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PUBLICATION OF THE MSM-UMR ALUMNI ASSOCIATJ

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SUMMER 2003

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How UMR rs revving up todays economy

VOL. 77, NO. 2


MSM-UMR Alumni Association Representing

over 45,000 alumni

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Castleman Hall • University of Missouri-Rolla • 1870 M iner Circle • Rolla, MO 65409-0650 • Telephone (573) 341-4145 • Fax: (978) 926-7986 • email: alumni@umr.edu • http://alumni.umr.edu

PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT-ELECT

ZEBULUN NASH, 72 Baytown, Texas (zebnash@msm.umr.edu)

LARRY L. HENDREN, 73 Columbia, Mo. (Ihendren@ess-inc.com)

VICE PRESIDENTS DAN HINKLE 73 Sugar Land, Texas (kdan@airmail.net)

SUSAN (HADLEY) ROTHSCHILD 74 St Louis, Mo. (srothsch@swbell.net)

DARLENE (MELOY) RAMSAY '84 Rolla, Mo. (ramsayd@umr.edu)

JON VANINGER '63 Manchester, Mo. (jvaninger@vanpak.com)

KENNETH G. RILEY 56 San Marino, Calf, (kgrpet@aol.com)

PERRIN R. ROLLER 80 Spring, Texas (perrin.roller@oceanenergy.com)

Chamber of Commerce Member

SECRETARY

TREASURER

ASSISTANT TREASURER

SUSAN WATSON '83 Danbury, Conn, (susane@us.ibm.com)

JERRY R. BAYLESS, '59 Rolla, Mo. (jerryb@umr.edu)

RICHARD L. ELGIN, 7 4 Rolla, Mo. (elgin@rollanet.org)

ASSOCIATIONS ADVANCE AMERICA

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PIRECTORS-AT-LARGE DAVID L. BEGLEY 73, Longmont, Colo, (dbegley@ball.com) ROGER A. DORF '65, Austin, Texas (rdorif@celitesystems.com) GARY W. HINES '95, Olathe, Kan. (gary.w.hines@williams.com)

JORGE A. OCHOA '85, Ft Wayne, Ind. (jochoa2@dpyus.jnj.com) RICHARD R. PAUL '66, Bellevue, Wash, (richard.r.paul@boeing.com)

AREA DIRECTORS Area 1 Area 2 Area 3 Area 4 Area 5 Area 6 Area 7 Area 8 Area 9 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18

JENNIFER POSDA, 76, Trenton, N.J. (jenposda@msm.umr.edu) ROBERT J. SCANLON, 73, Brookeville, Md. (rjscanlon@msm.umr.edu) JOHN R. DALTON, '88, Coker, Ala. (Jdalton@huntrefining.com) DANIEL L. CARNAHAN, '68, Margate, Fla. (danc@carnahan-proctor.com) U SA (WILLHAUS) GILBERT, '93, West Chester, Ohio (gilbert.lg@pg.com) M ARVIN E. BORGMEYER, 74, Baton Rouge, La. (borg769@aol.com) GREGORY JUNGE, '65, Galena, III. (jungegreg@msm.umr.edu) RICHARD W. EIMER, JR., 71, Decatur, III. (rich_eimer@dynegy.com) JOHN P. "PETE" LEGSDIN, 70, Louisville, Ky. (pete.legsdin@appl.ge.com) RICHARD R. ARNOLDY, '69, St Louis, Mo. (arnoldrr@arcol.com) ERNEST K. BANKS, '81, St Louis, Mo. (ernie.banks@tycohealthcare.com) JENNIFER DISKIN, '91, Alton, III. (diskin40@charter.net) RANDALL G. DREILING, '81, St Louis, Mo. (randy@design9.com)

Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Areas 10-18 Area 19 Area 20 Area 21 Area 22 Area 23 Area 24

JOHN R. FRERKING, '87, Kansas City, Mo. (jfrerki@burnsmcd.com) MICHAEL D. HURST, 74, St Louis, Mo. (mhurst@mccarthy.com) RON JAGELS, '86, St. Louis, Mo. (rjagels@earthlink.net) STEPHEN R. PULJAK, '92, Chesterfield, Mo. (srpuljak@msm.umr.edu) RODDY J. ROGERS, '81, Springfield, Mo. (RRogers@cityutilities.com) JANET WICKEY-SPENCE, '85, Kirkwood, Mo. (janetwi@sbcglobal.net) KELLEY (JOZW IAK) THOMAS, '91, Kirkwood, Mo. (mkthomas@networkusa.net) WILLIS J. W ILSON, 73, Cassoday, Kan. (wwilson@mkec.com) LINDA K. (MOORE) WRIGHT, '88, Houston, Texas (linda.k.wright@exxonmobil.com) DAVID B. AKERS, P.E., '82, Phoenix, Ariz. (dakers@huitt-zollars.com) NORBERT F. NEUM ANN, '52, Salt Lake City, Utah (nneumann@xmission.com) KAMILA (CRANE) COZORT, '85, Clayton, Calif, (ccozort@earthlink.net) H. PAT DUVALL, '62, Seattle, Wash, (pat_duvall@beaerospace.com)

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES MARK EBEL, Student Council President (mebel@umr.edu) ANDREW DRAKER, Student Union Board (adraker@umr.edu)

COMMITTEE CHAIRS HENRY E. BROWN, '68, Cincinnati, Ohio (brownhe@fuse.net) DAVID W. DEARTH, '68, Rolla, Mo. (dearth@umr.edu) JOHN F. EASH, 79, St Charles, Mo. (john.f.eash@boeing.com) JILL (MILLER) FINKLANG, '87, St Charles, Mo. (jillfinklang@ hotmail.com)

JAMES L. FOIL, 74, Lees Summit, Mo. (jfoil@burnsmcd.com) ED M IDDEN III, '69, Springfield, III. (hemiddeniii@worldnet.att.net) ROBERT R. MORRISON JR., 71, Naperville, III. (theromorco@aol.com) CRAIG S. O'DEAR, 79, Kansas City, Mo. (csodear@bryancave.com)

PAST PRESIDENTS ARTHUR G. BAEBLER, '55, Grantwood Village, Mo. (ivbaeb@aol.com) RICHARD H. BAUER, '51, St Louis, Mo. (rhbswb@earthlink.net) ROBERT D. BAY, '49, Chesterfield, Mo. (rdbay673@msn.com) ROBERT T. BERRY, 72, St Louis, Mo. (RBerryTwin@aol.com) JAM ES E. BERTELSMEYER, '66, Tulsa, Okla. (hpg1@msn.com) ROBERT M . BRACKBILL, '42, Dallas, Texas (rbrackbill@msm.umr.edu) MATTEO A. COCO, '66, Affton, Mo. (cocohm@mindspring.com) PAUL T. DOWLING, '40, St Louis, Mo

RAYMOND 0. KASTEN, '43, Kansas City, Mo. JAMES B. MCGRATH, '49, St Louis, Mo MELVIN E. NICKEL. '38, Chicago, III. JAMES R. PATTERSON, '54, Sikeston, Mo. (jrpat1@sbcglobal.net) LAWRENCE A. SPANIER, '50, Jupiter, Fla. (revellee@aol.com) GERALD L. STEVENSON, '59, Highland City, Fla. (esteven545@aol.com) JOHN B. TOOMEY, '49, Lorton, Va. (jbtoomey@aol.com)

STAFF LINDSAY LOMAX BAGNALL, 76, Executive Vice President, MSM-UMR Alumni Association (lindsayb@umr.edu) M ARIANNE A. WARD, Assistant Director, MSM-UMR Alumni Association (mward@umr.edu) STEPHANIE MARTENSEN, Coordinator of Alumni Sections, MSM-UMR Alumni Association (smarten@umr.edu) BETTY J. VOLOSIN, Administrative Assistant, MSM-UMR Alumni Association (bjv@umr.edu) RENEE D. STONE, Administrative Assistant, MSM-UMR Alumni Association (renees@umr.edu)


A PUBLICATION OF THE MSM-UMR ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

SUMMER 2003

VOL 77, NO. 2

UMR's Economic Impact More than a hill of beans.................. 6 it s a wonderful campus....... ........ 8 Protecting the homeland.........11

Feature: pgs. 4-8

Alumni impact.................... ...12 A public-private partnership........ 14 Controlling our destiny............... ..... 15 CAMPUS NEWS Anheuser-Busch establishes scholarship..... ........16 RESEARCH NEWS Solving the few-body problem...............................20 Testing shuttle foam...............................................21 HOMECOMING 2003...................................... ....24-27 DEPARTMENTS From the Editors.......................................................2 Campus News................................................... 16-19 Research News................................................. 20-21 Faculty/Staff Notes................................................ 22 Miner Sports.......................................................... 23 Association News..............................................28-29 Section News....................................................30-36 Alumni Notes.....................................................37-45 Memorials......................................................... 46-48

FUEL-

*» •jo u rn e y Illustrations © EYEWIRE INC.

MOVING? MAKE SURE YOUR ALUMNUS GOES WITH YOU! If you're moving, do n't fo rg e t to send us your change of address, so you don't miss an issue of your alum ni magazine. Send address correctio ns to: Records, 112-A Campus Support Facility, U niversity of M issouri-R olla, Rolla, MO 65409-1320


F romt h e The M S M -U M R Alumni Association publishes the MSM-UMR Alumnus to communicate and reflect the past,

ANDREW

CAREAGA

News and Features

current and future interests o f the alumni o f the Missouri School o f Mines and the University of Missouri-Rolla.

U N IV E R S IT Y O F M IS S O U R I- R O L L A CHANCELLOR Gary Thomas M S M -U M R A L U M N I A S S O C I A T IO N P R E S ID E N T Zebulun Nash, ’ 72 E X E C U T I V E V I C E P R E S ID E N T Lindsay Lomax Bagnall, ’76 The

MSM-UMR Alumnus

In that holiday movie classic "It's a Wonderful Life," the good-hearted, down-onhis-luck banker George Bailey gets the chance of a lifetime. In the words of Clarence Oddbody, Bailey's guide from above, he's "been given a great g ift.... A chance to see what the world would be like without you." As we prepared this special economic impact issue of the Alumnus, we kept coming back to that "Wonderful Life" theme. We wondered: What would Rolla — or the state, the nation 01 even the world — be like if MSM-UMR had never been created? Associate editor Mary Helen Stoltz, Engl'95, ponders that question in her article "It's a Wonderful Campus" (see page 8). Through interviews with historians and a bit of speculation, she discusses some possible alternate realities. What if, for instance, MSM-UMR hadn't been here to educate George Mueller, EE'39, a pioneer at NASA who

is written,

edited, and designed by the staff o f the U M R Publications Department, the U M R Public Relations Department, and the M S M -U M R Alumni Association.

WHAT IS UMR'S IMPACT ON THE ECONOMY?

A R T & P R O D U C T IO N E D IT O R Rebecca Frisbee, ’ 90 E D IT O R S (Alumni) Lindsay Lomax Bagnall, ’ 76

The bottom line: fo r every $1 o f state investm ent into U M R , w e generate nearly $5 o f e co n o m ic activity.

(Features & News) Andrew Careaga A S S O C IA T E E D IT O R S Claire Faucett John Kean Tricia Murphy Mary Helen Stoltz, ’95 A L U M N I S E C T IO N S E D IT O R Stephanie Martensen A L U M N I N O T E S E D IT O R Shannon Stites P R O D U C T I O N A S S IS T A N T S Ian Nance Joann Stiritz SU PPO R T STAFF Tracy Wilson

MSM-UMR Alumnus (USPS 323-500) (ISSN 1084-6948) is issued four times per year (M arch, June, September, December) in the interest o f the graduates and former students of the Missouri School of Mines

set the stage for the Apollo space flights? Would NASA have accomplished its goals without Mueller's work and insights? If MSM and its renowned faculty of the 1930s had not existed, would Mueller have earned a degree at all? It's impossible to answer, of course, but the questions are worth pondering as they point to an example of one MSM-UMR graduate's far-reaching impact. Also worth asking is the question that is at the core of this issue: What is UMR's impact on the economy? Last winter, the office of public relations, working with the office of institutional research and assessment, conducted an economic impact analysis of the campus, then shared the results with legislators in February. The bottom line: for every $1 of state investment into UMR, we generate nearly $5 of economic activity, based on our conservative estimates. (The full economic impact study begins on page 4.) We sent this study to the legislators to help them better understand this campus's critical importance to the state's future. The timing was not accidental. Missouri lawmakers faced a monumental task: balancing the budget without cutting too deeply into necessary services, such as public higher education. In the end, higher education took another big cut. But our hope is that this special economic impact issue will sow some seeds for next year by giving our state lawmakers a clearer picture of how important this campus is to the future of Missouri, and the global economy. We also hope it gives you alumni, who are our greatest legislative advocates, a clearer picture as well. Perhaps if lawmakers — and all of us — would take some time to imagine life without MSM-UMR, we would emerge with a better understanding and appreciation of this great institution.

and Metallurgy and the University of Missouri-Rolla. The MSM-UMR Alumnus is published by the M S M -U M R Alumni Association, Castleman Hall, 1870 M iner Circle, Rolla, M O 65409-0650. Periodicals postage paid at Rolla, M o., and additional mailing offices. POSTM ASTER: Send address changes to MSM-UMR Alumnus, Castleman Hall, PO Box 249, Rolla, M O 65402-0249.

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

We welcome your comments and suggestions for your MSM-UMR Alumnus. Letters to the editor may be addressed to: UMR Publications, 1870 Miner Circle, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, M 0 65409-1520, by fax at (573) 341-6157, or email at alumni@umr.edu. We reserve the right to edit letters for length as space allows.


JACKLING JOCKS I just read the article in the Alumnus about Jackling Gym. It brought back fond memories. My hand-balancing partner Roy Scown (ME'50) and I used to spend many hours working out in the gym when practicing our hand-balancing stunts. Roy was one of those who lived in the towers.

Jerry Schnadelbach (ME'50) took a picture of me doing a handstand on the edge of the roof. I never received a copy of it, and unfortunately I have not been able to locate Jerry.

The attached photos show Roy (pictured on the bottom) and me on the football field where we would work out during the warmer weather.

"THE OLD TOWN" Because I was raised in Rolla, I am very familiar with most of the landmarks shown in the photos accompanying the story on John Bradbury's book (spring 2003, pages 10-11). In fact, I am almost positive the Chevy shown in front of the A&P store is mine, since I worked there — and across the street at Colter's Standard Service — during high school and college. Trucks were unloaded via conveyer on 10th Street. When was the last time you saw 100-pound sacks of potatoes on a store front? Later they would be replaced by watermelons. The Dodge truck parked across the street belonged to Roy Colter, the owner of the Standard station, and we used it for service calls and picking up parts. Rolla certainly has changed, as has the campus — I hardly recognized the campus with all the new buildings. The Rolla Building still looks the same, but I bet it's been a long time since an outhouse was set on fire in front of the dean's house. MSM was and is a fine school. The education I received in Rolla has served me well. Thanks again for bringing me a smile. Bon Tower, ME'63 Vicksburg, Miss.

Bill Spencer, ME'50 Bio Bancho, N.M.

P.S. Roy Scown has been my brother-in-law since 1952.

MAD ABOUT LADD The (spring 2003) MSM-UMB Alumnus has been on our desk for several weeks. As I continue to view the quote by George E. Ladd I am no less offended than I was the first day the publication arrived. Surely there was another quote that could have been used to illustrate the character of this man that would not have contained a profanity. Marilyn H. Talley Florissant, Mo.

NO ROSE FOR THE BACHELOR' I wish to express my strong disappoint­ ment with the decision to devote an entire page to Mr. Aaron Buerge, ABC's ''The Bachelor," in the spring issue of the M SM UMB Alumnus. While his story may have been big in Rolla and Springfield, Mo., at the time, where I live Mr. Buerge was

considered to be little more than another self-absorbed participant in a foolish "reality" program. The reality is that Mr. Buerge's brief time in the spotlight is over, and perhaps the reason he can walk down the streets of Springfield without crowds of people stopping him is that no one cares about his story anymore. While I would still not have agreed with the decision to cover him so heavily, I could better understand the situation if Mr. Buerge was a practicing engineer, or even somewhat proud of his degree from UMR. Luckily for the university's reputation, never in any of the publicity to which I was exposed did Mr. Buerge ever admit he was an alumnus of the University of Missouri-Rolla. He simply billed himself as a vice president at his family's bank. I have been pleasantly surprised with the recent issues devoted to topics relevant to today's engineering graduates — biotechnology, top 40 under 40, etc. With all the problems the university is facing, such as a reduction in credit hours for graduation to remain competitive with other schools and the UM System's recent court battles, as well as the thousands of alumni who use their UMR degree on a daily basis to improve the quality of life for everyone, I see no need to further Mr. Buerge's story. The appropriate level of coverage can be found in Alumni Notes, a brief mention of Mr. Buerge's brush with fame. Let's hope his career with his family's business lasts longer than his highly-publicized relationship. Jason McHaney, ChE'91 Paducah, Ky.

/ CORRECTION: The incorrect photo appeared with the Parent of the Year article (spring 2003, page 14). We regret the error. Pictured from left are Christy Gordon, Robbie Gordon EE'02, Cheryl Gordon-Farmer (Parent of the Year) and Ashley Farmer during Family Day 2002. V ______________________________________________

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

3


Feature

It’s often been said that colleges and universities are the “economic engines” for state economies. Meeting last December with leaders of the state’s public colleges and universities, Missouri Gov. Bob Holden likened higher education to the high-octane fuel needed to keep an economy running smoothly and efficiently. “Economic growth in this new century is based on the knowledge economy — an economy based on information technology, life sciences and advanced manufacturing,” Holden said. “More than ever before, higher education will be the fuel to drive this economy.” Whether you think of higher education as the engine or the fuel, one thing is certain: UMR provides a lot of mileage for Missouri’s economy. For every dollar of state funds invested in UMR last fiscal year (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002), UMR contributed nearly $5 into Missouri’s economy. The more accurate estimate is $4.69 for every buck, or $237,352,779 of economic activity from a state investment of $50.6 million last year. (In addition, UMR generates jobs for the local economy — to the tune of 16 jobs for every 10 UMR employees.) No matter how you round it, the figure is a conservative estimate of UMR’s overall economic

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MS MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

impact, based on a conservative assessment of how UMR affects the local and state economy. Last winter, UMR’s office of public relations and department of institutional research and assessment took a comprehensive look at UMR’s economic impact for the 2001-2002 fiscal year. (UMR’s accounting/fiscal services and human resources departments also assisted with the project). While this study only examines UMR’s economic impact during one particular year, it provides a good snapshot of how the university is positively affecting the state economy.

Econom ic im p act: w h at it is n o t The study considers only the direct impact of UMR’s tangible contributions to the state economy. These include payroll and expenditures for goods and services, research and development, and conservative estimates of student expenditures. The assessment does not take into account the many other ways through which the university benefits Missouri’s economy —


By Andrew Careaga acareaga@umr.edu

> |i

Photos by Dan Seifert/Stonehouse Photography

in terms of jobs (both for UMR’s faculty and staff, and for the many UMR graduates who work in Missouri industry), the number of Missouri businesses created by UMR graduates, and the commercialization of technological advances developed in UMR’s laboratories. It’s tough to put a price tag on some of these endeavors, and even tougher to gauge the impact of all the ways UMR benefits Missourians. It is difficult, for example, to quantify how UMR improves Missouri’s quality of life through such benefits as auxiliary employment, and the cultural and educational opportunities UMR provides to Rolla and surrounding communities. Or how UMR benefits local businesses by providing a ready, part-time student work force. Or how campus activities bring extra money into the local economy by attracting diverse visitors — from international students and visiting scholars to the parents who drive down for a weekend sporting event, residents of neighboring communities who catch a performance at Castleman Hall or the many alumni who return to campus every March for St. Pat’s. (The impact of St. Pat’s on the sale of rubber snakes, for instance, would make an interesting study in and of itself.)

As UMR Chancellor Gary Thomas points out, UMR makes many important contributions to Missouri — economically, socially and culturally. “Truly,” he says, “UMR is a valuable asset to Missouri, not just in economic terms, but in terms of the quality of life and added value our institution, our researchers, our students, our alumni, and our faculty and staff provide to Missourians.” The study also does not take into account the tremendous economic value of UMR’s applied research activities. Many of these activities directly benefit Missouri businesses, particularly those high-tech industries that underpin Gov. Holden’s “knowledge economy.” While this study considers UMR’s research and development expenditures, it does not address the broader issue of how many of UMR’s innovations eventually become real-world products, or even selfsustaining businesses. (One stellar example of this impact is Mo-Sci Corp., a Rolla-based manufacturer of glass microspheres used to treat cancerous tumors. Established in 1985 as a spin-off from the work of UMR’s Delbert Day, CerE’58, Curators’ Professor emeritus of ceramic (continued on page 7)

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

5


Mote than a hill of beans UMR

researchers

LEADING THE W A Y ............. in soybean research

To many Missourians, a soybean is a soybean is a soybean. But for several UMR researchers, the soybean — one of Missouri's biggest agricultural products — is much more. The lowly legume may become a building block for fuels, construction materials, explosives and biodegradable coatings. In the future, we may drive across bridges built with soy-based composite materials. Our military may engage in war games under cloak of a soy-based biodiesel obscurant, rather than the diesel oilbased smoke they've used for years. Environmental engineers may dissolve away polystyrene pollution with a soy-based solvent. We may even be drinking beer and soda from a can lined with a biodegradable soy-based coating. These are but a few of the future possibilities for the little bean's big ™ future, and they all involve research UMR is conducting in partnership with the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council. "The exciting aspect of working with UMR is the researchers there take a practical problem-solving approach to

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

addressing new and alternative markets for soybean products," says Dale R. Ludwig, executive director and CEO of the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council. "What they're able to do is turn concepts and ideas into real products, into real sales that deliver new jobs to Missouri and additional revenue to soybean farmers while improving the environment in the state." All of that is important to Missouri's soybean producers, who produce about 7 percent of all soybeans grown in the United States (Missouri ranks sixth in the nation in total acres of soybeans planted.) UMR's partnership with the MSMC dates back to the early 1990s and has grown significantly over the years. Since 1997, UMR faculty members have received nearly $400,000 in MSMC funding for 17 research projects. One project that is of particular interest to Ludwig is the development of a soy-based oil to dissolve polystyrene, which poses a big problem for landfills because it takes up so much space. Researchers in UMR's Center for Environmental Science and Technology developed a

By Andrew Careaga acareaga@umr.edu

patented process that uses fatty acid methyl esters derived from soybean oil to dissolve polystyrene. These esters work well as solvents for "’ Styrofoam and are environmentally friendly to boot, say Shubhen Kapila, professor of chemistry and a senior investigator at CEST, and CEST Director Virgil Flanigan, ME'60, MS ME'62, PhD ME'68. Kapila and Flanigan, a professor emeritus of mechanical engineering, invented the process along with M ichael Maples, PhD Chem'03. The researchers weren't satisfied with simply reducing the volume of waste, however. "We wanted to produce value-added products from the scrap material," Kapila says. So they have developed several uses for the material, including coatings and resin systems for composite materials such as fiberglass. That's the kind of scientific inquiry that Ludwig and others believe will amount to much, much more than a hill of beans for Missouri’s soybean producers.

Background Image © 2003 www.clipart.com


engineering, the global company now employs 27 highly skilled full-time workers and six part-time student employees. Among Mo-Sci’s other products are bioactive glasses, which are designed to repair and reconstruct diseased or damaged parts of the body.) What the National Governors Association said in a recent report about America’s universities holds true for UMR today: “Universities can play a major role in economic development, and university-industry technology transfer can be a stimulant, precursor, or complement to building a high-skills, high-wage state economy.”

State income tax paid by UMR faculty and staff. This totaled $2,389,085 — or 3.6 percent of UMR’s payroll of $65,649,581. Annual expenditures. This includes purchases of supplies and materials; equipment costs and purchases; acquisitions; maintenance; and capital improvements, including construction and renovation. UMR’s annual expenditures for last fiscal year totaled $37,661,662.

C

Annual research and development expenditures. UMR spent $29,799,000 in R&D endeavors last year.

UMR's Economic Impact on the State of Missouri

Disposable (after-tax) income. The take-home pay for UMR faculty and staff, after taxes and ® other deductions (such as Social Security and health insurance), totaled $46,096,168.

A. State Income Tax

B. Annual Expenditures

C. Annual Research

D. Disposable Income

E. Student Expenditures 0

S10M

$20M

S30M

$40M

$50M

Raw Economic Impact: A+B+C+D+E = $124,922,515

Estimated student expenditures. By using an estimated expenditure of $1,800 per student, as provided by federal financial aid guidelines, we estimate that UMR’s 4,987 students spent $8,976,600 in the local economy last fiscal year.

Now, m ultiply a n d divide UMR's econom ic im pact: it a ll add s up All told, during the 2001-2002 fiscal year — a tough year for higher education in Missouri, when UMR’s budget was reduced by 14 percent — the state’s investment of $50.6 million in UMR yielded a total economic impact of $237,352,779. How did we come up with that number? Essentially, we adapted a method incorporated by the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC) for the association’s 2001 report, “Shaping the Future: The Economic Impact of Public Universities.” The formula measured the tangible economic benefits of UMR and its students and employees in five categories:

Adding these five figures, we get a raw economic impact of $124,922,515. But that number does not reflect the full economic impact of UMR. Economists have developed “multipliers” to better assess how universities and other entities affect local and state economies. According to Peter Taylor, in a 1990 Higher Education Review article, the multiplier effect is based on the assumption that money that flows into a region “is subsequently respent within the area by the initial recipients. The respending process continues in successive rounds,” until eventually it leaks out into the broader “external” economy. Economic impact studies conducted at other universities have used a variety of multipliers — ranging from the ultra-conservative 1.05 to 4.35. For the purposes of this study, UMR selected a conservative economic multiplier of 1.9, meaning that every dollar generated by UMR’s activities actually resulted in $1.90 in economic (continued on page 8)

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

7


impact. (The choice of this multiplier was based on a 1975 study by George R. Moore, which is seen as a kind of gold standard for economic impact studies.) Based on the economic multiplier of 1.9, UMR’s total economic impact to the state last fiscal year was $237,352,779. Dividing that total by the state of Missouri’s investment of $50.6 million in state funds, we come up with the analysis that every dollar of state funding invested into UMR results in a return of $4.69 for the state — in state taxes, disposable income, R&D expenditures, purchases of goods and services, student spending, and more.

It ' s

aW

By Mary Helen Stoltz mhstoltz@umr.edu

What exactly is UMR's impact on Rolla? With this question in mind,

w hat a b o u t em ploym ent? Looking beyond the pure dollars-and-cents impact of UMR on Missouri’s economy, the campus also is a major employer for the Rolla community — and the jobs at UMR generate additional jobs in the local economy.

l stood on top of the Hockey Puck in the middle of campus — like George Bailey on that Bedford Falls bridge in Frank Capra's film “It's a Wonderful Life." But rather than wondering what life in Rolla would be like if l had

UMR employed 1,000 people full time and 271 people part time in 2001, making it the largest employer in Phelps County. In addition, for every 10 jobs at UMR, an additional 16 jobs are created in the local economy. This estimate is based on an economic multiplier of 1.6 used in the 2001 NASULGC study, “Shaping the Future.” In other words, UMR’s 1,000 full-time and 271 part-time jobs generate an additional 1,600 full-time and 434 part-time jobs in the community, for a total employment impact of 2,600 full-time jobs and 705 part-time jobs. All of this is just an overview of UMR’s economic impact. We’re just revving up this economic engine. For more, read on.

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

never been born, l pondered what life in Rolla would be like without UMR. What if MSM-UMR had never existed?


o n o * * F O t C flM p ° V When roll was called on the first day of class at the University of Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy in November 1871, only 32 students answered. The school consisted of two rented floors of the Public Education Building (still standing and now known as the Rolla Building). Today more than 5,000 students inhabit a campus whose main area encompasses more than 220 acres. The university has come a long way in 132 years. But what if it had never been here? As far as the economic impact, the story on page 4 estimates the return Missouri sees from dollars spent on UMR. For every dollar in

state appropriations, UMR returns nearly $5 to the state economy through payroll, research, students expenditures and other means. So if UMR wasn’t here today, the state would save that dollar but lose the other $4. UMR’s impact extends beyond mere economics, however. Would FedEx be the fastest ship in the shipping business if not for the influence of former FedEx president and CEO Ted Weise (EE’67), one of FedEx’s first employees? Would the telecommu­ nications industry be the same without the work of Gary Forsee (CE’72) at BellSouth and Sprint? Would man have ever made it to

the Moon without the work of NASA pioneer George Mueller (EE’39), whose “all-up-testing” of the Saturn V rocket stages led to the Apollo 8 flight to the Moon? What about the advances in the treatment of liver cancer and arthritis made by Delbert Day’s (CerE’58) research into glass microspheres? Or the innovations in the copper mining industry made by the “Father of Open Pit Mining,” Daniel C. Jackling (MetE1892)? These and countless other advances in business, science, technology and the arts by tens of thousands of alumni might never have been made if MSM-UMR did not exist, and the world would be a lesser place because of that. (continued on page 10)


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1 Gary Forsee

Delbert Day

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Ted Weise

But UMR’s greatest impact, it would seem, has been on the community of Rolla. UMR is a major employer, not to mention a cultural draw, for the town and surrounding areas. “We wouldn’t know what to do without UMR,” Linda Kuenzie, executive director of the Rolla Area Chamber of Commerce, recently told a reporter from the Springfield News-Leader. “It’s had a huge impact.” Without UMR, says John Bradbury (Hist’74), senior manuscript specialist in UMR’s Western Historical Manuscript Collection and an expert on Phelps County history, Rolla may have ended up like other rural Ozarks communities. “Think of Lebanon or Sullivan — two models for what Rolla might have been,” Bradbury says. More than 16,300 people call Rolla home, but the populations of Lebanon and Sullivan, with economies based mainly on light manufacturing, are much lower (approximately 12,000 and 6,300, respectively). “Transportation would have been the key rather than education for Rolla.” It’s all about location, location, location. The Rolla Chamber of Commerce bills Rolla as “the middle of everywhere” and Bradbury says that’s true. The town lies on the Interstate 44 corridor, an essential passageway through the state and a historical conduit between the eastern U.S. and the west. This passage, which follows the natural ridge line through the state, has been a vital thoroughfare throughout history. From 1830 the route was known

■ T i H

as the St. Louis-Springfield Road, the best land route through the northern Ozarks and a major avenue into the Southwest, Bradbury says. After that, it was used as the northernmost branch of the Trail of Tears. Telegraph wire was strung along much of the path during the Civil War, giving rise to the “Old Wire Road” designation. The railroad was built along the route and to this day, most of the highway runs parallel to the tracks. From there came Route 66 and eventually 1-44. The junction of 1-44 and U.S. State Highway 63 in Rolla makes its location prime, says Bradbury. “With the development of Route 66, followed by Highway 63, Rolla easily made the transition from the railway age to the automobile age,” Bradbury says. “The economy was diversified enough that, although born a railroad town, Rolla didn’t suffer the effect of railroad downsizing after World War II.” Although the state founded MSM-UMR in Rolla because of the town’s proximity to Missouri’s chief mining district, Rolla turned out to be an excellent spot for a university for area residents. Without UMR, area students would have to travel to St. Louis, Springfield, Columbia or Cape Girardeau to attend a major university. More important to Rolla’s economy than the state appropriations brought in by the university, Bradbury feels, are the dollars funneled to federal agencies in the area. “By the early 1920s the U.S. Bureau of Mines Experiment Station had located in Rolla,” he says, and (continued on page 12)

10

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS Summer 2003


Since the events of Sept. 11, 2001, protecting Americans from acts of terrorism has become a prime concern of policymakers. UMR, with its long-standing relationship with nearby Fort Leonard Wood and its research expertise in areas of infrastructure, materials engineering and science, and information technology, is poised like few universities in the nation to support the nation's homeland security efforts. Already, UMR researchers are engaged in innovative projects designed to tighten security over the Internet and at our nation's nuclear reactors, as well as to improve rescue operations should another attack occur.

A NEW FACE FOR REACTOR SECURITY At UMR's nuclear reactor, faculty and staff are using their faces instead of keys to gain access to secured areas. This facerecognition technology is an experiment that could result in better security at nuclear facilities nationwide. Working with Omron Transaction Systems Inc. in ••'KMvtauat, v'

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Among UMR's homeland security efforts under way: PREVENTING HACK ATTACKS Through a $196,000 National Science Foundation grant and $56,000 worth of networking equipment from Cisco Systems, UMR is working to make the Internet more secure against the threats of cyber-terrorism. The NSF funding and Cisco equipment, secured by UMR graduate W illiam Eatherton, EE'95, a lead engineer with Cisco, has helped UMR develop the Trustworthy Systems Laboratory in the electrical and computer engineering department. The lab is part of UMR's trustworthy computing effort, which is designed "to develop more reliable computer-based, networked systems that can survive attacks and other security threats,” says Ann M iller, the Cynthia Tang Missouri Distinguished Professor of Computer Engineering and head of the lab.

This technology is a w a y to fingerprint your face." Schaumburg, III., UMR is evaluating Omron's Face Identification Access Control System, also known as the Face Key. UMR is the first university in the United States to test the system. "This technology is a way to fingerprint your face," says Akira Tokuhiro, assistant professor of nuclear engineering and director of the nuclear reactor. "It can even tell the difference between a set of identical twins' facial features."

CUTTING THROUGH RUBBLE SAFELY Talk about cutting-edge technology. If UMR's "rubble cutter" had been available to rescue workers at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11,2001, the death toll may have been lower. Anuj Gupta, associate professor of geological and petroleum engineering, and other researchers at UMR's High Pressure Waterjet Laboratory have developed a waterjet drilling system that sprays a narrow stream of water at such force that it can slice through steel, concrete and most other construction materials without disturbing the rubble surrounding the hole. Using a waterjet, rescuers can find out what is underneath all that rubble and debris. "A waterjet does not work like a mechanical drill. There is no pushing or force involved," says Gupta. "Instead, a stream of high-pressure water mixed with an abrasive, such as sand, cuts a hole that is truly straight, regardless of the material it hits." The waterjet can create a narrow tunnel and drill hundreds of feet straight through the rubble to an area where victims might be trapped. The waterjet could then be removed and a camera sent in to survey the damage and check for survivors. While UMR researchers have used waterjets for a variety of purposes in the past, the idea of creating a rubble-cutter had never occurred to them prior to 9-11. "None of us here at UMR thought about using the waterjet for this purpose until after Sept. 11," says Gupta. "Most of the technology has been around; we just hadn't thought of applying it to this until now. It forced us to think about how we can deal with something like this in a more efficient way."

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS I Summer 2003

1


Photo by Bob Phelan/Photomasters

by the 1930s the U.S. Forest Service had picked Rolla as a ranger district headquarters of the Mark Twain National Forest, then known as Clark National Forest. Around that same time, the U.S. Geological Survey established the mapping center in Rolla. But would those agencies have located in Rolla if it weren’t for the mining and geology resources MSM provided?

An aerial view of UMRs campus today

“I’m sure the university was a draw for these agencies,” Bradbury says. Being the county seat, Rolla has the benefit of many professional and legal services that you may not find in other highway towns. “Since 1940 anyway, it’s the federal money, rather than the state university appropriation, that has kept Rolla’s economy relatively stable.”

UMR GRADS help DRIVE the state's economy here's no doubt that the 16,000 plus UMR alumni who live in Missouri add tremendous value to the state's economy. It's well known that the majority of graduates go on to enjoy successful and well-paying careers as engineers, scientists and technologists, earning on average anywhere from $2,300 to $24,200 more a year than the average college graduate. But less well known is the impact UMR's entrepreneurs have had on the state. According to a 1994 UMR survey, 368 alumni-founded companies in Missouri generated annual sales of $1,486,596,000. During the nine years

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 21X13

since that survey, many of those businesses have no doubt grown, along with the expanding economy of the 1990s, while others have shut down. But for the sake of estimating their economic impact, let's assume that the number of companies has remained static. Assuming no additional growth in the number of alumni-founded companies and no real growth in annual sales, those same companies would have generated approximately $1,804,570,000 in 2002, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. There's also the impact of jobs those companies create. Those 368 alumni-founded companies employed

13,004 people in 1994. Using an employment multiplier of 1.6, those jobs resulted in an additional 20,806 jobs for Missouri's economy, bringing the full employment impact of UMR's alumnifounded businesses to 33,810 jobs. Missouri is home to roughly onethird of alumni founded businesses. Globally, UMR had founded 1,071 companies in 1994, generating annual sales of approximately $6.64 billion. Adjusted for inflation, those sales would translate into $8.06 billion in 2002 dollars.


“I am convinced that our university is central to the growth of Rolla,” says Jack B. Ridley, Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and co-author of UM-Rolla: a History of MSM-UMR. “The professional population of the community is very closely tied to UMR.” UMR has also had a tremendous impact on the cultural diversity of Rolla. “You can go a little east or west of Rolla and there are still travel communities, but they don’t have that cosmopolitan influence,” Bradbury says. “People who not only are from all other parts of the world, but who have been all over the world, find themselves here at UMR.”

Teaching Professor emeritus of history at UMR and co-author of the UMR history book. “Just think how much different elementary and secondary experiences would be for Phelps County kids. If diversity and challenge makes educational experiences better, the university greatly adds to both. Rolla would be a much different place.” So, standing there on the Hockey Puck, pondering UMR’s meaning in life, I came to the conclusion that we’re all pretty lucky to have such a valuable resource. To paraphrase the angel Clarence in “It’s a Wonderful Life,” MSM-UMR touches so many others, when it’s not there it leaves an awfully big hole.

“The cosmopolitan atmosphere would be absent,” echoes Lawrence O. Christensen, Distinguished

Photos by Bob Phelan/Photomasters

UMR students

UMR graduates

UMR alumnus Brian Ash and family in front of his Columbia, Mo., restaurant r : *-

Alumni im pact in Missouri While UMR has a global reputation and its graduates are in high demand all over the world, more than one of every three UMR graduates — 16,055 of UMR's 41,748 living alumni — choose to live and work in Missouri. And their economic impact on the state's economy? Based on U.S. Census Bureau data, college graduates earn an average of $12,000 more annually than high school graduates. Therefore, these UMR graduates earn at least an

estimated $192,660,000 more than an equal population of non-college graduates. Of course, this is a very conservative estimate. UMR's engineering and science graduates earn considerably more than the average college graduate. While the Census Bureau reports that the average college graduate (bachelor's degree) earns $52,200 annually, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that engineers

and scientists earn considerably more — from an average of $54,496 a year for mechanical engineers to $76,440 a year for petroleum engineers Using the low figure of $54,496, we may assume that UMR graduates living in Missouri earn approximately $229,522,280 more than an equal population of high school graduates. Surely, a UMR education pays dividends to all of Missouri.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003


A

A public-private partnership

Off to a

great start

As with most other public universities, UMR's future success w ill depend on the strong partnership between private donors and the state. And UMR alumni are doing their part to ensure the strength of private giving to their alma mater. In the 1990s, UMR alumni answered the call of the Circle Campaign, the campus' first-ever comprehensive private fund-raising campaign. Alumni and friends contributed more than enough to ensure UMR met its $60 million goal. In fact, the Full Circle Campaign completed its goal a year ahead of schedule, and with a total of $68 million in private support. Those gifts have resulted in new endowed scholarships, faculty support, endowed chairs and professorships and needed construction, such as the expansions to Emerson Hall and the Butler-Carlton Civil Engineering Building. Even after the campaign ended, private giving to UMR has continued. Most recently, a $5 million gift from Gary W. Havener, Math '62, a Mexico, Mo., native who has become one of UMR's most successful entrepreneurs, w ill help fund a new student center on campus. The Havener Center, due to be completed by the fall of 2004, will become a centerpiece for the campus, set directly across from two new residential buildings — a residential college and residence hall — on UMR's northwest corner. (UMR broke ground on the residential college in April; see page 17 for details.) While Havener's generous gift was vital to creating this new student center, other private donations — from various alumni and the UMR Parents' Association — w ill also help to make the structure UMR's "center of attention." UMR students also are an important part of the public-private partnership. In the case of the Havener Center, students voted to increase their own fees to help pay for construction. Their willingness to bear part of the cost for such projects allows more flexibility for the state, which traditionally has provided support for capital improvement projects. Contributions from alumni and friends, coupled with support from students and state funds, w ill help to ensure that UMR remains a leader in higher education in the 21st century.

AVERAGE STARTING SALARIES OF UMR GRADUATES An engineering or science degree from UMR means a promising economic future. Below are the average starting salaries for December 2002 graduates. Occupation

UMR starting salary

Petroleum engineers Chemical engineers Aerospace engineers Computer scientists Metallurgical engineers Civil engineers Mechanical engineers

$51,533 $51,392 $48,642 $49,083 $49,120 $42,769 $47,972

Source: UMR Career Opportunities Center report, December 2002

AN EMPLOYMENT SOURCE FOR MAJOR MISSOURI INDUSTRIES In today's knowledge-based economy, well-trained and well-educated workers are essential. Of the top 10 employers of UMR graduates, four are Missouri businesses and agencies: • General Motors • Anheuser-Busch • Black & Veatch • Missouri Department of Transportation

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS Summer 2003

^


CONTROLLING ....... our aestin y As the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education pointed out in its recent report, “College Affordability in Jeopardy,” state budget crises across the nation have hit public colleges and universities especially hard. The report cites Missouri

"We should focus on the things we can control instead o f worrying about those things we can't control, if we do then we will be fine." — Cary Thomas UMR Chancellor

schools as being among the hardest hit. According to the report, educational fees at Missouri’s public colleges and

universities increased by an average of 20 percent last year. Only Massachusetts, with a 24 percent jump, had a higher percentage increase. (The University of Missouri was able to hold the educational fee increase to only 8.4 percent, but also added a $9 per credit hour surcharge last year that has since become permanent.) But this gloomy news isn’t keeping UMR from moving forward with its plans to grow as a research institution and the state’s primary technological university. “We should focus on the things we can control instead of worrying about those things we can’t control,” says UMR Chancellor Gary Thomas. “If we do that, then we will be fine.” UMR has indeed seized control of its destiny in recent years. And the future looks bright for UMR, despite the state’s fiscal challenges. Even while UMR has experienced a decline in state funding, enrollment and research funding have increased significantly. Over the past 2 1/2 years: • UMR’s enrollment has increased by 14 percent — seven

terms in a row of increased enrollment. Enrollment last fall was 5,304 — just over the 5,300 target set two years earlier — and next fall enrollment is projected to be 5,500. This puts UMR on target for attaining the enrollment goal of 6,100 by 2006. • Retention of students has risen by approximately 5 percent for each of the last three entering classes (in 2000, 2001 and 2002). • Research and development activity has increased significantly — from $25,968,000 in R&D expenditures in fiscal year 2000 to $28,799,000 in FY2001 and $32,221,000 (preliminary data) in FY2002. The increase in research volume and indirect cost collection, both federal and total, are at an all-time high. UMR is on target to reach its goal of $64.8 million in R&D expenditures by 2006. Even with all of this good news, state funding still accounts for more than 40 percent of UMR’s overall budget. Continuing this public-private partnership with the state of Missouri will be critical to the future success of UMR, and the state’s well being.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

15


Campus N ew s photo courtesy of Anheuser-Busch

Pictured left to right: Mike Meyer, ME'75, senior director, brewing engineering & technology; Cihan Dagli, chair of engineering management; Ashok Midha, chair of mechanical & aerospace engineering & engineering mechanics; Robert Mitchell, dean of School of Engineering; Kurt Kosbar, associate professor, electrical and computer engineering; Doug Muhleman, group vice president, brewing operations & technology; Gary Thomas, chancellor; Phil Colombatto, CE'71, VP - corporate quality assurance; Greg Harris, senior development officer; Mary Bird, corporate and foundation relations officer; Doug Ludlow, chair of chemical & biological engineering; Jim Lambert, MEW , director o f engineering; Connie Eggert, vice chancellor of university advancement.

Anheuser-Busch establishes scholarship The endowment will provide scholarships for UMR The next time you twist off the cap of your favorite students majoring in mechanical, electrical, chemical, Anheuser-Busch product, say a toast to UMR’s new civil or computer engineering, or engineering partnership with the world’s largest brewery. In management. February, Anheuser-Busch Inc., “With more than 300 UMR employer to more than 300 alumni, The endowment w ill provide graduates now employed by announced the creation of a new scholarships for UMR students Anheuser-Busch, UMR and scholarship program for UMR Anheuser-Busch have enjoyed a majoring in mechanical, engineering students. long and fruitful partnership,” says The company established the electrical, chemical, civil or UMR Chancellor Gary Thomas. Anheuser-Busch Endowed computer engineering, or “We’re pleased to celebrate a new Scholarship Fund. This $250,000 dimension to this partnership. endowment is “in recognition of engineering management. We’re very thankful to Anheuserthe contribution made by the Busch for this investment in UMR, University of Missouri-Rolla in in the future of Anheuser-Busch, and in the future of developing excellent engineers to supply the needs of engineering education.” our society and our industry,” says Jeff Steinhart, Anheuser-Busch employees also may contribute to EMgt’79, vice president of engineering at Anheuserthis scholarship fund through a matching gifts program Busch. “It is our desire that this fund provide additional established by the company and UMR. support to help the university continue in this fine educational tradition.”

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003


Campus N ew s

New CEO helps researchers get entrepreneurial There’s a new CEO on campus. No, Chancellor Gary Thomas hasn’t retired. The CEO in this case is the UMR Center for Entrepreneurship and Outreach. Established in January to assist faculty members with technology transfer, the center is affiliated with the UMR School of Management and Information Systems. Its purpose: to get research ideas out of the labs and into the marketplace. “This connection to the UMR faculty helps me tie my work back with the students and the curriculum,” says Amy Light Mills, the CEO’s executive director. “We’re trying to incorporate this business atmosphere and entrepreneurial spirit into the curriculum of the school.” But the CEO’s services are not limited to the SM&IS faculty. Mills envisions the center as a catalyst for moving all kinds of ideas and inventions from laboratory to market. “A lot of our faculty members do incredible research and create new products and ideas, Bob Phelan/Photomasters Or improvements Im f to existing jM k products, and they often just go back yjr WKm ^ S |r Li W

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the researcher goes on to the next project,” Mills saYs- “It would be

out into the industry and Amy Light Mills of the Center for Entrepreneurship commercialize and Outreach with Paul Nam; in foreground: them, whether that S. Kapila, professor of chemistry with UMR means the military student Kristen Williams. or finding someone to manufacture them or just licensing the technology to someone else.” The CEO staff will not only help professors identify markets for existing products, but also assist them in tailoring the products to suit the market at the beginning of the project. “We can help them with the creative process of their research projects to keep the market in mind so their products are tailored to an application, rather than just an academic study,” Mills says. “If we can get the faculty members to be successful business people, as well as academics, that will not only improve the university’s standing in the academic world, but also the business world.”

Groundbreaking for Residential College

Left to right: Elson Floyd, president of the UM System; Nathan Mundis, co-chair of the Residence Hall Association; Mark Ebel, Student Council president; John Mathes '67, curator emeritus, UM System; Debra Robinson, vice chancellor for student affairs; Kathryn Sandefur, co-chair of the Residence Hall Association; and Gary Thomas, chancellor of UMR.

High-flying research Grad student's paper is AlAA's best UMR graduate student Katie Grantham’s research on a guidance system for the next generation of space shuttles has put her in the rarefied air of award-winning scholars. Grantham, AE’02, wrote a paper on the topic that won first place in the graduate student competition at the 2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) National Student Conference. The conference was held Jan. 7 in Reno, Nev. Grantham is a graduate student in aerospace engineering.

A GEM of a student group For the first time in its history, the UMR student chapter of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) received SME’s Outstanding Student Chapter of the Year award while also winning the organization’s GEM (Government, Education, Mining) Award. In February the group was honored during SME’s national meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio. The UMR chapter was cited for its outreaches to elementary schools in Rolla and neighboring communities. At the schools, SME members explained the importance of mining engineering and environmental issues associated with mining.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

17


Campus N ew s

Digging in over spring break While some of their fellow students sunbathed on the beaches of Cancun over spring break, a small group of UMR students headed farther south to Guatemala. They weren't there to soak up the sun, however. Instead, they spent the break installing a water system for a tiny village. The 10 students also earned college credit for the work. They were enrolled in a special geological engineering course, "International Groundwater Studies," offered this semester by Curt Elmore, GeoE'86, an assistant professor of geological engineering at UMR. The students, Elmore, and Elmore's wife (Cecilia Elmore, EMgt'86, coordinator, student recruitment. School of Mines and Metallurgy) and father-in-law (Ernie Gutierrez, Engl'77, former UMR photographer and publications director) traveled to Lemoa, in the highlands of Guatemala, to expand on an undergraduate research project taken on last spring. That's when Erin Sommers, a senior geological engineering major at UMR, and the Elmores oversaw the drilling of a $40,000 water well for an orphanage in Lemoa. The project was supported by UMR's Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) program and through a grant from Samaritan Hands, a mission organization affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Over spring break, Sommers and the other students enrolled in Curt Elmore's course expanded this water system to provide clean water to a nearby elementary school and neighboring residents of the village. Like many of the small villages in Guatemala's highlands, Lemoa has no community­ wide water system. "M ost places have electricity, but in the small villages a sustainable source of water is a problem," Elmore says. During the rainy season, villagers must purchase purified water for drinking and rely on small, hand-dug wells or cisterns to catch rainwater for washing, he adds.

UMR students visited Lemoa, Guatamala, over spring break to construct a water system.

If you have any questions or comments about campus news articles, contact Public Relations at news@umr.edu or call 573-341-4328. 18

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003


V.S. Holm: the sculptor of the Parker Hall statue By Elizabeth Cummins (cummins@umr.edu)

For more than 90 years, the bronze seated figure of Luman Franklin Parker has greeted people entering the front door of Parker Hall. photo by Terrill Story Sitting at the first stair landing, head inclined slightly, Parker appears to be inquiring about your business in the building. In his left hand, he holds a book into which he has inserted a finger, as if to hold his place because you’ve interrupted his reading. His shoe leather is wrinkled, but his formal coat and waistcoat signal a man of some affluence — a man accustomed to success, to observing both his clients and his employers, and accustomed to conversations about business matters in which he sometimes listened and sometimes spoke. Today, you would not find it difficult to locate information about who Parker was and why he sits in such a prominent place; early campus leaders and contemporary historians have made sure that the work of this early benefactor is remembered. But have you ever wondered who made this sculpture? The answer to that question began at the base of the sculpture itself. On the left side is incised the name “V.S. Holm” and the date “ 1912.” V.S. Holm was Victor S. Holm, a sculptor from St. Louis. He was born in Copenhagen in 1876 and brought to Chicago by his father. In Chicago, he and his brother both studied art. When he arrived in St. Louis in 1909 to take up a position in the art department at Washington University, he was warned that St. Louis was an “artistic desert.” By the time he died in 1935 and his obituary appeared in The New York Times, he had seen St. Louis become home to many sculpture pieces, due partly to his own efforts. He was a member of the National Sculpture Society, and a list of his works reveals that Holm was best known as a memorialist, an artist who did portrait monuments, busts, and bas reliefs that honor others for their good works. One of his most prominent works is the Missouri monument at the Vicksburg National Cemetery.

Holm had two bronzes in the 1915 World’s Fair in San Francisco, one of which is now in the St. Louis Art Museum. His life-size memorial sculptures are in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas and Louisiana. For the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, he designed a gold medal for the Spirit of St. Louis award. A number of his pieces are in St. Louis — reliefs and sculptures for churches, federal and state buildings, fountains in Forest Park, memorials in cemeteries and several pieces for the Masonic Temple. Holm’s long obituary in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch lists the Luman Parker statue as one of three “principal works” located outside of St. Louis. It may well have been the first large bronze that Holm did. The Sept. 14, 1911, issue of the Rolla Daily Herald reveals that the Parker family, upon learning that the new administration building would be named after their father, planned to commission a sculpture piece. Parker (1847-1907) was a Rolla lawyer who became general solicitor for the St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad and lived much of his life in St. Louis. But he maintained a strong loyalty to Rolla and to MSM, using his influence with legislators when support was needed and working with local businessmen to be sure that the school acquired property as it grew. Next time you are on campus, be sure you visit Parker Hall and look carefully at the statue or visit the Parker statue and other pieces of the UMR Art Collection by means of the online “Walking Art Tour” (www.visit.umr.edu). If you have a favorite story or photograph of the Parker statue, the Campus Art Committee would like to hear from you. Contact Elizabeth Cummins (cummins@umr.edu), professor emeritus of English. If you have inquiries concerning the campus art collection, contact Jim Bogan (jbogan@umr.edu), Distinguished Teaching Professor of art. Elizabeth Cummins is a member o f the Campus Art Committee.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

19


r W_ Research News

Solving the ffew-body' problem Physicists visualize the sub-atomic world in 3D Imagine you and a friend put on roller skates for a game of catch with a basketball. When you pass the ball to your friend, the force of your throw causes you to roll backward. As your friend catches the ball, she also rolls backward because of the force of the ball acting on her. -a = or

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UMR Physics Professor Michael Schulz and fellow researchers have published the first-ever three-dimensional images of atomic collision processes.

Now, apply this scenario to the world of atomic physics. You and your friend are electrons, and your basketball is now a photon, the particle which constitutes light. As you toss the photon to your friend, the Coulomb force causes specific reactions that physicists can measure. That’s because the Coulomb force is contained within this neat little game of “catch” between the two electrons. Now, imagine you, your friend and eight of your buddies all strap on roller skates for a game of fullcourt skate-basketball. The ball (photon) gets tossed back and forth among various combinations of players (electrons). While one player passes the ball to another, the rest of the players are in motion - setting screens, giving head fakes, positioning themselves for rebounds, and so on. Even though they don’t have the ball, they are still moving in reaction to the players passing and receiving the ball.

20

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

This is one way of conceptualizing what experimentalists such as Michael Schulz, a UMR professor of physics, call the “few-body problem.” Because of this problem, scientists can’t accurately measure how more than one pair of electrons interact with one another. Earlier this year, however, UMR physicists, working with colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, published work that may help solve the few-body problem. The researchers published the first-ever three-dimensional images of atomic collision processes in the March 6 issue of the British journal Nature. The paper, “Three-dimensional imaging of atomic four-body processes,” has enormous implications to theoretical physics, the authors say, because it offers scientists a new look at how ions react when they collide with atoms. “In order to understand nature, we must build on our knowledge of the forces acting in nature,” says Schultz. The four fundamental forces are called strong, electromagnetic, weak and gravitational. “All other forces are merely different manifestations of these four,” Schulz explains. “An important property shared by all of these forces is that they always act between pairs of only two particles at a time,” Schulz says. “As a second step, one has to investigate how systems containing more than two particles develop in space and time under the influence of these pairwise-acting forces ” This second step is known as the few-body problem. “Because most relevant systems in nature contain more than two particles,” Schulz says, “one has to understand the forces acting between pairs of particles and the few-body problem simultaneously.” But, to go back to our basketball team analogy, “Players are always moving around, throwing the ball in all directions, so at any given instance there is a force between two players as they throw the ball,” Schulz says. “But the other players, sooner or later, will also be involved. Although the force acts only in pairs, various pairs in the system are linked to each other and because of this linkage, the problem of treating more than two particles is actually analytically unsolvable.” For more on this story, visit research.umr.edu.


Research News

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Researcher tests space shuttle foam UMR researcher Reza Zoughi’s expertise in the field of microwave nondestructive testing is of great interest to NASA, which recently asked Zoughi to inspect samples of foam used to insulate NASA’s space shuttles. This is the first time NASA has used this particular method, known as near-field microwave nondestructive evaluation (NDE), to test shuttle materials. If successful, the effort could result in a new, more thorough approach to testing foam insulation and other composite materials used on space shuttles prior to launching. Zoughi, the Schlumberger Professor of electrical and computer engineering at UMR, is director of UMR’s Applied Microwave Nondestructive Testing Laboratory, one of the few facilities in the nation to conduct microwave NDE.

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Close-up of shuttle foam with damage. Inset, external tank of space shuttle.

Calculus research keeping fast company photos by Bob Phelan/Photomasters

What does calculus have to do with a bug’s life? Quite a bit, as researchers of insect populations are discovering since last year's publication of a research paper by M artin Bohner, an assistant professor of mathematics and statistics at UMR. The paper about dynamic equations and time scales has captured the attention of mathematicians worldwide for its numerous applications. One of those applications involves the study of insect populations. In January 2002, Bohner presented his paper, "Asymptotic Behavior of Dynamic Equations on Time Scales," at the American Mathematical Society's annual meeting in San Diego. The paper, co-authored with Donald Lutz of San Diego State University, has since been cited as "Fast Breaking" by ISI Essential Science Indicators. This designation means the work represents scientific contributions that are just beginning to attract the attention of the scientific community. "This paper is part of a fairly new and exciting effort to unify continuous and discrete calculus," says Bohner. "Dynamic

Assistant Professor Martin Bohner's research paper on dynamic equations and time scales has been applied to the study of insect populations.

equations on time scales have been introduced in order to unify the theories of differential equations." The study of time scales has been applied to the study of insect population models. "Time scales calculus has a tremendous potential for applications," Bohner says. "It can model insect populations that are continuous while in season, die out in winter — while their eggs are incubating or dormant — and then hatch in a new season, giving rise to a non­ overlapping population." Further applications of time scales include neural networks, heat transfer and epidemic models.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS/Summer2003

21


Faculty & Staff Notes

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Wiebe picked to lead global effort Physician-turned-chemist Nuran Ercal is UMR's Woman of the Year Nuran Ercal, an associate professor of chemistry at UMR whose background in medicine makes her an ideal advisor for pre-med students, was named 2003 Woman of the Year at UMR in April. The award is sponsored by UMR’s Division of Student Affairs to recognize an outstanding female faculty member who has helped improve the campus climate and has served as a role model for other faculty and students through her research, scholarship and service. Known for her research in the field of oxidative stress, Ercal also is getting a reputation on campus as a role model for female undergraduate and graduate students. Her medical background - she holds a medical degree from her native Turkey - gives her great insight for UMR’s many pre-medical students in chemistry, says Ekk Sinn, chair of chemistry at UMR, who nominated her for the award. “She inspires great loyalty in all her students,” Sinn says. “Her best quality as a female faculty member is to motivate young minds.” This was the seventh year for the award, which carries a $2,000 stipend funded by UMR graduate Cynthia Tang, Econ’85, the founder of Insight Industries Inc. of Platteville, Wis., and a past president of the UMR Board of Trustees.

Richard Bullock honored At the annual Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) national meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio, Richard L. Bullock, MinE’51, MS MinE’55, DE MinE’75, was named SME Distinguished Member. Bullock is the Robert H. Quenon Chair of mining engineering at UMR.

Henry Wiebe, a member of the UMR engineering management faculty since 1969, is now vice provost for UMR Global, a new initiative to expand UMR’s distance education, continuing education and international affairs programs. (The Alumnus will feature the UMR global initiative in the summer 2004 issue.) Wiebe chaired the Engineering Management Department from July 1999 until his Feb. 1 appointment, and also served as interim vice provost of the global initiative prior to Feb. 1.

Corps of Engineers vet joins campus as Fort Leonard Wood liaison Stephen H. Tupper, a 26-year veteran of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, joined UMR on March 24 as the campus’s liaison officer to Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Tupper is based at the University of Missouri Technology Park at Fort Leonard Wood, located about 30 miles west of UMR. His duties include helping the campus secure more militarysponsored research funding and increasing distance-learning opportunities with the military.

1990 grad named CIO Randy Tucker, CE’90, former vice president of operations at Williams Communications Group in Tulsa, Okla., returned to his alma mater in April as the campus’ chief information officer. Tucker joined UMR on April 21 to oversee computing and telecom­ munications services on campus. “Mr. Tucker brings with him vast knowledge and experience of technology and the entrepreneurial culture of industry,” says UMR Provost Y.T. Shah. Previously, Tucker served as vice president of operations for the emerging markets business unit of VYVX, the news and entertainment arm of Williams Communications Group in Tulsa, Okla. Photos by Bob Phelan/Photomasters

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003


Miner Sports

Two take All-America track honors photo courtesy of UMR Public Relations

Skola vaults to second place in NCAAs Junior J.R. Skola narrowly missed winning a national championship in the pole vault in March, but ended up setting a school record in the process. Skola finished second in the pole vault competition at the NCAA Division II Championships March 14 in Boston. He cleared a schoolrecord height of 16-4 3/4 on his first attempt, but was unable to go over at 16-8 3/4 in any of his three tries. Skola's second-place finish is still the best ever for a UMR track and field student-athlete. J.R. Skola with his second-place award.

Swimmers earn top academic honors Although the overall results didn't match up to the accomplishments of UMR swimming teams in recent years, the Miners still had six swimmers earn All-America status during the NCAA Division II Championships in March. And while the team finished 13th in the pool this season, it was the top academic team in Division II, earning the top academic team honor from the College Swimming Coaches Association of America for the 2002 fall semester. In the championships: • Phil Heller finished fifth in the 200-yard individual medley with a time of 1:53.00 and seventh in the 200-yard breaststroke in 2:08.94. He was also part of three relay teams that made the consolation finals. • Jack Pennuto made honorable mention All-America in four individual events. His highest finish was a ninth-place effort in the 200-yard backstroke in a school-record time of 1:51.79. Pennuto also established a new school record during the preliminaries of the 200-butterfly, posting a time of 1:51.80. • All five Miner relay teams earned honorable mention AllAmerica status as well. The teams consisted of Heller, Pennuto, Paul Adams, Andy Lozier, Sean O'Donnell and Tanner Woodman. As a team, the Miners finished in 13th place with a total of 97 points. Drury University won the meet with a total of 612 points. On the academic side, the Miners posted a cumulative grade point average of 3.36 during the fall semester. That GPA made them the top team in Division II for the eighth time since 1991. UMR was one of eight men's teams to receive the honor for the past semester of work and the only one of the eight to have a team grade point average of better than 3.0.

UMR’s Kate Hamera takes the lead in the 1,500-meter run at the NCAA Division II Championships.

Even after shattering the school record in the 1,500-meter run, Kate Hamera was still in motion. "I'm so happy right now that I can't stop moving," the UMR junior said minutes after picking up one of UMR's two All-America honors at the 2003 NCAA Division II Championships, held in late May at Edwardsville, III. Hamera s time of 4:35.67 in the 1,500meters was the best finish for a Lady Miner competitor at a national track meet. She finished third in the nation, earning All-America honors. "Finishing third was a lot better than I had hoped for," said Hamera, a junior from Easton, Mo. Also winning All-America honors at the event was another junior, J.R. Skola of Camdenton, Mo., who finished sixth. UMR sent a third athlete, sophomore Jamie Webb, to the track and field nationals, but she missed qualifying in the 200-meters.

Twice is nice for softball's Christy Deken It was a nearly perfect spring for UMR softball pitcher Christy Deken, who tossed two no-hitters during the season and came oh-so-close to pitching a perfect game. The first no-hitter came March 18 against Lincoln University, as Deken retired 15 of the 16 batters she faced in five innings. The only thing spoiling her perfect game was a walk in the fourth inning. Deken threw her second no-hitter on April 21, in the second game of a Lady Miners sweep of Lincoln University. UMR pitcher Christy Deken Deken also had one of the best outings in Division II this season during the Lady Miners' trip to Florida in mid-March. In a March 10 game against third-ranked Angelo State, Deken allowed a hit to the first batter she faced. She then proceeded to mow down the Rambelles over the next eight innings, allowing no hits and striking out 16 batters in the process. Deken helped her own cause at the plate, driving in both runs for the Lady Miners in the eighth inning of that 2-0 victory. Another early highlight for the UMR softball team in the spring was the pitching of Renee Roberts, who won six of her first 11 decisions.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

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The Bachelor & Elvis' to headline Friday Aaron Buerge, ME '97, starred in the leading role of ABC's "The Bachelor" in its second season. The television show offers one bachelor the opportunity to meet and date 25 women. Buerge will share his experiences on this reality based television show from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, in the Missouri Room of University Center-East. The annual Silver and Gold Cocktail Buffet kicks off at 6:30 p.m. with a buffet dinner (yes, there will be roast pig!) and a few card games to warm up alumni and their guests for the TCB band and Elvis impersonator Steve Davis. "Steve's amazing bass - baritone voice recreates the songs of Elvis Presley better than anyone we have ever seen. From the moving ballads like "Love Me Tender" to the rousing "Jailhouse Rock," he electrifies the theater with his genuine stage charisma," according to the courtesy Rivertown Sound Quartet. Tickets for | the Silver and Gold Cocktail t Buffet are $22.50 H and include the W TCB Band and Elvis performances. H f2 |


JTlond&if, Oct. 6 — £ic7ic£czy, Oct.

fUEOTS FOR R ll RLUIHDI Friday, October 10

Saturday, October 11

8 a.m.-7 p.m.

8-10:30 a m.

HOMECOMING REGISTRATION Miner Lounge, UC-E - All alumni who return to Rolla should register in the Miner Lounge. Free 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. UMR Archives "Memories" Display Miner Lounge, UC-E. Free 1-2 p.m. COURSES WITHOUT QUIZZES Taking a gamble on glass Delbert Day, a curators' professor emeritus of ceramic engineering, will talk about the myriad uses of glass in the human body, including the treatment of liver cancer, Missouri Room, UC-E. Free 2-3 p.m. COURSES WITHOUT QUIZZES - In the heat of it William Fahrenholtz, assistant professor of ceramic engineering, talks about efforts to develop ultra-high temperature ceramic tiles - tiles that could be used on future space shuttles. Meramac Room, UC-E. Free 3-4 p.m. COURSES WITHOUT QUIZZES Facing national security issues Face recognition technology allows for increased security at UMR's Nuclear Reactor. Akira Tokuhiro, assistant professor of nuclear engineering, talks about the face recognition system and the technology behind it, Missouri Room, UC-E. Free 3-4:30 p.m. Iron pouring demonstration Foundry in Room 244 McNutt Hall. Free 5:30-6:30 p.m. SPECIAL GUEST STARThe Bachelor Aaron Buerge, a 1997 mechanical engineering graduate from UMR, starred in the leading role in ABC's "The Bachelor." He shares his experiences of choosing a bride on national television. Missouri Room, UC-E. Free 6:30-11 p m SILVER & GOLD COCKTAIL BUFFET & "ELVIS - LIVE AT UMR!" SHOW Centennial Hall, UC-E Show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets required. Admission price includes the buffet and show. See ticket registration form for cost info. 8 11 p.m "ELVIS - LIVE AT UMR!" ELVIS PRESLEY IMPERSONATOR SHOW featuring Steve Davis and the TCB Band The TCB band opens the first half of the show; and in the second half, Steve Davis takes the floor as Elvis for an unforgettable evening of entertainment. Don't miss this event! Centennial Hall, UC-E. Tickets required. Admission to the Elvis show is included with the Silver & Gold Cocktail Buffet ticket price. See ticket registration form for cost info. 7-11:30 p.m. Epsilon Psi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Black & Gold "Miss Epsilon Psi" Ball and Step Show, location and cost TBA, contact Dwan Prude at prude@umr.edu or (573) 341-4164 for reservations

HOMECOMING REGISTRATION continues in Miner Lounge, UC-E. Free 8-10:30 a m. UMR Archives "Memories" Display Miner Lounge,UC-E. Free 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Piece and Plenty Quilt Show, Miner Rec Bldg, $4 admission at the door 9-10 a.m. COURSES WITHOUT QUIZZES - And, it's a winner! Christian End, assistant professor of psychology and business and management systems, answers the question, "Are sports fans really that predictable?" Stop in for a fascinating and light-hearted look at sports fans and their behaviors. Mark Twain Room, UC-E. Free 10-11 a.m. COURSES WITHOUT QUIZZES Secure connections Ann Miller, Tang professor of electrical and computer engineering, presents the latest in research on network security, Meramac Room, UC-E. Free 10:30-11:30 a.m. Chancellor's Reception at the Chancellor's Residence, 506 W. 11th St. Hosted by Chancellor Gary Thomas and his wife, Dr. Barbara Tedesco 11 a.m.-1 p.m. UMR Athletic Hall of Fame open to visitors, lower level, Gale Bullman Multi-Purpose Building. Free 11 a m 1 p.m ALL-ALUMNI REUNION LUNCHEON for all alumni, family and friends, Centennial Hall, UC-E. Features reserved seating for the reunion classes of 1952 and before, 1953,1958,1963,1968, 1973,1978,1983,1988,1993,1998 and 2003. See ticket reservation form for cost info. CLASS PICTURES WILL BE TAKENAT 11:30 A.M.! I p.m. Football Kickoff MINERS VS SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Allgood-Bailey Stadium. See ticket reservation form for cost info. 5 p.m. Mass at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, followed by a Wine and Cheese Social at the Newman Center 6:15 p.m. CASH BAR RECEPTION, Carver-TurnerRoom, first floor, UC-E 7-9 p.m. AWARDS BANQUET, Dining Hall, first floor, UC-E, followed by the MSM-UMR Alumni Association Annual Meeting. See ticket reservation form for cost info.

Sunday, October 13 I I a m -4 p.m.

Piece and Plenty Quilt Show Miner Rec Bldg, $4 admission at the door

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS Summer 2003

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Friday, Oct. 10 2:30-4 p.m.

Electrical & Computer Engineering Alumni Reception Emerson Electric Company Hall First Floor Lobby 2:30-5 p.m. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering & Engineering Mechanics Alumni Reception Home of department Chair Ashok Midha, 808 Lariat Lane 3-5 p.m. Chemical Engineering Alumni Reception 145 Schrenk Hall 3-3:30 p.m. Chemistry Alumni Social Webb Reading Room, 121 Schrenk Hall 3-4:30 p.m. Engineering Management Alumni Reception Engineering Management Building Foyer 3:30-4:30 p.m. Chemistry Department Seminar Room G-3 Schrenk Hall 3:30-4:30 p.m. Computer Science Colloquium Room 327 Computer Science Bldg., followed by reception 3:40 p.m. Physics Department Coffee & Donuts Reception 4-5 p.m. Physics Seminar, 104 Physics 4-5:30 p.m. 15th Annual Civil Engineering Alumni Reception, Kummer Atrium, Butler-Carlton Hall - Sponsored by the Academy of Civil Engineers and hosted by the officers of the student chapters of ACI, AGC, ASCE, Chi Epsilon, EERI, IDC, ITE, WEF, and the Alumni Committee of the Civil Engineering Advisory Council) 4-6 p.m. Seventh Annual Keramos Ceramic Engineering Alumni Homecoming Barbecue, McNutt Hall Quadrangle Area (McNutt Hull Commons if bad weather) 4:30-6:30 p.m. Computer Science Drop-in Reception and tours Room 327 Computer Science Building 7 p.m. Chemistry Dinner, Location to be announced 8 p.m. Physics Alumni Reception Home of Ed & Barbara Hale, 821 Oak Knoll Road

BOARD, ACADEMY AND ORGANIZATION MEETINGS These meetings are for alumni and others who are members of these groups.

Thursday, Oct. 9 UMR Board of Trustees (luncheon, meetings and dinner), Silver & Gold Room, UC-E Academy of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers Induction Reception and Dinner

Noon 6 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 10 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 8:30 a.m.- noon 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 9:30-11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

11:30 a.m. 1-2:30 p.m. 2:30-4 p.m.

4-5:15 p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 11 9 -11 a m.

5-5:45 p.m.

Teacher Education Alumni & Friends Brunch Call Evalee Lasater at (573) 341-4692 for reservations Silver & Gold Room, UC-E College of Arts & Sciences Alumni Reception Carver-Turner Room, UC-E

STUDENT-SPONSORED EVENTS AT HOMECOMING • Games, 12:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday, Hockey Puck • Homecoming BBQ, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6, Hockey Puck • Homecoming Banners on display starting at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, in the UC-E game room • Homecoming Lip Sync Contest, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, Centennial Hall, UC-E, open to participating organizations and campus audience, contact sub@umr.edu, (573) 341-4220 • Alumni/Student Golf Tournament, UMR Golf Course, 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10 • House Decorations on display around campus, 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10 • "Cruise-In," 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Gale Bullman Multi-Purpose Building Parking Lot • Royalty Introductions, 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Allgood-Bailey Stadium, Homecoming King and Queen crowned at halftime of the football game!

Alumni Athletic Events: 1-4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10 - Alumni/Student Golf Tournament (Call Student Union Board, (573) 341-4220 or email sub@umr.edu to sign up.) 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11 - Alumni Baseball Game contact Travis Boulware at (573) 341-4191 or email boulware@umr.edu

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

Corporate Development Council UMR Board of Trustees continue Silver & Gold Room, UC-E Academy of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineers Carver-Turner Room, UC-E Academy of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineers Spouse Program School of Mines and Metallurgy Alumni Academy, 124 McNutt Hall Luncheon for Volunteer Leaders, Centennial Hall, UC-E (Board of Trustees, Alumni Board, Corporate Development Council, academies and other boards). Tickets required Psychology Advisory Board OGS Executive Committee Castleman Hall, 2nd floor Conference Room Section Leaders Session for section officers Presenter: Stephanie Martensen, alumni & constituent relations. Mark Twain Room, UC-E Alumni Assisting with Admissions All Admissions Ambassadors and alumni who would like to help UMR with recruiting efforts are invited. Presenters: Lynn Stichnote and Sarah Salmons, UMR admissions. Mark Twain Room, UC-E

Saturday, Oct. 11 8-11 a.m.

Alumni Association Board of Directors Missouri Room, UC-E Chemistry Brunch, Location TBA Miner Music Section,138 Castleman Hall (Choir Room) Kappa Sigma Beta Chi Chapter's 100th Anniversary Hall of Fame Banquet, Gym, Gale Bullman Multi-Purpose Building Sigma Nu s 100th Anniversary Banquet, Centennial Hall, UC-E

10 a.m.-noon 4-5 p.m. 6 p.m.

6 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 13 1 p.m.

UMR Advisory Committee for African-American Recruitment and Retention, Missouri Room, UC-E

All alumni invited to awards banquet Come out and support your outstanding fellow alumni during the Awards Banquet Saturday night. The evening begins with a cash bar reception at 6:15 p.m. in the Carver-Turner Room downstairs in UC-E and continues with dinner and the awards banquet from 7 to 9 p.m. in the -/V dining hall on the first floor. Cost is $26 per person


LIKE TO HAVE A SOUVENIR? Students will be selling T-shirts during Homecoming.

----------------------Class o f '7 8 Gather for a special "pinning" ceremony during the Silver & Gold Cocktail Buffet at 7:45 p.m. on Friday. Alumni should meet at the "Class of 1978" table by 7:30 p.m. Don't forget the All-Alumni Reunion Luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 11, in Centennial Hall, UC-E. We'll be taking class reunion photos!

^ y u i ^ e s w l i i i u u i ij Learn about:

FUN AND

The uses of glass in the human body

1 to 2 p.m. Friday

d.

Ultra high-temperature ceramic tiles

2 to 3 p.m. Friday Face recognition technology

(in use at UMR's reactor) 3 to 4 p.m. Friday Sports fans and their behaviors

9 to 10 a.m. Saturday Network security, 10 to 11 a.m. Saturday

UMR's professors provide a fascinating look into their research efforts into these fields. All the courses will be held on the second floor of University Center-East. Metallurgical experts will lead an iron pouring demonstration from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in Room 244 of McNutt Hall. ni . .

Classes are free and no registration is required!

HOMECOMING 2003 TICKETS Oct. 10 and 11, 2003 _____ Silver & Gold Buffet AND Elvis Impersonator Show Includes buffet, show and one free drink. Cash bar. 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Centennial Hall, UC-E $22.50 per person _____ All-alumni Reunion Luncheon with CLASS PHOTOS 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Centennial Hall, UC-E REUNION CLASS PHOTOS WILL BE TAKEN AT 11:30 A.M. DURING THIS EVENT! Features reserved seating for the reunion classes of 1952 and before, 1953, 1958, 1963, 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998 and 2003 $8 per person; $4 for ages 7 to 12; under age 7, free _____ Football game: Miners vs. Southwest Baptist 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Allgood-Bailey Stadium $5 per person; Free for under age 7 and Golden Alumni (those who graduated 50 or more years ago) _____ Awards Banquet, Saturday, Oct. 11 6:15 p.m. reception in the Carver-Turner Room, first floor, UCE; 7 p.m. dinner; Dining Hall, First Floor, UC-E: $26 per person _____ Tickets for all events: $61.50 per person. Golden alumni (those who graduated 50 or more years ago): $28.25 EARLY BIRD SPECIAL. Send in your reservation by Sept. 15, and receive the same tickets for $60 per person. Save $1.50 per person when you register early, and make your Alumni Association staff extremely happy! TOTAL AMOUNT DUE $_________________________

To order your tickets: By Phone: (573) 341-4145, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday (have your credit card handy) By Fax: (978) 926-7986, 24 hours a day (include credit card information) By Mail: Send in this form - Alumni Office, UMR, Castleman Hall, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, M0 65409-0650

Name______________________________________________ Class year_

. Major at MSM-UMR_

Guest's Name

Kappa Sigma and Sigma Nu to celebrate 100 years of brotherhood Kappa Sigma Hall of Fame Banquet Saturday, Oct. 11 Gym of the Gale Bullman Multi-Purpose Building Five brothers will be inducted into the Beta Chi Chapter's Hall of Fame. Two brothers will be selected as men of the century. For more information contact Rob Hoffmann via email at Rob38h@aol.com or call (314) 966-2340.

Sigma Nu 100th Anniversary Banquet Centennial Hall of University Center-East. For more information contact Nicholas Barrack via email at CSE@wavecomputers.net or call (573) 341-2562.

Class year (if applicable). Address_____________ City/State/ZIP, Home phone_

. Work phone.

G My check is enclosed and made payable to the MSM-UMR Alumni Association. □ I have special dietary needs. Please arrange for my meals to be:

Please charge to my credit card: ___Visa ___Mastercard ___AMEX ___Discover Card Number______________________Expiration date. Name as printed on card. Signature____________ Phone:(573)341-4145 • Fax: (978) 926-7986 • Email: alumni@umr.edu

Special reunion for Student Council

t

If you served on Student Council while you attended MSMUMR, you and your family members are invited to join us at the special "Student Council" table during the All-Alumni Reunion Lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, in Centennial Hall, UC-E.

lPDEf*i N eed a p la c e to stay? Check out www.rollanet.org/busines/motets.html or phone (573) 364-3577. MSM-UMR ALUMNUS/Summer 2003

27


Association News

Alumni Alliance honors John Park

Member Benefits As an alumnus of M SM -UM R, you are automatically a member of the M SM -UM R Alumni Association and are entitled to:

MSM-UMR: Chairs, lamps, watches, rings, pendants, Platinum/Gold MasterCard, license plates for Missouri residents.

Career Assistance: UMR's Career Opportunities Center will help you in your job search!

Services: Online Community, including searchable directory. Access to alumni office via email (alumni@umr.edu). Alumni locator service to help you find lost friends. Address update service so you don't miss your MSM-UMR mail.

John T. Park, chancellor emeritus of UMR, received the University of Missouri Alumni Alliance Award during the annual UM Legislative Day luncheon Feb. 26 in Jefferson City, Mo. Park, who served as UMR's chancellor from 1992 to 2000, received the award in recognition of his years of service to UMR. Park joined the UMR faculty in 1964 as an assistant professor of physics. He was named vice chancellor for academic affairs in 1983 and became chancellor in 1992, a post he held until he retired eight years later. During his chancellorship, UMR's existing physical facilities were improved, new structures were added, a degree program in computer engineering was begun, and a $60 million capital campaign John Park successfully concluded. Park also championed new student leadership programs and created the UMR Board of Trustees. UMR also won the Missouri Quality Award and, in so doing, became the first public research university in the nation to be honored for making substantial performance improvements.

A lpha P

hi

A

lp h a

c e le b ra tin g 40 ’hi Alpha, mark your calendars now Brothers of Alpha Phi for April 29-May 1, 2005, and plan to come back to /our fraternity's 40th anniversary. Rolla to celebrate your ann

Founders of UMR's Alpha Phi Alpha.

celebrating 25 years CELEBRATION WEEKEND APRIL 16-18, 2004 — in honor of the sorority's 25th anniversary on the UMR campus. All Chi Omegas, mark your calendar now and plan to be there.

To take advantage

For information contact Darlene (Meloy) Ramsay at ramsayd@umr.edu or Janet Wickey-Spence at janetwi@sbcglobal.net.

of these offers, contact the alumni office: MSM-UMR Alumni Association

Castleman Hall University of Missouri-Rolla 1870 Miner Circle Rolla, MO 65409-0650

Phone:(573)341-4145 Fax: (978)926-7986 Email: alumni@umr.edu Web: alumni.umr.edu

MSM-UMR Alumni Association Mission and Goals M IS S IO N The association will proactively strive to create an environment — embodying communication with and participation by MSM-UMR alumni and friends — to foster strong loyalty to UMR and growth of the association. The association will increase its financial strength as well as provide aid and support to deserving students, faculty, and alumni friends.

GOALS • Assist university with recruitment and retention. • Improve communication with and expand the involvement of alumni, especially recent graduates and current students. • Increase financial resources of the association and the university. • Strengthen alumni section activity. • Increase volunteer support to the university and its students. The officers and other members of the association's board of directors provide leadership and actual participation to achieve these goals and fulfill this mission. For their efforts to be a success, they need YOUR active participation as well, in whatever alumni activities you choose.

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MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003


STUDENT RECEPTIONS: NEC - Springfield. III. Prospective students and their families gathered on March 26 in Springfield, III., to learn about UMR. Five area alumni spoke of their personal experiences, and addressed the ways in which UMR continues to assist them in their careers. Thanks to the coordination of Ed Midden, the event was held in the National Electrical Council Building. Those attending included David Tepen '90; Tom Hoppe 70; Thomas Feger 59; Amanda Withers '99, '02; Ed Midden '69; Sarah Salmons of admissions; and Stephanie Martensen o f the alumni office.

Boeing - St. Louis, Mo. Warm temperatures and blue skies set the scene for the St. Louis area student reception on March 23. Many thanks go out to Boeing for hosting the event. Special thanks to John Eash for coordinating and serving as the corporate contact for this event. Those attending included Ralph Wolfram '50; John Eash 79; Carol Smith and Sarah Salmons of admissions; Dee Leuellyn of student financial assistance; and Marianne Ward of the alumni office.

ABB Power - Jefferson City, Mo. Alumni and prospective students met Feb. 25 at ABB Power in Jefferson City, Mo., during an information session hosted by UMR's admissions and student financial aid offices. Jim Grace and Denis Gladbach, both of ABB Power, hosted the event. Those attending included Jim Grace 76; Denis Gladbach '94; Michael Taylor 72; Tom Gredell 78; Charles Shipman 70; Ellis Smith '55; Lynn Stichnote and Tim Cox of admissions; Bob Whites of student financial aid; and Marianne Ward of the alumni office.

Nooter/Erickson - Fenton, Mo. Nooter/Erickson Corp. was the site for the first prospective student reception of 2003, held Feb. 10 in Fenton, Mo. Jim Mueller of Nooter/Erickson hosted the event. Those attending included John Haake '86; Tim Carey '00; Gary Bland 73; Dave Siekmann '98; Brad Jackson '97; Mike Bynter '68; Mike Filla 77; Heather Shiner 88; Ralph Wolfram '50; Jim Mueller 78; Lynn Stichnote and Carol Smith of admissions; Bob Whites of student financial aid; Jay Goff, dean of enrollment management; and Lindsay L Bagnall 76 of the alumni office.

Springfield Utilities - Springfield, Mo. Kern Reed arranged for prospective UMR students to meet with alumni at Springfield Utilities in Springfield, Mo. Alumni congratulated the students for considering UMR and shared their career stories with the students. Those attending included Randall Herion '00; Scott George 72; Kern Reed '84; John Platz '88, '89; John Henning '00; Sarah Salmons and Tim Cox of admissions; Bob Whites of student financial aid; and Marianne Ward of the alumni office.

Caterpillar - Peoria, III. Sounds of swing music welcomed prospective students and their families to the UMR student reception in Peoria, III., March 27, at the Mossville facility of Caterpillar. Special thanks go to Linda Harrell and Larry Mueller for coordinating this evening. Those attending included Brian Call '97; Paul Moots 72; Linda Harrell '88; Larry Mueller 75; Sarah Salmons of admissions; and Stephanie Martensen of the alumni office.

Spring Career Fair — Record number of alumni return Nearly 100 alumni returned to UMR for the Spring Career Fair Feb. 11-12. Although the total number of companies (97) was down from last spring, the number of UMR alumni recruiters was almost doubled. Those attending included Timothy Faenger '94; Steve Bumpers '02; Chad Cornwell '00; Mark Viox '80; Robert Conaway '99; Katie Compiseno '01; Mike Gerdes 88; Jonathon Schelmbauer '02; Gary Gibson '91; Roy Jacobs '98; Justin DeWitt '91; Joe Echols '01; Brenton Cook '01; Patrick Flaherty '95; Brent Bossi 81; Bob Clark 83, 85; Greg Davis '93; Roddy Rogers 81, 83, '90; Chris Leonard 82; Dave O'Brien 85; Gary Rauls 70; Steve Ingram 82; Jeff Willey 81; Bob Hutchings 73; Josh Jolly 82; Holly Gillam 82; Eric Cierpiot 87; Nathan Graham 82; Kirk Brunig 85; Rob Krewson 86; Debbie Holdorf 81; Kathleen Smith 87; Scott Goehri 83; David B. Edgar 83; Robert E. Mooshegian 81; Charles Wipf 89; DAnne Murphy 83; John Hock 84; Matt Coco '66; Chaz T. Jaquess 82; Jennifer Kramer 81; Gregory L Kuntz 87; Tim Herrmann 81; Melanie Overholt 80; Scott Adams 83; Mike Richter 73; Amy Millard 81; Brad Butner 80; Kelvin Erickson 78, 79; Mike Hermesmeyer 71; Dennis Croessmann 81; Jesse Blair 88; Joe Kuss 70; Bob Wille 80; Tim Hand 81; Stacy Ray 88; Eric Schlef 82; Jeff Morris 81; Floyd Harris 74; Eric Neuner 89; Scott Davis 88; Craig Barnes 78; Stephen 80 and Anne (Heltibrand) 80 Lamitola; Will Reed 86; Chip Keim 81; Phil Bosanquet 82; Patrick Smith 86; Kate Trout 89; Scott Koopmann 80; Dale Waldo 80, 82; Wayne E. Lewis 70; Neil Book 72; Leon Hall 59, 71, 74; Patrick Myers 82; Ming Lau 80; Aaron Robison 81; J. T. Zakrzewski 89; Joe Schmidberger 80; Clayton Price 80, 85, 80; Keith A. Gettinger 80; Delilah Koch 85, 87; Chris Thomason 85; Chris M. Williams, 87; Bryan Tilley 86; Andy Mahlandt 89; Patricia Scroggin 82; Russell Espinosa 82; Courtney McCoy 81; Brett Kunce 81; Melissa Schwaller 82.


Section News

A I R

C A P I T A L

A R K - L A - T E X

Thunderous time at hockey game Cajun Cuisine Members of the Ark-La-Tex Section met Jan. 18 at Ralph and Kacoo's Restaurant in Shreveport, La., to enjoy socializing with fellow alumni. After dining on Cajun and seafood specialties, a short business meeting was held. Topics of discussion centered around John Livingston s "Old Guard" report and the UMR Mucking Team. The section decided to contribute $100 toward the 2003 UMR Mucking Team. Kenny Cochran coordinated the event. Those attending included Scotty Gerber '99; Rande 73 and Judy 74 Grotefendt; Ernie 70 and Philip Green; Steve Durham '91 and Jennifer Carter; Lincoln '02 and Connie '02 Bauers; Scot Roche '02; Bob '01 and Jill Myers; Elmond Claridge '39; John Livingston 39; Jerry Poland 32; Clydelle Compton, Loretta Moscari; Louise Patton; Helen Bruening; and Kenny Cochran 33.

Alumni, family and friends joined together on Feb. 1 for an evening of food and fun in Wichita, Kan. The evening began with dinner at Picadilly's Grill West, where Chancellor Gary Thomas updated the group on UMR and what is ahead for the future. Following the dinner, the group headed to the Kansas Coliseum for a Wichita Thunder minor league hockey game. The Tulsa Oilers defeated the Thunder, 4-2, but the spirits of alumni were not so easily dampened. Many thanks go to Sean Daly for organizing both events. Those attending were John Goethe '92; Tony '98 and Laura '99 McLaughlin; Willis 73 and Nancy Wilson; Jarrod Grant '98 and Liz Dixon '99; Steve Smith 35; Ken 75 and Carol Drake; Melissa 36 and David 95 Herberger and six guests; Jennifer Marshall 95; Kirk 96 and Tracy Peterson; Randy Schuetz 33 and his children; Steve Kunze 96 and his son; Aleen 36 and Brian Stinson; Anthony Sirignano 99; Travis Snider 92 and his fiancee; David Farnham 35 and his wife; Stan 78 and Kathy 77 Farley; Pamelia Edwards 76 and three guests; Jeff 92 and Kerrie Meyers; Ilex Brandenberger 91; Eric Hensley 97 and guest; Rob Davis 91; Sean Daly 96; Chancellor Gary Thomas; and Marianne Ward from the alumni office.

St. Pat's celebration

While serving their country in Bosnia, these alumni took time to celebrate St. Pat's.

St. Pat's tradition reaches Bosnia Our alumni know the importance of St. Pat's, and go so far as to seek out fellow alumni — even if they are outside of the United States. Capt. Brent Flachsbart '92, Lt. Col. Robert Schmitt '84, and Capt. Stan Hunt '93 have been mobilized with the 35th Infantry Division out of Kansas. They are part of the Stabilization Force 13 (SFOR - 13) peacekeeping mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

W E W A N T YO U R

NEWS! D eadline fo r subm issions to the w in te r issue o f the M S M -U M R A lu m n u s

Sept. 10, 2003 30

MSM-UMR ALUM NUS / Summer 2003

Several alumni, friends, and family gathered at the home of John Goethe in Wichita, Kan., to continue the tradition of green clothing, lots of food and a variety of beverages. In addition to the continuous nibbling of party food, guests conducted an informal beer and wine tasting seminar to capture the full meaning of St. Pat's. Partygoers also enjoyed watching college basketball in preparation for the upcoming NCAA tournament. Many thanks go to Sean Daly for organizing this event, and to John Goethe for hosting it at his home. Those attending included Rob Davis 91; Jarrod Grant 98; Kirk 95 and Tracy Peterson; Aleen 36 and Brian Stinson; Anthony Sirignano 99 and guest; Tony 98 and Laura 99 McLaughlin and Annabelle; John Goethe 92; and Sean Daly 96.

A U S T I N - S A N

A N T O N I O

Alumni gathered at Gingerman Pub on March 21 to celebrate the UMR tradition of St. Pat's with their family and friends. With more than 82 kinds of beer on tap and 120 bottled beers, a Austin-San Antonio alumni gather at Gingerman Pub. good time was had by all. Special thanks go to Doug Mitchell, Nik Jedrzejewski and Aaron Shaw for coordinating this event. Those attending included Ferrill 78 and Debbie Ford; George 30 and Connie Dickinson; Joe 30 and Lizette Peter; Rick 33, 39 and Rhonda Reinesch; Steve 39 and Katie 38 Hagen; Rob Dechant 90; Brad 95 and Cindy Harvey; Julie 97 and Scott Townsend; Nik 98 and Brittany Jedrzejewski; and Aaron Shaw 95.


Section News' B A Y

A R E A

C E N T R A L

O Z A R K

Early morning tradition

Bay area alumni gather on a bright; sunny day to keep the St. Pat's tradition alive.

Sun shines green in Bay Area Despite several days of rain and dreariness, the sun came out to welcome alumni and friends for the Bay Area St. Pat's party on March 15. The event was held at the home of Dave Robinson, where guests could enjoy a family dinner and outdoor activities. Many thanks go to Robinson for hosting such a great event. Those attending included Lu Meng '92; Wei Zhao '94; Wallace Troy '53 and Carole Harper; Dave Peacock '64; Jerry '58 and Kay Littlefield; Cunmin '95 and Haiyan Wang; Scott Patterson 73 and Diane Sawyer; Mike 77 and Marsha Patterson; Ayako Flint '92; Mike Bennett '85; Steve Goldammer 78; Jure Zaninovich '91; Derek Hillstrom 97; Dave Fontaine '81; Heather '96 and Jason '96 Boles; Bill Glick '57; Mike Hunter 99; Chris '88 and Kami '85 Cozort; Boger '65 and Jane Chapin; Paul Bobinson '52; and Dave Bobinson '85.

Raffles off fun More than 40 alumni and their families dressed in green and stormed Crossroads Restaurant for the annual St. Pat's celebration. After consuming 15 pizzas, section elections were held, with the results: president Fred Niemeier; vice president Kerry Knott; and treasurer Mark Goldsmith. Celebrating St. Pat's Chicago style. Section members also raised more than $200 with a white elephant raffle for the summer send-off picnic for incoming freshmen. Many thanks go to Kerry Knott for coordinating this event. Alumni interested in joining the section should contact Fred Niemeier at fniemeier@prtm.com. Those attending included Erik and Kathy 79 Andersen; William Bishop 71; Doug Dallmer '60; Steve Dunkmann 72; Bon Fadler 72, 73; Joe and Shelly '88 Gaither and family; Earl Boger Gardner '61; Mark 94 and Melanie Goldsmith; Chris Hudson 96 and Lindsey Martin; Charlotte Jia-Yuan '85; Kerry 96, 97 and Kathy Knott; Mike 77 and Sandy (Turnbough) 77 Marx; Charles 92 and Julie Misner; Bobert 90 and Leah Moore and family; Bob Morrison 71; Chris '89 and Kathy (Behnke) '84, '87 Nibeck and family; Fred 95 and Jessica 97 Niemeier; William Nix '80; Melanie Overholt '00; Ken Pendleton '60; George Staples '60; Joe Toth 75; Daniel 98 and Sheryl 98 Van Anne; Bichard '59 and Sara Jane Wieker.

Alarm clocks sounded early on the morning of March 15 for all MSM-UMR alumni, friends and family who attended the St. Pat's Pre-Parade Party. The event was held in the alumni lounge in Castleman Flail, hosted by the Central Ozarks Section. Alumni from both near and far traveled to continue the tradition of drinking green beer, eating petite cinnamon rolls and rubbing green paint off their jeans and sweatshirts. In addition to sporting the green, partygoers engaged in an informal competition of whose sweatshirt was the oldest, and had the most profuse smell of green. Alumni were having such a good time, they had to be convinced it was time to go watch the beginning of the parade. Those attending included William Strasser '00; John Smith '51 and his son Jim; M att '66 and Kathy Coco; Dale Leidy '61; Bandy Verkamp 72; Ed Albee 72; Bill Zaner 74; Bandy Dudenhoffer 74; Mark Bruno 70; Betty Eyberg; Jan Ostborg; Tom 73 and Janice Mills; Hardy '66 and Judy Pottinger; Paul '01 and Julie '00 Hirtz; Mindy '84 and Glenn '83 Brand; Tom '62 and Lana VanDoren; LG. Loos 77; Neal 74 and Jean Lewis; Don Myers '61, '64; Byan 94 and Carolyn Buschjost; John '42, '47 and Chili Allen; Nick Barrack 75, 76; Bill Anderson '67, 70; Christina Northrup 97; Pat 76 and D.C. Look; Doug Bada; Mike Lloyd 71; Cecilia Elmore '86; Dick Elgin 74; Kirby and Karen Cannon; Al '85 and Sue Hoppe; Chuck '49 and Agnes Bemington; Steve Gray '84; Henry Parrish 86; Chancellor Gary Thomas; George Karr 92; Doug Carroll 91; Norman Fanning '49; Joey SiHyman 77; Myong H. Hamilton; James K. Tharp '02; Lynn Stichnote; Andrew Careaga; Judy Cavender; Guss Mauller '68; Joann Stiritz; Bob '60 and Dorothy Marshall; Don W. Spencer '52; Bob Doerr 72; Dottye Wolf; Brian Call 97; Claire Faucett; Lisa Gremaud; Patrick Stokes 96; Jason Faulkenberry; Tricia Murphy; Larry Guszkowski; Kent 76 and Lindsay 76 Bagnall; Joel Faucett; Marianne Ward; Stephanie Martensen; Gary '60 and Barbara '61 Patterson; Don and Nancy Brackhahn; Jason Nolte; Mary Helen Stoltz 95; Bob Wethington 70, 71; Greg Harris; Dick '51 and Shirley Bauer; Armin Tucker '40; Norman Tucker '40; Bill and Maggie Morrison; Mike Tindill 77; Allen E. Flerlage 98; and Girard 74 and Lynn 70 Mirgain. MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

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^Section News C I N C I N N A T I

Help u m r and higher education in Missouri obtain necessary funding from the state check out the volunteer-run website

www.Joe-M iner.com Cincinnati alumni gather to celebrate the tradition and spirit of St. Pat's.

G E O R G I A

A taste of southern cuisine Alumni, friends and family gathered on the evening of March 25 to welcome Chancellor Gary Thomas to the Atlanta area. Everyone enjoyed a warm, welcoming atmosphere and delicious southern dishes. Section members were grateful for the opportunity to hear Thomas speak about current events at the university. His presentation included enrollment figures, expanding building projects for campus and ways that alumni can assist with recruitment of new students. Special thanks to George and Barbara Leek for hosting this wonderful evening. Those attending included: George '61 and Barbara Leek; Dan Sackberger '94; Tom Sellers '93; Teri Marvich '96; Curt Schroeder '88, '91; Paul '86 and Susan Schmidt; Chip Crossman '98 and Olivia Miller; Mark Coburn '99 and Tammy Jones; Mark Fehlig 73; Dale '61 and Irene Leidy; Dennis McGee '69; Chancellor Gary Thomas; and Julie Turley of university advancement.

Celebrating St. Pat's Members held their annual St. Pat's celebration at the Back Porch Saloon in Cincinnati. Along with keeping up the green tradition of UMR, the officers reviewed the events and happenings of the past year, and elected new officers: president Bret Baldwin; recruiting chair Jay Jones; scholarship chair Tom Zenge; and activity chair Gina Baldwin. Discussion also centered around three goals the section would like to work toward this next year: triple the number of volunteers, double attendance at events and give one scholarship. Amy Dunham was announced The Little Mac Award winner. Many thanks go to Bret and Gina Baldwin for organizing and hosting this event. Those attending included Jay Jones 71; Jay Krull 67; Tom Zenge 69; Bob 70 and Carolyn WiImesherr; Suzanne 91 and Brent Johnston; Patrick 98 and Jennifer Anstaett; Mike Sheridan 75; Lamar 95 and Vicki 92, 94 Gerber; Suzanne 93 and Nat Brooks; Colin Hester 98 and Anne Marie Daniel; and Bret 93 and Gina 93 Baldwin.

D A L L A S / F T .

W O R T H

L I N C O L I M L A I M D

The S t Pat's tradition lives! More than 20 alumni and family members spent an evening together at Southside Country Club on March 19 to celebrate the great tradition of St. Pat's! Dressed in green and ready to sample the hors d'oeuvres, this alumni group enjoyed the camaraderie and conversation of their peers. Special thanks go to Rich and Cathy Eimer for coordinating and hosting this event. Those attending included Rich 71 and Cathy Eimer; Dan Kerns 74; David Tepen 90; Earl '52 and Dee Pape; Jerry Parsons 70; Gerald '62 and Pita Duck; Jim '66 and Connie May; Rich 64 and Sandy Mochel; Ralph 65 and Karen Barr; Ed Midden 69; Amanda 99 and Andrew Withers; Will 66 and Carol Sudduth; Melvin 78 and Shirley Heisserer; and Jerry Hirlinger 66.

32

MSM-UMR ALUM NUS/Sum m er 2003

Alumni and family carry on the St. Pat's tradition.

Alumni relive St. Pat's Even from miles away, the Dallas/Ft. Worth Section was able to keep the UMR St. Pat's tradition alive. Many thanks go to Warren and Julie Unk for opening up their home to alumni and their families. Guests were able to enjoy good food, green beer and the opportunity to soak in the hot tub. Those attending included: Greg Copeland Terry Durham Hick McLean 75, 76: Glenn '83 and Mindy '84 Brand: Je ff Smith '01: Jim Bondi 72, 74;Jon Davis '85: Dan Pleis '86; Robert "Tuck" Watts '85; Mike Cook 77; Steve Bumpers '02; Denis Mink '95; Tim Shepardson 98; Chwan Wang ' Luke Hays 92; Nate Sauer 92; Lesley Schmid 92; Jim Swinford 94; Mike Krueger 76; Karla Niehaus 92; and Warren 91,93 and Julie Unk.


Section News L A S

V E G A S

BuSinesS Cards W anted! UMR is developing a map that showcases the locations our alumni are working in throughout the world. We want to highlight as many alumni as possible, so send us your business card! Please send your business card to:

Dean Jay Goff Enrollment Management 207 Parker Hall University of Missouri-Roila Rolla, MO 65409

m

St. Pat's now and then

/ v a / d c

Las Vegas Section

The Silver State Chapter of the alumni association held its second annual spring dinner at Landry's Seafood House in Las Vegas on March 21. The turnout was even better than last year's, and it was decided to make the spring dinner at Landry's an annual event because of the central location. The group will be planning summer and fall events. Special thanks go to Roger Keller and Tom Doering for coordinating this event. Those attending included Bill O'Neill '55; Gary Sellers '59; Larry Abernathy '63; Darrell Pepper '68, 70, 73; Les 76 and Susan '86 Winfield; James Saavedra '88; John Peters 72; Jim Fitzpatrick 72; Dan Henry '65; Linda Michaelsen '80; Hemi 70 and Asha Kalia; Jennifer Quigley 79, 84; Ken Schulenburg 74; Joe Skerik '99; Tom 78 and Maria 77 Doering; and Boger Keller 75, 82.

K A N S A S

d

C I T Y

Celebrating UMR's growth over St. Pat's Alumni and their families celebrated the St. Pat's tradition on March 21 at St. Ann's Parish Hall. Guests enjoyed a traditional meal of corned beef and cabbage, and shared memories and stories of their times in Rolla. The highlight of the evening was guest speaker Jay Goff, dean of enrollment management. Goff shared his passion for promoting and increasing UMR's enrollment. His presentation kept the audience focused on UMR's vision for growth and improvements for over an hour! Alumni were interested in hearing more about UMR's efforts to develop a local research park, and were surprised at the level of research that now goes into studying the interests and needs of current and prospective students. To cap off a wonderful evening of celebration, the door prize for the evening was a light-up, blinking shamrock that was fashioned as a lapel pin. Many thanks go to Jim Van Acker and Ken Drummond for organizing such an informative and fun event. Those attending included Bob 75 and Charlotte Honan; Bichard Herndon 86; Sreejit Mohan 81; Kenneth '97 and Cindy Bandelier; Cliff '57 and Bettie Tanquary; Ken 86 and Kris Drummond; Craig 88 and Wendy Borgmeyer; Ed '97 and Jennifer Beichert; Shakeel Mhaskar 81; Jamie Martens '98; Doug WesseIschmidt 83; Mike Lally 83; Warren Zeller 82; Jim '98 and Carrie Van Acker; Dave 87 and Mary Lee Skitek; John 87 and Mary Frerking; and Jay Goff.

Alumni celebrate St. Pat's at the Scanlon home.

Chancellor Thomas joins St. Pat's celebration Bob and Janet Scanlon of Brookeville, Md„ graciously opened up their home on March 6 for a St. Pat's party. More than 30 alumni, friends and family joined together to make this year's celebration "the best ever." Attendees were honored to have Chancellor Gary Thomas as the guest speaker for this event. Thomas presented details of exciting new construction projects, ongoing budgetary concerns, UMR's national college rankings and endeavors to enhance both the quality of education and standing of the university. Special thanks go to Bob and Janet Scanlon for organizing and hosting this exciting event. Those attending included Tom 83 and Elizabeth 83 DeGonia; Steven Alferink 80; Frank '52 and Mary Almeter; Alicia Cobb 82; John Cummings 74; Brad Fulton 88; Ben Hankins 81; Ed 71 and Cathy 72 Henson; Mary Hil/house (spouse of Dave HiI/house '50); Mike Millhouse 75; Inhi Hong, 87; Gene 81 and Eunice Kolb; Lloyd Langsdorf 87; Leonard Larson '43; Kent Lynn 85; Bich 88 and Michelle Milner; Byan Beading 82; Bob 73 and Janet Scanlon; Beth Schlapper 80; Sam 82 and Joan Schneider; Joe 82 and Amy Schumer and son Nate; Mihai Sirbu 83; and Anne (Lloyd) Spence 85 MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

33


Section News

M I D - M I S S O U R I

P E O R I A

Racing to celebrate St. Pat's St. Pat's may have been officially over, but the green beer was still flowing at the Mid-Missouri celebration on March 28 at the Elk's Lodge in Jefferson City, Mo. At the event, section leaders discussed raising funds to start a Mid-Missouri Endowed Section Scholarship. After the official business, alumni competed in balloon-powered car races with Danica Storall-Taylor winning the first heat and a T-shirt. Many thanks go to Kenny Voss for organizing and hosting this event. Those attending included Gregg Crane 70; Llans Taylor '96; Danica Stovall-Taylor '98; Eric '99 and Jill '96 Bruss; Larry Erickson 71; Winnette Swanson 77; Bob '58 and Norma Sfreddo; Kenny Voss '96; and Marianne Ward, alumni office.

N O R T H

C A R O L I N A

Peoria Section gathers at Bhodells.

Alumni social in Peoria, III. Thanks to the efforts of Brian Call, Peoria members gathered at Rhodells on Feb. 5. Everyone had the opportunity to share stories of the past, work on friendships for the future, and indulge in a wonderful spread of appetizers. For alumni who were not able to participate in this event, we have plans for a golf outing, formal dinner and bonfire social. Those attending included Daniel M. Dunn '84; BandaI Braun '68; Keith Kauffman '01; Darren Whitehurst '95; Nathan Parr '86; Art Bell 72; Will Strasser '00; Paul Moots 72; Lute Blair '01; Brian Call '97; David '99 and Jill Akers; Paul '90 and Beth Miles; J.D. Bridges '00; and Brent Summers '86.

North Carolina alumni gather to compete in the car race.

St. Pat's races Twenty-five alumni and friends celebrated St. Pat's on March 8 at the Elks Lodge in Salisbury, N.C. The wooden floor of the lodge's dining hall became the racetrack for those competing with balloon plastic car racers supplied by the alumni office. After several heats, the finalists took to the track for a grand champion race with Kim and Maurice Weathers' sons taking first place. Within seconds of receiving their racers, alumni started to make "improvements'' to them and a modified class quickly developed. Gene Langston and John Renz volunteered to serve as officers with Brian Tenholder for the upcoming year. Thanks to section president Brian Tenholder for organizing the event. Those attending included Gene (Merritt) '50 and Lennie Langston; John '81 and Yvonne '81 Benz; Patrick Martin '81; Bob '92 and Becky Bartelsmeyer; Steve Swartz '83; Mark McClane '83; Bill '69 and Sandy Knauf; Mike '87 and Kathy Tonelis; Ed Kendall '43; Sarah McGee '98 and her fiance' Jerry; Billy McGee '02; Kim '93 and Maurice '93 Weathers; Dennis '68 and Beba Peavler; Chester Sturgeon '60; Carl De Long '67; Brian Tenholder '97; and Marianne Ward, alumni office. 34

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

^ F

*

^ §}â–

1

Earl Buck's 1941 "cab over engine" dump truck provided transportation for alumni and family for the 22nd annual St. Pat's Day parade.

Keeping parade tradition alive Alumni from the Springfield Section participated in the 22nd Annual St. Patrick's Day Parade in downtown Springfield, Mo. Family and friends enjoyed a beautiful spring day while riding in the back of Earl Buck's 1941 "cab over engine" Chevy dump truck. While sporting their green, the participants passed out candy to the excited parade spectators. Many thanks go to Kern Reed for coordinating this event. Those attending included Earl 70 and Karen Buck, along with their children Bailey and Trevor; friend Madison Saner; Roddy Rogers '81 and son Will; Scott George 72 and grandchildren Robby and Missy; Dick Kahl '63; and Kem Reed '84.


Alumni Notes

VISIT alum ni.um r.edu

forsection information and events

P H O E N I X

Celebrating the St. Pat's tradition Chevy's Mexican Restaurant was the setting for the Phoenix Section St. Pat's party on March 8. More than 30 alumni and their guests enjoyed each other's company over a spread of delicious Tex-Mex appetizers. Thanks to the coordination of Dave Akers, alumni gathered to pay homage to UMR and the spirit of the green. Future event ideas were discussed, such as attending a Diamondbacks baseball game. Some folks even volunteered to travel with Dave to Hawaii to help restart a section there! Those attending included F. J. '60 and Pat Taylor; Mandy Wedertz '99 and her husband; Handy Gault 73; Bill '85 and Honi Boss; John "Wood" '61 and Jeanne Budolph; Stan Hansen '67; Andy Nolfo 71; Bradley '83 and Kelly Kauble; Philip '84 and Lori Scandura; Victor Gonzalez '99 and Nicole Wiley '99 Tait and their daughter; John '82 and Karen '83, '85 Pigott and their three children; Jim Bobison '63, '65; Dean '51 and Nancy Kleinkopf; Ken Shields '90; Larry W. Mays 70, 71; Tom '83 and MaryLynn Wetteroth; Ed Cole '65, '69 and his wife; Kerri Vencato '00; and Dave Akers '82.

R O C K Y

P E R U

Section receives charter In an emotional ceremony, 10 members of the Peru Section gathered on Jan. 10 to celebrate their new section. John Sheffield, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, presented the section with their official charter. Members agreed to create a Pre-Electoral Committee to initiate the process for the election of the section board. Members elected included: Daniel Rodriguez Hoyle, Pedro Tumialan de la Cruz and Johnny Ortiz. Those attending included Gonzalo Emilio Amezaga Menenez '96; Jose Bicardo Arce Alieva '91; Haul E Benavides Ganoza '80; Haul Leon Bodriguez '81; Bicardo E. Proano Seiler '61; Johnny N. Ortiz '96; Daniel M. Bodriguez Hoyle '50; Gonzalo Bodriguez Bisco '93; Bladimiro Sanchez Aguilar 71; Pedro Hugo Tumialan de la Cruz '68, and John Sheffield of mechanical and aerospace engineering.

M O U N T A I N

SME reception

Pocky Mountain Section celebrates St. Pat's.

A hero in our midst Close to 50 alumni and friends celebrated the St. Pat's tradition at the White Fence Farm restaurant in Lakewood, Colo. During the event, Marshall Shackelford announced Joseph Neumann as the winner of the alumni section scholarship. Upcoming events such as a summer picnic and a fall tour of the new Denver Broncos football stadium were discussed. It was discovered that alumnus Paul Murphy was one of the survivors of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis in 1945, and has written a book about his experience: Only 317 Survived! Navy's Worst Tragedy at Sea. Huge thanks go to Clancy Ellebracht for coordinating and hosting this wonderful event. Many thanks also to Randy Kerns for helping coordinate the group photos. Those attending included Clarence '51 and Dorothy Babcock; William 72 and Cynthia Balaz; Hugh '53 and Ann Blevins; Dave Bufalo '66 and Cynthia Powers; Terry 71 and Karen Donze; Dick 71 and Pam Doutt; Clancy '64 and Sharron Ellebracht; Michelle '97 and Eric Frisbee; John '66 and Linda Henry; Francis '01 and Jessica (Pence) '01 Humble; Mark '84 and Dolly JeIinske; Pick 74 and Margarete (Spiry) 73 Jones; Bandy 74 and Cherie Kerns and their children, Amy and Allison; Jim Lundy '67 and son; Kimberly '96 and J. Eric '96 Morrison; Paul '50 and Mary Lou Murphy; Casey '02 and Michelle (Grace) '02 Nordwald; Marshall 76 and Barbara Shackelford; Michael 73 and Brandy Steffens; Boger 72 and Lynn Taylor; Shawn '99 and Jennifer (Shay) '99 Walker; and Jack '42 and Margaret Zoller.

Alumni gathered for an SME reception at the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati on the evening of Feb. 25. The evening began with the mingling of alumni wanting to touch base with current students and catch up on news with faculty from UMR. Lee Saperstein, dean of the School of Mines and Metallurgy, served as the host for the evening and gave a brief campus overview. Those attending included Michael N. Greeley '62; F. Martino; Lee Saperstein; Ashley Mertens; Brian Almond; Josh Martin; Jeron Miller; Nathan Steele; Carey Steele; Larry Grayson; Brett Wissel; Megan Wissel; Art Schweizer 70; Steve Fiscor '86; Nellie E. Gvernsey; Carole A. O'Brien; Bichard ÂŁ Macy Jr. '99 and his wife; Brent Ward '96; Kurt Oakes '85; Don '02 and Jami (Girard) Dwyer; Amy Pousson '00; Cecilia Elmore '86; Barbara Bobertson; Jackie Martino; Brennan Laird; Anthony (Sam) Spearing; David Cornell '86; John Bockaway; Dave Summers; Dick Bullock '51, '55, 75; Guy Storm; Nathaniel Huckabay; Daniel Marschke; Jay Jones 71; Steven Johnson '85; Tad Golosinski; Wayne D. Kanack; Jack '43 and Mary Anne Burst; Bret '93 and Gina '93 Baldwin; Michael Watson; G. Joe Hatfield '90; Ann Hagni; Keith Willhaus '02; Lou Boltik; Mike '67 and Lee Hardy; Jim Pinkley '83; Jeff Schaffer '81; Kasi Johnson; Brian Whited; Jenna Bamsey; and John Blicha.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

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Section News H O U S T O N

St. Pat's at Dave & Buster's

Section hosts Chancellor Thomas

Nearly 50 alumni and friends met at the Briar Club to meet with Chancellor Gary Alumni, family and friends held their Thomas and hear his update on the direction UMR is heading with enrollment, St. Pat's party at Dave & Buster's in Houston on retention and the campus reputation. Thanks to Rich Langenstein and Nicole Talbot March 28. Elections were held with the results: for coordinating the event. president Ed May; vice president Rob Riess; and Those attending were Rex Alford '40; Wayne '58 and Betty Andreas; William K secretary Shannon Walker. Many Brune 73; Warren '59 and Hope Carroll; Lori Crocker '88; Adil Godiwalla '66; Gordon thanks go to Nicole Talbot for her Herron '87; Dan Hinkle 73; Alan Hopkins '89; PE llavia 70; Gary Jones 76; David three years of dedicated service Jones 71; Matt Kelly '02; Rich '87 and Stephanie Langenstein; John '67 and as the Houston Section president. . Margaret Lauletta; Kirk Lawson '85; Ed May '83; Ranney McDonough '66; Jim '67 Wilfred Bertrand won the prize W «df and Carolyn Medlin; Zeb Nash 72; Dennis '68 and Sue Parker; Russ Pfeifle 74; Eric for the oldest St. Pat's ^ 73 and Inge Potts; Ben '01 and Jenny '01 Rady; Fritz Rambow 73; Rob 79 and sweatshirt (1969). 1 . Becky Riess; Suzan £ Siy '86; Nicole Talbot 77; Fred Thompson 74; Bob 79 and Those attending included The Terri Thomure; Greg Vetter '87; John Warner 70; Chancellor Gary Thomas; and Connie Wayne '58 and Betty Andreas; Robert and Patty Eggert, university advancement. Porche; Tom Barnes '00; Rob Bartel '96; Mick 78 and Kathy Bayer; Wilfred 72 and Julie Bertrand; Jessica Brill '98; Jason Fanning '01; Chancellor Thomas tours ExxonMobil Adil '66 and Arnavez Godiwalla; Dan 73 and Houston alumni, with special guest Chancellor Gary Thomas, piled into an Delores 75 Hinkle; Victoria Hinkle; P £ 70 and ExxonMobil company van for a three-hour tour of the diverse facility. The Baytown Ami llavia; Dave 71 and Charlene Jones; M att Complex is one of the most integrated and technologically advanced petroleum and Kelly '02; Curt 73 and Marybeth Killinger; Ed petrochemical complexes in the world. The facility sits on 3,400 acres and employees May '83, '95; Jim '67 and Carolyn Medlin; John approximately 4,000 people. At the end of the tour, attendees received several Meyers '96, 00; Ed Midden '95; Eric Midden '98, mementos. Everyone then adjourned to a nearby Pappasito's Mexican Cantina. '03; Russ Pfeifle 74; Larry Ragsdale '98; Chad Special thanks to Zeb Nash, Jennifer Rady and Nicole Talbot for coordinating this '97 and Elizabeth Reimann; Eliott Reimann; incredible opportunity. Curtis Smith '90; Nicole Talbot 77; Bruce Those attending included Greg Savage '02; Zeb Nash 72; Matthew Kelly '02; Talbot; Mavis Talbot; and Frances '97 and Jennifer Rady '01; Mark Rooney '97; Chad Reimann '97; Nicole Talbot 77; John Shannon '97 Walker Wagner '92; Chancellor Gary Thomas; and Connie Eggert, university advancement.

Memorial note: The Houston Section wishes to honor the many contributions of loyal alumnus, Jim Paul '43, who passed away this past fall. Jim was an outstanding recruiter for UMR & SPE, founder of the Houston Scholarship Fund, and a true friend and mentor.

Student recruitment highlights Houston alumni ambassadors attended 20 college fairs (61 high schools), and discussed UMR opportunities with more than 250 students. Ambassadors included Rex Alford '40; John Campbell Lori Crocker '88; Adil Godiwalla '67; Mark Gredell 79; Dan Hinkle 73; Alan Hopkins '89; Curt Killinger 73, '80; Rich Langenstein '87; Jim Medlin '67; Zeb Nash 72, '93; Allen Nichols 76; Jim Paul ‘43; Russell Pfeifle 74; Col. Eric Potts 73; Walter Reed 69; Rob Riess 79; Perrin Roller '80; Nicole Talbot and Shannon Walker '97.

SPE career fairs Houston alumni participated in five "Engineering Career Night" programs. Special thanks to Curt Killinger for coordinating these events, and to Lenn Koederitz '68 for sponsoring the efforts. Those attending included Tom Belsha 74; Delores (Dee) Hinkle 75; Curt Killinger 73, '80; Jim Medlin 67; Rob Riess 79; and Sarah Salmons, UMR admissions.

36

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

l e t ’s talk col l ege

Prospective student reception held

Thanks to the efforts of Russ Pfeifle, the Houston TRANSTAR transportation and emergency management center hosted a prospective student reception Nov. 2. Those attending included Wayne 68 and Betty Andreas; Rex Alford '40; Dave 65 and Jeannine Bergt; Bill Brune 73; Ed Creamer 63; Dan Hinkle 73; Curt Killinger 73; Melissa Lane '97; Jim 67 and Carolyn Medlin; Jeff Meier 61; Ted Porter '80; Rob Reiss 79; Nicole Talbot 7;and Lynn Stichnote, UMR admissio

YES, WE LL "SHOW YOU THE MONEY' — AND EVEN GIVE YOU SOME! THE HOUSTON SECTION RECENTLY SELECTED WINNERS FOR BOTH THE $3,000 HOUSTON ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP AND THE 13TH ANNUAL HOUSTON ALUMNI SECTION SCHOLARSHIP ($1,000/PER YEAR FOR FOUR YEARS)


Alumni Notes %s.

I!3 0 s

d a u g h t e r ’s p rin t b u s in e s s w h ic h p r in ts m o s tly

1934

W. Thiele,

m y f e llo w a lu m n i, c la s s o f 1 9 4 4 .”

William

Photo by Bob Linder/Springfield News-Leader

s c e n e s o n M a r th a ’s V in e y a rd . G r e e tin g s to all

P o w e r , C h E : “ R e m e m b e rin g 1 9 3 0 -

Alfred

C h E : “ S till p la y in g g o lf th re e o r

f o u r tim e s p e r w e e k a n d m a n a g in g fa rm s in

1 9 3 4 a t M S M : g a in in g a c c o u n tin g e x p e r ie n c e

s o u th e a s t M is s o u ri. M y 8 0 th b ir th d a y w a s

a s tr e a s u r e r o f L a m b d a C h i A lp h a fra te r n ity ,

J a n . 5 , 2 0 0 3 .”

p la y in g n ig h t b a s e b a ll o n R o lla to w n te a m s , th e g o lf te a m , in te r e s tin g p r o fe s s o r s s u c h a s

1947

D o c S c h r e n k , ‘C o r k y ’ M o n r o e , D u n la p a n d

J. Walter Liddell,

D e n n e y .”

o f r e tire m e n t o n S e p t. 1 ,2 0 0 2 . M y w if e o f 5 0 y e a rs

and

I

A n ta rc tic a

C E : “ C e le b ra te d 3 0 y e a rs

have

w as

tr a v e le d

th e

la s t

th e

of

th e

w o r ld . seven

l8 4Qs

c o n tin e n ts . I k e e p b u s y w ith e n v ir o n m e n ta l

1942

M e tE :

a n d c o n s e rv a tio n is s u e s . O u r o n ly w o r ld a n d its d iv e r s e a n d m a g n if ic e n t w ild life n e e d s all th e h e lp it c a n g e t.” •

H . Warren Buckner,

San

r e tir e m e n t

in

S t.

M E : “ S till in v o lv e d

W a te r D is tr ic t a n d

d ir e c to r o f th e

James D. Sullivan,

e n jo y in g

G e o r g e , U ta h .”

w ith w a te r. L o c a lly , I a m a n e le c te d d ir e c to r o f H e lix

“ S till

D ie g o

re g io n a lly , a C o u n ty

W a te r

1948 Richard A. Walker,

M E : “ J u s t c o m p le te d a

p r e s id e n t a n d

tw o - m o n th , 1 0 ,0 0 0 -m ile d r iv in g tr ip g o in g

e x e c u tiv e c o m m itte e m e m b e r o f th e A C W A -

c lo c k w is e a ro u n d th e c o u n try , v is itin g frie n d s

A u th o rity . S ta te w id e , I a m JP IA

( A s s o c ia tio n

of

A u t h o r i ti e s - J o i n t A u t h o r i ty ) ,

C a li f o r n ia

P o w ers

a

s ta te w id e

W a te r

In su ra n c e

a n d fa m ily . H o m e w a s tru ly s w e e t o n o u r r e tu r n .”

se lf-in s u ra n c e

p ro g ra m f o r lia b ility , p r o p e rty a n d w o r k e rs

1949

c o m p e n s a tio n fo r 3 0 0 w a te r d is tr ic ts .”

David F. Brasel,

C h E : “ E n jo y in g re tire m e n t

w ith s e c o n d w if e , B e tty J e a n , tra v e lin g a n d

1943

w o r k in g

Edson S. Bumps,

M e tE : “ A t th e a g e o f 8 1 , 1

a m still in g o o d h e a lth , w ith tw o n e w k n e e s , e n jo y in g B e s id e s

s e n io r

g ro u p s, an d

c h u rc h

c la s s e s a n d te s tin g f o r lic e n s e s .”

life o n a 3 6 - h o le g o lf c o m p le x . g o lf , m y

o th e r a c tiv itie s

in c lu d e

s ta in e d g la s s , a n d c o m p u te r a n d y a rd w o r k .” •

Thomas E. Gregory,

M e tE : “ E n jo y in g th e

re tire d life m o re th a n e v e r. 1 w e n t o n a 1 0 -d ay c r u is e

w ith

a c tiv itie s . A ls o in v o lv e d w ith a m a te u r ra d io

to

th e

N o v e m b e r .” •

s o u th e r n

C a r ib b e a n

in

Edward T. Kendall Jr.,

M E:

l95Qs 1950

“ N o b ig n e w s . I e n jo y g o o d h e a lth , a n tiq u e

Earl A. Bage,

c a rs a n d fly in g m y 1 9 4 5 J -3 P ip e r C u b . I j u s t

s ta te

fin is h e d re b u ild in g th e c u b f o r th e s e c o n d

A m e r ic a n S o c ie ty o f M e c h a n ic a l E n g in e e rs

tim e s in c e 1971 ”

M E : “ I ’m f o llo w in g M is s o u r i

l e g i s la tio n

and

r e g u la tio n s

1944

Joseph Milich,

M E , re tire d

15 y e a r s a g o as a p r o je c t e n g in e e r w ith P ra tt

Philip M. Dampf,

M e tE :

“ R e tir e d

and

e n jo y in g life in K n o x v ille . T h e re a re m a n y g o o d f o o tb a ll g a m e s to se e a t th e u n iv e r s ity , a n d g r a n d s o n ’s h ig h s c h o o l a n d L ittle L e a g u e g a m e s .” •

Edwin Goetemann,

M e tE : “ S p e n t

3 0 -p lu s y e a r s in s a le s a n d m a r k e tin g w ith U n iv e rs a l C y c lo p s , w h ic h

b ecam e p a rt o f

A R M C O a n d is n o w A K S te e l. I re tire d in

and

W h itn e y

A ir c r a f t- D iv is io n

T e c h n o lo g ie s . •

M e tE : “ F o llo w in g g r a d u a tio n , I s p e n t e ig h t y e a r s in th e A n d e s o f P e ru in n o n - fe r r o u s s m e ltin g a s s u p e rin te n d e n t o f le a d s m e ltin g . I w o r k e d 2 8 y e a r s a t C B I a n d o b ta in e d a p a te n t f o r c la d d in g p ip e . A f te r r e tire m e n t, I s p e n t a f e w y e a r s a s a c e r tif ie d w e ld in g in s p e c to r.” •

1 9 9 0 . 1 a m n o w a c tiv e in g o lf a n d te n n is a n d

Donald A. Wummenberg, 1990. M y

d a u g h te rs

and

Warren L. Larson,

13

g r a n d c h i l d r e n .”

M e tE : “ A y e a r a g o w e

to C o v e n a n t V illa g e o f C r o m w e ll,

o f U n ite d

William F. Ricketts Jr.,

I v o lu n te e r f o r c h u rc h a n d th e h o s p ita l. I h a v e

m oved

th e

( A S M E ), to h e lp in te r p re t te c h n o lo g y is s u e s f o r le g is la to r s .” •

f iv e

fo r

M E : “ I re tire d in

w if e , B e tty , a n d

I liv e

in

S t.

A u g u s tin e , F la ., b u t s p e n d o u r s u m m e r s a t M e rc e r, P a .”

C o n n ., a c h u r c h - o w n e d r e tire m e n t c e n te r. W e

1951

h a d a m in i-f a m ily r e u n io n in O c to b e r w ith all

John W. Brillos,

o f m y b r o th e r s , s is te rs a n d th e ir s p o u s e s . It

y e a r s a n d s till e n jo y in g life , lib e rty a n d th e

M E : “ B e e n r e tire d f o r 10

w a s g o o d to se e m y tw o b r o th e rs . • ( C e r E ’4 3 ) a n d

Leonard Eugene P. Larson

p u r s u it o f h a p p in e s s .” •

H . Larson

M in E : “ E n jo y in g r e tire m e n t. I s p e n d a b o u t

( M E ’5 1 ) .

My

in

f o u r m o n th s o f th e y e a r tr a v e lin g a n d s e e in g

w if e

is

c h a rg e

of

my

Earl E. Jackson,

When your heart leads you home Switching paths mid-career seemed like the right thing to do for Russ Cochran, Phys'59, PhD Phys'65, when he decided to give up his teaching job at Drake University and move back home to West Plains, Mo. Now publisher of Gemstone Publishing Inc. (www.gemstonepub.com), which republishes classic comics and original movie cartoon artwork, Cochran is internationally known as a collector and dealer of these works. But he also has a passion for renovating old buildings, and in West Plains, Cochran has renovated more than a dozen of them. His most recent project was the West Plains Opera House. Built in the late 1800s, the building had been used as a storage facility for decades. Cochran found the building to be structurally sound, but had to make many modifications to bring it up to today's safety standards. Now, after years of lying dormant, the opera house's auditorium — a 50-by-110-foot room with 18-foot ceilings and an oak floor — is again accessible. According to an article in the Springfield News-Leader, Cochran hopes that the opera house will become a "community social center, a place to have parties, wedding receptions and other public gatherings." Cochran sees restoring areas of his hometown as a way of giving back to the community and its people. "I felt so protected in this town when I was a kid that I feel a real debt to the community. So I'm trying to give the town back a little history."

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

37


umm Notes m y c h ild r e n a n d m y s e v e n g ra n d c h ild re n , a g e s

ECONOMICS lOI Freshman legislators are in the House By Claire Faucett denboc@umr.edu The first step is finding the problem; the second step, analyzing it; and the third, finding the best solution. This type of clear-cut analytical thinking — second nature to an engineer — Freshman legislators Ed Emery and Jim Guest served freshman legislators Jim Guest, ME'62, and Ed Emery, PetE'72, well in the Missouri House of Representatives. The two, elected in 2002, were among the 90 members of the House's largest freshman class in its recent history. Both agree that their UMR education shaped their thinking on many levels and has helped them lead with Missouri's budget problems during their first session. Both Emery and "With my engineering background I tend to analyze Guest believe that things and break them down," says Guest, who UMR has a positive represents District 5. "We look at situations differently than someone with a philosophy background." impact on the state Politics snagged Emery's interest when he learned and that Missouri that the previous representative was stepping out of businesses need to office. Emery, who represents District 126 in southeast Missouri, admired that representative's leadership and supply the kind o f wanted to continue it. "It occurred to me that I had never careers that UMR invested any of myself into my state and I just might run graduates seek in for that position and continue the heritage that I felt like he had begun." Emery, from Lamar, Mo., owns and order to keep their operates Character Returns!, an educational consulting talents in Missouri. firm that works with area businesses and institutions. Guest's first year as a legislator has been "exciting, frustrating, challenging and satisfying." A bit of a veteran to local politics, he first entered public service when he was elected to the school board in his hometown of King City, Mo. He held that office for 10 years. Guest owns and operates Guest Farms, Guest Rentals and two pizza establishments (one in King City and another in Albany, Mo.) Missouri's budget has been hit hard over the past two years, resulting in cuts to several areas, including higher education. "The first few weeks of the session I was frequently asked, 'Are you enjoying it?' Because of the serious budget fiscal crisis that we faced I was hesitant to say yes," says Emery. "How can you enjoy having to wrestle with these kind of budget issues, seeing so many cuts resulting in a lot of people being shocked and disappointed in where the budget was headed?" Both Emery and Guest believe that UMR has a positive impact on the state and that Missouri businesses need to supply the kind of careers that UMR graduates seek in order to keep their talents in Missouri, says Emery. "Once we've lost them to another state it's hard to get them back, so we've got to make this state business-friendly." Guest agrees. UMR graduates "produce some high-paying jobs along with the fact that UMR has a very strong reputation as an engineering school," he says. Emery and Guest harbor much fondness for their alma mater and both remember a common theme. "You don't go to UMR for recreation, you go because you know you will get a good education," says Guest. That doesn't mean that they didn't find time to have a little fun too. "I had four very enjoyable years," says Guest. "I lived in a fraternity and that provided the social aspect for me. It was very relaxed and unconventional. However, you don't slide through this particular college."

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

Cyril M. Kinane,

2 th r o u g h 2 7 .” •

M in E :

“ O ld m in e r s n e v e r d ie , th e y ju s t k e e p o n g o in g . W e a re e x p a n d in g K in a n e E n g in e e rin g , a b u lk - m a te ria l h a n d lin g b u s in e s s , to a s e c o n d o ffic e in P e o r ia , A riz . I t ’s b e e n to u g h le a r n in g C A D , b u t w e h a v e fin a lly m a d e it in S a lt L a k e C ity , as w e ll a s o u r A r iz o n a o f fic e .” •

R. Oldham, m assag e

William

C E : “ R e tire d in 1988 a n d d o in g

th e r a p y .

E n g in e e r in g

p r i n c i p le

a p p lie s d ir e c tly to th is th e r a p y ”

1952 James R. Boyle,

M in E : “ M y g ra n d d a u g h te r

g r a d u a te d f ro m U M R in D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 2 in g e o lo g ic a l e n g in e e r in g .”

1954 Richard tim e

Kolb,

C.

R V in g

and

M E : “ N in e y e a rs o f f u ll­ I am

s till e n jo y in g

th is

v a g a b o n d life s ty le . W e ’v e m a d e a ll th e lo w e r 48

s ta te s

and

m ost

C a n a d ia n

p ro v in c e s .

R e tir e m e n t is g r e a t! ”

1956 Harry D. Hays,

M e tE : “ R e tir e d n o w

and

e n jo y in g b r id g e a n d m y s ta m p c o lle c tio n .”

1957 Larry T. Lee, O k la h o m a

M E,

s o ld

G a lv a n iz in g ,

h is

and

is

re tire m e n t w ith h is w ife , B a rb a r a . •

Watwood Jr., C E :

b u s in e s s , e n j o y in g

James E.

“ R e tir e d ! ”

1958 Joseph in

C.

Kroutil, M E ,

F e b ru a ry

1999

M S M E ’6 3 : “ I r e tire d fro m

M c D o n n e ll

D o u g la s /B o e in g in S t. L o u is . I a m e n jo y in g re tire m e n t a n d s e rv in g a s a d e a c o n in th e S t. L o u is A r c h d io c e s e .” * Thomas C .

Metcalf Jr.,

M E , f o r m e r c h ie f o f e n g in e e r in g a n d te s tin g at R o c k Is la n d A r s e n a l, r e tire d fro m g o v e r n m e n t s e rv ic e o n J u ly 3 , 2 0 0 2 , a f te r 41 y e a r s a n d th re e m o n th s . •

James E. Twyman,

M e tE :

“ R e tir e d a n d c o n tin u in g T w y m a n E n g in e e rin g S e rv ic e s ,

a

m e ta llu r g ic a l

and

q u a lity

m a n a g e m e n t c o n s u ltin g b u s in e s s .”

1960 Walter H. Dickens,

C E : “ B e tty a n d

I

a re

r e tire d a n d liv in g in D ix o n , M o . F rie n d s a re w e lc o m e to c a ll a n d v is it a n y tim e .”

1961 Bruce L. Stinchcomb,

G G ph:

w o r k in g o n O z a r k , C a m b r ia n

“I

keep

p a le o n to lo g y .


Alumni Notes^W A m a jo r p a p e r o n m o n o p la c o p h o r a is d u e in

Journal of Paleontology s h o r tly .” • Lowell E. Tripp, M E : “ R e tire d fro m U .S .

th e

D e p a rtm e n t o f E n e rg y o n D e c . 3 1 ,2 0 0 1 , a f te r m o re th a n 3 0 y e a rs o f g o v e r n m e n t s e rv ic e . I a m n o w w o rk in g p a rt tim e as a c o n s u lta n t in n u c le a r sa fe ty a n d o p e r a tio n s .”

1965

a re

Robert

e n g in e e r s . I w o u ld b e g la d to e x p la in th is

Breeding,

E.

p la n s to h u n t, f is h , tra v e l a n d m a n a g e 25 to w n h o u s e

Mulyca,

u n its

p la n t

c e le b r a te d

M E : “ I h a v e r e tire d f ro m

T ra n e - A m e r ic a n S ta n d a rd a fte r 3 8 y e a r s o f

H. Pat Duvall,

M a th : “ E a rly s ta rt

its

1 0 0 th

b i r th d a y

th is

C E , is

now

tr a n s p o r t a t i o n

p r o je c t

m anager

t u to r in g

y ears

of

e x p e r ie n c e

e n g in e e r in g ,

in

c o n s tru c tio n ,

S e a ttle

C o m m u n ity

C o lle g e

in

Milton L. Leet, 1999. • Paul D.

F e b ru a ry . W is h m e lu c k ! ” • M in E , r e tire d M a y 3 1 ,

Plavnick,

E E : “ I h a v e a c c e p te d th e p a s to ra te

o f N e w B e g in n in g s C h u r c h a n d w ill a ls o b e te a c h in g o n th e a d ju n c t fa c u lty o f Iv y T e c h C o m m u n ity C o lle g e in K o k o m o , I n d .” •

A. Rowley,

EE,

re c e iv e d

th e

Blair

A f f ilia te

S o c ie tie s C o u n c il E d u c a tio n A w a rd . H e is th e d ir e c to r o f th e f re s h m a n e n g in e e r in g p r o g ra m in th e W rig h t S ta te U n iv e r s ity C o lle g e o f E n g in e e rin g a n d C o m p u te r S c ie n c e .

1966 Jack A. Halpern, w o rk

a s an

w o r k in g

M in E :

“I h a v e

g o n e b a c k to

in d e p e n d e n t c o n s u lta n t. I am

fo r

El

P aso

C o rp .

on

p r o je c t

d e v e lo p m e n t f o r th e m a jo r p r o je c ts g ro u p w ith in e a s te rn p ip e lin e s . I a m a ls o c o n s u ltin g

Ron

fo r o th e r p r iv a te -s e c to r e n e rg y c lie n ts .” •

Pettus,

P h y s , is a n

a s s is ta n t p r o fe s s o r o f

p o litic a l s c ie n c e a t S t. C h a rle s C o m m u n ity C o lle g e a n d a s e lf- tra in e d E g y p to lo g is t. H e h a s b e e n g iv in g p r e s e n ta tio n s to s tu d e n ts in H o w e ll

s c h o o ls

fo r

Strickland,

15

M E:

y ears.

“ S t r ic k la n d

E n g in e e rin g m o v e d in to a n e w ly re n o v a te d ChE:

“I

now

a v a ila b le .

The

M o re

of

C o n s t r a in t s

i n f o r m a tio n r e c e n tly

o ffic e b u ild in g a t 113 W . M a in S t. in J a c k s o n ,

r e s id e

in

J i m ’s

e m a il

Floyd

Mitchell,

C h e s te rfie ld , M E:

“ I have

r e c y c lin g

s o lu t i o n s

P re s to n b u r g , K y .” •

In

c iv il

a d d itio n

s u rv e y o r, w e h ire d

to

e n g in e e r in g a

fro m

r e g is te r e d

Shawn Weber,

la n d

E E ’9 5 , as

new of C hE,

re tire d o n N o v . 1 ,2 0 0 2 , fro m a p o s itio n a s V P o f sa fe ty , h e a lth a n d e n v ir o n m e n t at C o n o c o In c . H e a n d h is w if e , S u e , c o n tin u e to re s id e a t 3 3 7 S u g a rb e rry C ir c le , H o u s to n ,T X 7 7 0 2 4 .

UM C.

in

a

te c h n o lo g ie s

s p e n d in g

g r a d u a te

is a 1992 U M R g ra d u a te

a c c e p te d

Dennis R. Parker,

1969

Mark

M o.

p o sitio n o f V P o f E n g in e e rin g /O p e r a tio n s fo r

Roger N. Brummel,

e n jo y in g

of

a d d re s s is j i m h jo n e s @ s b c g lo b a l.n e t . •

1994

“I a m

y ears

a r o u n d th e w o rld . J im a n d h is w if e c u rre n tly

e n jo y in g d o in g s o m e c o n s u ltin g w o rk a n d M E:

33

S t. L o u is w o r k in g o n c h e m ic a l p la n t d e s ig n s

in m e c h a n ic a l e n g in e e r in g , a n d B ria n is a

Arvinkumar M. Shah,

a fte r

fo o d p ro d u c t R & D in C in c in n a ti. H e w a s th e n

a n d A T O F IN A C h e m ic a ls In c . I h a v e b e e n •

at

e m p lo y e d fo r 2 9 y e a r s w ith M o n s a n to C o . in

M o . M y tw o s o n s h a v e jo in e d o u r firm in

f a m ily .”

S ig m a .

fo u n d

f o u r y e a rs w e re w ith P ro c te r & G a m b le in

re c e n t y e a rs .

w ith

S ix

be

James H. Jones,

re tire d

r e tire d in J a n u a ry 2 0 0 2 a f te r a c o m b in e d 3 8 -

tim e

w ith

can

p lu s y e a r s w ith B F G o o d r ic h C h e m ic a l C o .

m o re

1 ,0 0 0 - p lu s - p a g e

p r o fe s s io n a l c h e m ic a l e n g in e e r in g . T h e firs t

Thomas

Robert (Sonny) Rommelman,

is

p r a c titio n e r a n d m a n a g e m e n t b o o k p u b lis h e d

C hE,

F r a n c is

1963

1968 Forrest Breyfogle III, M E : “ T h e se c o n d e d itio n o f m y b o o k , Implementing Six Sigma,

s m a r te r s o lu tio n s .c o m .” •

s tu d e n ts in c o lle g e a lg e b r a a n d p r e -c a lc u lu s a t S o u th

p r o g ra m f u rth e r, a s it is th e o n ly o n e o f its k in d in th e n a tio n .”

b y W ile y in te g r a te s L e a n T h in k in g a n d th e

35

p la n n in g a n d lo c a l r o a d sy s te m s .

s ta r te d

to b e

T h e o ry

th a n

th r o u g h

I

th e

s tu d e n ts . A ll d e s ire

B e lle v ille , 111., o f fic e o f W o o lp e rt L L P . H e h a s tr a n s p o r ta tio n

2003.

in

to 4 .0

m o re

o n r e tire m e n t! W o rk in g tw o d a y s p e r w e e k A ugust

Walter C.

o w n s .” •

William Polka,

s u m m e r .” •

s e rv ic e .” •

he

M e tE : “ L a s t y e a r I m o v e d b a c k to

th e A lc o a p la n t th a t I s ta rte d w ith in 1 9 6 5 . T h e

1962 Robert A. Cox,

M E , r e tire d in A p ril

fro m A m e re n U E w ith 3 6 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e . H e

3 .9

P f iz e r

as

v ic e

C h e m : “ R e tir e d fro m

p re s id e n t

of

c h e m ic a l

d e v e lo p m e n t. N o w I a m te a c h in g at C a lv in

W. Foster,

C o l l e g e .”

tw o

M S C E ’7 0 : “ I a m still h a rd a t w o r k f o r U n c le

lo t o f tim e w ith m y th re e g r a n d c h ild r e n .” •

e n g in e e r in g

Janies Tira,

m a n a g e r .” •

my

re tire m e n t

by

C e rE :

s w im m in g

“I

r e g u la r ly ,

re tire d D e c . 3 1 , 2 0 0 2 ,

s e n io r

e n g i n e e r in g

d e s ig n e rs ,

t e c h n ic ia n s

and

an

William S. Warda, C E :

tw o

Charles

o u r e le c tr ic a l e n g in e e r. O u r s ta ff a ls o in c lu d e s

d a n c in g , p la y in g ta b le te n n is a n d s p e n d in g a

CE,

o f f ic e

S a m a n d th e U .S . A rm y a n d w e are e m p ty

“ I re tire d

n e s te rs n o w . L iv in g a n d w o r k in g in th e D .C . a re a is c o n tin u o u s ly s tim u la tin g , b u t w ith to o

at

fro m th e C o u n ty o f L o s A n g e le s a n d w e a re

and

n o w re s id in g in G e o rg ia . M y w ife b e c a m e

m u c h p o litic s .” •

te c h n o lo g y , 12 y e a rs a t M c D o n n e ll D o u g la s

d e a n o f th e S c h o o l o f N u rs in g a t G e o r g ia

“ W e m o v e d to A u s tin 1 1/2 y e a r s a g o to e n te r

a s a m a te r ia ls e n g in e e r a f te r 2 6 H o n e y w e ll

in

f le e t

y ears

m a in te n a n c e

S ta te

U n iv e r s ity

and

Terry L. McLellan,

M E:

a n d tw o y e a rs a t P E M C O C o r p . L o o k f o rw a r d

S o u th w e s te r n

I am

th e s e m in a ry . I p la n to f in is h m y tra in in g in

to d o in g f re e la n c e w o r k , w o rk in g a ro u n d th e

e n jo y in g m y tr a c to r a n d o th e r la n d s c a p in g

D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 3 to b e c o m e a m in is te r in th e

h o u s e a n d d o in g s o m e tr a v e lin g . M y w if e is

e q u ip m e n t.”

P r e s b y te r ia n C h u r c h .” •

still d ir e c to r a t o u r c h u rc h p r e s c h o o l.”

1967 1964 C h E : “ R e tir e d a n d

liv in g o n L a k e C o n ro e in T e x a s .” •

E. Burchill,

d e p a r tm e n t

A & M U n iv e rs ity o n F e b . 4 , 2 0 0 3 . •

Odendahl,

William

N u c E , w a s a p p o in te d h e a d o f th e

n u c le a r e n g i n e e r in g

at T ex as

James P.

C E : “ R e tire d f ro m W e y e rh a u s e r

C o . in N o v e m b e r 2 0 0 1 . E n jo y in g th e e x tr a tim e .” •

p r o je c t m a n a g e r w ith

Michael L. Deelo,

Henry W. Bryant Jr.,

Manubhai M. Patel,

M E : “ R e tir e d .”

M e tE :

“I to o k

r e tire m e n t

fro m th e D o e R u n C o . a n d I n o w w o r k w ith A rro w

T e rm in a ls , a c o m p a n y

s to r a g e

and

h a n d lin g

m e ta llu rg ic a l m a te r ia ls ." •

in v o lv e d

of

in

im p o r te d

John F. Lauletta,

G G p h , w a s a p p o in te d c h ie f e x e c u tiv e o f fic e r at V a rc o In te rn a tio n a l In c . in H o u s to n , T e x a s.

• Dale R. Merrell, C E : g ro u p

of

h ig h

“ I a m te a c h in g a g re a t

sch o o l

s e n io r s

fro m

H

A

I

T

’ I

S

N E W •

t

b e n d us vo u r a lum ni note s via: ■'

Jacobs

E n g in e e rin g

G r o u p . I a m w o r k in g o u t o f J a c o b s ’ o ffic e s in S t. L o u is .” •

Peter W. Sauer,

E E , w as

re c e n tly e le c te d in to th e N a tio n a l A c a d e m y of

E n g in e e r in g

(N A E )

fo r

h is

te c h n ic a l

c o n tr ib u tio n s to th e m o d e lin g , s im u la tio n , a n d d y n a m ic a n a ly s is o f p o w e r s y s te m s a n d fo r le a d e r s h ip

in p o w e r e n g in e e r in g e d u c a tio n

a n d re s e a rc h .

six

d if fe r e n t h ig h s c h o o ls in th e P o rtla n d a re a . A ll

W

Michael L. Mertens,

M E : “ In J u n e 2 0 0 2 , I a c c e p te d a p o sitio n as

W I T H

(Continued on page 40)

Y O U ?

EMAIL: alumni@umr.edu FAX: MSM-UMR Alumni Association, (978) 926-7986 MAIL: MSM-UMR Alumni Association, University of Missouri-Rolla, Castleman Hall, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409-0650

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

39


Alumni Notes

- /

' 70s

Future Miners Edwin Kuntz, C E ’9 6 , a n d h is w if e , Deena,

Damon Allen, C E ’9 2 , a n d h is w if e , Jeanne (Jackson),

C h E ’9 5 , h a d a g ir l,

M e tE ’9 2 , h a d a

A p ril 1 6 ,2 0 0 2 .

A b ig a il M a rg a r e t, o n

g ir l, N ic o le L e e , Trevor and Aubree Elizabeth Tilley

in J u n e 2 0 0 1 .

Courtney (Sandford) Birkel,

MS

E n v E ’9 4 , a n d h e r h u s b a n d , M ic h a e l, h a d a b o y , A le x a n d e r V on, o n N o v . 2 1 ,2 0 0 2 .

Craig Borgmeyer, C E ’8 8 ,

a n d h is w ife ,

Jeffry Lueddecke, A E ’9 5 ,

E liz a b e th .

h is w if e , L is a , h a d a b o y ,

Rodnev Gavin Jenkins

J a s o n D o u g la s , o n D e c . 2 7 , 200 1

Jill Dana, C h E ’9 5 ,

h e r h u s b a n d , G r e g , h a d a g ir l, C la ir e C a th e r in e , o n S e p t. 8 , 2 0 0 2 .

Philip Frerking,

M e tE ’9 0 ,

Suzanne (Hale) Gentry, C h E ’8 6 , a n d h e r h u s b a n d , S ta n , h a d a b o y , A d a m Adam Scott Gentry

jo i n s b ig b r o th e r C o lin , 5.

Kimberley Greene, C E ’9 7 , a n d h e r h u s b a n d , Gary, C E ’9 6 , h a d a b o y , A le x a n d e r R e e s e , o n A u g . 2 5 , 2 0 0 2 .

h is w if e . A m b e r, h a d a b o y ,

e d u c a tio n p r o g ra m .” •

Rick Jordan,

been

th e

a p p o in te d

to

SSM

M E , has

S t.

Jo sep h

be re s p o n s ib le fo r o v e r s e e in g all f u n d -r a is in g a c tiv itie s a n d p ro je c t r e q u e s ts . J o r d a n is th e c o - f o u n d e r o f P a ric C o r p . a n d E n v ir o n m e n ta l M a n a g e m e n t C o r p ., w h e r e he is c o a c h in g th e s e c o n d g e n e r a tio n o f c o r p o ra te le a d e r s h ip . H e th re e s ta te s a n d p a s t p r e s id e n t o f th e U M R A cadem y

of

M e c h a n ic a l

s ta r te d

my

c o n s u l ti n g

and

A ero sp ac e

Kurt F. Leighner,

E n g in e e rs . •

ow n th e

b u s in e s s m in in g

in

G G ph:

Ju n e

“I

2002,

in d u s tr y .

I

am

s p e c ia liz in g in m in e ra l e x p lo r a tio n , s tra te g ic p la n n in g a n d m in e p la n n in g , p e r m ittin g a n d

N u c E ’9 2 , a n d h is

d e v e lo p m e n t.”

R eed , on Feb. 3 , 2003.

1971

Deborah Stewart, A E ’9 1 , a n d

Larry Erickson, C E : “Nanette,

h e r h u s b a n d , T o d d , h a d a g ir l,

I a re h a p p y to a n n o u n c e th e J u ly 6 , 2 0 0 2 ,

P s y c ’7 1, a n d

Shelley Elizabeth, Cory Lee Gretlein, M in E ’0 1. T h e

A in s le y , o n F e b . 3 , 2 0 0 3 . S h e

m a r ria g e o f o u r d a u g h te r ,

jo in s h e r b ig s is te r H a le y , 3.

C S c i ’0 0 , to

a n d h is w ife , g ir l, R y le ig h

Matt Taylor, P h y s '9 8 , a n d h is w if e , Becky, E E ’9 8 , h a d a g ir l,

M e g a n L e ig h , o n O c t. 2 , 2 0 0 2

Bryan Tilley,

M in E ’9 6 , a n d h is w ife ,

c h ie f e x e c u tiv e o f fic e r a t S p rin t. •

Greene,

b r o th e r T re v o r, 3 .

M ic h a e l M e tE ’8 8 , a n d h e r

h u s b a n d , M a rty , h a d th e ir th ird

C h E ’9 9 ,

d a u g h te r , M a ry A lic e , o n A u g . 1,

a n d h is w ife , C in d y , h a d a

2002.

b o y , R o d n e y G a v in , o n J u n e 13, 2 0 0 2 . G a v in j o in s b ig s is te r , S y d n e y , 5 . H e is th e

Rick Jenkins.

E E ’9 3 , a n d th e g r a n d s o n o f Mary Grace Frerking

C h E ’6 9 .

K a te , h a d a b o y , R e ile y J a m e s , o n S e p t. 2 9 , 2 0 0 2 . H e jo i n s h is b ig

“I

P erez,

S p e c ia lis ts ,

th e

now

w o rk

in

h is

V ir g in ia

fo r

W. Marie my

com pany,

son, Seal

d is trib u to r

fo r

B u r g m a n n M e c h a n ic a l S e a ls . In th e n e w a g e o f c o m m u n ic a tio n , I d o a ll w o rk f ro m N e w M e x ic o .” •

Merrily,

Ronald D. Parker, fro m

th e m in in g

“I

have

in d u s tr y

and

M E:

Michael Vaugh, M E ’0 1 , a n d h is w if e , Kelly, B io S ’9 9 , h a d a g ir l,

q u ilt

A b ig a il R a c h a e l, o n J a n . 2 6 ,

S p r in g f ie ld , M o . W e h o p e all o f o u r U M R

2002.

f rie n d s h a v e th e o p p o r tu n ity to v is it u s s o o n .”

Gregory Weatherford,

E E ’8 9 ,

G r e g o ry , o n D e c . 2 8 , 2 0 0 1 . H e jo in s h is b ig s is te r K e ls e y , 4 .

Robin Winslett,

b r o th e r, W e sle y .

CE:

s e m i- r e tir e d

a n d h is w if e , A n d r e a , h a d a b o y , R y a n M E '9 7 , a n d h is w if e ,

C E , f o r m e r v ic e c h a ir m a n at

B e llS o u th in A tla n ta , a c c e p te d th e p o s itio n o f

D e a n n a , h a d a g ir l, A u b re e E liz a b e th , o n

Regina Topi,

Rodney Jenkins,

1972 Gary Forsee,

J u n e 2 9 , 2 0 0 2 . S h e jo in s h e r p r o u d b ig

A n n e , o n N o v . 16, 2 0 0 2 .

Jim Kamper,

G r e tle in s r e s id e in A u s tin , T e x a s .”

S c o tt, o n J u ly 18, 2 0 0 2 . H e

th e la te

111.”

“ B e e n d o in g a

w if e , A m y , h a d a b o y , N a th a n ie l

16, 2002 .

nephew of

M e tE ’9 5 , a n d

N a th a n S c o tt, o n J u ly 19, 2 0 0 1 .

g ir l, M a ry G r a c e , o n S e p t.

Nathan Jenkins,

S p rin g fie ld ,

is a ls o a lic e n s e d p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in e e r in

David Perkins,

B e n ja m in E a rl, o n M a y 8 , 2 0 0 1 .

a n d h is w if e , T iffa n y , h a d a

Craig Hindle, M E ’9 3 , Melissa, M E ’9 3 , h a d a

and

Donald Lueddecke, C h E ’7 0 ,

Joseph Schumer,

in

to

V a s c o n c e lle s

F o u n d a tio n b o a rd . A s a b o a r d m e m b e r h e w ill

Tamra Scheiblhofer, E M g t’9 5 , a n d h e r h u s b a n d , Chris, M e tE ’9 5 , h a d a b o y ,

and

C o rp .

p la n n in g

w ith

a s p a rt o f a n A lu m n i H o lid a y s c o n tin u in g a

M S C E ’8 I .

Phillip Courtney. G e o E ’9 9 ,

I am

c a reer

o n e w e e k in T u s c a n y w ith o th e r R o lla g r a d s ,

A le x a n d e r Je ffry , o n M a y 1,

a n d h is w ife , M e lis s a , h a d a b o y ,

s e r v ic e .

my

lo t o f b u s in e s s tra v e l to A s ia , e s p e c ia lly C h in a .

2 0 0 2 . A le x is th e g r a n d s o n

D e c . 3 1 ,2 0 0 1 .

s ta te

B u t th e m o s t m e m o ra b le tr ip o f 2 0 0 2 w a s o u r

S h e jo in s h e r o ld e r sis te r,

of

in

Michael A . Finkelstein, E M g t:

g ir l, E m ilie , o n D e c . 2 0 , 2 0 0 2 .

h a d a b o y , J u s tin , o n

y ears

E n g in e e r in g

Todd Lippincott, G G p h ’9 8 , a n d h is w if e , Elaine (Cozort), G G p h ’0 1 , h a d

a n d h is w ife , S e m o n e ,

th e

R e so u rc e s,

O ffic e o f W a te r R e s o u r c e s , a f te r m o re th a n 31

Alison Lawrence,

W a lk e r, o n A u g . 8 , 2 0 0 2 .

M e tE '9 7 ,

C E : “ R e tire d fro m

D e p a r tm e n t o f N a tu r a l

C E ’9 8 , a n d h e r

M a rie , o n O c t. 2 0 , 2 0 0 2 .

Chi-Ming Chang,

I llin o is

c o n tin u e

h u s b a n d , B ill, h a d a b o y , W illia m

W en d y , h a d a g ir l, H a n n a h

1970 Robert H. Dalton,

C h E ’9 5 , h a d a g ir l,

P s y c ’7 2 , h a s o p e n e d a f a b ric a n d

sh o p ,

M e r r ily

We

• Clyde T. Parsons Jr.,

Q u ilt

C S c i:

A lo n g ,

“I re tire d

in

fro m

U S A A in O c to b e r 2 0 0 1 . M y w if e , P a tr ic ia , a n d I tr a v e le d to E n g la n d f o r six m o n th s to v is it h e r r e la tiv e s . I h a v e a ls o w o r k e d w ith c h a r itie s a n d o n w o o d w o r k in g . N o p la n s to r e tu rn to w o r k ! ”

K y ra, on A u g . 9 , 20 0 2 .

Ingeborg Kaus, C e rE '9 8 ,

had a boy,

E s k il, o n J a n . 2 4 , 2 0 0 2 .

1973 Carol A. Davies, C h e m : L a u r a , g r a d u a te d f ro m

40

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

“ O u r o ld e s t d a u g h te r , UMR

in D e c e m b e r


Alumni Notes 2 0 0 2 w ith a d e g re e in c h e m ic a l e n g in e e r in g . I am g o in g to m iss th e fre q u e n t tr ip s b a c k to R o lla !” •

John M. Keating, M e tE : “I f in is h e d

Weddings_______

a m a s te r ’s d e g re e in te c h n o lo g y m a n a g e m e n t in

D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 2 . G o in g

to

school

and

w o rk in g fu ll tim e w a s in te re s tin g . N a n c y a n d 1 m o v e d in to a n e w h o u s e o n a la k e in c e n tra l

J. Curtis Killinger,

F lo rid a . C o m e v is it! ” •

M a th , M S E M g t’80: “ E n jo y in g m y 2 7 th y e a r in th e p e tr o le u m e x p lo r a tio n a n d p r o d u c in g b u s in e s s

w ith

C h a ll e n g e r

M i n e r a ls ,

w ith

o p e r a tio n s in th e G u lf o f M e x ic o a n d th e N o rth

Jonathan

( M in E ’9 8 ) a n d K a tr in a A n n C a rm a c k w e re

m a rrie d o n A u g . 17, 2 0 0 2 .

Cory Gretlein,

Shelley Erickson, C S c i’0 0 ,

M in E ’0 1 , a n d

w e re m a rrie d o n Ju ly 6 , 2 0 0 2 . T h e c o u p le r e s id e s in A u s tin , T exas.

Joe Hale,

Denise McMillan.

M in E ’0 2 , a n d

M e tE ’0 0 , w e re

m a r rie d on A u g . 3 , 2 0 0 2 .

S e a . A s a s u b s id ia ry o f G lo b a l S a n ta F e , th e

Keith Kuhlniann. G e o E ’9 6 .

se c o n d la rg e s t o ffs h o re d rillin g c o m p a n y , I

o n S e p t. 2 7 , 2 0 0 2 , in A rlin g to n H e ig h ts . 111. T h e c o u p le

h o p e to g e t th e o p p o r tu n ity to a p p ly so m e

r e s id e s in A lis o V ie jo , C a lif.

e n g in e e r in g

m a n a g e m e n t.

I

am

h a p p ily

m a rrie d w ith tw o c h ild r e n , a g e s 14 a n d 1 1 •

Stephen L. Robertson,

CE:

“I

w a s re c e n tly

n a m e d p re s id e n t o f C o n v e rg y s I n te rn a tio n a l. T h e o ffic e re lo c a te d to C a m b r id g e , E n g la n d .”

Douglas

a n d C h ris tie G ip e w e re m a rrie d

( M E ’8 4 ) a n d C h ris tin e M o e h le w e re m a rrie d o n

William and Rebecca Tyrrell

M a y 14, 2 0 0 2 , in J u n e a u , A la s k a . C h ris tin e is a w o n d e rfu l s te p m o th e r to B e n , 10, a n d L a u re n , 6 .

David Schledorn, C E ’8 6 ,

M S C E ’9 0 , a n d J e n n ife r P rio r w e re m a rrie d o n N o v . 3 0 ,

2 0 0 2 , in S t. B r ig id a C a th o lic C h u r c h in U n te rm a u b a c h . G e rm a n y . T h e y w ill r e s id e in C o p p e ll, T e x a s .

1974 C E , M S C E ’7 6 : “ O u r

Shawn Steen,

P s y c ’9 4 , a n d C h r is tin a B a sh a m w e re m a rrie d in S e p te m b e r 2 0 0 1 .

firs t g r a n d d a u g h te r w a s b o rn in J a n u a ry to o u r

Steve Squibb,

M E '9 8 , a n d

re c e n tly m a r rie d d a u g h te r , N e o m ie . O u r tw o

in T u ls a , O k la .

Jerome

Maurseth,

A.

e ld e s t d a u g h te r s , T h r u s ie

and

K r is tin , a re

e n g a g e d . K r is tin a tte n d s G e o r g e to w n M e d ic a l

Patrice Ryan,

S c h o o l.” •

m y p r iv a te p r a c tic e

in

P sy c : “ In a d d itio n to K n o x v ille , T e n n ., I

p ro v id e p s y c h o lo g ic a l

s e rv ic e s tw o

w eek

E m p lo y e e A s s is ta n c e

as

p a rt o f th e

days a

Amie Wood.

William Tyrrell, C h E ’0 1 , a n d

M g S y ’9 8 , w e re m a r rie d o n S e p t. 2 8 , 2 0 0 2 ,

R e b e c c a S to ry w e re m a rrie d in R o lla , M o ., o n J a n . 4 ,

2 0 0 3 . T h e c o u p le w ill r e s id e in M ia m i, O k la .

Gerald Wallock, E M g t’9 6 .

a n d G re tc h e n C o rd ill w e re m a r rie d at S t. D o m in ic

C a th o lic C h u r c h in B o lin g b r o o k , 111., on A p ril 2 0 , 2 0 0 2 .

P ro g ra m a t O a k R id g e N a tio n a l L a b o ra to r y .” •

George new

Skosey,

A.

M E : “ I re c e n tly s ta rte d a

c o m m u n ic a tin g

m e ta llu r g y

and

c o r r o s io n

p r o b le m -s o lv in g th a t h a s h e lp e d m e c o p e w ith

life . In N o v e m b e r 2 0 0 2 , I to o k e a rly

is s u e s a n d s o lu tio n s th ro u g h o u t B P ’s R e fin in g

my

r e tire m e n t fro m J o h n D e e r e , a f te r m o re th a n

S e c to r w o r ld w id e . W ith th e m e rg e r o f th e

g a in f u lly e m p lo y e d m o s t o f m y a d u lt life ,

28 y e a r s o f s e rv ic e . M y m o s t re c e n t j o b w a s a

f o r m e r B ritish P e tr o le u m , A m o c o a n d A rc o

h a v in g m y e d u c a tio n h a s b e e n a c o m fo rt a n d

te s t e n g in e e r fo r th e la w n a n d g a rd e n d iv is io n

in to B P, o u r r e fin e r ie s a re lo c a te d a ro u n d th e

s u p p o r t f o r m e .”

in H o r ic o n , W is .” •

Gerry Wiegmann.

E M g t,

d is a b ility .

Though

u s e in th e n e x t c o u p le o f y e a r s ! ” •

w a s re c e n tly ra n k e d 3 3 4 a m o n g th e n a tio n ’s

Cummings,

“Ted,

M E:

E E ’7 6 ,

Ramona and I

to

w e lc o m e d o u r f irs t g ra n d c h ild w a y b a c k in

c o n s tru c tio n re v e n u e in 2 0 0 1 b y

Engineering

1 9 9 9 a n d lo o k f o rw a rd to o th e rs o n th e w a y .

R ic h m o n d ,

News-Record,

p u b lic a tio n .

T e d is a d e s ig n e n g in e e r fo r D a im le r C h r y s le r

G e o E ’7 6 ,

s p e c ia lty

c o n tr a c to rs

a n a tio n a l

tra d e

a c c o r d in g

W ie g m a n n A s s o c ia te s is a S t. C h a rle s , M o .based

f u l l- s e r v i c e

s p e c ia liz in g

m e c h a n ic a l

c o n tra c to r,

in h e a tin g , v e n tila tin g

and

a ir

1975 Michael V. Lupo, Marias Miracle, w a s

AE:

“My

new

book,

p u b lis h e d in J u ly 2 0 0 2 .

Y ou c a n o r d e r it a t w w w .lu p o b o o k s .c o m .” •

Donald E. Simpson.

C E , M S C E ’8 8 : “ I a m a

re s id e n t e n g in e e r f o r th e W a lte r F. G e o rg e c o n c re te c u to f f w a ll p r o je c t w o rk in g in w a te r d e p th s

up

to

10 0

f e e t. T h e

d e s ig n -b u ild

te c h n o lo g y is th e f irs t o f its k in d in th e U n ite d S ta te s .”

0

Donald J. Chronister, to

r e f in in g

a d v is o r -

a n d is a m e m b e r o f K a p p a A lp h a fra te rn ity . O u r d a u g h te r , M a g g ie , is a ju n io r in h ig h

a n d E n g in e e rs in S t. L o u is .

Randall Noon.

M E , s y s te m s

e n g in e e r fo r N e b r a s k a P u b lic P o w e r D is tr ic t, tw o c h a p te r s

Forensic Science,

o f th e

new

te x tb o o k ,

p u b lis h e d th is fa ll b y C R C

P re s s . H e p re s e n te d

a p ap er on

p o te n tia l

Marcel Maupin. f o r th e

T e a c h in g

A w ard

U n iv e r s ity

in

McCallister,

R e g e n ts fro m

N ovem ber

M a th ,

w as

D is tin g u is h e d

O k la h o m a 2002.

S ta te

Larry

C E , M S C E ’7 9 , a U .S . A rm y

c o lo n e l, is a tte n d in g th e A rm y W a r C o lle g e at C a rlis le B a rr a c k s in C a rlis le , P a . T h e

I n t e r n a tio n a l

R e lia b ility

c iv ilia n o ffic ia ls o f th e fe d e ra l g o v e r n m e n t f o r to p -le v e l c o m m a n d a n d s ta ff p o s itio n s w ith

P ow er

P la n t

E M g t:

“I

am

c u r r ic u lu m

th e a rm e d

David

G.

p re p a re s

f o rc e s th r o u g h o u t

Winter,

o f f ic e r s

12-

C o n f e r e n c e la s t N o v e m b e r in H o u s to n , T e x a s

and

th e w o rld . •

C E : “ I h a v e c h a n g e d jo b s

a n d a m n o w r e s p o n s ib le f o r n a tio n a l p r o g ra m d e v e lo p m e n t f o r G e o E n g in e e r s In c . M y n e w

o il a n d g a s is s u e s .” •

site ,

“ M y e d u c a tio n a t U M R ta u g h t m e a n a ly tic

and

m o n th

o u r h u g e T e x a s C ity re fin e r y a n d c h e m ic a ls c o o r d in a tin g

s c h o o l .” n o m in a te d

tr a n s f o rm e r p r e v e n ta tiv e m a in te n a n c e at th e

1977

be

te a c h in g

C o . M e c h a n ic a l C o n tr a c to r s

John Bown, G G p h :

a ls o

w ith

at U M R m a jo r in g in e le c tr ic a l e n g in e e rin g

m e ta llu rg y a n d c o r ro s io n a t BP. I w ill still b e

w ill

Bob.

year

p r o m o te d to c h ie f

fig h tin g c o r ro s io n a n d m a te ria l p r o b le m s at but

y e a rs.

2 6 th

o p e r a tin g o f fic e r o f M u rp h y

M e tE , M S M e tE ’8 0 :

g lo b a l

f iv e

c e r tific a tio n . O u r s o n , A d a m , is a s o p h o m o re

r e tire d a n d lo v in g it.”

“ P r o m o te d

h is

M E,

Dave Hardin.

H e a ls o r e ta in s h is title o f e x e c u tiv e v ic e

w r o te

fo r

m ark ed

m id d le s c h o o l m a th a n d e a r n in g m y te a c h e r

te a m .” •

p re s id e n t. •

C E : “ W e h a v e liv e d in

T ex as,

S c h lu m b e r g e r la s t su m m e r. I am

• Leonard H. Wasserman,

1976

been

le a d

A u to m o tiv e a n d I a m

at left, w a s

c o n d itio n in g .

not

1978 Wilma K. Hilton,

600

have

w o r ld . L o o k s lik e m y p a s s p o rt w ill g e t a lo t o f

is p r e s id e n t o f W ie g m a n n A s s o c ia te s , w h ic h to p

I

e m a il is d w in te r @ g e o e n g in e e r s .c o m .” “ I still w o rk f o r B L M on

Michael W. Jones,

M E:

(Continued on page 42) MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

41


iimni Notes C h E : “ I a m w o rk in g f o r M e rid ia n M e d ic a l

The ultimate research project

T e c h n o lo g ie s

The connection between Ultimate Frisbee and research at the University of California Davis Sports Biomechanics Laboratory may seem unnatural, but for Sarah Hummel, ME'97, it's anything but. Hummel, w ho started playing Ultimate Frisbee during her undergraduate days at UMR, chose Frisbee dynamics as her master's thesis topic at UC Davis. Hummel studied simulation of the fligh t of the Frisbee and the biomechanics of Frisbee throwing. Her research involved calculating the torques at the shoulder, elbow and w rist jo int to understand where and how power for the throw is generated, and eventually optimizing the outcome.

as

a

m e th o d s

d e v e lo p m e n t

c h e m is t. M y o ld e s t b o y is a fre s h m a n a t M U . M y d a u g h te r is a s e n io r in h ig h sc h o o l a n d m y y o u n g e s t b o y is a f re s h m a n . T im e f lie s ! ”

1983 Philip Kauble, E E :

“ I a m c u r re n tly a t B o e in g

in M e s a , A r iz . M y jo b u p d a te s T 3 8 J e t tr a in e rs f ro m A m o d e ls to C m o d e ls , u p d a tin g th e a v io n ic s

Hummel's research was featured on Discovery Canada in November. See the video clip, "High-flying Frisbee science," at www.exn.ca/dailyplanet/view.asp?date=11/15/2002

f ro m

a n a lo g

to

d ig ita l, a n d

r e v a m p s th e c o c k p it f ro m w h ic h in c lu d e s a H U D .” • jo in e d

M o r r is s e y

Don Markus,

C o n s tr u c tio n

e s tim a to r . H e h a s

Co.

Mausshardt, a t- h o m e

CE,

as

an

19 y e a r s o f e s tim a tin g

Denise

e x p e r ie n c e in th e S t. L o u is a re a . • The three red dots shown in the photo are LEDs fixed to the top of the Frisbee and are used to track its flight. When the Frisbee is thrown, four high-speed video cameras record the motion of the LEDs during the flight, providing the 3-D position of each LED. This allows Hummel to determine the orientation, velocity and spin of the Frisbee throughout the flight. The method allows Hummel to get data which can't be determined from wind-tunnel experiments.

a ls o

g a u g e s to g la s s

M a th : “ I c o n tin u e to b e a sta y -

m om

and

am

now

a c tiv e

in

th e

sc o u tin g m o v e m e n t. M y o ld e r s o n , G e o r g e , a n d h is d e n j u s t m o v e d f ro m C u b S c o u ts to B o y S c o u ts , r e lie v in g m e o f th e d e n le a d e r s ta tu s . H o w e v e r , I still le a d m y d a u g h te r ’s G irl S c o u t tr o o p a n d I a m a m e m b e r o f th e N e w H o r iz o n s R o u n d T a b le s ta ff f o r C u b S c o u ts .

1979

num ber

Mike Koclanes,

C S c i,

re c e n tly

had

th e

is

(8 1 6 ) 4 2 0 - 8 7 0 0

and

e m a il

is

Robert J. Hoffmann,

b h e r z ig @ k c .rr .c o m .” •

My UMR

d e g r e e h a s h e lp e d m e to b u ild

c ir c u its , p e r fo r m

a ir p r e s s u re e x p e r im e n ts ,

c o m p a n y h e c o - fo u n d e d , C r e e k P a th S y s te m s ,

M E : “ D o n ’t m is s th e 1 0 0 th a n n iv e r s a r y o f

le a d a m a th e m a tic s a w a r d a n d a n u m b e r o f

chosen

K a p p a S ig m a a t M S M -U M R ! S e e y o u a t

o th e r p r o je c ts .” •

a s th e “ E m e rg in g C o m p a n y o f th e

Shahin Safaei,

Michael T. Moylett,

G G ph,

M S G G p h ’8 5 : “ J e n n ife r , J a k e a n d A le e a re

H o m e c o m in g .” •

c o m m u n ity in th e c a te g o ry o f m a n a g e m e n t

d o in g O K so far. It is a lw a y s n ic e to h e a r

d o in g g r e a t. I ju s t s ta rte d a n e w j o b

s o f tw a r e . K o c la n e s is th e c h ie f te c h n o lo g y

f ro m U M R s tu d e n ts b e c a u s e th e y w e re n o t

P a r a lle l P e tr o le u m ( P L L L ) a n d I a m e n jo y in g

o f fic e r o f th e c o m p a n y . •

Kent at left,

e v e n b o rn w h e n I w a s a s tu d e n t a t U M R .” •

m y tim e in th e ‘o il p a t c h .’”

P. Koenemann,

Walter James Unverferth,

C o n s tr u c tio n

H o u s to n f o r th e lo n g h a u l. S o ld o u r c o m p a n y

1984

a n d s ta rte d o v e r w ith sa m e n a m e - S y n e rg y

Steven Meyer, A E :

H B

ffm m

— I I jo in e d

U n ite d

CE,

as v *c e p re s id e n t. He is r e s p o n s ib le f o r s u p e r v is in g B

M

^ B

o v e r s e e in g

f ie ld

c o n s tr u c tio n

c o n c e p tu a l

le s s th a n f o u r y e a r s .”

v a lu e

O u r d a u g h te r s , A llis o n , 6 , a n d S a r a h , 4 , a re

e n g in e e r in g a n d d e s ig n /b u ild p r e -c o n s tr u c tio n s e r v ic e s ;

Allan

d e v e lo p in g

and

m a in ta in in g

g r o w in g C.

re lo c a te d

c lie n t r e la tio n s h ip s .

Beshore, to

th e

C h E , M S C h E ’8 6 : “ J u s t K ansas

C ity

area

fro m

W a s h in g to n , D .C . L o o k in g f o r w a r d to b e in g ■ B H B j j b a c k

HHRHfK

i*8Qs

,*r v*

th e

M id w e s t.” •

C o n s tru c tio n in S t. L o u is as

B |

a p ro je c t e x e c u tiv e . H e is fo c u s in g o n n e w

C E , j o in e d

P a r ic C o rp . in

O ’F a llo n , M o ., a s a p r o je c t d ir e c to r. H e h a s m o re

in

David A. Brewer, M E , at left, j o i n e d C la y c o

3

1980 Tim Williams, th a n

16

y e a rs

of

e x p e rie n c e

in

c o n s tru c tio n m a n a g e m e n t.

f H

i

a r |d fo r

b u s in e s s

p r o je c t d e v e lo p m e n t C la y c o , w ith an

e m p h a s is o n h e a lth c a r e , in s titu tio n a l a n d new

te c h n o lo g y

Foeller,

o p p o r tu n itie s . •

Kirk

C.

G G p h : “ R e tire d f ro m th e A rm y a s a

m a jo r in S e p te m b e r 2 0 0 2 . 1 a m n o w w o r k in g

1981

f o r S A IC in H u n ts v ille , A la .” •

Steven Cronin,

C E , w a s p r o m o te d to v ic e

p r e s id e n t o f th e c o n c r e te g r o u p a t T a rlto n

Benjamin Hankins, G e o E :

Linda Hand,

M a th : “ I w ill b e o n s a b b a tic a l fro m M is s o u r i S o u th e r n

S ta te C o lle g e f o r th e 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

I llin o is a n d In d ia n a . I h a v e b e e n m a r rie d f o r 17 y e a r s a n d h a v e tw o w o n d e r fu l c h ild r e n , a g e s 13 a n d 9 .” •

s e rv in g

EE:

“ H ere

is

my

b u s in e s s

ChE:

“ R e c e iv e d

p ro fe s s io n a l

e n g in e e r

p r o u d ly ! ” •

John M.

R o b e rt B o s c h T o o l C o r p .” •

Robert J. Weir,

A E , M S A E ’85: “ V e n u s, o u r tw o c h ild r e n a n d I liv e in N e w M e x ic o , b u t g e t b a c k to M is s o u r i e v e r y y e a r. I still w o rk in m is s ile d e f e n s e , u s in g s o m e o f th e fa s te s t c o m p u te r s in th e w o rld . I t ’s h a r d to b e lie v e it h a s b e e n m o re th a n 15 y e a r s s in c e I g r a d u a te d .”

1985

Herzig,

c o u n tr y

M e tE : “ I w a s r e c e n tly p r o m o te d to

s e n io r v ic e p r e s id e n t o f e n g in e e r in g f o r th e

Glenn

Brian A. Schmidt,

th e

Remmers,

o th e r m u s e u m s . I m a y b e a b le to c o m e to ta lk a t U M R , D r. H a ll.” •

“A s one

to a c tiv e d u ty , I a m w e a r in g m y o th e r u n if o rm ,

C o n s t r u c ti o n

Robert L.

Steven Poppe, M E :

o f th e th o u s a n d s o f m ilita ry r e s e r v is ts r e c a lle d

s c h o o l y e a r. I a m p la n n in g a v is it to E n g la n d

A m e r ic a (C M A A ) in M a y 2 0 0 2 .” •

Mark A. Odum,

s u p e r v is o r o f th e r o o f c o n tr o l g r o u p in d is tr ic t

to v ie w a r tifa c ts a t th e B ritis h M u s e u m a n d

of

q u ic k ly ! ” •

e ig h t. W e c o v e r a ll u n d e r g ro u n d m in e s in

“I becam e

M a n a g e m e n t A s s o c ia tio n

up

M in E : “ I h a v e w o rk e d f o r th e la s t fiv e y e a r s as

a c e r tifie d c o n s tru c tio n m a n a g e r th r o u g h th e

C o rp . •

“ W e re c e n tly r e lo c a te d to

C a ry , N .C ., in a s s o c ia tio n w ith a p r o m o tio n to d e f e n s e m a r k e t m a n a g e r f o r L o rd A e r o s p a c e .

a c tiv itie s ;

e s t im a t i n g ,

w ith

C E : “ S ta y in g in

O il a n d G a s . O u r o ld e s t w ill b e in c o lle g e in

1982

and

CE:

“I a m

Y e a r,” b y th e in f o rm a tio n o p e r a tio n s (I/O )

to

Fournie,

d ire c to r

of

N ovem ber 2002. •

M E,

w as

S u r g iC a r e

Robert

C.

p r o m o te d R&D

Hazlett,

in CE:

in f o rm a tio n : B o b H e r z ig a n d A s s o c ia te s In c .,

lic e n s e f o r M is s o u r i a n d I llin o is . L iv in g in S t.

“ P r e s e n tly

C o n s u ltin g E n g in e e rin g S e r v ic e s , P.O . B o x

L o u is w ith m y w if e , P e g g y , a n d m y c h ild r e n ,

p la n n in g /tr a f f ic o p e r a tio n s g r o u p f o r K im le y -

2 8 0 6 5 , K a n s a s C ity , M O 6 4 1 1 8 . M y p h o n e

J e n n if e r a n d J e ff re y .” •

Margaret Schroeder,

H o r n . S in c e lo c a tin g h e re in 19 9 8 , L in d a a n d I

42

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

le a d in g

D e n v e r ’s tr a n s p o r ta tio n


h a v e h a d tw o d a u g h te r s , L in d s a y , 3 , a n d L ily ,

Bob Schmitt,

in

p u r c h a s in g in th e S t. L o u is c o r p o ra te o ffic e .

1.” • William L. Kovacich, M e tE :

W e n tz v ille , M o . W e h a v e tw o c h ild re n : J o h n ,

A ls o , c e le b r a tin g 3 0 y e a rs o f m a rria g e to a

b ra z e

6 , a n d S a ra h , 4 m o n th s . I h a v e b e e n b u sy

R o lla g ir l, M a ry T h u rm o n d . W e h a v e tw o

p re fo rm s f o r p o w e re d m e ta l p a rts . T h e p a te n t

b e in g a m o m a n d s e llin g re a l e s ta te . B o b

w o n d e r fu l d a u g h te r s , a g e s

c o v e rs a n e w

w o r k s f o r J a c o b s E n g in e e rin g as a p ro je c t

George Manyando,

P h D C E , M S E M g t’9 1:

m a n a g e r.

“ R e c e n tly

S ta n d a r d

a

p a te n t

fo r

l i q u id - p h a s e te c h n iq u e

“ R e c e iv e d

s in te r e d

f o r a p p ly in g

b ra z e m a te ria l d u rin g s in te r in g .” •

Maurice,

PM

Craig J.

M E ’8 9 ,

O ur

and

e m a il

we

liv e

a d d ress

is

jo in e d

Matthew Scholl,

E n g in e e r in g

R e c e n tly p ro m o te d to s y s te m s u p p o r t o f fic e r

M E : “ I h a v e ta k e n a n e w jo b

g e o te c h n ic a l

f o r a v ia tio n in th e o ffic e o f th e d e p u ty to th e

as

y e a rs

E M g t: “ E v e ry th in g is g o in g g re a t.

com m ander

fo r

s y s te m

su p p o rt

Nancy Nethington,

c h e r is c h m itt@ m s n .c o m .” •

fo r

s a le s

rep

H a n d lin g

fo r

M a te r ia l

S o lu tio n s

in

M e m p h is , T e n n .” •

Greg R.

a m w o r k in g as a s u b s titu te te a c h e r f o r th e

Vetter,

s ta rte d a

R ockw ood

te n u re -tra c k p o s itio n

A M C O M .” •

S chool

D is tr ic t.

G G ph: “I

W ith

our

y o u n g e s t f in a lly in s c h o o l, it w a s m y tu rn to

Stephen Rode,

d o s o m e th in g d if fe r e n t.” •

at left,

EE,

C o.

as

17 a n d

2 1 .” •

T e s tin g

and

O k la h o m a

C ity

d e p a r tm e n t m a n a g e r a f te r

w ith

W o o d w a rd

( U R S ) in S t. L o u is .” •

11

C ly d e

C o n s u lta n ts

Tracy

S.

Perkins,

C h e m , M S C h e m ’9 1 , w a s n a m e d a m e m b e r o f H u s c h a n d E p p e n b e rg e r L L C . S h e p ra c tic e s in

a s an

th e f ir m ’s e n v ir o n m e n ta l a n d re g u la to ry la w

a s s is ta n t p r o fe s s o r o f la w at th e U n iv e r s ity o f

p r a c tic e g r o u p , c o n c e n tr a tin g in th e a re a s o f

H o u s to n .

in c lu d e

e n v ir o n m e n ta l a n d o c c u p a tio n a l sa fe ty

ro le

h e a lth

H is

re se a rc h

in te r e s ts

la w .

P e r k in s

a d v is e s

and

c lie n ts

on

C h E : “ I a m c u rre n tly w o r k in g fo r P ro c te r &

i n te lle c tu a l p r o p e r ty , p a te n ts , th e

G a m b le in S h e r m a n , T e x a s . I g o t m a r rie d

in te lle c tu a l p ro p e rty in c o m m e rc ia l la w a n d

re g u la to ry c o m p lia n c e is s u e s a n d r e p re s e n ts

N ov. 6, 2002. M y

in f o rm a tio n te c h n o lo g y law .

c l ie n ts

h o b b ie s

in c lu d e

g o lf ,

of

h u n tin g , f is h in g a n d a little w a te r s k iin g . M y e m a il a d d r e s s

is s te v e r o d e @ m s m .u m r .e d u .

D ro p m e a lin e .” •

Anne M. Werner, C E :

“I

p la n to f in is h m y P h .D . in c iv il e n g in e e r in g in sp rin g 2 0 0 3 ( fin a lly ) .”

1988

l itig a tio n .

Craig Borgmeyer,

C E : “ I c h a n g e d jo b s in

“ M is s y

J a n u a ry 2 0 0 2 a n d

I am now

E n v ir o n m e n ta l

Joseph

1986

R e s o u r c e s M a n a g e m e n t.” •

Carter,

A.

w o rk in g fo r

E M g t, h a s re tu rn e d to

H e id e m a n a n d A s s o c ia te s In c . a s a s e n io r

Scott Avis, M e tE :

“ M o v e d to G e o r g ia in 2 0 0 2

e le c t r i c a l

e n g in e e r .

He

has

14

y ears

to m a n a g e C a te r p illa r ’s s e a l r in g fo u n d ry .

of

e le c tr ic a l

e n g in e e r in g

e x p e r ie n c e

C a m i, H a ile y , 6 , L in d s e y , 6 , M o r g a n , 3 , a n d I

e n c o m p a s s in g

e d u c a tio n a l,

h e a lth c a r e ,

a re e n jo y in g w in te rs n o w ! ” • C hE:

“ S till w o r k in g

coach.

My

w if e ,

as

Curt Beutler,

a fu ll- tim e

K aren ,

s w im

f in is h e d

her

c o m m e rc ia l,

in d u s tria l,

in s t i t u t i o n a l ,

and

a e r o s p a c e , a s w e ll as p a rk s a n d r e c re a tio n a l fa c ilitie s . •

William B. McNally,

M E: “M y

r e s id e n c y in fa m ily p r a c tic e a n d h a s s ta rte d

w if e , C in d y , a n d I liv e j u s t o u ts id e S t. L o u is .

w o rk in g in a c lin ic in L ittle C h u te , W is . O u r

L ife is g o o d ! ” •

Douglas Farrar, a n d I c e le b r a te d o u r

h o u rs a re f in a lly b e tte r.” •

“Vicky,

C hE :

C h E ’8 6 ,

16th a n n iv e r s a r y in D e c e m b e r. W e h a v e tw o

in

a d m in is tra tiv e

Regina Topi,

M e tE : “ I h a v e

Kenneth B. Rigsby,

and

I a re

liv in g

Korba, H e a lth

in

L S c i, C a re

in

Christiane

C o l o r a d o .” • jo in e d

P a tie n ts

F ir s t

W a s h in g to n , M o ., a s

an

o b s t e tr i c i a n - g y n e c o l o g i s t .

Ken Lovelace, re tu rn e d

to

CE,

S t.

at left,

L o u is

to

jo in L e g a c y B u ild in g G r o u p L L C , as

v ic e

o p e ra tio n s .

p r e s id e n t o f

Joe Swan,

M in E : “ T e rri a n d I c e le b r a te d o u r 2 0 th w e d d in g a n n iv e r s a r y o n A u g . 7 , 2 0 0 2 . L a u ra is 18 y e a rs o ld a n d a tte n d in g a ju n io r c o lle g e a n d H o lly is 14

have

a

R e p u b lic a n

a g a in .”

M E , is a p r o c e s s

e n g in e e r a t F o rd M o to r C o . H e a ls o lik e s to c o lle c t

and

r e s to r e

v in ta g e

C u n n in g h a m w a s p ic tu r e d in th e

American h is

in N o v e m b e r 2 0 0 2 s ta n d in g b e s id e

1928

Kearney,

v e h ic le s .

St. Louis

F o rd

M odel

A*

Charlene P.

P sy c : “ A f te r a w o n d e r fu l c a r e e r a s

a lic e n s e d

c lin ic a l

s o c ia l

w o r k e r in b o th

M is s o u ri a n d V irg in ia , I h a v e re tire d e n jo y d o in g

and

all o f th e th in g s th a t I h a v e

a lw a y s w a n te d to h a v e th e tim e to d o .” *

Cheryl (Mohan) Schmitt,

M e tE : “ I m a r rie d

M in E :

s o u th w e s t

C o n g ress

and

Mark Rosebrough,

p r o d u c tio n

m anager

fo r

S e n a te

C hE,

D uPont

is

P r o te in

T e c h n o lo g ie s n e a r T u ls a , O k la . H e a n d h is w ife h a v e fiv e c h ild r e n .

1991 Mary F. Beecher,

M e tE :

“I a m

still e n jo y in g

th e u ltim a te life c h a lle n g e — p a r e n th o o d ! M y c h a lle n g e s

are

m u n c h k in s .

d a ily

w ith

I s u d d e n ly

our

f iv e

a p p r e c ia te

little

a ll

my

p a r e n ts d id f o r m e g r o w in g u p . H e llo , to m y

a p a r t- tim e

fe llo w

s c h e d u le .

I am

a r e a l e s ta te

J

Thomas A . Polcyn, M E , at left, w a s e le c te d p a r tn e r

I

a t T h o m p s o n C o b u rn L L P hiw firm in S t. L o u is . H e

a lu m s ! ” •

a p p r a is e r n o w .”

1989 Mary

1L

Collins,

MS

CE,

a

^

r e g is te r e d

p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in e e r in M is s o u ri, h a s b e e n

\

E con:

“I

a m b u s y w ith tw o b o y s , K y le , 11 m o n th s , a n d M a tt, 3 1/2. M y h u s b a n d , w o r k in g C o lo .” •

fo r A g ile n t

John,

E E ’8 7 , is

in C o lo r a d o

S p rin g s ,

Julie Sanders Luckerman, M a th :

“I

a m a fu ll-tim e s ta y -a t- h o m e m o m to a lm o s tf o u r-y e a r-o ld A le x , a n d 2 0 - m o n th - o ld K a te . I t’s th e m o s t s a tis f y in g jo b I ’v e e v e r h a d .”

? p ra c tic e s

M

p r e p a r a tio n

|

and

are a .

f i r m ’s and

te c h n o lo g y

H is

p r o f e s s io n a l i n c lu d e s

p r o s e c u tio n

th e

o f p a te n t a n d

tr a d e m a rk a p p lic a tio n s b o th d o m e s tic a lly a n d in te rn a tio n a lly .

1992 Damon Allen, C E , a n d h is w ife , Jeanne (Jackson), M e tE ’9 2 , m o v e d to B o is e , Id a h o , in 1 9 99. • Kyle Metzloff, M e tE : “ I a m a I

o n e -m o n th -o ld

U n iv e r s ity have and

Charles Misner, p r o m o tio n

1990

th e p r o p e r ty

e x p e r ie n c e

P l a tte v ille .

1 9 90s

in

i n t e lle c tu a l

jM H

S o c ie ty o f P ro fe s s io n a l E n g in e e rs ’ E n g in e e r

Sheri Kerley,

j ~

i n f o r m a tio n

a w a r d e d th e S t. L o u is c h a p te r o f M is s o u ri o f th e Y ear A w a rd . •

-M

.

p r o f e s s o r a t th e

Rodrick Cunningham,

still e n jo y in g

c h a n g e d c a re e rs to a c c o m m o d a te m y n e e d fo r

y e a rs o ld a n d in e ig h th g r a d e .”

1987

b e fo re

V irg in ia w ith P a tr ic k , 8 , a n d L e x i, 4 . H a p p y to

k id s , M a tth e w a n d L a u ra , a g e s 12 a n d 10, a n d e n jo y

m a tte r s

v a rio u s f e d e ra l a n d s ta te a g e n c ie s a n d in c iv il

in

o f W is c o n s in -

tw o a

c h ild r e n :

a

1 7 - m o n th - o ld .”

E M g t:

“I

O c to b e r 2 0 0 2

r e c e iv e d and

w ill

a be

w o r k in g in th e C h ic a g o a re a a s d ir e c to r o f

Laura Compton,

C S c i:

“I

am

e n jo y in g

s ta y in g a t h o m e w ith m y th re e c h ild r e n a n d A.

Crowe,

o p e r a tio n s

in

t r a n s p o r ta tio n

fo r

U n io n P a c ific R a ilr o a d . J u lie is a s ta y -a t- h o m e m o m ta k in g c a re o f A le x a n d e r , 17 m o n th s .”

te a c h in g k id s c la s s e s a t a c o o k in g s c h o o l.”

• Daniel

te r m in a l

M S E E , w a s r e c e n tly

n a m e d p a r tn e r a t th e in te rn a tio n a l la w firm o f B ry a n C a v e L L P . • am

now

E n e rg y

in and

my w as

Gary Hatfield,

3 0 th

y e a r w ith

p r o m o te d

to

M in E :

“I

P eabody

d ir e c to r o f

(Continued on page 44) MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

43


umni Notes 1993

• Gary Hubbard,

Kerrie Blazek,

G G p h : “ L ife in th e S t. L o u is

w o n d e rfu l jo b

as

M in E :

g en eral

“I

la n d e d

a

a t B o e in g ID S in S t. L o u is w ith th e S M & P

a

a f fo r d a b ility te a m a f te r w o r k in g f o r a y e a r a n d

q u a r r y in g

a h a lf a s a s e n io r p ro c e s s e n g in e e r o n th e F /A -

m anager

of

a r e a is g o o d . I e n jo y s h a rin g m y lo v e o f e a rth

p r iv a te ly

s c ie n c e w ith m y s tu d e n ts at J e n n in g s J u n io r

c o m p a n y .” •

E E , has been

1 8 E /F S u p e r H o rn e t. O u ts id e o f w o r k , h e lik e s

H ig h . T a k e c a r e a n d k e e p in to u c h . M y e m a il

w o rk in g f o r N A S A f o r 12 y e a rs a n d lo v e s

w a k e b o a rd in g , ra c in g m o to c r o s s a n d s p e n d in g

Alfred

a d d r e s s is m s k a b @ h o tm a il.c o m .” •

Cureau Jr.,

M E : “ I a m a F o rd M o to r C o .

h e ld

lim e s to n e /g r a n ite

Kurt W. Leucht,

tim e

G e o E ’9 7 , a n d h e r s o n , C o d y . B e y e r still liv e s

s u b s y s te m s

f o r f u tu r e

checkout

te a m m a n a g e r f o r th e W in d s o r e n g in e p la n t.”

s y s te m s a t K e n n e d y S p a c e C e n te r. •

• Dave Dobkowski,

Sept,

d ire c to r

of

C E , M S E M g t’9 5 , is

e n g in e e r in g

Douglas

M a th : “ M y w ife , A n d r e a , a n d I m o v e d

w ith

h is

g i r lf r i e n d ,

in O ’F a llo n , M o . “ B e s id e s

• Randy L. Canis,

w o r k in g

as

a

f u ll- tim e

C S c i: p a te n t

ABNA

to C o lu m b ia , M o ., in J u ly 2 0 0 2 . 1 a m te a c h in g

a tto rn e y a t G r e e n s f e ld e r in S t. L o u is , I a ls o

E n g in e e rin g in S t. L o u is . H e h a s b e e n w ith

m a th e m a tic s , a lg e b r a I th r o u g h A P c a lc u lu s ,

te a c h C S 3 1 7 , “ C o m p u te r s a n d th e L a w ,” a n d

th e c o m p a n y s in c e 2 0 0 1 . •

fo r

Vanessa Paul,

e v e ry m in u te o f it. H e d e s ig n s a n d c r e a te s d a ta r e c o r d in g

Karen Frederich,

Shawn

a t C o lu m b ia I n d e p e n d e n t S c h o o l.” •

C E , w a s p ro m o te d to a s s is ta n t e n v ir o n m e n ta l

Steen,

p r o je c t m a n a g e r f o r H o m e r & S h ifrin in S t.

s o c ia l w o r k e r in 2 0 0 1 a n d b e g a n w o rk in g a t

Amy Henke,

L o u is . • se v e ra l

y ears

“I liv e d

E M g t:

w o r k in g

at

c o m p a n y , a n d in J a n u a ry

an

in Io w a

in s u r a n c e

C o rp s o f E n g in e e rs . I a m a p r o je c t m a n a g e r in C a te r p i l l a r

Tony Kertz,

I n c .,

th e

M E : “ I w o rk fo r

b ig

y e llo w

t r a c to r

c o m p a n y . I m o v e d fro m E a s t P e o r ia , 111., to B e lg iu m

to

d e s ig n in g

open

a

c o o lin g

new

d e s ig n

s y s te m s

fo r

o f f ic e a ll

of

C a te r p illa r ’s E u ro p e a n m a c h in e p la n ts . S in c e 2 0 0 1 , th e s ta ff h a s g r o w n to fiv e . W e c o n tin u e to

expand

m illio n s

our

c a p a b ilitie s

o f d o lla r s

r e d u c tio n

in itia tiv e s . M y

and

in c o s t a n d

th ro u g h

G en eral

L e o n a rd W o o d A r m y

C o m m u n ity

H o s p ita l in th e F a m ily A d v o c a c y P ro g r a m .”

1 9 9 9 I m o v e d to

C h a rle s to n , S .C ., to w o rk fo r th e U .S . A rm y r e g u la to ry .” •

P s y c : “ I w a s lic e n s e d a s a c lin ic a l

new

p r o v id e w a r ra n ty

p ro g ra m s

and

w if e , S a ra , a n d tw o b o y s ,

N ic k , 5 , a n d A d a m , 3 , h a v e s e ttle d in n ic e ly ,

Ryan Barr,

C E , w o rk s fu ll tim e f o r R .G .

B r in k m a n n C o n s tru c tio n a n d tr a in e d f o r h is f o u rth I ro n m a n T ria th lo n , h e ld in N o v e m b e r 2002. •

Kevin Biggers,

M e tE : “ I g o t m a r rie d

f o u r- p lu s y e a r s a g o . I n o w h a v e a 1 3 -y e a r-o ld re a lly e n jo y in g th e C in c in n a ti a r e a .” •

Murphy,

Karen

C h E : “ I h a v e f in is h e d m y m a s te r ’s

in m a n u f a c tu rin g m a n a g e m e n t f ro m K e tte r in g U n i v e r s ity ,

f o r m e r ly

know n

as

to th a n k U M R f o r p r o v id in g m e th e e d u c a tio n

m a r rie d a n d m a d e th e b ig m o v e fro m th e

to b e a b le to e x p e r ie n c e s o m e th in g lik e th is .”

C h ic a g o a re a to S o u th e rn C a lif o r n ia . M y w if e ,

• David Schuehler,

C h r is tie , is a n O h io W e s le y a n h y d r o g e o lo g is t

M E , and

h is

w if e , M a ry , s ta r te d

b u s in e s s , W ild in g

a new

E n g in e e rin g I n c ., w h ic h

( n a tc h ) ;

s till

w o r k in g e n g in e e r

as

a

got

s e n io r

w ith

D e lta

le a r n

th a t

my

I llin o is lo n g

P .E . w a s

as I p a s s exam s.

Oh

v a lid

th r e e

in

m o re

w e ll, e v e n

th o u g h th e tr a ff ic a n d th e r e a l e s ta te a re b r u ta l,

1994 Gregory Effland, C E : “I still

w o r k fo r B u tle r

M a n u fa c tu r in g . M y w ife , S a r a h , a n d I ju s t b o u g h t a n e w h o u s e . I a ls o h a v e a o n e -y e a ro ld d a u g h te r , H a n n a h .” • G G ph:

“ M a rr ie d

w o r k in g

Brian

as an

w ith

Timothy Gungoll,

tw o

d a u g h te r s

a s s is ta n t d is tr ic t

Haggard,

L S c i:

a c c e p te d

re se a rc h

w ith

h y d r o lo g is t

th e

and

a tto rn e y .”

“ M oved

F a y e tte v ille , A r k ., a n d

a jo b

i t ’s to u g h to sa y n o to th e b e a c h , th e w e a th e r, a n d th e s u s h i. H e r e ’s h o p in g th a t th e ‘b i g ’ e a r th q u a k e h o ld s o f f f o r a n o th e r c o u p le o f d e c a d e s . I f n o t, w e ll, I w a s g la d to m e e t y o u .”

1997

to

Ramin D. Ashrafzadeh,

as

M is s o u ri p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in e e r lic e n s e . H e

U SD A

A g r ic u ltu ra l R e s e a r c h S e rv ic e in 2 0 0 1 .”

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

C E , e a rn e d

h is

w o rk s f o r H o r n e r & S h ifrin

in S t. L o u is .

• Brian Beyer, M e tE , a c c e p te d

a n e w p o s itio n

Kerrie Blazek GGph'93, mskab@hotmail.com Seth Coggin, CE'98, sacsrl22@aol.com Robert L. Herzig, EE'8t, bherzig@kc.rr.com James H. Jones, ChE'68, jimhjones@sbcgtobal.net Keith Kuhlmann, GeoE'96, kkuhlmann@deltaenv.com Kurt W. Leucht, EE'94, Kurt.WIeucht@nasa.gov 44

“ I re c e n tly

E n v ir o n m e n ta l C o n s u lta n ts . I w a s th r ille d to

C a lif o r n ia - s p e c if ic

G eoE :

e n v ir o n m e n ta l

C a lif o r n ia , a s

c a te r s p ro d u c ts f o r P o rs c h e a u to m o b ile s .

s ta te o f M is s o u r i. H e is e m p lo y e d b y B u rn s & M c D o n n e ll in S t. L o u is a n d s p e c ia liz e s in

Hunn,

Susan

M e tE : “ I h a v e b e e n w ith C a te rp illa r

f o r fiv e y e a r s n o w . T im e re a lly f lie s .

I m iss

th e c a m p u s a n d f rie n d s . S till m a k e it d o w n to

canoe

on

th e

y e a r th o u g h . S ta y

C u rren t in to u c h

R iv e r M e tE

e v e ry a lu m s ! ”

Lorey makes marathon milestones

GMI

I n s titu te .”

W e a re re a lly e n jo y in g o u r s e lv e s , a n d I w a n t

Paul C. Wilding,

CE,

d a u g h te r a n d a 2 1/2 -y e a r-o ld so n . W e a re

1996

W a s h in g to n U n iv e r s ity .” •

Sean Courtois,

a n d d e s ig n a n d h y d r a u lic a n a ly s is . •

Keith Kuhlmann,

d o c to r a l d e g re e in c o m p u te r e n g in e e r in g fro m

re c e n tly b e c a m e a r e g is te r e d e n g in e e r in th e

r o a d w a y a n d s ite d e s ig n , g e o m e tr ic a n a ly s is

1995

a n d w e a re liv in g th e E u ro p e a n e x p e r ie n c e .

C S c i: “ I a m p u rs u in g a

E E 3 0 1 , “ P a te n t L a w ,” f o r th e U M R d is ta n c e e d u c a tio n p r o g ra m .”

The Olympic trials are coming soon, and Becky Lorey, GeoE'94, plans on being there. Over the past two years, Lorey has been training in hopes of qualifying for the 2004 Olympic marathon trials in St. Louis. She has been running and racing for 15 years in all. Lorey, who was the MIAA Woman Athlete of the Year in 1994, has strong ties to the UMR community beginning with her husband Robert Lorey, GeoE'86, MS GeoE'87, and spanning to her father-in-law Ed Lorey, a retired professor of ceramic engineering and dean of continuing education and public service. Lorey is currently a stay-at-home mom, with a two- and five-year-old.

Charles Misner, EMgt'92, juliemisner@sbcglobal Paul D. Plavnick, EE'62, plavnickpm@yahoo.com Stephen Rode, ChE'85, stevprode@msm.um|edu Cheryl Schmitt, MetE'87, cherischmitt@msn.com David G. Winter, CE'78, dwinter@geoengineer$.c


Alumni Notes • Joel Mikelionis,

$ 1,000 Advantage

C h E : “ I ’m still e m p lo y e d

b y U n iv e r s a l O il P ro d u c ts in D e s P la in e s , 111. M y c u r re n t a s s ig n m e n t is in H a rb in , C h in a . In th e p a s t y e a r, I h a v e a ls o b e e n a s s ig n e d to jo b s in S p a in a n d S w e d e n . L ife is g r e a t! ” •

Darren Mulford, E x tr e m e

C E , a n d h is

S h o t I n c ., w e r e

N o v e m b e r /D e c e m b e r

Digest,

com pany,

f e a tu r e d

is s u e

in

th e

If you live outside the state of Missouri, you may get help with the cost of sending your "legacies" to UMR. /

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th e p r e m ie r m a g a z in e f o r in v e n to r s ,

n e w p r o d u c ts a n d g r e a t id e a s . E x tr e m e S h o t m a n u f a c tu re s c a m e r a

m o u n ts f o r o u td o o r

e n th u s ia s ts , a llo w in g h u n te rs a n d f is h e r m a n to

c a p tu r e

v id e o ta p e . •

t h e ir e x p e r ie n c e s

Vanessa Paul,

e n g in e e r f o r T S i

on

f ilm

Children and grandchildren of MSM-UMR alumni can qualify J to receive an additional $1,000 ' scholarship beyond any other scholarships the student \ may receive. Contact \ UMR Admissions. A ,

or

G e o E , is a s ta ff

E n g in e e rin g

I n c . in

S t.

L o u is . H e r s o n , C o d y , w ill b e f o u r y e a r s o ld th is s p rin g a n d e n te r in g p r e s c h o o l in th e fa ll.

• Scott Preston, C E , M S

E M g t’0 2 : “ R e tu r n e d

fro m a tw o - y e a r to u r in B a m b e rg , G e rm a n y , w ith

th e

c o m p le te d

F ir s t

I n f a n tr y

E n g in e e r

D iv is io n

O f f ic e r s

and

f - 800-522-0938

C a p t a i n ’s

C a re e r C o u r s e in 2 0 0 1 . I a m se rv in g in th e F ifth

E n g in e e r B a tta lio n

www.umr.edu

a t F o rt L e o n a rd

Christine Robinson, C h E :

W o o d , M o .” •

2 0 0 1 , I le ft m y e n g in e e r in g p o s itio n

“ In and

r e tu rn e d to sc h o o l to b e c o m e a p h a r m a c is t. It is a s ix - y e a r p ro g ra m a n d I a m in y e a r fo u r. T h e U n iv e r s ity o f K a n s a s is m u c h d if fe r e n t

UNIVERSITY OF MISS0URI-R0LLA

fro m U M R , b u t it is k in d o f fu n b e in g in school

a g a in .

I can

r e a lly

te ll

th a t

my

b a c k g r o u n d h e lp s in th is n e w c u r r ic u lu m .” •

Brenda Roth,

C E , r e c e n tly p a s s e d th e S ta te

o f I llin o is P.E . e x a m . S h e is e m p lo y e d b y B u rn s

&

s p e c ia liz e s

M c D o n n e ll in

in

S t.

L o u is

tr a n s p o r t a t i o n

and

s tu d ie s ,

in te r s e c tio n d e s ig n s tu d ie s a n d r o a d w a y a n d h ig h w a y d e s ig n . •

Lars Seme,

M a th : “ A f te r

fo u r y e a r s te a c h in g a t H e n d rix C o lle g e , w e m oved

to

F o rt S m ith , A r k ., w h e r e

I am

te a c h in g a t th e U n iv e r s ity o f A r k a n s a s .” •

James Turner, M e tE :

“ A f te r g r a d u a tin g fro m

U M R in 1 9 9 7 , 1 w o r k e d a lm o s t fiv e y e a r s as

1999

D e e r e /H ita c h i.” •

Phillip J. Courtney, G e o E : an

“ I a m w o rk in g as

e n v ir o n m e n ta l e n g in e e r fo r L a fa rg e

Jody Schiermeier, C E , a n d Todd, M E ’0 0 , re c e n tly m o v e d

D e n v e r .” • h u sb an d

th e ir n e w

hom e

in

in her

Stefanie A. Voss,

G eoE ,

M S G e o E ’0 2 : “ In J u n e , I s ta rte d w o rk in g w ith th e U .S . A rm y C o r p s o f E n g in e e rs in K a n s a s C ity , M o .”

in to

M a u m e lle , A rk . T o d d

a c c e p te d a p o s itio n w ith I n te rn a tio n a l C o rp . a s a d e s ig n e n g in e e r in C o n w a y , A rk .

2001 Jennifer Knapp, D ie g o

o f f ic e

G e o E , jo in e d

th e

S an

o f K le in f e ld e r G e o te c h n ic a l

th e p la n t m e ta llu rg is t f o r C ita tio n F o a m , in

E n g in e e rin g a s a g e o te c h n ic a l e n g in e e r in

C o lu m b ia n a , A la . I m a r rie d V ic k y W h itn e y

F e b r u a ry 2 0 0 3 . •

a n d m o v e d b a c k to K a n s a s C ity to b e w ith o u r fa m ilie s in F e b ru a ry 2 0 0 2 . 1 a m w o r k in g as a f ra m in g c a r p e n te r , b u t a m still o n th e lo o k o u t f o r a m e ta llu rg y c a r e e r in th e K a n s a s C ity

»OOs 2000

a re v e ry h a p p y .”

Cheryl Espinosa,

Todd Lippincott, G G p h : “ M y (Cozort), G G p h ’O l , a n d I tr a n s f e r r e d

to

w if e ,

Elaine

w ere

K a ty , T e x a s , w h e r e

ju s t I am

C hE : “I

in Q u a p a w , O k la . I r e p la c e d a n o th e r U M R g ra d ,

William ‘Ed’ Saunders,

C h E ’6 3 , a s a

fa c u lty e n g in e e r a f te r h is r e tire m e n t in M a rc h

a re a . O u r fa m ily is d o in g w o n d e rfu l a n d w e

1998

William Tyrrell,

a m a p r o c e s s e n g in e e r f o r E a g le -P ic h e r B o ro n

2003. E n g l, p u b lis h e d a c r e a tiv e

n o n - f ic tio n

p ie c e ,

L if e / D e a t h ,”

and

S te r n e ’s n o v e l L ite r a r y

an

“ I t ’s

a

essay L eads

on

my

m a s te r ’s in

is c o m p le tin g h e r te a c h in g d e g re e b y d a y .

L a u re n c e

O n c e I h a v e a d d e d an M B A a n d P .E ., I w ill

“ S te r n e ’s

h a v e a lic e n s e to s te a l!”

to

C r e a tiv e

C o n c e p tio n o f T ris tr a m S h a n d y ,” in v o lu m e 7 8 , 2 0 0 3 e d itio n o f

w o r k in g

W o n d erfu l on

Tristram Shandy,

In te rc o u rs e

I am

b u s in e s s a d m in is tr a tio n b y n ig h t an d m y w ife

The Rectangle, th e jo u r n a l

2002

Christopher

o f S ig m a T au D e lta , th e I n te rn a tio n a l E n g lis h

Jonathan Baker,

C S c i: “ L iv in g in A le x a n d r ia , V a.,

H o n o r S o c ie ty . S h e is p u r s u in g a m a s te r ’s

a s e c o n d lie u te n a n t in th e U .S . A ir F o rc e a fte r

a n d c u r re n tly w o r k in g a t th e P e n ta g o n .” •

d e g r e e in E n g lis h a t S o u th w e s t M is s o u r i S ta te

c o m p le tin g th e A ir F o rc e R e s e rv e O f fic e r

Todd Owens, M E , jo in e d

U n iv e rs ity . •

w o rk in g fo r C o n o c o P h illip s .” •

Mayberry,

m e c h a n ic a l

H N T B C o r p . in th e

C e rE , M S

C e r E ’0 2 , re c e iv e d th e T o p T e k e A w a rd fro m

tr a in e e a s s ig n e d

M g S y s : “ I a m n o w w o r k in g

T a u K a p p a E p s ilo n ’s in te rn a tio n a l fra te rn ity

G r o u p at T in k e r A ir F o rc e B a s e , O k la h o m a

g ro u p .

as a s e n io r s y s te m s a n a ly s t w ith F W M u rp h y

in S e p te m b e r 2 0 0 2 . E ig h t a c tiv e m e m b e rs

in

r e c e iv e

th a n

T u ls a , th r e e

Steve,

T ra in in g C o r p s P ro g ra m . B a k e r is a p ilo t

Amie

e n g in e e r in g

(Wood) Squibb,

Robert D. Leerssen,

M E , w a s c o m m is s io n e d a s

O k la .,

a f te r

y e a rs tr a v e lin g

s p e n d in g

m o re

a n d c o n s u ltin g .

M E ’9 8 , is a p r o je c t m a n a g e r w ith

W illia m s E n e rg y .”

th is h o n o r e a c h

Pousson, w o r k in g

M in E : in th e

a p p lic a tio n s

“I Q uad

am

y e a r. • s till

Amy R.

liv in g

and

C itie s a s a m in in g

e n g in e e r

fo r

John

C ity , O k la . • g r a d u a te

to

th e

552nd

O p e r a tio n s

Laura Schoenbeck,

s tu d e n t

a t G e o r g ia

C e rE , a

I n s titu te

of

T e c h n o lo g y , r e c e n tly r e c e iv e d a P a tric k W . H a llo ra n S c h o la r s h ip A w a rd b y th e O r d e r o f O m ega. MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

45


Memorials

1932

1943

Bruce W. Treible, N D D ,

t M a y 10, 2 0 0 2

r

1933 Harry Federow, C h E ,

w as a

***

m e m b e r o f T au B e ta P i a n d w a s in th e u p p e r fifth o f h is fre s h m a n c la s s w h ile a tte n d in g M S M U M R . H e w o rk e d f o r S h e ll fo r

»

1949 Donald J. Coolidge,

Charles H. Boschert, N D D ,

fO c t. 6 , 2002

a c tiv e in in tra m u r a l s p o rts an d

J?

w a s a m e m b e r o f S IM E , P h i

Theon Grojean Jr., C E ,

fO c t. 1 ,2 0 0 2

K a p p a P h i, E n g in e e rs C lu b a n d

f

B lu e K e y w h ile a tte n d in g

J B

William Teas, C E ,

f D e c . 1 1 ,2 0 0 2

M S M -U M R . t A u g . 2 5 , 2 0 0 2

Edwin M. Thomasson, M in E , f A p r il John J. Northcutt,

s e v e ra l y e a rs b e fo re s ta rtin g h is

M in E , w a s a

m e m b e r o f T e c h C lu b , A IM E , 1 % *** V

F e d e r o w w a s s ta tio n e d in G u a m w ith th e U .S . N a v y d u rin g W o rld W ar II. H e w a s a

m

m e m b e r o f th e K iw a n is C lu b , E lk s L o d g e ,

3,

2002

1944

o w n b u s in e s s , F e d e ro w Iro n a n d M e ta l C o ., w h ic h h e c o - fo u n d e d w ith h is f a th e r in 19 3 7 .

M E , w as

1950 Richard O. Biddick,

M in E , w a s

I n d e p e n d e n ts , S tu d e n t C o u n c il a n d In tra m u ra l B o a rd S tu d e n t

a m e m b e r o f A S M E w h ile

C o u n c il w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

a tte n d in g M S M -U M R .

U M R . f D e c . 1 9 ,2 0 0 0

10,2002

f A p ril

M a s o n ic L o d g e a n d A b o u B e n A d h e m

1945

S h rin e . tD e c . 8 , 2 0 0 2

Ralph

W.

Richmond,

M in E , f U M R n o tifie d

o f d e a th o n D e c . 3 1 ,2 0 0 2

Harold F. Webers, M E ,

tA p ril 8, 2002

1946 Richard C. Sartorius, N D D ,

1935 Corbin T. Richmond III, N D D ,

f D e c . 14,

2002

Frank T. Chambers, f A p r il 2 , 2 0 0 2

CE,

s e rv e d in

th e U .S . A rm y d u rin g W o rld W a r II a n d w a s a m e m b e r o f th e B e ra c h a h C h u r c h . tN o v . 8, 2 002

Robert G. Fleming, C E ,

1937 Walter L. Holz, M E ,

1947 w as a

Joseph L. Haleski,

m e m b e r o f In d e p e n d e n ts , B lu e K e y , th e A th le tic A s s o c ia tio n , th e O f fic e rs C lu b , T h e ta T au O m e g a , th e r ifle s q u a d , A S M E a n d th e S t. P a t ’s B o a rd w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . f J u ly 2 5 , 2 0 0 2

w as a m em ber o f

A S C E w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . H e M E , w as a

s e rv e d in th e U .S . N a v y in th e P a c ific fro m

m e m b e r o f S ig m a P i, R O T C ,

194 3 to 1 9 4 6 . A fte r g r a d u a tin g fro m M S M -

S A M E a n d D e to n a to r s , w a s th e

U M R , h e w o r k e d as a s a le s e n g in e e r f o r

b o x in g c h a m p io n in th e 165-

se v e ra l c o m p a n ie s in th e M id w e s t a n d a s a

p o u n d w e ig h t c la s s , a n d w a s o n

c iv il e n g in e e r o n th e P e n n s y lv a n ia T u rn p ik e

th e H o n o r L is t w h ile a tte n d in g

p r o je c t. F le m in g r e tu rn e d to S p rin g f ie ld , 111., to w o rk w ith th e Illin o is D e p a r tm e n t o f

M S M -U M R . f A p ril 2 3 , 2001

H ig h w a y s , la te r tr a n s f e r rin g to th e F o x R iv e r

Harold

G.

Pierce, M in E ,

f U M R n o tifie d o f

Robert

d e a th o n J a n . 1 7 , 2 0 0 3

1940 Gerald

E.

Wallace, P e tE ,

tM a y 2 5 , 2002

C hE , w as a

V alley . In 19 6 8 h e w a s n a m e d a s s is ta n t

m e m b e r o f E n g in e e rs C lu b ,

s u p e rin te n d e n t o f h ig h w a y s fo r K a n e C o u n ty ,

I n d e p e n d e n ts , R O T C , G le e C lu b ,

111. H e r e tire d in 1 984. f N o v . 2 3 , 2 0 0 2

B o a rd , A lC h E , A lp h a C h i S ig m a ,

Donald

B lu e K e y , P h i K a p p a P h i a n d

m e m b e r o f th e f o o tb a ll s q u a d ,

s e rv e d a s a s tu d e n t a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g

Robert K. Boyd, C E ,

w as a

m e m b e r o f T h e ta T a u O m e g a ,

m *

th e E n g in e e rs C lu b a n d th e v a r s ity tra c k te a m w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . In 1 9 8 1 ,

fcA

Johnk,

S tu d e n t C o u n c il, th e R o lla m o

1941 g!

E.

B o y d re c e iv e d a n A lu m n i

A s s o c ia tio n A w a rd . tN o v . 19, 2 0 0 2

L.

Heath,

C e rE , w a s a

A I M E , M C lu b a n d s e rv e d a s a

M S M -U M R , g r a d u a tin g w ith F irs t H o n o r s .

s tu d e n t a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g

J o h n k r e c e iv e d se v e ra l a w a r d s w h ile a t

M S M -U M R . f J a n . 1 8 ,2 0 0 2

M S M -U M R , in c lu d in g a L u c y W o rth a m J a m e s S c h o la r s h ip , th e A . P. G r e e n M e d a l a n d th e B e ta D e lta C h a p te r o f A lp h a C h i

Alden

S ig m a A w a rd f o r m a in ta in in g th e h ig h e s t

m em b er o f A S M E and

C.

Hutchison, M E ,

w as a

s c h o la s tic a v e r a g e in c h e m ic a l e n g in e e r in g ,

In d e p e n d e n ts a n d w a s o n th e

f Jan . 23, 2002

H o n o r L is t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . f J a n . 1 8 ,2 0 0 2

1942

1948 Nicholas Mushovic,

W ^

M e tE , w a s

M E , w as

a m em b er o f Phi K appa Phi and

f o o tb a ll te a m s , th e S o c ie ty o f

A S M E a n d s e rv e d a s a s tu d e n t

M e ta ls , L a m b d a C h i A lp h a a n d

a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

T h e ta T au O m e g a w h ile

U M R . H e w a s o n th e H o n o r L is t

a tte n d in g M S M -U M R .

a n d g r a d u a te d w ith F irs t H o n o rs .

fO c t. 5 , 2002

46

Charles M. Mitchell,

a m e m b e r o f th e b a s k e tb a ll a n d

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

tJ a n . 6, 2002

Robert H. Leonard, E E ,

w as

o n th e H o n o r L is t a n d s e rv e d as a s tu d e n t a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . H e s e rv e d in th e U .S . N a v y d u r in g W o rld W a r II a n d w a s a m e m b e r o f S t. P a tr ic k ’s C a th o lic C h u r c h . fN o v . 2 1 ,2 0 0 2


M em orials Robert K. Preiss, M e tE ,

w as a

1954

m em b er o f A S M and w as on

1961 Russell E . Davis, M E ,

th e H o n o r L is t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . t J u l y 3 ,2 0 0 2

w as a

Edward M. Cholerton,

P e tE , w a s a m e m b e r

m e m b e r o f I n d e p e n d e n ts ,

o f In d e p e n d e n ts , A I M E a n d th e N e w m a n

E n g in e e rs C lu b , S p e lu n k e r s a n d

C lu b w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . f U M R

A S M E w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

n o tifie d o f d e a th o n J a n . 17, 2 0 0 3

U M R . |M a y 2 5 , 2 0 0 2

Robert E. Smith Sr., C E ,

a W o rld W a r

II

v e te r a n , w a s a m e m b e r o f th e F irs t

Roland D. Dayley, G G p h , Robert L. Robbins, C E ,

K a p p a P h i, C a n te rb u r y

th e G le e C lu b , S ig m a N u , th e fo o tb a ll s q u a d ,

P re s b y te r ia n C h u r c h o f C r y s ta l R iv e r, F la ., th e A m e r ic a n L e g io n a n d th e C itru s S h rin e

th e M C lu b a n d A S C E w h ile a tte n d in g

A s s o c ia tio n a n d S ig m a G a m m a

M S M -U M R . f A p r il 16, 2 0 0 2

E p s ilo n a n d w a s o n th e H o n o r

C lu b , E g y p t S h rin e T e m p le a n d D e tro it

L is t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

M o s le m S h rin e T e m p le . H e w a s a 5 0 - y e a r m e m b e r o f th e W a lp o le , 111., M a s o n ic L o d g e .

1957

U M R . f Ju ly 9 , 2 0 0 2

Gerald G. Myers, M E ,

fJ a n .7 ,2 0 0 3

w as a

m e m b e r o f th e R ifle C lu b a n d

Ralph Stallman, G G p h ,

w as

a m e m b e r o f T a u B e ta P i, P hi

w as a m em b er o f

A S M E w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

w as a

UM R.

m e m b e r o f T h e ta K a p p a P h i, th e

Kuldip S . Chopra, M e tE ,

w as a m em ber o f

A S M , th e I n d ia n S tu d e n ts A s s o c ia tio n , A F S a n d s e rv e d a s a s tu d e n t a s s is ta n t w h ile

+Feb. 22, 2002

a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . f M a r c h 19, 2 0 0 2

fo o tb a ll te a m , M C lu b a n d A IM E a n d s e rv e d as a s tu d e n t

Frederick J. Gorczyca, M in E ,

a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

w as a m em b er o f A IM M E ,

1958

U M R . f M a rc h 1 7 ,2 0 0 2

S A M ile , th e D o rm C o u n c il,

Bob L. Marlow, M E ,

1951

w a s th e d ir e c to r o f

N e w m a n C lu b , 5 9 e r s C lu b a n d

p h y s ic a l fa c ilitie s a t U M R fro m 1 9 7 4 u n til

David K. Anderson, M in E ,

w as

a m e m b e r o f th e fo o tb a ll s q u a d ,

th e F irs t P re s b y te r ia n C h u r c h a n d a p a s t

M C lu b a n d A I M E w h ile

m e m b e r o f R o lla L io n s C lu b , O a k M e a d o w

a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . H e

C o u n tr y C lu b a n d th e A s s o c ia tio n o f

w o r k e d f o r C h e v ro n O il f o r 3 0

P h y s ic a l P la n t D ir e c to rs |D e c . 3 1 , 2 0 0 2

Harry L. Penn, M E ,

d e a th J a n . 1 7 ,2 0 0 3

1963 Willard Glen Starwalt, C E ,

w as a m em ber

o f D e lta S ig m a P h i, S A M E , A S C E a n d w a s

w as a

m e m b e r o f E n g in e e rs C lu b , th e g o lf te a m a n d th e M C lu b a n d

w as a m em b er

a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M U M R . f O c t. 2 5 , 2001

y e a rs , f U M R w a s n o tifie d o f

Vincent J. Hession Jr., M E ,

A I M E a n d s e rv e d a s a s tu d e n t

h is re tire m e n t in 1 9 9 2 . H e w a s a m e m b e r o f

o f T h e ta X i, th e M C lu b , A S M E a n d th e

re c e iv e d th e C u r a to r s ’ A w a rd

f o o tb a ll s q u a d w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R .

w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R .

f O c t. 1 0 ,2 0 0 1

f F e b . 2 8 ,2 0 0 2

o n th e H o n o r L is t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M U M R . H e s p e n t h is e n tir e c a r e e r in h ig h w a y c o n s tru c tio n in s o u th e rn I llin o is w ith firm s s p e c ia liz in g in b r id g e a n d c u lv e r t c o n s tru c tio n . S ta r w a lt o w n e d W o rtm a n S ta r w a lt In c . in E f f in g h a m , 111., a h ig h w a y

Raymond F . Roller, G G p h ,

w as

c o n s tru c tio n f irm th a t re c e iv e d n u m e r o u s

1959

a w a r d s f ro m th e I llin o is D e p a r tm e n t o f

a m e m b e r o f A I M E w h ile

Craig E . Bierbaum, M E ,

a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . A W o rld

m e m b e r o f S A E , S ig m a N u ,

S ta r w a lt w a s th e im m e d ia te p a s t sta te

W a r II v e te r a n , R o lle r s e rv e d in

A S M E a n d w a s o n th e H o n o r

p r e s id e n t o f th e A s s o c ia te d G e n e r a l

th e U .S . N a v y a n d r e tire d fro m

L is t w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

C o n tr a c to r s o f I llin o is a n d s e rv e d o n th e ir

R e lia n c e E le c tric C o . a f te r m o re

U M R . f O c t. 7 , 2001

b o a r d o f d ir e c to r s f o r s e v e ra l y e a r s .

w as a

th a n 3 7 y e a r s o f s e rv ic e . f O c t . 5 , 2 0 0 2

Milton A . Sobie, G G p h ,

tJ a n . 6, 2002

fD ec. 4, 2002

David R. McClure, M in E ,

1952

w as

a m e m b e r o f D e lta S ig m a P h i

Paul G. Barnard,

M e tE , w a s a

w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . tN o v . 1 9 ,2 0 0 1

m e m b e r o f S p e lu n k e r s C lu b ,

B o a rd a n d A S M E w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

S t. H e le n s , O r e . E im e r w a s a m e m b e r o f th e

A w a rd , w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -

Leslie E. Spanel, P h y s ,

29, 2002

w as a m em b er o f

T h e ta K a p p a P h i, E n g in e e rs C lu b , N e w m a n

Duane A. Crawford, P e tE ,

w as a m em ber o f

P h i K a p p a T h e ta , P e r s h in g R if le s , th e M in e r

C h e m ic a l C o . a n d C o a s ta l f e rtiliz e r p la n ts in

C lu b , r e c e iv in g th e G le e C lu b

+Aug.

1965 Kenneth E. Eimer, M E ,

U M R . H e w a s m a n a g e r o f C h e v ro n

L a m d a C h i A lp h a a n d th e G le e

UM R.

T r a n s p o r ta tio n f o r o u ts ta n d in g b r id g e w o rk .

w as

C lu b , S ig m a Pi S ig m a , T au B e ta P i, a n d P h i

a m e m b e r o f E n g in e e rs C lu b

K a p p a P h i w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . H e

a n d I n d e p e n d e n ts , w a s o n th e

ta u g h t in th e p h y s ic s d e p a r tm e n t a t W e s te rn

H o n o r L is t, a n d s e rv e d a s a

W a s h in g to n U n iv e r s ity f o r 3 4 y e a r s a n d

s tu d e n t a s s is ta n t w h ile a tte n d in g

re p re s e n te d h is n e ig h b o r h o o d o n th e

M S M -U M R . f O c t . 1 8 ,2 0 0 2

B e llin g h a m (W a s h .) M a y o r ’s N e ig h b o r h o o d

S t. H e le n s E lk s C lu b , th e K iw a n is C lu b a n d th e C o lu m b ia H u m a n e S o c ie ty . H e s e rv e d in th e U .S . A rm y , th e U .S . M a rin e C o r p s , th e R e s e rv e s a n d th e N a tio n a l G u a r d . tJ u ly 6, 2002

A d v is o r y C o m m is s io n . f O c t . 8 , 2 0 0 2

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

47


Memorials Roy D. Hays, E E ,

w as a m em ber

o f C a m p u s C lu b a n d IE E E a n d re c e iv e d th e F irs t H o n o r A w a rd

1976 James T. McLean Jr., G e o E ,

fM arch

frie n d s

11,

2002

a n d th e P h i K a p p a P h i B o o k P la te A w a rd w h ile a tte n d in g

Gary R. Schuchardt,

M S M -U M R . H e la te r e a rn e d a

a m e m b e r o f P i K a p p a A lp h a

m a s te r ’s d e g r e e a n d a P h .D . fro m th e

w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . H e

U n iv e r s ity o f A la b a m a . H a y s w o r k e d fo r

w o r k e d a s a p la n t g e n e ra l

D y n e tic s In c . in H u n ts v ille , A la ., a s a

m a n a g e r f o r B & C D ie C a s t a n d

r e s e a rc h e n g in e e r a n d w a s v ic e p r e s id e n t o f th e c o m p a n y u n til re tire m e n t. H a y s w ro te

Shawnee Menace, a

M e tE , w a s

w a s a m e m b e r o f th e F irs t P r e s b y te r ia n C h u r c h . f J a n . 2 5 , 2 0 0 3

1966 Maurice A. Williams, C E ,

w as a

m e m b e r o f A S C E , P ro s p e c to r s a n d In d e p e n d e n ts w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . f D e c . 8 , 2 0 0 2

1967 Harley P. Sartain, M E ,

w as a

w ife o f J a m e s B o n d i,

E E ’7 1 . f A u g . 4 , 2001

George Carney, a

R o lla b u s in e s s m a n ,

s e rv e d in m a n y b u s in e s s v e n tu re s th r o u g h o u t h is life , in c lu d in g c r e a tin g th e O z a r k E x tr a v a g a n z a a n d re s to r in g a n tiq u e c a rs a t h is b u s in e s s ,

sto ry o f th e w e s tw a rd

e x p a n s io n o f th e la te 1 7 0 0 s. f O c t . 8 , 2 0 0 2

Judith Bondi,

M e m o r y v ille , U S A , o n U .S . H ig h w a y

1978

63 N o r th in R o lla . H e w a s w e ll k n o w n

Erma Durbin Lange, P s y c , San Diego Union-Tribune in

re tire d fro m th e

f o r h is b e a u tifu l a r tw o rk a n d p o r tra it

19 9 5 . S h e w ro te

p a in tin g s . f J a n . 12, 2 0 0 3

tr a v e l a r tic le s f o r su c h p u b lic a tio n s a s th e

Carefree Enterprise, Cappers Weekly, Good Old Days, Mature Living, Mobil Home, Sojourn a n d Western RV News. S h e w a s a

Myron Daugherty, h u s b a n d

m e m b e r o f th e S a n ta M a ria G e n e a lo g ic a l

Maxine Fort, w ife

S o c ie ty . f S e p t . 9 , 2 0 0 2

M in E ’4 0 . |S e p t . 1 , 2 0 0 0

1982

Lois O. Haskell,

m em ber o f A SM E , SA E ,

Timothy Ritz,

I n te rn a tio n a l F e llo w s h ip , P h i K a p p a P h i a n d P i T a u S ig m a w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R .

of

E liz a b e th F a rre ll. f N D D o f G e o rg e E . F o r t,

f S e p t . 10, 2 0 0 2

E M g t, w o rk e d a t

F a ir b a n k s - M o r s e in K a n s a s C ity ,

Opal Haviland,

K a n ., f o r 15 y e a r s . H e w a s a c tiv e

H a v ila n d , E E ’3 9 . f O c t . 3 0 , 2001

w ife o f R o b e rt

in a v a rie ty o f s p o r ts a n d lo v e d

H e g r a d u a te d w ith F irs t H o n o rs .

c o a c h in g h is k id s . f N o v . 2 , 2 0 0 2

tJ u ly 22, 2002

Mary Jane Hoffman,

f U M R n o tifie d

o f d e a th o n J a n . 2 2 , 2 0 0 3

1985

1968 Stephen H. Eggers, M E ,

w as<

Craig N. Fahrenkrog, E M g t,

Lavon Lockett, w ife f A p ril 13,

2002

o f D o n a ld N .

L o c k e tt, M E ’5 0 . f A p r il 2 1 ,2 0 0 2

m e m b e r o f th e 5 9 e r s C lu b , A S M E , a n d S A E a n d s e rv e d

Mary Nowlin,

o n th e S tu d e n t U n io n B o a rd

1986

w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R .

Kimberly Ann Miller, C S c i,

fJa n . 7, 2003

Paul E. Ponder,

f S e p t . 2 2 , 2001

Marvin Short, N D D ,

Douglas A. Stamm,

fo rm e r U M R

p r o fe s s o r . f D e c . 8 , 2 0 0 2

1996 1969

w ife o f R o g e r E .

N o w lin , M e tE ’4 8 . f J a n . 6 , 2 0 0 3

f D e c . 2 8 , 2001

M E , w as a m em b er

Virginia Schmidt, w if e

o f M ilto n

S c h m id t, C E ’5 4 . f N D D

o f S A E w h ile a tte n d in g M S M -U M R . f J a n . 12, 2 0 0 3

1972 Phillip A. Bolt,

P s y c , f S e p t . 2 1 ,2 0 0 2

me

for publishing Alumni Notes

La Wanda Sievert,

w ife o f O . M o r r is

S ie v e r t, M E ’4 4 . f O c t . 2 8 , 2 0 0 2

Corinne Wilkerson,

w if e o f A u g u s tu s

B . W ilk e r s o n , M in E ’2 3 . f U M R

John R. Winkelmann,

E E , f J u ly 2 4 ,2 0 0 2

1973 Gabriel J. Alberici,

n o tifie d o f d e a th o n D e c . 18, 2 0 0 2

►W e w ill m e n tio n a spouse's n a m e if it is s p e c ific a lly m e n tio n e d in th e in fo rm a tio n pro v id ed by th e a lu m n u s /a lu m n a .

Evelyn Wills,

C E , w a s c h a ir m a n o f

J .S . A lb e ric i C o n s tr u c tio n C o ., f o u n d e d b y h is f a th e r in 1 9 1 8 . T h e firm b u ilt m a n y o f S t. L o u is ’ m o d e rn la n d m a r k s , in c lu d in g th e P o p la r S tre e t B r id g e , th e E d w a rd J o n e s D o m e , th e S a v v is C e n te r, th e S t. L o u is S c ie n c e C e n te r a n d th e G a lle r ia . A lb e r ic i w a s a c tiv e in re g io n a l p o litic s a n d w a s r e g a rd e d a s o n e o f th e c i t y ’s m o s t g e n e r o u s p h ila n th ro p is ts . t D e c . 9 ,2 0 0 2

1974 Mark A. Miller, G G p h ,

w o rk e d f o r A s a r c o ’s

S ilv e rb e ll M in e u n til D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 1 . tN o v . 8 ,2 0 0 2

48

* W e a re h a p p y to a n n o u n c e w e d d in g s , birth s and p ro m o tio n s , a fte r th e y h a v e occurred.

MSM-UMR ALUMNUS / Summer 2003

►T he M S M -U M R Alumnus w ill a n n o u n c e d e a th s if in fo rm a tio n is s u b m itte d by an im m e d ia te fa m ily m em ber, o r fro m a n e w s p a p e r obitu a ry . N o tific a tio n o f d e a th s th a t h a v e occurred m o re th a n tw o y e a rs b e fo re th e d a te o f p u b lic a tio n w ill not be p u b lis h e d , un les s a s p e cial re q u e s t is m a d e by a fa m ily m em ber. ►O b itu a ry in fo rm a tio n on a lu m n i spouses w ill be p rin te d only if th e a lu m n u s /a lu m n a s p e c ific a lly re q u e s ts th a t w e p rin t it. 1 W e w ill p rin t a d d re s se s if s p e c ific a lly re q u e s te d to do so by th e a lu m n u s /a lu m n a s u b m ittin g th e note. 1 W e re s e rv e th e right to e d it a lu m n i no te s to m e e t s p a ce re q u ire m e n ts . 1 W e w ill use s u b m itte d p h o to s as s p a ce p e rm its .

fJa n . 30, 2003

Jessica Wolf, th e

f o u r- y e a r -o ld

d a u g h te r o f C a ro lin e E . (H o c k ) W o lf, E M g t’8 9 , fo llo w in g a tw o - y e a r b a ttle w ith c a n c e r. S h e is th e n ie c e o f K e ith H o c k , N u c E ’8 3 , M S N u c E ’8 4 ; J o h n A . H o c k , C E ’8 4 , M S C E ’8 9 ; a n d B o b H o c k , P h y s ’8 7 . T h e f a m ily e n c o u r a g e s o th e r s to d o n a te b lo o d a n d to b e o rg a n d o n o r s . tN o v . 2 6 , 2001


ALUMNI PROFILE

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Larry (MinE'73) and Polly (EMgt'73) Hendren understand UMR's impact — not only on the state economy, but also on their lives. And they both work hard to make sure everyone they meet knows it. Larry is president and CEO of Engineering Surveys and Services, a firm headquartered in Columbia, Mo. The company specializes in civil, mining, environmental and geotechnical engineering; all types of surveying; and laboratory services, including construction materials testing and environmental laboratory services. The firm also has offices in Sedalia, Mo., and Jefferson City, Mo. Polly volunteers for the Columbia Aeronautics and Space Association, a program offered through Columbia's Hickman High School to help students learn more about space exploration. The program features a mock-up of the space station, complete with a fully functional mission control, a production area and a flyable orbiter. Once a year the students hold a week-long mission and Polly often gets UMR faculty involved. Two years ago, the mission was held in conjunction with UMR's Aerospace Camp, giving kids the chance to go through a live simulation in the Columbia lab after their time at UMR. Polly has made it her goal in working with these high school

students to make sure they know about UMR.

pilgrimage to the State Capitol to talk with legislators about UMR.

Before moving back to Missouri in 1978, the Hendrens headed east after graduation to work in the coal mines of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. "We realized when we graduated and moved to the East Coast the significance of having an engineering degree from UMR," Polly says. "Even in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, if you said engineering, they knew you were from UMR."

Larry is the chair of the Public Resource Ambassadors, which acts as the alumni association's legislative affairs branch. He keeps in constant contact with UMR Chancellor Gary Thomas and Missouri's legislature, keeping the campus informed on legislative actions, and keeping UMR in the minds of the legislators. Larry also created and maintains www.joe-miner.com, a website for the Public Resource Ambassadors to keep interested faculty, staff and alumni informed.

"When you go to school at UMR you make an investment," Larry adds. "You realize when you get out of school that the better UMR's reputation, the greater the return on that investment. Giving back to UMR, you make an even better university, continuing your investment." Aside from their "day jobs," both the Hendrens work hard for that investment in UMR and give their time to the MSM-UMR Alumni Association. In 1997, Polly formed the association's Mid-Missouri Section. As president-elect of the alumni association, Larry oversees the sections and technology committees, among other duties. But it's during his days at ESS's Jefferson City office that Larry's dedication to UMR really shines. On those days, he makes a

For the Hendrens, giving back to UMR is part of the bond they feel as alumni. "The thing about UMR that's great is the camaraderie," Polly says. "It's a small school, everybody's in the same boat, taking the same hard classes, and that even continues after you graduate. I think that's why UMR's alumni giving is so strong compared to other schools." Larry agrees. "At UMR we worked hard and we played hard. But the thing was, you knew that everyone else was going through the same thing you were."


Learning through

R EA L experience. UMR's student Design Teams More than 200 of our students are involved in 14 teams that plan, design and build concrete canoes, solar-powered homes, futuristic fuel cells, bridges of steel and timber, robots and, oh yes, solar cars. Keep an eye out for the next issue of the Alumnus, which will have updates on UMR's teams.

â– V U M R J