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CLIFFORD MARIO KOSASIH ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO SELECTED WORKS 2013-2016


Clifford Mario Kosasih Address Mobile Email

#03-31, 639 Choa Chu Kang Street 64, Singapore, 680639 +65 9882 0829 clifford.mario.kosasih@gmail.com

Education 2015 – 2016

Singapore University of Technology and Design Masters of Architecture, Architecture and Sustainable Design (Class of 2016)

2012 – 2015

Singapore University of Technology and Design Bachelor of Science, Architecture and Sustainable Design Summa Cum Laude CGPA: 4.79 (maximum of 5.0)

2010 – 2011

Anglo-Chinese School (Independent), Singapore International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IBDP) Overall point: 44 (maximum of 45)

Working Experience Oct 2016 - now

CPG Consultants Pte. Ltd.

Sept - Dec 2015

Singapore-ETH Centre - Future Cities Laboratory Research and Design Assistant Project: Grand Projet: Towards Adaptable and Liveable Urban Mega-projects • Producing planning frameworks • Drawing of analytical diagrams, plans, and sections • Assisting in designing prototypical projects (2D & 3D)

May – Sept 2014

P.A.C. Pte. Ltd. Architectural Intern Project: Backpackers Hostel at Stanley Street • Developed schematic and detailed design for back-packers hostel rooms • Produced architectural drawings for construction of the rooms

May – Sept 2013

CPG Consultants Pte. Ltd. Architectural Design Intern Projects: Eco Spring at Johor Bahru and NUS Sports Complex • Developed 3D model for preliminary designs of the residential complex • Produced architectural renderings, presentations and fly-through

Teaching Assistant Feb – May 2015

Singapore University of Technology and Design 20.102 Architecture Core Studio 2

Sept – Dec 2015

Singapore University of Technology and Design 20.201 Architectural Science and Technology


Awards and Competitions Oct 2015

Board of Architects Prize 2014/2015

July 2015

Keppel Award of Excellence 2015 Architecture and Sustainable Design (Junior and Senior year)

Feb 2015

Singapore University of Technology and Design Architecture Core Design Award

Jan 2015

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Winter Independent Activity Period 2015

Mar 2013

Go Green in the City Singapore 2013, by Schneider Electric First Place, Singapore representative in Go Green in the City East Asia 2013

2012 - 2015

ASEAN Undergraduate Scholarship

SUTD Undergraduate study in Architecture and Sustainable Design

Research Projects Oct – Dec 2013

Singapore University of Technology and Design Built Form and Land Use Survey in Solo, Indonesia

Sept – Dec 2012

Singapore University of Technology and Design Design by Analogy

Technical Experience and Skills Proficient

Rhino and Grasshopper SketchUp C# and Python Script

V-Ray for Rhinoceros Adobe Suites CS6 AutoCAD

Basic

Autodesk Revit Dynamo Microsoft Office

Vasari DIVA Lumion

Language

English

Indonesian

Others 2013 – 2015

Singapore University of Technology and Design Residential Assistant in SUTD Hostel

2012 –2014

Singapore University of Technology and Design Creative Director (Music) SUTD A Cappella Society and SUTD Show Choir


Contents 001 Hyper-dense Hybrid 002 The Future of Cities: URBANATURE 003 Urban Living: Interweaving Public Spaces 004 Million Cuts: Hatched 005 SG50 Living Repository: The Singapore Stories 006 Container Architecture: In-Out Units 007 Singapore Visitor Center: Seamless Spaces 008 Plug-in Space: The Jewel 009 Topology Optimization: Floating Staircase 010 SUTD Master Plan: Voids of Discovery Intervention: Flexible Interaction


001 Hyper-dense Hybrid Term 10 | 28 weeks | Thesis

Mentor: Thomas Schroepfer Typology: Urban/Mixed-use Total Area: 511,105 sqm

The motivation for this thesis arises from the observation of Singapore’s urban fabric of the public housing estates, that is dense, yet lack in intensity; efficient, yet it tends to be mono-functional; and utilitarian, yet it tends to lack in character. Furthermore, considering Singapore’s aim of 6.9 million people by 2030, I believe that to achieve a liveable, hyper-dense architecture, there is a need to incorporate diverse functions into the design. Yet, it should not be your typical mixed-use developments that tend to be introverted and fail to catalyse intense urban life of the surrounding context. It should embrace integrated public space, synergistic relationships between programmes and yet allows some degree of flexibility in the programme arrangements. These three qualities of hybrid are the ones that this thesis is trying to achieve, while providing a hyper-dense living for a sizeable self-sufficient town. Integrated public realm

SECTION PERSPECTIVE

Programme relationship

Flexibility


Hort Park

Telok Blangah Hill Park

105m

Mount Faber

Keppel Golf Club Berlayer Creek 46m

As going hyper-dense requires fitting in larger number of people into a smaller area, going vertical is inevitable; yet, by stacking repetitive floors above one another, it defeats the purpose of a hybrid, which is to have a synergistic relationships between different programmes. Therefore, the hybrid core should comprise of single, continuous and fluid surface that integrates all the programmes.

46m

Labarador Nature Reserve 28m

Bukit Chermin

Keppel Island

1:30000 SITE PLAN

Moreover, placing residential above this public realm has been a recurring pattern in the mixed-use building typologies, creating a disjointed connection between the public and the private. Thus, by allowing the residential blocks to be placed side to side with the public realm, it provides more opportunity for the residents to interact and directly engage in the public sphere, changing the relationship between the private and the public.


Within the site itself, the four massings are placed closer to the MRT station. The massings are then rotated slightly to create a more enclosed courtyard in between, where the programmes shared within a town, namely sports hall, swimming complex, hawkers’ centre and polyclinic, are placed. Moreover, 10m x 10m circulation cores are planted in all four corners of the neighbourhoods. Then, the alternating Four neighbourhoods residential blocks of 250-300 people are placed within the circulation cores.

1:2500 UNFOLDED PLAN - TALL TOWER

Creating courtyard


Town programmes

Circulation cores

Residential blocks

RETAIL

BADMINTON COURT

ACTIVITY ROOM

CLINIC

PAVILION

RESIDENTS’ CORNER

PLAYGROUND

SENIOR CITIZENS’ CORNER

KINDERGARTEN

DANCE STUDIO

ELDERLY CARE CENTRE

CHILD CARE CENTRE

BASKETBALL COURT

LIBRARY

KIOSK

FITNESS EQUIPMENTS


1:2000 MASSING MODEL


1:500 FULL MODEL


Sky garden and stringer plants

Sky garden

Sky ga

GREEN FACADE

Garden and spillover space

Programs and garden

PROGRAM

Ramp with open programs and garden

Ramp with programs and garden

Ramp with program and spillover space

Ramp with program and spillover space

Distribution of circulation types

Ramp with programs on both sides

Ramp-staircase with program

CIRCULATION

RESIDENTIAL 6.2m x 6.2m column grid

10m x 10m column grid

10m x 10m column grid

Alternating Hybrid and Residential space with transfer columns

STRUCTURE


rden and planter box

Stringer plants

Planter box

Program distribution nearer to residential:

Program distribution further away from residential:

low noise level and/or lower privacy level needed

high noise level and/or higher privacy level needed

4 bedroom apartment 96 sqm

Multi-generational apartment 120 sqm 2 bedroom apartment with balcony 48 sqm 2 bedroom apartment 60 sqm 2 bedroom apartment 48 sqm

Studio apartment 36 sqm 6 main unit types


HYBRID CORE GROUND FLOOR

HAWKERS’ CENTRE

GRAND STAIRCASE


1:200 SECTIONAL MODEL


1:200 SECTIONAL MODEL

1:2500 UNFOLDED PLAN - SHORT TOWER

1:200 SECTIONAL MODEL


TOWN CENTRE

CONNECTION BETWEEN TOWERS

SCHOOL

DANCE STUDIO

LIBRARY

ELDERLY CARE CENTRE

ACTIVITY ROOM

CLINIC

BADMINTON COURT

PLAYGROUND

KINDERGARTEN

NURSING HOME

RESIDENTS’ CORNER

SENIOR CITIZENS’ CORNER

PAVILION

FITNESS EQUIPMENTS


HYBRID CORE


002 The Future of Cities: URBANATURE Term 8 | 14 weeks | Design Studio Mentor: Thomas Schroepfer Typology: Mixed-Use Total Area: 171,600 sqm Team Member: Lee Fu Hui The Future of Cities studio aims at re-thinking future urban typologies in the context of Keppel-Labrador-Bukit Merah, a 64-hectare-site situated along Singapore’s southern waterfront that has been earmarked for development. The studio will address the need for enhanced liveability through the design of new urban typologies that tackles ecological aspects, future mobility needs and climate issue. Given the importance of the existing ecosystem and biodiversity on the Keppel Golf Club, the proposed development aspires to merge urban and natural landscape together, hoping that the residents and nature can co-exist in daily basis. The proposed development also aims to connect the existing Telok Blangah residential complex to the development and eventually Mount Faber.

SITE

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

By considering the existing topography of the site, four main axes were chosen to capitalize on the views towards the sea and Mount Faber. A grid system is then developed to create an urban landscape with residential towers. As the four towers are accentuated, pockets of green are introduced at different heights to be either private or shared sky-gardens. DEVELOPMENT DIAGRAM

1:1000 SECTION


0

20 10

100m 50


0 0

1:2000 1:2000 PLAN PLAN LEVEL LEVEL 4 4

1:1500 SECTION LONG SECTION

40 40 20 20

200m 200m 100 100


0

1:2000 PLAN LEVEL 16

40 20

200m 100

COMMERCIAL SHOP-HOUSES COMMUNAL SPACES HDB LIBRARY CONDOMINIUM

0

30 15

150m 75


Access to interior void 2m x 4m planter box

Operable canopy/gate

Full height inoperable display glass

Full height glass doors 4m x 4m planter box 2-4m corridors

COMMERCIAL

1m balcony with climber plants to screen pollution

Shared garden access from lift core

Full height inoperable glass window

2m x 4m planter box

Full height glass door

Solid wall

RESIDENTIAL

FACADE CONSIDERATION

Bougainvillea cultivars

Ficus microcarpa

Ficus elastica

Epipremnum aureum

Rhapis excelsa

Plumeria


The merging of urban and natural landscape happens at different scales, starting from the urban scale, targeted to connect the Southern Ridges through the development, to the development scale, where public plaza and covered natural landscape co-exist together connected by a promenade of commercial activities. Within the units itself, each unit will have access to either a private balcony with green spaces or shared green space. URBANATURE development comprises of three towers of public housing, HDB, and one tower of private housing, condominium, with wide variety of communal spaces: library, community centre, and ďŹ tness corners as well as commercial activities. Commercial spaces are divided into three categories, shops facing the lake, the shop-houses and shops which sell daily necessities.

INTERIOR RENDER

1:200 SECTIONAL MODEL


PERSPECTIVE RENDER


003 Urban Living: Interweaving Public Spaces Term 6 | 10 weeks | Design Studio Mentor: Oliver Heckmann Typology: Residential Total Area: 22,000 sqm

The urban habitation concept revolves around connecting diverse living communities in a series of interweaving public spaces that is present in different scales. The series of plazas at the ground oor, surrounded by commercial activities and the ďŹ ve residential blocks, aims to enliven the neighborhood by inviting residents and passers-by alike to use the space; hence providing opportunity for interaction between residents and their neighbors of surrounding developments The internal courtyard, where most of the bustling interactions between residents are expected to happen, does not only become the source of light to the units, but also acts as the vertical circulation of the different blocks, with spiraling staircase tucked at the side of the corridors. Multiple communal spaces are scattered throughout the blocks with one primary double volume space at each block that is connected to one another, creating a journey of different communal spaces. At the unit level, the less private spaces such as the living and dining room are also interweaved in between the bedrooms to further enhance interactions within its unit.

1:500 SECTION


MR Bea T S uty tati Wo on rld (U /C )

N

Identifying important nodes and connection to the Beauty World MRT station exit.

MR Bea T S uty tati Wo on rld (U /C )

MR Bea T S uty tati Wo on rld (U /C )

N

N

More reďŹ ned zoning and circulation paths are deďŹ ned according to the accessibility of the site.

0

5

10

The blocks are extruded at the various heights based on surrounding buildings and topography.

20

50m


1:200 PHYSICAL MODEL

1:500 PHYSICAL MODEL WITHIN THE SITE


Dividing public, private and circulation

DeďŹ ning bedrooms within the private zone

Shifting bedrooms to sculpt public space

Opening access to the living and dining space

Creating a mezzanine level for the bedrooms

DEVELOPMENT DIAGRAM FOR RESIDENTIAL UNIT

0

CIRCULATION AND PUBLIC SPACES DIAGRAM

2

5

1:200 UNIT PLANS

10

20m


1.

15 mm adhesive parquet 25 mm screed 12 mm impact-sound insulation sealing layer 120 mm reinforced concrete 12 mm impact-sound insulation 110 mm reinforced concrete 10 mm plaster with gypsum white paint

2.

120/24 mm yellow balau profile 50/30 mm battens leveling battens sealing layer 120 mm reinforced concrete 12 mm impact-sound insulation 110 mm reinforced concrete 10 mm plaster with gypsum white paint

3.

25/25 mm dark grey aluminium angle frame white silicate paint 2 x 5 mm mineral rendering 120 mm reinforced concrete 10 mm plaster with gypsum white paint

4.

4 2

balustrade: 55/10 mm steel fiat Diameter 16 mm tubular steel baluster

3

5.

operable sash, aluminium profile with double glazing: 6 mm float glass + 16 mm cavity + 8 mm laminated safety glass

6.

glass balustrade: 55/10 mm steel flat 6 mm float glass + 16 mm cavity + 8 mm laminated safety glass Diameter 16 mm tubular steel baluster

7.

5 6

sealing layer 35 mm thermal insulation sealing layer 120 mm reinforced concrete 10 mm plaster with gypsum white paint

1:50 FACADE DETAIL 0

0.5

1

1:200 PHYSICAL MODEL

2

5m


0

0

1:1000 SITE PLAN

10

20

50

100m


004 Million Cuts: Hatched

Term 5 | 2 weeks | Digital Fabrication Mentor: Stylianos Dritsas Team Members: Bianca Su Fen Gill, Melissa Ho, Timothy Lum

Challenged by the design brief that requires us to produce an artifact that cannot be drawn or made manually using conventional techniques, but using the laser cutter, we brainstormed different properties innate to wood veneer and advantages of using the laser cutter. It was then decided that we explored the possibilities of making the wood veneer permeable by altering its texture and tapping into laser cutter’s accuracy and precision. Laser cutter can actually control the amount of power it generates unlike manual production which connotes to inconsistency and inimitable. The pattern is then generated with a shape grammar, in which a particular logic is chosen.

SHAPE GRAMMAR

PATTERNS GENERATED BY SHAPE GRAMMAR


EXPERIMENTING WITH POWER AND HATCH PATTERNS

OVERALL VIEW OF THE LAMP

CLOSE UP OF THE TEXTURE


005 SG50 Living Repository: The Singapore Stories Term 5 | 8 weeks | Design Studio Mentor: Kee Wei Hui Typology: Museum Total Area: 3,000 sqm

Linear form to fit the narrow site

Elevated building mas

Singapore Living Repository aspires to celebrate Singapore as a nation. It features specific aspects, which Singaporeans and/or residents can relate to, both spatially and physically. Designed to house 50 of Singapore’s most iconic objects, this museum strives to embody Singapore’s resilient, vibrant, inclusive and welcoming nature in its spatial allocation and building configuration. Those qualities are translated into an angular monolithic mass that appears to be suspended in the air. This bold architectural gesture represents Singapore’s resilience as a young and growing nation, with passion to aim for the better. As most of the building mass is elevated, it creates a shaded public plaza which allows Singaporeans and visitors alike to enjoy the riverside, giving a different experience with the river in the hope of making the riverside more vibrant.

1:125 SECTION


ss to create shaded public space

SITE FIGURE GROUND

Directing the ends of the mass to the east-west view

Pushing up the mass as a welcoming gesture

SITE BUILDING HEIGHT DISTRIBUTION

0

1.625

3.25

SITE GREEN SPACES DISTRIBUTION

6.25

12.5m


1:200 FLOOR PLANS


2ND LEVEL

SZE

SZE

1ST LEVEL

GROUND LEVEL

0

2

5

10

20m


THE START OF THE LIVING REPOSITORY

MIDDLE SECTION OF THE LIVING REPOSITORY


Facade Treatment | The facade is parametrically derived from the trusses which act as a structural support for the building. Inherent to the design intention, the triangular shape of the truss is extracted and put into a grid that covers the north and south elevations of the living repository. By ensuring that a continuous line from one end to another is achieved, the facade enhances the linearity of the form, while making subtle reference to the structure.

Structural Consideration | A cage of trusses allows the staggering 25 m cantilever to achieve the design intention of having a mass seemingly oating above ground. Eight V columns are erected from the ground level to hold up the cage of truss and letting the interior spaces to be column free, hence it becomes more spacious and suitable for an exhibition space.

THE END OF THE LIVING REPOSITORY


VIEW FROM ALONG THE SINGAPORE RIVER


006 Container Architecture: In-Out Units Term 4 | 12 weeks | Building Technology

Mentor: Stefan Schafer and Sarah Norman Typology: Hostel extension Team Members: Amanda Yeo, Anissa Tan, Chen Yutong, Tay Jenn Chong

Circulation Cores

A 17 storey hostel made of containers that can be slot in and out with ease. The concept of this hostel is derived from the popular childhood games Jenga, so as to extract its exibility in changing the blocks (units) in different orientation and levels. Equipped with a canteen, common areas and gardens, In-Out units aims to promote work-life balance while having a good time staying within a community. We have three typical plans for the residential containers. Classifying it as private, semi-private and shared rooms, our residential containers provide exibility for residents who want to have a more private room or a more lively environment.

SITE MAP

1:100 PHYSICAL MODEL

Bathroom and Pantry


Garden

Lobby and Dining Hall

Residential Units

Corridor

Level 3

3

5,7,9,11,13,15,17

Level 4,6,8,10,12,14& 16

0

1:400 FLOOR PLANS

5

10

20

40m


RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE GARDEN, CORRIDORS AND THE UNITS

PUBLIC SPACES IN BETWEEN THE CONTAINER UNITS


1:200 SECTION

0

2

5

10

20m


007 Singapore Visitor Centre: Seamless Spaces Term 5 | 5 weeks | Design Studio Mentor: Kee Wei Hui Typology: Visitor centre Total Area: 800 sqm

6

1 3

The new Singapore Visitor Centre aims at connecting people seamlessly from different activity nodes at Orchard Road. With spacious and well-lit double volume atrium at the heart of the visitor center, the building is equipped with spaces for gift shops at the B1 level and cafe at the B2 level. The main counters of the visitor centre will be easily accessible due to its proximity to the main nodes of activities. As a main feature which articulates the concept as well as the design intention, the roof plays an important role to be visual clues for pedestrians as well as motorists and to bring in light to the interior spaces because of the use of ETFE as its material.

4

2

5

10 7 8

9

1. The Heeren

6. Chatsworth International School

2. Faber House

7. 313 Somerset

3. Mandarin Orchard Singapore

8. Orchard Gateway

4. Orchard Building

9. Orchard Central

5. Orchard Shopping Centre

10. The Centrepoint

SITE MAP

OVERALL PERSPECTIVE FROM ORCHARD ROAD

SITE


Responding to the busy junction

Bringing in light from the back

Providing seamless access

OPEN COLUMN FREE SPACE

1:100 FRONT ELEVATION

Creating structural column

VIEW FROM THE SIDE ENTRANCE

0

1

2

5

10m


VIEW FROM THE CAFE

1:50 PHYSICAL MODEL


GROUND LEVEL

BASEMENT 1 LEVEL

BASEMENT 2 LEVEL 0

1:250 PLANS

1

5

10

25m


1:50 SECTION


0

0.5

1

2

5m


008 Plug-in Space: The Jewel

Term 4 | 5 weeks | Design Studio Mentor: Thomas Schroepfer Typology: Performance and exhibition space Total Area: 400 sqm

Initial volume of the site

Rotate its volume to avoid direct sunlight

Plug-in Space is an interstitial space which aims to provide the SUTD community a place to gather and meet in the heart of the Dover Campus. The concept lies on the idea of providing a gathering space for students, faculty members and staffs to interact and mingle. This is translated into the central lobby area which connects different uses of the building. The Jewel seems to float amongst the greenery within the oasis, with only six visible columns coming down to the first floor, while the rest of the structure rests onto the existing structure. As a building intervention, The Jewel tries to connect different spaces in the campus while respecting the existing ecosystem.

1:50 SECTION

Facade | The lobby will be a well-lit double storey space with double-glazed glass panels. This will allow indirect sunlight to illuminate the lobby without blocking the offices at the existing building. The pattern continues to envelope the performing arts space on an opaque


Cutting with the initial volume

Fitting the roof scape of the site

Rooftop Garden | The Jewel is surrounded by lush greenery that serves as the ‘oasis’ for SUTD. Not only that the roof garden acts as an extension of this green space, but it also serves as a waiting area before a performance or during intermission.

OVERALL VIEW FROM THE OASIS

Accomodating the existing trees

Structural Consideration | 6 steel columns will support the lobby from one side and an extension of the floor slab will pass through the existing building’s floor at level 3 and 4. Additional support will be added on top of level 5 East Lobby.


PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE


3RD LEVEL

2ND LEVEL

1ST LEVEL 1:200 FLOOR PLANS

0

2

5

10

20m


MAIN EXHIBITION AND GATHERING SPACE

SEMINAR SPACE


009 Topology Optimization: Floating Staircase Term 7 | 4 weeks | Computational Design

Mentor: Sawako Kaijima Typology: Staircase Team Members: Amanda Yeo Qian Yu and Lee Hui Ling Alexandra

The design intention is to re-conceptualize a flight of stairs. We propose to vary the gap in between the steps and the wall as the height changes, in which the gap will be connected with our topologically optimized joint. The joint system aims to not only structurally connect the steps and wall, but also to create an illusion of floating. Equipped with knowledge in topology optimization and computational geometry, we have identified different components of the systems which we would like to analyze in the topology optimization.

B | point load of person

A | wall

After many iterations, the final design is intended to have a more effective structural support, with thinner compression members and tapering form of the two joints that converge nearer to the steps. We have also added tension cables for additional support.

SERIES OF TOPOLOGICALLY OPTIMAL JOINTS BASED ON VARYING THE STEPS POSITION

C | cantilever steps


1:10 PHYSCAL MODEL


010 SUTD Master Plan: Voids of Discovery and Intervention: Flexible Interaction Term 7 | 14 weeks | Design Studio

Mentor: Kevin Mark Low and James Coleman Typology: Master plan and building intervention Team member: Leon Jared Cher, Felicia Lim, Liliani Saputri, Kenickie Cher, Tong Lishi, Sharon Ho

1:200 PHYSICAL MODEL OF THE NEW SUTD MASTERPLAN PROPOSAL


SUTD’s pedagogy champions collaboration and interaction across different pillars of study as strongly reflected in the fluidity of its learning spaces and connectivity between the different blocks. The first phase of SUTD at Somapah Road becomes a lasting testimony of the vibrancy and collaborative learning that happens within the SUTD community. However, stronger relationships should be forged at different fabric of the community at large. Aiming to offer a more holistic perspective of this university, the new master plan proposal looks at SUTD as a university in relation to its neighboring community of residents and Changi Business Park employees. In addition to that, relationships should be constantly forged between the pillar students (Sophomore, Juniors and Seniors) and the Freshmore which is evidently lacking in the university.

Term

Pillar

8 7 6 5

ASD

EPD

ESD

ISTD

Architecture and Sustainable Design

Engineering Product Development

Engineering Systems Design

Information Systems Technology and Design

4 3 2

Freshmore Sciences, Mathematics, Computing, Humanities, Social Science, Design

1 SUTD CURRICULUM


Uninviting sharp turns to the main axis

Opening up the main axis to cross junction

Primary, secondary and

Residential complex

Changi Business Park

Macro Thesis | Located between residential and commercial/industrial areas, SUTD will become a central hub for a diverse group of people around the neighborhood, to naturally discover the spirit and vibrancy of design and technology in SUTD. An inviting main entrance towards the Changi Business Park acts as a cue to channel people into the main axis of the campus on the ground oor. Here, neighboring communities will be able to discover glimpse of what SUTD is, in the hope that it will ignite stronger collaboration and interaction between the university and the industry partners.

0

SITE CONTEXT

20

40

80

160m


tertiary circulation

Plaza as an intersection of various circulation

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Material differentiation of the main axis

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Micro Thesis | Interaction between Freshmore and Pillar students is enhanced by facilitating the discovery of other fields and gradually, the sharing of resources and skills through strategically positioned spaces of congregation. Every Freshmore cohort classroom is also an SOS which encompasses a flexible gathering space for studying, discussion and/or prototyping where Freshmore and Pillar students can share their expertise, knowledge and ideas, bringing about a more vibrant and closely-knit campus life.

EXPLODED VIEW OF SCHEMATIC PROGRAM ALLOCATION STRATEGY


      

)7

















1:250 PLAN OF SOS AND FRESHMORE AT BUILDING 1 LEVEL 4

0

1



5

10

25m


Freshmore and SOS | The workstation allows for flexibility in the arrangement and spatial quality of the space. It can transforms the space by sliding across from the docking area to the other end. Additionally, it provides flexibility and spontaneity by allowing the users to choose where they want to use the workstation. SOS is emerged when there are workstations used outside the Freshmore classroom boundary as a spill-over space for the Pillar students to study and have a discussion.

1:200 SECTION

CLOSED

INDIVIDUAL STUDY

GROUP DISCUSSION

LECTURE

WORKSTATION CONFIGURATION

0

2

5

10

20m


OPEN STATE

280

830

FRESHMORE CLASSROOM

1020

2910

GROUP DISCUSSION

FRESHMORE/PILLAR INTERACTION

495

145

LECTURE/TEACHING

1:12.5 SOS AND FRESHMORE WORKSTATION

265


2320 265

265

265

280

Pulley Storage System | Making use of the negative space on top of the workstation, this storage system can be operated using mechanised pulley system for easy handling.

Tension Rod System with Circular Disk | Structurally, the Freshmore/SOS workstation is made up of mainly 30 mm hollow steel section of 2 mm thickness. It is then strengthened with tension rod system with circular disk at strategic places to avoid shear forces that could potentially lead to the workstation collapsing.

Cushion Stainless Steel Air Cylinder | The cushioned air cylinder is equipped with two compressed air ports to decelerate the rod’s movement so as to avoid slamming and decrease noise of the operate-able perforated metal canopy.

Linear Ball Bearing with Shaft | The linear ball bearing is mounted in an aluminum pillow block, which is attached to the back of the table. Both the shell and the balls are made of steel. All these are coupled with end supported shaft running horizontally across the table.

Transformable Storage Stools | The six stools can be neatly stored under the table. It is equipped with retractable back rest as well as storage space of front-lid opening. The stool is also equipped with 360o rotation wheel on all four edges. Linear Ball Bearing Carriage | The linear ball bearing carriage provides precise and rigid linear motion for the door to be stored. Nested system is also employed to completely closed the entire width of the Freshmore/ SOS workstation while being able to store it completely.

0

1.625

3.25

6.25

12.5cm

Track Roller Carriage | With sufficient width, the track roller are able to ensure greater rigidity and load capacity. The track roller carriages are installed on the bottom face of the workstation’s four corners.


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Clifford Mario Kosasih Architecture Portfolio 2016  

Selected works 2013-2016

Clifford Mario Kosasih Architecture Portfolio 2016  

Selected works 2013-2016

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