Issuu on Google+

FOUNDATION TRAINING ON POWERFUL BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

REPORT 2 WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL MARKETING LOOK LIKE?

CCS HELPS YOU GROW YOUR PRACTICE At Click.Convert.Sell we use lean startup, theory of constraints, direct response marketing, market leadership, inbound marketing & marketing automation to help our clients succeed.

Delivering you: More Customers More Sales. More Profits.


The Click.Convert.Sell model is designed to position your business as the market leader in your chosen area. In this foundational training we go through the different elements of the powerful business intelligence worksheet. To ensure you have the understanding that we can then build on the more powerful elements of your business growth engine. We know there are only 3 ways to grow a business. 1. Get more customers 2. Increase the transaction size. 3. Increase the frequency of purchase. So everything we do is designed to increase one or several of these metrics. We only work with one type of business per geographic area so that we can ensure they dominate their niche. If you’ve got a business and you want to grow it to be the market leader in your area then get in touch.

Dr Aalok Y Shukla Founder of Click.Convert.Sell

@Sales_Automator Facebook.com/clickconvertsell clickconvertsell@gmail.com clickconvertsell.com


Aalok Y Shukla:

What does a multichannel approach look like? We’re talking about a systematic assault here.

Alfred Egesi:

Would do you mean by multichannel?

Aalok Y Shukla:

Multichannel means ... okay ...

Alfred Egesi:

Media, right? Media?

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yeah. A channel is a way of reaching somebody. A channel could be a shop front. It could be the interior of the shop. It could be a banner advert on a website.

Alfred Egesi:

It’s different ways of delivering a message.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Correct. We start with the message. Let’s go through some basics of message design. If you’re trying to engage somebody in what you’re doing, what would you start with?

Alfred Egesi:

I’d probably start with what they’re most comfortable with receiving. For example, if someone’s not used to telephone, my first form of contact wouldn’t be me calling them up and saying, “Hi, here’s my service.” Yeah, so I’d usually state your problem better than they can state it.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Exactly, so you’re building a rapport, first of all, by are you concerned about prematurely greying hair? That’s not the best way of stating the problem, but if you can say you’ve noticed over time, your hair is going greyer early. Therefore, you try to enter the conversation that’s going on in their mind.

Alfred Egesi:

Yeah. I don’t even know what the message was about.

Alfred Egesi:

Oh, boy.

Aalok Y Shukla:

That’s the kind of attention, fractions that we’ve got. If it was hair loss or something like that, at least you’d get that bit. If you were motivated enough, you could then choose how to engage. This is the key thing, be engaging, be theatrical. Life is boring.

Alfred Egesi:

Right, right. I just want to say probably out of ... which one is more important? Out of the message and the carrier system, which one out of the two would you say is more important?

Aalok Y Shukla:

It starts with the message. Otherwise, you’re just talking techniques and tactics and empty stuff.

Alfred Egesi:

I remember ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

just impersonal robots.

Alfred Egesi:

I remember hearing once Gary Halbert, one of the marketers that ... just amazing legend guy. He was saying that ... I think the example he gave was Kate Moss scribbles her number on a scrunched up piece of paper. That number is going to be really, really valuable. It’s more valuable than the paper. However, if you had your friend’s ugly step-aunt give you a number ... her phone number on embossed paper, that’s going in the bin. Message is really ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

It’s all about what improvement you’re offering, what glimmer of hope you’re offering someone in their harassed daily life. That’s like being the message and being engaging and being useful. Either move the person from pain or towards pleasure. You need to drive them, because emotions drive decisions. You need to trigger their emotions.

Alfred Egesi:

We’re emotional creatures.

Aalok Y Shukla:

You said, for example, we’re coming to it, but that was at the precise place where people generally with that problem would be looking. You’re stating the problem, and then Dean Jackson talks about more cheese, less whiskers. He talks about a mouse. A mouse is programed to get cheese and avoid whiskers. What you want to make sure is your message is cheese. It’s something they want. You don’t have to explain it to them, they know. Baby food you call it.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Absolutely. That’s how we make decisions. The key thing is with messages these days, you got so many tools that you can actually test your messages. You can do testing on paper click to see ... on underwear basically to see what messages people click on more. You can look at forum questions to see what pulls. You can also then see what gets shared more on Facebook. You can do a lot of testing these days.

Alfred Egesi:

Baby food for the brain. That’s the term I like to use. You don’t want to be too flowery with your language or too smart.

Alfred Egesi:

You’re trying to see what your target market are putting into their computer.

Aalok Y Shukla:

If you have to think about it, you’ve lost it.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Alfred Egesi:

You’ve wasted money, because you’ve paid for that space, that media and that message.

Aalok Y Shukla:

I was driving through Birmingham, and I was going round and round about really quickly. I quickly saw the corner of one billboard, and it was the picture of a teddy bear. I was just making a comment to somebody that they spent millions or thousands trying to get that billboard up there.

What they’re responding to and that maps the key thing. You want to also be visually attractive and unique. You want your message to be, just like you said on the embossed paper, the message was visually attractive, but you didn’t perceive it as being valuable.

Alfred Egesi:

If you’ve got the right message packaged in the right way, on the right ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

You’re just attracted. You can’t help yourself. You’re just drawn. The second thing is that once you’re drawn towards it, but then it’s like an insurmountable way of getting in touch, then you’re not going

Alfred Egesi:

4

Interesting. Interesting you say that, because on the back of ... when you read those newspapers, and they’ve got the sports pages, and on the lower end at the end of the paper, it’s got a title Hair Loss? That message states a problem better than they can say it. Hair loss and question mark. That just ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

That’s an expensive teddy.

WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL LOOK LIKE?

WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL LOOK LIKE?

5


to do that. It needs to be easy. It needs to be like Dean Jackson says, “Would you like a cookie?” If you come to my house, and I say, “Okay, if you want, help yourself to some food. There’s some food in the kitchen. Go for it.” You’d be like, “Okay, thank you,” but you won’t get up and do anything. If I go to the kitchen and get a box of cookies and say, “Would you like a cookie,” and open the box in front of you, it’s very little friction for you to just reach your hand and just pick up a cookie. That’s the difference.

Alfred Egesi:

You know how I think more about in terms of broadcast? It’s when you put the message through that media, but you don’t necessarily know ... it’s more freely available.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yes, all this stuff is quite freely available. It’s weird in that way that it’s pushed out. There’s no talking, it’s just pushed out. You broadcast it, absolutely like you say. You can just look at it across all the different media. You’ve got the PowerPoint presentations, you’ve got PDF’s, you’ve got video channels, you’ve got video blog, you’ve got guest blogs, you’ve got articles in magazines. It’s not just online, it’s all over the place basically. You’ve got your press releases going out. You’ve got all that kind of stuff.

Alfred Egesi:

It’s just a cookie.

Aalok Y Shukla:

It’s just a cookie. Now, you’re like, “Okay. I’m enjoying the cookie. It was a good cookie. What else you got?” That’s the way. The message design is very important. The engagement scale, the steps, the simple friction free steps.

Alfred Egesi:

When you say engagement ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

It’s not equal steps, it’s an escalator.

Alfred Egesi:

Okay, okay. You’ve got my attention. What were you talking about, engagement? What ...

Alfred Egesi:

It means that I’m involving myself in the process. I’m not a receive. I’m an active participant.

All of that would feed in. If we’re going from a broad outlook, it would feed in to a more of the customer identifying themselves.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yes.

Alfred Egesi:

We’re timing the client into an active participant?

Alfred Egesi:

Raising their hand and saying ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

Absolutely. You have to activate them. They’ve got to look at that message and think this is for me.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Alfred Egesi:

That gives them a sense of control, which relates to the trust factor.

That’s the whole point of that is to get them to raise their hand. Then, there comes the next step, interactive. This is building engagements.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yeah, because then they’re like, “I’m choosing to listen to you. I’m engaged with you.” The minute you do something which is incongruent or misses it, they’re switched off. You need to make sure it’s like that. As I say, you need to make sure you communicate the unique sensory package of value that attracts their secret emotional desires the most. That’s the message. We just talked about that, but what does multichannel look like? We can break it out.

Alfred Egesi:

Now, they’ve said, “Hi, I’m interested on some level.”

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yeah, “I’ve stopped. I’m listening to you.”

Alfred Egesi:

“You’ve got my attention.”

Aalok Y Shukla:

They don’t want to hear a sales pitch.

Alfred Egesi:

What do they want to hear? The message is getting them ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

Actually, they don’t want to hear anything. They want to tell you something. The best way would be to engage and ask them something, so they can then say ...

Alfred Egesi:

That’s what makes it interactive.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Absolutely.

Alfred Egesi:

That’s probably where you’re going to get the problems coming up. What’s got ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

Active listening. Active listening. Live webinars, questionnaires, poles, hang outs, chats, all these sorts of ways. These are all communication pathways.

Alfred Egesi:

These are interesting as they are. I always have ... it’s like you’ve got a focus group. You ask people would you buy this? It’s the problem of the focus group. Would you buy this?

Aalok Y Shukla:

It’s not a true answer. The only way to do that is actually put the

Aalok Y Shukla:

6

broadcast in terms of your paper click adverts on Google. You can have videos on YouTube. You can have adverts on Bing. You can have video emails being sent out, so you have people who have asked about stuff from you before. You can have email questions going sent out to people. You can create PowerPoint presentations and push that out on SlideShare.

Alfred Egesi:

Now, we’ve got the message. Now, we’ve got that message that gets the attention, engages them.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yeah, you could wrap it in different dimensions, but essentially it’s the same. It’s a permutation of the same message. What you want to do is you want to then look at different methods. You’ve got broadcast, interactive, and offline. These are very simple ways. You’re looking at ...

Alfred Egesi:

We’re looking at the same message on multiple media.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Same message. Same message, but in different ways of engaging with people. With broadcasting, you could be looking at putting your articles in a blog form out there. You’re making sure that there’s a lot of information going out there, so then people will be able to find you. You can look at broadcast in terms of banner adverts, making sure that you’re all over the place. You can look at

WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL LOOK LIKE?

WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL LOOK LIKE?

7


product there and pretend it was a shop.

8

Alfred Egesi:

Right. You have to be smart with the interactive media, be more like a fly on the wall.

Aalok Y Shukla:

You’re way, way, way far away from the actually purchasing at this point. You’re still just building trust. Forget trust, you’re just trying to find out about them. This is what we call response channel optimization. There’s different channels they can respond through. How do you optimize the engagement and the conversation through that.

Alfred Egesi:

You want the conversation to be as natural and flow freely.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Absolutely. Speed, free flow, information. When they ask things, this is where you can leverage your broadcast content, because they say, “Well, how much is this?” Say, “Well, here’s a guide we’ve got, and we’ll send it to you,” because they don’t believe you in your lying emails, what you say. If they read the guide, because everyone else can read the guide, and it’s freely out there, I trust you.

have. How many times do you think they’ve talked to one of your competitors? Alfred Egesi:

Probably the same amount.

Aalok Y Shukla:

I don’t think so.

Alfred Egesi:

In a diffused way, not in the controlled stage.

Aalok Y Shukla:

No, very few businesses have a systematic communications system in place.

Alfred Egesi:

Exactly. We have ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

They’re all disjointed. Unconnected.

Alfred Egesi:

On the web, we have many tabs of them. It’s obvious that they might be looking at ours, looking at our competitors, looking at something else, checking their email.

Aalok Y Shukla:

If you don’t have a systematic way of deepening engagement ...

Alfred Egesi:

Right, and that goes back to what we were saying in the other ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yeah, it’s not even what to say, how to say it, and the vehicles for delivering it and engaging.

Alfred Egesi:

Right. We’re still filtering in.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Yeah, the trust is not there.

Alfred Egesi:

Okay, okay. What’s the next stage, really.

Alfred Egesi:

Consistency.

Aalok Y Shukla:

You have to get deeper engagement. You have to actually have a conversation at a time, you have to be consistent, you have to make sure that you actually deliver what you said you would deliver. That might be just in terms of information, or it might be in terms of an appointment. It’s all these sorts of things, but you’re still talking online.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Alfred Egesi:

Let me interject here ...

Yes. There are the different things you have. Obviously, forget computers. People walk around in the real world too. You look at mobiles. You look at their letters. You look at postcards. You look at FedEx packages. You look at appointments within a shop for a consultation. You look at phone calls. You look at geographic direct mail, for example like local posts. You look at magazine articles. You look at all that kind of stuff. Retail. Do not underestimate the power of the real world.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Or by phone, yeah.

Alfred Egesi:

We’re constantly looking for ways to ...

Alfred Egesi:

... the client, the customer, you used the word here information. We’ve done the filtering down ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

To surround and envelop your target market.

Aalok Y Shukla:

They’re qualifying themselves.

Alfred Egesi:

Right. I like that word, envelop. Yeah.

Alfred Egesi:

They’re qualifying themselves. We can then give them information that’s relevant, because we now ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

That’s what a multichannel approach would look like.

Alfred Egesi:

Okay.

Aalok Y Shukla:

Because you’re the leader. Your position is the leader, so all you’re doing is ... they’ve said, “I’m interested. I have the problem, and I’m looking at you, because you appear to have more information,” so you give them more.

Alfred Egesi:

Because we’ve been interacting with them or have seen them or heard them interacting on the media sites and everything, we can offer information that is relevant. By the time we’ve had ...

Aalok Y Shukla:

You’ve talked to them 10 times about a specific problem they

WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL LOOK LIKE?

WHAT DOES MULTICHANNEL LOOK LIKE?

9


What does multichannel marketing look like?