Liberty to give students an outlet for expression in the form of a free speech wall on Friday. Besides students, faculty and alumni walking near the Bovee University Center also wrote on the wall. “There are a lot of things that will be put on the wall that I might not agree with, but that’s the whole point of freedom of speech,” said Troy junior Christian Conley, University Libertarians vice president. “You can say or write whatever you want in this country, because it is a liberty that’s afforded to you.” A free speech wall is one of many

activism projects the University Libertarians have planned throughout the year. Conley said the wall was one of several ideas suggested by the Young Americans for Liberty, the RSO’s national partner, to use as an activism project. “We are just trying to draw attention to the First Amendment and individual rights as a whole,” said University Libertarians President Ty Hicks, a Jackson sophomore. Some students wrote down their thoughts on politics, while others wrote whatever was on their mind at the time. Illinois sophomore Meredith Fruhauf took to the wall to relieve some stress in the wake of midterms. “I wrote, ‘Failing is not always failure,’ because a lot of people are

Amanda Brancecum | Staff Reporter A CMU student writes a passage on the University Libertarians’ free speech wall last Friday near the Bovee University Center.

stressed out, especially with it being homecoming week,” Fruhauf said. University Libertarians is a local chapter at Central Michigan University. The chapter works closely with its national partner Young Ameri-

cans for Liberty. “We have a very collaborative relationship because our ideals line up,” Hicks said. studentlife@cm-life.com


Voices

Editorial Board

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Catey Traylor | editor@cm-life.com MANAGING EDITOR | John Irwin | news@cm-life.com STUDENT LIFE | Samantha Smallish | studentlife@cm-life.com UNIVERSITY | Kyle Kaminski | university@cm-life.com METRO | Tony Wittkowski | metro@cm-life.com

cm-life.com

EDITORIAL | Pressing university concerns unanswered

n a lot of ways, Central Michigan University President George Ross’ State of the University address last week was structured like a U.S. president’s State of the Union speech usually is. It was a fluffy speech, designed to reassure the audience that things aren’t as bad as they might seem. But anyone who watched the speech looking for a bold vision of where CMU is heading in the wake of an enrollment crisis was left sorely disappointed. And yes, it is a crisis, despite what Ross said in his speech. Ross had a grand opportunity to rally the university behind a strategy that specifically confronts the enrollment and budget issues head-on, but he botched the opportunity, failing to provide specificity on any of the very real issues facing CMU this year. Within the first few minutes of the speech, Ross had already mentioned the newly-planned Biosci-

ences building and CMU’s crown jewel, the College of Medicine. Instead of speaking directly to the concerns of his constituents, he made the decision to tout some of the university’s largest expenditures (including a particularly expensive “living wall” addition to the Biosciences building). Then came the boldest statement of the afternoon. “I honestly believe that our enrollment challenge has made our campus more cohesive and energized than it’s been in a long time,” he said to the full auditorium. It’s one thing to recognize a problem, but it’s another to try to spin it into positivity. While Ross recognized some issues, he didn’t speak much on clearcut solutions

Detroit is a bankrupt has-been whose only dealings nowadays are in violence and job loss. If you are particularly in tune with most mainstream media and popular opinion, you might find yourself nodding your head right now. Who can blame you? When’s the last time you read a national headline saying something nice about the city? It’s only news if it bleeds, and if people didn’t know any better, they might think Detroit has been dead since Kwame Kilpatrick kicked it a few years back. Then, coverage of the whole Big Three bailout fiasco reminded America that the city was still in poor shape and falling further from its former glory. The situation stagnated until reaching an inevitable, history-making outcome. “The Motor City Goes Bust,” as USA Today bluntly printed it. Or, “Out of Money, Detroit Calls it Quits,” the Los Angeles Times gracefully announced. I was in San Francisco wearing a “Made in Detroit” shirt the day it happened. Almost everybody I walked by muttered a comment or made a sneer that said it all.

“I’m sorry about that,” an older lady said to me. It took me a second to understand. “I’m sorry you were made in Detroit,” she finally said unapologetically, half laughing. I was so dumbfounded by the words of this total stranger that all I could do was offer a few seconds of insincere laughter. The several other off-beat interactions with strangers, however, helped me shape a stronger rebuttal. “Have you ever been?” I asked of the people eager to take blows at the city they became experts on by studying headlines. Nearly everyone answered no. That’s when I realized the problem was less about the decay of Detroit and more about the decay of informed opinion. When I talk to someone who has never been to Detroit, they usually follow with something like: “I’d rather not get mugged or attacked.” I have developed a theory that people who have never visited the city “because they are scared of it” are actually scared they will like it. They are scared of being wrong and worried Detroit might no longer be fit to serve as their target of sarcasm and ignorant humor. I won’t feign expertise about every aspect of Detroit, but throughout the four years I went to high school in the city, I never heard a single gunshot. Each year when the world’s largest free jazz festival rolls into town, all I hear is beautiful music. All I witness is a diverse audience appreciating it. I have lived to tell the tale of my enriching experience with the city. I suppose I owe myself a congratulations for defying a set of odds fabricated by the uninformed outspoken among us. People get violent and unruly for no reason, no matter the venue — it’s not just Detroit. In closing, I’ll share with you an age-old lesson I reteach myself everyday: Don’t believe everything you hear.

Central Michigan Life

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com

Kurt Nagl

Staff Reporter

Visit Detroit before you define it

EDITORIAL Catey Traylor, Editor-in-Chief

Hometown: Lowell, Mich. Years with CM Life: Four

and a half years.

and planning for the future. He simply said that planning and the budget needed collective restructuring – an obvious answer to a more complicated problem. Ross played two video presentations, quoted former university presidents, called CMU a “firstchoice university,” and referenced John F. Kennedy. He even established a twopronged “solution” toward the end of the speech: Student support and bold-decision making. However, after the speech, it’s still unclear what exactly Ross plans to do. Although the hourlong address spoke to several issues impacting campus, specifics were a scarcity. Make no mistake, Ross is wellintentioned, probably working hard behind the scenes, but his address left us wanting more. It left many of those who watched struggling to see what kind of future Ross envisions for CMU. It sends the message that the president, ultimately, is unsure of what to do next.

BEHIND THE DESK

I

Ross misses opportunity with State of University

TONY WITTKOWSKI | METRO EDITOR

What does your desk do?

We cover all the cops, courts and community issues that arise surrounding CMU students. What was the first story you covered for CM Life?

It was concerning President Ross, but it was when he was president at Alcorn State. It was about the variance of accents from students in the south who used CMU facilities.

If a movie was made of your life, what genre would it be and who would play you?

It would be academy awardwinning, and I would be played by Clint Eastwood in his prime. What’s the best part about working at CM Life?

Pam’s cooking. It gets me up in the morning. If you had to eat at one restaurant for the rest of your life, where would it be?

Red Robin. It’s the home of the best burger in the world, the Royal Red Robin Burger. What’s something most people don’t know about you?

I can’t swallow pills; I have to deal with headaches on my own.

To get in touch with Tony, email him at metro@ cm-life.com

This ‘black and white’ lifestyle isn’t satisfying I read a quotation recently that really spoke to me. Some would say it was sappy, a “motivational” motif that people enjoy reading but never take to heart. When I read this, something switched on inside me. It was like a lightbulb came on. I had an “ah-ha!” moment, if you will. As humans, we revel in security, conformity and the safety of a monotonous tomorrow. But let’s face it. This black and white lifestyle isn’t satisfying. When I think back on the things that have satisfied me most in my life, I think of the times I took risks. When I did something for myself. And when, despite the potential criticism, I went for what it was I desired anyway. So many of us remain stagnant in our unhappy circumstances. But if we aren’t happy in these circumstances, why don’t we change them? This is a simple concept, yes, but

it can also be a simple action. If you hate your job, look for something else. Something new will come. If your roommate is a negative, self-wallowing pessimist, cut the ties. You will meet others; people who will make you a better person, and people who will lift you up, not make you doubt yourself. I’m not telling you to quit the only job you have that pays the rent. Hell, if you don’t care enough to find something better, I’m not even asking you to consider finding something new. You might be lonely for a while. But being alone is better than being in bad company. At the very least, it’s something to think about. I believe that everything happens for a reason, but I also believe that it is up to us to take action. Now is the time to make things happen. Now is the time to do something extraordinary, to march

Samantha Smallish

Student Life Editor boldly in the direction of where you want to be. An excerpt from said quotation goes like this: “The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.” Life is too short to be anything but happy. And it all starts with you. Stop the bad habits, remove yourself from the things that make you sad and start involving yourself in the things that give you pride, that lift your spirits and make you hold your head high. It won’t be easy. Change is hard and it’s scary. But it’s also well worth the risk.

CARTOON | CHIPS N' DIP

Mail | 436 Moore Hall

John Irwin, Managing Editor

Mount Pleasant, MI 48859

Kyle Kaminski, University Editor Samantha Smallish, Student Life Editor

989.774.LIFE

Tony Wittkowski, Metro Editor Kristopher Lodes, Sports Editor

cm-life.com

Ben Solis, Copy Editor Taylor Ballek, Photo Editor Katy Kildee, Assistant Photo Editor Mariah Prowoznik, Lead Designer Luke Roguska, Page Designer Kayla Folino, Page Designer Austin Stowe, Multimedia Editor Nick Dobson, Online Coordinator ADVERTISING MANAGERS Julie Bushart Daniel Haremski Gabriella Hoffman PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER Kaitlyn Blaszczyk

Michigan

Life

and commentary submissions. Only

correspondence

that

includes a signature (email excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do

not

include

attached

documents via email. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary

PROFESSIONAL STAFF

should not exceed 500 words.

Rox Ann Petoskey

All submissions are subject to

Production Leader Kathy Simon

editing and may be published

Assistant Director

in print or on cm-life.com

of Student Publications Dave Clark Director of Student Publications

STUDENT FACES

welcomes letters to the editor

in the order they are received.

Cassie Kramer is a senior from Frankfurt who is majoring in radiology. CM Life: Describe yourself in three words: Cassie Kramer: Energetic, optimistic and funny. What is the best part about being a Chippewa? CK: Everyone’s always so happy, and sometimes you just don’t

see that at other schools. They just like to have fun.

Who is your role model? CK: My mom. She just makes the best out of every situation and

strives to be the best.

What is the best piece of advice you have ever gotten? CK: Don’t let a ‘C’ feel like you’re failing. Don’t let it affect how

you feel about yourself.

What is your favorite part about Halloween? CK: The decorations and the colors. It’s like the holiday everyone

wants to take part in.

S ENIOR CA SS IE KRAME R

James Wilson, Social Media Coordinator

Central


News

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Friday, Oct. 21, 2013 | 5A

5K supported Special Olympics Michigan By Natalie Town Staff Reporter

Tianyu Han | Staff Photographer

Participants in the Homecoming 5K Run line up Saturday before the race begins on South Franklin Street.

PARADE | CONTINUED FROM 1A

According to Klaus, CMUPD averages six to 12 MIP citations per game. He explained that while officers do not actively demand patron identification, they often must act on obvious violations. “If you look like you’re 12 and are drinking a beer, we’ll check you,” Klaus said. “We’re not actively looking for it.”

1:50 P.M.

Moving into the tailgating area of Kelly/Shorts’ southern parking lots, Klaus compared CMU’s atmosphere as more concentrated than at larger universities. CMU recently got rid of the roped-off area designating the tailgating spots. Klaus said behavior has improved since the area was opened up. “It’s different here,” he said. “You get bigger groups in smaller areas. It’s more spread out at MSU. The behavior has been a little better, since there’s been more intermingling with the families. We get a ton of alumni, and they behave for the most part.”

2 P.M.

As he approached the tailgaters, Klaus was greeted by a woman who thanked him for his work. Making his way to the grass parkways at the back of the lot, Klaus peered down the aisles of RV’s watching out for any disorderly behavior. “A lot of alums bring their big rigs to tailgate,” he said. In his third year supervising the homecoming parties, Klaus was wary about attendees going too far and becoming dangerously intoxicated. “We’ll deal occasionally with someone who’s over-consumed,” Klaus said. “Sometimes we have to get a medical transport. We look out for fighting, people throwing projectiles and MIPs.”

2:15 P.M.

After his first pass through the student parties, Klaus headed up to CMUPD’s inci-

dent command center near the stadium’s press box on the west side of the stadium. Greeted by CMU Police Chief Bill Yeagley and Ferris State’s Director of Public Safety Bruce Borkovich, Klaus was able to observe the field through the large windows on the top floor of the athletic complex. “The time and the organization an event like this takes is tremendous,” Borkovich said. “Most people don’t know how much work goes into this. The whole university really has to come together. Everything is surprisingly safe and orderly for the amount of people.” Yeagley reported just one MIP, medical incident and drug charge since the festivities began.

studentlife@cm-life.com

“The whole idea is it takes down the activity,” Klaus said about turning off the music. “We get the music down and make assignments from there.”

2:55 P.M.

Officers locate an unconscious woman underneath a truck. They quickly call an ambulance and lift her to safety. To get the victim out of the crowds, officers were tasked with negotiating the surges of people. “We’re going to part the waters and get that person out,” Klaus said. “That girl needs a medical response. She’s down in between two trucks. This push is going to be a long one.”

2:59 P.M.

As kickoff was imminent, officers began sternly shutting down the parties after the girl was safely en route to the hospital. Estimating crowd control would continue outside until halftime, officers set to work pouring out beers and urging attendees toward the field. The crowd was slow to respond.

2:20 P.M.

Inside CMUPD’s surveillance room on the top floor of the complex was Captain Fred Harris and two 32-inch plasma screen TVs, recording from more than 20 cameras around the stadium. Officers can also view the field through a large glass window above their screens. “We’ve got a very good vantage point up here,” Harris said. One thing we don’t watch is the game. We can get things reported pretty quickly up here.” Harris said his four medical teams, comprising paramedics and law enforcement officers, respond mostly to patrons who are “over-intoxicated” or acting disorderly. He said most officers are assigned to the student-populated southern lots, and that most cases there are drinkingrelated.

Taryn Wattles | Staff Photographer CMU students show off their school spirit by braving the cold fall weather in a hot tub at the CMU homecoming tailgate behind Kelly/Shorts Stadium on Saturday. Playfully labled, “Tub-gaters,” the homemade hot tub trailer gathered many onlookers and participants.

3:10 P.M.

Approaching some seasoned partiers intent on finishing their last drinks despite police orders, Klaus was intent on re-directing foot traffic to the north. “You get more crap from the old folks than you do the young ones,” he said.

4 P.M.

CMU police moved into the stadium to police the crowds packing the bleachers to witness the game. Klaus and a small team of officers stayed in the lots to make sure the job was done. “It can look overwhelming,” he said. “It takes a minute to get rolling. We moved more people today than usual. This went pretty well — people mostly moved when we told them. We’re here to keep the peace. We try to convince people to go in and watch.”

2:50 P.M.

After several officers convened on a back parkway with Klaus, they prepared to begin their “push.” Officers walked through the parking aisles, asking attendees to pour out their drinks and either leave or enter the stadium. Cutting the music from large speakers, officers waited to see if partiers got the message.

metro@cm-life.com

Check out more photos from this weekend’s Homecoming festivities on cm-life.com

Mr. Phi Significant Join the ladies of Phi Sigma Sigma for their annual male beauty pageant

Come watch your favorite men strut their stuff on stage, while they try to win your hearts! There will be 3 different rounds they will be competing in: a costume round, a talent round, and a Q & A round. Admission: $2 from a sister or $3 at the door Tuesday, October 22 @ 7 PM Where? Anspach Hall 162 *If you have a contestant or wish to be a contestant, please contact Katie Molloy.

Central Michigan University kicked off its weekend homecoming festivities with the annual Special Olympics 5K run. The Special Olympics 5K has been a fundraiser for more than 40 years, said Manager of Marketing at Special Olympics Michigan at CMU Erin Dougherty. The event is important in raising awareness and spreading the word of Special Olympics Michigan and its relationship with the university. “It is a great way to raise awareness for Special Olympics and to let people know we are on campus,” Dougherty said. A few hundred people were in attendance Saturday morning at Finch Fieldhouse and the surrounding area, where eager runners, supporters and volunteers anxiously waited for the run to begin. Runners took a few moments to stretch and warm up in preparation for the 3.1 miles around CMU’s campus. The runners

then pinned on their registration numbers and discussed why the Special Olympics 5K is so important to them. “It goes to a good cause, it is nice to see all the support from CMU and the community because we host it,” said Sterling Heights junior Sasha Rudow. Club Running at CMU participates in several 5Ks throughout the fall season, however, those that support good causes are the ones they enjoy most. “I have a lot more fun with 5Ks for a good cause,” Rudow said. Louisiana junior Danielle McDermott was running the 5K for her third time. “I love the people, because everyone is so happy and supportive, even if you run it in three hours,” she said. Those who participated in the run were encouraged to raise money for more than 20,000 athletes with intellectual disabilities in Michigan.

Mollo1kf@cmich.edu

Daytona Niles | Staff Photographer Twenty-two Police officers from State Police, CMUPD, Mount Pleasant Police, Tribal Police and Shepherd PD patrol the parking lots surrounding Kelly/Shorts Stadium during CMU’s Homecoming game against NIU Saturday.

BOAT RACE | CONTINUED FROM 1A

In each heat it was common to see at least one boat take water and sink. Many teams who sank in last year’s race came back this year to recover their reputation. “We want to prove our professors wrong,” Monroe junior Bryan Wallace said. “They’re all here watching us. We sank last year, so they’re just waiting for us to sink again.” Last year’s sinking gave way to their unofficial team name

this year: ‘We Did the Math This Time.’ “We did the calculations for buoyancy multiple, multiple times,” said Wallace’s teammate, St. Johns senior Caleb Bancroft. Once in the boat, Bancroft relied on his teammates to make it to the finish line. “Our strategy was sleek and fast,” Bancroft said. “We had good teamwork with strong rowing. We had great team chemistry.” Students had numerous strategies for staying afloat, including figuring out the perfect sized surface area and

length and arranging riders in the right positions. To keep the competition fair, each team was allowed $100 in boat bucks to buy cardboard, duct tape and liquid nails. No other materials were allowed. After the race was over, students were not allowed to keep their boats due to safety reasons. “We have to destroy them because (people) have taken them out of the dumpsters before and tried to use them again in the ponds,” Spinks said. studentlife@cm-life.com


News

6A | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Psychology professors receive $500K, plan to train autism professionals By Andrea Peck Senior Reporter

Photo Illustration by Katy Kildee | Assistant Photo Editor

Sprint, AT&T to add 4G LTE coverage to Mount Pleasant towers By Megan Pacer Senior Reporter

Students using Sprint and AT&T cell phone services can look forward to 4G LTE coverage in Mount Pleasant soon. Josh Simon, Central Michigan University manager of mobile device administration and support, said this is a step in the right direction for carriers. “The carriers seem to be investing a lot into 4G technology,” Simon said. “That’s a pretty big step forward.” AT&T was unable to give comment, but according to a news release, 4G LTE has been made available to customers in the Mid-Michigan area. “This launch is part of AT&T’s Project Velocity IP, a three-year investment plan announced last fall to expand and enhance its IP broadband networks,” read the release. With 4G LTE comes faster speeds and better reliability. Customers will be able to download, stream and upload data with more ease than was available with past services. According to the news release, AT&T has invested

“The carriers seem to be investing a lot into 4G technology. That’s a pretty big step forward.” Josh Simon, CMU manager of mobile device administration and support around $98 billion in its wireless network over the past five years nationwide. While Sprint Retail Sales Manager Bryan Beadle could not confirm a definitive timeframe for the introduction of 4G, he did say Sprint is well into the LTE transition. “We are in the process of upgrading our network,” Beadle said. According to Simon, Sprint has been working to improve both of its network and structure in the Mount Pleasant area for the last several years. Simon said CMU students should also expect better results with university services, including BlackBoard and the new university email system, on their phones. “That’s just a much faster data,” Simon said. “That’s only going to make the user experi-

ence that much better.” Rochester Hills junior Sean Kennedy, a Sprint customer, said he is more than looking forward to seeing an improvement to his service. For Kennedy, the experience with Sprint service has been consistently mediocre at best. “The service is decent,” Kennedy said. “Internet is slow. I use Pandora on my phone for walking to class, and most of the time I’ll maybe get one song before it just cuts out for five minutes.” Kennedy said when he is in areas with 4G, his phone generally works faster. While he was surprised to hear that Sprint and AT&T are updating their networks, Kennedy said the better service will maximize the benefits of unlimited data with Sprint. metro@cm-life.com

Central Michigan University psychology professors are working to increase the number of professionals trained to serve those with autism spectrum disorders. The professors, Carl Merle Johnson, Susan Bradley-Johnson, Michael Hixson, Mark Reilly and Katrina Rhymer, were awarded $500,000 from the state of Michigan to train students in applied behavior analysis, which focuses on improving social behaviors of individuals with autism using intervention practices to modify actions and teach new skills. Johnson said there is a shortage in Michigan of qualified people to provide services to children diagnosed with autism. “We have been planning undergraduate and graduate programs in behavior analysis over the last couple of years,” Johnson said in an email. “Over the summer, we found out about

this grant opportunity and applied for it to facilitate the development of these trained programs.” Training for the first group of students for the program will begin in January. Students can submit applications for the program to the psychology department later this semester. Hixson said the grant money will be used in a variety of ways, including hiring additional assistance and to help students financially. “One of the most important (ways) is to hire additional faculty to teach the necessary courses and provide supervision of students working with children diagnosed with autism,” Hixson said. “Grant money will also be used to help fund students through the program.” The goal of those involved is to provide help to those affected with autism disorders. “There are many families who have children with autism spectrum disorders that are not

getting the services they need to help their children because of the shortage of qualified behavior analysts who provide the best treatment for these children,” Johnson said. The one-year grant from the state of Michigan began Oct. 1 and will certify 25 undergraduate students as Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts and eight graduate students as Board Certified Behavior Analysts. While the grant is part of a statewide effort to raise awareness for services for those with autism, CMU’s program will focus solely on serving those in central and northern Michigan. “Applied behavior analysis might not decrease the number of cases of autism,” Bradley-Johnson said in a press release. “But it can certainly improve the quality of life for individuals with autism and their families.” studentlife@cm-life.com

HITTING THE JACKPOT

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor DJ Scout dances in celebration after winning a $1,000 check during RedBull’s Thre3Style University event hosted at Wayside Central Friday night.


News

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | 7A

CMED officials say Western’s medical school is no threat CMED FIRST CLASS: 64 CLASS CAPACITY: 104 ESTABLISHED: 2008 OPEN: 2013 SIZE: 60,000 SQ. FT. FLOORS: TWO BUILDING COST: $24 MILLION HOSPITALS PARTNERED: COVENANT AND ST. MARY’S OF MICHIGAN cmed.cmich.edu | wmed.wmu.edu

Left, CMED’s first-ever semester is underway. Right, Western Michigan University’s college of medicine is slated to open in Fall 2014. Adrian Hedden Senior Reporter

While CMED’s first-ever semester is underway, another medical school is close to opening nearby. Western Michigan University’s college of medicine will open its doors to a 50-student inaugural class in Fall 2014. WMED’s founding dean, Hal Jenson, is certain that the two medical schools will work in

Adrian Hedden

Senior Reporter As a pair of medical schools at two of Michigan’s largest universities gain prominence, Central Michigan University’s new crown jewel might face more competition than previously reported. Originally a school of education, intended to fill nearby teacher shortages, CMU has worn many hats over the years. In addition to a burgeoning college of healthcare — practically begging for a high-profile nursing program — CMU also

“CMED’s been a great help to us. They’re a year ahead, and they’ve helped us with what they’ve done. ” While recruitment will largely comprise Michigan students, Jenson said that WMED is looking to draw student from 16 other states, including California. “We’re a private medical school,” Jenson said. “While we expect to have Michigan

unison to address deficits of licensed doctors across the state. “Its great to have both medical schools,” Jenson said. “There are plenty of great applicants out there who will become great physicians.” Jenson said WMED has already looked to CMED and other new medical schools as models. “We’re not in competition with CMU,” he said.

When Patricia Mooradian was appointed to Central Michigan University’s Board of Trustees, she found herself in yet another position to make a difference. Replacing Patricia Maryland to serve the remainder of the eightyear term, expiring in December 2018, Mooradian, president of the Henry Ford Museum, is used to running large institutions while retaining a strong value for intellectual needs. “It was a bit of a surprise,” Mooradian said. “I’ve worked with the governor before, and I’ve always let him know that I’d be willing to fit in wherever needed. He really thinks my experience in leading a complex institution would lend itself toward dealing with the challenges of higher education.” Gov. Rick Snyder affirmed his confidence in Mooradian via a press release in early August. “Patricia is an experienced professional and I know she will make a positive contribution to the board,” Snyder said in the release. With her experience at The

standard mission,” Biggs said. “They’re poised differently. They’re more broad.” Biggs said CMED’s mission of recruiting students from communities the school intends to serve is uncommon among nearby medical schools. “We’re very unique as far as medical schools are concerned,” Biggs said. university@cm-life.com

WMED FIRST CLASS: 50 CLASS CAPACITY: 80 ESTABLISHED: 2007 OPEN: 2014 SIZE: 350,000 SQ. FT. FLOORS: SEVEN BUILDING COST: $68 MILLION HOSPITALS PARTNERED: BRONSON HEALTHCARE AND BORGESS HEALTH (KALAMAZOO)

WMED may pose more competition than expected offers award-winning communications and fine arts degrees. But the original CMU philosophy was followed when it introduced the brand new medical school in 2008. Aimed to recruit from and send graduates to rural areas of Michigan that are suffering from large reductions in licensed care, CMED is poised to build upon its localized vision through a strong regional focus. With declines in enrollment nagging the university’s academic and fiscal future, CMED might very well provide the prestige and visibility needed to re-align its university’s reputation and enrollment rate. According to Vice President of Enrollment and Student Services Steven Johnson, a

medical school changes a university’s audience, and his ambitions might not be restricted to medical students. It is hoped the medical school could raise the visibility of CMU, increasing interest and awareness in Michigan and throughout the country. It could be part of the antidote to campus-wide reductions and deficits. While CMU is enjoying the successful open and potential benefits of CMED, Western Michigan University has been fast at work building its own seven-story medical school, opening in Fall 2014. With a similar end-game as CMED, Western has voiced a noble desire to also help medically under-served communities.

New trustee Mooradian focused on making a difference at CMU By Adrian Hedden Senior Reporter

students, we are recruiting nationally. There’s no quota.” CMED’s Senior Associate Dean of Administration and Finance Deborah Biggs said the two medical schools have very different visions. She explained that while CMED is aimed to serve specific regions in middle and upper Michigan, WMED is positioned to operate as a more traditional medical school. “(WMED) has more of a

Henry Ford Museum and cultural center, Mooradian felt that her background in knowledge-based institutions would serve her well at the university. “The Henry Ford is education driven,” she said. “There are some similarities that can be drawn with CMU.” As her first board meeting drew near, Mooradian readied herself to learn the ins and outs of the university with a zeal for leadership and public service. “The first thing I wanted to do was learn a lot about CMU,” she said. “I gathered information from various sources to figure out what the issues would be.” At her first meeting, a board retreat in September, Mooradian was able to gain a strong understanding of the university’s direction. Naming the decline in enrollment as a main issue facing CMU, she was certain the administration would rise to the occasion. “I was very fortunate to attend the retreat,” Mooradian said. “The strategic plan was discussed and I was able to get very well grounded, to get that strategic foundation. They have very strong policies to reach their

According to CMED’s Senior Associate Dean of Administration and Finance Deborah Biggs, WMED aims to offer a more traditional medical school format. Pointing out the unique, and undeniably essential, agenda of CMED, Biggs explained that WMED would hope to serve a broader range of students. But after speaking with WMED’s Founding Dean Hal Jenson, it seems CMED’s aspirations might not be so unique after all. Although WMED has taken a broader aim when recruiting students — pulling admission from 16 states, including one student from California — it has chiefly expressed the same concerns for under-served Michigan regions.

Jenson also admitted a large majority of WMED students will be from Michigan. This made it clear that although they might not compete academically, the schools will obviously be competing for students and job to placement them in. WMED’s inaugural class will be comprised of 50 students. That number is hoped to grow to a first-year class of 70 next year. CMED’s first class numbered 64 students. They hope to expand as well, with a goal of 104 for next year. The question is: How many medical students in Michigan will go to a start-up medical school for their training with such a regional focus?

Both schools are counting on hundreds. Especially with the renowned medical school at the University of Michigan, that target audience for these developing colleges has got to be slim. Driven by a dedicated faculty and student body, both universities will undoubtedly continue to develop. The presence of both is healthy, as students will be able to weigh both options and serve to measure the success of the differing visions. As CMED moves forward, it needs to analyze this possible source of competition and consider expanding its vision as well.

JUDICIAL DECEIT:

Tyranny and Unnecessary Secrecy at the Michigan Supreme Court A conversation with former Chief Justice Elizabeth Weaver about the need to reform the Michigan Supreme Court

Patricia Mooradian

goals. We spent a lot of time on (enrollment).” Mooradian hopes to continue to further the mission of higher education, despite changing industry tides. “I think there are a lot of challenges the industry is facing,” she said. “Fundraising is very important. To maintain a campus this size, to build on the need takes capital expenditures. That money has to come from somewhere. You need good strategies to manage those issues.”

Monday, October 21 7 to 8:30 p.m. Powers Hall Ballroom OPEN TO THE PUBLIC www.cmich.edu/chsbs

HOSTED BY:

The Robert & Marjorie Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government

university@cm-life.com

BE SMART & AVOID

A MAJOR PARTY FOUL

Nobody likes their good time spoiled by a fat fine or criminal record!

CALL US & LET US SERVE YOUR NEEDS WHEN IT COMES TO: • MIP • DRUNK DRIVING • DRUG OFFENSES • OPEN INTOXICANTS • NUISANCE PARTIES • DRUNK & DISORDERLY

J o s e p h T. B a r b e r i , P C Rating

A T T O R N E Y S

Superb

2305 Hawthorn Drive Suite C • Mt. Pleasant

10.0 Top Attorney Criminal Defense

A T

L A W

989-334-1400

To Learn More About Us, Visit Our Website @ www.centralmichiganlaw.com


Classifieds Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day! cm-life.com/classifieds

Classifieds cm-life.com/classifieds

MIGHTY MINIS

STEPHEN CHASE, M.D.

Antique

EAR, NOSE & THROAT

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 SODOKU Monday-FrIdayGUIDELINES: 8aM - 5PM

to solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 throught FOR9 must RENT fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. the 914 DOUGLAS 4 BEDROOM, 4 more numbers you .can 1 PE R S ON TOWN H OMES figureCAMPUS. our the easier itNO BLOCK FROM PETS. 779-9099. gets to solve!

2 BEDROOM, 2 PERSON HOUSE. 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. WASHER /DRYER, NO PETS. 779-9099.

Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day! • Board Certified • University of Michigan Medical School • Cleveland Clinic Fellowship • Serving the area since 1986

Vintage Costume Jewelry

211 S. Crapo, Mt. Pleasant (989) 773-0028

806 S. MiSSion - next to taco Boy

2 - 5 bedroom houses/apartments leasing 2014/ 2015 starting $280 each. Walk to campus. (Some free cable, internet) Washer/ dryer, dishwasher. Locally family owned. 989-772-9577. quick1g@cmich.edu

Classifieds SHOP

AND MORE!

cm-life.com/classifieds

We Save SOLES! 436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

STUDENTS GET 10% DISCOUNT!

FA

OF M MIL Y I Visit D MI., P FO O C ou wwwr webs (989)TCA .fam ite for 775- RE 8 ilyf help oot ful h 500 care ints .biz !

2316 S. Mission•Stadium Mall

989.779.0317 SUDOKU

SODOKU GUIDELINES:

JAMESTOWN 2

to solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 throught Semester Lease 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear ONLY only once in each row, $ or box. the column more numbers you can figure our the easier it gets to solve! Internet, Cable & Shuttle

1-5 Bedrooms 1 Person Special 340 FREE

Pet Friendly 775-5522 LiveWithUnited.com Presented by:

ASKED ABOUT TALLGRASS PROMISE

2 OR 3 People, Great Location, FREE Cable & Internet, Presented by:775-5522 ! DOWNTOWN LOFT APARTMENT.

THIS IS A Life Changing Ad.! Change your life. Change your address.! Leasing for 2014-2015 year on October 15th.! Partlo Property Management www.partloproperty.com 989-779-

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 9886. Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM ! (989) 773-1234

20 foot ceilings. Brick walls, dishwasher. Available May 2014. All amenities. Year lease. 989-444-1944.

Models Now Available for CROSSWORD Viewing! Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 Bedroom Apartments & Townhouses

Presented by:Why wouldn’t

www.AMGhousing.com • Call 989.773.3890

RENT DOESN’T INCREASE FOR 3 YEARS* Be like Success Kid. Live at Tallgrass.

A/C | Fitness Center | Cable | Internet | Shuttle

779-7900 *must be eligible for tallgrass Promise

Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day!

Classifieds

HOROSCOPE

 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments cm-life.com/classifieds

Heat Included (optional)

24/7 Fitness Center

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

6B | Monday, Oct. 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com  21, Cathedral Ceilings (optional)

 32,000 Pool & Sundeck Reach more than readers each publishing day! 

Short Term Leases Available for a Limited Time Only!

Classifieds 1517 Canterbury Trail On the corner of Crapo & Preston cm-life.com/classifieds canterbury@millenniahousing.com www.mhmltd.com

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

(989) 773-1234

Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

1-2 ISSUES: $7.75 per issue 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per isssue issue People’s Choice13+#1ISSUES: Jeweler$7.00 for 12per Years!

Models Now Available for Viewing Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

$0 Deposit Down!

www.ssfjstore.com 4, 5 & 6 Bedroom Townhouses • • • • • •

Furnished or Unfurnished FREE High-Speed Internet WALK TO CLASS! FREE Expanded Cable 24 Hour Maintenance Full Size Washers & Dryers

Starting at $245/month

HOROSCOPE By Nancy Black Tribune Content Agency

a vision. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Today is a 7 – There’s more analysis required. Practice (MCT) obedience, and get much stronger. You’re Today’s Birthday (10/21/13). Travel and attracting the attention of an important education are recurring themes this year. person. Be careful not to rock the boat. Chase innovation and pursue mastery at Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) – Today is a your art. Attend lectures and confer6 – You’re entering a house cleaning phase. ences. Write, record and publish. Leave Keep tight track of your money. New a light footprint as you go. Balance your opportunities present themselves with lifestyle for health. Get social and grow new research. Keep working! Postpone a partnerships and networks. Play with your romantic interlude until the job’s complete. favorite people, and collaborate to make Make plans and even reservations. A flexdreams real. ible schedule suits. To get the advantage, check the day’s Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) – Today is a 6 – rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most Review recent personal decisions. Get into challenging. negotiations. Run a reality check. It could Aries (March 21-April 19) – Today is a get awkward. Make repairs right away. The 7 – It’s Mercury retrograde Monday. Brace more careful you are with the details, the yourself for the unexpected. Communicabetter you look. tions and transportation may break down. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) – Today Flexibility serves you well. Think fast and is a 7 – Settle in and develop plans. Join back up vital info. Spark imagination and forces with a master of surprises. Keep it CLASSIFIED RATES: creativity. You get a great story to tell. practical. Travel beckons but take care. Wait Taurus (April 20-May 20) – Today is a take action on your dreams. Spend time 15 word minimum pertogrowing classified ad. 7 – There may be setbacks and resistance, a partnership. but at the end it’s all worth it. This week Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Today is a 1-2 ISSUES: issuecould get confusing. Review the is especially good for attracting money.$7.75 per 7 – Travel Sign contracts only after thorough review. data toissue find the truth. Keep it updated and 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per It’s better to be sure than sorry. Consult a backed up. Gain deeper insight with patient isssue respected friend. 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per listening. Go ahead and wax enthusiastic. Gemini (May 21-June13+ 20)ISSUES: – Today is $7.00 a Wait to see per issuewhat develops. 6 – Watch out for confusion at home over Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) – Today is the next three weeks. You’re eager to go. a 6 – Carefully review your savings plan andput.centered withthe fire, GetBold, fartheritalic by staying Complete atype are andavailable develop teamalong goals. Tend domestic project. Havespecial back up plans for all like andad manage chores and responsibilities. other features attractors. essential operations. Leave extra leeway. Imagine a path into a brighter future. Cancer (June 21-July 22) – Today is a Regroup and go again. Just show up. Eat 6 – Review recreational plans and refurbish healthy food. necessary equipment. Revise and refine. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) – Today Finish up old projects. Costs appear prohibi- is a 5 – Reorganize a kitchen drawer. tive at this point. Don’t venture far. Find fun Keep equipment in repair, as you study close to home. unfamiliar territory. Stay close to home CLASSIFIED RATES: Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) – Today is a 7 – as much as possible. This saves time and Secure what you’ve achieved, and complete money. Conference calls and chats keep you 15 word minimum perconnected. classified ad. household projects. Clarify issues first. Consider an outsider’s objections. Discuss (c)2013 BY NANCY BLACK DISTRIBUTED 1-2DoISSUES: $7.75 per issueCONTENT AGENCY, LLC. ALL what should be done first. what’s best BY TRIBUNE for all. Ignore distractions. Work towards RIGHTS RESERVED 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

13+ ISSUES: $7.00 per issue WE SEE

RUNNING

Bold, italic andIN centered type are available along with YOUR other special features like ad attractors. FUTURE! 2316 S. Mission St. • 779-0317 • In the Stadium Mall

SODOKU GUIDELINES:

to solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 throught 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. the more numbers you can figure our the easier it gets to solve!

Presented by:

CLASSIFIED RATES: 15 word minimum per classified ad.

STUDENTS 7-12 GETISSUES: 10% DISCOUNT! $7.25 per isssue

TTY: 800-649-3777 or 711

SUDOKU

Paid On Call Firefighter: The City of Mt. Pleasant is seeking high energy and team-oriented individuals who are committed to our community and interested in joining our Paid On Call Firefighter team. Candidates must be willing and available to complete extensive firefighter training, be committed to ongoing education, and have the ability to immediately leave their place of employment for firefighting duty. Residency within the City of Mt. Pleasant or Union Township is required. by: To apply visit our Presented www.mt-pleasant.org. website at The position will remain open until filled. EOE

www.AMGhousing.com • Call 989.773.3890

Starting at $260/month

Fireplaces (optional)

and interested in joining our Paid On Call Firefighter team. Candidates must be willing and available to complete extensive firefighter training, be committed to ongoing education, and have the ability to immediately leave their place of employment for firefighting duty. Residency within the City of Mt. Pleasant or Union Township is required. To apply visit our www.mt-pleasant.org. website at The position will remain open until filled. EOE

HELP WANTED

People’s Choice #1 Jeweler for 12 Years!

www.ssfjstore.com

Paid On Call Firefighter: The City

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with high enof Mt. Pleasant is seeking ergy and team-oriented individuals other special features like ad attractors. who are committed to our community

you live here?

(989) 773-1234

1240 E BroomfiEld St.

CROSSWORD

$0 DEPOSIT DOWN and FREE: • Laundry • Shuttle Service to Campus • High-Speed Internet • Basketball Court • Expanded Cable • Sand Volleyball

Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

M-Fri: 9-5, Sat 12-4 • www.tallgrassapts.com

1-2 ISSUES: $7.75 per issue 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per isssue 13+ ISSUES: $7.00 per issue

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

FOR RENT

Vintage Sisters

Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

SUDOKU

6B | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

989-774-LIFE CLASSIFIEDP:RATES: 15 word minimumF: per989-774-7805 classified ad.

CROSSWORD

Across 1 Floating platforms 6 Guy or fellow 10 Haughty sort 14 Creepy starer 15 Top military draft category 16 Skid row denizen 17 German cars bought by Riyadh residents? 19 Not many 20 Releases (on), as an attack dog 21 Cafeteria carriers gone missing? 23 QB’s mishap 24 Tennis icon Arthur 25 Makes a choice 26 Drawing upon 28 100-yard race Presented by: STUDENTS GET 10% DISCOUNT! 30 Shoulder wrap People’s Choice #1 Jeweler for 12 Years! 32 “Once __ a time ...” WE SEE 34 PC software RUNNING 38 Rose of baseball 39 Hard to hear IN YOUR 40 Was a passenger FUTURE! 41 Figure skater’s leap 2316 S. Mission St. • 779-0317 • In the Stadium Mall42 Uncle Remus’s __

www.ssfjstore.com

Rabbit 43 Nursery-rhyme Jack or his wife 44 Put down, as floor tile 46 “__ my case” 48 Fixes with thread 50 Plastic coffee container designed for a Keurig brewer 51 Sports enthusiast 54 Streamlined onion relatives? 57 Pie à la __ 58 Basketball’s __ “The Pearl” Monroe 59 Stories you’ve heard a bajillion times? 61 Bad to the bone 62 Promgoer’s concern 63 Leaning somewhat 64 Lousy grades 65 Like so 66 Zappos.com inventory Down 1 Big name in vermouth 2 A second time 3 Vary irregularly, as prices

4 Koppel and Knight 5 __ Lanka 6 Teeth-and-gums protector 7 Conductor Previn 8 “Star Wars” princess 9 “Piece of cake!” 10 Out-of-tune string instruments? 11 Like Jack 43-Across’s diet 12 Does as directed 13 Curtain call acknowledgments 18 Part of YMCA: Abbr. 22 How-__: instruction books 24 Feel lousy 27 Neato water sources? 28 Insult comic who was a frequent Johnny Carson guest 29 Crumb-carrying insect 30 Relaxation center 31 Put a curse on 33 Dessert with a crust 35 Financial planner’s concern

36 Handheld computer, briefly 37 Go down in the west 39 “The X-Files” gp. 43 Ninth mo. 45 Pop the question 47 Ploy 48 Work really hard 49 Spooky 50 Reeves of “Speed” 52 Dancer Astaire 53 Homes for chicks 54 Future flower 55 J.D.-to-be’s exam 56 __ A Sketch 57 Trig or calc 60 Prof.’s helpers

Bo


Sports cm-life.com

MEN’S BASKETBALL Team shows off offense in scrimmage

MONDAY, OCT. 21, 2013|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 25 VOL. 95 »PAGE 5B

NIU’s Lynch sets rushing record against CMU Saturday By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

There have been more than 10,000 college football games played in history. None of them featured what Northern Illinois senior quarterback Jordan Lynch did on Saturday against Central Michigan. Lynch rushed for 316 yards; a Football Bowl Subdivision record for a quarterback. He averaged 9.9 yards per his 32 carries on the day. The previous holder for the rushing record? Northern Illinois quarterback Stacey Robinson in 1990, when he rushed for 308 yards against Fresno State. As a Heisman Trophy candidate in 2012 and leading Northern Illinois to the first-ever BCS bowl for a Mid-American Conference team last year, head coach Dan Enos knew trying to emulate Lynch in practice was difficult. “We used (freshman quarterback) Darrien Boone,” Enos said. “He is very athletic and works it. We used Alex Niznak a little bit in situations, too. We had our offense go real fast and use two huddles against them. At the end of the day, Jordan Lynch is outstanding.” At one point, Lynch lost his shoe dropping back, then took off for a 30 yard run wearing only one shoe. Aside from his ability to run, Lynch also scored through the air. He passed for 155 yards and threw a nine-yard touchdown pass in the first quarter to wide receiver Tommylee Lewis. Last week, Lynch became the 10th quarterback in FBS history to rush for more than 3,000 yards and pass for more than 4,000 in a career. While Lynch gained all the stats, Enos believes his team was out blocked on the line of scrimmage. “Absolutely,” Enos said. “Him and the blocking, he is a great player. You just don’t go and rush for 300 yards with no blocking.” Lynch agreed with Enos’ assessment of the blocking. “The holes were so wide open; it was nothing I did,” Lynch said. sports@cm-life.com

Jordan Lynch

Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Freshman defensive end Joe Ostman and teammate attempt to hold a NIU rusher. Despite their efforts, CMU gave up 437 yards on the ground. This included 316 yards by NIU quarterback Jordan Lynch, setting a new FBS record.

Run over NIU quarterback Lynch runs for a record day as the Huskies beat CMU on homecoming By Jeff Papworth | Staff Reporter

Head coach Dan Enos is just fine with never having to face Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch again. Who can blame him after the senior rushed for 316 yards – a FBS record for a quarterback – and also passed for 155 yards to lead his team to a 38-17 win on Saturday in front of 18,796 fans at Kelly/Shorts Stadium? “Jordan Lynch is outstanding,” Enos said. “But the offensive line and tight ends did a good job.” Northern Illinois’ lead widened, as the holes for Lynch to run through did the same. The Huskies took the lead for the first time in the game at the start of the third quarter with a field goal, making it 17-14. Then Lynch, who had 232 rushing yards in the second half, contributed to a drive that extended their lead to 10 with a 40 yard carry and a one yard run into the end zone with 3:22 left in the third quarter. He was not done, as he ran another 40 yards on the first play of NIU’s drive in the middle of the fourth quarter and then he followed his blockers to score a three yard touchdown to extend the lead to 31-17. “He’s a tough guy. He’s a competi-

tor,” said senior safety Avery Cunningham. “He has a certain drive to him, so that’s going to help him out.” CMU, looking to tie the game prior to that drive, moved to midfield, but redshirt freshman quarterback Cooper Rush was sacked for a loss of nine on third and seven. Rush completed 16 of 32 passes for 271 yards. He had his best quarter in the first with two touchdown passes and eight completions out of 11 throws for 146 yards. Only against Michigan, did the running game do worse than it did against the Huskies, tallying 75 yards with sophomore Saylor Lavallii leading the running backs with 58 yards. In the first quarter, the CMU defense looked like it was going to keep Lynch somewhat under wraps. The Huskies scored its second

Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Sophomore defensive back Kavon Frazier tackles NIU wide-receiver Tommylee Lewis on Saturday at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

touchdown to tie it at 14 by the middle of the second quarter after Rush put the defense in a bad spot, throwing a pick to give them the ball at CMU’s 26 yard line. Senior receiver Jerry Harris was responsible for a fumble after catching a pass that would have been

enough to convert a fourth and four. “Against good teams, you can’t have missed opportunities and we missed one right there with that,” Enos said. sports@cm-life.com

Lavallii, CMU rushing attack shut down by aggressive NIU defense By Aaron McMann Senior Reporter

Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Running back sophomore Saylor Lavallii carries the ball up field against NIU Saturday at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Looking at the stat sheet after Central Michigan’s 38-17 loss to Northern Illinois on Saturday, Dan Enos was able to diagnose what went wrong. Sure, stopping Jordan Lynch from rushing for a Football Bowl Subdivision-record 316 yards might have helped, but CMU couldn’t get a ground game established itself, making it particularly difficult to score in the second half. “Our longest run of the day, I see, is 8 yards,” Enos said. “We couldn’t get it like we had been the last few weeks.” As expected, CMU came out throwing the ball, an effort to attack a NIU secondary that ranks last in the Mid-American Conference in passing yards allowed. By the end of the first quarter the Chippewas had a 14-7 lead, relying on big passing plays to move the offense. They ran the football just four times. Redshirt freshman quarterback Cooper Rush found junior receiver Titus Davis for 38 yards on CMU’s second drive of the game, returning to Davis

three plays later on a 9-yard touchdown pass to put the Chippewas up 7-0. Rush connected with sophomore Andrew Flory for a 36-yard touchdown catch on CMU’s next possession, and thinks appeared to be rolling. Enos said NIU began to change to change their defensive schemes, especially in the second half, forcing the Chippewas to run the ball. And they couldn’t. “They started forcing us to run the football,” Enos said. “We had gotten some big plays in the pass-game, they kind of changed their philosophy and went to a lot of 2-deep zones … And we didn’t get any explosive runs.” The Huskies tied the game at 14 midway through the second quarter, and Enos opted to try to push the run-game. Sophomore Saylor Lavallii couldn’t break a tackle or find a hole, unable to pick up a carry of more than 4 yards. After setting career-highs in back-toback weeks, Lavallii rushed 16 times for 53 yards. Redshirt freshman Maurice Shoemaker-Gilmore didn’t fare much better, rushing 12 times for 37 yards. w LAVALLII | 2B


Sports

2B | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

LAVALLII |

Seth Newman

CONTINUED FROM 1B

Enos said he tried inserting Shoemaker-Gilmore in the second half to “change things up,” but CMU couldn’t muster a carry for longer than 7 yards. They rushed for 75 yards total in the game, the third time CMU has been held under 100 yards rushing this season. “When you can’t run the ball it’s hard to get the offense moving, and we take pride in running the ball,” said senior left guard Andy Phillips. “We’ve done it well the past few weeks, we just didn’t get it going. It’s hard to win when you can’t the ball.” Things became difficult for Rush, too. After going 11-for-19 for 206 yards, and throwing an interception, he became a non-factor, going 5-for-13 for 65 yards. Part of the problem was not having the football — NIU dominated the time of possession, holding on to the football more than six minutes longer through the first three quarters. You can chalk that one up

Staff Reporter

You missed out again This will sound like a broken record. And it is. But why do students continue to leave after halftime? Is that what you did during high school football games? I’ll give students credit for showing up to this game, and at one point the student section was close to 90 percent full, but why leave during halftime? I feel like students have one football game to attend a year: Homecoming. It was perfect weather for football. If you’re coming to the game, you should know it’s going to be cold. Dress in layers, it’s always easier to take something off. Leaving because it’s cold is no excuse. I’m all for drinking and tailgating. But you also have to know that the football game will last around three hours. I know most students drink a ton before the game, show up for a quarter or two and then leave to go home and pass out. What’s the point? If you actually enjoy watching football and you left, then shame on you the most. Northern Illinois is a Top 25 team that is undefeated. They haven’t lost in the Mid-American conference in almost two years. Their last loss? Right here in Mount Pleasant. You also had an opportunity to watch one of the best college football players of the past few years in Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch. He was a Heisman Trophy candidate last year, and you bet he is one this year as well after this game. I wrote an entire article on Lynch because he did something on Saturday that has never been seen before. As a quarterback, he rushed for 316 yards. The most ever in FBS history. And you missed it. A performance of a lifetime. It’s not like CMU is the worst team in the MAC. It just came off of a huge upset against Ohio last week and is probably going to be eligible for a bowl game for the second straight season. Even Western Michigan, who is winless and has eight losses, gets more excitement from the students. You know these guys playing for CMU, you have class with them, or you’ve seen them on campus. They’re fellow Chippewas. Support them for once. Show up for 60 minutes of football. Then, continue the party.

CM Life

Stay up-to-date 24/7 online

Visit

Pick n Your Ow Pumpkins Daily

sports@cm-life.com

NINE GRILL

ENIN BAR

Voted Best Bowling 9 Years in a Row! 2 miles West of CMU on Broomfield • 772-5726

www.riverwoodresort.com

Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Redshirt freshman quarterback Cooper Rush looks downfield for junior wide receiver Titus Davis against NIU on Saturday at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. The Chippewas lost 38-17 against an undefeated NIU team.

Rush struggles as run game fails to produce, receivers step up By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

Quarterback Cooper Rush could not have started the game against No. 23 Northern Illinois any better on Saturday at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. He had eight completions in 11 attempts for 146 yards and two touchdown passes in the first quarter to give his team a 14-7 lead. Then Rush’s efficiency declined and the offensive production came to a halt. CMU scored three more points and Rush completed eight of 21 passes for 125 yards in the next three quarters. Head coach Dan Enos, who said Rush did “well,” had a diagnosis of why the passing game went awry, which entailed struggles with running the ball and a schematic change from the Huskies’ defense. “They kind of changed their philosophy a little bit and went to a two deep zone,” Enos said. “We’re getting three yards (rushing), we’re getting two yards (rushing). We need to get a 15 yards (rushing) in there.” The longest carries by CMU in the game were 8 yards by running backs Saylor Lavallii and Maurice Shoemaker-Gilmore. Central Michigan rushed for 75 yards for the game, second worst of the season. Enos said the offense’s time of possession could have been better in the second half with a run game that could be relied on, and it gave NIU’s offense a chance to establish itself, as it amassed 299 rushing yards in the second half. “It really comes down to, at the end of the day, their ability to run the football and our inability to run the foot-

“When you put it on your quarterback and say you’ve got to throw every down or you’ve got to convert all of these third and eights, it’s going to get really difficult.”

ball,” Enos said. “When you put it on your quarterback and say you’ve got to throw every down or you’ve got to convert all of these third and eights, it’s going to get really difficult.” Rush was not beyond criticism. In addition to speaking about easy throws he missed, Enos touched on his costly interception. “He couldn’t see somebody and you’ve got to understand as a young quarterback if you can’t see him don’t throw it,” Enos said. “He was going by ‘I thought he was going to be in a certain spot’ and he wasn’t there.” The CMU receivers were there for Rush more than the running backs. Titus Davis, returning from a shoulder injury, had five catches for 109 yards and accounted for the first touchdown of the game with a catch in the corner of the end zone. “The coverage dictates who gets the ball,” Enos said. “Early in the game, they were singling him and we probably took advantage of it too quickly. We should have not done so many so they would not change the coverage so fast. But Andrew Flory made a couple big plays, too. That was really nice to see him do that.” Flory, who had five catches

st Biggetion Selecst Be s Price

Voted Best Costume Store Voted Best Costume 2011 - 2012

Store in 2012

5.00 Off 5.00 Off

$ $

Any purchase of $25 or more

Any Purchase of $25 or more

Expires 11/1/13 Expires 10/30/12

Dan Enos, head coach for 81 yards, ran down the middle of the field on a route and had a 36-yard touchdown catch to take back CMU’s lead 14-7 at the end of the first quarter.

Now in Stadium Mall

Stadium Mall

• Costumes • Accessories • Make-up • Shoes

Between O’Kelly’s & Big Apple Bagel

Rejuvenate Like Us on

DIRECTIONS:

3909 S. Summerton Rd. Mt. Pleasant

Hay Rides :: Pumpkin Maze & Patch :: Fruit & Vegetable Picking :: Corn Maze :: Private & Group Parties

to win acebook for chances

iCate! a $100 Gift Certif

sports@cm-life.com

MIND. BODY. SOUL.

MASSAGE CENTRAL RELAX, YOU’RE IN GOOD HANDS.

Schedule Online Today! MassageCentral.co

Therapeutic Message Spa Facials Couples Relaxation

Thousand s of Pumpk ins in Stock!

Hay Rides Available! Scheduling Groups Daily! (989) 773-4345 • www.papasfamilyfarm.com

Limit One Coupon Per Customer Limit One Coupon Per Customer

• COSTUMES • ACCESSORIES • • MAKE-UP • SHOES • CONTACTS •

Papa’s Pumpkin Patch

Come in for Cider, Donuts, Apples & PUMPKINS!

From Mission go 2 Miles East on Broomfield to Summerton. Then 1/8 mile North.

to Lynch and NIU’s offensive line, who had their way with the CMU defensive line. “When you’re just going to put it on your quarterback and throw every down, and convert all these third-and-8’s, it’s going to get very difficult,” Enos said NIU: Better than last year? After the game, Enos was asked if this year’s Northern Illinois team, out to a 7-0 start and ranked in the Top 25, was better than 2012. “I don’t know, I don’t know,” Enos responded. “I don’t want to say that right now, because I’m not sure. They’re very good, and I thought last year’s team was outstanding too. We’ll see.” Last year, CMU trailed NIU 24-21 early in the third quarter in DeKalb, Ill., before the Huskies went on to outscore the Chippewas 31-3. “When you look at them you don’t see any glaring weakness,” Enos said. “You don’t say you’re going to attack this or attack that. You see places where you think you can attack.”

60 min. massage ~ $55 $45/ mo. & $40/ two weeks 60 min. couples massage Ask about ~ $110 package 60 min. spa facial deals! ~ $55

1010 W. High Street, Mount Pleasant, MI • (989)400-0573


Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | 3B

CENTRAL MICHIGAN F O

O T

B A

L

L

SATURDAY, OCT. 19, 2013

KELLY/SHORTS, MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.

(3-5, 2-2)

17

1ST

2ND

3RD

4TH

38

7 7 10 14 14 0 0 3

(7-0, 3-0)

21.8

11

YARDS PER CATCH

TACKLES

109 YARDS

1

INTERCEPTION

TITUS DAVIS JUSTIN CHEROCCI

5

CATCHES

5

0.5

SOLO TACKLES

TACKLES FOR LOSS

1

TOU C H DOWN

Silent Auction

6th Annual

SHOT OF THE GAME

Sponsored by the CMU Honors Program Wednesday, October 23rd 9:00 am - 4:00 pm in the UC Rotunda

Benefitting the Community Compassion Network Mobile Food Pantry To fight Hunger in Isabella County • • • • • • • • • •

Item Categories Include: Laptop Computer • Artwork and Jewelry iPad • Holiday Items 2 Sets of Beats Studio Headphones • Tools 100+ Themed Gift Baskets • CMU and other collegiate items 40+ Restaurant Gift Cards • Specialty Foods 30+ Department Store Gift Cards • Hotel and Bed and Breakfast Stays Quilts & Blankets • Dinner for 12 with President and Household Products Mrs. Ross at their home Entertainment Tickets • And much more! Home Decor Hundreds of items available just in time for the holidays!

Samantha Madar|Staff Photographer Sophomore tight end Ben McCord, left, prays Saturday before the homecoming game against Northern Illinois at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. Chippewas lost 17-38.

Open 24/7 and a 10% Student Discount... Is this real life?

Yes! Yes it is!

5245 E Pickard • Mt Pleasant • 989-773-4050


Sports

4B | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Team gets into an offensive rhythm By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

For the fourth straight game, the women’s soccer team held their opponent scoreless. The defense was strong for the Chippewas early on in Sunday’s game against Buffalo but it was the offense that determined the outcome. Head coach Peter McGahey said the offensive rhythm his team has gotten into is all the result of finishing on the scoring chances created. “I think we are finding a good rhythm in creating chances, and, more importantly, now we are actually finishing those chances,” McGahey said. Forward Laura Gosse continues to be a key contributor offensively for CMU. She has four goals in the last four games for the Chippewas, including the game winner against Buffalo in double overtime. Offensively, the team has come alive during conference play, scoring 10 goals in eight games. The offense is being set up by a strong defensive efforts early in games. Although the team struggled to find the back of the net, it was the relentless

Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Junior forward Laura Gosse protects the ball Oct. 13 at the CMU Soccer Complex. Gosse led scoring against the NIU Huskies with two goals. The Chippewas added one more goal to win 3-0.

Fourth straight win in double overtime Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer Sophomore defender Taylor Potts challenges a Dayton opponent for possession of the ball during their Sept. 20 loss at the CMU Soccer Complex.

offensive attack throughout the second half that helped lead to another CMU win. McGahey said that Gosse’s success has been based on many of the little things she does in order to create chances to score. “I think her form right now is really good,” McGahey said. “For four games running now, it’s all about the other things she is doing that is creating the

goals for her.” With a four-match winning streak since starting Mid-American Conference play 2-2, the Chippewas are now tied for first in the MAC West with Eastern Michigan, who holds the tiebreaker after a 3-0 win at Mount Pleasant two weeks ago. sports@cm-life.com

VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball splits weekend with a pair of four-set matches By Taylor DesOrmeau & Joe Judd Staff Reporters

After winning Friday’s game with an impressive offensive effort against Miami (Ohio), volleyball traveled to Bowling Green to try to keep up its winning ways. It was not in the cards for CMU, as it dropped the match 3-1 to the Falcons, 1725, 19-25, 25-23 and 10-25. Senior libero Jenna Coates collected 22 digs in her team’s losing effort, while junior outside hitter Kaitlyn McIntyre had 13 digs of her own, to go with 14 kills. It was a different story Friday night, when the Chippewas beat the RedHawks in four sets. For the second straight week, senior outside hitter Katie Schuette helped CMU win its first game of the weekend, leading the team in kills. “I thought Schuette was very aggressive in set three and that changed the match around for us,” said head coach Erik Olson to CMU Athletics. “When Schuette’s playing great, we’re a very good team.” Schuette and junior outside hitter Kaitlyn McIntyre had 15 kills in the Chippewas 3-1 victory. Schuette eclipsed her career-high in

Morgan Taylor | Staff Photographer CMU volleyball players celebrate after scoring against Ball State on Sept. 28 in McGuirk Arena.

kills, which was 13 in a 2010 match against Northern Illinois. She’s recorded 12 kills twice this season. Friday’s match was the first time CMU has won a match in which it lost a set since Sept.7, when it beat Robert Morris 3-2. The regular veterans played to form, as Coates recorded 24 digs and senior setter Kelly Maxwell had 43 assists. “Kelly did a great job distributing the ball and put up some great numbers once again,” Olson said to CMU Athletics. “She also had 10 digs. I thought Coates was outstanding

with 24 digs. Coates made some great reads and was almost digging half the court tonight.” With the loss to Bowling Green coming right after a dominating victory against Miami, this weekend is a good representation of the Chippewas season thus far. Head coach Erik Olson and his coaching staff will look for answers next weekend in McGuirk Arena, where they will be playing Buffalo at 7 p.m. Friday and Akron at 7 p.m. Saturday. sports@cm-life.com

School of Music Central Michigan University Upcoming Event

Percussion Ensemble Tuesday, October 22nd @ 8 p.m Staples Family Concert Hall Free & open to the public

Faculty Artist Brad DeRoche, guitar* Thursday, October 24th @ 8 p.m Chamichian Recital Hall

Faculty Artist Fangye Sun, violin* Tuesday, October 29th @ 8 p.m Staples Family Concert Hall

Women’s soccer followed up its 2-0 win against Akron with a double-overtime thriller Sunday, defeating Buffalo 1-0. Head coach Peter McGahey said it’s always challenge playing on the road but was happy with his team’s performance against Buffalo. “You come on the road in the Mid-American Conference and it’s not easy,” McGahey said. “We Chuck Miller | File Photo definitely had to put forth Junior forward Laura Gosse attempts to kick the ball during the second a very good effort and extend that into overtime half of the 2012 MAC quarterfinal tournament game against Northern Illinois. today. It was a wellearned team victory today and a very good goal in “It’s her movement, her running, overtime.” With the victory, CMU her energy that she is playing moves to 6-2 in the MAC with that has contributed to her West and is tied for first place with Eastern Michigan. success. Her spirit and enthusiasm Forward Laura Gosse for the game right now scored the lone goal of the game in the 103rd minis really good.” ute, lifting CMU to their fourth consecutive win. Once again, the defense Peter McGahey, head coach set the tone early for the Chippewas giving up only fense has really gotten weekend, starting with a two shots in the first half into a consistent rhythm 3 p.m. kickoff Friday at and 13 total to the Bulls. recently thanks in part to Miami (Ohio) before playGoalkeeper Grace Gosse who has been the ing a 3 p.m. game Sunday Labrecque put on a strong focal point in CMU’s sucagainst Ball State. performance with six saves cess the last four games. The Chippewas will be while recording her sixth “It’s her movement, her rooting for Buffalo on Frivictory of the season. This running, her energy that day and Akron on Sunday was Labrecque’s fourth she is playing with that as they look to continue consecutive shut out. has contributed to her their winning streak and Forward Emma success,” McGahey said. pass the Eagles for firstDwenger led CMU with “Her spirit and enthusiplace in the MAC West. three shots and two shots asm for the game right on goal. The Chippewas now is really good.” had 11 shots in the game. sports@cm-life.com CMU will split time at McGahey said the ofhome and on the road next

Applications for Spring 2014 semester now available at the CM Life front desk. You must be enrolled as at least a half-time student in good academic standing to be eligible for these positions.

! u o Y ants

W

Editor In Chief is responsible for directing the overall

news and editorial operation of the paper. The editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The editor has final student authority in decisions and is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Friday, November 15, 2013 to select the Editor in Chief for CM Life for spring 2014. The selected CM Life Editor in Chief will later interview and hire all other section editors prior to the end of the fall 2013 semester. In order to facilitate electronic transmission of application materials to board members, PLEASE EMAIL a copy of your resume in a PDF format, email a Microsoft Word document answering the application questions at cm-life.com/contact-us and have your letters of recommendation emailed to: clark6da@cmich.edu.

Managing Editor is responsible to the editor in chief and oversees the news editors. News Editors are responsible to the managing editor

and oversee the news-gathering operation and the content of the newspaper.

News Page Designers should be familiar with the grammar of AP style as well as Adobe InDesign. Duties include page layout, headline writing and proofreading.

Sports Editor

is responsible for the sports news gathering of the newspaper. The sports editor assigns articles, edits copy, designs pages and writes headlines for the sports pages.

*Tickets available by calling 989-774-3045 or at the door

More program information at:

By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

www.music.cmich.edu/events

CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity within its community (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo).

Photography Editor coordinates photography for Central Michigan Life. Administrative ability and photography experience necessary. Person must be able to direct photography staff and make assignments. Must have Photoshop experience.

Staff Photographers work under the direction of the photo editor in covering campus and community news, sports and entertainment events. Staff Writers are needed within the news, sports and features departments to cover a wide range of campus and community beats. Although journalism or writing backgrounds are helpful, they are not required Reporters should be mature, dedicated, responsible, hard-working and willing to learn.

Multimedia Editor, Videographers assist in the production of video content for www.cm-life.com. Are you interested in shooting and editing video clips for ongoing news and sports events, personalities, lifestyle projects, advertising and marketing clips, and podcasts? Desired skills: digital camcorder use and Mac computer video production using iMovie or FinalCut Studio.

Editors are expected to work all day Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday during the semester. Experience is an asset, but not required.

APPLICATIONS DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOV. 1 • 5 PM 436 Moore Hall • CMU • Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • (989) 774-3493 • Fax (989) 774-3040


Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | 5B

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Team shows off offense in scrimmage By Kristopher Lodes Sports Editor

Before kicker Ron Coluzzi was kicking field goals at Kelly/Shorts Stadium, the men’s basketball team was making baskets at McGuirk Arena. The 2012-13 Chippewas were in action for the first time prior to the CMU homecoming football game and the Maroon squad, comprised of sophomores: Guard Chris Fowler, forward John Simons, forward Blake Hibbitts, guard Austin Stewart, guard Spencer Krannitz and Gregory Cornwell | Staff Photographer guard Rayshawn Simmons; Sophomore guard Sheldon Lowman dribbles down the court during a freshman guard Josh Kozinski preseason scrimmage Saturday at McGuirk Arena. and senior center Zach Saylor, ran past the gold team with well, as they come in as freshing the middle of the season, a strong shooting effort from men. It’s going to take some something got to me and threw three-point range. time to develop. It doesn’t me off – maybe the change of “It was good, but that’s mean the way we shot (Saturthe game from high school to what the Maroon squad does,” day) is going to be every game, college – but now I’m used to it Krannitz said. “We push it and but we’ve got several guys who and my shot feels good.” look for our shot. We all know are great shooters and can help Simons, Hibbitts and Fowler we can shoot the ball, so that us win games.” were also solid from three for helps a lot.” Krannitz is a perfect examthe Maroon squad. Krannitz, along with Hibple of how the shooters have The Gold squad was reprebitts, Simons, Fowler and used the offseason to develop. sented by freshmen: Center Kozinski, all contributed with Of the 11 players who appeared Milos Cabarkapa, forward multiple three-pointers on in half of the games last season, Nick Carlos and guard Braylon Saturday afternoon, which 10 attempted a three-pointer Rayson; sophomore guards allowed the maroon squad and Krannitz shot the second Sheldon Lowman and Derrick to post nearly 80 points in 30 lowest three-point percentage Richardson Jr. and senior forminutes of play. (.245) of those players. ward DeAndray Buckley. This isn’t a surprise to It’s much too early to tell, “What we’re doing is we’ll anyone who has followed head but during Wednesday’s open have a top group of Maroon coach Keno Davis’ career or practice and Saturday’s scrimand the next group of Gold, saw the team last season. With mage, Krannitz was knocking but those teams change,” Davis a roster full of youth and a lack down shots both inside and said. “We’ll change the guys of size last season, the offense behind the three-point arch who have been at the top of pushed a high-tempo pace and with consistency. Gold and who haven’t been on shot 754 three-pointers, making “During the end of last the top of Maroon and we’ll 33 percent of those attempts. season, I was missing my shots keep rotating those guys over.” “We knew last year that we when I got in there,” Krannitz had a team with good shooters said. “I know (the team) is sports@cm-life.com on it,” Davis said. “It didn’t looking for me to go in there mean we were going to shoot and make those shots. Dur-

Jeffrey Smith | File Photo Junior guard Austin Keel goes for a layup during a game against University of Michigan Dec. 29, 2012 at Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor. CMU lost 88-73.

Guard Keel sprains ankle, not expected to miss significant time By Aaron McMann Senior Reporter

Central Michigan guard Austin Keel is day-to-day after suffering a sprained ankle in practice last week. He sat out of the open Maroon & Gold scrimmage Saturday, wearing sweats and a walking boot on his left foot. Keel and head coach Keno Davis both said after that he is not expected to miss any significant time and could play in CMU’s exhibition game Oct. 28 against Lake Superior State. “He stepped on somebody’s foot in practice,” Davis said. “This was his first practice ever missed of his career, and I told him that if there was ever a good time to miss a couple of days, it’s right now.”

Keel played in all 31 games last season, starting in 20, at the shooting guard spot on a team that was in transition. A few players from the Ernie Zeigler era remained, and Keel played about 17 minutes per game while averaging 4.6 points and 1.8 rebounds per game. Many of those players have since left, with Keel and sixth-year senior center Zach Saylor the only two left. Barring injury, Saylor is expected to play significant minutes while Keel will have some competition to deal with on a guard-heavy team. “That’s the plan,” Keel said of landing in the starting lineup. “There are definitely some guys who can play. As long as I make shots, I should see a lot of

playing time.” Davis said Keel’s injury allowed others, citing sophomore combo-guard Spencer Krannitz, to get more playing time. Expect senior DeAndray Buckley and sophomores Austin Stewart, Rayshawn Simmons and Derrick Richardson Jr. to compete for minutes, too. “You can’t press and run and play five, six guys,” Davis said. “You have to have at least eight, and we’ve got more than that. When we have an injury, like Keel not practicing today, it doesn’t affect us much. It’s kind of like the next man up, so we’re going to be a tough team to go against.” sports@cm-life.com

Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day!

Classifieds cm-life.com/classifieds

Classified Advertising Policy: CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered val

FOR RENT

ueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

We Are PLedged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

A PICTUre IS WOrTH A thousand words! Add an attractor to your classified ad for $1.00 per issue.

1 BEDROOM APARTMENT available now. Very clean. Broadway and Brown apartments NO PETS! 989-772-3887.

Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day!

Classifieds cm-life.com/classifieds

SO CLOSE

YOu Can

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

WaLk tO CLaSS!

SUDOKU • 2 Baths

• Washer/Dryer • FREE Cable & Internet • Sign Today!

Appian Way & SODOKU 1200 W.GUIDELINES: Campus

to solve a sudoku, the Call 989-779-7900 • OFFICES LOCATED AT TALLGRASS

numbers 1 throught Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 12-4 Or by appt. • www.tallgrassapts.com 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. the more numbers you can BEDROOM figure our the easier it gets to solve!

1-2 ISSUES: $7.75 per issue 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per isssue 13+ ISSUES: $7.00 per issue

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

6B | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

NOTICES

CLASSIFIED RATES: 15 word minimum per classified ad.

FOR RENT 1-11 BEDROOM HOUSES, apartments & duplexes for rent. Close to campus. Available 2014-2015. Contact Amy at 989-773-8850, ext. 245 or visit www.labellerealty.net. ! (989) 774-3493 • www.cm-life.com

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

WESTPOINT VILLAGE BRAND NEW - Free Shuttle CLASSIFIED RATES: 2 Person 2 Bedroom 15 word minimum per classified ad. 2 Master Bathrooms

FREE

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

1-2Pet ISSUES: Friendly $7.75 per issue 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 perAND issue CABLE! INTERNET 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per isssue LiveWithUnited.com 13+ ISSUES: $7.00 per issue

779-9999

YORKSHIRE COMMONS

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with UNION other special featuresSQUARE like ad attractors.

Pool & Hot Tub

1 person special $550 1-2 person 2 Bedroom

Pet Friendly

Spring Semester Leases FREE Internet, Cable & Shuttle

2 Person 2 Bedroom CROSSWORD 2 Person Town Homes FREE Internet & Shuttle!

773-7272 LiveWithUnited.com

772-2222

Pet Friendly LiveWithUnited.com

WESTERN ISLANDS DEERFIELD VILLAGE SOUTHPOINT VILLAGE 2 Semester Lease NO DEPOSIT – 4 3-4 Person 4 Bedroom 4 BEDROOM 2½ BATH 3-5 Person ONLY $ 3-5 Person 5 Bedroom WALK TO CLASS 4 & 5 Bedrooms 340 Next to La Señorita Internet & Cable

PresentedFREE by:

Presented FREEby: Internet,

Cable & Shuttle

772-2222 LiveWithUnited.com

773-9999 LiveWithUnited.com

People’s Choice #1 Jeweler for 12 Years! Pet Friendly

Park Place

Pet Friendly No Deposit FREE Internet & Cable - Walk to Campus

773-7272 LiveWithUnited.com Now Leasing!

(989) 773-1234

Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

www.ssfjstore.com

A p A r t m e n t s

• • • Spacious 2 Bedroom Apartments • • Walking Distance to Campus • • All Utilities Included

(Electricity, Heat, A/C, Water & Sewer)

Apartments as low as

300

$

Laundry in Every Building Dishwashers New Managing Staff Immediate Occupancy Available

Newly Renovated Units available parkplaceaptscmu@yahoo.com • www.rentparkplaceapts.com

1401 E. Bellows St.- E7, Mt. Pleasant 772-4032

a month

Pets Allowed!

Feels Like Home!

• Indoor Heated Pool • All utilities included • FREE electric, gas, heat, air conditioning, sewer, trash • 24-hour maintenance

3300 EAst DEERFIElD RoAD • Mt. PlEAsAnt • (989) 773-3300


Classifieds Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day! cm-life.com/classifieds

Classifieds cm-life.com/classifieds

MIGHTY MINIS

STEPHEN CHASE, M.D.

Antique

EAR, NOSE & THROAT

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 SODOKU Monday-FrIdayGUIDELINES: 8aM - 5PM

to solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 throught FOR9 must RENT fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. the 914 DOUGLAS 4 BEDROOM, 4 more numbers you .can 1 PE R S ON TOWN H OMES figureCAMPUS. our the easier itNO BLOCK FROM PETS. 779-9099. gets to solve!

2 BEDROOM, 2 PERSON HOUSE. 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. WASHER /DRYER, NO PETS. 779-9099.

Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day! • Board Certified • University of Michigan Medical School • Cleveland Clinic Fellowship • Serving the area since 1986

Vintage Costume Jewelry

211 S. Crapo, Mt. Pleasant (989) 773-0028

806 S. MiSSion - next to taco Boy

2 - 5 bedroom houses/apartments leasing 2014/ 2015 starting $280 each. Walk to campus. (Some free cable, internet) Washer/ dryer, dishwasher. Locally family owned. 989-772-9577. quick1g@cmich.edu

Classifieds SHOP

AND MORE!

cm-life.com/classifieds

We Save SOLES! 436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

STUDENTS GET 10% DISCOUNT!

FA

OF M MIL Y I Visit D MI., P FO O C ou wwwr webs (989)TCA .fam ite for 775- RE 8 ilyf help oot ful h 500 care ints .biz !

2316 S. Mission•Stadium Mall

989.779.0317 SUDOKU

SODOKU GUIDELINES:

JAMESTOWN 2

to solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 throught Semester Lease 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear ONLY only once in each row, $ or box. the column more numbers you can figure our the easier it gets to solve! Internet, Cable & Shuttle

1-5 Bedrooms 1 Person Special 340 FREE

Pet Friendly 775-5522 LiveWithUnited.com Presented by:

ASKED ABOUT TALLGRASS PROMISE

2 OR 3 People, Great Location, FREE Cable & Internet, Presented by:775-5522 ! DOWNTOWN LOFT APARTMENT.

THIS IS A Life Changing Ad.! Change your life. Change your address.! Leasing for 2014-2015 year on October 15th.! Partlo Property Management www.partloproperty.com 989-779-

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 9886. Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM ! (989) 773-1234

20 foot ceilings. Brick walls, dishwasher. Available May 2014. All amenities. Year lease. 989-444-1944.

Models Now Available for CROSSWORD Viewing! Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 Bedroom Apartments & Townhouses

Presented by:Why wouldn’t

www.AMGhousing.com • Call 989.773.3890

RENT DOESN’T INCREASE FOR 3 YEARS* Be like Success Kid. Live at Tallgrass.

A/C | Fitness Center | Cable | Internet | Shuttle

779-7900 *must be eligible for tallgrass Promise

Reach more than 32,000 readers each publishing day!

Classifieds

HOROSCOPE

 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments cm-life.com/classifieds

Heat Included (optional)

24/7 Fitness Center

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

6B | Monday, Oct. 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com  21, Cathedral Ceilings (optional)

 32,000 Pool & Sundeck Reach more than readers each publishing day! 

Short Term Leases Available for a Limited Time Only!

Classifieds 1517 Canterbury Trail On the corner of Crapo & Preston cm-life.com/classifieds canterbury@millenniahousing.com www.mhmltd.com

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

(989) 773-1234

Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

1-2 ISSUES: $7.75 per issue 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per isssue issue People’s Choice13+#1ISSUES: Jeweler$7.00 for 12per Years!

Models Now Available for Viewing Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

$0 Deposit Down!

www.ssfjstore.com 4, 5 & 6 Bedroom Townhouses • • • • • •

Furnished or Unfurnished FREE High-Speed Internet WALK TO CLASS! FREE Expanded Cable 24 Hour Maintenance Full Size Washers & Dryers

Starting at $245/month

HOROSCOPE By Nancy Black Tribune Content Agency

a vision. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Today is a 7 – There’s more analysis required. Practice (MCT) obedience, and get much stronger. You’re Today’s Birthday (10/21/13). Travel and attracting the attention of an important education are recurring themes this year. person. Be careful not to rock the boat. Chase innovation and pursue mastery at Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) – Today is a your art. Attend lectures and confer6 – You’re entering a house cleaning phase. ences. Write, record and publish. Leave Keep tight track of your money. New a light footprint as you go. Balance your opportunities present themselves with lifestyle for health. Get social and grow new research. Keep working! Postpone a partnerships and networks. Play with your romantic interlude until the job’s complete. favorite people, and collaborate to make Make plans and even reservations. A flexdreams real. ible schedule suits. To get the advantage, check the day’s Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) – Today is a 6 – rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most Review recent personal decisions. Get into challenging. negotiations. Run a reality check. It could Aries (March 21-April 19) – Today is a get awkward. Make repairs right away. The 7 – It’s Mercury retrograde Monday. Brace more careful you are with the details, the yourself for the unexpected. Communicabetter you look. tions and transportation may break down. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) – Today Flexibility serves you well. Think fast and is a 7 – Settle in and develop plans. Join back up vital info. Spark imagination and forces with a master of surprises. Keep it CLASSIFIED RATES: creativity. You get a great story to tell. practical. Travel beckons but take care. Wait Taurus (April 20-May 20) – Today is a take action on your dreams. Spend time 15 word minimum pertogrowing classified ad. 7 – There may be setbacks and resistance, a partnership. but at the end it’s all worth it. This week Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Today is a 1-2 ISSUES: issuecould get confusing. Review the is especially good for attracting money.$7.75 per 7 – Travel Sign contracts only after thorough review. data toissue find the truth. Keep it updated and 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per It’s better to be sure than sorry. Consult a backed up. Gain deeper insight with patient isssue respected friend. 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per listening. Go ahead and wax enthusiastic. Gemini (May 21-June13+ 20)ISSUES: – Today is $7.00 a Wait to see per issuewhat develops. 6 – Watch out for confusion at home over Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) – Today is the next three weeks. You’re eager to go. a 6 – Carefully review your savings plan andput.centered withthe fire, GetBold, fartheritalic by staying Complete atype are andavailable develop teamalong goals. Tend domestic project. Havespecial back up plans for all like andad manage chores and responsibilities. other features attractors. essential operations. Leave extra leeway. Imagine a path into a brighter future. Cancer (June 21-July 22) – Today is a Regroup and go again. Just show up. Eat 6 – Review recreational plans and refurbish healthy food. necessary equipment. Revise and refine. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) – Today Finish up old projects. Costs appear prohibi- is a 5 – Reorganize a kitchen drawer. tive at this point. Don’t venture far. Find fun Keep equipment in repair, as you study close to home. unfamiliar territory. Stay close to home CLASSIFIED RATES: Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) – Today is a 7 – as much as possible. This saves time and Secure what you’ve achieved, and complete money. Conference calls and chats keep you 15 word minimum perconnected. classified ad. household projects. Clarify issues first. Consider an outsider’s objections. Discuss (c)2013 BY NANCY BLACK DISTRIBUTED 1-2DoISSUES: $7.75 per issueCONTENT AGENCY, LLC. ALL what should be done first. what’s best BY TRIBUNE for all. Ignore distractions. Work towards RIGHTS RESERVED 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue

P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805 Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

13+ ISSUES: $7.00 per issue WE SEE

RUNNING

Bold, italic andIN centered type are available along with YOUR other special features like ad attractors. FUTURE! 2316 S. Mission St. • 779-0317 • In the Stadium Mall

SODOKU GUIDELINES:

to solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 throught 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. the more numbers you can figure our the easier it gets to solve!

Presented by:

CLASSIFIED RATES: 15 word minimum per classified ad.

STUDENTS 7-12 GETISSUES: 10% DISCOUNT! $7.25 per isssue

TTY: 800-649-3777 or 711

SUDOKU

Paid On Call Firefighter: The City of Mt. Pleasant is seeking high energy and team-oriented individuals who are committed to our community and interested in joining our Paid On Call Firefighter team. Candidates must be willing and available to complete extensive firefighter training, be committed to ongoing education, and have the ability to immediately leave their place of employment for firefighting duty. Residency within the City of Mt. Pleasant or Union Township is required. by: To apply visit our Presented www.mt-pleasant.org. website at The position will remain open until filled. EOE

www.AMGhousing.com • Call 989.773.3890

Starting at $260/month

Fireplaces (optional)

and interested in joining our Paid On Call Firefighter team. Candidates must be willing and available to complete extensive firefighter training, be committed to ongoing education, and have the ability to immediately leave their place of employment for firefighting duty. Residency within the City of Mt. Pleasant or Union Township is required. To apply visit our www.mt-pleasant.org. website at The position will remain open until filled. EOE

HELP WANTED

People’s Choice #1 Jeweler for 12 Years!

www.ssfjstore.com

Paid On Call Firefighter: The City

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with high enof Mt. Pleasant is seeking ergy and team-oriented individuals other special features like ad attractors. who are committed to our community

you live here?

(989) 773-1234

1240 E BroomfiEld St.

CROSSWORD

$0 DEPOSIT DOWN and FREE: • Laundry • Shuttle Service to Campus • High-Speed Internet • Basketball Court • Expanded Cable • Sand Volleyball

Call for today’s specials or order online at: www.papajohns.com

M-Fri: 9-5, Sat 12-4 • www.tallgrassapts.com

1-2 ISSUES: $7.75 per issue 3-6 ISSUES: $7.50 per issue 7-12 ISSUES: $7.25 per isssue 13+ ISSUES: $7.00 per issue

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

FOR RENT

Vintage Sisters

Monday-FrIday 8aM - 5PM

436 MoorE Hall, CMU, Mt. PlEaSant, MI 48859

SUDOKU

6B | Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

989-774-LIFE CLASSIFIEDP:RATES: 15 word minimumF: per989-774-7805 classified ad.

CROSSWORD

Across 1 Floating platforms 6 Guy or fellow 10 Haughty sort 14 Creepy starer 15 Top military draft category 16 Skid row denizen 17 German cars bought by Riyadh residents? 19 Not many 20 Releases (on), as an attack dog 21 Cafeteria carriers gone missing? 23 QB’s mishap 24 Tennis icon Arthur 25 Makes a choice 26 Drawing upon 28 100-yard race Presented by: STUDENTS GET 10% DISCOUNT! 30 Shoulder wrap People’s Choice #1 Jeweler for 12 Years! 32 “Once __ a time ...” WE SEE 34 PC software RUNNING 38 Rose of baseball 39 Hard to hear IN YOUR 40 Was a passenger FUTURE! 41 Figure skater’s leap 2316 S. Mission St. • 779-0317 • In the Stadium Mall42 Uncle Remus’s __

www.ssfjstore.com

Rabbit 43 Nursery-rhyme Jack or his wife 44 Put down, as floor tile 46 “__ my case” 48 Fixes with thread 50 Plastic coffee container designed for a Keurig brewer 51 Sports enthusiast 54 Streamlined onion relatives? 57 Pie à la __ 58 Basketball’s __ “The Pearl” Monroe 59 Stories you’ve heard a bajillion times? 61 Bad to the bone 62 Promgoer’s concern 63 Leaning somewhat 64 Lousy grades 65 Like so 66 Zappos.com inventory Down 1 Big name in vermouth 2 A second time 3 Vary irregularly, as prices

4 Koppel and Knight 5 __ Lanka 6 Teeth-and-gums protector 7 Conductor Previn 8 “Star Wars” princess 9 “Piece of cake!” 10 Out-of-tune string instruments? 11 Like Jack 43-Across’s diet 12 Does as directed 13 Curtain call acknowledgments 18 Part of YMCA: Abbr. 22 How-__: instruction books 24 Feel lousy 27 Neato water sources? 28 Insult comic who was a frequent Johnny Carson guest 29 Crumb-carrying insect 30 Relaxation center 31 Put a curse on 33 Dessert with a crust 35 Financial planner’s concern

36 Handheld computer, briefly 37 Go down in the west 39 “The X-Files” gp. 43 Ninth mo. 45 Pop the question 47 Ploy 48 Work really hard 49 Spooky 50 Reeves of “Speed” 52 Dancer Astaire 53 Homes for chicks 54 Future flower 55 J.D.-to-be’s exam 56 __ A Sketch 57 Trig or calc 60 Prof.’s helpers

Bo

Oct. 21, 2013  

Central Michigan Life

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you