Page 1

Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

+

Inside: Holiday Arts Preview!

Fashion or Wearable Art? The art of Richard Koppe sets an intriguing context as we examine techniques that make local fashion designers artists in their own right.

Years and 125counting Celebrating Auditorium Theatre's ground-breaking milestone season Winter 2015

$4.99

ClefNotesJournal.com

Harris Theater Tees Up Hubbard Street Young Guns in Eat (and Drink) to the Beat Series !


Our 90th Anniversary Season features a thrilling lineup of daring new works, award-winning hits and iconic classics. Be pArt Of it! the 2014/2015 SeASOn in the AlBert

RaptuRe, BlisteR, BuRn

two tRains RunninG

the little foxes

By Gina GionfRiddo diRected By KimBeRly senioR

By auGust wilson diRected By chucK smith

By lillian hellman diRected By henRy wishcampeR

staRts JanuaRy 17, 2015

staRts maRch 7, 2015

staRts may 2, 2015

Vanya and sonia and masha and spiKe By chRistopheR duRanG diRected By steVe scott

staRts June 20, 2015

4-play Albert packages start at just $90! GoodmanTheatre.org/Subscribe or 312.443.3800 Above: Nathan Lane and Lee Wilkof in The Iceman Cometh from the Goodman’s 2011/2012 Season. Photo by Liz Lauren.

312.443.3800 | GoodmanTheatre.org

Major Corporate Sponsor for Rapture, Blister, Burn

Corporate Sponsor Partner for Rapture, Blister, Burn

2•CNCJAWinter 2015 Development and Diversity initiatives Principal Supporter of Artistic

Major Corporate Sponsor for Two Trains Running

exclusive Airline of Goodman Theatre

Major Corporate Sponsor for Two Trains Running

PeTTeriNo’S, Preferred Partner

official Lighting Sponsor for Two Trains Running

Corporate Sponsor Partner for Two Trains Running

Major Supporter of the August Wilson Celebration

Media Partner for Two Trains Running

Major Production Sponsor for The Little Foxes

Corporate Sponsor Partner for The Little Foxes


Contents Winter 2015

22 CNCJA

FEATURES Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

+

Harris Theater Tees Up Hubbard Street Young Guns in Eat (and Drink) to the Beat Series !

Inside: Holiday Arts Preview!

Fashion or Wearable Art? The art of Richard Koppe sets an intriguing context as we examine techniques that make local fashion designers artists in their own right.

and 125Years counting Celebrating Auditorium Theatre's ground-breaking milestone season

On the Cover: Dress designed by Chicago designer Anastasia Chatzka set admid the backdrop of the Richard Koppe exhibition at the Elmhurst Art Museum (photo by Krzysztof Hanisiak). Above: The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, which celebrates 125 years this year with a star-studded gala on December 9 (photo courtesy of The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University).

12 Potent Collaboration

This fall, at the White House First Lady Michelle Obama presented Chicago Shakespeare Theatre's CPS Shakespeare! with the 2014 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award. We give you a snapshot of the program's recent project, A Midsummer Nights' Dream and the collaborative potency CPS Shakespeare! unleashes.

22 125 Years and Counting

A look back at the stunning evolution of the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, celebrating an astounding 125 years this season with a star-studded concert full of luminaries to beat the band this December.

26 Holiday Season Performance Preview

We've got your guide to an amazing slate of diverse performances and exhibitions in Chicagoland that will get you squarely in the spirit of the holidays this season.

48 Specificity

Strict adherence to Lucas Hnath's script is just one way director Michael Halberson approaches a very personal look at the life of Isaac Newton. We take a look at how Halberson brings to life one of sciences' biggest luminaries in Isaac's Eye at Writers Theatre this winter.

Winter 2015CNCJA•3


It's fascinating how so many arts experiences linger well beyond the moment when the lights dim and the curtain falls. Something very distinct stays with the viewer, I believe. Every great performance or work of art seems to leave something very potent behind. It's what makes the arts so transformative. There's a message, a theme, an intangible experience that is buried deep within any really potent art, and you carry that with you well after the experience. And that message, that theme has the distinct ability to transform who we are. In fact, that's what keeps us coming back for more. Sure, we love to laugh, hear great music, see great art, but those intangibles that come with every great arts experience are precisely what make us return to see that opera we've heard so many times before or that dance company whose last performance we just can't seem to forget. It's because we somehow recognize the real potency of great culture that we keep returning to the scene of the crime. And that potency, those intangible elements are just what our Winter 2015 issue is all about. In this issue of Clef Notes, we take a look at the history of the iconic Chicago arts institution, Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University. Incredibly, reinventing itself, for 125 years, the landmark theater has made an art of delivering that intangible element to audiences in Chicago. And December 9, 125 years to the day the theater first opened its doors, it will celebrate that milestone with a star-studded concert to commemorate its Interior of the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, celebrating historic evolution. 125 years this season with a star-studded concert on December 9. Also in this issue, music and dance editor Fred Cummings sits down one-on-one with fiddler, singer, songwriter AND stepdancing artist April Verch. An icon in her own right, Verch has spent much of her career thrilling audiences with multi-dimensional performances, each influenced by that intangible Ottawa style folk music that shaped her youth. And we parallel art and fashion with a feature that pairs works of local designers with art from the Richard Koppe exhibition, currently on view at the Elmhurst Art Museum. We commissioned a photo shoot that compares design techniques with elements of Koppe's unique aesthetic to flesh out a new perspective on art and fashion and see just how similar the two realms really are. So wherever you are, when you've soaked in all we have to dish out with our winter issue, I hope there's at least a little something more than what meets the eye that lingers, that gets into your bones and moves you to get out and enjoy the amazing culture we are so lucky to enjoy here in the Windy City. Photo Courtesy of The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University

Photo by Kipling Swehla Photography

From the Publisher’s Desk

Happy Winter!

Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts Winter 2015

Publisher D. Webb

Editorial Editor in Chief

Patrick M. Curran II

Associate Editors Fred Cummings Scott Elam Christopher Hopper

Editorial Support Rachel Cullen

Staff Writers and Contributors Kathryn Bacasmot Raymond Benson David Berner Don Fujiwara Emily Groch Laura Kinter Michael McNeil Leslie Price Donna Robertson

Art & Design Art Director

Carl Benjamin Smith

Contributing Photographers Colin Lyons Bob Briskey

Graphics & Design Chelsea Davis Angela Chang

Advertising

Adam McKinney Adam.McKinney@ClefNotesJournal.com Jason Montgomery Jason.Montgomery@ClefNotesJournal.com

D. Webb Publisher

4•CNCJAWinter 2015

Subscriptions Clef Notes is published quarterly (March, June, September and December) each year. An annual subscription to the magazine may be purchased by mailing a check or money order for $18 to Clef Notes Publishing, Inc., 5815 N. Sheridan Road, Suite 1107, Chicago, IL 60660. Bulk rates are also available. Credit card purchases may be secured online at ClefNotesJournal.com or by calling 773.741.5502. © 2014 Clef Notes Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the USA.


Contents Winter 2015

CNCJA

DEPARTMENTS

10 Luminary: April Verch

The multi-dimensional Canadian fiddler talks authenticity in a Q&A with Fred Cummings before heading to the Old Town School of Folk Music this January for a concert unlike any other you've probably ever seen.

16 Curator's Corner: Shaken Not Stirred

32

10 Photo by Sandlin Gaither

32 Art by Design: Is It Fashion Or Is It Art?

The Richard Koppe exhibition, on view now at the Elmhurst Art Museum, sets a striking context for our visual examination of the techniques that make some of Chicago's top fashion designs works of art, themselves.

Photo by Krzysztof Hanisiak

Photo by Todd Rosenberg

54

The Art Institute embarks upon a series of intriguing exhibitions poised to examine the influence of our rapidly changing society on the field of Modern art. We take a look at the first in the series, Shatter, Rupture Break, on view this winter.

54 Shall We Dance?: Up and Comers

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago has long held the reputation for cutting-edge choreography. This winter, their young protege troupe, Hubbard Street 2, are front and center in Harris Theater's Eat and Drink to the Beat Series. Emily Groch sits down with the group's artistic director and chat's up the young emerging choreographers whose work will be on display in their performance this December.

Clockwise fro top: Hubbard Street 2 Dancers Jules Joseph (left) and Elliot Hammans; Model wearing York Furrier Signature Style Amethyst dyed Sheared and Grooved Beaver Zip-up Jacket and Knit Rex Rabbit Infinity Scarf and Cap with artist Richard Koppe's ; singer/songwriter/fiddler and step dancer April Verch.

Winter 2015CNCJA•5


chatter room

Letters from our readers...

Photo courtesy of Visceral Dance)

Dance Credits I loved Emily Groch's article on Nick Pupillo and Visceral Dance Studio. It takes a lot of gumption to start a dance company in a city like Chicago. It's not an easy thing to do. But to start a full dance center and studio, augmenting Chicago's dance community with facilities and an educational division is an astounding feat. Hats off to Nich! I am looking forward to hearing more great things about him. Candice Booker Wilmette, IL

Nick Pupillo, founder of Visceral Dance Studio, in training with young dancers.

Appreciating A Chicago Gem

I read your charming interview with Francis Guinan of Steppenwolf Theatre ("10 Questions for Francis Guinan" Autumn 2014 Issue). His success is really is a credit to the power of regional theatre here in Chicago. Photo by Michael Brosilow

And his humility is endearing...You can't even hope for his level of achievement without real, real talent and still he credits so many others in the acting community for his success. (Guinan) is a real Chicago treasure. Andrew Blasz Lakeview - Chicago

In your short article on the new Cole Theatre launched by Boyd Harris and Layne Manzier this fall (Autumn 2014 Issue), Raymond Benson asked (in a rather cheeky way) why Chicago needs another itinerant theater. I think the story itself answered the question; Harris and Manzier bring something new and distinct to the table. But I think that, no matter how crowded Chicago's theater scene ever gets, we should always welcome new voices... The larger and more diverse any cultural community is, the richer the experience for its audiences. Here's to diversity and a stage for all voices. Allison Campbell Streeterville - Chicago Readers may submit letters to Feedback, Clef Notes Publishing, Inc. 5815 N. Sheridan Road, Suite 1107, Chicago, IL 60660 or via E-mail to Scuttlebutt@ClefNotesJournal.com.

6•CNCJAWinter 2015

No portion of this publication may be reproduced without the express written consent of the publisher. Clef Notes Publishing makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the magazine’s content. However, we cannot be held responsible for any consequence arising from errors or omissions.

Photo courtesy of Cole Theatre

Join the Crowd

Francis Guinan with Steppenwolf ensemble members John Procaccino and K. Todd Freeman in Art at Steppenwolf Theatre.

Cole Theatre founders Boyd Harris and Layne Manzier.


DECEMBER 4, 2014– FE B R UARY 8, 2015 A boisterous and moving ode to the outcasts who make life a little more interesting.

BY LISA D’AMOU R DIRECTED BY JOE MANTE LLO

going to Broadway IN S P R I N G O F 2 0 1 5,

FIRST!

it here

SEE

Corporate Production Sponsor

TICKETS START AT $20

steppenwolf.org | 312-335-1650 2014/15 Grand Benefactors

2014/15 Benefactors

Winter 2015CNCJA•7


V

ictory Gardens Theater hosted its premier fundraising event, the 24th Annual Chicago Stories Benefit, on Friday, October 24, celebrating the Chicago theater’s 40th anniversary season. Nearly 350 guests gathered at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Chicago, to celebrate and support Victory Gardens’s work, enjoying cocktails, a three-course gourmet dinner, silent and live auctions and three short plays. The evening raised nearly $350,000 to support the work and mission of Victory Gardens. The Honorary Gala Chair for the Chicago Stories Gala was Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Victory Gardens Board Member Stephanie Pendexter and Penny Brown co-chaired the benefit. Proceeds from this unique event will help underwrite the cost of producing world premieres, providing educational programs for Chicago Public Schools, offering assistive devices to the disabled community and making theater available to underserved and disabled audiences.

Christiana Forsberg and Vanessa Hofer

Rachel and Mark Stein

8•CNCJAWinter 2015 8•CNCJAWinter 2015

Photos by Michael Courier

Out and About

Victory Gardens Artistic Director Chay Yew, Brandon Marshall, Marcelle McVay, Board President Steve Miller, Mike Evans and Managing Director Chris Mannelli

Steve and Pamela Adelman

Maggie Scrantom and Jeff McLaren


Playwright Ike Holter and AROT Board Member Mollie Stromberg

Kelly Wey and John Michael Lesniak

Photos by Chris Zoubris

O

n Saturday, November 8, A Red Orchid Theatre celebrated 22 years of ensemblebased theater in the Windy City at its annual gala. The 2014 Gala was co-hosted by A Red Orchid co-founder and Academy Award nominee Michael Shannon and Chicago personality and Rockit Ranch Productions CEO Billy Dec and raised more than $100,000 to support AROT’s mission and work. The event began with a VIP cocktail reception and gourmet dinner at Sunda New Asian restaurant and featured live performances from a variety of the company’s productions, performed by members of the AROT Ensemble, as well as a live and silent auction. The evening continued with an after party and live auction at The Underground, where guests enjoyed specialty cocktails, delicious late-night bites from Rockit Bar & Grill and had the chance to bid on the custom suit Shannon wore as his character Nelson Van Alden on HBO’s Boardwalk Empire.

Screen actor Henry Cavill, Billy Dec and Michael Shannon

Playwright and AROT Ensemble Member Brett Neveu of Evanston, AROT Board Member Pam Harrington and David Harrington of Glencoe

AROT Co-President Guilia Sindler of Northbrook and Ann McCartney of Wilmette

Winter 2015CNCJA•9


Luminary

April Verch By FRED CUMMINGS

B

Back when April Verch was a young prodigy in Rankin, Ontario, she probably never really knew how her wildly diverse talents would coalesce to form her uncommonly distinctive career. Fresh from Boston’s Berklee College of Music, the Canadian fiddler moved rather precisely into prestigious performance circles where singing, songwriting and step-dancing began to work their ways quite organically onto the stage, alongside sterling playing of the traditional Ottawa Valley style fiddle tunes that had fed her youth. Now, two decades into a distinctly inimitable career, Verch is a singular artist who is as well versed in U.S. and Appalachian folk music as she is her native repertoire. And with her latest album, Bright Like Gold, she’s added collaborations with Bluegrass luminaries as well. Verch has done it all. And this winter, she’ll bring her collective artistic knowledge (and her acclaimed April Verch Band) to The Old Town School of Folk Music for a concert that is not likely to resemble anything you’ve seen before. Verch takes a particularly humble approach to her art (given the size of her talent) but what really struck me from my recent conversation with her was her fierce dedication to authenticity, performing what speaks distinctly to her. Like our conversation, her performances are the real deal, a genuine reflection of who April Verch really is. Q: Of course, your performance range is clearly broad one, but you've carved out quite an incredible niche for yourself performing Ottawa style folk music. Did you know back at Berkley College of Music that you wanted to focus your career on such a niche genre? A: You’re absolutely right...my performances and repertoire cross genres and boundaries, and that’s probably because I play what I love, and I am passionate about a lot of different fiddle styles. When I was studying at Berklee College of Music in Boston, I knew that I wanted to make a career of performing and touring. I was still exploring styles and deciding exactly how I was going to accomplish that… Having said that, I always knew that the Ottawa Valley style that I grew up with would be a big part of my sound. It’s part of my roots, and I love it. So no matter what I play or explore, I let it go through that “Ottawa Valley filter,” and in that way, I’m being true to myself and creating my own sound at the same time. It’s a niche, yes, but it’s what I love and it helps to differentiate me in a lot of ways as well. Well, your multi-demensional performances are also very niche, themselves. You sing, you play and you step. And music students are typically encouraged to think as broadly as possible when launching their careers. How did you begin on such a unique path? Fiddling and step-dancing have been a part of my life as long as I can remember. I started dancing at age 3 and fiddling at age 6. My 10•CNCJAWinter 2015

parents were fans of those traditions back home, and my Dad played music as a hobby, and so I was around it a lot. I guess that’s how I got started on the path that I took; really I was on that path before I even realized it…And I was so passionate about it that I continued on that path and found ways that I could share it with the world. It wasn’t necessarily a very calculated decision, it just felt right; it felt like what I was meant to do. After two decades in the industry, you've learned a lot about taking the narrow path. What would April Verch now have told April Verch then before launching her career? I think part of the process of learning as you go is what makes this such a rich experience. I’ve made some mistakes, but nothing I regret. Everything has lead me to this moment. Getting worried and nervous at certain points in my career did, and still does, lead me to some better results down the road. So I’m glad I didn’t know before what I know now. I figured things out a little at a time, like how you don’t have to try to please absolutely everyone (because you never will), and getting to that point was really important and made me try a lot of things I might never have tried. So, I guess April Verch “now” would have told April Verch “then” something like this: “It’s going to be a rocky road. There are going to be a lot of ups and downs. But follow your gut, be yourself, respect everyone and everything along the way, and realize that in the end, everything will work out for the best. Be patient with yourself and enjoy the journey.” What was it like recording your latest album, Bright Like Gold, with Bluegrass Hall of Famer Mac Wiseman? Mac is such a gem. It was a real honor to work with him and have him sing on our recording. I learned so much from him, especially from sitting around talking and listening to him tell stories of the “old days” and his experiences in the business. He’s not only a wonderful and legendary musician; he’s also a very savvy business person and is more than willing to share his knowledge and give advice. He’s also extremely genuine and sincere. I look up to him in many ways and am ever thankful we got to know him through that recording experience. I visit him every chance I get to pass through Nashville and those visits are treasures. Tell me about performing in the Opening Ceremonies at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. What was that like for you? Performing in the Opening Ceremonies...in Vancouver was the thrill of a lifetime. The audience in the stadium and the perceived viewing audience in your mind is an adrenaline rush for sure. But in addition to the huge production and excitement, it was also a very emotional experience for me. I felt so proud to be representing our Canadian fiddle tradition to the world on behalf of fiddlers today and those that paved the way and have passed on, but there is such a strong, vibrant fiddle community. And to be able to represent that was a true honor. It felt like a huge responsibility, but it was also a lot of fun.


So what can we expect from your January 2015 Old Town School of Folk Music performance? Our shows feature a mix of instrumental, vocal and Ottawa Valley step dancing selections. We incorporate a few different roots/traditional music styles into our repertoire, including Canadian Old-time (which I grew up with), Appalachian, Bluegrass and Western Swing, which keeps things fresh for us and the audience. Some of the tunes and songs are traditional, some are original and a few are covers. We love to get to know people and we talk about where or who we learned tunes from or what inspired us to write them. I feel so fortunate to travel with the band members I have. They are two of the best musicians that I’ve worked with, and we really click both on stage and off. Cody Walters plays bass and claw hammer banjo in the band…Our guitarist, Hayes Griffin...also plays mandolin. It’s neat to have the guys switching instruments and taking the lead on their own songs. I usually dance three or four times each set and it’s a style of dancing that most people aren’t familiar with, so I love sharing that with them. We love mixing moods and using different band configurations…It’s a really good time. We love performing and entertaining, and it’s my hope that we can take people out of their everyday thoughts or worries for a while and on a little journey to somewhere they need to go.

Photo courtesy of April Verch

You can experience that journey on January 18 when April Verch swings into Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music and gives audiences a taste of the most authentic, heartfelt folk performance we'll see in the Windy City this season.

Winter 2015CNCJA•11


potent collaboration

This fall, First Lady Michelle Obama honored Chicago Shakespeare Theater (CST) with the 2014 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award at a White House ceremony, and in doing so, shined a well-deserved national spotlight on an amazing, collaborative youth development initiative called CPS Shakespeare. The program employs engagement in the arts and the humanities to develop skills and increase academic achievement for talented young CPS students. Here's a snapshot of that potency in action.

Photo by Steven E. Purcell

Photo by Steven E. Purcell

1

2 3

1

During the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award ceremony, program participant Jennifer Guadalupe Gonzalez Gonzalez addressed the civic and cultural leaders in a moving speech about the transformative effect of CPS Shakespeare! on her life, both academically and personally.

4

2

3

Ensemble members Matthew (right) and Ana (left) spar in stage combat training during rehearsal for the 2014 production.

Director Kirsten Kelly addresses the student-teacher ensemble at rehearsal for CPS Shakespeare! A Midsummer Night's Dream on the CST Courtyard Theatre stage.

4

12•CNCJAWinter 2015

Photos by Liz Lauren

Featuring 26 students and 9 teachers from 10 CPS schools across Chicago, the CPS Shakespeare! ensemble warms up with vocal and physical exercises during rehearsal for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a collaborative effort of the groups collective making which was performed on CST’s Courtyard Theater stage, November 7 and 8.


HARRIS HARRISTHEATER THEATER2014–2015 2014–2015SEASON—STARTING SEASON—STARTINGAT AT$10 $10 MARCH MARCH5,5, 2015 2015 FEBRUARY FEBRUARY5,5, 2015 2015 AlonzoKing KingLINES LINESBallet Ballet The TheChamber ChamberMusic MusicSociety Society Alonzo Meyer Meyerand andWriting WritingGround Ground ofof Lincoln LincolnCenter Center Drumming Drumming MARCH MARCH17,17, 2015 2015 Laurie LaurieAnderson Andersonand and FEBRUARY FEBRUARY6,6, 2015 2015 DECEMBER DECEMBER10, 10, 2014 2014 Kronos KronosQuartet Quartet The ThePeking PekingAcrobats Acrobats Chicago ChicagoChildren’s Children’sChoir Choir Landfall Landfall and andSphinx SphinxVirtuosi Virtuosi FEBRUARY FEBRUARY27, 27, 2015 2015 MAY MAY7–9, 7–9, 2015 2015 Orquesta OrquestaSinfónica Sinfónicadel del DECEMBER DECEMBER18, 18, 2014 2014 Scottish ScottishBallet Ballet EstadodedeMéxico México The TheChamber ChamberMusic MusicSociety Society Estado A AStreetcar StreetcarNamed NamedDesire Desire ofof Lincoln LincolnCenter Center MARCH MARCH2,2, 2015 2015 Bach’s Bach’sBrandenburg Brandenburg MAY20, 20, 2015 2015 The TheChamber ChamberMusic MusicSociety Society MAY Concertos Concertos The TheChamber ChamberMusic MusicSociety Society ofofLincoln LincolnCenter Center Lincoln LincolnCenter Centerand and Romantic RomanticPiano PianoQuartets Quartets ofof JANUARY JANUARY21, 21, 2015 2015 Emerson EmersonString StringQuartet Quartet Wendy WendyWhelan Whelan Mozart, Mozart, Liebermann, Liebermann, and and MARCH MARCH4,4, 2015 2015 Restless RestlessCreature Creature Tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky Alonzo AlonzoKing KingLINES LINESBallet Ballet Constellation Constellation DECEMBER DECEMBER3,3, 2014 2014 Teatro TeatroRegio RegioTorino Torino Gianandrea GianandreaNoseda Noseda Rossini’s Rossini’sWilliam WilliamTell Tell

312.334.7777 312.334.7777• •HarrisTheaterChicago.org HarrisTheaterChicago.org• •205 205East EastRandolph RandolphDrive Drive

Season Season Sponsor Sponsor

Season Hotel Hotel Partner Partner Official Official Airline Airline of of thethe Harris Harris Theater TheaterSeason Winter 2015CNCJA•13


potent collaboration Ensemble members Melanie, Diana and Samantha rehearse musical arrangements for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, under the musical direction of Mather High School orchestra teacher Christian Smith (second from left) in preparation for performances on CST’s Courtyard Theater stage,

5

6

5

CPS Shakespeare! ensemble members play their violins as part of the on stage ensemble in the official production for their 2014 season.

Puck (Ana) and Oberon (Taleah) interact on stage in costumes created by students and CST creative team members as a part of their 2014 production activities. The performances offer students an opportunity to get real world experience in a professional performance setting that inspires confidence and creativity.

7

6

7

8

Titania (Jennifer Gonzalez), Bottom (Michael Watkins) and the ensemble of CPS Shakespeare!in action on stage at CST's Courtyard Theatre in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a fully staged production with collaboration from creatives at CST and CPS teachers allow students to enjoy the rewards of their labor live on stage in a professional performance space.

14•CNCJAWinter 2015

Photos by Liz Lauren

8


It’s not over yet. Two thrilling programs are still to come in Season 37.

A SINGULAR SPRING.

ALL-CERRUDO SUMMER. JUNE 11–14

Examine the nature of gender identities and relationships with a specially curated, unique program.

Our second-ever program devoted to a single artist—Alejandro Cerrudo—is a must-see.

MARCH 12–15

World Premiere by Gustavo Ramírez Sansano JUST ADDED!

A Picture of You Falling by Crystal Pite HUBBARD STREET PREMIERE

Celebrate six years of Cerrudo’s choreographic residency at Hubbard Street, with his 14TH WORLD PREMIERE and audience favorites.

hubbardstreetdance.com/summer

Cloudless by Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo

Performing at

Falling Angels and Sarabande by Jiří Kylián

hubbardstreetdance.com/spring

Commissioning Sponsor World Premiere by Gustavo Ramírez Sansano

Season Sponsors

37

SO S EA

Choose your two-pack subscription today to see them both and save. hubbardstreetdance.com/subscribe 312-850-9744

N

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO SUBSCRIBE.

Above left: Hubbard Street Dancers Jonathan Fredrickson, left, and David Schultz in Sarabande by Jiří Kylián. Above right: Hubbard Street Dancers Jacqueline Burnett, left, and Ana Lopez in Cloudless by Alejandro Cerrudo. Photo by Todd Rosenberg. Winter 2015CNCJA•15


not

SHAKEN

stirred

The Art Institute launches its new Modern Series with an exhibition that examines the artful output of a society jarred by rapid and unsettling change. By LAURA KINTER

Curator's Corner

O

On Sunday, February 15, the Art Institute of Chicago will premiere the first exhibit in their Modern Series, Shatter, Rupture, Break. With the launch of the new exhibition, museum-goers will be propelled into the rapidly and radically changing society around the outbreak of World War One, and will experience the exhilaration and anxiety of artists caught in societal transition. The Modern Series will feature modern objects from the Art Institute’s collection across all media, and unite them in newly devised exhibits. Shatter, Rupture, Break will bring together photographs, collages, paintings, books and films to explore how the three words permeated modern art and caused a momentous shift in artistic perception. Artists such as Robert Delaunay and Gino Severini will be featured for their exploration—and disruption—of depth and illusionism by responding to the new, faster-paced metropolis. Delaunay’s Champs de Mars: The Red Tower, a key piece in the exhibit, depicts the Eiffel Tower in frag16•CNCJAWinter 2015

mented and shifting form. This image perfectly exemplifies the “shift in perception” the exhibit will evoke, by showing how modern life in an accelerated metropolitan environment encouraged new and fractured worldviews. “Picturesque vistas no longer adequately conveyed the fast pace of the modern city,” explains exhibit curator Sarah Kelly Oehler. Shutter, Rupture, Break will span two galleries that feature works arranged thematically. Oehler notes the importance video and projected images will play in the multimedia experience of the exhibit: “The goal is to create a dynamic space that evokes the exciting, disruptive and cacophonous nature of modern art at this time, as well as alludes to how modern artists did not confine themselves to one medium but explored different visual effects across a variety of media. We want visitors to make their own associations and be inspired by the connections they see; to that end, we are prominently featuring the voices of artists, writers, scientists and intellectuals of the period.” Three films will be projected in the gallery space adjacent a variety of media: Above: Umbo (Otto Umber). Untitled, 1928. Julien Levy Collection, Gift of Jean and Julien Levy. © 2014 Phyllis Umbehr/Galerie Kicken Berlin/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Opposite Page: Robert Delaunay. Champs de Mars: The Red Tower, 1911/23. The Art Institute of Chicago. Joseph Winterbotham Collection.


Winter 2015CNCJA•17


Curator's Corner In this cacophonous exhibit, museum-goers will be thrown into the brutal, fractured and hectic age of our very own society in 2014. The world, particularly Chicago, finds itself in just as much of a transitory age of paranoia, anxiety and over-stimulation. The exhibit, therefore,

photographs, paintings, sculpture, decorative works and designed objects, works on paper, textiles and books, truly giving a museumgoer the anxious and overstimulated nature of modern society. The Art Institute has played a pivotal role in Chicago’s modernity for over one hundred years, and this show will feature both new acquisitions of modern art, but also important pieces that have formed the core of the museum’s modern collection. The works of Ivan Albright hold special significance as a Chicago modernist, and the Art Institute owns his most important works. Shutter, Rupture, Break will feature several Albright pieces, including a rarely displayed water color medical sketchbook. The sketchbook depicts gruesome images of soldiers wounded at war, and even x-rays of their injuries, thus incorporating an artistic perspective of the (then) new medical technology. The body plays a key role in this exhibit, as it often did in modern art. “A devastating and mechanized world war had blasted bodies to pieces and returned men to the front with fragments missing. Surrealists fetishized body parts in images, separating out eyes,

18•CNCJAWinter 2015

hands and legs in suggestive renderings. The exhibition will combine these two impulses—violent and sexual—in salon style display,” notes Oehler. Albright’s sketchbook will show a gruesomely literal representation of those shattered bodies. Oehler also draws special attention to Mz 13 Call, a Kurt Schwitters piece assembled from salvaged materials. “The employment of thrown away, ripped-up and scissored out pieces of paper, divorced from their original meanings and reassembled with nails and glue into new aesthetic statements was an act that exposed social and political disruptions,” Oehler explains. Schwitters used the garbage of German society in the service of Merz, “an invented term meant to signify an artistic practice that included collage, assemblage, paintings, poems or performance.” Another notable piece is gelatin silver print Self Portrait, Zacopane (broken glass) by Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz (1910). Above Left: Fernand Léger. Composition in Blue, 1921-27. The Art Institute of Chicago. Charles H. and Mary F. S. Worcester Collection. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.; Above Right: Diego Rivera. Portrait of Marevna, c.1915. The Art Institute of Chicago. Alfred Stieglitz Collection, gift of Georgia O'Keeffe. © 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.


modern art during the outbreak of World War One. This experience, however, is not all that different from state as in the early 1900s. The digital age has rapidly descended on our everyday lives and created a new creates a bridge between the chaos of a century ago, and the chaos of today.

Converging with the exhibit’s themes of fractured perception, Witkiewicz literally broke a glass negative and reassembled it to create a print. The piece represents the broken psyche that was endemic to the modern period, especially in artists. In this cacophonous exhibit, museum-goers will be thrown into the brutal, fractured and hectic age of modern art during the outbreak of World War I. This experience, however, is not all that different from our very own society in 2014. The world, particularly Chicago, finds itself in just as much of a transitory state as in the early 1900s. The digital age has rapidly descended on our everyday lives and created a new age of paranoia, anxiety and over-stimulation. The exhibit, therefore, creates a bridge between the chaos of a century ago, and the chaos of today. Shutter, Rupture, Break will show the freshness and novelty of ideas we find old and archaic. It will evoke a sense of social, political and artistic change that we feel in present day, over an entirely new set of fractured perceptions and changing technologies. “We rightly see the present day as a period of rapid change,” Oehler explains, “but this sense of social change is not new. It is precisely how people felt a century ago, in the period roughly from World War I to the post World War II period. This was a time of great change; world wars, destruc-

tion, and death; new technologies of communication and transportation, and production that accelerated the pace of life; new understandings of psychology and the mind; and disruptions of the old artistic traditions and the development of new ideologies and methods.” The artists in Shutter, Rupture, Break reacted to these changes with anxiety and paranoia the same way we react to our own rapidly changing life in Chicago. The broken glass, collages and assembly of garbage all evoke the fear and confusion we feel in the middle of a transitioning society. Oehler hopes the exhibit “excites interest in the modern period as a crucial precursor to the changes of our own time.” Shutter, Rupture, Break is the first of the Art Institute’s Modern Series, which is meant to be nimble and experimental. The next exhibits in the series will not appear in the very near future. However they are being planned with an eye for the changing conditions of society and continuing the freshness and liveliness that Shutter, Rupture, Break exemplifies. Above: Kurt Schwitters. Mz 13 Call, 1919. The Art Institute of Chicago. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice E. Culberg. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.

Winter 2015CNCJA•19


Around Town

C

Who: Acclaimed Jazz Songstress Dianne Reeves What: BeautifulLife Concert Performance When: 8 p.m., January 30, 2015 Where: Symphony Center in Downtown Chicago How: Visit cso.org or call 312.294.3000 20•CNCJAWinter 2015

Photo by Jerris Madison

Chicago favorite Dianne Reeves has a peerless vocal intensity that brings shivers, fueling jazz standards like precious few singers of her (or any other) generation. In Beautiful Life, her first studio project in five years, Reeves joins her longtime pianist and musical director, Peter Martin, illuminating the powerful concept of love. With timeless songs from the cannon like "Stormy Weather," Reeves will enchant an auspicious Symphony Center audience this winter with a concert performance that not even the Polar Vortex could chill.


Stream more than 800 hours of music history.

EXPLORING MUSIC.ORG debuts!

Bill McGlaughlin, host of Exploring Music

After 10 successful years, WFMT’s flagship program, EXPLORING MUSIC with BILL McGLAUGHLIN, is going online! Now every program can be heard at your convenience at our new streaming web site. Listen to more than 800 hours of personable, insightful, entertaining programs on the history of classical music, featuring entire weeks (5 hours of programs) devoted to specific composers (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Mahler…), genres, cities, historical periods, and much more on this unparalleled subscription streaming website. Visit exploringmusic.org to secure your membership for unlimited listening anytime, anywhere.

wfmt.com

exploringmusic.org

Winter 2015CNCJA•21


Years 125

Counting and

Chicago's Auditorium Theatre celebrates a monumental milestone on December 9 with a starstudded affair that salutes the theater's longevity, service and masterful reinvention. By DONNA ROBERTSON

22•CNCJAWinter 2015


A

After 125 years of bringing Chicago audiences world class performances, one must admit that The Auditorium Theatre has to have been doing something right. Home to iconic artists and performers from virtually every genre known to man, the landmark Auditorium Theatre stage has been our window to the a world of culture and performance (from global luminaries to local favorites) since it first opened its doors in 1889. And isn’t it ironic that, like so many other revered Chicago treasures, the Auditorium Theatre owes at least some of its beginnings to the city’s most destructive event, The Great Chicago Fire of 1871? Indeed, the Chicago Fire became the impetus for so

many changes within the city we call home. In the historic aftermath of the devastating blaze, architects from around the world flocked to Chicago to take part in the city’s rebirth. At the same time, massive immigration from Europe created a much-needed labor force for construction. Meanwhile, the vast fortunes made by some during the Left: It's performance night and a capacity crowd sits in The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University; Above: In 1942, The Auditorium Theatre is taken over by the city of Chicago and used as a WWII Servicemen's Center, complete with a bowling alley on the stage; The original planned 1889 Opening Day sketch of The Auditorium Theatre.

Gilded Age expanded the size of Chicago’s upper class, which, in turn, created a demand for more and better cultural experiences. By the late 1800s, Chicago was eager to make its mark on the world. Unfortunately, the deplorable working and living conditions of the equally growing immigrant workforce increased tensions between the working class and the wealthy industrialists, culminating in the Haymarket Square Riot in 1886. What is not commonly known is that both the Chicago Fire and the Haymarket Square Riot were the great precursors in a very real sense to the development of The Auditorium Theatre we know today. But it only makes sense that an institution so vital to Chicago’s rich cultural history has just as rich a history of its own. In 1886, Ferdinand Peck, a wealthy Chicago businessman, conceived an ambitious plan to build the world’s largest and grandest theater. According to Brett Batterson, executive director of Auditorium Theatre, the venue was built for two very distinct reasons: to prove that Chicago could build an opera house on par with those in Europe; and to bring together the city's working class and industrialists through the power of the arts—the latter, a deliberate response to the rising tensions between those two factions. The Chicago architectural firm of Adler and Sullivan was hired to design the building (joining the firm a year later was a young draftsman by the name of Frank Lloyd Wright, who prepared the drawings for the theater). German-born Danmark Adler was widely recognized as an exceptional structural engineer and acoustic genius, and Louis Sullivan was famous for his designs and ornamentation. Both men were instrumental in the rebuilding of Chicago after the fire. The two complemented one another perfectly in creating a theater renowned for its lavishly appointed interior of marble mosaics, art glass, murals and plaster reliefs with acoustics that were ahead of their time. For the stage, Sullivan designed modular panels that can transform its size, and Adler included hydraulic systems for dynamic sets. According to Ashley Wheater, artistic director for the theater’s resident company, The Joffrey Ballet, the design is “very forward thinking…conceived and built 125 years ago with the technology available at that time. The sightlines are excellent, the acoustics are excellent, and the stage can handle all the grandeur of a full-scaled ballet but works equally well for a smaller, abstract work. It allows you to be creative in your dancing.” Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, given National Historic Landmark status in 1975 and designated a Chicago landmark 1976, the theater was truly ahead of its time in Winter 2015CNCJA•23


Like its beginnings, programming at the Auditorium Theatre today reflects the variety of cultures in the city. One of the goals, according to (Brett Batterson, executive director) is to “celebrate all of the great cultures and embrace our sameness while respecting our differences.” When deciding on programming for the theater, Batterson asks, “Is this a celebration of a culture that’s alive and well in Chicago and can it introduce new people to that culture?” many ways. The Auditorium Theatre officially opened its doors on December 9, 1889 with an extravagant affair attended by the U.S. President and Vice-President, the Illinois Governor and the Chicago Mayor. It was the first multi-purpose building in the world, and, standing at 17 floors, the tallest building in Chicago at the time. There was a hotel just in front of the theater and an office tower behind it. It was also the first theater in the world to be entirely outfitted with electricity and air conditioning. The first tenant was the Chicago Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art, followed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra taking up residency in 1891 and the Chicago Opera Association much later in 1910. True to the spirit of art, The Auditorium Theatre has been reimagined and reinvented many times throughout the years. Like many other Chicago cultural institutions, it suffered during the Depression of the 1930s and was closed from 19411967. (Although officially closed, the City of Chicago used the theater during World War II as a center for servicemen, complete with dances and a bowling alley on the stage.) Reopening in 1967 with the New York City Ballet’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the theater would then serve as Chicago’s premier rock house until the mid-1970s, showcasing performers such as Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Who and The Grateful Dead. Again, the theater experienced a metamorphosis when it evolved into the Chicago home of Broadway hits from the late ‘80s to the ‘90s. Audiences packed the house to national tours of Les Miserables, Phantom of the Opera, Miss Saigon, and Show Boat. And in the 2000s, the theater ushered in its dance era when it became the resident home of The Joffrey Ballet.

24•CNCJAWinter 2015

Through its ups and down, the Auditorium Theater has not only survived, but thrived. Michelle T. Boone, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, noted that “Over its storied history, the Auditorium Theatre has helped to propel the careers of thousands of performing artists through its steady presentation of concerts, and theatrical and dance productions of all kinds. Today, the Auditorium continues to provide incredible arts experiences for Chicagoans and visitors from across the globe —while supporting our many local cultural and community organizations, and outreach programs in schools.” Said Mayor Rahm Emanuel, “...We are proud to celebrate the Auditorium Theatre’s 125th birthday. This National Historic Landmark is representative of our rich history in the arts as well as the unique Chicago architecture styles that have influenced American building structures for generations. The Auditorium Theatre continues to make Chicago a leader in the arts and culture today.” To commemorate its rich 125 year history, the Auditorium Theater has programmed some very special performances throughout the 2014-2015 season. With some artists and companies making their Auditorium Theatre debuts and others returning after a long absence, the season continues to be a kind of re-discovery of the theater for audience and artist alike. The season opened with the storied American Ballet Theater From Top: Legendary rockers Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and rock band The Who (photos by Getty Images).


and will close with the Royal Ballet of London. The Joffrey Ballet is performing for a total of twelve weeks throughout the year. And for the first time in 17 years, the Dance Theater of Harlem will grace the Auditorium Theatre stage. Season regulars are back, of course. Alvin Alley American Dance Theater will perform again for two weeks—its longest run outside of New York City. And rounding out the trademark eclectic lineup of performances for which the theater has become known are Orbert Davis’s Chicago Jazz Philharmonic; Too Hot to Handel (the annual jazz-gospel Messiah); His Way (a tribute to Sinatra’s 100th birthday); singer/songwriter Susan Warner in concert; dance companies from South America; a concert to honor 75 years of Mavis Staple; and an interview with Ina Garten, host of the culinary television series, Barefoot Contessa. All of this amazing history and incredibly diverse cultural programming will culminate in an extraordinary gala celebration on December 9 at the theater. Entitled Living the History, the concert will be a salute to the Auditorium Theatre throughout the decades. Hosted by Tony Award winner John Mahoney, the program will showcase the venue’s beginnings with performances by members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Brass and Lyric Opera of Chicago. They’ll continue with a salute to World War II servicemen, followed by salutes to the theater’s rock, Broadway and dance eras. The Apollo Chorus, which sang at the opening of the Auditorium Theater in 1889, will sing again at the December 9 celebration. The Joffrey Ballet and the Alvin Alley American Dance Theater will also showcase works on the program. Grammy and Tony Award winner Patti Lapone will be featured. Lupone is the great-grandniece (and namesake) of Adelina Patti, celebrated operatic soprano who sang at the theater’s 1889 opening. In recognition of the Auditorium Theatre’s contributions to the arts here, the City of Chicago recently honored the theater as one of five venerable recipients of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events’ Fifth Star Awards—the first of its kind. According to Mayor Rahm Emanuel, the award is meant to recognize, “artists whose work has forever changed and enhanced our city . . . artists who have been our ambassadors . . . and artists who have inspired and mentored new generations of artists who call Chicago home.” It’s significant that the Auditorium Theatre was recognized

as among the top five candidates for the first award of this kind. Reflecting on the honor, Brett Batterson admitted to a degree of humility in accepting the honor. But he explained that he sees the award as “largely as a recognition of what the theater has meant to the city over the years and a validation of what we’re doing and to keep doing it.” Like its beginnings, programming at the Auditorium Theatre today reflects the variety of cultures in the city. One of the goals, according to Batterson, is to “celebrate all of the great cultures and embrace our sameness while respecting our differences.” When deciding on programming for the theater, Batterson asks, “Is this a celebration of a culture that’s alive and well in Chicago and can it introduce new people to that culture?” He explained that the concept really materialized for him when the American Ballet once performed at the theater and members of the company noted all of the cultures that attended the performances. Of course, the Auditorium Theatre is not just about performances. Batterson also launched a community initiative called “Hands Together, Heart to Art,” a day camp that has helped more than 700 children who have experienced tragic loss heal through participation in music, theater and dance. And, for the first time ever, the Auditorium Theatre will host the NFL Draft in late April/early May 2015 (the first Chicago appearance for the Draft in 51 years). The significance of the opportunity for the theater was put into perspective when Batterson pointed out, “In 125 years, an estimated 20 million people have come to the Auditorium Theatre, and now 45.7 million people will see the inside of the Auditorium Theatre on T.V.” Under Batterson’s guidance, the theater has certainly come full circle, fulfilling Peck’s original vision of a theater for the entire community.

From Top Left: Joffrey Ballet's Victoria Jaiani in The Merry Widow (photo by Herbert Migdol); Tenor Mariusz Kwiecien in Lyric Opera's 2014 production of Don Giovanni (photo by Ken Howard); Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre's Alicia Graf Mack and Jamal Roberts (photo by Andrew Eccles); Center: Broadway luminary Patti Lapone and acclaimed film and stage actor John Mahoney (photos by Getty Images).

Winter 2015CNCJA•25


'Tis the Season! For Chicagoland holiday performances and we've got your best bets for seasonal concerts and exhibitions that will get you in the spirit this year.

A Christmas Carol at Goodman Theatre (goodmantheatre.org) Christmas in Chicago just wouldn’t be the same without the quintessential telling of Charles Dickens’ timeless tale of hope. Goodman Theatre’s enchanting production enraptures audiences every season with delightful sets, thrilling effects and captivating numbers that ring in the holiday with the true meaning of love and redemption. The show runs through December 28 in Goodman’s Albert Hall. Christmas Around the World and Holidays of Light at The Museum of Science and Industry (msichicago.org) The Museum of Science and Industry’s 73rd annual Christmas Around the World and Holidays of Light features more than 50 trees and displays,

Photo by Liz Lauren

Left: Larry Yando as Ebeneezer Schrooge in Goodman Theatre's A Christmas Carol.

26•CNCJAWinter 2015

beautifully decorated by volunteers from Chicago’s ethnic communities to reflect their diverse culture and holiday traditions. Guests can stroll through the dazzling forest of trees, enjoy intermittent falling “snow” every half hour and savor the performances of various dance and choral groups on the Holiday Stage. The exhibition runs through January 15, 2015. A Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol at Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (chicagoshakes.com) "A hip-hop holiday treat set to a bangin’ beat!" is what Chicago Shakespare Theater calls the Q Brothers' (creators of Othello: The Remix and Funk It Up About Nothin’) latest creation. Get a gander at the Dickens classic with a mix of reggae and dancehall and dubstep to epic rock ballads. The Ghosts of Hip-hop Past, Present and Future will lead Scrooge on a his wild Christmas night ride and will have you moving in your seat the entire time. Performances run through December 31, 2014 at the Upstairs theater. Dee Snider’s Rock & Roll Christmas Tale at Broadway Playhouse (broadwayinchicago.org) The infamous lead singer of Twisted Sister, Dee Snider brings a hilarious romp that will warm your heart (and rock the house) this season. Performances run at the Broadway Playhouse (broadwayinchicago.org) through January 4, 2015. Neapolitan Crèche at The Art Institute of Chicago (artic.edu) After a wildly popular debut last season, The Art Institute brings back the spectacular 18th century Neapolitan crèche this year en-


hanced with newly acquired figures. One of the very few and finest examples of such a work outside of Naples, the crèche is an intricate Nativity scene that reflects the vitality and artisanship that the city is still known for. View the extraordinary crèche through January 11, 2015. A

Christmas Carol at Drury Lane Theatre for Young Adults (drurylaneoakbrook.com) The visually beguiling one-hour play is a holiday experience perfect for children of all ages. On select performance dates, families will have the opportunity to enjoy breakfast or dinner with Santa Claus in Drury Lane’s elegantly decorated dining room. The classical holiday tale runs at Drury Lane Theatre (drurylane.com) through December 23.

The Christmas Schooner at Mercury Theatre (mercurytheatrechicago.org) The whole family will enjoy this heart-warming story of the first Christmas tree ship and the family who risked their lives to foster the Christmas spirit in the Windy City. This critically acclaimed production features a powerful, moving story and an amazing score of original music and traditional holiday favorites. The Christmas Schooner docks at Mercury Theatre through December 28. J.S. Bach Christmas Oratorio by Music of the Baroque (baroque.org) This rarely performed Bach masterpiece is a sprawling work meant to be performed during the Christmas season. Comprised of six cantatas, the piece runs some two-and-a-half hours and spotlights the German composer toward the end of his career when the focus became intimacy, color and emotional potency. Hear Bach’s Christmas Oratorio December 1 at Harris Theater for Music and Dance. Clockwise From Top Left: More than 50 trees and displays are decorated by volunteers from Chicago's ethnic communities in the Museum of Science and Industry's annual holiday exhibition, Christmas Around the World and Holidays of Light (photo by J. B. Spector); The members of the popular male a cappella chorus, Chanticleer (photo courtesy of Chanticleer); Cast of The Christmas Schooner at Mercury Theatre (photo courtesy of Mercury Theatre); Lil' Tim (JQ, at center) hip hops along with his family, Mrs. Cratchit (Jackson Duoran, left) and older sister Martha Cratchit (Postell Pringle, right) in Chicago Shakespeare Theatre's production of A Q Brothers' Christmas Carol (photo by Michael Brosilow).

A Chanticleer Christmas at Symphony Center (cso.org) This Grammy-winning “orchestra of voices” will be back in residence at Chicago’s Symphony Center for their annual celebration of traditional Christmas music. Their program’s range is about as large as their talent pool. From Baroque classics to 21st century favorites, Chanticleer’s annual concert could pull even Ebenezer Scrooge into the Christmas spirit. Concerts are December 1 and 2. A Christmas Gathering:Feile Na Nollag at the MAC (atthemac.org) The critically acclaimed traditional Irish musical group, Danú, comes to the McAninch Arts Center (MAC) for A Christmas Gathering: Féile Na Nollag. For this concert, Danú will perform a mix of heartwarming and high energy traditional holiday music, such as “The Wexford Carol,” one of the oldest extant Christmas carols in the European tradition; “Miss Fogarty’s Christmas Cake,” a humorous 19th century song; “Oiche Chiuin” (“Silent Night”) and more. The performance takes place 8 p.m., Saturday, December 6. Wonderland Express at Chicago Botanic Garden (chicagobotanic.or) One of Chicagoland’s top holiday attractions, the family friendly Wonderland Express is an amazing railroad garden, light and holiday topiary show that will thrill garden and miniature enthusiast alike. See the show at the Garden’s Glencoe campus December 6. Brandenburg Concertos by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center at Harris Theater for Music and Dance (harristheaterchicago.org) Chicago has a host of holiday traditions, but its newest is most delightful to the ears. The venerable Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center let us in on one of New York City's treasured holiday concerts last season when they brought their annual performance of Bach's beloved Brandenburg Concertos to Harris Theater. The Society returns this year with a festive performance to ring in the holiday season with a must-see concert. Hear the complete cycle of the Brandenburg Concertos December 18. Winter 2015CNCJA•27


The Nutcraker by Joffrey Ballet (joffrey.org) Joffrey Ballet is back for the 27th annual presentation of one of Chicago’s most popular holiday traditions, in a 24-performance engagement at the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University. When Robert Joffrey choreographed The Nutcracker in 1987, he replaced the traditional European setting with a 19th century American home, populating it with toys from his very own childhood. From there, familiar characters Clara and the mysterious Dr. Drosselmeyer embark on an amazing adventure. Share in the lush, contemporary presentation of one of the world’s most cherished holiday performances December 5 – 28.

nationally renowned a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock offers a stunning vocal celebration rooted in African American traditions. And drawing influence from cultures ranging from American to Latin to Hebrew, this program promises to honor the holiday spirit from Christmas to Kwanzaa. Works include traditional holiday works like “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” and new holiday favorites. Hear Sweet Honey in The Rock celebrate the holidays December 7 at Symphony Center.

Candelight Carols Presented by The St. Charles Singers (stcharlessingers.com) The west suburban mixed-voice choir’s founder and music director Jeffrey Hunt will conduct a program of 18 songs spanning from the Renaissance to the present day, many of which the choir has never performed before and some offering unusual soundscapes. One of those is Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds’ “Stars” for mixed choir and water-tuned glasses. The carol, composed in 2011, calls for some singers to play stemmed drinking glasses, also known as glass harps. Hear the program December 5-7 in Chicago and St. Charles.

The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show at City Winery Known for breaking genre boundaries and stirring interpretations of gospel and contemporary Americana alike, The Blind Boys of Alabama are a treasure of the American stage. Rolling Stone Magazine calls them “a superweapon of roots-music…” And this holiday season, the Blind Boys are touring in support of their new album Talkin’ Christmas! on the Sony Masterworks label. Only their second Christmas album, Talkin’ Christmas! features blues legend Taj Mahal and includes several brand new songs and older classics. In addition to songs from the new album, the concert will also draw from the band’s

Sweet Honey in the Rock Celebrating the Holidays at Symphony Center (cso.org) With music inspired from faiths and religions around the world, inter-

Above: Joffrey Ballet's Chicago holiday staple, The Nutcracker (photo by Cheryl Mann) Below: Members of the acclaimed all-woman a cappella ensemble, Sweet Honey in the Rock (photo courtesy of Sweet Honey in the Rock).

28•CNCJAWinter 2015


previous Grammy-winning Christmas recording, Go Tell It on the Mountain. Hear The Blind Boys of Alabama perform at City Winery on December 11.

Too Hot to Handel: The Jazz-Gospel Messiah at The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (auditoriumtheatre.org) Too Hot to Handel celebrates 10 years in Chicago and at the Auditorium Theatre. Take Handel’s holiday classic and add a jazz combo along with the talents of riveting soloists Roderick Dixon, Alfreda Burke and Karne Marie Richardson and then throw in the swerve of Count Basey, the heat of a swinging jazz orchestra and 100 person gospel choir and you’ve got the thrill that is Too Hot to Handel. Performances take place January 17 and 18, 2014.

Welcome Yule! Members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (cso.org) For 20 seasons now, Welcome Yule! has delighted audiences with the sounds of the season. Featuring members of the CSO and CSO Chorus, this milestone program promises surprises and familiar favorites alike. Hear them all December 13 – 23 at Symphony Center.

Annual Tribune to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by The Chicago Sinfonietta (chicagosinfonietta.org) The Chicago Sinfonietta celebrates the boundless optimism of youth as the orchestra is joined by young musicians, composers, singers and poets who embody the next generation of Dr. King’s legacy. Guests include 17-year-old African-American composer/conductor Jherrard Marseille Hardeman, 13-year-old African-American prodigy cellist Sujari Britt, high school-aged spoken word poets from Young Chicago and the powerful singers of the Waubonsie Valley High School Mosaic Choir. Performances are January 18, 2015 at Wentz Concert Hall of North Central College in Naperville and January 19, 2015 at Symphony Center's Orchestra Hall in downtown Chicago.

Holiday Brass and Choral Concerts by Music of The Baroque (baroque.org) From poignant chant to ancient carols, these marvelous works proffer the true sound of the season and tradition. Hear William Jon Grey conduct this wonderful ensemble of brass and choral December 18 – 21. Handel’s Messiah by The Apollo Chorus (apollochorus.org) Chicago’s oldest musical organization will perform their signature rendition of Handel’s choral masterpiece for the 135th straight season. Few works today are as celebrated or beloved as Handel’s Messiah, and this annual performance has become a holiday tradition for many Chicago families. Hear this annual concert on Saturday, December 6 at 3:00 p.m. at Orchestra Hall at Symphony Center and Saturday, December 20 at 3:00 p.m. at Harris Theater for Music & Dance. Wonderful Santaland Miracle, Nut Cracking Christmas Story... Jews Welcome! Stage 773, (stage773.com) This annual off-the-wall holiday performance puts a spin on the traditional holiday show with this interactive show directed by creative genius Brian Posen. Wonderful Santaland… features original Christmas carols, dance numbers, spoken word, puppets and everything in between. Cookies and "non-holiday-specific" eggnog will also be served. The show runs through December 28. Additionally, Stage 773 will serve as a drop-off site for the Greater Chicago Food Depository throughout the run of the production. Visit their Website for more details. Clockwise From Top Left: Members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and cast of Welcome Yule! at Symphony Center; Conductor Mei-Ann Chen, conductor and music director of The Chicago Sinfonietta (photo courtesy of The Chicago Sinfonietta).

Check out these Holiday Performances Also On Our Radar!

December • • • • • • • • •

5-28 — Twist Your Dickens by The Second City at Goodman Theatre (goodmantheatre.org) 5-7, 12-13, 20 — Holidays a cappella by Chicago a Cappella (chicagoacappella.org) 6 & 7 — The Swedish American Museum’s Annual Julmarknad Christmas Bazaar (swedishamericanmuseum.org) 10 —Chicago Children's Chori and Sphinx Virtuosi Holiday Concert at Harris Theater for Music and Dance 12 — Clint Black’s Christmas Show at The McAninch Arts Center in Glen Ellyn (atthemac.org) 12 — Mandy Barnett, Christmas Classics at Freedom Hall in Forest Park (freedomhall.org) 20 & 21 — Holiday Delights by Bella Voce Chamber Choir (bellavoce.org) 21 — HoliDaze Live Stage Review by Step Up Productions (stepupproductions.org) 21 & 22 — Do-It-Yourself Messiah, International Music Foundation Harris Theater for Music and Dance (harristheaterchicago.org)

Winter 2015CNCJA•29


Around Town

Who: Carrie Hanson’s Dance Company, the Seldoms What: Power Goes, new commission by the MCA When: March 20-29, 2015 Where: MCA Stage in Downtown Chicago How: Visit mcachicag.org or call 312.397.4010

30•CNCJAWinter 2015


F

For her lush new dance theater piece, choreographer Carrie Hanson enlisted the creative powers of playwright Stuart Flack, her dynamic slate of dancers and a wildly creative design team—a first for the Seldoms— to investigate just how we understand and deploy power. Set against the backdrop of today’s political gridlock, Hanson’s study of power—acquiring it, wielding it, expressing and deploying it—is a step forward in dance and theater collaboration. A new MCA commission, Hanson’s Seldoms will present Power Goes on the MCA Stage next spring in what will no-doubt be the performance art experience of the season.

Heroes of the Holocaust

were people just like you.

Photo by William Frederking

Come be inspired.

IllinoisHolocaustMuseum.org Winter 2015CNCJA•31


Is it Fashion or is it Art?

32•CNCJAWinter 2015


Art by Design The Elmhurst Art Museum's Richard Koppe exhibition sets the context for Clef Notes' examination of the real artistry behind fashion design. By LAURA KINTER

W

Photos By KRZYSTOF HANUSIAK

With the help of the University of Illinois at Chicago, the Elmhurst Art Museum, just west of the city, is currently exhibiting some rarely seen works by Mid-century Modern artist Richard Koppe. On display are paintings, prints and drawings that give a glimpse into

throughout his body of work with the swooping, ascendant curves of his lines and painterly gestures, as well as his repeated use of winged creatures such as birds and angels. His body of work in the late 1950s alludes to space flight and exploration as well as the robotic forms of his large paintings of heads from the early 1960s.” Richard Koppe has participated in the interior design of spaces, the illustration of aeronauKoppe’s fascination with tical engineering figures line and color, composition and has created an impresand space. His exploration of sive collection of sculpcubism and surrealism protures. His interest in the duced both playful and intrithree dimensional is no secate works, and his mastery cret, and “he often strived of diverse media transcended to create an effect of three that playfulness across madimensions in his two diterial boundaries. What you mensional work, and often can’t see at the Elmhurst Art made somewhat flat sculpMuseum, however, is the tures that created more of a carefully curated photoshoot 2D effect in three dimenClef Notes Journal commissions,” notes Boris. This sioned with Staci Boris, cubalance in Koppe’s work rator of the Koppe exhibit, is precisely what lends it and several Chicago fashion so perfectly to a relationdesigners. The project was ship with design. His work devised to put Koppe’s works shares so many design elin conversation with speements with garments secifically selected garments, lected for this project that adding another dimension to it helps illuminate the ofthe context of his art, and in ten overlooked comparison turn, examining the more arbetween art and fashion tistic elements employed in design. modern commercial fashion Chicago designer design. Annie Andrews, of Annie Criss-Cross Tunis (Sienna/Melon) The Koppe exhibition is A. Clothing, constantly Rayon (Silk detail) supremely well suited to such strives for balance within Price: $240.00 an examination, actually. her garments: balance in Design permeated Koppe’s color, line, and balance Pencil Skirt (Melon) 4-ply Silk life and artistic career. His between masculine and Cost: $160.00 fascination began at St. feminine. And as such, Paul’s School of Art, where her pieces dovetail quite Annie A. Clothing he immersed himself in line, naturally with several of (annieaclothing.com) shape, and color. His educaKoppe’s works. Available at locallux.com tion carried him to the New The brown Criss-Cross Set against Richard Koppe's Tunic from her autumn Bauhaus School in Chicago, Forest Figures (1949, ink on pawhere his professors integrat2014 collection, for inper), Richard Koppe exhibition, ed visual art, technology and stance, utilizes the same Elmhurst Art Museum. industrial design. Bauhaus graphic contrast as seen tailored Koppe’s education in Koppe’s Forest Figures by combining his visual art (1949, ink on paper), which courses with intense classes depicts three imaginary in math and science, giving figures in white on a black birth to Koppe’s interest in background. Andrews sees machinery, engineering and flight. Exhibit curator Staci Boris ex- a continuity in balance with masculine and feminine aspects between plains: “One can discern (Koppe’s) interest in flight and machinery the tunic and the painting. The figures Koppe depicts here are threatWinter 2015CNCJA•33


ening and dark, while at the time reflect a soft and wispy pallet. Likewise, Andrews’ melon-colored Coat Dress with Sienna UnderDress shares quite strikingly in the use of geometry and dimension that Koppe employed in both his Untitled (1948, oil on canvas) and Composition 1 (1948, oil on canvas). “If you take the gar34•CNCJAWinter 2015

ment and the painting, you can find similar shapes in them. You can find the little circle in the button and the triangle in the neckline. We (placed) her there quite intuitively. It’s a little magical and I think (Koppe's) got beautiful balance in terms of his composition and in terms of where the eye wants to go,” Andrews explains.


Art by Design Left: Belted Coat Dress (Melon) 4-ply Silk/Horn Button Price: $385 UnderDress (Sienna) Rayon Price $170 Annie A. Clothing (annieaclothing.com) Available at locallux.com Set between Richard Koppe's Untitled (1948, oil on canvas) and Composition 1 (1948, oil on canvas), Richard Koppe exhibition, Elmhurst Art Museum.

Inset: Vintage Inspired Dress (Taupe) Acetate Price: $295 Annie A. Clothing (annieaclothing.com) Available at locallux.com Set against Richard Koppe's Three Figures (1946, oil on canvas), Richard Koppe exhibition, Elmhurst Art Museum.

Both artist and designer also employed the use of space in similar fashions, providing visual interest with graphic contrast, yet offering beautiful balance and spatial appeal.

Andrews noted that this spatial interest is what often maintains our attention, both the viewer and the wearer: “It’s simple, but there’s always some place for the eye to go. The belt, the uneven hem; it’s like this little teaser. Visually, there’s always something going on without overwhelming the eye. There’s a quiet, subtle sensibility in both (Koppe’s) work and mine.” Of course, depth and dimension are ele-

Winter 2015CNCJA•35


Zuki designed "Abstract dyed Sheared Beaver Jacket with Natural Fox Collar and Trim Sale Price: $5995.00 York Furrier 83rd Anniversary Collection Available in York Furrier's Elmhurst City Centre and Deer Park Town Center store locations Set against Richard Koppe's Planetary (1957) ink on paper, Richard Koppe exhibition, Elmhurst Art Museum.

ments Koppe worked with exceedingly well. And for Andrews, depth and dimension distinguish her style much in the same way that they propel Koppe’s vision. Koppe’s painting, Three Figures (1946, oil on canvas), represents the heavy influence of surrealism and cubism on the artist’s work, considering the dark colors, open doorway and enigmatic figures. We paired this work with Andrews’ taupe Vintage Inspired Dress. The tapered layers in the dress, the shadows they create and the color all create depth much in the same way that Koppe’s painting demonstrates. Andrews finds the relationship between her dress and the painting quite intuitive, and notes especially the balance between angles and curves. “Your eye can easily make the connection 36•CNCJAWinter 2015

between the dress and the painting. There are some harsh angles in the dress, but it’s very soft. The painting has that same essence.” We also paired outerwear from the 83rd Anniversary Collection of Chicagoland's York Furrier quite intuitively with works from the exhibition and discovered some striking similarities in textural elements found in Koppe’s work. The lines and angles created by the cuts of some of the garments correlate quite naturally to the geometric and surrealist aesthetic of Koppe’s works on paper. For Kathy Rezny, co-owner of York Furrier, this correlation comes as no surprise. “Fur fashion, like art, is meant as an outlet of expression for the artist or designer; and for the wear-


Art by Design

er, fur fashion projects their personal sense of style,” notes Rezny. Designers employ many of the techniques of traditional artists, not just to create an appealing color pallet, or seasonal style, but to visually articulate an idea or emotion. It’s the connection with that idea or emotion for the wearer that translates to commercial appeal. Says Rezny, Fur designers “are using new techniques and adaptations to knit, weave, shear and groove fur into spectacular pieces…” When looking at fashion as works of art, “…creativity abounds.” One particularly striking pairing we captured is York’s Zuki designed abstract dyed Sheared Beaver Jacket with Koppe’s Planetary (1957). Both designer and artist captured the spectacular structural,

abstract “grid” that catches the eye upon first view. While the jacket does not share the same exact color pallet that Koppe employed, as Boris explains, the garment’s colors “do appear in Koppe’s other more abstract and gestural paintings from a few years earlier, demonstrating his keen and continued interest in color, especially unusual colors—at least for abstract paintings of the mid-century—like pinks and purples and oranges.” The Zuki abstract jacket demonstrates just how that keen interest in color can translate to a three-dimensional garment quite naturally and articulate the same kind of aesthetic. Another more textural pairing that jumps out at you from the project is Koppe’s painting Untitled with York’s Natural Silver Feathered Fox Jacket. Boris notes that the painting is among Koppe’s best known works, and that the repeated horizontal lines in both painting and garment—as well as the gradated grey—create a compelling atmospheric background, utilizing both depth and contrast. Also, here we see the importance of line in Koppe’s work, particularly in connection with his fascination with space and dimension. The feathered fox jacket quite naturally adds to the dark and cubic atmosphere of the work. For the painting and the jacket, the key elements of interest are the lines that define the space between. Koppe himself admitted that in his own work, “a dominant characteristic is Winter 2015CNCJA•37


the wiry line that describes space and volume. The size and position of the elements create dramatic tensions with subtle humor.” Clearly that element can be articulated three-dimensionally in a commercial garment designed to achieve a similar effect, while still retaining a very commercial appeal. For Rezny, the pairing of these Koppe works with pieces from this year’s collection was quite a natural fit. The collection, entitled Artistry in Fur, she says, “features fashion artists using sheared beaver, mink or shearling as their canvas. In these (pairings), the furs and the art share the spotlight quite nicely. For the Zuki piece, it’s all about the bursts of color that catch the eye…(and) with the feathered silver fox, the fine lines softly draw your attention.” The juxtaposition of horizontal and vertical lines in both the paintings and the garments, she notes, cause the viewer to observe the entire garment/painting, while at the same time focusing on every single detail. Of course symmetry between art an design does not always have to be quite so literal. Techniques that, on the surface, may seem too avant garde for the retail fashion space can, none the less, be articulated beautifully in an elegant garment when the designer clearly understands precisely how to wield the elements at play. Translating bold graphic elements like those in Koppe's Past Portrait, 1961 (oil on canvas), for example, can still lend itself to commercial appeal. Chicago designer Anastasia Chatzka employed much of the same color and contrast aesthetic in the design of her “Golden Hour” dress. A simpler effect, too be sure, but the 38•CNCJAWinter 2015

Above: Natural Silver Feathered Fox Reversible to Cashmere Sweater Jacket Price: $4,995.00 York Furrier 83rd Anniversary Collection Available in York Furrier's Elmhurst City Centre and Deer Park Town Center store locations Set against Richard Koppe's Untitled, 1948, Oil on canvas, UIC Campus Collection, Richard Koppe exhibition, Elmhurst Art Museum.


Art by Design

Inset: York Signature Style Sapphire Mink Walking Coat with Geometric Detail Sale Price: $6,495.00 York Furrier 83rd Anniversary Collection Available in York Furrier's Elmhurst City Centre and Deer Park Town Center store locations Dancer Dress (Black) Stretch Italian Wool Price: $320 Annie A. Clothing (annieaclothing.com) Available at locallux.com Set against Richard Koppe's Winter 2015CNCJA•39


Top Right: The Golden Hour Gold Geometric Brocade in slim-fitting silhouette with bodice darts and pleats at the waist. Fully lined in a soft cotton with a center back zipper. Price: $225.00 Anastasia Chatzka (anastasiachatzka.com) designer, Anastasia Boutique in Chicago Set against Richard Koppe's Past Portrait, 1961, Oil on Canvas, UIC Campus Collection, Richard Koppe exhibition, Elmhurst Art Museum Bottom: Two Piece Beautiful Hot Pink and Black Brocade. Fabric made into a two piece ensemble: strapless dress with boning and a center back zipper can be worn alone or with the long hi low full circle skirt on top. Strapless Dress: $165 Long Hi Low Full Circle Skirt: $225 Anastasia Chatzka (anastasiachatzka.com) designer, Anastasia Boutique in Chicago Set against Richard Koppe's Untitled, (1954) Watercolor and ink on paper. UIC Campus Collection, Richard Koppe exhibition, Elmhurst Art Museum.

use of color and pattern (if muted) bear clear resemblance. For Chatzka, the subtle integration of elements expressed so boldly in art is simply another way of expressing an artistic concept on a more commercial three-dimensional canvas. ”I do agree that a fashion designer can look at (a work of art) and take away elements like bold techniques, colors, styles, emotions and express them in clothing designs that can be worn every day,” notes Chatzka. “Fashion is wearable design, no matter how simple or avant garde it might be. The real challenge with clothing design is keeping it interesting while keeping it wearable. I find it important to mix colors, textures and shapes as well as explore the use of volume in my designs." Deriving inspiration from the kinds of elemental techniques you find in art, designers employ aesthetics that draw the eye and maintain interest much in the same way that traditional (and not so traditional) artists do. The use of a monochromatic color scheme amid an intricate contrasting pattern, for instance, as in Koppe's Untitled, 1954 (watercolor and ink on paper), is also employed to great effect in Chatzka's own two-piece, hot pink and black brocade design. Like Koppe’s application of the aesthetic, Chatzka stuck to a simple statement of a contrasting pattern. “I kept the design of the dress fairly simple, with the attention on the print of the fabric and the (drama) of the volume in the skirt,” she told me. “… Like the painting, I think when you take a first glance, it might seem fairly plain in its pink with black motion, but when you spend time looking at it, there are layers and shapes that you begin to notice more.” And as with Koppe’s work, the pattern in the dress seems to evolve the more you study it. At the end of the day, fashion is fashion and art is art. But understanding elements of both and concepts shared between the two can help us understand why we enjoy what we enjoy in both art and fashion. The garment designs in this project (none of which were originally designed with Koppe’s work in mind) underscore the three dimensional, surrealist and practical elements of Richard Koppe’s art. These elements in both the works and garments encourage the eye to new and exciting places. The fashions offer three-dimensional perspectives of techniques utilized in Koppe’s works on paper, and the paintings themselves encourage new and altered perspectives of the designs. As demanding as it may be to see these garments as art works, themselves, it is a distinct challenge to stretch the mind to see the practical and commercial side of visual art, but perhaps there is no better artist than Koppe to help us do just that. “Art is just as functional as the automobile we drive, the house we live in, the chair we sit in or the spoon we eat with,” Koppe once said, “Who can deny the function of painting, sculpture, poetry, literature, music, dance and drama in our lives?” Who indeed?

Art by Design

40•CNCJAWinter 2015


TICKETS MAKE A GREAT GIFT!

SAT. DEC. 6 AT 8PM

vertical format

SAT. DEC. 20 AT 8PM For tickets go to RosemontTheatre.com or visit the theatre box office 5400 N. River Rd. Rosemont, IL

horizontal format

Winter 2015CNCJA•41


Tidbits

Holidays at the Wrights

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright loved Christmas and celebrated it in very traditional ways with his six children in his home. Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation and Trust will offer a full view of the holidays in the Wright household as youth volunteers lead tours and guide visitors through Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio, meticulously decorated as it was when the Wright family lived there during the late 1800s and early 1900s. The free event, which is a holiday tradition at the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, will take place 9-11 a.m., Saturdays, Dec. 13 and Dec. 20, at 951 Chicago Avenue. Visitors will hear stories of the Wright children pulling taffy in the kitchen and spying on their father as he readied gifts around the tree. A 12-foot tree decorated with Victorian-style ornaments will be a highlight of the 30-minute tour. Tickets are not required. For more information, visit flwright.org/programs/ christmas.

JAMin Rhythms The Chicago Human Rhythm Project (CHRP) will welcome students and performers alike to its annual Winter Tap JAMboree February 13-15, 2015. The event will feature master classes, auditions for the organization’s Tap Scholar Program and Nicholas Young’s Institute For The Rhythmic Arts (IFTRA), a panel discussion and several Tap JAMs at the American Rhythm Center, Chicago's collaborative arts space in the historic Fine Arts Building (410 S. Michigan Ave., Suite 300, Chicago). Among those teaching classes anticipated for the event are guests Cartier Williams, a leading tap choreographer and protégé of Savion Glover, and Nicholas Young, who received a 2014 New York Dance. During the upcoming event, CHRP will offer up to $10,000 in tuition awards to dancers between the ages of 12 and 18 who compete in its annual Tap Scholarship Auditions Saturday, February 14. For more information or to register, visit visit chicagotap.org/ Performance-Education-DetailFestival/winter-tap-jamboree-2015.aspx.

Dancing on the EDGE The Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) will present the second year of OnEdge, a free experimental theater, dance and performance series this January 16 – February 1, 2015. The series will feature Chicago and world premieres from national and international artists and companies at various venues throughout the city. OnEdge dives into themes of identity and spirituality while challenging audiences to reexamine life and culture through intense, contemporary performances by emerging and mid-career artists Michelle Boulé (New York), and Eric Hoff & Jesse Morgan Young (Chicago). The series also includes workshops with some of the guest artists. For a complete schedule, visit cityofchicago.org/dcase. As the holiday season fast approaches, the 14th annual One of a Kind Show and Sale, returning December 4-7, 2014 at Chicago's Merchandise Mart (222 W. Merchandise Mart Plaza), is the city's ultimate holiday shopping destination. With something special for everyone even on the longest of holiday gift lists, the One of a Kind Show offers shoppers thousands of one-of-a-kind gifts from more than 600 juried artists, in a vast array of media and at a wide range of price points. Gifts come in all shapes and sizes, and in categories including: accessories, ceramics, fashion, fiber art, furniture, glass and mixed media. For more details about the oneof-a-kind finds, or for tickets or more information, call (800) 677-MART (6278) or visit www. oneofakindshowchicago.com.

One of a Kind Finds

42•CNCJAWinter 2015

Deidre & Rudolph

On Sunday, December 7, actress and television icon Deidre Hall will join theater collective Hell in Handbag for its annual benefit, A Very Special Rudolph, at Dank Haus German American Cultural Center in Chicago. On hand for the evening’s festivities, Ms. Hall will appear in a very special production of the perennial hit show Rudolph the Red-Hosed Reindeer (an irreverent, satirical parody of the Christmas classic Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. What’s billed as a “socially awkward event” will also feature food and beverages from Goose Island Breweries, a raffle, a silent auction and a live auction with thousands of dollars in astounding items Hell in Handbag’s team insists you “actually want and can use.” A variety of ticket packages are available for A Very Special Rudolph. For more information or to reserve your seats, visit www.brownpapertickets.com or call (800) 838-3006.

Clockwise from top right: Frank Lloyd Wright Home decorated as it was for Christmas when the Wright family lived there in Oak Park (photo courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust); Tap choreographer Nicholas Young (photo by Guido Mandozzi); Television star Deidre Hall (photo courtesy of Hell in Handbag Productions); McClean Bronze sculptures from the 2014 One of a Kind Show at the Merchandise Mart (photo courtesy of the Merchandise Mart).


Photo by Jenifoto

Winter 2015

Cultural Almanac Winter 2015CNCJA•43


44•CNCJAWinter 2015

Music &CDance The hi cago SoulRevue

l 2l 3l 4l 5l

1

6

l 8l

7

9

l 11l 12l

10

14

l 16l 17l 18l 19l

15

l

20

l

21

22

23

l 25l 26l

24

27

28

29

l 31l 30

l l l

l l l l l l

l

l l

l l l l l

l

l

l l

l l l l

l

14

l

l l l l l l

l

l

l l l l l l l l l

l

l

l

l l l l 12l 13l

l

l

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

l l l l l l l l l

l l l l l l l l l l l l l

l

l l

15

l

l

l l l l

l l l l l l

l

l

l l

l

l

16

l

22

l

23

24

25

26

l l l

l

27

l

28

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l l l

l

21

l

l

l

20

l

l

l

l l l

19

l

l

l l l l

18

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l

l l l l l

17

l

l

l l

29 30

31

l l

l l

l l l

l

l l l l l l l

l l l

l

l l l

l

l l l l l l l l l

l

l

l l

l l l

l l l l

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

l l l l l l l

l

l l l l

l

l l l l l l l l l

l l l l l l

l

l l l l l

l l l l l l

l l l l

l

l l l l

l

l l l l

l l l l

l

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

13

The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Living The History - 125 Years of The Auditorium Theatre l Bella Voce Chamber Choir (Tel. 877.855.6277, bellavoce.org) Holiday Delights Chicago a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) Holidays a cappella l l l City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz=**, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Lisa Loeb with special guest Zachary Scot Johnson* l Suzy Bogguss "A Swingin' Little Christmas" show†† l Chicago Philharmonic Sunday Series* l Griffin House with special guest Clarence Bucaro* l Lisa Fischer from '20 Feet From Stardom† l An Acoustic Evening with Rich Robinson of the Black Crowes with special guest Guthrie Brown† l Toh Kay (of Streetlight Manifesto)† l The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show* l The Bad Plus* Delbert McClinton† †† Los Lobos† Tab Benoit †† The Westies' Record Release Party with special guest Nicholas Tremulis* Michael McDermott - Mischief & Mistletoe Christmas Show with Anne Heaton* Michael McDermott - Mischief & Mistletoe Christmas Show with The Canterbury Carollers* Poi Dog Pondering† The Chicago Soul Revue† Shemekia Copeland† Elements Contemporary Ballet ( Tel. 773.704.9274, elementscontemporaryballet.com) Evanston Symphony Orchestra Holiday Concert l Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Willaim Tell - Teatro Regio Torino (Royal Theatre of Turin) l Concert Orchestra + Prepartory Strings Concert - Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestras l Chicago Children's Choir and Sphinx Virtuosi l Joyous Jubilie: Polish Carols, Songs and Dance - The Lira Ensemble Eat + Drink to the Beat: Hubbard Street 2 Bach Brandenberg Concertos - The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Do-It-Yourself-Messiah - International Music Foundation Joffrey Ballet (Tel. 312.386.8905, joffrey.org) The Nutcracker l l l l l Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.386.8905, lyricopera.org) Anna Bolena l l Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 HubbardTaiko Street Dance Princess Grace Awards: New Works l l l l l Tsukasa Taiko Legacy 11 Tsukasa Taiko Reduction Music of the Baroque (Tel. 312.551.1414, baroque.org) The Christmas Oratorio by J. S. Bach l Holiday Brass and Choral Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) A Chanticleer Christmas l l CSO: The Nutcracker and Petrushka l l l l SCP Jazz Series: Kenny Barron and Dave Holland/Julian Lage and Chris Eldridge l CSO Chamber: CSO Chamber at the Art Institute l SCP Special Event: Sweet Honey in the Rock Celebrating the Holidays l CSO: Beethoven 7 l Holiday: Welcome Yule! SCP Special Event: Chicago Symphony Orchestra Brass CSO: Prieto and Yeh

December2014

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) KiDe ng Learcember2014 City Lit Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) HolBlackmesEnsembl and WatesonTheater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) ChrAt Lastistm:asA Readi Tributneg to Etta James Cour t TheatInreChi(Tcelago. 773.(T7el02.. 312.7005,977.cour1700,t heatbroradwayi e.org) nchicago.org) Broadway IphiHanselenia&inGrAuleteisl: A Wickedly Delicious Musical Treat Goodman Dee Snider'Theat s Rockre&(TRolell. Chr312.i4st43.mas3800,Talegoodmantheatre.org) UntMytahmedbusteAntrs: Behiarcticnad the Myth Tour AI LoveChrisLucytmas -CarLivoel Onstage TwiDisney'st Yours NewsiDicekenss GrRogereenhouse + HammerTheatsteeinr'Cent s Cinderer (eTl ela . 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) TheChicGogo Show e Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) ago Shakespear TheKingMagiLearc Cabaret LiCintye OneLit Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) IHolt's AmesWonder and WatfulsLionfe: Live in Chicago! ElChrStisotmrieass: Readi Holidnayg Train TheCourClt Theat ean Housere (Tel. 773.702.7005, court heatre.org) Eveni Iphieninag iofn AulExpris ession LiGoodman feline TheatTheatre r(eT(elT.el773.. 312.761.443.4477,3800,lifegoodmant linetheatrheeat.com)re.org) TheUntaVelmedvetAnteenarRabbi ct i ca t


Winter 2015CNCJA•45

Theater

Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) The Apple Family Plays: That Hopey Changey Thing and Sorry Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) Samsara

February2015

Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) At Last: A Tribute to Etta James At Last:InAChicago Tribute(Tel. to 312.977.1700, Etta Jamesbroadwayinchicago.org) Broadway Broadway Chicago (Tel.Musical 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) Hansel & Gretel:In A Wickedly Delicious Treat Dee Snider's RockClub & Roll Christmas Tale First Wives Mythbusters: Behind the Myth Tour Dancing Pros Live! I Love Lucy - Live Onstage Dee Snyder's Disney's Newsies Rock 'N Roll Christmas Tale Chicago Shakespeare Roger + Hammerstein's CinderellaTheatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Macbeth King Lear Dunsinane City Lit Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) City Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) BlackLit Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) Holmes and Watson Father Christmas Reading At Last:Ruffian A Tribute to Etta James Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) Iphienia in Aulis Waiting for Godot First Wives Club Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) First Folio Theatre Dancing Pros Live! in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Untamed Antarctica On Rock The 23rd Floor Dee Snyder's 'N Roll Christmas Tale ALaughing Christmas Carol Twist Your Dickens Fooling Buddha Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Greenhouse Theater Center(Tel. (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Goodman Theatre 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Macbeth The Gogo Show Rapture, Blister, Burn Dunsinane The Magic Cabaret Coal, FireTheatre & Ice (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) City Lit Line One Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) It's A Wonderful Life: Live in Chicago! Father Ruffian El Stories: Holiday Train Softy Blue Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) The Clean House Yankee Tavern Waiting for Godot Evening of Expression Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Lions in Illyria The Velveteen Rabbit Laughing On The 23rd Floor Lookingglass Theatre One Came Home(Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Fooling Buddha Lookingglass Alice Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Goodman Theatre (Tel. goodmantheatre.org) Northlight Theatre in Skokie (Tel.312.443.3800, 847.673.6300, northlight.org) Lookingglass Alice Rapture, Blister, Burn The Mousetrap Raven Theatre 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Profiles Theatre 773.549.1815, profilestheatre.org) Coal, Fire & (Tel. Ice (Tel. Hellcab Dividing the Estate Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) The CryptogramTheatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) RedTwist Softy Blue Raven Theatre (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Red Yankee Tavern Land of Plenty Steep Theatre (Tel. 773.649.3186, steeptheatre.com) Shelock Holmes and the Case of the Christmas Goose Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) RedTwist The LionsVandal inTheatre Illyria(Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) ISteppenwolf and You Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) One Came Home Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Airline Highway Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Airline Highway Theater (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Theater Wit Wit (Tel. Alice 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Lookingglass The Santaland Diaries (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Mr. Burns Raven Theatre Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Timeline Theatre Dividing the Estate (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Danny Casolaro Died for You The Apple Family Plays: That Hopey Changey Thing and Sorry RedTwist Theatre The Apple Family Plays: That(Tel. Hopey773.728.7529, Changey Thing andredtwist.org) Sorry Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. victorygardens.org) Red Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000,773.871.3000, Victory victorygardens.org) Samsara Late NightTheatre TV Steep (Tel. 773.649.3186, steeptheatre.com) The Testament of Mary The Vandal Tamer of Horses Steppenwolf Theatre Company 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Jaret Landon Presents Celebrating the Holidays (Tel. with Friends Airline Liquor andHighway Latkes Writers Theatre Glencoe (Tel. 847.242.6000, writerstheatre.org) Theater Witin(Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Isaac's Eye Mr. Burns

De c e mb rr 2y 012 40 Fe b r ue a 15

l

l

l

2

l

2

1

l

l

l

1

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l 1

l

3l

3

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

6 l

l 3

l l

5

l

4

l

5

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l 4

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

8

l

l

l

l

l

l

7

l l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l 5

l

l

l l

l 8

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l l l l l l

l l

l 7

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l 6

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

9

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

10

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

11

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

12

l

l l

l

l l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

13

l

l

l l l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

14

l

l

l

l

17 14

l l l

l

l

l l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

15

l

l

l

l

18 15

l

l

l

l

l

l

16

l

l

l

l

19 16

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

17

l

l

ll

l

20 17

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll l

ll

l

19

ll

l

ll

l

18

l

l

l

ll

l

l l l

l

l

l

ll

ll

l

20

l

l

ll

l

l

21

l l l l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l l ll l

l

l

l

2529 2630 2731 28

l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l 27 28 l 22 23 24 25 26

l

l

l ll l l

l

21 18 2219 2320 2421 2522 26 23 27 2428

l

l

l

l

l

13

l

ll

l

l

14

l

ll l

l15 l

l

l l

l

l 16 l

l

l l

l

l

l 17 l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l 18 l

l l

l l

l

l

l

19

l

l

l

l

20

l

l

l

21

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

22l 23l 24l 25 l 26 l 27 l 28 l l l l l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

29 l30 l31 l l l l l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l l

l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

ll

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

9 l 10l 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 l20 21 22 l 23 l 24 l 25 26l 27l 28 l l l l l l

l

l

l

12

l

l l l l l 8 l 9 l 10l 11l 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 l20 l21 22 l 23 l 24 l 25 26l 27l 28

l l

l

l

ll l

l

l l ll

l

l

7

l

l

l

l l

l l l l l l l l

6

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

6

l

l

l

7 l 8 l 9 l 10 l 11 l l l l l

l

l l ll l l

l

l

l

l l

l

2 l

l

4

l l

ll l

l

l

l

2

l

1 l ll

l

l

l

ll l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

ll l l

l

l

5

l ll

l

l

l

l

l

4

l

l

l

3

l

l

16 4 7 5 8 6 9 7 10 8 11 9 12 1013 1114 1215 13

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

6

l

l

l

l

l

2

l

l

l

l

53

l

42

l l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

1

l

31


46•CNCJAWinter 2015

Art Museums

1 1

2 2

Art Institute of Chicago (Tel. 312.443.3600, artic.edu) Puppets! Puppets! Decidedly Surreal: The Bindings of Mary Louise Reynolds Decidedly Surreal: The Bindings of Mary Louise Reynolds Shatter Rupture Break Shatter Rupture Break Wade Guyton Wade Guyton Chicagoisms Chicagoisms Ethel Stein, Master Weaver Ethel Stein, Master Weaver Ghosts and Demons in Japanese Prints Ghosts and Demons in Japanese Prints Sarah Charlesworth: Stills Sarah Charlesworth: Stills Holiday Thorne Rooms Holiday Thorne Rooms The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980 The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980 focus: Lucy McKinzie focus: Lucy McKinzie The Comic Art and Architecture of Chris Ware The Comic Art and Architecture of Chris Ware Neapolitan Crèche Neapolitan Crèche Temptation: The Demons of James Ensor Temptation: The Demons of James Ensor Veiled Architecture: Kukje Gallery, SO-IL Veiled Architecture: Kukje Gallery, SO-IL Strokes of Genius: Italian Drawings from the Goldman Collection Strokes of Genius: Italian Drawings from the Goldman Collection Joseph Beuys: Untitled (Sun State) Joseph Beuys: Untitled (Sun State) Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections A Voyage to South America: Andean Art in the Spanish Empire A Voyage to South America: Andean Art in the Spanish Empire Thomas Schütte: Bronze Woman No. 17 Thomas Schütte: Bronze Woman No. 17 Anri Sala: Mixed Behavior Anri Sala: Mixed Behavior Bridget Riley Bridget Riley Cy Twombly: Sculpture Selections, 1948-1995 Cy Twombly: Sculpture Selections, 1948-1995 Expanded Gallery for Arthur Rubloff Collection of Paperweights Expanded Gallery for Arthur Rubloff Collection of Paperweights James Welling: Diary of Elizabeth and James Dixon, 1840–41 / Connecticut Landscapes, 1977–86 James Welling: Diary of Elizabeth and James Dixon, 1840–41 / Connecticut Landscapes, 1977–86 Jesús Rafael Soto: Pénétrable de Chicago Jesús Rafael Soto: Pénétrable de Chicago Modern Masters Return Modern Masters Return Of Gods and Glamour: The Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Art Of Gods and Glamour: The Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Art Photography Is _______________. Photography Is _______________. The Elizabeth Morse Touch Gallery The Elizabeth Morse Touch Gallery Elmhurst Art Museum (Tel. 630.834.0202, elmhurstartmuseum.org) Elmhurst Art Museum (Tel. 630.834.0202, elmhurstartmuseum.org) Richard Koppe Richard Koppe Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University (Tel. 847.491.4000, block-museum.northwestern.edu) Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University (Tel. 847.491.4000, block-museum.northwestern.edu) Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) MCA DNA: Richard Hunt MCA DNA: Richard Hunt Doris Salcedo Doris Salcedo MCA Screen: Clemens von Wedemeyer MCA Screen: Clemens von Wedemeyer David Bowie Is David Bowie Is BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Sarah and Joseph Belknap BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Sarah and Joseph Belknap Anne Collier Anne Collier Body Doubles Body Doubles MCA DNA: Alexander Calder MCA DNA: Alexander Calder National Museum of Mexican Art (Tel. 312.738.1503, nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org) National Museum of Mexican Art (Tel. 312.738.1503, nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org) Rito y Recuerdo: Day of the Dead Rito y Recuerdo: Day of the Dead Líneas Borrosas: Selected Works by Gabriel Villa Líneas Borrosas: Selected Works by Gabriel Villa Desde Adentro: Abstract Works from the Permanent Collection Desde Adentro: Abstract Works from the Permanent Collection Smart Museum of Art - University of Chicago (Tel. 773.702.0200, smartmuseum.uchicago.edu) Smart Museum of Art - University of Chicago (Tel. 773.702.0200, smartmuseum.uchicago.edu) Carved, Cast, Crumpled: Sculpture All Ways Carved, Cast, Crumpled: Sculpture All Ways Judy Ledgerwood: Chromatic Patterns for the Smart Museum Judy Ledgerwood: Chromatic Patterns for the Smart Museum Expressionist Impulses in German and Central European Art, 1890-1990 Expressionist Impulses in German and Central European Art, 1890-1990 Monster Roster: Existentialist Art in Postwar Chicago Monster Roster: Existentialist Art in Postwar Chicago Objects and Voices: A Collection of Stories Objects and Voices: A Collection of Stories South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960 to 1975 South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960 to 1975 Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television GalleryX GalleryX

De c De ce emb mbe er r2 20 01 14 4 Art Institute of Chicago (Tel. 312.443.3600, artic.edu) 3 3

4 4

6 6

7 7

8 8

9 9

10 10

11 11

12 12

14 14

15 15

16 16

17 17

18 18

19 19

Exhibit Closes December 21 Exhibit Closes December 21 Exhibit Closes December 26 Exhibit Closes December 26 Exhibit Closes January 11 Exhibit Closes January 11 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 11 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 11 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 12 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 12 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 15 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 15 Ongoing Ehxibit Begins February 16 Ongoing Ehxibit Begins February 16 Ongoing Exhibit Ongoing Exhibit

Exhibit Closes December 14 Exhibit Closes December 14 Exhibit Closes January 18 Exhibit Closes January 18 Ongoing Exhibit Ongoing Exhibit

Ongoing Exhibits Ongoing Exhibits

Exhibit Opens December 18 Exhibit Opens December 18 Exhibits Begin February 21 Exhibits Begin February 21 Exhibit Closes January 15 Exhibit Closes January 15 Exhibit Closes February 14 Exhibit Closes February 14

Exhibit Closes December 7 Exhibit Closes December 7

Exhibit Closes January 7 Exhibit Closes January 7

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibit Closes February 1 Exhibit Closes February 1 Exhibit Closes February 6 Exhibit Closes February 6 Exhibit Closes February 15 Exhibit Closes February 15 Exhibit Closes February 21 Exhibit Closes February 21 Exhibit Closes February 22 Exhibit Closes February 22

Exhibits Close January 25 Exhibits Close January 25

Exhibit Closes January 6 Exhibit Closes January 6 Exhibit Closes January 11 Exhibit Closes January 11 Exhibit Closes January 18 Exhibit Closes January 18 Exhibit Closes January 19 Exhibit Closes January 19

Exhibits Close January 4 Exhibits Close January 4

Ongoing Exhibit Begins December 6 Ongoing Exhibit Begins December 6 Ongoing Exhibit Begins January 20 Ongoing Exhibit Begins January 20 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 15 Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 15 Exhibit Closes December 7 Exhibit Closes December 7

13 13

20 20

21 21

22 22

23 23

24 24

25 25

26 26

27 27

28 28

29 29

30 30

31 31

The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication. 5 5


Winter 2015CNCJA•47

Art Galleries

Chicago Model CityStudio Lego Architecture Lego Architecture Studio

Schneider Gallery's A selection of Artists from the Gallery Project Space: Doug25th NessAnniversary: "Urban Pop" Adler Planetarium (Tel.Anniversary: 312-922-7827, adlerplanetarium.org) Schneider Gallery's 25th A selection of Artists from the Gallery Adler Planetarium (Tel. 312-922-7827, adlerplanetarium.org) Astronomy and Culture Cyber Spaceand Culture Astronomy Hidden Wonders Cyber Space Historic Atwood Sphere Hidden Wonders Our SolarAtwood SystemSphere Historic Our Solar System Planet Explorers Planet for Explorers Shoot the Moon Shoot for the Moon Telescopes Telescopes The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time Worlds of Chesley Bonestell Worlds ofArchitecture Chesley Bonestell Chicago Foundation (Tel. 312.922.3432, caf.architecture.org) Chicago Architecture Foundation 312.922.3432, Women Building Change: Celebrating(Tel. 40 Years of Chicagocaf.architecture.org) Women in Architecture Women Building Change: Chicago: City of Big Data Celebrating 40 Years of Chicago Women in Architecture Chicago: City ofCity Big Data Chicago Model

Project Space: Doug Ness "Urban Pop" Project Space: Doug Ness(Tel. "Urban Pop" Schneider Gallery, Inc. 312.988.4033, schneidergallerychicago.com) Schneider Gallery's 25th Anniversary: A selection of Artists from the Gallery

Drawings II Russell Bowman Art Advisory (312.751.9500, bowmanart.com) Schneider Drawings II Gallery, Inc. (Tel. 312.988.4033, schneidergallerychicago.com)

Russell Bowman Art- Advisory bowmanart.com) Schneider Gallery, schneidergallerychicago.com) Jim Bachor: Jentaculum n. FirstInc. meal(312.751.9500, of(Tel. the day312.988.4033, in ancient Rome

Jen Blazina: Outdated Nancy Mladenoff: Girl Bands Adam Fung:Outdated Observatory Jen Blazina: Jim Bachor: Adam Fung:Jentaculum Observatory- n. First meal of the day in ancient Rome

Paula Henderson & Megan Euker Phillip J. Capuano

Packer GalleryProjects (Tel 312-226-8984, packergallery.com) Rites of Schopf Passage Linda Warren (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Nancy Girl Bands PackerMladenoff: Schopf Gallery (Tel 312-226-8984, packergallery.com)

Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Michael Hoffman: Rhythms and Place Kathleen Waterloo: GLOBALocal Michael Dubina: Matchbooks ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org) "The 'F' Word: Feminism Now Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Carson Fox & Eric Finzi Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Truppe Fledermaus Paula Henderson & Megan Euker& The Carnival At The End Of The World Carson Fox & Eric Finzi McCormick Gallery (Tel 312-226-6800, thomasmccormick.com) Paula Henderson & Megan Euker Echt Gallery (Tel. 312.442.0288, echtgallery.com) Actuation - Conversion McCormick Gallery (Tel 312-226-6800, thomasmccormick.com) Chris Antemann Rites of Passage Actuation - Conversion

Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Kathleen Waterloo: GLOBALocal Michael Hoffman: Rhythms and Place Michael Dubina: Matchbooks Kathleen Waterloo: GLOBALocal ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org) Michael Dubina: Matchbooks "The 'F' Word: Feminism Now ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org) Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) "The 'F' Word: Feminism Now Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival At The End Of The World Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Echt Gallery (Tel. 312.442.0288, echtgallery.com) Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival At The End Of The World Chris Antemann Echt Gallery (Tel. 312.442.0288, echtgallery.com) Jean Gallery (Tel 312-440-0770, jeanalbanogallery.com) Chris Albano Antemann New Dimensions in Sculpture Jean Albano Gallery (Tel 312-440-0770, jeanalbanogallery.com) Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) New Dimensions in Sculpture

February2015

December2014 Addington (Tel. e 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) De cGallery emb r20 14 Michael Hoffman: Rhythms and Place

l l l l l l

l l

l l l l l l

l l

l l l l

l l l l

2 2

1 1

3

3

l

l l

l l

l

l l l l

l l l l

l

l

l

l

l l l l

3

1l

2

l l l l

1

3

l

2

1 4

4

4

l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l l l l

2l

4

3

5

l

l

l

5

l 5

l l

l l

l l

l

6

l 6

7

7

l

l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

5

7

7

l

l

l l

l l l l

l l l l l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l l

4

6

6

l l

l l l l

l

5

8

8

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

6

8

8

7

9

9

l 9

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

9

8

10

l 10

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

10

10

11

l

l

l

l

l

l

12

l 12

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l l l

12

12

13

l 13

l l

l

l

l l

l l l l

l

13

13

l

14

14

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

15

15

15

15

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

16

l 16

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

16

16

17

l 17

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

17

17

18

l 18

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

18

18

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibit Closes December 30 Exhibit Closes December 30

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

14

14

19

l 19

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

19

19

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

20

l 20

ll l

l

l

l

l

l

l

20

20

21

21

21

21

22

22

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

22

22

l l

l

l

l l

l

25

25

l

l

23

l 23

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

24

l 24

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

25

25

l

l

ll ll l

l

ll ll l

ll ll l

l l

l

l

l

l l l l

24

24

ll ll l

ll

l l l l

23

23

26

l 26

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

ll

l

ll

ll

l l

l

l

l

ll

ll

l l l l

26

26

l l

27

l 27

ll

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

27

27

28

28

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

28

28

29

29

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

29

29

30

l 30

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l l l

30

30

31

l 31

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

31

31

l l 9 l10 11 12 13 l 14 l 15 l 16 l 17 18 19 20l 21l 22 23l 24 25 26 27 28

l 11

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l

l l l l

l

11

11

Photos from left: Chesley Bonestell, "Saturn-sized booster pushes insterstellar expedition toward Earth orbit, ca. 1964." (Adler Collection, CB-14.); "Saturn from Titan, 1944." (Adler Collection, CB-13.); "Orbital Rocket Airplane... Nova Zembla, ca. 1976." (Adler Collection, CB-8.); "Mars seen from Phobus-The Inner Satellite, ca. 1972. (Adler Collection, CB-5.). All Images Reproduced courtesy of Bonestell LLC.

Museums


48•CNCJAWinter 2015

L

Legacy, love, jealousy and up really enjoying the challenge,” explains passion are intertwined in Halberstam. “We absolutely spent time in reWriters Theatre’s current hearsal making sure that we were able to execute production of Isaac’s Eye. the idea without being distracting, particularly if This creative interpreta- writing on the wall was happening at the same tion of the life of a young time as crucial storytelling. Fortunately, I have Isaac Newton brings the an amazing cast and they developed a tremenstory of the famed scientist to the live stage dous sense of ensemble and were all very sensithrough compelling storytelling that allows the tive to each other’s actions.” audience to immerse themselves in both the hisEqually challenging are the words themtory of this remarkable man and the drama of his selves. Hnath’s script is an incredible blend life. of rhythm, verse, prose and punctuation. “The Though many folks may know Newton only text is complex and highly specific,” says from their class textHalberstam, “and books, his story is a far any variation from more interesting one that the written word and what was told in the dry the rhythms of the lectures heard in many text (pauses and sihigh school classrooms. lences, for instance), Just like most human bewhich are painstakings, Newton had relaingly crafted, would tionships, dealt with distend to throw the appointments, worried scene off balance at about his purpose in life first. So we spent a and questioned the world fair amount of time in around him. His science rehearsal getting preis what we remember, cise with the text.” but his humanity is just The text is, inas fascinating—if not deed, challenging, more so. Isaac’s Eye however in no way reminds us that there’s do the highly styldrama in science—both ized elements of the in the work itself and in play keep the viewer the lives of the scientists at a distance. Instead, doing the work. all of these very speSome of the drama cific details somehow in this production comes manage to draw the from things that are audience into the stoDirector Michael Halberstam and Isaac's Eye playwright Lucas Hnath known to be true about on the set of Isaac's Eye at Writers Theatre. ry of this man and his Isaac Newton. And some myth. Rather than disof the drama is also simply imagined by the play- tilling the stuffy lectures of high school, Hnath wright. Though fact and fantasy are combined in takes us into the cool teacher’s classroom—the Isaac’s Eye, separating truth from fiction is in- teacher who magically makes science and hiscredibly easy in this instance. Playwright Lucas tory relatable and important. It’s thrilling, really. Hnath ties much of the play’s historical detail to We’re no longer bogged down in the dogma that footnotes that are literally written out on walls surrounds Newton’s Laws. Instead, we’re drawn for the audience to read as the action progresses. into the intrigue of Newton’s life, thanks to a litThough this conceit is explicitly required due tle insight and imagination. to the structure of the script, director Michael Newton was just a man—albeit a brilliant Halberstam says this concept has been anything man—doing what he loved. Everyone can unbut a constraint for him and the actors. “We fol- derstand that. In creating such specificity of lowed the playwright’s suggestions and ended character, place and design, Hnath has created Photos Courtesy of Writers Theatre

specificity

With strict adherence to a taught script and an intimate setting, director Michael Halberson draws audiences into an imagined life of one of science's biggest luminaries, Isaac Newton, this winter.


a world in which the audience can appreciate the nuances of Newton’s life and gain renewed appreciation for his science. Writers Theatre takes things a step further in making the audience part of the world of the play due to some very creative choices with their performance space. Currently, in the midst of building a new arts center in collaboration with the Woman’s Library Club and the Village of Glencoe, Writers Theatre is celebrating its roots and performing in its beloved bookstore theater at Books on Vernon. With only 61 seats, the intimate setting lends itself to allowing the audience to get close to the action and cozy with the characters. Performing at this venue has been ideal for Isaac’s Eye, says Michael Halberstam: “One of the many magical aspects of our Bookstore Theatre is how it keeps transforming, and just when we think we’ve found every possible configuration, we find another new one. This one is definitely new! Our set designer and lighting designer, Collette Pollard and Keith Parham, were particularly drawn to the idea of creating the feel of an operating theater and lecture hall. Interestingly enough, the playwright said he had always thought the play should be physicalized in this way. So it turned out to be the perfect configuration for the play….” Writers Theatre has developed a strong reputation for itself by producing classic work in intriguing ways and by creating exciting contemporary pieces, too. Isaac’s Eye is the absolute best of both worlds. It’s not exactly classic nor is it exactly contemporary. It transports us to the 17th century, yet it allows us to remain grounded in 2014. It makes us question the things we know are true while confirming that some things simply never change. Isaac’s Eye is the story of a legend and the story of ourselves. In short, it’s what a really good play should always be.

Heroes of the Holocaust

were people just like you.

Come be inspired.

Isaac’s Eye runs at Writer’ Theatre in Glencoe through December 21. Photos: Cast of Isaac's Eye - Jurgen Hopper as Isaac Newton (top left); Elizabeth Ledo (top right) Marc Grapey (bottom right), LaShawn Banks (bottom left) - at Writers Theatre in Glencoe.

IllinoisHolocaustMuseum.org Winter 2015CNCJA•49


Museums

50•CNCJAWinter 2015

SNIPPETS

Sign up online for

2

2

1

1

3

3

4

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12 Exhibit Closes January 4

Exhibit Closes January 4 14 15 16 17 18 19

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibit Closes January 4 Exhibit Closes February 1

Exhibit Closes January 4 Exhibit Closes December 31 Exhibit Closes February 1

Exhibit Closes December 31

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibit Closes January 15 Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Ongoing Exhibit Begins January 15

Exhibit Closes January 15

Ongoing Exhibit Begins January 15

13

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Our weekly byte-sized version of the something wonderful we put into every issue of Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts!

31

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Want more Clef Notes? Sign up online at ClefNotesJournal.com for Snippets, our weekly e-newsletter with updates on arts and culture throughout Chicagoland. With Snippets, we bring you news, interviews, performance reviews and our weekly picks for Chicago's must-see arts & culture performances!

Tiny Giants 3D Thomas Miller Mosaics Titans of the Ice Age 3D Field Museum of Natural History (Tel. 312.922.9410, fieldmuseum.org) Waking the T. rex 3D: The Story of SUE Tiny Giants 3D The Machine Inside: Biomechanics Titans of the Ice Age 3D Before the Dinosaurs: Tracking the Reptiles of Pangaea Waking the T. rex 3D: The Story of SUE Africa The Machine Inside: Biomechanics Ancient Americas Before the Dinosaurs: Tracking the Reptiles of Pangaea Bunky Echo-Hawk: Modern Warrior Africa Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence Ancient Americas Crown Family Play Lab Bunky Echo-Hawk: Modern Warrior Earnst & Young Three-D Theatre Creatures Planet of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence Evolving Crown Family Play Lab Extreme Mammals EarnstDiscovery & Young Center Three-D Theatre DNA Evolving Planet Grainger Hall of Gems Extreme Mammals Hall of Jades DNA Discovery Center Inside Ancient Egypt Grainger Hall ofHouse, GemsRuatepupuke II Maori Meeting Hall of JadesFossil Prep Lab McDonald’s Inside Ancient Pacific Spirits Egypt Maori Meeting House, Ruatepupuke II Pawnee Earth Lodge McDonald’s Fossil Prep Lab Sue The T. Rex Pacific of Spirits Titan's the Ice Age Pawnee Earth Adventure Lodge Underground Sue The T. Rex Titan's of the Ice Age Underground Adventure

Abraham Lincoln Museum (Tel. 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org) Chicago History Chicago: Crossroads of America The 1968 Exhibit Chicago Styled: Fashioning The Magnificent Mile Abraham Lincoln Facing Freedom Chicago: Crossroads of America Lincoln's Chicago Chicago Styled: Fashioning The Magnificent Mile Railroaders: Jack Delano's Homefront Photography Facing Freedom Unexpected Chicago Lincoln's Chicago Vivian Maier's Chicago Railroaders: Jack Delano's Homefront Photography DuSable Museum of African American History (Tel. 773.947.0600, dusablemuseum.org) Unexpected Chicago Free AtMaier's First: The Evolution of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians Vivian Chicago Spirits of the Passage: StoryAmerican of the Transatlantic Slave773.947.0600, Trade DuSable Museum ofThe African History (Tel. dusablemuseum.org) A Slow Greatness: Harold Washington Story Free At Walk First: to The EvolutionThe of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians Africa Speaks Spirits of the Passage: The Story of the Transatlantic Slave Trade Red, White, Blue & Black: A History of Blacks in the Armed Services A Slow Walk to Greatness: The Harold Washington Story The Freedom Now Mural Africa Speaks Thomas Miller Mosaics Red, White, Blue & Black: A History of Blacks in the Armed Services FieldFreedom Museum of Natural The Now Mural History (Tel. 312.922.9410, fieldmuseum.org)

December2014 Chicago History Museum (Tel. 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org) De ember2014 The 1968c Exhibit


Museums

Winter 2015CNCJA•51

Subscribe at ClefNotesJournal.com and get great quarterly cover to cover coverage of Chicago's amazing arts and culture. Get four great issues for $18. Call 773.741.5502 for more details.

Clef N tes

Subscribe To Chicago's Premier magazine for Culture & the Performing Arts!

Amy Reichert: Reinventing Judaica

Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies (Tel. 312.332.1700, spertus.edu)

Abbott Oceanarium Amazon Rising Aquatic Show Caribbean Reef Jellies Polar Play Zone Waters of the World Wild Reef

Shedd Aquarium (Tel. 312.939.2438, sheddaquarium.org)

Christmas Around the World and Holidays of Light Treasures of the Walt Disney Archives 80 at 80 Animal Inside Out All Aboard the Silver Streak: Pioneer Zephyr Coal Mine Colleen Moore's Fairy Castle Earth Revealed Fast Forward…Inventing The Future Genetics and the Baby Chick Hatchery NetWorld Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze Science Storms Swiss Jolly Ball The Great Train Story The Idea Factory Things Come Apart Think Toymaker 3000: An Adventure in Automation Transportation Gallery U-505 Submarine You! The Experience

Museum of Science and Industry (Tel. 773.684.1414, msichicago.org)

Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust Race: Are We So Different? The World Knew: Jan Karski's Mission for Humanity Karkomi Permanent Exhibition Legacy of Absence Gallery Make a Difference: The Miller Family Youth Exhibition Rescue and Renewal: The Jewish Cultural Reconstruction Collection of Hebrew Theological College

Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center (Tel. 847.967.4800, ilholocaustmuseum.org)

December2014 1

5

Just a short drive from the Windy City

Top Vineyards

Smart Museum exhibit focuses on the national identity

AMERICA'S Self-Image

Rest your head at the epicenter of dance this summer

at the

SUMMER PILLOW

We go one-on-one with the artist as she gets set to make her Ravinia debut this summer.

Summer 2013

JEWEL

4

5

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

3

Clef N tes

2

6

8

10

11

The crooner talks life, music and bringing his Large Band to Ravinia

Lyle's Large Life

SUMMER 2011

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

4th Anniversary Issue

9

Clef N tes

7

12

14

15

16

17

18

19

+

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art examines the impact of the Steins Family and and the passion they inspired in the appreciation of modern art.

a Legacy unveiled

Interview with Steppenwolf Theatre ensemble member K. Todd Freeman

Lens of authenticity

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre celebrates a quarter century celebrating Shakespeare.

25 YEARS & COUNTING

A preview of the historic Paris Opéra Ballet as they kick off their American Tour at Harris Theatre.

Paris Comes to Millennium Park

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Clef N tes

Ongoing Exhibit

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibits Close January 4

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibits Close January 25

Ongoing Exhibit Begins February 22

13

22

23

Andreas Mitisek takes the helm of Chicago Opera Theater with a new collaborative model that just may take COT to a whole new level

A Tale of Two Cities

Stephen Petronio Company is just one of our picks for the best and the brightest in Chicagoland's amazing new cultural season!

21

GTheuide

20

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31


52•CNCJAWinter 2015

Music & Dance

1

2

3 1 4 2 5 36

47

58

69

7 10

118

129 1310 1411 1512 16 1317 1418 1519 1620 17 21 18 22

19 20 25 21 2622 2723 2824 29 2530 2631 27 23 24

28

Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Groupo Corpo Too Hot To Handel l l l Tango Buenos Aires Theater (Tel. 312.704.8414, chicagooperatheater.org) Chicago Opera l Giordano Chicago Thérèse Dance Raquin l l l l l Baroque (Tel. 312.235.2368, baroqueband.org) ChicagoBand a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) Beasty Boyz en Español l ll l A Cappella l l l City (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz=**, Blended/Pop, rock orBlended/Pop, soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Country/Blue grass = ††] CityWinery Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz=**, rock or soul fusion=†, Bilal** l Steve Earle - Solo and Acoustic with special guest Dawn Landes* l The Furs†John Oates: A concert celebrating his DVD release† l l l An Psychedelic Evening with l Marshall Crenshaw & the l Marc Broussard** † Bottle Rockets† l l Howie l l 10,000Day* Maniacs † l Stooges Band with special† guests Lowdown Brass Band** l PedritoBrass Martinez Group l Chuck l Black Ragan* Violin† †† l Mary FahlColvin* (formerly of The October Project) w/ Rachael Sage* l Shawn l l The Duhks* l Colin Hay† l l l An Evening with Jackie Greene† l Leon Russell†† l l Wynonna and Friends: Stories and Song†† l Ed Kowalczyk: Throwing Copper Unplugged - 20th Anniversary Celebration† l Jeff Daniels with the Ben Daniels Band* l Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago (Tel. 312.369-8330, colum.edu/dance_center) Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago (Tel. 312.369-8330, colum.edu/dance_center) David Roussève/Reality l l l Sandglass Theater l l Chicago Dance Crash l l l Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Beyond The Aria l Drumming - The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center l Excelon Family Series - DanceWorks Chicago l Peking Acrobats l MusicNOW: There Will Be Blood - The Chicago Symphony Orchestra l Excelon Family Series: The (Dance) Peking Acrobats l Restless Creature - Whendy Whelan l Eat To l Swan LakeThe - TheBeat: StateThe BalletMusic TheatreInstitute of Russia of Chicago l l l Orquesta Sinfónica- Roosevelt del Estado de México l Concert Performance University CCPA Symphony Orchestra l LyricOpera Opera of Chicago 312.386.8905, lyricopera.org) Lyric of Chicago (Tel. (Tel. 312.386.8905, lyricopera.org) ToscaBolena l Anna l l l l Tannhäuser l l l l l l l l The Magic Victrola l l The Passenger: Exploratory Discussion l Tosca l l l Museum Contemporary Art312.280.2660, (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) 8 12 9 13 10 14 11 15 12 1613 1714 181519 1620 1721 1822 19 23 28 24 2925 3026 3127 28 Museum of of Contemporary Art (Tel. mcachicago.org) 1 2 31 4 2 5 3 6 4 7 5 8 6 9 710 11 23 20 24 21 25 22 26 27 Sònia Sánchez Le Ça (The Manual Cinema Mementos Mori Id) l l l l ll l Mariano Cineastas (Filmmakers) Stan’s CaféPensotti The Cardinals l l l l l l Musicofof Baroque 312.551.1414, baroque.org) Music thethe Baroque (Tel. (Tel. 312.551.1414, baroque.org) BaroqueRival Invention Handel's Queens l l ll Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) River North Dance Chicago (Tel. 312.944.2888, rivernorthchicago.org) Lewis Plays Beethoven Emperor Winter Performance l l l l l Family: Once Upon a Symphony — Little Red Hen Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago l CSO: and Event: Bronfman l l l SCP Muti Special The Godfather l l SCP Jazz Series: Eddie5 Palmieri Latin Jazz Band/Carlos Henriquez Quintet l CSO: Beethoven l l l MusicNOW: MusicNOW: WillPark Be Blood l Civic Orchestra: CivicThere In The l CSO: Prokofiev and Scriabin l l l SCP Muti Jazz Conducts Series: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra l l CSO CSO Chamber at the Art Institute l SCP Chamber: Special Event: Jazz for Young People l SCP Piano Series: Garrick Mozart Ohlsson Requiem CSO: Muti Conducts l l ll l CSO: Conducts Scriabin l SCP Muti Orchestra Series: Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra l SCP Jazz Series: Beautiful— LifeLittle Red Hen l Family: OnceDianne Upon Reeves a Symphony l University ChicagoOlli Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) SCP PianoofSeries: Mustonen l Soprano AnneConducts Sofie von Otter and Pianist 6Angela Hewitt l CSO: Muti Tchaikovsky l l l Contempo at 50: Now and Then I l SCP Jazz Series: Butler, Bernstein & the Hot 9/Dee Alexander l Pacifica Quartet l University of Chicago Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) Alba Consort l Chamber Duo: Isabelle Faust and Alexander Melnikov l Tigran Hamasyan Trio l Avi Avital and David Greilsammer l Jerusalem Quartet l

F e br ar y 2015 J a nu au ry 20 15

The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.


Winter 2015CNCJA•53

Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) Strandline At Last: AInTribute Etta312.977.1700, James Broadway Chicagoto (Tel. broadwayinchicago.org) Broadway In AChicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, Hansel & Gretel: Wickedly Delicious Musical Treat broadwayinchicago.org) Dee Snider's First WivesRock Club& Roll Christmas Tale Disney's Newsies Dancing Pros Live! Rogers + Hammerstein's Cinderella Dee Snyder's Rock 'N Roll Christmas Tale 50 Shades! The Musical Parody Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Stomp Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Macbeth Pericles Dunsinane The Table City Lit Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) Macbeth Father City LitRuffian Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Father Ruffian Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Waiting for Godot Waiting for Godot First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Laughing On Laughing On TheThe 23rd23rd FloorFloor Fooling GoodmanBuddha Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Rapture, Blister, Burn (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Goodman Theatre College Night Rapture, Blister, Burn Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Coal, Fire & Ice El Stories: Holiday Train Greenhouse The Clean HouseTheater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Softy Blue Softy Blue Lifeline Theatre Yankee Tavern(Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Lions in Illyria Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Lions in Illyria Lookingglass Alice One Came Home Profiles Theatre (Tel. 773.549.1815, profilestheatre.org) Hellcab Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Raven Theatre (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Lookingglass Alice Shelock Holmes and the Case of the Christmas Goose Raven Dividing Theatre the Estate (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Dividing Estate RedTwist the Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) I and You Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) RedTwist Steep Theatre (Tel. 773.649.3186, steeptheatre.com) Red The Vandal Steep Theatre (Tel. 773.649.3186, steeptheatre.com) Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) The Vandal Airline Highway Theater Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Mr. Burns Airline Highway Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Theater Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) The Apple Family Plays: That Hopey Changey Thing and Sorry Mr. Burns Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) The Apple Family Plays: That Hopey Changey Thing and Sorry Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) Samsara

A Red Orchid Theatre (Tel. 773.943.8722, aredorchidtheatre.org)

J a nu a ry 20 15 F e br u ar y 2015

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

3

l

l

2

l

l

l

l

1

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l ll

l

l

l

5 l 6 l 7l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

4

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

3

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l1

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

4 8 5 9 610 711

l

l

l

63 7

l

2

l

52

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

41

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

8

l

l

l

l

l

l

812

l

l

9

l

l

l

l

13 9

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l l l

l

l

l

l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

22 18 23 24 1520 1621 17 19 2520 2621 2722 28 2329 2430 2531 26 27

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

14 10 1511 1612 1713 18 1419

Photos from left: National Touring Cast of "Newsies" (photo courtesy of Broadway In CHicago); Blind Summit Theatre puppeteers bring the cantankerous puppet Moses to life in The Table (Photo by Lorn Palmer); Ben Carlson in the title role in William Shakespeare’s Pericles (photo by Bill Burlingham).

Theater


Shall We Dance?

UPand Comers Hubbard Street Dance Chicago's young guns get a chance to shine the spotlight on emerging choreographers in Harris Theater Eat and Drink to the Beat series. By EMILY GROCH

M

Many in the Windy City are familiar with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago (HSDC) and the contemporary company’s impressive body of work—including the many creative feats of resident choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo, and HSDC’s recent, critically acclaimed collaboration with The Second City. The Hubbard Street family, however, extends beyond the main company to include an astonishingly talented group of nine early-career dancers who make up Hubbard Street 2 (HS2). After training and touring with HS2, many of these dancers will go on to join national or international contemporary dance companies, some even advancing into the ranks of HSDC. HS2 not only develops young professional dancers, but it also nurtures the development of choreographers through its International Commissioning Project (IC Project). IC Project involves the selection of two to three emerging choreographers each year who are given the opportunity to set new work on HS2, work which will become a part of the company’s repertoire. To-date, the program has produced 40 original works, and former IC Project grantees include Robert Battle, now artistic director at Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and Jessica Lang, who founded and directs her own successful company. Celebrating the 15th anniversary of the IC Project, HS2 will perform new works from three choreographers as part of the Harris Theater’s Eat (and Drink) to the Beat series. Just over one month ahead of this December 16 production, I caught up with HS2’s director, Terence Marling. Now in his second year heading up the company, Marling spoke with me about his dancers, the IC Project and the works in development for the upcoming performance. 54•CNCJAWinter 2015


Photos by Todd ROsenberg

Inset: Hubbard Street 2 Dancer Director Terence Markling (right) with HS2 Dancers clockwise from left: Zachary Enquist, Jules Joseph, Elliot Hammans, Katie Kozul, Katlin Michael Bourgeois (center), Natalie Leibert, Megan Meyers, Adrienne Lipson and Andrea Thompson; Above: Hubbard Street 2 Dancer Jules Joseph.

Winter 2015CNCJA•55


Shall We Dance?

56•CNCJAWinter 2015

this program’s history, I’m struck not only by the artistic and demographic diversity of past recipients, but by how far they’ve come since working in our studios with HS2....Our three IC Project choreographers for 2014–2015 absolutely hold the same potential.” That potential will manifest in some very intriguing works this winter. Marling suggested that Rustem’s recent decision to dedicate his energies full-time to choreography influenced his piece, “Long Story Short.” Marling, who was hesitant to describe the works (as many artists are—preferring that the audience experience the piece for themselves), noted that Rustem’s work touches on human relationships and how those change as life changes. Marling would only say of Arias’s “Changed in Its Affection,” “When I’m done watching the piece, I feel a strange warmth. The work (plays on) inclusion and exclusion from a group. It will send the viewer on a bit of a journey, emotionally.” Looking at this year’s IC Project, and the work HS2 has put in, Photo by Todd ROsenberg

HS2 is unique not only in its mission to prepare young professionals for a career in dance, but also because of the kind of dancer it attracts. HS2 requires a special desire and skill set to work with emerging choreographers in a very short time-frame to create something fantastic. Marling points out, “The field of dancers interested in doing this kind of work is extremely competitive. Hubbard Street 2 has a high caliber of dancers.” HS2 boasts such gifted dancers, and the IC Project itself has gained such esteem over its 15-year history, that many of the annual submissions come from established choreographers that want the chance to work with the company. Marling explains, “From the group of entrants, which is usually near 100, there are going to be 15 that are strongly ahead of the field, (and) not necessarily emerging choreographers.” After the call for submissions (which begins each January), Marling is tasked with whittling the 100 applicants down to just two or three choreographers who will create new work for his dancers. “Those choices are really important in terms of the direction of the company, (as) the new work always gets put on stage,” he notes. "The experience is a significant opportunity for both the dancers and the choreographer to create process," Marling adds. Each choreographer has a mere two weeks to develop the work, so all of the artists involved are challenged to hit the ground running and refine the dance-making process quickly. From this year’s submissions, Marling selected the director of Chicago’s Ruth Page School of Dance and co-director of the Ruth Page Civic Ballet, Victor Alexander; New York City-based freelance artist Bryan Arias; and London-born Ihsan Rustem, a choreographer who has recently decided to conclude his performing career in order to pursue choreography full time. Marling recently said of the IC Project artists: “Looking back at


Photo by Joris-Jan Bos Photography Photo Courtesy of Ihsan Rustem Photo by Vin Reed

Photo by Todd ROsenberg

Marling is, happy with what dancers and choreographers have made and certainly excited to bring it to Chicago audiences. “This is the first time we’ve really been able to have our own program at Harris Theater,” he says. “...it’s a good opportunity to show Chicago what we’ve got. “(HS2) are amazing artists…. We do a lot of touring nationally and internationally, but (in Chicago), I don’t know if people know so much that this group of artists is here and they are making new dance work all the time.” For those who are new to HS2 and what they do, Harris Theater’s Eat (and Drink) to the Beat series offers a perfect reasonably-priced way to become acquainted: theater-goers can enjoy HS2’s three new dance works on December 16 for a mere $5. HS2 joins a long line of top local and visiting artists showcased during Harris Theater’s low-cost Eat (and Drink) to the Beat evening performances. As part of the experience, visitors can also purchase Harris Theater signature cocktails and eats from Chicago’s favorite food trucks to enjoy while watching the show. For an evening of never-before-seen works by one of Chicago’s hidden gems, HS2’s Eat (and Drink) to the Beat production might just stretch your $5 farther than it has gone all year. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. on December 16 at Harris Theater, 205 E. Randolph Drive. Tickets may be purchased through Harris Theater at 312-334-777, or by visiting harristheaterchicago.org. Above: Hubbard Street 2 Dancer Jules Joseph.

Opposite Page Inset: Hubbard Street 2 Dancer Katie Kozul; Above: Hubbard Street Dancers Jules Joseph and Katie Kozul; Right From Top: IC Project Choreographers Brian Arias, Ishan Rustem and Victor Alexander.

Winter 2015CNCJA•57


58•CNCJAWinter 2015

Schneider Gallery, Inc.Inc. (Tel.(Tel. 312.988.4033, schneidergallerychicago.com) Schneider Gallery, 312.988.4033, schneidergallerychicago.com) Project Space: NessNess "Urban Pop" Pop" Project Space:Doug Doug "Urban Schneider Gallery's 25th Anniversary: A selection of Artists from the Gallery Schneider Gallery's 25th Anniversary: A selection of Artists from the Gallery

Paula Henderson Euker Russell Bowman & ArtMegan Advisory (312.751.9500, bowmanart.com) Phillip DrawingsJ. IICapuano

Paula Henderson & Megan Euker

Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com)

Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com)

New Dimensions in Sculpture Chris Antemann

Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Addington Gallery (Tel. addingtongallery.com) Michael Hoffman: Rhythms and312.664.3406, Place Michael Hoffman:GLOBALocal Rhythms and Place Kathleen Waterloo: Michael Dubina: Matchbooks Kathleen Waterloo: GLOBALocal ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, Michael Dubina: Matchbooks arcgallery.org) "The 'F' Word: Feminism Now ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org) Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) "The 'F'Fledermaus Word: Feminism Now At The End Of The World Truppe & The Carnival Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Echt Gallery (Tel. 312.442.0288, echtgallery.com) Chris Antemann Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival At The End Of The World Jean Albano Gallery 312-440-0770,echtgallery.com) jeanalbanogallery.com) Echt Gallery (Tel.(Tel 312.442.0288,

Ja nua ryr 2y 012 5015 F e brua 1 l

7

5 l

8

6 l

9

7

l

10

8

11

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l ll l l l l l

l

l ll l l l l l

l ll l l l l l

l

l

l

l ll l l l l l

l

l

l

The crooner talks life, music and bringing his Large Band to Ravinia

Lyle's Large Life

SUMMER 2011

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

+

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art examines the impact of the Steins Family and and the passion they inspired in the appreciation of modern art.

a Legacy unveiled

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre celebrates a quarter century celebrating Shakespeare.

25 YEARS & COUNTING

A preview of the historic Paris Opéra Ballet as they kick off their American Tour at Harris Theatre.

Paris Comes to Millennium Park

A ProgrAm of

merit

II

Merit Music’s incred ible contribution to the city’s music education legacy

By Patrick M. Curran

the Uncommo

n DivA

A look at opera star Frederica von Stade as she prepares for her last staged Chicago performance

Mayor Daley’s grand vision for a revitalized Chicag o Theater District has been a long time coming, and Broadway In Chicag o significant role in makin has had a g that a reality.

Bringing Broadway to chicago

Winter 201 0

Concert Journal for the Arts

Clef N tes

Stirring UP LAUg hter Chicago’s 2009 Huma nities Festival and its celebr ation of the many sides of laughter

Advertise with

Clef N tes

l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

l

l

l

ll

ll

ll

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ll l l l l

ll l l l l

l

l

ll l l l l

ll l l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l ll ll l l l

l

l

l

l

l

ll

ll

l

l

ll

ll

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l l ll ll

l

l

ll

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Contact Account Executive Jason Montgomery Tel. 773.741.5502 or e-mail: Jason.Montgomery@ClefNotesJournal.com for special advertising opportunities.

For advertisers looking to reach an audience that is cultured, sophisticated, and values strong branding, there's no better place for your message than Clef Notes. Our readers open our pages for the best in Chicagoland arts and culture.

l

l

l l l l ll ll l

l

l l l l ll ll l

l l l l ll ll l

l

l l l l ll ll l

l l l l ll ll l

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

l

l

l

ll

Clef N tes

l

l

ll ll ll

l

l

l

ll ll ll

ll ll ll

ll ll ll

l

ll ll ll

l

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

l

4

l

l

6

ll ll ll

3

l ll l l l l l

5

l

2

4

l ll l l l l l

l

1

3

l

l

2

The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Listings for permanent and ongoing exhibits at museums listed within the Almanac may be found on pages 46, 47, 50 & 51

Art Galleries


Winter 2015CNCJA•59

Music & Dance

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Groupo Corpo l Chicago Opera Theater (Tel. 312.704.8414, chicagooperatheater.org) Thérèse Raquin l l l l Chicago a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) A Cappella en Español l l l l City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz=**, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Steve Earle - Solo and Acoustic with special guest Dawn Landes* l An Evening with John Oates: A concert celebrating his DVD release† l Marc Broussard** † l l 10,000 Maniacs † l Pedrito Martinez Group † l Black Violin† †† l Shawn Colvin* l l Colin Hay† l l l Leon Russell†† l l Ed Kowalczyk: Throwing Copper Unplugged - 20th Anniversary Celebration† l Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago (Tel. 312.369-8330, colum.edu/dance_center) David Roussève/Reality l l l Chicago Dance Crash l l l Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Drumming - The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center l Peking Acrobats l Excelon Family Series: The Peking Acrobats l Eat To The Beat: The Music Institute of Chicago l Orquesta Sinfónica del Estado de México l Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.386.8905, lyricopera.org) Tosca l l Tannhäuser l l l l l l l l l The Passenger: Exploratory Discussion l Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Sònia Sánchez Le Ça (The Id) l l l Mariano Pensotti Cineastas (Filmmakers) l l l Music of the Baroque (Tel. 312.551.1414, baroque.org) Baroque Invention l l River North Dance Chicago (Tel. 312.944.2888, rivernorthchicago.org) Winter Performance l Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) SCP Special Event: The Godfather l l CSO: Beethoven 5 l l l Civic Orchestra: Civic In The Park l SCP Jazz Series: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra l l SCP Special Event: Jazz for Young People l CSO: Muti Conducts Mozart Requiem l l l l SCP Orchestra Series: Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra l Family: Once Upon a Symphony — Little Red Hen l SCP Piano Series: Olli Mustonen l CSO: Muti Conducts Tchaikovsky 6 l l l SCP Jazz Series: Butler, Bernstein & the Hot 9/Dee Alexander l University of Chicago Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) Chamber Duo: Isabelle Faust and Alexander Melnikov l Tigran Hamasyan Trio l Avi Avital and David Greilsammer l Jerusalem Quartet l

February2015


Theater

Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) At Last: A Tribute First Wives Club to Etta James Broadway Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) The Book ofInMormon First Wives Club Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) The Book of Mormon Macbeth Chicago DunsinaneShakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Macbeth City Lit Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) Dunsinane Father Ruffian City Lit Theatre (Tel. 773.293.3682, citylit.org) Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Father Ruffian Waiting for Godot Court Theatre (Tel.in 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) First Folio Theatre Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Waiting for Laughing OnGodot The 23rd Floor First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Fooling Buddha Laughing The 23rd Floor GoodmanOn Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Fooling Buddha Rapture, Blister, Burn Goodman (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Coal, Fire &Theatre Ice Rapture, Blister, Burn Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Greenhouse Theater Coal, Fire Softy Blue & Ice Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Yankee Tavern Softy BlueTheatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Lifeline YankeeinTavern Lions Illyria Lifeline Theatre One Came Home (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Lions in Illyria Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Lookingglass One Came Home Lookingglass Alice Lookingglass (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Raven TheatreTheatre (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Lookingglass Alice Dividing the Estate Raven Theatre (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) Dividing the Estate Red RedTwist Theatre 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) Steep Theatre (Tel.(Tel. 773.649.3186, steeptheatre.com) Red Vandal The Steep TheatreTheatre (Tel. 773.649.3186, steeptheatre.com) Steppenwolf Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) The Vandal Airline Highway Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Marie Antoinette Airline TheaterHighway Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Marie Antoinette Mr. Burns Theater Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Mr. The Burns Apple Family Plays: That Hopey Changey Thing and Sorry Timeline TheatreTheater (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Victory Gardens (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) The Apple Family Plays: That Hopey Changey Thing and Sorry Samsara Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) Samsara

February2015 Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) F ebruary2015 At Last: A Tribute to Etta James 2

1

l l l

l l l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

7

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l l

l l

6

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l l

5

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

4 l

l

1

3

2

l

6

l 7

5

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l 1

l

l

11

11

l

12

12

l

13

13

14

14

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

8

l

l 8

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

9

9

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

15

15

16

16

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

19

19

l l

l

l

l

18

18

l

17

17

l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

21

21

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

20

20

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l l

l

l l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

l

l l

l l

l l

l

l

l l

l

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

l

l 15 l 16 17 18 19 20 21 l 22 l 23 24 25 26 27 28 l 10 11 12 13 14

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

l

l

10

10

l

l

9

9

l

l

8

8

l

7

7

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

6

6

l

l

l

l

l

4

l l

l l

l

l l

l

5

5

l l

4

4

l

3

3

3

The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

l

2

2

1

Photos from left: Cassidey Slaughter-Mason from Rapture, Blister, Burn at Goodman Theatre this Winter (photo courtesy of Goodman Theatre); Cast of Lookingglass Alice (Courtesy of Lookingglass Theatre); National Touring Cast of First Wives Club (Photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago); National Touring Cast of Book of Mormon (Photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago).

60•CNCJAWinter 2015


Art Galleries

Schneider Gallery, Inc. (Tel. 312.988.4033, schneidergallerychicago.com) Project Space: Doug Ness "Urban Pop" Schneider Gallery's 25th Anniversary: A selection of Artists from the Gallery

Paula Henderson & Megan Euker Phillip J. Capuano

Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com)

Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Michael Hoffman: Rhythms and Place Kathleen Waterloo: GLOBALocal Michael Dubina: Matchbooks ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org) "The 'F' Word: Feminism Now Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival At The End Of The World Echt Gallery (Tel. 312.442.0288, echtgallery.com) Chris Antemann

February2015 1

2

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l l

l l

l

4

l

3

l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

6

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

5

7

8

9

JEWEL

5

Just a short drive from the Windy City

Top Vineyards

Smart Museum exhibit focuses on the national identity

AMERICA'S Self-Image

Rest your head at the epicenter of dance this summer

at the

SUMMER PILLOW

We go one-on-one with the artist as she gets set to make her Ravinia debut this summer.

Summer 2013

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Clef N tes

the Uncommon DivA A look at opera star Frederica von Stade as she prepares for her last staged Chicago performance

A ProgrAm of merit Merit Music’s incredible contribution to the city’s music education legacy

By Patrick M. Curran II

Mayor Daley’s grand vision for a revitalized Chicago Theater District has been a long time coming, and Broadway In Chicago has had a significant role in making that a reality.

Bringing Broadway to chicago

Winter 2010

Clef N tes

Co Cele ve br rin ati n Ar g Ch g 5 ts ica Gr & go ea Concert Journal for the Arts Cu 's A t Y ltu m ear re azin s g

Emily Disher chats it up with Hubbard Street Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo.

Up Close & Personal

with hot young symphonic conductor Andrew Grams

Gene Siskel Film Center Under Glass

Q&A

Feast for the Eyes

Goodman Theatre will transport audiences this summer to that enchantingly wistful Scottish village with the first major US revival of the beloved Lerner and Lowes classic in 30 years.

BRIGADOON!

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

A Decade At The Harris

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Chicago’s 2009 Humanities Festival and its celebration of the many sides of laughter

Stirring UP LAUghter

Cultivating a genuine corporate sponsor partnership based on shared values and mutual goals

Philanthropy & The Arts

Alonzo King's LINES Ballet returns to the Windy City

BETWEEN the LINES

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

World's finest cultural newborns slated for Chicago audiences this winter

NEWBIES

Preeminent Sondheim interpreter Gary Griffin mounts two highly anticipated productions of the composer's works at Shakespeare Theater this season.

Take

JOAN ALLEN

YOUR

to the 2013-2014 season of fine arts in Chicagoland!

Guide

A global spotlight on Chicago's culture scene

EXPO CHICAGO

Back on the Steppenwolf stage

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Chicagoland Journal for the Clef N tes Arts Clef N tes Clef N tes Griffin's

4th Anniversary Issue

l l

Clef N tes

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Enjoy a year of the digital edition for ONLY $4.

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Just visit: ClefNotesJournal.com and click "Subscribe" to get a year of Clef Notes Digital at 78% off.

Meet the international dream team that will design Chicago's new Lucas Museum

+

Read Clef Notes Journal’s DIGITAL Edition

The Adler Planetarium gets downright theatrical in its newest tour of the cosmos.

Transgalactic Journey

Questions for Steppenwolf Theatre's Francis Guinan

10

Your guide to Chicago's new fine arts season, packed with our editors' picks for the 'Best of the Best' performances and exhibitions in the new season.

Guide

The

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Clef N tes

Listings for permanent and ongoing exhibits at museums listed within the Almanac may be found on pages 46, 47, 50 & 51

Winter 2015CNCJA•61


T

Around Town

Three-time Grammy nominees Dailey & Vincent aren't just your run-of-themill, fun-loving Bluegrass duo. Highly touted as the elite of the elite luminaries in the genre, and blessed with one of the most loyal fan bases in all of music, they routinely play to sold out houses in more than 115 tour dates each year. These guys are the real deal. And they've got the licks to prove it. "Steel Driving Man," the lead single on their most recent studio release, Brothers of the Highway (Rounder Records), was a multi-week number 1 hit on the Bluegrass Radio Charts just three weeks out from the song's release. They'll bring a heavy dose of charm when they play Chicago's City Winery this February.

Who: Bluegrass Duo Daily & Vincent What: Their 5th Studio Album: Brothersof theHighwaystudioalbum When: 5 p.m., February 8, 2015 Where: City Winery in Chicago's West Loop How: Visit citywinery.com/chicago or call 312.733.9463 62•CNCJAWinter 2015


Winter 2015CNCJA•63

Photo courtesy of city winery


Winter 2015 Picklists

Theater

Adam Paxton's Theater Picks

Rapture, Blister, Burn Goodman Theatre Grad school pals Catherine and Gwen pursued different lives after graduation. After a decade-long estrangement, the women decide to spend a summer reconnecting. But their impulsive attempt to trade places soon erupts in a heated battle for affection and a fiery examination of their feminist ideals. See playwright Gina Gionfriddo’s tour de force in Goodman Theatre’s Albert Hall January 17– February 22, 2015. Visit goodmantheatre.org or call 312.443.3800 for more information. Airline Highway Steppenwolf Theatre In the parking lot of The Hummingbird, a once-glamorous motel on New Orleans' infamous Airline Highway, a group of friends gather. A rag-tag collection of strippers, hustlers and philosophers have come together to celebrate the life of Miss Ruby, an iconic burlesque performer who has requested a funeral before she dies. The party rages through the night as old friends resurface to pay their respects. A world premiere from the author of Detroit, Airline Highway is a boisterous and moving ode to the outcasts who make life a little more interesting. See the production before it heads off to Broadway this spring. It runs December 4, 2014 – February 8, 2015. Visit Steppenwolf.org or call 312.335.1650 for more details.

Exhibits

Mr. Burns – A post electric play Theater Wit What are we left with when everything is taken away? After life as we know it has ended, small bands of survivors come together to keep the pilot light of civilization burning. Their path to redemption is as unexpected as it is inevitable. A paean to the power of live theater and the resilience of Bart Simpson through the ages, Mr. Burns is an animated and hilarious exploration of how the pop culture of one era might evolve into the mythology of another, and a dazzling, panoramic vista on the power of storytelling. See the work The New York Times called “downright brilliant” in its winter Chicago run January 2 – February 23, 2015. Visit theaterwit.com or call 773.975.8150 for more information. Karyn Peterson's Exhibit Picks

exhibits

Chicago Styled: Fashioning the Magnificent Mile Chicago History Museum Chicago Styled features more than twenty ensembles from the Chicago History Museum’s costume collection to tell the story of the growth of this landmark district. The garments hail from a wide range of retailers: independent boutiques; high-end designer shops and luxury department stores. The clothes and the buildings on the Mag Mile were considered cutting-edge and innovative and had a symbiotic relationship. As more upscale retailers flocked to the area, developers built impressive structures fit to house them—the John Hancock Center was the area’s first example of a large-scale, mixed-use building, and Water Tower Place was one of the nation’s first and largest vertical malls.

Set against a shifting cityscape, pieces by noted designers such as Norman Norell, Adolfo, Christian Lacroix, Yohji Yamamoto and Chanel evoke memories of the Mag Mile and the stylish people who shopped there. See Chicago Styled at The Chicago History Museum through August 2015. Visit chicagohistory. org or call 312.642.4600 for more details. Free at first: The Evolution of the Association for The Advancement of Creative Musicians DuSable Museum of African American History In 1965, musicians Muhal Richard Abrams, Phil Cohran, Steve McCall and Jodie Christian decided something had to be done to promote creative music and musicians on the South Side of Chicago. The result was the creation of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM). This consortium of musical talent was the next evolution for Chicago’s renaissance of black visual and performing artists that began in the early 1930s. Over the years, AACM has been a hallmark of Chicago and a major player on the international creative music scene. Free At First: The Anthology of the AACM chronicles the history and impact of the prolific organization. The exhibit opens January 15, 2015. Visit dusablemuseum.org or call 877.387.2251 for more details.

EXHIBITS

David Bowie Is Museum of Contemporary Art David Bowie Is presents the first retrospective of the extraordinary career of David Bowie—one of the most pioneering and influential performers of our time. More than 400 objects, most from the David Bowie Archive—including handwritten lyrics, original costumes, photography, set designs, album artwork and rare performance material from the past five decades—are brought together for the first time. See David Bowie Is before it closes January 4, 2015. Visit mcachicago.org or call 312.397.4010 for more information. Above: Kmberly Swift, Director of Rapture, Blister, Burn at Goodman Theatre this winter.; Right: Album cover shoot for Aladdin Sane, 1973. Design: Brian Duffy and Celia Philo; make up: Pierre La Roche.(photo by Brian Duffy. Photo Duffy © Duffy Archive & The David Bowie Archive.)

64•CNCJAWinter 2015


Dance

Brittany Rice's Dance Picks Restless Creature by Wendy Whelan Harris Theater for Music and Dance New York City Ballet’s Wendy Whelan, named “America’s greatest contemporary ballerina” by The New York Times, embarks on a new dance adventure with four of today’s leading choreographers. Whelan, together with her collaborators, will present Restless Creature (which received its world premiere in August 2013 at Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival), an evening of four duets created by and danced with Kyle Abraham, Joshua Beamish, Brian Brooks and Hubbard Street Dance Chicago Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo. The performance takes place January 21, 2015. Visit harristheaterchicago.org or call 312.334.7777 for more details.

Dance

Song of Eva Perón Tango Buenos Aires Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University The Auditorium Theatre presents Tango Buenos Aires’ Song of Eva Perón, a Tango dance and music performance inspired by the most important feminine character in Argentinian history. Tracing her epic life — from her ascent to fame in the 1930s to her death in 1952 — this is a sparkling and poignant spectacle that is not to be missed. “Repeatedly crafted swirling, fast-paced tapestries of movement, laced with proud postures and sensual couplings,” says The Washington Post. See for yourself January 25, 2015. Visit auditoriumtheatre.org or call 800.982.ARTS (2787) for more information.

dance

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago Princess Grace Awards: New Works MCA Stage – Museum of Contemporary Art Three dance visionaries show us the shape of dance to come in new works specially made for Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, which makes its return to the MCA’s intimate Edlis Neeson Theater. Three North American treasures in contemporary dance, all recipients of the prestigious Princess Grace Award, share their bright, distinctive styles, which are shaping the dance of today and tomorrow. The three artists developed their works with the phenomenal Hubbard Street before these world premieres at MCA Stage. See the performances December 4-14. Visit mcachicago.org or call 312.280.2660 for more details.

Music

Fred cummings' Music Picks

Drumming Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Harris Theater for Music and Dance In an exhilarating Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center program that is both aurally and visually captivating, gems of the percussion repertoire take center stage, including Thierry de Mey’s mesmerizing Musiques de tables, John Cage’s ethereal In a Landscape, and Bartók’s riveting Sonata. Hear probably the most uniquely individual chamber music experience Chicagoans will enjoy this season February 5, 2015. For more information, visit harristheaterchicago.org or call 312.334.7777. Tosca Lyric Opera of Chicago A fiery diva, the rebel artist who claims her heart, and the sadistic police chief before whom all Rome trembles — for more than a hundred years, audiences have watched and listened spellbound as the cat-and-mouse game between Tosca and Scarpia plays to its deadly conclusion. See the performances January 24 - March 14, 2015. Visit lyricopera.org or call 312.827.5600 for more information.

music

Riccardo Muti Conducts Scriabin and Prokofiev Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus Symphony Center Riccardo Muti conducts works by two Russian composers for whom he has a remarkable affinity. Scriabin’s First Symphony is a glorious six-movement work that culminates in a triumphant chorus, yet it also holds much tender lyricism. Prokofiev’s cantata Alexander Nevsky, by contrast, is full of fire and steel, its imaginative orchestration and rousing choruses evoking Russia’s medieval victory over invading Teutonic knights. Hear the performance January 22 – 24, 2015. Visit cso.org or call 312.294.3000 for more details. Top: Acclaimed ballerina Wendy Whelan (photo courtesy of Harris Theater for Music and Dance); Right: Conductor Riccardo Muti leads the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (photo by Todd Rosenberg).

Winter 2015CNCJA•65


Winter 2015 Picklists

Editor's Picks Stomp Bank of America Theatre

Theater The international percussion sensation, Stomp, has garnered armfuls of awards and rave reviews. The eight-member troupe uses everything but conventional percussion instruments — matchboxes, wooden poles, brooms, garbage cans, Zippo lighters, hubcaps — to fill the stage with magnificent rhythms. Year after year, audiences worldwide keep coming back for more of this pulse-pounding electrifying show. As the Boston Globe says, “If you haven’t seen Stomp, GO! If you have seen it, take someone and share the pleasure!” See what the noise is all about when Stomp runs January 20 - 25, 2015. Visit broadwayinchicago.org or call 312.977.1700 for more information. Objects and Voices: A Collection of Stories Smart Museum of Art – University of Chicago Why do objects matter? What kind of stories do they help tell? Through a series of micro-exhibitions curated by 20 guest collaborators, Objects and Voices reveals the multiple ways people work with, learn from and enjoy objects of art.

Music

This collection-based exhibition is divided into a series of small thematic presentations organized by distinguished professors, artists, museum professionals, UChicago students and notable Smart Museum alumni. These vignettes reveal the diverse perspectives, passions and expertise of their curators while raising bigger questions about the interpretation of creative and cultural objects, the role of audiences and the transmission of knowledge through art. The exhibition opens February 12, 2015. Visit smartmuseum.uchicago.edu or call 773.702.0200 for more information.

Publisher's Picks

exhibits

Race: Are We So Different? Holocaust Museum People are different. Throughout history, these differences have been a source of community strength and personal identity. They have also been the basis for discrimination and oppression. The idea of “race” has been used historically to describe these differences and justify mistreatment of people and even genocide. Today, contemporary scientific understanding of human variation is beginning to challenge “racial” differences, and even question the very concept of race. Race: Are We So Different?, developed by the American Anthropological Association in collaboration with the Science Museum of Minnesota, is the first national exhibition to tell the stories of race from the biological, cultural and historical points of view. Combining these perspectives offers an unprecedented look at race and racism in the United States. The exhibition runs through January 25, 2015. Visit ilholocaustmuseum.org or call 847.967.4800 for more details. Wynona and Friends – Stories and Song City Winery Everyone has a story to tell. And, for Wynonna Judd, those stories have been told through song with one of the most influential and important voices of our generation. Experience the timeless tales of her unparalleled artistry as she takes you on the revolutionary journey of her 30 year platinum career. Hear the stories that inspired her to record the songs, create the tours and make recording history while inspiring countless friends along the way. Joined by her 3-piece band including her husband, producer and award-winning artist Cactus Moser, they will take you inside the hits and history of this iconic artist. Hear Wynona and Friends January 28, 2015. Visit citywinery.com/Chicago or call 312.733.9463 for more details.

music

Top: National Touring Company of Stomp (photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago); Country star Wynona Judd (photo courtesy of City WInery).

66•CNCJAWinter 2015


‘Tis the Season for Fur and Fine Outerwear! Luxe Look

FUR Glam or on the Go! Onyx dyed Sheared Beaver Flounce Coat with Natural Silver Fox Collar and Trim

York Signature Style Natural Black Velvet Chinchilla Hooded Jacket

Super Stylin’

Norwegian Fox Trimmed Alpaca Blend Cape with a Badgley Mischka Designed Metallic Evening Clutch

Day or Nite

www.YorkFur.com

FUNctional Fashion

For shopping and errand running, to an elegant evening out, discover Chicagoland’s most extensive selection of gorgeous furs, stylish outerwear, and awesome accessories. Find innovative designer creations, York’s own Signature Styles, or work with the York Design Team to create a custom-made Exceptional Exclusive. For him or her, work or weekend, the York Collection is ON SALE NOW! View the York Collection at: www.YorkFur.com/catalog

Fu r s

Shearlings

Cashmeres

Leathers

S k i we a r

Zandra Rhodes Designed Natural Cross Mink Walking Coat with Natural Ranch Mink Trim and Floppy Hat, Leather Gloves

Handbags

Ac c e s s o r i e s


Clef Notes Journal - Winter 2015 Digital Edition  

Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts' Winter 2015 Digital Edition, featuring "Art by Design," a comparison of art and fashion in Chic...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you