The Clothworkers' Company Annual Review 2016-17

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annual review 2016-17 the clothworkers’ foundation annual review 2016-17

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

annual review 2016-17


the clothworkers’ company 2016-17

Master Michael Jarvis

Clerk to the Company Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar

Wardens Dr Carolyn Boulter DL John Coombe-Tennant Alex Nelson Neil Foster

Director of Finance, Property and Investments Hamesh Patel

Court of Assistants Christopher Jonas CBE Anthony West DL Richard Jonas John Stoddart-Scott DL Robin Booth Christopher McLean May Michael Howell Antony Jones Melville Haggard Oliver Howard Tim Bousfield Peter Langley John Wake Philip Portal Nicholas Horne Dan Jago Denis Clough Tom Ingham Clark Dr Lucy Rawson Joanna Dodd Andrew Strang

Chief Accountant Andy Boon Beadle and Hall Manager Michael Drummond Head of Grants Philip Howard senior Archivist Jessica Collins

The Clothworkers’ Company The Clothworkers’ Foundation Clothworkers’ Hall Dunster Court Mincing Lane London EC3R 7AH Tel: 020 7623 7041 enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk

introduction

Textiles 3

The Clothworkers’ Company is a 500 year old philanthropic membership organisation with roots in the textile trade. Established by Royal Charter in 1528 through the merger of the Fullers and the Shearmen, the Company was founded to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London. It supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship.

collections 11

Today

Trusteeship 17

Having accumulated considerable wealth over the centuries, largely through bequests from members and the prudent management of its assets, the Company’s overall objectives today are to administer its assets and affairs responsibly, play its part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry in appropriate ways and seek to increase its charitable giving.

contents

Affiliations

18

Facing page: Textiles, Central Saint Martins See p7 Cover: The Caged Bird’s Song

The Clothworkers’ charitable activity is channelled through its grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation,

established in 1977 with a significant endowment from the Company. The Company passes its income, having met the costs of running the Hall and its other activities, across to the Foundation each year. This, together with income from the Foundation’s own investments, is distributed to a broad range of charities. This Review covers the key activities of the Company in textiles (where the Foundation is also active), its commitment to trusteeship, the continuing interest in its heritage and collections, and its support for the Armed Forces. The reverse side of the Review contains information on the broad range of activities undertaken by The Clothworkers’ Foundation. The Review is directed both at the members of the Company, as well as interested outside parties; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of an ancient City Livery Company.

(detail), 2014–2017 Wool, cotton and viscose © Chris Ofili Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London, The Clothworkers’ Company and Company photography by Kate Darkins and Richard Valencia

Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh

Printing by Park Lane Press; Design by Lydia Thornley

(photography Gautier Deblonde) the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

1


the clothworkers’ company 2016-17

Master Michael Jarvis

Clerk to the Company Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar

Wardens Dr Carolyn Boulter DL John Coombe-Tennant Alex Nelson Neil Foster

Director of Finance, Property and Investments Hamesh Patel

Court of Assistants Christopher Jonas CBE Anthony West DL Richard Jonas John Stoddart-Scott DL Robin Booth Christopher McLean May Michael Howell Antony Jones Melville Haggard Oliver Howard Tim Bousfield Peter Langley John Wake Philip Portal Nicholas Horne Dan Jago Denis Clough Tom Ingham Clark Dr Lucy Rawson Joanna Dodd Andrew Strang

Chief Accountant Andy Boon Beadle and Hall Manager Michael Drummond Head of Grants Philip Howard senior Archivist Jessica Collins

The Clothworkers’ Company The Clothworkers’ Foundation Clothworkers’ Hall Dunster Court Mincing Lane London EC3R 7AH Tel: 020 7623 7041 enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk

introduction

Textiles 3

The Clothworkers’ Company is a 500 year old philanthropic membership organisation with roots in the textile trade. Established by Royal Charter in 1528 through the merger of the Fullers and the Shearmen, the Company was founded to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London. It supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship.

collections 11

Today

Trusteeship 17

Having accumulated considerable wealth over the centuries, largely through bequests from members and the prudent management of its assets, the Company’s overall objectives today are to administer its assets and affairs responsibly, play its part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry in appropriate ways and seek to increase its charitable giving.

contents

Affiliations

18

Facing page: Textiles, Central Saint Martins See p7 Cover: The Caged Bird’s Song

The Clothworkers’ charitable activity is channelled through its grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation,

established in 1977 with a significant endowment from the Company. The Company passes its income, having met the costs of running the Hall and its other activities, across to the Foundation each year. This, together with income from the Foundation’s own investments, is distributed to a broad range of charities. This Review covers the key activities of the Company in textiles (where the Foundation is also active), its commitment to trusteeship, the continuing interest in its heritage and collections, and its support for the Armed Forces. The reverse side of the Review contains information on the broad range of activities undertaken by The Clothworkers’ Foundation. The Review is directed both at the members of the Company, as well as interested outside parties; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of an ancient City Livery Company.

(detail), 2014–2017 Wool, cotton and viscose © Chris Ofili Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London, The Clothworkers’ Company and Company photography by Kate Darkins and Richard Valencia

Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh

Printing by Park Lane Press; Design by Lydia Thornley

(photography Gautier Deblonde) the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

1


textiles

Objectives Support textile technology and manufacturing in the UK

The Clothworkers’ roots are in textiles, and support for the sector continues to be an important part of our activities. Today, this is channelled through both the Company and the Foundation.

and prototype products to address healthcare requirements in the areas of blood filtration, healthcare acquired infections, chronic wound treatment and incontinence management.

Formed in 1977, The Clothworkers’ Foundation celebrates its 40th birthday this year. Its approach to grant-making has evolved over the years, with a number of changes to strategy and focus areas of support. Until relatively recently, our textiles support had been very much on a reactive basis but, following a grantmaking review in 2006, there was a shift to a more proactive approach, with a number of textiles grants being made under the Regular Grants Programme. This has enabled us to develop long-term relationships with selected organisations.

Academic Excellence and Innovation

Maintain our support of academic excellence and innovation in technical textiles, traditional textiles and colour science in the UK

“The TC2 Norway digital Jacquard looms have enabled the Woven Textile Department to offer students a state of the art studio weaving facility.”

Encourage young adults to pursue studies and a career in these fields Selectively support and reward excellence in textile design Contribute to the preservation and accessibility of textiles collections of national importance

Philippa Brock Weave Specialist Area Leader Central Saint Martins

Our textiles objectives have likewise evolved and there follows a reflection on our support, past and present, for a wide-range of initiatives. Textile Technology and Manufacturing

Facing page: Jacquard loom, Central Saint Martins See p7

2

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

In 2012 we helped to establish the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare (CCTMIH) at the University of Leeds, with a £1.75m anchor donation. The Centre works to develop enabling technologies

We have been a major supporter of both the Textiles and Colour Science Departments at Leeds University since they were established and, over the last 20 years, have made grants totalling in excess of £10m. We currently provide bursaries for a number of PhD and Masters’ students across the two departments. In addition, we make the occasional capital grant for building refurbishment works, or to assist with the purchase of certain specialist equipment. The Company and the University are co-funders of an Innovation Fund to foster commercial ideas in textiles and colour science. Since 2005, the Fund has disbursed over £1.2m to allow the development of early stage innovations. Encouraging Young Adults We encourage young people to go into the UK textile industry through subsidised work placements;

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

3


textiles

Objectives Support textile technology and manufacturing in the UK

The Clothworkers’ roots are in textiles, and support for the sector continues to be an important part of our activities. Today, this is channelled through both the Company and the Foundation.

and prototype products to address healthcare requirements in the areas of blood filtration, healthcare acquired infections, chronic wound treatment and incontinence management.

Formed in 1977, The Clothworkers’ Foundation celebrates its 40th birthday this year. Its approach to grant-making has evolved over the years, with a number of changes to strategy and focus areas of support. Until relatively recently, our textiles support had been very much on a reactive basis but, following a grantmaking review in 2006, there was a shift to a more proactive approach, with a number of textiles grants being made under the Regular Grants Programme. This has enabled us to develop long-term relationships with selected organisations.

Academic Excellence and Innovation

Maintain our support of academic excellence and innovation in technical textiles, traditional textiles and colour science in the UK

“The TC2 Norway digital Jacquard looms have enabled the Woven Textile Department to offer students a state of the art studio weaving facility.”

Encourage young adults to pursue studies and a career in these fields Selectively support and reward excellence in textile design Contribute to the preservation and accessibility of textiles collections of national importance

Philippa Brock Weave Specialist Area Leader Central Saint Martins

Our textiles objectives have likewise evolved and there follows a reflection on our support, past and present, for a wide-range of initiatives. Textile Technology and Manufacturing

Facing page: Jacquard loom, Central Saint Martins See p7

2

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

In 2012 we helped to establish the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare (CCTMIH) at the University of Leeds, with a £1.75m anchor donation. The Centre works to develop enabling technologies

We have been a major supporter of both the Textiles and Colour Science Departments at Leeds University since they were established and, over the last 20 years, have made grants totalling in excess of £10m. We currently provide bursaries for a number of PhD and Masters’ students across the two departments. In addition, we make the occasional capital grant for building refurbishment works, or to assist with the purchase of certain specialist equipment. The Company and the University are co-funders of an Innovation Fund to foster commercial ideas in textiles and colour science. Since 2005, the Fund has disbursed over £1.2m to allow the development of early stage innovations. Encouraging Young Adults We encourage young people to go into the UK textile industry through subsidised work placements;

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

3


textiles

“Over the years, the Clothworkers have enabled over 40 talented individuals to become textile conservators thanks to their bursary funding. The textile conservation profession is not large, so this represents an extraordinary contribution to the discipline over many decades.” Professor Frances Lennard, Director of the Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History

organising an annual conference on opportunities in the sector; and fostering apprenticeships in Yorkshire. Most recently, we committed £90,000 over three years to the Crafts Council, towards its flagship education programme Make Your Future. This hands-on programme is designed to bring together traditional textilemaking with digital technologies, to stimulate the creativity of young people and inspire future careers in textiles. Our successful partnership with creative business incubator, Cockpit Arts, continues to flourish. The arrangement provides studio space and access to looms for graduate weavers, enabling them to set up in business. For a number of years we have funded student bursaries through the Royal College of Art, Central Saint Martins and the University of Huddersfield, as well as making capital grants for the purchase of specialist equipment. Textile Design

Facing page: Shima Seiki digital knitting machine, Royal College of Art See p7

4

We are longstanding supporters of Texprint, New Designers and the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition and, four years ago, set up a Materials Innovation Fellowship through The Arts Foundation.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Textile Conservation We are a major supporter of textile conservation in the UK. Since the 1980s, we have made capital grants, funded research and provided bursaries for students at the Centre for Textile Conservation – initially when it was at the University of Southampton, and now in its relatively new home in Glasgow – to the tune of £1.75m. In addition, we fund internships in tapestry conservation through Historic Royal Palaces, at Hampton Court. 2013 saw the opening of the Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion, at Blythe House. The Foundation’s £1m grant to the V&A, towards the £3m overall cost of the Centre, was to allow students, designers and researchers alike, greater access to its extensive collection. In 2014, the British Museum opened its new World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre. Our £0.75m grant to the Museum was for the creation of The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio, which is housed within the Centre, and brings together conservation and scientific research under one roof, in specially designed studios and laboratories. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

5


textiles

“Over the years, the Clothworkers have enabled over 40 talented individuals to become textile conservators thanks to their bursary funding. The textile conservation profession is not large, so this represents an extraordinary contribution to the discipline over many decades.” Professor Frances Lennard, Director of the Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History

organising an annual conference on opportunities in the sector; and fostering apprenticeships in Yorkshire. Most recently, we committed £90,000 over three years to the Crafts Council, towards its flagship education programme Make Your Future. This hands-on programme is designed to bring together traditional textilemaking with digital technologies, to stimulate the creativity of young people and inspire future careers in textiles. Our successful partnership with creative business incubator, Cockpit Arts, continues to flourish. The arrangement provides studio space and access to looms for graduate weavers, enabling them to set up in business. For a number of years we have funded student bursaries through the Royal College of Art, Central Saint Martins and the University of Huddersfield, as well as making capital grants for the purchase of specialist equipment. Textile Design

Facing page: Shima Seiki digital knitting machine, Royal College of Art See p7

4

We are longstanding supporters of Texprint, New Designers and the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition and, four years ago, set up a Materials Innovation Fellowship through The Arts Foundation.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Textile Conservation We are a major supporter of textile conservation in the UK. Since the 1980s, we have made capital grants, funded research and provided bursaries for students at the Centre for Textile Conservation – initially when it was at the University of Southampton, and now in its relatively new home in Glasgow – to the tune of £1.75m. In addition, we fund internships in tapestry conservation through Historic Royal Palaces, at Hampton Court. 2013 saw the opening of the Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion, at Blythe House. The Foundation’s £1m grant to the V&A, towards the £3m overall cost of the Centre, was to allow students, designers and researchers alike, greater access to its extensive collection. In 2014, the British Museum opened its new World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre. Our £0.75m grant to the Museum was for the creation of The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio, which is housed within the Centre, and brings together conservation and scientific research under one roof, in specially designed studios and laboratories. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

5


textiles: recent grants

“The Shima Seiki machine allows our students to engage and innovate with state of the art technology and enhances their skill set for future employment.” Anne Toomey, Head of Textiles Programme, Royal College of Art

Our current support of £13,000 provides bursaries each year for two MA textile students.

Our annual grant of £12,500 comprises a £10,000 materials fund, to allow ten final year textile students to purchase materials, and a £2,500 third-year printed textile bursary.

Most recently, we assisted with the purchase of a digital knitting machine. Our grant was for £25,000, towards the overall cost of £66,000.

“The new looms have allowed me to produce a body of work which communicates imagery, text and colour in a way I would not otherwise have been able to do.”

Facing page: Digital knitting, Royal College of Art Right: Woven textile, Central Saint Martins the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Central Saint Martins

Over the years, we have made capital grants totalling some £100,000 towards the purchase of looms and digital printing equipment.

Anna-Marie Southern Year 3 Weave Student Central Saint Martins

6

Royal College of Art

Alongside their other equipment, the Shima Seiki enables the Royal College of Art to deliver textile education relevant to the 21st century. With its multi-terminal computerised design system, the machine allows students to undertake programming themselves, thus freeing specialist technicians to work with a greater number of students.

In 2010 we provided funding of £55,000 towards the purchase of a digital knitting machine. More recently, we assisted with the purchase of three TC2 digital Jacquard looms. Our grant was for £30,000, towards an overall acquisition cost of £80,000. The flexibility of the new looms enables swift design adjustment, and allows the Jacquard-trained students to have total control over the design process. The skills learned by the students easily translate into industrial weaving methods, ensuring high employability.

Following a somewhat dramatic entry into the textiles department, via crane, and the subsequent discovery of shipping damage to the machine, there was a delay in its commissioning. However, we are delighted that it is now fully operational, and is being intensively used. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

7


textiles: recent grants

“The Shima Seiki machine allows our students to engage and innovate with state of the art technology and enhances their skill set for future employment.” Anne Toomey, Head of Textiles Programme, Royal College of Art

Our current support of £13,000 provides bursaries each year for two MA textile students.

Our annual grant of £12,500 comprises a £10,000 materials fund, to allow ten final year textile students to purchase materials, and a £2,500 third-year printed textile bursary.

Most recently, we assisted with the purchase of a digital knitting machine. Our grant was for £25,000, towards the overall cost of £66,000.

“The new looms have allowed me to produce a body of work which communicates imagery, text and colour in a way I would not otherwise have been able to do.”

Facing page: Digital knitting, Royal College of Art Right: Woven textile, Central Saint Martins the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Central Saint Martins

Over the years, we have made capital grants totalling some £100,000 towards the purchase of looms and digital printing equipment.

Anna-Marie Southern Year 3 Weave Student Central Saint Martins

6

Royal College of Art

Alongside their other equipment, the Shima Seiki enables the Royal College of Art to deliver textile education relevant to the 21st century. With its multi-terminal computerised design system, the machine allows students to undertake programming themselves, thus freeing specialist technicians to work with a greater number of students.

In 2010 we provided funding of £55,000 towards the purchase of a digital knitting machine. More recently, we assisted with the purchase of three TC2 digital Jacquard looms. Our grant was for £30,000, towards an overall acquisition cost of £80,000. The flexibility of the new looms enables swift design adjustment, and allows the Jacquard-trained students to have total control over the design process. The skills learned by the students easily translate into industrial weaving methods, ensuring high employability.

Following a somewhat dramatic entry into the textiles department, via crane, and the subsequent discovery of shipping damage to the machine, there was a delay in its commissioning. However, we are delighted that it is now fully operational, and is being intensively used. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

7


textiles: recent grants 2016 Textiles Grants The Arts Foundation Materials Innovation fellowship Four years ago, with The Arts Foundation, we set up a £10,000 Materials Innovation Fellowship. This was to be awarded each year to an individual who had already achieved some professional standing, with the funds being available for living or work expenses. This year, the winner was British-Italian artist and inventor, Julian Melchiorri. Julian is currently Inventor in Residence at the Victoria & Albert Museum, and runs the research practice, Arborea. His innovative work combines biochemistry, micro fluidics and hand-crafting to create environmentally-friendly objects. He created the first man-made

biological leaf that can convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, and has plans for a carbon-neutral “bio” chandelier. Previous winners of the award have included Julia Lohmann (2014), who uses seaweed as a material for design and manufacture; Sarat Babu (2015), whose microkenetics technique has been used in soft tissue replacement for those with osteoporosis; and Carmen Hijosa (2016), the creator of Piñatex, a unique natural and sustainable non-woven textile leather substitute made from pineapple leaf fibres.

Foundation Crafts Council Over three years towards the Make Your Future programme £90,000

University of Leeds School of Design PhD bursary over three years £70,000

Historic Royal Palaces Towards three internships in textile conservation over three years £45,000

Texprint Towards the annual design competition for three years £45,000

At a high profile ceremony in London, Julian was presented with the award by the author, and guest of honour, Will Self.

The Arts Foundation Materials Innovation Fellowship over three years £44,400

The Weavers’ Company Textile Education Fund Industry placement scheme £29,100

University of Leeds Department of Colour Science MSc bursaries £24,000

Bradford College Textile Archive Towards roller-racking storage system £20,000

University of Leeds School of Design MSc bursaries

Company Textile Centre of Excellence, Huddersfield Apprenticeship Champion £44,000

Textile Centre of Excellence, Huddersfield Joint funding with the Drapers’, Dyers’ and Weavers’ Companies for a new set of Trailblazer apprenticeship standards £30,000

£20,000

University of Huddersfield BA/BSc bursaries £15,000

Royal College of Art MA bursaries £13,000

Making It in Textiles Joint sponsorship with Campaign for Wool, and the Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies, of a careers conference for third year textile students £14,000

Central Saint Martins Materials fund and student bursary

New Designers Sponsorship and Printed Textile Design Prize

£12,500

Bradford Textile Society Trust Textile design competition

£2,560

£4,650

Centre for Textile Conservation MPhil bursary £27,400

Total: £460,050

Total: £90,560

Right: Silk Leaf detail (2014) and Silk Leaf luminaire prototypes detail (2014), Julian Melchiorri Facing page: Piñatex textile, Carmen Hijosa

8

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

9


textiles: recent grants 2016 Textiles Grants The Arts Foundation Materials Innovation fellowship Four years ago, with The Arts Foundation, we set up a £10,000 Materials Innovation Fellowship. This was to be awarded each year to an individual who had already achieved some professional standing, with the funds being available for living or work expenses. This year, the winner was British-Italian artist and inventor, Julian Melchiorri. Julian is currently Inventor in Residence at the Victoria & Albert Museum, and runs the research practice, Arborea. His innovative work combines biochemistry, micro fluidics and hand-crafting to create environmentally-friendly objects. He created the first man-made

biological leaf that can convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, and has plans for a carbon-neutral “bio” chandelier. Previous winners of the award have included Julia Lohmann (2014), who uses seaweed as a material for design and manufacture; Sarat Babu (2015), whose microkenetics technique has been used in soft tissue replacement for those with osteoporosis; and Carmen Hijosa (2016), the creator of Piñatex, a unique natural and sustainable non-woven textile leather substitute made from pineapple leaf fibres.

Foundation Crafts Council Over three years towards the Make Your Future programme £90,000

University of Leeds School of Design PhD bursary over three years £70,000

Historic Royal Palaces Towards three internships in textile conservation over three years £45,000

Texprint Towards the annual design competition for three years £45,000

At a high profile ceremony in London, Julian was presented with the award by the author, and guest of honour, Will Self.

The Arts Foundation Materials Innovation Fellowship over three years £44,400

The Weavers’ Company Textile Education Fund Industry placement scheme £29,100

University of Leeds Department of Colour Science MSc bursaries £24,000

Bradford College Textile Archive Towards roller-racking storage system £20,000

University of Leeds School of Design MSc bursaries

Company Textile Centre of Excellence, Huddersfield Apprenticeship Champion £44,000

Textile Centre of Excellence, Huddersfield Joint funding with the Drapers’, Dyers’ and Weavers’ Companies for a new set of Trailblazer apprenticeship standards £30,000

£20,000

University of Huddersfield BA/BSc bursaries £15,000

Royal College of Art MA bursaries £13,000

Making It in Textiles Joint sponsorship with Campaign for Wool, and the Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies, of a careers conference for third year textile students £14,000

Central Saint Martins Materials fund and student bursary

New Designers Sponsorship and Printed Textile Design Prize

£12,500

Bradford Textile Society Trust Textile design competition

£2,560

£4,650

Centre for Textile Conservation MPhil bursary £27,400

Total: £460,050

Total: £90,560

Right: Silk Leaf detail (2014) and Silk Leaf luminaire prototypes detail (2014), Julian Melchiorri Facing page: Piñatex textile, Carmen Hijosa

8

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

9


collections “Dovecot were thrilled when the Clothworkers embraced our proposal of a Chris Ofili designed tapestry and by Chris’ interest in accepting the commission. His instinctive response to the medium and openness to collaborate is wonderful. His visits to the Studio, and the time taken for thoughtful interchanges with the weaving team to understand the medium, have resulted in an extraordinarily beautiful design.” David Weir, Director of Dovecot

Tapestries In 2014 the Company commissioned a new tapestry for display in the Livery Hall. It has been the intention of the Court to commission a modern British tapestry for the Hall since its refurbishment in the 1980s, and the new piece will replace the Joseph and Potiphar tapestry on the west wall, purchased at that time. Designed by the Turner Prize winning artist Chris Ofili CBE, and hand woven by the internationally renowned Dovecot Tapestry Studio in Edinburgh, The Caged Bird’s Song is a bold and vibrant triptych which draws on Ofili’s ongoing interests in classical mythology and contemporary demi-gods, and is inspired by the stories, magic and colour of the Trinidadian landscape he inhabits. The commission and, in particular, the choice of such a prominent artist to design the work, make a powerful statement about our commitment to our root craft and our desire to support endangered skills and nurture talent.

Facing page: The Caged Bird’s Song (detail), 2014–2017 Wool, cotton and viscose © Chris Ofili Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London, The Clothworkers’ Company and Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh (photography Gautier Deblonde)

10

Dovecot is one of only two surviving tapestry studios in the UK, and it has taken a team of five master weavers over two and a half years to translate Ofili’s watercolour design to the loom, interpreting,

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

replicating and magnifying each and every colour and nuance with great skill and artistry. The three panels together measure some 7.8m wide x 2.8m high. The commission has thus necessitated close collaboration between artist and maker(s), in what Ofili has fittingly described as a ‘marriage of watercolour and weaving’. In the left panel, we see a female figure, elegant and goddess-like, positioned at the edge of a scene, carrying crab-eye, a type of grass fed to songbirds, and on the right, a male figure, carrying a song-bird in a cage. The central panel contains an imagined landscape in which a waterfall tumbles into the sea, and where a musician serenades his female companion. She, in turn, receives a mysterious drink into a cocktail glass poured by an athletic Dionysian figure from the tree above. The male and female figures could be considered onlookers to the central scene; however, the curtain-like backdrop of the richly coloured background may refer to a more literal sense of the passage of time, and thus if taken chronologically, the left and right panels may represent the two figures before they meet and perhaps the central panel, the romantic scene that ensues thereafter. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

11


collections “Dovecot were thrilled when the Clothworkers embraced our proposal of a Chris Ofili designed tapestry and by Chris’ interest in accepting the commission. His instinctive response to the medium and openness to collaborate is wonderful. His visits to the Studio, and the time taken for thoughtful interchanges with the weaving team to understand the medium, have resulted in an extraordinarily beautiful design.” David Weir, Director of Dovecot

Tapestries In 2014 the Company commissioned a new tapestry for display in the Livery Hall. It has been the intention of the Court to commission a modern British tapestry for the Hall since its refurbishment in the 1980s, and the new piece will replace the Joseph and Potiphar tapestry on the west wall, purchased at that time. Designed by the Turner Prize winning artist Chris Ofili CBE, and hand woven by the internationally renowned Dovecot Tapestry Studio in Edinburgh, The Caged Bird’s Song is a bold and vibrant triptych which draws on Ofili’s ongoing interests in classical mythology and contemporary demi-gods, and is inspired by the stories, magic and colour of the Trinidadian landscape he inhabits. The commission and, in particular, the choice of such a prominent artist to design the work, make a powerful statement about our commitment to our root craft and our desire to support endangered skills and nurture talent.

Facing page: The Caged Bird’s Song (detail), 2014–2017 Wool, cotton and viscose © Chris Ofili Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London, The Clothworkers’ Company and Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh (photography Gautier Deblonde)

10

Dovecot is one of only two surviving tapestry studios in the UK, and it has taken a team of five master weavers over two and a half years to translate Ofili’s watercolour design to the loom, interpreting,

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

replicating and magnifying each and every colour and nuance with great skill and artistry. The three panels together measure some 7.8m wide x 2.8m high. The commission has thus necessitated close collaboration between artist and maker(s), in what Ofili has fittingly described as a ‘marriage of watercolour and weaving’. In the left panel, we see a female figure, elegant and goddess-like, positioned at the edge of a scene, carrying crab-eye, a type of grass fed to songbirds, and on the right, a male figure, carrying a song-bird in a cage. The central panel contains an imagined landscape in which a waterfall tumbles into the sea, and where a musician serenades his female companion. She, in turn, receives a mysterious drink into a cocktail glass poured by an athletic Dionysian figure from the tree above. The male and female figures could be considered onlookers to the central scene; however, the curtain-like backdrop of the richly coloured background may refer to a more literal sense of the passage of time, and thus if taken chronologically, the left and right panels may represent the two figures before they meet and perhaps the central panel, the romantic scene that ensues thereafter. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

11


collections

The tapestry is on public display in its own dedicated Sunley Room exhibition at the National Gallery, until 28 August, before permanent installation in Clothworkers’ Hall. As the artist’s first foray into the medium of tapestry, Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic is expected to attract large audiences at the National Gallery, and will include Ofili’s preparatory works for the final piece. Silver We are fortunate to possess an extensive collection of silver, dating from the early seventeenth century, with particular highlights including the magnificent suite of plate presented by Samuel Pepys, Master 1677, and the Horne Cup, a splendid art nouveau style piece in solid gold designed by the noted Arts and Crafts silversmith, Omar Ramsden.

Left: Horne Cup, designed by Omar Ramsden Above right: The weaving of The Caged Bird’s Song at Dovecot Tapestry Studio, 2014–2017. Commissioned by The Clothworkers’ Company. Woven by Jonathan Cleaver, Naomi Robertson, Freya Sewell, Louise Trotter and Emma Jo Webster at Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh.

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Our collection exists, in large part, due to the generosity of past Masters and members; however, we seek to build a representative collection of the best of contemporary British silver, and every two years we commission a piece from a modern designer. We were delighted that our most recent acquisition, a striking three handled silver loving cup inspired by the form of teasels, designed by up and coming silversmith Rauni Higson, won a bronze award at the 2016

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Goldsmiths’ Craft and Design Council Awards.

“We are very proud at the National Gallery to be able to unveil this major new work by celebrated contemporary artist, Chris Ofili, and enormously grateful to The Clothworkers’ Company for making this possible. As a curator, it has been fascinating watching the process of a contemporary tapestry being made and it has brought to life for me the age old practice of an artist designing a tapestry. Chris Ofili joins the ranks of Raphael, Rubens and Goya in designing tapestries and I hope that for the public, too, this exhibition will help bring art history to life.” Minna Moore Ede, National Gallery Curator

We have recently embarked upon two new silver commissions with Angela Cork, and Leo and Ginnie de Vroomen, following competitions to design a rosewater dish inspired by our new Royal Charter granted in 2015, and a new Clerk’s badge. Bookbinding Bookbinding is an endangered craft which the Company decided, ten years ago, it wished to support. As a result, we are slowly building up a collection of designer bookbindings, and currently have five books out on commission. We recently took delivery of our second binding by Jenni Grey, appositely of a catalogue raisonné of Chris Ofili. All our bindings are displayed in a prominent position at Clothworkers’ Hall in order to draw the attention of members, guests and Lent Hall visitors, alongside a striking selection of bindings generously lent by a member of Court. Other heritage collections With the exception of the Ofili tapestry, our commissioning activity is usually focused upon plate and bookbindings; however, on occasion our core collections are

Top: The Costume of Yorkshire,

Above: O Thoma! score

bookbinding by James Brockman

See p14

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

13


collections

The tapestry is on public display in its own dedicated Sunley Room exhibition at the National Gallery, until 28 August, before permanent installation in Clothworkers’ Hall. As the artist’s first foray into the medium of tapestry, Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic is expected to attract large audiences at the National Gallery, and will include Ofili’s preparatory works for the final piece. Silver We are fortunate to possess an extensive collection of silver, dating from the early seventeenth century, with particular highlights including the magnificent suite of plate presented by Samuel Pepys, Master 1677, and the Horne Cup, a splendid art nouveau style piece in solid gold designed by the noted Arts and Crafts silversmith, Omar Ramsden.

Left: Horne Cup, designed by Omar Ramsden Above right: The weaving of The Caged Bird’s Song at Dovecot Tapestry Studio, 2014–2017. Commissioned by The Clothworkers’ Company. Woven by Jonathan Cleaver, Naomi Robertson, Freya Sewell, Louise Trotter and Emma Jo Webster at Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh.

12

Our collection exists, in large part, due to the generosity of past Masters and members; however, we seek to build a representative collection of the best of contemporary British silver, and every two years we commission a piece from a modern designer. We were delighted that our most recent acquisition, a striking three handled silver loving cup inspired by the form of teasels, designed by up and coming silversmith Rauni Higson, won a bronze award at the 2016

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Goldsmiths’ Craft and Design Council Awards.

“We are very proud at the National Gallery to be able to unveil this major new work by celebrated contemporary artist, Chris Ofili, and enormously grateful to The Clothworkers’ Company for making this possible. As a curator, it has been fascinating watching the process of a contemporary tapestry being made and it has brought to life for me the age old practice of an artist designing a tapestry. Chris Ofili joins the ranks of Raphael, Rubens and Goya in designing tapestries and I hope that for the public, too, this exhibition will help bring art history to life.” Minna Moore Ede, National Gallery Curator

We have recently embarked upon two new silver commissions with Angela Cork, and Leo and Ginnie de Vroomen, following competitions to design a rosewater dish inspired by our new Royal Charter granted in 2015, and a new Clerk’s badge. Bookbinding Bookbinding is an endangered craft which the Company decided, ten years ago, it wished to support. As a result, we are slowly building up a collection of designer bookbindings, and currently have five books out on commission. We recently took delivery of our second binding by Jenni Grey, appositely of a catalogue raisonné of Chris Ofili. All our bindings are displayed in a prominent position at Clothworkers’ Hall in order to draw the attention of members, guests and Lent Hall visitors, alongside a striking selection of bindings generously lent by a member of Court. Other heritage collections With the exception of the Ofili tapestry, our commissioning activity is usually focused upon plate and bookbindings; however, on occasion our core collections are

Top: The Costume of Yorkshire,

Above: O Thoma! score

bookbinding by James Brockman

See p14

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

13


collections

Clothworkers singing – a Rutt caricature c1766

supplemented with other, no less significant, works of art. In 2016 we were fortunate to receive two most unusual and original gifts from past Masters. The first was a framed transcript of the score for O Thoma!, the carol commissioned for St Thomas’ Eve by Melville Haggard, Master 2015-16. The second, an elegant embroidered armorial badge for the Master’s gown, commissioned by Michael Howell, Master 2014-15, from the Royal School of Needlework. We also commissioned a striking wreath formed of red poppies from the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red installation at the Tower of London to commemorate each of the eighteen Clothworker Liverymen lost in two wars. The wreath was designed by Colin Bowles and has been affixed to our war memorial in our guild church, St Olave Hart Street. Supporting talent We have a long track record as a patron of the arts and today we continue to support up and coming talent in selected areas. From top: Ellie Lanham backing a book Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 Kairos, a centrepiece by Theresa Nguyen Armorial badge, stitched by the Royal School of Needlework

14

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

In silversmithing, we have recently agreed a second grant to Bishopsland Educational Trust, to enable students to purchase silver bullion, the essential raw material

for their pieces. Bishopsland is a unique one year residential workshop for emerging silversmiths, providing master classes in craft techniques coupled with essential training in marketing and business skills. Prominent alumni include Rod Kelly, Jane Short, Hiroshi Suzuki and Theresa Nguyen, all of whom feature in our growing plate collection. In bookbinding, we fund prizes in the Open Choice category of the Designer Bookbinders annual competition, which consistently attracts high quality bindings from talented craftsmen. We also fund bursaries to enable deserving binders to attend training master classes jointly organised by Designer Bookbinders and the Society of Bookbinders, as a means of enabling skills transfer from one generation to the next. In 2016 the Company played a pivotal role in the creation of the Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme (QBAS), the first Bindery apprenticeship to be established since the 1970s. Over a seven-year pilot period, up to six apprentices will gain unparalleled experience working in the Royal Bindery at Windsor and attending external workshops, acquiring a broad range of bookbinding skills including fine leather binding, edge-gilding and

gold finishing, which may otherwise be lost forever. The scheme was endorsed by HM the Queen during her 90th birthday celebrations and over 250 applications were received for its first intake. Two exceptional candidates, Ellie Lanham and Matthew Stockl, began their fiveyear apprenticeships in October, and will receive City and Guilds qualifications upon completion of the scheme. We have sponsored a competition at the Royal School of Needlework over several years in which students are asked to design a kneeler for St Olave’s. The competition and commission give the Future Tutor students at the School real life experience of producing designs to a brief, and studio practice in stitching work to a deadline. In recent years, the quality of designs has been of a very high standard, with the Great Fire of London-inspired kneeler produced for the 2015-16 Competition by Sarah Smith as a fine example. We also fund a small monetary prize for the Best Future Tutor in any year at the School. ARCHIVES 2016 was a busy year for the Archives, with a record number of Hall tours, research visits and enquiries received. Facilitating research and promoting accessibility

have therefore been priorities. A new exhibition on the Great Plague and Great Fire of London was installed in the Entrance Hall, and a significant achievement was the digitisation and display of framed facsimiles of our series of hand written and illuminated Royal Charters, Ordinances and Grants of Arms earlier in the year. The project involved locating and having made wax copies of the Great Seals of past Monarchs in surviving matrices and appending these to the facsimiles, carefully replicating the stitching and threads on the original vellum. The facsimiles, now framed, are on display in the Court Corridor. We are currently engaged in another facsimile project, to create reproductions of the Rutt Caricatures, a charming set of late eighteenth century pen and ink sketches of Court Members by Henry Rutt, Master 1783. Once framed, these previously little known drawings will go on display in the Hall, where they can be enjoyed by a wider audience.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

15


collections

Clothworkers singing – a Rutt caricature c1766

supplemented with other, no less significant, works of art. In 2016 we were fortunate to receive two most unusual and original gifts from past Masters. The first was a framed transcript of the score for O Thoma!, the carol commissioned for St Thomas’ Eve by Melville Haggard, Master 2015-16. The second, an elegant embroidered armorial badge for the Master’s gown, commissioned by Michael Howell, Master 2014-15, from the Royal School of Needlework. We also commissioned a striking wreath formed of red poppies from the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red installation at the Tower of London to commemorate each of the eighteen Clothworker Liverymen lost in two wars. The wreath was designed by Colin Bowles and has been affixed to our war memorial in our guild church, St Olave Hart Street. Supporting talent We have a long track record as a patron of the arts and today we continue to support up and coming talent in selected areas. From top: Ellie Lanham backing a book Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 Kairos, a centrepiece by Theresa Nguyen Armorial badge, stitched by the Royal School of Needlework

14

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

In silversmithing, we have recently agreed a second grant to Bishopsland Educational Trust, to enable students to purchase silver bullion, the essential raw material

for their pieces. Bishopsland is a unique one year residential workshop for emerging silversmiths, providing master classes in craft techniques coupled with essential training in marketing and business skills. Prominent alumni include Rod Kelly, Jane Short, Hiroshi Suzuki and Theresa Nguyen, all of whom feature in our growing plate collection. In bookbinding, we fund prizes in the Open Choice category of the Designer Bookbinders annual competition, which consistently attracts high quality bindings from talented craftsmen. We also fund bursaries to enable deserving binders to attend training master classes jointly organised by Designer Bookbinders and the Society of Bookbinders, as a means of enabling skills transfer from one generation to the next. In 2016 the Company played a pivotal role in the creation of the Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme (QBAS), the first Bindery apprenticeship to be established since the 1970s. Over a seven-year pilot period, up to six apprentices will gain unparalleled experience working in the Royal Bindery at Windsor and attending external workshops, acquiring a broad range of bookbinding skills including fine leather binding, edge-gilding and

gold finishing, which may otherwise be lost forever. The scheme was endorsed by HM the Queen during her 90th birthday celebrations and over 250 applications were received for its first intake. Two exceptional candidates, Ellie Lanham and Matthew Stockl, began their fiveyear apprenticeships in October, and will receive City and Guilds qualifications upon completion of the scheme. We have sponsored a competition at the Royal School of Needlework over several years in which students are asked to design a kneeler for St Olave’s. The competition and commission give the Future Tutor students at the School real life experience of producing designs to a brief, and studio practice in stitching work to a deadline. In recent years, the quality of designs has been of a very high standard, with the Great Fire of London-inspired kneeler produced for the 2015-16 Competition by Sarah Smith as a fine example. We also fund a small monetary prize for the Best Future Tutor in any year at the School. ARCHIVES 2016 was a busy year for the Archives, with a record number of Hall tours, research visits and enquiries received. Facilitating research and promoting accessibility

have therefore been priorities. A new exhibition on the Great Plague and Great Fire of London was installed in the Entrance Hall, and a significant achievement was the digitisation and display of framed facsimiles of our series of hand written and illuminated Royal Charters, Ordinances and Grants of Arms earlier in the year. The project involved locating and having made wax copies of the Great Seals of past Monarchs in surviving matrices and appending these to the facsimiles, carefully replicating the stitching and threads on the original vellum. The facsimiles, now framed, are on display in the Court Corridor. We are currently engaged in another facsimile project, to create reproductions of the Rutt Caricatures, a charming set of late eighteenth century pen and ink sketches of Court Members by Henry Rutt, Master 1783. Once framed, these previously little known drawings will go on display in the Hall, where they can be enjoyed by a wider audience.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

15


Trusteeship Governor is one of the most valuable ways to do this.

As Clothworkers, we are committed to fanning the sparks of our root trade, helping foster both innovation and conservation. However, the Court had felt that there was scope for the Company to identify a relevant and important contemporary need or purpose, with a wider application. A number of possibilities were thoroughly considered and robustly debated. Amongst the contenders, was Trusteeship.

There are close to 200,000 organisations in the UK’s Third Sector, with an annual income in excess of £70 billion. To support this vital sector, enabling paid staff and volunteers to shape and deliver their service, there are around a million Trustees. Their purpose is to ensure that their charities achieve impact for beneficiaries, in a sustainable way.

Some were unsure what Trusteeship had to do with us, and how we could have an impact. With an ancient endowment, the Company is not in the business of fundraising to support its sister-Foundation’s grant-making; but it has a large membership, increasingly eager to be involved in Civil Society. Being a Trustee or School the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

from fireplace at Clothworkers’ Hall

What has Trusteeship got to do with us?

The Third Sector’s need for Trustees – the essential guardians of purpose – continues to be very significantly undersupplied. It was felt that the Company could do its bit, with others, to promote Trusteeship. The Company’s new ‘Common Purpose’ was born.

16

Facing page: Carving of Apollo, detail

The Trustee Leadership Programme that we co-fund, has so far seen over 500 would-be Trustees undertaking highlyvalued training, in London and beyond. Alongside this, we have underpinned a Trustee

“To deliver good governance (the ‘what’ and the ‘how’), committed and able Trustees (the ‘who’) are indispensable. This is a central facet of the quiet enabling role of the Company.” Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar, Clerk to the Company

matching service, placing over 1900 Trustees in roles of which the huge majority are deemed to make a really discernible difference. The Company works with others to help the sector strive for better standards of governance. Sometimes this requires us to prime the pump (for example, helping fund work on the new Governance Code). Additionally, we work in partnership with the sector to stage the Charity Governance Awards. This scheme, and the seminars and conferences run by sector thought-leaders, see Clothworkers’ Hall being used as a ‘safe space’ to convene those who strive for a really effective Third Sector. A few years into our commitment to the common purpose of Trusteeship, the Company is an influential partner, enabling the fostering of capability and, also, the engagement of new Trustees in the sector. In terms of Clothworkers themselves fulfilling Trustee or School Governor roles, good progress has been made; however, we are committed to growing our own engagement with the essential work of capable and sociallyaware Trustees.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

17


Trusteeship Governor is one of the most valuable ways to do this.

As Clothworkers, we are committed to fanning the sparks of our root trade, helping foster both innovation and conservation. However, the Court had felt that there was scope for the Company to identify a relevant and important contemporary need or purpose, with a wider application. A number of possibilities were thoroughly considered and robustly debated. Amongst the contenders, was Trusteeship.

There are close to 200,000 organisations in the UK’s Third Sector, with an annual income in excess of £70 billion. To support this vital sector, enabling paid staff and volunteers to shape and deliver their service, there are around a million Trustees. Their purpose is to ensure that their charities achieve impact for beneficiaries, in a sustainable way.

Some were unsure what Trusteeship had to do with us, and how we could have an impact. With an ancient endowment, the Company is not in the business of fundraising to support its sister-Foundation’s grant-making; but it has a large membership, increasingly eager to be involved in Civil Society. Being a Trustee or School the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

from fireplace at Clothworkers’ Hall

What has Trusteeship got to do with us?

The Third Sector’s need for Trustees – the essential guardians of purpose – continues to be very significantly undersupplied. It was felt that the Company could do its bit, with others, to promote Trusteeship. The Company’s new ‘Common Purpose’ was born.

16

Facing page: Carving of Apollo, detail

The Trustee Leadership Programme that we co-fund, has so far seen over 500 would-be Trustees undertaking highlyvalued training, in London and beyond. Alongside this, we have underpinned a Trustee

“To deliver good governance (the ‘what’ and the ‘how’), committed and able Trustees (the ‘who’) are indispensable. This is a central facet of the quiet enabling role of the Company.” Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar, Clerk to the Company

matching service, placing over 1900 Trustees in roles of which the huge majority are deemed to make a really discernible difference. The Company works with others to help the sector strive for better standards of governance. Sometimes this requires us to prime the pump (for example, helping fund work on the new Governance Code). Additionally, we work in partnership with the sector to stage the Charity Governance Awards. This scheme, and the seminars and conferences run by sector thought-leaders, see Clothworkers’ Hall being used as a ‘safe space’ to convene those who strive for a really effective Third Sector. A few years into our commitment to the common purpose of Trusteeship, the Company is an influential partner, enabling the fostering of capability and, also, the engagement of new Trustees in the sector. In terms of Clothworkers themselves fulfilling Trustee or School Governor roles, good progress has been made; however, we are committed to growing our own engagement with the essential work of capable and sociallyaware Trustees.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

17


affiliations The Company continues to foster its relationships with the Scots Guards, HMS Dauntless, 47 Squadron and the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY). Over the last twelve months, we have enjoyed several reciprocal events, and are currently working on a number of interesting initiatives. Our financial support assists, primarily, with a range of welfare activities for the servicemen and servicewomen, and their families, and, in the case of the FANY, with certain salary costs. Of particular note, however, in 2016, was our funding towards a memorial commissioned by 47 Squadron. Formed in 1916 in Beverley, East Yorkshire, the Squadron has just celebrated its centenary. To mark this, the Company was delighted to support the commissioning of a memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum (NMA), Erewash, as a lasting legacy to members of the Squadron; past, present and future. Yorkshire-based artist, Peter Naylor, was selected to design the memorial. Naylor works in a wide variety of media and his designs range from small-scale stationery, to large-scale museum installations. He has worked on the design and production of a

18

developed. This had to be done in consultation with the NMA, who required some minor adjustments during the process. Naylor project-managed the build, engaging local fabricators in Hull. The installation itself was undertaken by Scott Developments, a company used by the NMA for other projects.

Wing Commanders Dave Stewart and Andy Thompson

“Crafted in corten weathering steel, the structure features airmen and airwomen from different eras of the Squadron’s century of active service, the places it has served, and its nine battle honours.” number of memorials in honour of those who have served in the Armed Forces. Having identified the artist, and located and purchased a suitable plot, the design was

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Several months in the making, the memorial was unveiled on 1 March. On a day blessed with blue skies, the Master led a small group of Clothworkers to Erewash, where they joined past and present members of the Squadron, and their families. The dedication was led by the Squadron’s Chaplain, and was followed by a few words from Wing Commanders Dave Stewart and Andy Thompson, outgoing and incoming Officers Commanding, respectively. Also in attendance was Group Captain Mike Neville, President of the 47 Squadron Association. Of course, such an event could not take place without a spectacular ‘three ship’ Hercules flypast. There remained ample time for the group to walk round the Arboretum and experience for themselves the atmosphere of such a special place. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

19


affiliations The Company continues to foster its relationships with the Scots Guards, HMS Dauntless, 47 Squadron and the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY). Over the last twelve months, we have enjoyed several reciprocal events, and are currently working on a number of interesting initiatives. Our financial support assists, primarily, with a range of welfare activities for the servicemen and servicewomen, and their families, and, in the case of the FANY, with certain salary costs. Of particular note, however, in 2016, was our funding towards a memorial commissioned by 47 Squadron. Formed in 1916 in Beverley, East Yorkshire, the Squadron has just celebrated its centenary. To mark this, the Company was delighted to support the commissioning of a memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum (NMA), Erewash, as a lasting legacy to members of the Squadron; past, present and future. Yorkshire-based artist, Peter Naylor, was selected to design the memorial. Naylor works in a wide variety of media and his designs range from small-scale stationery, to large-scale museum installations. He has worked on the design and production of a

18

developed. This had to be done in consultation with the NMA, who required some minor adjustments during the process. Naylor project-managed the build, engaging local fabricators in Hull. The installation itself was undertaken by Scott Developments, a company used by the NMA for other projects.

Wing Commanders Dave Stewart and Andy Thompson

“Crafted in corten weathering steel, the structure features airmen and airwomen from different eras of the Squadron’s century of active service, the places it has served, and its nine battle honours.” number of memorials in honour of those who have served in the Armed Forces. Having identified the artist, and located and purchased a suitable plot, the design was

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

Several months in the making, the memorial was unveiled on 1 March. On a day blessed with blue skies, the Master led a small group of Clothworkers to Erewash, where they joined past and present members of the Squadron, and their families. The dedication was led by the Squadron’s Chaplain, and was followed by a few words from Wing Commanders Dave Stewart and Andy Thompson, outgoing and incoming Officers Commanding, respectively. Also in attendance was Group Captain Mike Neville, President of the 47 Squadron Association. Of course, such an event could not take place without a spectacular ‘three ship’ Hercules flypast. There remained ample time for the group to walk round the Arboretum and experience for themselves the atmosphere of such a special place. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2016-17

19