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NO. 34 | VOL. 99

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

GRAWN OF A NEW AGE Students and faculty celebrate a massive renovation for CMU’s most historic building S E P T. 1 8 , 2 0 1 7  

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M O U N T P L E A S A N T, M I


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LIFE

SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

CENTRAL MICHIGAN

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The Museum of Cultural and Natural History to receive largest donation ever

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NEWS Two CMED students each receive $3,000 grant for research initiatives

FROM THE EDITOR

NEWS University sets single day donation record

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SPORTS CMU drops first game of season to Syracuse 41-17

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OPINION CMU should continue to promote liberal arts in future

The CMU Board of Trustees will meet at 9 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 21 in the President’s Conference Room in the Bovee University Center. The agenda for the meeting was not available at press time. Follow our coverage on Facebook and Twitter.

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Family of CMU sophomore, mother killed in bus crash open GoFundMe PAGE.

STAFF

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JORDYN HERMANI MANAGING EDITOR EVAN SASIELA NEWS EDITOR MITCHELL KUKULKA NEWS EDITOR EMMA DALE FEATURES EDITOR PAIGE SHEFFIELD OPINION EDITOR ELIO STANTE SPORTS EDITOR MCKENZIE SANDERSON ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR DYLAN GOETZ PHOTO EDITOR ARIANA STRZALKA

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR MACKENZIE BROCKMAN DESIGN EDITOR ALYSSA TEMPLETON

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Hundreds of women go Greek in Sorority Bid Day rush 2017

PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER ISABELLA KROLIKOWSKI

ASSISTANT PAGE DESIGN EDITOR CONNOR BYRNE

STREET SQUAD MANAGER MITCHELL HATTY

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR RILEY BUSSELL

PROFESSIONAL STAFF

ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR GRANT POLMANTEER

ADVERTISING

MANAGER RACHEL RING MANAGER CLARE COX

MANAGER SUMMER VARNER SOCIAL CAFE MANAGER ZACH NOWAK

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS DAVE CLARK ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS KATHY SIMON PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DAWN PAINE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS KATHY SIMON PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DAWN PAINE


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

NEWS

Museum receives its largest artifact donation on Monday By Samantha Shriber Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

The Museum of Cultural and Natural History in Rowe Hall will accept its largest donated artifact at 4 p.m. Sept. 18 at Fabiano Botanical Garden. The 1920 Transport Truck was donated to the museum by Mount Pleasant business owner Sam Staples. Staples’ interest in the automobile peaked after purchasing the Mount Pleasant Commerce Center at 711 W. Pickard Road. The site was the location for Transport Truck Company from 1918-25. The company was the only automobile company in Mount Pleasant and a place for students to work in the early years of engineering, mechanism and restoration. Jay Martin, director of the museum and associate professor of history, said the Transport Truck is an icon of the community. “We’ve seen pictures of it in front of CMU buildings,” Martin said, adding the vehicle was once a frequent sight across campus and in the community. Transport Trucks had been cleared out of the Commerce Center long prior to Staples’ purchase. This initiated Staples’ journey to

Courtesy Photo | Jay Martin MST and CRM students prepare the 1920 Transport Truck that will be donated to the Museum of Cultural and Natural History on Monday, Sept. 18.

returning one of the now-rare vehicles back to its home roots, Martin said. Staples’ search brought him to southern Michigan, where he bought one of three 1920

Transport Trucks left in existence. He believed the truck was an important part of Mount Pleasant history and it was important that it’d be returned, Martin said.

Staples donated the vehicle to the museum soon after its arrival in honor of CMU’s 125th anniversary. The Transport Truck will now serve as a crucial education tool for students in the Museum Studies minor program, Martin said. “The museum’s initial purpose is to serve as a laboratory for teaching the ins and outs of being in museum professions,” he said. Martin said it is a crucial his students understand how to operate, display and use an antique automobile. “There are over 35,000 museums in the United States and at least a third of them have one or two automobiles in their collections,” Martin said. “Students will learn the means of preserving (the car) and maintaining it, along with working on ways of restoring it and operating it again.” Martin said the 97-year-old car will be driving into the ceremony on Monday, in what will also be in honor of the Transport Truck Company, which will soon be celebrating its 100th anniversary. “We are doing our work for making further reservations,” Martin said, adding students have been working on starting and tuning the truck. The ceremony will be followed by an ice cream social in the Bovee University Center.

College of Medicine students use grant for research initiatives By Samantha Shriber Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Two students from the Central Michigan University College of Medicine are using aid from a $3,000 student grant to battle health stigmas and misconceptions in rural communities. The Student Award Program of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation aims to help aspiring doctors amend the health of Michigan residents through original research. In order to be eligible, medical and doctoral-level students must be attending Michigan universities and have an innovative research plan focusing on concerns of in-state communities. Two of the five recipients included second-year students George Matar of Los Angeles, California and Maryssa Lyons of Freeland. The $3,000 grant provides each student with money for transportation, supplies and any other necessities required for getting in immediate contact with communities, Matar said. In order to maintain the grant, student-researchers must provide a report updating the foundation of how

the research is progressing and if any new goals have unfolded. Matar’s faculty mentor and assistant professor Neli Ragina said the context of these projects is to raise awareness and to educate people directly through community outreach. Lyons’ research is survey-based and focuses on the undermining of mental health in rural populations across the Michigan thumb area and Upper Peninsula. Her surveys are being handed to patients attending nine clinic sites through central, eastern and northern Michigan. She hopes to collect 400 surveys by the end of her project. “My goals for research really concern examining the barriers to care for mental health concerns for patients seeking primary care,” Lyons said, adding 40 percent of residents in her coverage area meet the mental health diagnostic. “Ultimately I would like my research to help clinicians improve their patients usage of mental health resources for better outcomes for mental illness in rural areas.” Lyons said her survey asked patients general questions that could indicate a number of mental health disorders.

“I anticipate to encounter predominantly depression and anxiety disorders since those are most prevalent in America,” she said. Another goal of her research is to battle the role stigma plays in limiting a person’s access to mental health services in rural areas. “The reason a lot of people don’t try to get more care is that they are worried how it’ll make them look,” she said, addressing that negative impressions of people with mental health continue to restrict people from attaining the services, medication and other treatments they need. Lyons hopes to complete her research by next summer, where a 15-page paper covering all collected data is required by the foundation July 18, 2018. Matar expects his research regarding cardiovascular health and awareness to be completed by Christmas. “I became a recipient because I am involved in a Cardiovascular Community Awareness Research project involving one of the potentially silent heart disease, Aortic Valve Stenosis,” he said. Aortic Valve Stenosis is a heart disease that builds up plaque in one of the four major heart valves. The disease affects people of ages 60 and over

with symptoms including shortness of breath, chest pain, signs of weakness and fatigue. “Patients, especially the elderly population, attribute weakness, fatigue and some of these other effects as symptoms of old age rather than the fact that they may have a heart disease,” Matar said. With help from the grant, Matar has been able to establish a team of 10 other students to attend farmers’ markets in Clare, Isabella, Midland, Saginaw, Bay and Grand Traverse counties, among others. “We have a survey that we’re handing out to them and we’re asking them if they have any signs or symptoms,” he said, adding that nearly 200 elderly people surveyed admitted to having several symptoms for Aortic Valve Stenosis. The goal of Matar’s project is for elderly people to reach out to doctors who will in turn take bigger concern for the disease that affects 12 percent of the elderly in the U.S. Ragina said Matar’s project is already receiving gratitude from his survey recipients. “His research has been extremely well received from the community and gets huge interest from participants,” she said. “That’s amazing that he’s making a direct impact.”


NEWS

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LIFE IN BRIEF

SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

HAZING PREVENTION EVENTS TO TAKE PLACE THIS WEEK INCLUDE VIGIL, PANEL DISCUSSION Various hazing prevention events will take place at Central Michigan University throughout the week to bring awareness to the harmful effects hazing can have on students and college campuses. “Hazing’s Lasting Effect” takes place at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 18 in Pearce Hall room 127. The event tells a story of hazing and how its effects impacted

a college campus. The second event — a vigil to remember those who have lost their lives because of hazing — will take place from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19 in Fabiano Botanical Gardens. A “Hazing at CMU” panel discussion is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 20 in the Bovee University Center Lakeshore Room. Staff

and faculty members will discuss hazing in student activities and hazing prevention at CMU. The final event is a ”Fire Up Against Hazing” pledge from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21 on the UC Lawn. The event allows students to take a pledge against hazing at CMU. -Zoe Newmann, Staff Reporter

Courtesy Photo | Charles R. Lux Family Funeral Home Central Michigan University sophomore Joshua Schafer, left, and his mother Kimberly Schafer, right,

were killed Sept. 8 after their vehicle hit the back of a Mount Pleasant School bus.

CMU sophomore and mother remembered; GoFundMe page created to help family By Evan Sasiela Managing Editor news@cm-life.com

A Central Michigan University sophomore will be remembered for his loyalty to his friends and for his love for his family. Joshua Schafer, a 19-year-old from Isabella Township, and his mother Kimberly Schafer, 56, were killed Sept. 8 when their vehicle struck the back of a Mount Pleasant school bus. The Schafers’ funeral services took place Sept. 13 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Mount Pleasant. Their obituaries are posted on the Charles R. Lux Family Funeral Home website. A family member confirmed to Central Michigan Life Joshua Schafer was a sophomore at CMU. He began his first classes this semester after transferring from Mid-Michigan Community College. A GoFundMe account was created for the Schafers. The fundraiser has accumulated more than $17,00 with a goal of $20,000. It can be found online at gofundme.com/schafer-family.

Joshua Schafer graduated from Mount Pleasant High School in 2016, according to his obituary. He received varsity letters in both football and wrestling. A member of Sacred Heart Parish, Joshua Schafer enjoyed hunting, fishing, lifting weights and being outdoors. The obituary states Joshua Schafer adored his parents, Matthew and Kimberly, his siblings and loved being with his family — including his grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. Heather Smith, director of communications at University Communications, said every time CMU loses a member of the community, it’s “tragic and heartbreaking.” “We’re a pretty tight-knit community here so it kind of hits everybody at all levels — whether it’s a student, a faculty or staff member or an alum,” she said. “Our heartfelt sympathies go out to the family and friends.” Kimberly Schafer’s obituary states she was a daycare provider for 19 years and enjoyed being a mother, wife and supporting her children at their sporting events and extracurricular activities.


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

NEWS

All Haircuts Include Precision Haircut Hair Wash Scalp Massage

Hot Towel Style

Courtesy Photo |Central Michigan Universiy Alumni Association Members of the Future Alumni Association pass out complementary ice cream on Sept. 13 in

Flat Screens Comfortable atmosphere student discounts

Fabiano Botanical Garden.

University breaks donation record for 125th anniversary By Mitchell Kukulka News Editor news@cm-life.com

Central Michigan University broke its previous record for donations in honor of the university’s 125th anniversary, with 1,149 donors raising $102,708 in one day. The fundraiser took place on Sept. 13 the day of CMU’s 125th anniversary. For this year’s fundraiser, CMU aimed to top last year’s turnout with a goal of reaching 500 donors. The previous record for largest amount of donations was the Giving Tuesday event in 2016, when 401 donors contributed $52,873. Participants could donate money to anywhere within the university, though the majority of the funds donated will go to scholarships, said Bryan Griffin, director of Annual Giving with Alumni Relations.

Griffin credits the recordbreaking turnout to the administration being proactive and innovative when reaching out to donors. The university engaged potential donors through Facebook, Twitter and sent email reminders up to two weeks before the fundraiser to alert alumni of the event. “It was a perfect storm,” Griffin said. “A lot of people were excited about the 125th anniversary, we did a better job this year of using social media outreach and our alumni board members where a big part of this. They were social media ambassadors for us. They really pushed the message out there and challenged their friends to give, so we had a great grassroots campaign via social media. “Our email strategy was sharper this year. We had a good strategy this year, good

execution and great alumni engagement.” Annual Giving launched its University Campaign earlier than usual this year. It targets retirees, staff and faculty. Griffin believes the early launch resulted in a higher turnout – 51 people donated, raising more than $11,000. Annual University Campaign was able to reach more than 40,000 people on Facebook. Phonathon also set an all-time record, with 307 donors participating. Other campaigns included teaming up with the Clarke Historical Library to produce “did you know” features highlighting important events throughout the university’s history, and having the Future Alumni Association give out free ice cream in the Fabiano Botanical Garden with the option of donating $1.

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OPINION

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SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

EMBRACING THE FUTURE CMU’s push toward STEM, health care should go hand-in-hand with liberal arts preservation

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t his State of the University address Sept. 13, President George Ross presented a look into the future of Central Michigan University. The evolution of CMU is underway. The university is adapting to meet the challenges of an ever-changing world students will be entering post-college. This evolution focuses on expanding science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), health care and business programs. CMU is “already a recognized leader in STEM, health care and business,” Ross said, and CMU will “continue to expand its leadership in these areas.” He then emphasized this doesn’t mean CMU is abandoning the liberal arts tenets this university was founded on more than 100 years ago. But he acknowledged CMU isn’t classified as a “true liberal arts college.” And he’s right. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education describes CMU as a doctoral university with commitment to higher research activity. We’re now on track to expedite production within the STEM fields, as well as health care and business. “Yes, some balk at this evolution, arguing that we are a liberal arts university, concerned that we don’t support the liberal arts,” Ross said. “We absolutely do.” We believe these concerns aren’t unfounded. The move towards expanding the STEM fields has dramatically shifted the focus of tuition dollar spending — shifting our school’s priorities. Our reputation for being a teaching and liberal arts school has gradually declined because of the changing economy and nation. The emphasis on athletics spending and the STEM colleges, while down-sizing the liberal arts colleges, has people nervous about the future. We agree CMU has to change and evolve overtime, but we can do that while staying true to our legacy of liberal arts. There were two major initiatives Ross unveiled that can help move us into the future and if done right, keep CMU true to its history. In his speech, Ross unveiled the newly renamed Sarah R. Opperman Leadership Institute and its new mission at CMU. The institute will create programs for all students — emphasizing leadership through volunteering and developing a sense of purpose.

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer

President George Ross delivers the State of the University Address on Sept. 13 in Plachta Auditorium.

This reflects our history as a teaching college. Being a teacher is having confidence, patience and being a leader — qualities the Leadership Institute instills in students who go through its programs. New programming and possibly making leadership classes part of all students’ curriculum is a good thing. CMU may not produce as many teachers as it once did, but it will continue to mold the leaders of tomorrow. Ross also unveiled new partnerships with Quicken Loans and Ford Motor Co. Ross was quick to clarify these relationships would do more than just benefit business or engineering students: they could benefit all students. Quicken Loans and Ford need employees proficient in English and writing to help with

internal and external company work. They need advertising and designing students to help with marketing. They need individuals who are experts in programming and coding to help with their businesses or production lines. These partnerships are more than meets the eye. These partnerships are a modern-day conglomeration of what the university was founded on in 1892. Our university was originally the Central Michigan Normal School and Business Institute. It prepared students to be teachers and leaders in business. Both companies listed CMU on their lists of top recruiting schools. These partnerships involve corporate leaders coming to campus and access to internships and scholarships. It’s easy to see this as something only benefiting the College of Business Administration, but these partnerships can be made to benefit all students. Ford and Quicken Loans will certainly need public relations students, graphic

designers, students with writing proficiency, foreign language experts and human resources skills — skills and professions taught in our liberal arts colleges. These new programs, subject emphasis and corporate partnerships should be a positive for all students, while keeping CMU a wellrounded university. We understand and recognize the changing world around us. CMU is moving towards a future in STEM, health care and business that will make us a university even more competitive on a global scale than it already is. We applaud the changes and commitment to leadership we see. While we are shifting gears to prioritize STEM and business, please keep in mind the liberal arts and do not forget to nurture those departments as well —they are the backbone that prepares students to be the well-rounded individuals our founders sought us to be.


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

OPINION

Letter to the

EDITOR

Central Michigan University community supports DREAMers TO THE EDITOR: On Sept. 5, 2017, President Donald Trump had Attorney General Jeff Sessions announce the administration’s intent to rescind the protections afforded to undocumented immigrants under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program beginning in early 2018. Known as “DREAMers,” this population of immigrants arrived without papers as minors. Although they were born in other countries, the United States is their longtime home — sometimes Christi Brookes (WLC) Alejandra Rengifo (WLC) Kelly J. Murphy (REL/WGS) Cathy Willermet (SASW) Alan Rudy (SASW) David Jesuit (PSC) Elizabeth Meadows (PSY) Amanda E. Garrison (SASW) Joseph Michael Sommers (ENG) H. Talat Halman (REL) Al Wildey (ART) Guy Newland (REL) Sara Moslener (REL) Jeffrey Bean (ENG) Andrew Blom (PHL) JoEllen DeLucia (ENG/WGS) Anthony Feig (GEO) Cathy Hicks Kennard (ENG) Naveen Sharma (HSC) Renee Babcock (PSY) Greg Colores (BIO) Sarah Surface-Evans (SASW) Harry Mika (SASW) Laura Cochrane (SASW) Tracy Brown (SASW) Tara McCarthy (HST) Jennifer Schisa (BIO) George Ronan (PSY) Sergio Chávez (SASW) Ed Simpson (JRN) Ethan Kolek (EDL) Liann Yates (GEO) Bruce Bonnell (Music)

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Jordyn Hermani MANAGING EDITOR | Evan Sasiela OPINION EDITOR | Elio Stante MULTIMEDIA EDITOR | Riley Bussell NEWS EDITOR | Mitchel Kukulka NEWS EDITOR | Emma Dale FEATURES EDITOR | Paige Sheffield DESIGN EDITOR | Alyssa Templeton

the only home they remember. They have lived, studied and worked here for almost all of their lives; they are strangers in their birthplaces. The Trump administration’s recent decision throws their lives into great uncertainty and, for some, possible tragedy through deportation to what is effectively a foreign country. Some of those DREAMers are part of our community here at Central Michigan University. We, the undersigned, state our unflinching support for you. We recognize that you are invaluable

Elizabeth Bradshaw (SASW) Philip Hertzler (BIO) Nathanial Smith (ENG) Nathan Weed (PSY) Katrina Piatek-Jimenez (MATH) Joe Finck (PHY) Kristy Shih (HEV) Elbert Almazan (SASW) Han-Jung Ko (HEV) Susan Grettenberger (SASW) Lesley Withers (COMM) Andrew Wehrman (HST) Marco Fornari (PHY) David Smith (REL) Brittany Bayless Fremion (HST) Douglas A. Lapp (MATH) Koblar Alan Jackson (PHY) Merlyn Mowrey (REL) Tierney Popp (HEV) David Kinney (SASW) Joellen Lewsader (HEV) Mark Francek (GEO) Eileen Malone Beach (HEV) Matthew Redshaw (PHY) Jennifer Liu Demas (HST) Gil Musolf (SASW) Gregory Smith (HST) Joseph Anderson (PHL) Tracy Galarowicz (BIO) Jeffrey Weinstock (ENG) Mary Senter (SASW) Benjamin Heumann (GEO) Kirsten Weber (COM)

Lauren McConnell (TID) Lisa Gandy (CST) Barbara Andersen (GEO) Carrie Euler (HST) Edward Clayton (PSC) Andrew Dietzel (SASW and HST) Kathleen Donohue (HST) Eric Linton (BIO) Mark Hwang (BIS) Brian Smith (SASW) Lane Demas (HST) Rachel Caspari (SASW) Amy Carpenter Ford (ENG) John Robertson (HST) Xantha Karp (BIO) Lissa Schwander (SASW) Debra Linton (BIO) Anja Mueller (PHY) Kathleen Woehrle (SASW) Jorge Brea (GEO) Philip Oshel (BIO) Traci Goldsworthy (BIO) Dusty Myers (SASW) Matthew Johnson (EDL) Justin Smith (SASW) Lawrence Lemke (EAS) Jonathan Truitt (HST) Rebecca Hayes (SASW) Laurel Zwissler (REL/WGS) Matthew Katz (PHL) Ari Berk (ENG) Nicole Sparling-Barco (ENG) Tom Rohrer (CHSBS)

members of our communities, and we uphold your right to stay in the U.S. and to lead a life free from the fears of deportation. We will do what is in our power to help you, and to point you to other available resources. We stand behind the DREAMers. Immigrant experiences, documented and undocumented, define in many ways American history and society. We believe in your American dream because it is our dream too.

Jonathan Glenn (MASS) Mike Pisani (MGT) Adrián Flores-Barrera (WLC) Lorrie Murray (WLC) Julie Fortino Schurtliff (CHSBS) Phame Camarena (HON) Cedric Taylor (SASW) María Chouza-Calo (WLC) Cynthia Damer (BIO) Tracy Collins (ENG) Susan Knight (WLC) Concha Allen (MKT) Scot Squires (MKT and President, UTF) Raymond Francis (TEPD) Michelle Cassidy (HST) Veronica Barone (PHY) Doina Pasca Harsanyi (HST) Marcello Graziano (GEO) Crina Tarasi (MKT) Jeff Hoyle (MKT) Katie Squires (CSD) Luz Marcela Hurtado (WLC) Krzysztof Kulawik (WLC) Will Anderson (BCA) Frim Ampaw (EDL) Donna Eriksen (Math) Neil Christiansen (PSY) Joyce Baugh (PSC Emerita) Roger Hatch (PHL Emeritus) Alfredo Estrade (PHY) Peter Orlik (BCA Emeritus) Jim McDonald (TEPD) Norma J. Bailey (TEPD Emeritus)

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Brigitte Bechtold (SASW) Jill Taft-Kaufman (CDA) Lisa DeMeyer (MATH) JoDell Heroux (CSE) Kate Rosier (SASW) Robert Faleer (LIB) Joyce Hendricks (PHL Emerita) Annette Thornton (CDA) Roberto Mendoza Farías (WLC) Michelle Bussert (ELI) Jeff Smith (BCA) Tim Hartshorne (PSY) Tyler Morkin (OIA) Daniela Teodorescu (WLC) Marian Matyn (LIB) Patty Williamson (BCA) Kristen McDermott (ENG) Mark Reilly (PSY) Maiko Bronson (ELI/WLC) Kim Chorvath (ELI) Khila Pokharel (ELI) Carolina Gutiérrez-Rivas (WLC) Steve Couture (ELI) Kevin Cunningham (EDU) Shane Cavanaugh (EDU) Sue Guevara (ATH) Matthew Wilson (MKT) Karen Robson (MKT)

These were all the names on the submitted Google Doc prior to the time of submission on Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College

Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


NEWS

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New year, SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Central Michigan U building on campus makeover says f By Mitchell Kukulka News Editor news@cm-life.com

Madeline Tunison | Freelance Photographer

Students study on Sept. 11 in Grawn Hall.

Madeline Tunison | Freelance Photographer

Students study on Sept. 12 in Grawn Hall.

Grawn Hall’s grand reopening ceremony Thursday, Sept. 21 will mark the end of the two-year, $10.8 million renovation of the oldest building on Central Michigan University’s campus. Originally proposed in 2015 as a way to modernize the College of Business Administration and the building it operates in, the project has seen more than 16,200-square-feet of the historic hall remade, refurbished and reimagined for a new era of business at CMU. The most significant change is the addition of a 6,600-square-foot atrium on the west side of the building. The atrium will serve as event space and a location for students and faculty to work and socialize. Obinna Obilo, assistant professor of marketing, said he has already has received positive feedback from his students about the new work space. “They can work in this building, in these spaces, instead of having to meet in the library or scheduling something in a coffee shop,” Obilo said. “That’s what (students) have been raving about. Faculty are excited, as well.” Students aren’t the only ones who will benefit from the improvements. Obilio said the new space will make life easier for faculty to spend time with students and offers a nearby space to prepare for classes. “Now if I have some time between my classes to review some notes, I don’t have to sit in my clunky classroom chair or walk all the way back to my (Smith Hall) office,” Obilo said. “We have these spaces here now where I can sit down, drink some coffee and go over my notes – I have some of that excitement too.” With the new atrium, the CBA can host many of its own events, something that wasn’t possible

for the hall in the past. The first major event to take place in the new space will be a data analytics conference Friday Sept. 22. Charles Crespy, dean of the CBA, hopes improvements to the building will encourage students to be more active and involved with their education. Speaking with Central Michigan Life in July, Crespy explained his plans to strengthen the communication between the CBA faculty and students. “If we have faculty members sitting (in the atrium) everyday, it’s a lot easier for students to approach them for questions and advice,” Crespy said. “If we can encourage that, we’ve done a good job because we’ve gotten (students) more focused on business education, and spending more quality time with faculty.” Clarkston senior Karoline Holsbeke thinks the renovation has made Grawn more accommodating for student use. A member of Pi Sigma Epsilon, Holsbeke said the new atrium offers more space for student organizations to socialize with the student body. “It’s definitely an improvement from what we had,” Holsbeke said. “It’s good timing for the business students to have an upgrade. I definitely like spending time in here a lot more now. There are more places to study and do homework between classes.” Other major additions to the building include the installation of a Which Wich Superior Sandwiches shop, the conversion of two second-floor classrooms into public study spaces and improvements to the building’s fire suppression systems.

A HISTORIC CHANGE Named after CMU’s first president Charles Grawn, the building opened in July 1915. The hall served as the home for CMU’s agriculture, psychology, geography, biology, physics and chemistry departments.


new Grawn CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

9

NEWS

University’s oldest s gets much needed faculty, students Due to the original Warriner Hall being destroyed in a fire, Grawn is the oldest standing building on campus. Grawn itself received damage from two separate fires in 1933 and 1954. Grawn Hall was one of the first steel buildings constructed in Michigan. During the 2017 construction of the new atrium, workers uncovered several beams bearing the Carnegie Steel Company insignia – Carnegie Steel has been defunct since 1901. After the construction of the Brooks Hall science building in 1964, Grawn replaced Smith Hall as the home of the CBA. That move required a $850,000 renovation. Grawn was renovated again in 1989 with the addition of the $1.7 million, 20,000-square-foot Applied Business Studies Complex. In February 2015, Crespy submitted the $10.8 million budget and renovation plan to CMU’s Board of Trustees. The project was presented on the condition that half of the cost would be covered by donations from investors and alumni. President George Ross promised the university would match those donations dollar for dollar. Between 200 and 300 donors contributed to the project. At the time of Grawn’s grand reopening Sept. 21, the amount of money received through donations will be around $4 million – just short of the $5.4 million goal. Crespy is confident the goal amount for donations will be met in the near future.

GRAWN OF A NEW AGE Marketing professor Mike Garver can only describe the renovations in one way: game-changer. “In the short time we’ve had (the new building), it’s had a major impact on how we conduct business here,” said Garver, who has worked at CMU for more than 20 years. “It just screams of professionalism. It feels like a business environment, where business things happen.

“I’m thinking about starting to dress up in a suit again. It just feels like we have a new building and it’s allowing us to do things that a modern-day business school needs to do.” Grawn’s new look goes a long way towards making the space seem more professional and inviting, said Minnesota junior Cassondra Boothroyd. A recreation and event management major, Boothroyd appreciates the atmosphere the building has now. She said she finds the atrium to be better than the Charles V. Park Library or Bovee University Center. “It’s so open and welcoming,” Boothroyd said. “It really shows how Central is moving forward as a community, which is really exciting to see.” The push to bring Grawn Hall into the 21st century began when Crespy became dean of the CBA in 2010. When he first took the position, Crespy was asked by former Provost Gary Shapiro what he envisioned the future of the college to look like. Crespy recalled reading numerous studies that pointed toward a future where every student had a laptop or tablet, which meant creating more computer labs wasn’t going to benefit a modern university. Along with the rest of CBA’s faculty, Crespy pushed for an update to Grawn that would lend itself to helping students develop skills to make them attractive to employers – namely, better social skills and an emphasis on teamwork. “We can turn out 21st century graduates that can compete with anybody if we get more quality time with them, if they get more experience working in teams, speaking publicly and competing in competitions,” Crespy said. “All of those things we value greatly. All of those things can be greatly enhanced by how we redesign the physical facilities – giving (students) an opportunity to do what they do well in a space where they want to be.”

Madeline Tunison | Freelance Photographer

Students study on Sept. 11 in Grawn Hall.

Mackenzie Brockman | Assistant Photo Editor

Grawn Hall sits on Sept. 15 on CMU’s campus.


NEWS

10

SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Hundreds rush during sorority Bid Day 2017

Photos by Madeline Tunison | Freelance Photographer

Zeta Tau Alpha members run toward new members during Bid Day on Sept. 16 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

New sorority members run toward their sorority during Bid Day on Sept. 16 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Sigma Kappa members dance to music during Bid Day on Sept. 16 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Delta Zeta members greet new members with hugs during Bid Day on Sept. 16 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.


11

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

LIFE IN BRIEF

NEWS

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

MOUNT PLEASANT PUBLIC SCHOOLS RECEIVE $5,000 GRANT FOR SIXTH-GRADERS

Comedy Central duo use real life experiences as comedic inspiration By Paige Sheffield Features Editor news@cm-life.com

James Davis said his Comedy Central series, “Hood Adjacent with James Davis,” reminds him of when he was in college. On the show, Davis addresses a variety of issues and shares his perspective of growing up ‘hood adjacent,’ or close to the ‘hood.’ “Every episode is almost like an essay,” Davis said. “We pick a topic and we really inform ourselves, educate ourselves, then do the work of connecting comedy to it. If anybody here hasn’t seen the show, they should because maybe they’ll be inspired about how they can unpack or investigate things for their classes.” Davis, along with comedian Norm Nixon Jr., performed on Sept. 14 at Central Michigan University as part of the Hood Adjacent Live College Tour. The stand-up show was presented by CMU’s Program Board and was free and open to the public. Nixon said “Hood Adjacent” is Davis’ perspective formatted into a comedy show with field pieces and

interviews — it’s a mix of who he is and where he grew up. “The goal is to share the hood adjacent perspective in order to spark further conversations on topics we thought maybe we knew everything about,” Davis said. “It’s also just to provide imagery and stories that are not just JAMES DAVIS: following this “Every episode is tired, repetitive almost like an essay.” format that we’ve seen with other shows where they only show you one type of black person and this one type of experience. It’s almost like you know what you’re going to hear at the start of the episode or you know what angle you’re going to get on a certain topic just because that’s the angle they always use.” In terms of his stand-up, Davis said he likes talking about himself and what’s going on in the world around him because that’s what makes his material original. Both Davis and Nixon made jokes about a wide range of

topics — also talking about college to relate to the audience. “You try to find truisms — things that ring true to everybody,” Nixon said. “But the best jokes are always the things that no one else can tell, that only you can tell.” Davis joked about social media and relationships, but he also used his comedy to talk about topics like police violence. “The first part of any joke is normally based on truth, so you can establish your opinion on anything as long as you have a clever or funny way of ending that thought,” Davis said. “A lot of people can touch on taboo subjects knowing that a laugh will come at the end of that subject.” At the end of his show, Davis encouraged anyone who is interested in comedy or another passion to just pursue it. “(Through my shows), I want to be a form of escape from whatever’s bothering people temporarily and I want them to become a follower of my comedy,” Davis said. “It’s like a campaign style. You stop somewhere and you want to make them feel good but you also want them to keep following you on your journey.”

Sue Guevara

Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Norm Nixon Jr. performs for the Hood Adjacent Comedy Show on Sept. 14 at Plachta Auditorium.

As a part of the Mid-American Conference push to create a community-based program at each MAC campus, Mount Pleasant Public Schools will receive $5,000 to benefit sixthgrade education. The MAC announced it is partnering with the College Football Playoff Foundation to provide $60,000 for elementary and/or secondary schools. The funding, provided by the partnership with CFP, will be for the 2017-18 academic year. According to the MAC website, the funding will allow Mount Pleasant Public Schools to purchase more supplies and continue education programs with Central Michigan University. “I am extremely pleased to see the diversity of community programs our athletic programs have partnered for

this upcoming season,” said MAC Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher. “Our students, coaches and athletic administrators support their campus communities with events throughout the year and this opportunity only enhances our support within each community.” Kaylee Vander Baan, a Mount Pleasant Middle School sixth-grade teacher, is thankful for the MAC and Central Michigan University partnership. “The support from institutions like Central Michigan University and the MidAmerican Conference is what makes the Mount Pleasant community such a great place to live, work, and learn,” she said. -Dylan Goetz, Assistant Sports Editor

TUESDAY,

October 10th

11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Comfort Inn Conference Center, Mount Pleasant KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Sue Guevara

Head Coach, CMU Women’s Basketball

TICKETS: $45

Tables of 8-10 also available. To purchase tickets, call 989.773.7322 by October 3, 2017 KEYNOTE SPEAKER SPONSORED BY:

The Look Who’s Talking Speaker Series features prominent speakers focusing on topics of interest to our community. Proceeds benefit the Mt. Pleasant Area Community Foundation’s Women’s Initiative which provides for the needs of women and girls in Isabella County.


SPORTS

12

SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Syracuse scores 31-unanswered points in Chippewas’ first loss By McKenzie Sanderson Sports Editor sports@cm-life.com

Syracuse scored 31-unanswered points to seal the win against Central Michigan Saturday in the Carrier Dome. The Orange defeated the Chippewas 41-17, handing CMU (2-1) its first loss of the season. CMU started the first quarter with 10 points off of two Syracuse turnovers, but a pick-six and an interception late in the first half swung the momentum to the Orange. The Chippewas recorded their ninth interception of the year in a game filled with turnovers and sloppy play. Both teams combined for five turnovers by halftime. CMU had one interception while Syracuse had two, and each team lost a fumble in the first half. “I’m disappointed,” head coach John Bonamego said. “In the second half, you saw inability to finish drives and we gave up about three or four big plays, which really hurt us.”

FADING CONFIDENCE After a Syracuse field goal early in the first quarter, sophomore linebacker DeAndre Dill stripped the ball from the Orange’s running back and Mitch

Stanitzek recovered the fumble to give CMU an opportunity to score. Less than a minute later, quarterback Shane Morris found Cameron Cole for a 56yard receiving touchdown to take the first lead of the game. It was Cole’s first career catch and touchdown. Cole popped the ball up in the air later in the first quarter, allowing the Syracuse defense to run in a pick-six and tie the game at 10 going into the second quarter. Sophomore running back Jonathan Ward responded with a 14-yard touchdown reception, giving the Chippewas a 17-10 lead to start the second quarter. Syracuse killed CMU’s momentum with back-to-back touchdowns from running back Dontae Strickland to end the half at 24-17. The Orange scored 14 points off two interceptions from Morris, who struggled to complete passes without wide receivers Corey Willis and Brandon Childress. Syracuse added a pair of touchdowns and a field goal in the second half to pull away with the lead. Romello Ross tried to add another CMU touchdown with six minutes left in regulation, but he

Courtesy Photo | Central Michigan Athletics The CMU defensive line tackles a Syracuse player during the football game against Syracuse University on Sept. 16 in the Carrier Dome, Syracuse, New York.

fumbled on the one-yard line and a touchback was called. Syracuse quarterback Eric Dungey finished with 279 passing yards and 3 touchdowns. He

also added 105 rushing yards for the Orange. “Eric Dungey is a great quarterback for that offense because of his ability to move his legs; we saw that late in the

game,” Bonamego said. “He is a tremendous competitor and (Syracuse has) a lot of good, talented young receivers.” Morris completed just 22-of45 passes for 279 yards and two touchdowns. He was replaced by backup quarterback Tony Poljan late in the fourth quarter.

MOVING FORWARD Senior defensive end Joe Ostman emphasized the importance of looking ahead to CMU’s next contest rather than dwelling on Saturday’s loss. “We’ve got to get better (and) we’ve got to stay together as a team,” Ostman said. “It’s one loss. Adversity is going to come. Whether we’re winning or we’re losing, we have to stay together as a team. We’ll make the corrections and be ready to go next week.”

The Chippewas return to Kelly/Shorts Stadium for their Mid-American Conference opener on Sept. 23 against Miami (Ohio). The RedHawks are 1-2 after a 21-17 home loss to Cincinnati on Saturday. They fell to Marshall, 31-26, in their season opener then topped Austin Peay, 31-10. Last year, Miami defeated the Chippewas a 37-17 in Oxford, Ohio, snapping CMU’s three-game win streak. “We still have a lot of football in front of us,” Bonamego said. “We’ve just got to go back to work tomorrow — everybody, myself, coaches, players — and look at this objectively, take things to heart, accept the coaching, take the criticism, make the corrections and just go out and try to be a better football team next week.”


13

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

NEWS

Pelafas ties all-time record in soccer’s 4-2 victory By Evan Petzold Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Saturday was Senior Day for the Central Michigan soccer team, but junior forward Lexi Pelafas stole the show. Pelafas scored three goals in CMU’s 4-2 victory over Mount St. Mary’s at the CMU Soccer Complex. With the win, the Chippewas improve to 5-2-1 this season. “We wanted to get the win for the seniors because this was their day,” Pelafas said. “We played for each other. If we just keep going out and giving our hearts and playing with character, we will go far.” CMU head coach Peter McGahey said it was not the prettiest performance, but he was pleased with the outcome in the end. “They played some really good soccer,” McGahey said. “With the emotions as high as today, sometimes the game isn’t going to be as pretty as you want. I was really proud of the team as they found a way.” Just three minutes into the game, midfielder Savannah Beetcher crossed the ball down the field and found the back of the opposing net. Two minutes later, Pelafas scored her first goal on a penalty kick, giving CMU a 2-0 lead just six minutes into the game.

Jenna West, the leading scorer for the Mountaineers (3-6-0), scored the first goal at the CMU Soccer Complex this season. The junior midfielder beat goalkeeper Zoie Reed for her fifth goal in the 2017 campaign. The only other goal scored by Mount St. Mary’s was a penalty kick goal by midfielder Jaylyn Chandler with two minutes left in the contest. Pelafas scored her second and third goals eight minutes apart in the second half. The third goal for the junior was a slow roller to complete the hat trick. Pelafas’ three-goal performance on Saturday gave her 26 career goals, which tied her with Stephanie Martin for the all-time goals scored record at CMU. “I’m humbled by it,” Pelafas said. “It’s an honor. My teammates setting me up for it, I’m just finishing the goals. Thanks to my teammates for giving me the great balls.” The Chippewas will play at home on Friday, Sept. 22 for a battle against Mid-American Conference opponent Kent State. “We are moving into our second season — which is the MAC regular season — with a good little bit of momentum and confidence,” McGahey said.

Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Junior midfielder Madison Pogarch, center, jumps for the ball on Sept. 16 during the soccer game against Mount St. Mary’s at the Soccer Complex.

Volleyball falls to Notre Dame in last match of Shamrock Invitational By Travis Olson Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

After splitting the first two games of the Shamrock Invitational on Friday, the Central Michigan volleyball team dropped the last game on Saturday to Notre Dame in three sets to finish 1-2 in the tournament. “It was a big test for us this weekend,” head coach Mike Gawlik said. “We played some really good teams from the ACC and Big Ten.” CMU now holds a record of 8-4. The Chippewas have participated in three different invitational tournaments and conference play starts on Sept. 21 against Toledo at McGuirk Arena. In the first set on Saturday, Notre Dame jumped out to an 11-5 lead. CMU made a run to cut the

deficit to 11-8, but the Irish pulled away to take the first set 25-17. The second set had points going back and forth for both teams. CMU rallied and cut the lead to three at 21-18, but Notre Dame finished the Chippewas off with a four-point run to take the second set. MIKE GAWLIK: The Chippewas had an early “You can’t beat good teams lead in the third set and kept it without going close through the first timeout up against at 11-9. The Irish dominated afgood teams,.” ter the timeout to take the third set 25-16 and win the match in three sets. “You can’t beat good teams without going up

against good teams,” Gawlik said. “It was a really good test for us to play really good teams in our region.” The Shamrock Invitational got off to a good start for the Chippewas after sweeping Southern Illinois in three straight sets. CMU went on to lose the next two matches, each in three straight sets. Senior outside hitter Jordan Bueter led the team in the Shamrock Invitational. She tallied a team-high 32 kills over the weekend, playing in front of her hometown fans in South Bend, Indiana. Gawlik said he was happy for the opportunity to play top teams and is looking forward to conference play next weekend. The Chippewas will go up against Toledo at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 21 in McGuirk Arena. The game will be available on ESPN3.

UPCOMING MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE MATCHUPS: • The Chippewas open MAC play on Thursday, Sept. 21 with a 7 p.m. match against Toledo at McGuirk Arena. • CMU hosts Ball State at 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23. • CMU faces Western Michigan on Friday Sept. 29, at 7 p.m. in Kalamazoo. Follow our coverage on Twitter @ CMLifeSports for live Tweets during both games.


14

SEPT. 18, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

CLASSIFIEDS C M - L I F E . CO M /C LA SS I F I E D S

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One 2-bedroom apartment available on attractively landscaped property: 4206 E. Wing Rd. Mount Pleasant, MI. Appliances (washer, dryer, range, refrigerator, and dishwasher) are included. Attached Garage. Utilities and horseboarding not included. Interested? E-mail extra. ideas@hotmail.com or call Mrs. Ann (313)-623-1468 _______________________________

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To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 - 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. The more numbers you can figure out the easier it gets to solve!

A milkman has 2 empty jugs: a 3 gallon jug and a 5 gallon jug. How can he measure exactly 1 gallon without wasting any milk?


15

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | SEPT. 18, 2017

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

CLASSIFIEDS

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16

SEPT. 18, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

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Timber Creek Apts.

:15 :18 :21 :25 :42

DEERFIELD Northwinds Apts.

WHEN CMU CLASSES ARE IN SESSION

CRAWFORD

OPERATES LATE AUGUST THROUGH EARLY MAY

Winchester Towers / Southpoint Village

Broomfield Mall Tallgrass Apts.

JCPenney /KMart

Deerfield Village

Lexington Ridge

CHANDLER

University Meadows

Village at Bluegrass

Menards

Dick’s Sporting Goods Kroger WALMART

Copper Beech

Kohl’s

SAM’S CLUB

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 2017

REGULAR FARE $2.00

EVERY HALF HOUR SHUTTLE STOPS: BUS STOPS No fare collected/prepaid stops by contract with our partners.

CMLife 09182017 16Pgs.indd 16

Jamestown Apts.

127

SOUTH

TO ALMA & LANSING

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

8:00PM & 10:30PM RETURN FROM PARK LIBRARY TO APT. COMPLEXES ONLY

APARTMENT COMPLEX STOPS Rides for residents prepaid by complex

127

BROOMFIELD

W

COMMUTER SHUTTLE OPERATES LATE AUGUST THROUGH EARLY MAY

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

REQUEST STOPS:

REMUS

The Reserve

Target Union Square

3L EA VE

DENISON DR

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

PRESTON

BLUEGRASS

Westpoint Village

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

CMU Kelly/Shorts Stadium

COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER

BELLOWS Mt. Pleasant High School

AY

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

Stone Crest Apts

HIGH ST.

Yorkshire Commons

SAC, McGuirk Arena

CMU Theunissen Stadium

Hospital

C O L L EG I A T E

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

Moore Hall

CMU EVENT CENTER

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

LOT #33

R. SD

BROOMFIELD

:45 :48 :50 :55 :59 :00 :12

Foust

Library Music

Towers Complex

WHEN CMU CLASSES ARE IN SESSION

:15 :18 :20 :25 :29 :30 :42

Southpoint/Kmart/Winchester Tallgrass Apartments Jamestown Apartments Oakridge Apartments Music Bldg. - Lot#33

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

OPERATES LATE AUGUST THROUGH EARLY MAY

DEERFIELD Towers ( @ 7/11) Westpoint Village Deerfield Village Lexington Ridge Kewadin Village SAC/McGuirk Music Bldg. - Lot#33

:45 :48 :53 :55 :12

Country Place Apts

Health Professions

STADIUM MALL

:15 :18 :23 :25 :42

Northwest Apts

TO BIG RAPIDS

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

GAYLORD

CLAYTON

OPERATES LATE AUGUST THROUGH EARLY MAY

Village at Bluegrass Copper Beech The Reserve Yorkshire Commons Music Bldg. - Lot#33

MAPLE

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

211 Crapo Community Mental Health

SUMMERTON

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

MMCC/ Doan Center

ISABELLA RD.

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

UPON REQUEST

GOLD

WISCONSIN

Health Parkway

MT. PLEASANT

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

Michigan WORKS

BROADWAY

CRAPO

UPON REQUEST

MOSHER

ELIZABETH

:50

UPON REQUEST

DOWNTOWN

OLD MISSION

:20

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

MAIN ST.

:25 :35 :36 :37 :38 :42 :45

EVERY 1/2 HOUR

DR.

:55 :05 :06 :07 :08 :12 :15

UPON REQUEST

W. C A M P U S WASHINGTON

:50 :55 :59 :00 :02 :12 :14 :15 :16 :17 :18

E. CAMPUS DR

:20 :25 :29 :30 :32 :42 :44 :45 :46 :47 :48

MISSION ST. (BUSINESS 27)

WHEN CMU CLASSES ARE IN SESSION

CRAWFORD

MAROON Walmart/Sam’s Club University Meadows Union Square Target Southpoint/Kmart/Winchester Music Bldg. - Lot# 33 Washington/Ojibway Anspach/Pearce Barnes Ronan/Grawn Main St./Gaylord ISMO/Crossings (roadside) Doan Center Washington/Clayton (Gaylord) Larzelere Wightman Park Library Music Bldg. - Lot#33 SAC/McGuirk Stadium Mall Walmart/Sam’s Club

C0MMUTER SHUTTLE ROUTES

OPERATES LATE AUGUST THROUGH EARLY MAY

BE SEEN! Step to the curb and wave

WHEN CMU CLASSES ARE IN SESSION

www.ictcbus.com

All Buses Flex 1/4 Mile of Published Route, Call Ahead for Service

(989) 772-9441 9/15/17 3:33 PM

September 18, 2017  

Central Michigan Life

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