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Clef N tes

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Arts & Education Issue!

Longtime Lookingglass Theatre stage manager gets her wings with new production of her first stage play.

Spring 2014

$4.99

ClefNotesJournal.com

Bold and wildly innovative, Grammywinning sextet eighth blackbird is rewriting the rulebook on contemporary classical music performance.

PALM AT THE PIER

Finding

SARA

POETIC license

The Palm Beach Show Group brings one of the world's largest art and antiques shows to Navy Pier.

LUMINARY ďƒŠ Q&A with folk icon John Gorka


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Contents Spring 2014

33 CNCJA

FEATURES Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Arts & Education Issue!

Bold and wildly innovative, Grammywinning sextet eighth blackbird is rewriting the rulebook on contemporary classical music performance.

PALM AT THE PIER

Finding

SARA

POETIC license

Longtome Lookingglass Theatre stage manager gets her wings with new production of her first stage play.

The Palm Beach Show Group brings one of the world's largest art and antiques shows to Navy Pier.

 LUMINARY Q&A with folk icon John Gorka On the Cover: Members of the acclaimed contemporary chamber music sextet, eighth blackbird (photo by Luke Raytray). Above: (L - R) Steppenwolf Theatre ensemble member Francis Guinan, ensemble member Alana Arenas, Steve Haggard, Helen Sadler, John McGinty and ensemble member Molly Regan in Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s Chicago-premiere production of Tribes by Nina Raine this winter.

12 Early Exposure

A look at some of Chicago's most dynamic youth arts education programs, creating exciting platforms for young artists that can be invaluable in building a foundation for a career in arts and culture.

10

29 In This Quarter Year

Steppenwolf Theatre's Tribes, Joffrey Ballet's Contemporary Choreographers, the Kremerata Baltica Chamber Orchestra and Goodman Theatre's Luna Gale are just a few of the Chicago area performances we review In This Quarter Year.

38 Finding Sara

Longtime Lookingglass Theater stage manager Sara Gmitter has been honing her playwriting skills in her long journey behind the scenes in live theater. Her first staged work, In a Garden: A Darwinian Love Story, will come to life this spring on the Lookingglass Theatre stage.

40 Poetic License

Grammy Award-winning contemporary chamber music sextet eighth blackbird is a virtuosic, eclectic and prolific ensemble, but their bold artistic vision is what sets them at the vanguard of classical music performance. Spring 2014CNCJA•3


From the Publisher’s Desk

Photo by Kipling Swehla Photography

One of the most important aspects of art and culture is the level to which they teach and inspire understanding of concepts old and new. And that’s one reason why arts education is among the most inspirational of all learning. In a real sense, learning in the arts is learning how to teach in the most creative of ways. And with the spring issue of Clef Notes, we take our annual look at the incredibly diverse and wonderfully creative cultural education initiatives here in Chicago, initiatives where talented students and artists don't simply study the arts, they engage in performance, learn from the professionals at the highest level in their fields and, in some cases, even step out onto the international stage like a bird nudged out of the proverbial nest. Many of the world’s great performers began their work in Chicago’s arts education community. And today, many of tomorrow's cultural icons work tirelessly to expand their own possibilities through the powerful resources of Chicago’s cultural education institutions. As a world class cultural Mecca, Chicago's arts education community creates unparalleled access to world class luminaries currently at the highest level of performance, honing and coaching the young artist in their craft. One of the best examples of this is Lyric Opera of Chicago's prestigious Ryan Opera Center. We had an opportunity to talk with administrators and artists in the renowned fellowship program and got a sense of not only the unparalleled artistic training young singers get, but also the coaching they receive in the more practical administrative aspects of a career in opera. In this issue, we also look at the dynamic fight club mentality founders of Black Box Acting Studios teach students of their Chicago northside training center. The brainchild of actors who received their own training under the auspices of Steppenwolf Theatre's educational programs, Black Box inspires a powerful, take-no-prisoners approach to acting that focuses on fighting for one's artistic perspective on the live stage. Again, art, by very nature, is an incredibly educative pursuit because of the level of thought and understanding it provokes. And there are few genres in the arts that inspire thought more than contemporary music. Add to that the high art of thought-provoking staging and a dash of unconventional choreography and you have one of the country's hottest contemporary chamber groups in the ground-breaking, Grammy Awardwinning ensemble, eighth blackbird. Donna Robertson sat down with the cutting-edge group known for its bold performances and artistic ingenuity in an Members of the acclaimed contemporary chamber music sextet effort to get to the heart of the group's ineighth blackbird give an innovative performance of Pierrot genious way of looking at contemporary Lunaire by Arnold Schoenberg. chamber music. They don't stop where other great chamber ensembles do, at the highest artistic and technical levels of performance of works within their massive repertoire, they go a step or three beyond by incorporating other dimensions of performance in their music, stretching the boundaries of centuries-old tradition in art expression and broadening the "canvas" of artistic communication for the listener. Truly, at the end of the day, any experience—cultural or not—is a learning experience (at least it has the opportunity to be), but consider the great level of cultural learning we enjoy simply because we live in a city so deeply rooted in thought, experimentation, questioning and passion. Without that rich network of cultural learning, Chicago could very well be a ponderously different place. Enjoy the issue!

D. Webb Publisher

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Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts Spring 2014

Publisher D. Webb

Editorial Editor in Chief

Patrick M. Curran II

Associate Editors Fred Cummings Scott Elam Christopher Hopper

Editorial Support Rachel Cullen

Staff Writers and Contributors Kathryn Bacasmot Raymond Benson David Berner Emily Disher Don Fujiwara Laura Kinter Cathlyn Melvin Leslie Price Donna Robertson

Art & Design Art Director

Carl Benjamin Smith

Contributing Photographers Colin Lyons Bob Briskey

Graphics & Design Chelsea Davis Angela Chang

Advertising

Adam McKinney Adam.McKinney@ClefNotesJournal.com Jason Montgomery Jason.Montgomery@ClefNotesJournal.com Subscriptions Clef Notes is published quarterly (March, June, September and December) each year. An annual subscription to the magazine may be purchased by mailing a check or money order for $18 to Clef Notes Publishing, Inc., 5815 N. Sheridan Road, Suite 1107, Chicago, IL 60660. Bulk rates are also available. Credit card purchases may be secured online at ClefNotesJournal.com or by calling 773.741.5502. © 2014 Clef Notes Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the USA.


Photo courtesy of pilobolus Dance Theatre

Contents Spring 2014

58 CNCJA

DEPARTMENTS

10 Luminary: Interview with John Gorka

Soulful crooner and folk music icon John Gorka talks one-on-one with Fed Cummings about the road to his 12th studio album years after his start at Godfrey Daniels coffee house on the East Coast and how he packs every bit of the authenticity of those humble beginnings in his performances today.

20 Arts & Education: Training Day

Arts and Education: Chicago's Black Box Studios shapes a fight club mentality when training its growing base of aspiring Chicago stage actors, advocating a "survivalist" approach when teaching the art of fighting for your own perspective on the live stage.

24 Curator's Corner: Palm at the Pier

Chicago's Navy Pier will host one of the world's most prestigious art and antiques shows this spring when the renowned Palm Beach Show Group brings their international celebration of rare finds to The Windy City.

58 Shall We Dance?: Finding the Light Above: Innovative dance company Pilobolus performs "Automation" by Alonzo King.

Incredibly innovative dance creative Pilobolus Dance Theater reaches for limitless possibilities not only in movement or collaborative partnerships but also in its professional vision, which takes the applications of modern dance to new, ingenious heights. Spring 2014CNCJA•5


scuttlebutt

Letters from our readers... More love for the GUIDE The

Guide

Clef Notes' annual compilation of editors' picks, best bets and down-right must see performances and exhibits for the amazing new 2012-2013 arts and culture season!

MUSIC C Music By FRED CUMMINGS

hicagoland sets the bar pretty high for classical music performance. And when speaking of the best and the brightest here, you're usually talking about the best and brightest anywhere. The city's new arts and culture season will see some of the most profoundly beautiful and diverse music performed by the greatest artists around the globe, and as such, Chicagoans are in for a veritable feast of diverse one-of-a-kind performances. In fact, what makes Chicagoland's 2012-2013 concert season so special is that each concert is so special. There's nothing run-of-the-mill about the new performing arts calendar. So if you plan to indulge, get ready for some pretty wonderful surprises. Symphonic

For fans of symphonic music, there's simply no better place to live than Chicago. Each year, the city enjoys a rich cascade of symphonic programming, and with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO) (cso.org) as its chief proponent, we experience a broad range of the most sophisticated symphonic literature through performances of the absolute highest order. This season, the CSO brings us nothing short of a symphonic listener's dream through a broad range of programming and wildly talented conductors and solo artists to compliment the CSO's gifted musicians and, of course, Riccardo Muti, one of the world's most celebrated and decorated conductors today. In his third season as music director, Muti has created something of a perfect storm for listeners who enjoy the deeply powerful impact of symphonic literature.

In fact, when announcing the new Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association (CSOA) season, Muti pointed out, “I have tried to create a season that reflects a historically broad spectrum of music, from works by Bach and Vivaldi to composers of today, including a commission from Christopher Rouse and works by our Mead Composers-in-Residence, Mason Bates and Anna Clyne...” Three distinct themes permeate CSOA programming this year: the impact of Wagner on that very broad spectrum of symphonic literature; The power and influence of rivers and nature as explored in the canon of music as well as other cultural media; and the centennial celebration of the birth of CSO's beloved eighth music director, Sir Georg Solti. With these intriguing themes at work and a vastly diverse selection of monumental compositions at play, there are more than just a few concerts that I'd recommend you not miss at Symphony Center this season. For starters, on September 29, celebrated violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter returns to the CSO on the occasion of their 2012 Symphony Ball as soloist with Muti and the Symphony in an undoubtedly sumptuous performance of one of the world's most popular concerti, Mendelssohn's Concerto for Violin. Mutter's consummate lyricism and technical supremacy make the perfect compliment to Muti and the CSO in Mendelssohn's lavish masterwork. Also, in the first of his two-week residency (October 18, 19 and 20) this season on the CSO podium, Dutch conductor Bernard Haitink will explore the Germanic tradition leading an all-Brahms program featuring two of the composer’s great symphonic works: his lush Double Concerto for Violin and Cello with brothers violinist Renaud and cellist Gautier Capuçon as soloists and Brahms' mighty Symphony No.1. On November 14, Charles Dutoit will conduct Stravinsky’s landmark The Rite of Spring a full century after its notorious premiere. This groundbreaking work still captures audiences' imaginations and inspires artists one hundred years later. Also on the all-Russian program are Mussorgsky’s A Night on Bald Mountain and Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No.1 featuring the 2011 Tchaikovsky Piano Competition winner Daniil Trifonov. On January 25th at Harris Theater for Music and Dance (harristheaterchicago.org) and January 27 at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts, acclaimed Mozartian Jane Glover and the Music of the

Baroque Symphony celebrate Mozart’s birthday with a festive program exploring his genius in works for orchestra, piano and voice. Works on the program include Mozart's Exsultate, jubilate, the Symphony No. 39, and the C-minor Piano Concerto. Russian pianist Vladimir Feltsman and soprano Arianna Zukerman are the evening’s featured soloists. Finnish conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen makes the list with his February (21, 22, 23, 24) appearance in Chicago as part of "The Wagner Effect," the CSO's exploration of the indelible impact Wagner's work has had on the literature. The program will include Act II of Wagner’s stirring and powerful Tristan and Isolde. For his second week of subscription concerts (February 28 and March 1 and 2), Salonen joins forces with CSO Judson and Joyce Green Creative Consultant Yo-Yo Ma to perform Lutosławski’s dark and esoteric Cello Concerto. This must-see performance is a rare opportunity to hear a deeply contemplative work illuminated by one of the greatest cellists of our time. Rising conductor Mei-Ann Chen makes the list with her CSO subscription debut (May 9, 11 and 14) leading a concert that features the Symphony's first performance of Florence Price’s Mississippi River. The work portrays the river’s history in music through orchestrated folk song. Price (1887–1953) was the first female African American composer to have a symphony performed by a major orchestra; CSO Music Director Frederick Stock conducted the Orchestra in the world premiere of her Symphony in E Minor in 1933 at the Chicago World’s Fair. Chen is the music director for the culturally diverse Chicago Sinfonietta, and only the second in the group's history. Some of the most thrilling symphonic concerts this season will come at the hand of visiting orchestras. And one of the most spellbinding performances I recommend will take place October 21 in the Symphony Center debut of The World Orchestra for Peace. Founded by Sir Georg in 1995, this ensemble is made up of the finest musicians selected from the world’s greatest orchestras, including past and present members of the CSO. The ensemble was founded to affirm, in Solti’s words, "the unique strength of music as an ambassador for peace." Conductor Valery Gergiev leads the orchestra on what would have been Solti’s 100th birthday, hosted by Lady Valerie Solti and featuring vocal luminaries Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Plácido Domingo, René Pape. Widely praised for its exceptional energy and brilliance, the internationally acclaimed FrenchCanadian chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy will return for its second performance at the Harris Theater for Music and Dance (October 24, 2012) and its first Chicago performance with celebrated flautist Emmanuel Pahud. The program will offer a unique opportunity to hear a thrilling exploration of music composed by J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, and Benda. Esa-Pekka Salonen again makes the list with his London-based Philharmonia Orchestra and their November 7 appearance at Symphony Center. The orchestra's principal conductor, Salonen and The Philharmonia last performed here in 1955. In the over half century

since that appearance, the orchestra has established a stellar international reputation. Salonen leads the orchestra in Beethoven’s Second Symphony, along with Berlioz’s enduring ode to love and obsession, Symphonie fantastique. Solo, Duo & Chamber Recitals Recitals have long been a mainstay of classical music's powerful hold on Chicagoans, and this season is example of just the kind of uniquely gifted artistic weight that makes Chicago a home to some of the most important recital performances on the globe every year. But there are indeed a few select performances I strongly recommend this season that offer particularly thrilling and thoughtful programming paired with particularly insightful and illuminating artistry. On October 12 at Northwestern University's Pick-Staiger Hall (music.northwestern.edu/concerts), pianist Jeffrey Siegel will bring an exhilarating concert of Bach's Toccata in D, the vivacious Italian Concerto, and the soul-stirring Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue. This high-voltage recital is made up of Bach masterworks that display the virtuosity of the artist amid the ambiance of deeply expressive music. On October 14, celebrated American pianist Murray Perahia will return to Symphony Center for his first recital appearance in five years as part of the CSOA's season-long celebration of Sir Georg Solti. Perahia was a frequent soloist with Solti and the CSO. And he brings with him a program that Solti would have reveled in hearing. It includes Schubert's beguiling Six Moments Musicaux, D. 780, Beethoven's beloved (Moonlight) Sonata in C-sharp Minor, and Chopin' s Scherzo No. 1 in B Minor . Next spring British pianist Paul Lewis brings the final program in his widely acclaimed, three-season, five-concert exploration of Schubert's mature piano works to Symphony Center. His recital (March 3) features the composer’s last sonatas, D. 958, 959 and 960. Written during the final months of Schubert’s life, these pieces went unpublished for a decade but are considered stunningly mature achievements and are now part of the core piano repertoire. The greatly admired and enigmatic Russian pianist Evgeny Kissin makes his return Symphony Center appearance on April 28 this season. Having won a Grammy in 2010 for Best Instrumental Soloist for his recording of Prokofiev’s Second and Third Piano Concertos with the Philharmonia Orchestra, Kissin's Symphony Center performance promises to provide listeners an afternoon of his trademark intense and dynamic musicianship. In addition to her appearance this season in the CSOA's Symphony Ball concert, violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter will return on March 10 for her first recital appearance at Symphony Center since 2008. Joined by her longtime collaborator, pianist Lambert Orkis, Mutter will present a varied program that includes works by Schoenberg, Webern and Grieg, culminating in Franck’s lyrically beautiful Violin Sonata in A Major, written as a wedding present for famous Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe in 1886. Midway through the season, Lyric Opera (lyricopera.org) subscribers will be treated to a unique vocal recital event featuring two acclaimed and superbly talented voices, Lyric Creative Consultant, soprano (Opposite Page): violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter with conductor Michael Francis (photo ©Chris Lee/Deutsche Grammophon; (Clockwise from top) conductor Esa-Peka Salonen (photo courtesy of the artist); pianist Murray Perahia (photo courtesy of the artist); (Left): Members of Les Violons du Roy (photo courtesy of Harris Theatre for Music and Dance.

Underlay: Symphony Center's Audience (photo by Todd Rosenberg).

Autumn 2012CNCJA•21 2012CNCJA•21 Autumn

20•CNCJAAutumn 2012

I wanted to send over a quick thank you for your fall arts guide (Autumn 2014 Special New Season Preview)...I recently took in the Chicago Opera Theater performance of Queenie (by Duke Ellington) at Harris Theater and it was a wonderful production of a show I'd never known even existed. I love jazz and noticed your mention of the show this season in your guide, so I kept an eagle eye out for it ever since.

Guide to Music in Chicago's 2012-2013 fine arts season.

I continue to be a big fan of Clef Notes. Thank you again. Stanley Rodgers Chicago - Hyde Park

And Something to Think About What a beautiful cover (Winter 2014 issue) with Gary Griffin (Chicago Shakespeare Theater associate artistic director)....You guys always rock the stunning photos! Your magazine is simply gorgeous. Louise Flowers Chicago - Streeterville ...Very nice photo of Gary Griffin on the cover of the recent issue of Clef Notes. You really show him shining in his element.

Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

BETWEEN the LINES

Alonzo King's LINES Ballet returns to the Windy City

Preeminent Sondheim interpreter Gary Griffin mounts two highly anticipated productions of the composer's works at Shakespeare Theater this season.

Philanthropy & The Arts

Cultivating a genuine corporate sponsor partnership based on shared values and mutual goals

Kelly Fenton Arlington Heights, IL

NEWBIES World's finest cultural newborns slated for Chicago audiences this winter

I like the look of Gary Griffin on the cover...so nice to see him there. He deserves that spot! Cassie Healy Winnetka, IL

Griffin's Take

The Winter 2014 Issue of Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts with Associate Director of Chicago Shakespeare Theater Gary Griiffin on the cover.

I read the very insightful feature you published on arts philanthropy last month (The String Too Short, Winter 2014 Issue). I work in the arts also and felt affinity with the smaller organizations (Don Fujiwara) mentioned and their plight in competing for valuable corporate support....I hope you do more to spotlight creative ways smaller organizations can work to develop funding and support in a highly competitive city like Chicago. Gary Weiler Chicago - River North Readers may submit letters to Feedback, Clef Notes Publishing, Inc. 5815 N. Sheridan Road, Suite 1107, Chicago, IL 60660 or via E-mail to Scuttlebutt@ClefNotesJournal.com.

6•CNCJASpring 2014

No portion of this publication may be reproduced without the express written consent of the publisher. Clef Notes Publishing makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the magazine’s content. However, we cannot be held responsible for any consequence arising from errors or omissions.

The South Gallery of The Museum of Contemporary Art,


Spring 2014CNCJA•7


Out and About

F

In keeping with the theme, guests arrived in “pearls/black tie” attire. An array of tastings was prepared by Limelight Catering and guests enjoyed sushi provided by Arami and sake courtesy of Tenzing and Bonzai Beverage Corp. The Fantasy Cabaret performance in Civic Opera House’s Ardis Krainik Theatre began shortly after 8 p.m. and featured stars of Lyric’s current season. Lyric’s music director Sir Andrew Davis sparkled as Master of Ceremonies.

Photos by Dan Rest

or just one night, the Civic Opera House became a Japanese garden, complete with Torii gate, kimonos, paper lanterns, and Taiko drummers (with environmental design by Event Creative). This set the scene for “Petals and Pearls” the 30th annual Fantasy of the Opera Gala benefit hosted by Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Guild Board of Directors on Friday, January 31. The gala benefit raised $412,000 for the world-renowned opera company.

Japanese lanterns drape high above Civic Opera House's Rice Grand Foyer for Lyric Opera's annual Fantasy of the Opera Gala.

ABC7's Kathy Brock and Doug Regan. Photo by Cheri Eisenberg.

Fantasy Cabaret artists take a bow.(L-R):Eric Owens, Ana Maria Martinez, David Cangelosi, Will Liverman, Jill Grove, pianist Craig Terry, Brandon Jovanovich, Christine Brewer, Sir Andrew Davis.

Fantasy of the Opera guests dance to Rendezvous Music. 8•CNCJASummer 2013 8•CNCJASpring 2014

(Lto R): David and Courtney Burk, Steve and Lois Eisen, and Yale and Jai Eisen enjoyed box seats for the Fantasy Cabaret and dinner. The Eisen Family Foundation was a Fantasy Silver Grand Benefactor.

Taiko drummers perform in Civic Opera House's Rice Grand Foyer.


T

Photos by J.B. Spector

he Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago hosted its 31st annual Black Creativity black-tie gala on Saturday, January 25, 2014. The gala, planned in collaboration with a committee of prominent Chicago African-American leaders, raised $360,000 to support the annual Black Creativity programming and events, which pay tribute to the culture, heritage and science contributions of African Americans and help motivate youth in the sciences.

The evening kicked off with nearly 700 guests enjoying cocktails and hors d’oeuvres in the annual Black Creativity Juried Art Exhibition, featuring more than 85 original works Lorraine and Wayne Morgan of art from African-American artists.

Kevin and Melonese Brookins

Roslyn Chapman and Earl Bowles

Norm and Cheri Chappelle and Vera and Frank Clark Spring 2014CNCJA•9


Luminary

S

By FRED CUMMINGS

Photos courtesy of the artist

Singer/songwriter John Gorka is just about as real a deal as you’re going to find on the concert scene today. Gorka’s been penning his own authentic brand of poignant, lyrical songs since the late '70s when he opened for headliners like Shawn Colvin and Suzanne Vega at Godfrey Daniels in eastern Pennsylvania. Today Colvin and Vega—and the host of other leading folk artists that inspired a college-age Gorka—now call him peer. In fact, Gorka has worked with many of the big names, including Mary Chapin Carpenter, and many have sung his heartfelt tunes.

Acclaimed folk singer John Gorka 10•CNCJASpring 2014

Though authenticity is usually what sets his genre apart, authenticity is what sets Gorka apart from other artists within his genre. He’s a purposedriven performer, driven to communicate the wealth of tender themes that permeate his music. Not surprisingly, Gorka’s soulful, velvettoned voice melting on the lyrics of poignant, heartfelt tunes is more than enough to reach right down to the hearts of listeners. And that’s why audiences love hearing him. They leave with something near tangible in tow. I had a chance to sit down with Gorka on the heels the of his 12th studio album, Bright Side Down, called one of his most important and meaningful music to date. And that’s saying something. Gorka had


a thing or two to say about the need to be out there in front of the audience, the need to communicate the themes of his own story, and reach the hearts—not just the ears—of the fan base that keep him coming back. Now celebrating your 12th studio album, success has clearly taken you far from your beginnings at Godfrey Daniels coffee house back in Pennsylvania. Yet your music today seems every bit as authentic and fresh as your early efforts. How do you continue to write such grounded, emotionally accessible music with the many winds of change that typically steer an artist's work over the life of their career? I feel that the strength of what I do comes from what I have in common with others and not in what I have that is different. I don't feel the need to look, act or be any different than the people out there listening. Bob Feldman, who started Red House Records, once said to me "People want to see themselves in the songs." I have taken that to heart. I don't feel that my life is all that special. Even when I'm writing a song that came from my experience, I try to keep in mind that it is just one example of a larger truth. I try to be true to the narrator's character, whether that be my or another's voice. And, in general, I try to write of the things I feel strongly about, and more and more I try to get out of the way of the song and let it be what it wants to be. I am very grateful I have the chance to do this for a living. For some artists and genres today, a studio recording can easily serve as the final piece in the artistic process, where concerts become an afterthought or a supplement to the recording project. But I get the sense that, for you, recording is merely a piece of that process that culminates in live performance. Do you ever envision a time when recording alone will be enough to satisfy artistically? I have always based what I do on the songs and the live show. I enjoy making records but of the 3 main things I do: performing, writing and recording, it is the thing I've spent the least amount of time doing. I enjoy the process, the players, the technology, all of it, but nothing comes close to the immediacy of knowing when a song is connecting to a live audience. I think I will continue to play shows until I am physically unable to do so. Your music seems to be all about the connection it makes with the audience. How then do you capture the same authenticity and spontaneity in a studio recording setting that you get with an audience to feed off of? I think of them as 2 different worlds and I try to get them to work in both. Songs are larger than record-

ings and they can have many lives even if no one else records them. I can play a song exactly the same way I did on the recording but sometimes the world will change and meaning of the lyrics will change too. In recording I just try to get a performance that feels right and that I can live with after listening to it repeatedly. That's one of the things I liked about recording Bright Side of Down was that we worked on it a little bit at a time and I was able to see how the performance held up and if the different elements of the track held up over time. A live performance only has to connect with that particular room full of people at that one moment in time. I have found that in recording, the first time I play something is often the best time so that we are trying to capture the moment of creation rather than recreating something for posterity. That doesn't mean that the first take is always the best take. Sometimes it takes me forever to play a particular song or instrumental part but it will be the first time I play a new variation that will be the one that works and becomes the keeper. You once said in an interview that you were "drawn to" perform more than your were actually comfortable with it. Yet you are so well known for your stage presence and comfort with your audience. What happens to you when you take the stage that allows you to connect so easily? I have more fun now than when I started performing. I think I have come to terms with my own discomfort and social shortcomings and now try to use them to my advantage with the audience. I don't have a comfort zone. I have never had a comfort zone, so I don't try to pretend that I do. Most of the time the audience understands and in any case, I am glad they are out there. If your battery of work is any indication, your latest album is a distinct emotional journey. Where does Bright Side Down begin and where does it take the listener? It begins in a blizzard before the actual official beginning of winter and ends with a hope for spring. In between, there are indications of mortality, dealing with the loss of friends, but there is also joy in songs like “Honeybee” and some playfulness in songs like “Mind to Think.” In addition there are some musings and some smart aleck behavior. I hope it will be a nice ride for people. You can catch part of that ride when John Gorka performs songs from Bright Side Down at his April 24th Chicago CD release concert at City Winery in Chicago’s West Loop.

Spring 2014CNCJA•11


Early Exposure Photo courtesy of the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra

Chicago is a phenomenal city for study of the arts and for very young artists, actors and musicians there's a wealth of options for training that could lead to a real career in the field. But even more, through programs like these, kids at every level can enjoy a superb introduction to the arts that can lead to a valuable lifelong appreciation of culture.

The Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra performs at Symphony Center's Orchestra Hall.

 The Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra had been training young Chicago musicians since 1946. With an expanding repertoire, performance opportunities that include Chicago's Symphony Center and luminary alumni that currently perform with world orchestras from the Chicago and Boston Symphonies to the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the CYSO is a superb training ground for any young instrumentalist in the making. 12•CNCJASpring 2014

 Just west of the Chicago Loop, Merit School of Music has an impressive slate of programs that not only introduce a young musician to the vast possibilities of a career in the arts but provide a real framework for success. And with an unprecedented focus on inclusion, Merit opens doors to a high quality music education for all Chicago children, unmasking their full potential. Luminary alumni include world renowned flutist Anthony McGill, who regularly performs with leading orchestras around the globe.

 The Music Institute of Chicago (MIC) is one of the three largest and most respected community music institutions in the country. And it propels its mission to provide the "foundation for a lifelong engagement with music" by proffering a diverse slate of high caliber programming initiatives from music theory to performance to arts therapy. With locations throughout Chicagoland, MIC is able to reach an expansive population with its diverse curriculum, which has been producing award winning artists and ensembles for more than 83 years.


Photo by Matt Hollis

 The award winning Joffrey Academy of Dance is any and every young dancer's dream experience. The official school of the internationally renowned Joffrey Ballet, The Joffrey Academy has built a reputation for excellence on par with dance conservatories around the world. The program offers students a prestigious platform of programs based on the highest level of education in classical ballet right in the heart of the Chicago Loop. Students are trained in the Academy's 20,000 square foot Exelon Education Center with state-ofthe-art studios, learning a wide variety of skills from artistry to creativity to discipline and self-confidence.

The University of Chicago Department of Music presents over 100 diverse and exciting events each year involving over 700 musicians!

UPCOMING EVENTS SATURDAY, APRIL 26 • 8:00 PM University Symphony Orchestra Concerto Showcase SUNDAY, MAY 4 • 3:00 PM New Music Ensemble Grad Student Composers FRIDAY, APRIL 18 • 8:00 PM SATURDAY, APRIL 1 9 • 11 AM & 7 PM South Asian Sound Intervention Affective Labor in Dance: South Asia and Beyond SATURDAY, MAY 31 • 8:00 PM SUNDAY, JUNE 1 • 3:00 PM Annual Cathy Heifetz Memorial Concert University Symphony Orchestra, University Chorus and Motet Choir Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms and more

Joffrey Bridge Program students training at the 20,000 square foot Exelon Education Center in Joffrey Tower.

 The Chicago Children's Choir (CCC) has been integrating cultures and experiences in one unified ensemble of musical excellence for more than half a century. Serving nearly 3,500 children annually, CCC has racked up a plethora of accolades and offers young singers the opportunity to tour internationally. With the slew of world class celebrities they count as collaborators, the ensemble creates an amazing platform for both musical appreciation and professional possibilities. The Chicago Children's Choir

SUNDAY, JUNE 1 • 7:00 PM Middle East Music Ensemble Arab traditions THURSDAY, JUNE 5 • 8:00 PM Jazz X-tet

For event locations and full calendar listing, visit

Photo courtesy of the chicago Children's Choir

music.uchicago.edu

Spring 2014CNCJA•13


Photo courtesy of The Morton Arboretum

 Sating young appetites for museum science learning, there are a host of museums with a great depth of programming to nurture young scientists. Up in Lisle, Illinois, Morton Arboretum’s highly-regarded Summer Science Camp features more than 100 camps for kids in kindergarten through 8th grade, with 13 new camps added to keep the experience fresh for repeat campers. Taking place from June 9-August 8, each week-long camp engages and educated kids as they explore bizarre bugs, wriggling frogs, fairy worlds and more. Similar programs abound throughout Chicagoland with institutions like Kohl Children's Museum along the north shore and Chicago Children's Museum at Navy Pier. But at the top of the list has to be the Museum of Science and Industry's stellar Learning Labs programs, which offer students profoundly rich hands-on science exploration in a variety of intriguing sub-

Chicago's young thespians have fewer options for real professional training in theater arts, but no less a formidable resource in Lookingglass Theater's dynamic Summerglass and Springlass Theater Camps. Run in the spring and summer months Lookingglass' camps offer daily classes in physical theater and acting. Programs from morning to late afternoon bolster campers' physical dexterity on the stage with lessons in everything from juggling to clowning to tumbling. It all culminates when they apply their creativity to their own original adaptation of a Lookkingglass play. The camps accept participants ages 8-14 years of age and sessions take place on Chicago's sparkling lakefront.

(Above) Budding young scientists participate in the Morton Arboretum's Summer Science Camp; (Right) Young theater students participate in physical theater exercises at Lookingglass Theater's Springglass Camp.

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SUMMER 2014

jects. From the laws of Newton  Many programs exist in the Windy to forensic sciences, students City to nurture young artists in their are able to roll up their sleeves craft, but Kidstreet Classes & and dig into real laboratory sciCamps at Lill Street Art Center ence, building an invaluable in Chicago's Lincoln Park offers an platform for learning and inspiexceptional cache of training opration for years to come. tions amid the center's broader art programs. Students gain entry to the program through school parWhether your tot is a budding ticipation, and Home School DaVinci or simply loves to create Labs are available too. those special treasures for mom and With labs in session from dad, Lill Street's curriculum offers September through June high quality training and guidance in each year, there's no shortage a non-competitive environment that of powerful ancillary learnwill nurture students from novice ing opportunities for young through portfolio development for explorers. college education in the field. Critical thinking, creativity, confidence and technique are all on the agenda for participants in the program.

2014 SUMMER PROGRAMS Classes and camps for everyone from newborn to 18.

EARLY CHILDHOOD JUNE 16 – AUGUST 9 Shake, Rattle & Roll Movers & Shakers Music Masters I Music Together Music Masters Camp

GROUP CLASSES

JUNE 16 – AUGUST 7 Inroduction to Band Instruments Cadet Band Intermediate Band Guitar Piano Children’s Choir

SUMMER CAMPS JUNE 16 – JUNE 20 Horn Camp Percussion Camp Saxophone Camp Trumpet Camp Voice Camp

JULY 8 – AUGUST 14 Summer Conservatory Wind Ensemble

JUNE 23 – JUNE 27 Flute Camp Guitar Camp Trombone Camp Tuba/Euphonium Camp

JULY 21 – AUGUST 1 Band Camp String Camp

Photo courtesy of Lookingglass Theatre

JULY 7 – JULY 11 Piano Camp - Session 1 JULY 7 – JULY 18 Chamber Music Camp Jazz Camp

JULY 14 – JULY 18 Piano Camp - Session 2

JULY 21 – JULY 25 Piano Camp - Session 3 AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 8 Summer Conservatory Orchestra AUGUST 11 – AUGUST 15 Suzuki-Alegre Strings Camp

REGISTER ONLINE www.meritmusic.org

MARCH 14 - Priority Registration begins APRIL 1 - Open Registration begins

Joy Faith Knapp Music Center I 38 South Peoria St I Chicago, IL 60607 312. 786. 9428 I www.meritmusic.org

Spring 2014CNCJA•15


expanding

horizons By LAURA KINTER Ryan Opera Center member J'nai Bridges as Flora in Lyric Opera's 2013-2014 production of Verdi's La Traviata

Arts & Education

I

It's no secret that it takes more than a lovely voice to succeed in the opera world. Several major opera companies across the country have artistic development programs that coach young singers in the business and professional sides of operatic performance, providing fellows with the practical instruction required to succeed in such a competitive environment. One such program in our own backyard is The Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Opera Center of Lyric Opera of Chicago, and it offers unparalleled educational and development opportunities to young artists, equipping them for a thriving and longlasting career in the field. The program is considered one of the most prestigious vocal 16•CNCJASpring 2014

training apprenticeships in the world and has dispatched a roster of distinguished alumni like Quinn Kelsey, Amanda Majeski, Susanna Phillips and countless other acclaimed vocalists. Founded in 1974, the Ryan Opera Center is the oldest artistic development program affiliated with a major company like Lyric Opera. With a world-renowned team of opera singers, directors, conductors, and orchestral musicians to help fashion the fellowship experience, the Ryan Opera Center has risen to the top tier of programs of its ilk. In addition to hearing singers from operatic summer programs in San Francisco (Merola Opera Program) and Santa Fe (Santa Fe Opera apprentice program), the Ryan Opera Center holds auditions in New York City and Chicago. From that pool, 20 talented artists are invited to audition with one short month to prepare their final audition piece. Of that 20, three to four artists are welcomed as new members into the Ryan Opera Center's program. Ensemble members are ushered into an intensive training program from May to August, attending a wide range of classes for vo-


ers gain practical business and professional knowledge of the industry from the program’s veteran administrative team. The program is often compared with a conservatory experience, but Novak insists it offers opportunities far and beyond that of a conservatory. “The Ryan Opera Center is not a school or a conservatory. It is the next step in artistic development after a conservatory. I refrain from calling (Ryan ensemble members) students, because they’re really young professionals. It’s an experience that you can’t get anywhere else besides an international company. It’s a real eye opener when they get here, for them to see how things work.” Novak and Terry both maintain relationships with the performers, encouraging independent artistic vision and confidence. “My relationship with them is primarily to help them grow artistically and musically through the various assignments they have during the season,” says Terry. “There are operatic engagements in the house and recitals…we program nine recitals a year. I help them become more competent and accomplished. It’s the most exciting part of my job.” Novak adds, “We want them to stand on their own artistic feet and say ‘this is what I have to say,’…We want them to keep doing what they’re doing—on their own. Our goal as administrators of the program is to inspire the confidence to say what they want to say artistically.” Exposing the performers to the pragmatic, business side of opera singing truly sets the Ryan Opera Center apart from other artistic development programs of its kind. J’nai Bridges, a mezzo-soprano currently in the program, notes just how the Ryan Opera Center has helped her overcome the more practical challenges within the industry. “There are many different dimensions of this art form and singing is only a part of it. You have to be capable of promoting yourself and handling all situations in a respectful and classy manner. Seeing many sides of this field has given me more confidence in my gift of singing, speaking, and appreciating the opportunities. It's not always easy, but the end result is so satisfying.” From top: Ryan Opera Center member Tracy Canton in Barber of Seville; Alek Schrader and Ryan Center member Will Liverman in Barber of Seville; and Adrian Erod and Ryan Center member Julie Ann Miller in Die Fledermaus.

Photos By Dan Rest

Photo by Todd Rosenberg

cal coaching, acting, language and diction. Lyric Opera’s mainstage season begins in September, during which artists have the unique opportunity to perform and understudy roles in mainstage productions. Artists may reaudition to remain in the program, and most continue for two years before moving on to independent careers. Ensemble members receive artistic instruction from performers at the “highest international levels,” says music director Craig Terry. “Being around those kinds of artists that are still performing at the top of their game, and to be advised by them, makes our program beneficial in a very practical way.” Chief among those artist/advisors is celebrated, worldrenowned soprano Renée Fleming, who stunned a national audience with beautiful operatic performance of The National Anthem during this year’s Superbowl—a first for any operatic performer. Fleming works with the artists as part of her role as Ryan Opera Center Advisor. “Renée brings her incredible experience as an iconic member of our profession to really try and nurture young talent,” says Terry. “She coaches all of our young artists in singing technique, and artistry. She is also wonderful about advising them on career choices. She’s happy to help as much as she can, and she mentors them on the business side of being a professional opera singer.” Having mentors like Renée Fleming, in addition to other experienced Lyric principal singers, creates a truly nurturing environment for young artists. “We informally call it the ‘buddy system,’” explains Dan Novak, director of the program. “A lot of seasoned, experienced professionals are so gracious, and mentor (their junior colleagues). They’ll offer real world advice such as, ‘Here’s what it’s like when you have to work in Europe and deal with taxes.’” Aside from the high caliber of artistic instruction, sing-

Spring 2014CNCJA•17


Photo By Dan Rest

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is typically a far and away dream for most young opera singers, but the Ryan Opera Center gives fine young artists the training and opportunity to do just that. Novak and Terry have very high hopes for furthering the growth of the program. “It’s a very exciting time at the company. We’ve added some things, like a recital series on the radio twice a month, and we’re excited about what other possibilities the future might hold for us. We hope to continue to grow the program and provide the unique experiences that make it the most attractive to young performers.” Chicago is clearly a pivotal epicenter for educational and developmental opportunities for aspiring artists of all kinds. Says Bridges, “There is a wealth of opportunities for young musicians, and Chicago should be incredibly proud of that. Artists involved (in the program) will gain tremendous experience.” Bridges' account of her rich experience should encourage young performers to audition. “My confidence on stage has grown. Now, instead of the negative stage jitters, I have nerves that give me energy to sing and emote well in front of an audience. I also am more confident about what works and what doesn't work for my voice. I've discovered things about myself that I'm not sure I would have had the courage to do without the help of the Ryan Opera Center.” Above: Ryan Opera Center member John Irvin in the Lyric Opera cast of Otello; (Inset) Joseph Calleja and Ryan Opera Center member Quinn Kelsey in La Traviata.

Photo by Todd Rosenberg

Bridges earned her Bachelor of Music at the Manhattan School of Music, and subsequently her Master of Music degree at the Curtis Institute of Music before joining the Ryan Opera Center in 2013. She has small roles this season in Lyric productions of Parsifal, La traviata and Rusalka. “I heard so many wonderful things about the Chicago Lyric Opera’s Ryan Center before auditioning,” says Bridges. “Many singers from all over the country raved about how outstanding (the program) was especially because of the exposure and role preparation opportunities given. It was a very positive experience, and singing on the main stage for the final audition was a thrill!” For the first time, this year’s final round of auditions was held on the Lyric Opera stage in front of a live audience, made up of donors and subscribers. “It was a really wonderful experience for the performers and audience,” says Novak. “It was a great way to give our supporters a behind-the-scenes look, so they could hear someone from the ground floor.” Ryan ensemble members have also had the occasional opportunity to perform the roles they’ve understudied in Lyric’s main stage productions before Lyric’s Civic Opera House audience. This past December, tenor and second year ensemble member John Irvin stepped into the role of Alfred for two performances of Johann Strauss, Jr.'s Die Fledermaus. Last season, Ryan soprano Kiri Deonarine stepped in at the last minute to sing Gilda in Rigoletto. Such opportunities to perform a lead role on an international stage

Arts & Education


Stream more than 800 hours of music history.

EXPLORING MUSIC.ORG debuts!

Bill McGlaughlin, host of Exploring Music

After 10 successful years, WFMT’s flagship program, EXPLORING MUSIC with BILL McGLAUGHLIN, is going online! Now every program can be heard at your convenience at our new streaming web site. Listen to more than 800 hours of personable, insightful, entertaining programs on the history of classical music, featuring entire weeks (5 hours of programs) devoted to specific composers (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Mahler…), genres, cities, historical periods, and much more on this unparalleled subscription streaming website. Visit exploringmusic.org to secure your membership for unlimited listening anytime, anywhere. LINES Ballet dancer Michael Montgomery

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exploringmusic.org

Spring 2014CNCJA•19


Arts & Education Chicago's Black Box Acting promotes a curriculum that teaches a dynamic fight club mentality, encouraging actors to fight for their perspective on the live stage.

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By DAVID BERNER

ust before 9 a.m. on a Tuesday morning in late January, Laura Hooper and Audrey Francis, the co-founders of Black Box Acting, step out from a car parked across the street from the brand new address of their five-year old acting school. They’re carrying a simple mop and a plastic bucket. It's been just a few days since moving into the new headquarters at 2625 W. North Avenue near Chicago’s Logan Square, and the dust is still settling...real dust.

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“Still needs some touching up,” Laura Hooper says, smiling. “Got to keep the place clean, and we love it.” Black Box Acting’s new home is a recently rehabbed 3,200 square foot space washed in a bold and contemporary design. There are three classrooms for training and performances, each plainly appointed with nothing more that what is absolutely essential to the school’s acting technique: hardwood floors, a few chairs and dark painted walls. “There are going to be different directors and set designers everywhere you work,” Audrey Francis says with affable confidence, “but all there is here is the actor.” she explains. “You learn how to be an actor in a naked space. It’s a ‘black box’ for the actor to work in.” In 2009, Black Box Acting began in comparatively tight quarters, a 600-square foot boutique studio in Wicker Park with 12 part-time students and just two classes. Now, the school employs five full-time staff members, nine instructors, and has trained in its two programs nearly 700 aspiring performers from all over the world. The Studio class is a five-week program set on a parttime schedule; and The Academy, which launched two years ago, is an intense five-month accelerated program geared toward the actor who is ready to begin a professional career. Black Box not only needed the physical space to match its continuing growth, it also needed the space to match its developing reputation. Hooper, who trained at the School at Steppenwolf and continues to act and direct, firmly believes Black Box can revolutionize acting in Chicago. “A Black-Boxer is someone who plays fearless in the room, and when I’m out auditioning I can see the difference between those who have trained here and those who have not,” Hooper says. The Black Box method is based on acting in its rawest form and has its roots in the Stanford Meisner Technique, a method based on the actor building an emotional life and a unique, personalized response to the craft. Hooper and Francis say their method is based on that very premise and employs physical and emotional impulses, encourages imagination, and builds an actor’s stamina and focus. “It allows the actor to take risks,” says Francis, who met Hooper at the School at Steppenwolf and continues to act in independent films and television, including a recent episode of Chicago Fire. “We want the people who are in control of theater in Chicago to take more risks with the underdogs, underdogs with some talent.” There are plans to line the lobby walls of the school’s new building with large portraits of Black Box students, portraying battered and bloodied actors, as a way to continue the school’s dynamic theme. The large photos are expected to fit in perfectly with the suspended bare light bulbs that pay tribute to what the co-founders call the school’s “Fight Club” attitude.


Training Day Photos courtest of Black Box Acting Studios

By DAVID BERNER

Actress and Academy student Amanda Fink, whose talent led her to be cast in a show Francis was directing, says the school’s boxer attitude suits her just right. “I push myself harder here than anywhere else I have ever trained,” Fink says. “The work is tough and so very honest.” Student Johnny Kalita believes the school’s values make total sense. Kalita, also a member of The Academy, is a tall, movie-star-handsome actor dressed in a sport jacket and tie. He's trained in a number of places in and around Chicago but says he wasn't really ever satisfied with any one program until he began his work at Black Box. “Here, you can be brave enough to expose every side of yourself even if it’s scary,” says Kalita. Hooper and Francis admit starting Black Box Acting was an extremely risky venture. Five years ago they both were struggling actors, not getting the parts they wanted, and starting a training program from such a shaky platform was undeniably dicey. But, as Francis points out, she and Hooper were committed and willing to work hard just like their students. “Through our own struggles as actors, we became really good teachers. It helped us develop and copyright our method,” Francis says. But, both she and her co-founder concede it wasn’t always an easy process and there were difficult times.

“We had our fights,” says Hooper, “Only one or two, though.” Hooper admits one of the arguments was intense, but understands it needed to happen. “We worked at it and fixed it. And in the end, it was a real cosmic shift. It made us and Black Box stronger.” There’s still physical work to be done at the school’s new headquarters and development work for the future of Black Box Acting. A few more details and some design work will complete the look of the new headquarters, and Hooper and Francis say they must continually consider what will come next for the school as more actors find success through their method. “I know it sounds weird,” says Francis, “but we train people not to act.” She says the students who get the most out of Black Box come to believe that what they bring to the craft is unique and fascinating. “We don’t want our students to be what someone else thinks they should be. We want them to fight to find their distinctive place as an actor. We want them to throw some punches.” (Opposite page-top): The new Black Box Acting studios on west North Avenue in Chicago's Logan Square; (left and above) Students take part in training exercises in the Black Box Method cultivating a "fight club" approach to acting.

Spring 2014CNCJA•21


Arts & Education

New Second City Improv Training to Address Autism Spectrum Disorders

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By ANDREW PHILLIPS

Photo By Rob Holmes

The Second City Training Center is launching its unique Improv for ASD curriculum this spring, offering both teens and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders a unique 12-week mentoring and development experience that includes improv games and exercises to help with the exploration of relationships and social cues. As Andrew Alexander, CEO and executive producer for The Second City, points out, the program is a natural offshoot of the company's already robust training offerings. “We are so thrilled to be expanding our training programs to reach a new audience with Improv for ASD,” noted Alexander, "The launch of this class falls right in line with our company's broad initiatives to make improvisation accessible to all. We truly believe in the powers of improv to increase social skills, confidence and play at all ages...I welcome our new students into the Second City family.” The Second City's overall slate of educational programs is based on the idea that improvisation in all forms improves wellness through encouraging teamwork and collaboration, building confidence, tying success to a model of listening and support of others, and creating a safe space to take a risk and encourage creativity. Improv for ASD is fine-tuned to help students on the autism spectrum break through various social barriers. The classes were originally offered as a piloted program in the summer of 2013. Further developed in collaboration with the Newmark School in New Jersey, these one-of-akind improv classes are facilitated by skilled Second City instructor Nick Johne. The program's therapeutic value goes far and away beyond what one might expect. According to psychologist Dr. Robert E. Daniels of the Chicago Children’s Clinic, "The improv workshops and camps perfectly complement what we do in therapy, providing an outlet for creativity and an opportunity to form strong friendships. Second City’s approach is consistent with the most cutting-edge research in positive psychology.” Summer Camps for teens ages 15-18 will launch in Chicago and New Jersey this summer. Classes will focus on ensemble and team building to help with the exploration of different relationships and social cues. Improvisational games used in this class will teach the students skills such as accessing emotions and storytelling. This will The Second City Training Center Artistic Director Matt Hovde leading one of the center's be done in a safe improvisation and sketch comedy classroom sessions. and fun setting where the students can explore and challenge themselves. The Second City Training Center has a current student body of 3,500 per week and is the largest school of improvisation and sketch comedy in the world. Registration is open now for Friday classes starting March 7. Classes are 12 weeks for 90 minutes per week. For more information, visit www.secondcity.com/training/chicago. 22•CNCJASpring 2014


ChiArts Academy Launches New Prodigy Institute By SCOTT ELAM

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The Chicago Academy for the Arts, a Kennedy Center School of Distinction, launches its latest innovative program, The Prodigy Institute this spring. The Prodigy Institute facilitates students’ access to professionals working in the field as well as the community’s access to some of the most promising young talent in the country. The Prodigy Institute engages Chicagoland’s world-class institutions and the world’s most exciting and relevant artists of the day to provide experiences to our most promising young artists,” says Academy Head of School Pamela Jordan. “The Institute’s professional experiences enable our students to elevate their creative potential to the highest level possible, and attract those students with the greatest potential to Chicago and to The Chicago Academy for the Arts.” The Prodigy Institute increases professional development opportunities for the academy’s students by expanding the number of master classes and artistic residencies; formalizing partnerships with premier international, national and Chicago-based arts organizations; and creating outreach programs that allow students to serve Chicago communities. The Goethe Institut, Harris Theater, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and Lyric Opera of Chicago are among the partner arts institutions in the Institute’s inaugural year. To celebrate the launch, The academy hosted an event February that highlighted the Prodigy Institute’s vision and showcased the Institute programming in the dance and visual arts departments. The Institute’s programming will enhance the curriculum in each of the academy’s six arts disciplines: dance, media arts, music, musical theater, theater and visual arts. An example of the kind of professional collaboration the academy is providing its students, the visual arts department is bringing in contemporary artist, film maker and cartoonist Lille Carre, whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Best American Comics and The Sundance Film Festival, for an artist lecture and master class at the academy. The Prodigy Institute program is expected to help position the academy to advance toward its Vision 2020 goal to set new standards in arts education.  (Above): Students if the ChiArts Academy media arts proram(photo courtesy of ChiArts Academy); (right) Student of the Chicago Mosaic School (photo courtesy of the Chicago Mosaic school).

Arts & Education

Chicago Mosaic School Offers Only Curriculum of its Kind in the Nation By ANDREW PHILLIPS

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Founded in 2005, The Chicago Mosaic School (CMS) is the first and only professional school for the high art of mosaics in North America. The school provides artists and teachers an exemplary environment to explore all facets of mosaics, from classical reproduction to contemporary abstraction. With some of the world’s foremost masters in tow, CMS aims to influence a new generation of mosaic artists in North America seeking a professional education in the field. CMS’s 7,500+ square foot facility, located in the heart of Chicago, houses classrooms, artist studios, a library and conference space. Students are also able to show their work in The Gallery of Contemporary Mosaics and attend lectures and presentations from renowned local and international artists. CMS was founded by Karen Ami, an award winning sculpture and mosaic artist who has exhibited worldwide for more than three decades. While a graduate student at the School of the Art Institute (SAIC), Ami focused her talents on mosaics seeking post-graduate educational opportunities in the field. With few serious institutions here in the states, she traveled to Italy and sought out masters from the art form who would be willing to travel to Chicago to teach. Gradually, more and more enthusiastic responses meant the start of a new professional school for mosaic arts right here in the Windy City. Offering a wide array of course work and training as well as a new Certificate Program in Mosaic Arts, CMS is continually broadening its reach to visiting artists from around the world. For more information about programming and enrollment, visit chicagomosaicschool.com. Spring 2014CNCJA•23


Pier

alm at the

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By LAURA KINTER

This April, Chicago’s emblematic Navy Pier will host the first Midwest extension of the Palm Beach Show Group’s Chicago International Art, Antique and Jewelry Show. Over 150 internationally recognized exhibitors will showcase their art and collections of American and European silver, Asian antiquities, sculpture, textiles, furniture, and contemporary art at Navy Pier. An opening night private preview celebration will kick off the event on Thursday, April 24 and the show will run until Monday, April 28. Palm Beach Show Group offers the most prestigious and highly regarded antique show in the country, and will bring its high caliber collections to Chicago to meet the needs of local art galleries, buyers, designers and antique enthusiasts. The Palm Beach Show Group has booked shows across the country in Los Angeles, New York, Baltimore, Dallas, Naples, and Palm Beach. This will be the group’s first show in the Midwest, and they have very high hopes for Chicago’s sophisticated collec-

The Palm Beaach Show Group's Only Authentics section feattures authentic collectibles like luxury handbags by Hermes and Chanel. Other rare items include a wide selection of fine art and jewelry.

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Photos courtesy of the palm beach show group

Curator's Corner

Chicago's Navy Pier gets set to host one of the world's most prestigious art and antiques shows. The prestigious Palm Beach Show Group's International event will become the feather in the cap of the city's antiques calendar this year.


tor market. Owner Scott Diament is excited to host a show at Navy Pier and feels the event will connect collectors, buyers, and enthusiasts of all kinds. “Chicago’s a very special place for our show. Because of its influential architects and designers. The city was the precursor for many contemporary shows. Contemporary art can be extremely valuable, and Tony’s (Karman) Navy Pier show is proving that can be brought back to Chicago.” Shows in different locations are curated to cater to each city’s specific collector market. Diament claims Chicago is a great market for furniture, therefore the Chicago show will feature more interior design than, say, antique jewelry. Navy Pier is known as the most frequently visited tourist location in the Midwest. Diament is hopeful that hosting the show on the city’s coast will encourage easy access and less traffic, as opposed to a clogged, center-city location. “You need logistics. You need high ceilings. It’s the most

(Top left): Visitors browse booths at the Palm Group's International Art, Antique amd Jewelry Show in Dallas.; (from top): Gruber armchair and Kano Seiun sculpture (photos by Antonio Varardi of Mack Lowe Gallery).

Spring 2014CNCJA•25


logical place to hold a high end antique and jewelry show,” says Diament. The high ceilings and expansive indoor space will provide exhibitors with maximum viewership potential and encourage a wide-open browsing experience. The Palm Group's total collection covers “pretty much the entire fine arts of the last 5,000 years,” claims Diament. The show’s Chicago premiere will host an array of fine items, including one very special 41-piece Gladstone Dinner Set by Paul Storr, exhibited by New Orleans-based M. S. Rau. The set—by far the largest complete set to enter the market—retails at $2.5 million. As for jewelry, there will be a gold necklace originally owned by Elizabeth Taylor (retail: $28,000), a gold Ventura watch owned by Elvis Presley (retail: $30,000), and pair of 1950s style earrings owned by Marilyn Monroe (retail: $20,000). Select exhibitors have their items highlighted in a design showcase intended to help visitors understand just how their collections can be incorporated into everyday lifestyles. Six designers will have a designated area or room to create beautiful living spaces using items for sale at the show. They will merge their own personal styles with the art, antiques,

Curator's Corner

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and jewelry available from the exhibitors participating in the show. This portion of the event is unique to the Chicago show. Diament notes that 40-50 exhibitors are reserving specific items especially for the Chicago collecting public. Only about ten exhibitors attend every Palm Beach Show Group show across the country. “The total amount of exhibitors is around 1,500, so a low percentage do every event. A lot more would do it if it were easier to schedule because we have some really dedicated fans of the show group,” says Diament. He points out the purpose of the show group is to “provide an economic engine inside this industry that brings the constituents together in a conducive manner to sell all the pieces.” Exhibitors were chosen specifically for their relevance to the Chicago collective market, and hope to meet the unique, design-oriented needs of the city’s many enthusiastic buyers. For more information about the show or to purchase tickets, visit www.chicagospringshow.com.

Photos courtesy of the palm beach show group

The Palm Group's total collection covers “pretty much the entire fine arts of the last 5,000 years,” claims (Scott) Diament (Owner of the Palm Beach Show Group). The show’s Chicago premiere will host an array of fine items, including one very special 41-piece Gladstone Dinner Set by Paul Storr, exhibited by New Orleans-based M. S. Rau.

(Above): M.S. Rau Antiques -The Gladstone Dinner Service by Paul Storr; (below): Fine art and authentics on display at the Palm Beach Show Group's Naples Winter Show.


WARM UP WITH HUBBARD STREET. THINK SPRING Dive deep into a single-choreographer evening with Hubbard Street’s Spring Series.

In Hubbard Street’s first allKylián program, see COMPANY PREMIERES of celebrated choreographer Jiří Kylián’s Falling Angels and Sarabande along with audience favorites Petite Mort and 27'52".

March 13–16, 2014

GET MORE ALEJANDRO THIS SUMMER Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo brings another world premiere to the Harris Theater stage for the Summer Series...

...plus William Forsythe’s transcendent Quintett and Nacho Duato’s sinewy, Mediterranean Gnawa.

June 5–8, 2014

GET TICKETS NOW! hubbardstreetdance.com/spring hubbardstreetdance.com/summer 312-850-9744

Performing at

Season Sponsors

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago in Petite Mort by Jiří Kylián. Photo by Todd Rosenberg. Hubbard Street Dancer Ana Lopez in Quintett by William Forsythe. Photo by Cheryl Mann.

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Tidbits

The Gene Siskel Film Center (GSFC) of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) will continue its legacy of saluting important leaders in cinematic achievement by honoring Academy Award-winner Morgan Freeman, Saturday, June 7, 2014, at The Ritz-Carlton Chicago (160 E. Pearson Street.) The festive evening will celebrate Freeman’s legendary career as an actor and director as well as give attendees the opportunity to enjoy a candid and insightful conversation as Freeman reminisces about his favorite performances, key influences and most powerful experiences—as well as discussing upcoming projects and his creative process. A retrospective of film clips from his most memorable performances will accompany the conversation. The evening will culminate with the presentation of the Gene Siskel Film Center Renaissance Award to Freeman by SAIC President Dr. Walter E. Massey. For more information about the event or for tickets, call (312) 846-2072.

Community Music

The Chicago Chamber Musicians (CCM) recently announced its new program designed to support both local musicians and Chicago neighborhoods. Beginning March 10, 2014, CCM will present six free concerts for all ages in Chicago parks and public libraries as part of its CCM presents: Concerts for Chicago Neighborhoods. The featured concerts are made possible through a generous grant from The Field Foundation of Illinois. CCM designed these “neighborhood tours” to align with the vision of the 2012 Chicago Cultural Plan for enriching and strengthening the city’s arts and cultural sector, supporting the idea that music not only has the capability to change lives for both the listener and the performer, but also to create stronger and more engaged communities. All concerts will be held in local and accessible locations and will offer an approachable and in depth look at the beauty and relevancy of chamber music.

28•CNCJASpring 2014

Cohn Magic at the ECC

Film Icon in the House

On Saturday, March 15, Grammy Award-winner Marc Cohn brings an evening of intoxicating pop and smooth jazz to the ECC Arts Center, on the campus of Elgin Community College. Cohn is well known for classics like “Walking In Memphis,” “Silver Thunderbird,” and “True Companion.” After taking a decade-long sabbatical, Cohn returned in 2007 with “Join The Parade.” Inspired by the events following Hurricane Katrina and his own near fatal shooting just weeks before, “…Parade” has been described as his most moving and

critically acclaimed record to date. Cohn toured with Mary Chapin Carpenter this past summer and is a guest vocalist on legendary songwriter Jimmy Webb's 2013 record, "Still Within The Sound Of My Voice."

A Walk with Genius

MacArthur Genius Award-winner and self-taught, celebrated ragtime pianist Reginald Robinson will perform at 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., Saturday, May 17 at Unity Temple in Oak Park in a benefit concert for the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust. The concert will be presented as part of the Trust’s All Wright Architectural Housewalk, which celebrates the 125th anniversary of Wright’s Home and Studio and the 40th anniversary of the Trust. Robinson is an internationally recognized pianist, composer, recording artist and educator. He's performed as a soloist internationally and as a guest artist with the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic, Chicago Sinfonietta and Andrew Bird’s Bowl of Fire, among others. Tickets for the May 17 concert will be $15 for the general public and $12 for Trust members. For more information and tickets, visit flwright.org/programs/ legacyyearconcert. Performing songs from their brand-new release, The Spark & the Fire, indie jazz and pop sensation Leftover Cuties opens the 2014 Club MAC series in the new Playhouse Theatre at the McAninch Arts Center (MAC) at College of DuPage with shows on Friday, March 21 and Saturday, March 22 at 8 p.m. Club MAC is the MAC’s popular cabaret-style concert series. Co-produced by multiple Grammy Award-winner Dave Way (Fiona Apple, Sheryl Crow, Macy Gray), The Spark & the Fire delivers a throwback to a sound that evokes a stroll with a special someone. Chicago area fans of Leftover Cuties had their first taste of the new release at Schubas on Southport during a July 2013 show. These songs are almost an ode to a time period that celebrated skilled musicianship with craftsman-like songwriting. For tickets and more information, call 630.942.4000 or visit AtTheMac.org.

Cabaret at the MAC

(Clockwise from top): Grammy Award-winning singer Marc Cohn (photo courtesy of the ECC Arts Center); MacArthur Genius Award winner, pianist Reginald Robinson (photo courtesy of the artist); Hit indie jazz pop band Members of the acclaimed Chicago Chamber Musicians (photo courtesy of the ensemble); Academy Award-winning film icon, Morgan Freeman (photo courtesy of the Gene Siskel Film Center).


I n This

Quarter

Year Spring 2014CNCJA•29


Classical Concert Review

Kremerata Baltica Brings its Brilliance to Harris Theater's 10th Season By KATHRYN BACASMOT February 9, 2014 - Currently there are a handful of wonderful, young string ensembles populating the classical music landscape. Kremerata Baltica is one of them, offering excellent performances with the unique twist that the members are all natives of three Baltic states: Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia. Renowned violinist Gidon Kremer (a native of Riga, Latvia—the hometown of another legendary artist, dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov) founded the ensemble in 1997 as a way to mentor subsequent generations of musicians from the region, and as a vehicle to explore and showcase repertoire outside the so-called “canon.” Programming effectively is a constant challenge, and unexpected events may complicate matters, making even the best selection and ordering of repertoire subject to change. Sadly, bass vocalist Alexei Mochalov, who was to be the featured soloist in Dmitri Shostakovich’s Anti-Formalist Rayok, had to pull out of performances last minute due to the sudden death of his wife, pianist Mariya Barankina. This, of course, forced a program change for the ensemble. Two works, Mieczysław Weinberg’s Concertino, Op. 42, and Benjamin Britten’s Young Apollo, Op. 16, (with pianist Andrius Zlabys ) replaced Anti-Formalist Rayok. What was great about the evening was the chance to hear such rarely performed works. In particular, the two Weinberg pieces offered an opportunity to compare and contrast the types of works

being written by contemporaries of Prokofiev and Shostakovich. Additionally, Young Apollo is a marvelously spritely work that is far too neglected, as it is not quite long enough for most concerts featuring (and bringing in) a piano soloist. One unfortunate result of the programming change was the placement of Weinberg’s Symphony No. 10 before the Shostakovich Sonata Op. 134. The two pieces seemed a little too similar in some sections—mood, pacing—and felt redundant. Furthermore, the arrangement of the sonata for violin and piano did not quite seem to work to its optimal potential. In the original instrumentation, the violin is, by default, set apart from the sound of the piano. However, when placed in the context of other strings, Kremer’s sound seemed to get lost. These concerns aside, Kremerata Baltica is a fantastically talented, skilled collective. The quality and array of tones and colors the group displayed throughout the evening enriched each selection with thoughtfulness and depth, ethos and precision. Their ability to draw a crowd was evidenced by the solid attendance, which is saying something given the fact that Riccardo Muti and the CSO were presenting a concert at the same time just down the street. The appreciative audience was treated to two encores at the end of the night: Rag-Gidon-Time by Giya Kancheli, and an arrangement of Weinberg’s Bonifatsy's Holidays.

Photo courtesy of the Kremerata Baltica

Members of the acclaimed Kremerata Baltica Chamber Orchestra.

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Theater Review

Falls' Production Lifts Luna Gale Beyond Plot Pitfalls

Photo by liz lauren

By RAYMOND BENSON

(L to R) Jordan Baker (Cindy), Richard Thieriot (Pastor Jay) and Mary Beth Fisher (Caroline) in the world-premiere production of Luna Gale by Rebecca Gilman

Janrary 22, 2014 - When a social worker is faced with less-than-satisfactory options to solve a routine abused or neglected child intervention case, should that under-appreciated public service professional go contrary to the rules and do something unethical in order to accomplish a suitable outcome? That is the question posed by the Goodman Theatre’s top-notch production of artistic associate Rebecca Gilman’s world premiere play, Luna Gale. Luna Gale is an infant whom the audience never sees, but the little girl is still a strong presence throughout the story of Caroline (Mary Beth Fisher), a social worker who must take the child away from her drug-addicted teen parents, Karlie and Peter (Reyna de Courcy and Colin Sphar) and place her in either a foster home or a “kinship” residence (i.e., a relative’s household). Karlie’s mother, Cindy (Jordan Baker), is the obvious choice, and that’s where baby Luna is temporarily sent while Karlie and Peter clean themselves up, go to counseling, and work toward the inevitable court date when perhaps they might get their daughter back. However, Caroline soon decides that Cindy is a “crazy Christian” strongly influenced by her take-control pastor, Jay (Richard Thieriot). When Cindy begins the process of officially terminating her daughter’s and Peter’s parental rights and adopting Luna, Caroline decides to concoct a scheme to thwart the woman. Gilman's play tackles a number of hot button issues—drug addiction, religion, office politics, child abuse and molestation, and guilt—and does it with a frankness and realism that's sometimes painful. It’s a lot to throw

into the mix, and Gilman manages to balance the various ingredients well enough to create perhaps not a great play, but certainly a good one. It is the production that lifts what might have been a Lifetime Television movie-of-the-week to extraordinary heights. Directed by Robert Falls, Goodman's adroit artistic director (in his fourth collaboration with Gilman), the play’s staging and acting is simply outstanding. Fisher holds it all together with a strong, no-prisoners-taken performance that, in the end, reveals the vulnerability and tragic soul inside her character that's at first hidden to the audience. Luna Gale makes it clear why Mary Beth Fisher is considered one of Chicago’s acting treasures. The kids—de Courcy and Sphar—are also winning as meth-addicted youths portrayed in various stages of drug influence, withdrawal, and recovery. But perhaps the real star of the production is Todd Rosenthal’s magnificently-detailed set design, built on a rotating platform to display several real-world locations—a hospital waiting room, the social worker’s office, a modest kitchen, a courthouse break room and more. Even the ceiling consists of those familiar office tiles and fluorescent lighting panels. The bulletin boards, bookshelves, wall decorations, signage, and actual soda vending machines are so spot-on that the audience feels as if they are peering through a real observation window into a government building where drama, heartbreak, tragedy, and ultimately love, all take place.

Spring 2014CNCJA•31


Theater Review

Brisk Pace and Deft Staging Propel The Golden Dragon By LESLIE PRICE February 8, 2014 - A flash of light, a burst of sound, and the audience is jarred out of the saccharine, guilty pleasures of the 1970s music that precedes the curtain and into the beautiful mess that is Sideshow Theatre Company's The Golden Dragon. Set in a Thai-Chinese-Vietnamese restaurant and its adjoining living spaces, this fast-paced production tells a complex tale of deceit, regret, food, and futility with an economy of language and an abundance of dark humor. The characters populating the globalized world of The Golden Dragon are cast with little regard for the gender, age, or ethnicity of the actors bringing them to life onstage. In the world of The Golden Dragon, people, relationships, and situations are far more complicated than they appear, and what lies beneath the surface can be shocking. The cast of five capable actors transforms into nearly 20 different characters whose lives intersect unexpectedly—and in ways that perhaps the audience alone sees. A boy with a toothache, a couple in crisis, a shop owner with a secret...these and every other soul in this rich script are all one in the same: all so busy with life, that they fail to savor it as they go; all so fixated on life's challenges, that they inadvertently lose the payoff. Or worse...they toss the most valuable rewards away. Playwright Roland Schimmelpfennig's narrative, self-conscious writing allows the audience to take small bites from each character's story while blending all of these pieces into a startling climax.

Combining a little bit of Brecht and a healthy dose of chamber theater, Schimmelpfennig's style is incredibly effective at establishing place, character, and mood. Within its brief one hour running time, The Golden Dragon moves from comic to dark to deeply disturbing. The quick pacing of the production is a testament to directors Jonathan L. Green and Marti Lyons' understanding of the piece and to the actors' ability to move effortlessly from one character to another. The design and technical aspects of the production serve only to complement the efficient storytelling. John Kelly's lighting design takes us from the fluorescent reality of the kitchen at the heart of the play to the creepy, dreamworld of a secret warehouse just above the restaurant. The soundscape by Christopher M. LaPorte moves deftly from one environment to the next, and William Boles' spare scenery includes just enough detail to create an array of locations without any pesky scene changes to slow down the production's breakneck pace. The Golden Dragon is filled with as many technical challenges as a much more epic production, but all of the elements come together seamlessly under the stage management of Alison McLeod and Brittany Parlor. The Golden Dragon plunges the viewer into a world where we're confronted with our greatest fears: powerlessness, meaninglessness, and the stark reality that perhaps we are all alone in the world. The reality is ugly, but The Golden Dragon shines in spite of it all.

Photo by Jonthan L. Green

David Hamilton (front left) with (left to right) Daria Harper, Noah Sullivan, Deanna Myers, and Matt Fletcher in Sideshow Theatre Company’s Chicago premiere of The Golden Dragon by Roland Schimmelpfennig.

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Theater Review

Tribes Uses Wit and Range to Peel Back Layers of Complex Family Dynamics

On SALE nOW AT THE GOODMAn

By JAMES F. POWE February 9, 2014 - While watching a documentary about a deaf couple expecting their first child and wanting their child to be born deaf, British playwright and director Nina Raine found the inspiration for her latest stage play. “We all want our kids to display some sort of aspect of ourselves, because in a way, there's ego and vanity in having children and creating your own dominion.” No more is this evident than in her latest work, Tribes. Playing at the Steppenwolf Theatre, Tribes peels back layer after layer of the complex family dynamic through an eccentric, intellectual, yet highly dysfunctional British clan. Christopher, played with steely intelligence by Francis Guinan, is an opinionated critic who loves debate. He often finds himself honing his talent for critique through over-examination of his own family, their careers, and life paths. Even his eccentric novelist wife Beth—played poignantly by Molly Regan—isn't spared his opinion. Steve Haggard, in a fearless Steppenwolf debut as Daniel, was at times breathtaking as the eldest son moved back home to work on his graduate thesis. The thesis deals with language and its meaning. Yet Daniel's progress is sometimes hindered by the voices in his head. Helen Sadler showed a broad range as Ruth, the loving daughter that fancies herself an opera singer. And, of course, there's Billy. John McGinty was stalwart as the son born deaf but taught, very intently, by his parents to read lips. His identity is even based on his prowess at this skill. Billy's world, along with the rest of his family, is turned upside down when he John McGinty (Billy) and Steve Haggard (background - Daniel) in meets Sylvia, given a gripping visSteppenwolf Theatre's Chicago premiere of Tribes by Nina Raine. ceral edge by Alana Arenas. Sylvia is a fun-loving girl experiencing the progressive loss of her own hearing. Her parents were born deaf so Sylvia is very proficient in sign language. And after they become a couple, she proceeds to teach Billy to sign, effectively exposing him to “deaf culture.” This sets off a tug of war, unhinging the family bond because Christopher and Beth raised Billy to read lips so that he would appear “normal.” The characters in Tribes seem to struggle heavily with their own internal issues, which are compounded by Billy's growth as he refuses to continue to be the “disabled” family member behind which they can all rally. The problem so aptly underscored in Tribes is that everyone wants to be heard but no one wants to listen. Austin Pendelton's taut direction nicely conveyed the longing and desire to truly be heard. In order to be heard though someone has to listen. Tribes explores that quest and through wit and intellect, it holds up a mirror and forces you to listen.

Venus Fur in

DirecteD by

by DAviD ives JoAnie schultZ

Photo by Michael Brosilow

MArch 8 – April 13

Written AnD DirecteD by

MAy 3 – June 8

MAry ZiMMerMAn bAseD on the clAssic chinese FAble

312.443.3800 | Goodmantheatre.org 312.443.3820 or Goodmantheatre.org/Groups for groups of 10+

Major corporate sponsor for Venus in Fur

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Spring 2014CNCJA•33


Dance Review

Photo by Julia rae antonick

Khecari and The Humans Offer Dreamscape in Dance Center Double Bill By EMILY DISHER

Khecari perform cresset: vibrant, rustig as part of a vibrant, surreal double bill with The Humans at The Dance Center at Columbia College February 7-9.

February 9, 2014 - Khecari and The Humans guided viewers through an often unsettling fantasy during their double bill at the Dance Center at Columbia College February 7-9, 2013. Mouths agape in horror, stifled sounds, and silent screams recurred during the series, tying together three disparate works. Khecari led the evening with Julia Rae Antonick’s cresset: vibrant, rusting, a surreal exploration of the body, wherein dancers squirmed and struggled to creepy, slow-motion sounds created by sound artist Joe St. Charles, who was placed rather inconspicuously on stage. Khecari dancers then performed Jonathan Meyer’s Esther & the Omphali, a piece defined by its quirky yarn beards, athletic partnering, and accompanying live accordion music. The lineup concluded with the Humans performing Rachel Bunting’s my my gray sky, an eerie concoction that seems to successfully transport the viewer directly into someone’s nighttime dreams, with an unnerving series of events tied together by familiar tropes that peak out in all the right moments. Khecari’s Danielle Hammer, Maggie Koller, Chih-Hsien Lin, and Jordan Reinwald seemed like mannequins animating and exploring their newfound movements at the start of cresset: vibrant, rusting. The four women performed on raised platforms or in a square of light, as if on display as they struggled against their own bodies. They moved as though their limbs were bound by rubber bands, pushing against the imaginary resistance. However, as time progressed, tropes of death and decay become more apparent, the dancers writhing as if rising from the grave. The struggles heightened and culminated in visceral expressions of pain and 34•CNCJASpring 2014

horror. cresset: vibrant, rusting manages to somehow elicit both repulsion and attraction to the movements on stage. Esther & the Omphali’s costuming, designed by Jeff Hancock, intrigued. The elaborate yarn creations worn by Josh Anderson and Edson Cabrera added personality, but they also heightened a sense of suffocation and struggle, conveyed by the dancers’ stifled grunts, purposefully woven throughout. Musician Sarah Morgan interacted with the dancers as she performed the accompanying accordion music. Meyer’s skill for partnering again emerged in this work with its difficult man-on-man lifts, plus moments when Anderson and Cabrera practically tossed one another around. The sheer strength of these two dancers, combined with the emotion of their movements, leaves a strong impression on the viewer. The Humans closed the evening with the dream-like my my gray sky, which at times devolved into the nightmarish, but always grounds itself with the light-hearted and familiar. The primary string pulling the movements together was an energetic and adorable little girl, seven-year-old Vera Brenneman, who ran and danced about, wholly oblivious to the more disturbing moments unfolding around her on stage. The work is disturbing, with strange impressions evoked by expertly implemented props. Yet the familiar always feels inexplicably rewarding. It is a remarkable feat to make an audience feel as though witnessing someone’s dream— nightmarish as it may become—by creating that foreign, yet familiar mix that dreams often elicit.


Classical Concert Review

CSO and Art Institute Offer Intriguing Integration of Visual Art and Music By KATHRYN BACASMOT February 9, 2014 - Chicago is privileged to be home to one of the finest orchestras in the world, and downright spoiled that the Chicago Symphony Orchestra musicians are featured in their own chamber music series in collaboration with The Art Institute of Chicago. On Sunday, February 9, the String Quartet No. 3 in B-flat Major, Op. 67 by Johannes Brahms, and the String Quartet No. 6 by Béla Bartók were performed by the Meridian String Quartet: Cornelius Chiu (violin), Kozue Funakoshi (violin), Weijing Wang (viola), and Daniel Katz (cello). The tendency of artistic disciplines to segregate themselves is a little baffling, so to spend an afternoon with visual art and music integrated into one program experience was a refreshing treat. As a newcomer to this series, it came as a delightful surprise that the performance was preceded by a brief lecture highlighting a few paintings from the collections. And as an added benefit, audience members were invited to join the guide on a brief tour of the galleries to view the paintings in person at the conclusion of the concert. Navigating the complexities of comparison is not always an easy task, and the art works selected as representative of some of the musical elements of the Brahms and Bartók (amongst them, Delacoix, Gauguin, Rossetti, and Constable) struck me more as conjured rather than meaningful. However, the discussion of Constable, “painting scenes of nostalgia,” away from the Industrial Revolution sweeping his native England, seemed a very apt set-up for the music of Brahms, who loved the outdoors, and whose music is constantly imbued with dark, melancholy aching; and Bartók, whose sixth quartet was written in the shadow of his mother’s death, and his impending departure from Hungary (and Europe) with the outbreak of war biting at his heels. When it came to the music, the ensemble delivered impeccable performances of both works. Those familiar with Arnold Schoenberg’s essay, Brahms the Progressive, are acquainted with his ardent (and spot-on) insistence that the rhythmic irregularities Brahms wrote are crucial components that are too often executed lazily, therefore never quite allowing the listeners the full effect of such subtle syncopation. The members of Meridian gave wonderful depth to their interpretation by being rhythmically precise, thus framing the colors and textures inherent to the score. A special treat was the simply gorgeous tone of Weijing Wang during the extended viola solos of the third movement. The instrument withstands a lot of jokes, but when played well, it emits a rich sound like none other. Following intermission, the quartet delivered a powerhouse performance of the Bartók, a difficult and intricate work. In particular, their ability as an ensemble to navigate the numerous transitions (thematic, rhythmic, dynamic) so tightly, infused the music with a vital sense of momentum and direction—qualities that could have easily been muddled in the hands of less skilled crafters. The integrity of the structural complexity was not simply maintained, but underscored.  Meridian String Quartet violist Weijing Wang (photo courtesy of The Meridian String Quartet).

John nelson conducts J. s. Bach

st. Matthew Passion “Nelson [has] a deep and sensitive understanding of what gives this music its unique spiritual resonance and urgent dramatic power.” — John von Rhein, Chicago Tribune

Friday, aPril 11, 2014 7:30 P.M. harris theater nicholas Phan, Evangelist stePhen Morscheck, Jesus lisette oroPesa, soprano lawrence ZaZZo, countertenor colin ainsworth, tenor Matthew Brook, bass-baritone toBias GreenhalGh, baritone chicaGo Bach choir & orchestra Donald Nally, Chorus Master

aniMa—young Singers of Greater Chicago Emily Ellsworth, Artistic Director

Tickets: $25 - $55 * Online: HarrisTheaterChicago.org Phone: 312.334.7777

Harris Theater for Music and Dance 205 E. Randolph Drive Chicago, IL 60601 *Student $12.50 discount ticket available with student I.D. at Harris Theater Box Office. For group student discounts, call SDG 630-984-4300.

Presented by Soli Deo Gloria, Inc. 800 Roosevelt Rd Ste A-100 Glen Ellyn, IL 60137 SDGmusic.org 630-984-4300 sdg@SDGmusic.org Spring 2014CNCJA•35


Classical Concert Review

Pitchfork a Glimpse of Script's Real Possibilities Photo by emily Schwartz

By LESLIE PRICE

Aislinn Kerchaert and Fred Geyer in Interrobang Theatre Project's production of The Pitchfork Disney by Philip Ridley.

February 8, 2014 - The squalid apartment that greets the audience as they arrive for Interrobang Theatre Project's The Pitchfork Disney only hints at the sickness festering among the characters of this darkly challenging production. Twins, Presley and Haley Stray, have been living in the filthy, trashfilled unit since their parents died ten years ago. Without them, the twins have become frighteningly dependent upon one another, terribly suspicious of outsiders, and trapped within a daily spiral of candy, drugs, and a penchant for terrifying apocalyptic stories. When the brash Cosmo Disney appears, their small, ugly world explodes into a tantalizingly horrific nightmare that is at once repulsive and magnificent. The Pitchfork Disney aims to elicit a visceral reaction from the viewer. Appalling tales of animal cruelty, dreams of torture and pain, and (most famously) the cockroach-eating Cosmo Disney all exist to disgust and intrigue audiences. We're supposed to be shocked by this world of fear and filth. We're supposed to feel in our bodies what the characters feel. Could we ever devolve into the decay and debauchery of this world? Perhaps that's the most viscerally jarring notion of all. At the center of The Pitchfork Disney is Fred Geyer's powerful portrayal of Presley Stray. In a production where the characters aren't exactly likeable, Geyer manages to develop Presley into a freak show of a man we simply can't turn away from. Geyer is boyish, pitiable, and repellent as Presley, and he navigates the unusual story without judgement. 36•CNCJASpring 2014

Aislinn Kerchaert as Haley Stray is also compelling, and Kevin Webb's Cosmo Disney gives the production a potent (albeit cheeky) energy. Mark Lancaster's brief appearance as Pitchfork Cavaliere is both frightening and heartbreaking. Pitch is a modern-day Frankenstein, a monster feared by all and understood by few. Members of the production team have outdone themselves in creating the rotting, sordid environment of the play. The incredible mess of a set is superbly detailed. Trash abounds and a stunning amount of dingy patina encrusts every inch of playing area. The simple but effective lighting design relies heavily on lamps and other practicals that the actors can control and refocus. The production is incredibly cohesive, and there isn't a misstep where design is concerned. The real flaw lies in Philip Ridley's script itself. While the “in yer face” technique is an interesting exercise, it's difficult to sustain. Instead of shocking the audience into seeing the horrors of the world around us, the heavy-handed storytelling meant to be edgy ultimately becomes cloying. We see the playwright's hand everywhere, telling us what to think, telling us how to feel. The script feels like the work of a young writer working through the bluster and bombast that will ultimately lead to more sophisticated writing. The Pitchfork Disney is not a play for the faint of heart. It is a world of terrible sadness and despicable characters. While the script is far from perfection, Interrobang Theatre Project has created a bit of theater that will linger long after the curtain call.


Dance Review

Dazzling Joffrey Showcase of Contemporary Choreographerslls By EMILY DISHER February 12, 2014—Joffrey Ballet brought some of the finest in contemporary dance works to Auditorium Theatre with its program, Contemporary Choreographers, running February 12-23. The evening built momentum with each gorgeous abstraction, saving the best for last with Alexander Ekman’s “Episode 31.” Chicago native Brock Clawson’s “Crossing Ashland” was an intriguing exploration about human connections. The link between the clothed individuals crossing an imaginary street in the background and the dancers clad in nude leotards or dance belts in the foreground was not readily apparent (without reading the program notes), but the body formations were so beautiful that it almost didn’t matter. This is a work that makes one want to have a camera handy to capture each fleeting, beautiful shape created by the dancers. The lighting paired with the movement not only accentuates the shadows of every muscle (the performers look like Grecian statues come to life), but also dramatically illuminates dancers’ limbs against a black backdrop in the third section. While “Crossing Ashland” offered pleasing aesthetics in many places, some of the dancing lacked polish, particularly the synchronization issues in section one. Christopher Wheeldon’s “Continuum” takes a similarly minimalist approach to costuming with performers wearing simple green leotards or unitards. Performed to György Ligeti’s rhythmically complex music, which was played live by pianists Mungunchimeg Buriad and Paul James Lewis, the choreography was striking with its corresponding geometric shapes and precise movements. Wheeldon’s use of shadow, as well as his

play on flexing limbs made for striking visuals. And the multiple pairings throughout “Continuum” showcased some of the finest duos of the Joffrey Ballet: Christine Rocas and Temur Suluashvili; Yumelia Garcia and Rory Hohenstein; Mahallia Ward and Alberto Velzquez; and April Daly and Fabrice Calmels. Each pairing wowed with their fluid, dynamic partnering and clean, polished execution. Just when you think the evening can’t get any better, the Contemporary Choreographers showcase concludes with Alexander Ekman’s “Episode 31,” one of the most original and exciting contemporary works I’ve seen in the past decade. The performance was preceded by video footage of Joffery dancers performing flash-mob-style around Chicago, as well as rehearsing “Episode 31” and commenting on their impressions of the work. One of the dancers likened the piece to an action movie where characters race against time to perform a variety of different tasks—this is certainly an apt description. Ekman’s piece is incredibly high-octane for the first half, with dancers costumed (remarkably stylishly) in various suit pieces rushing around at sustained high-energy levels. It’s one of those pieces with the kind of contagious vigor that gives you the itch to start dancing yourself, while simultaneously gluing you to your seat so you don’t miss one second of it. What a treat that Joffrey Ballet reprised this piece after the company first performed it at the Chicago Dancing Festival in August. It is always satisfying to see the Joffrey Ballet bring to life the work of contemporary choreographers with the same personality and athleticism that they bring to classic story ballets.

Photo by Cheryl Mann

Joffrey Ballet perform choreographer Alexander Ekman's "Episode31" as part of their Contemporary Choreographers program this February at Auditorium Theatre.

Spring 2014CNCJA•37


Finding

Sara L

This spring, Sara Gmitter will see her journey culminate in the world premiere of her first stage play at Lookingglass Theater, where she's worked as stage manager for the past 15 years.

38•CNCJASpring 2014

By RAYMOND BENSON

Lookingglass Theatre’s imaginative upcoming production, In the Garden: A Darwinian Love Story, is written by the company’s long standing stage manager, artistic associate Sara Gmitter. Gmitter (40) has been with Lookingglass for 15 years and has worked on over 40 productions with the ensemble. After devising and running two original pieces for the Lookingglass Young Ensemble—Waging Peace and Mending the Peace—Gmitter is making her authorial debut on the main stage. In the Garden is the story of the marriage of Charles Darwin and his wife, Emma. “Like most people involved in theater, I started out as an actor,” says Gmitter from her home, now in Santa Fe. Her obsession with theater began back when she was in second grade. “I was an incredibly shy child—painfully shy,” she admits. Her teacher, though, challenged Gmitter’s shyness when casting a school play, Sad Sam the Clown, asking her to play the lead. “I thought I would die,” Gmitter says, “but once we started rehearsing, I found that


having written short stories and worked on theatrical adaptations during her time behind the scenes at Lookingglass. It wasn’t until she stopped stage managing that she had the time and focus necessary to develop further as an author. “I heard a podcast interview with a woman who’d written a young adult biography of Charles and Emma Darwin. I realized there was so much I didn’t know about Darwin, the person, not the Father of Evolution, and I was fascinated by the idea of their marriage—a skeptic and a devout Christian—a couple who had to figure out together how to live their lives and raise their children in the midst of this huge conversation about science and religion. I was struck by what a wonderfully personal perspective they could bring to this very abstract conflict. I remember thinking after the interview was over, ‘That would be a great idea for a play.’” Gmitter’s research was relatively easy. “Fortunately there’s so much material out there—letters and journals written by Charles and Emma. I became quite enchanted with their story. Their letters to each other are so genuinely loving and sweet.” And thus, In the Garden: A Darwinian Love Story was born. “It’s a love story, really, set amid one of the great intellectual conflicts of our age and the relative merits of faith and proof,” Gmitter explains. “But even beyond that specific conflict, the play is about how we reconcile ourselves with people who think differently than we do on any important subject and whether it’s possible to find enough common ground on which to build a life.” Gmitter, who also has an MA in Peace Education, now has several more writing projects “churning around in the hopper to see which pops up as the most viable for a next project.” She wants to do peace education work, which, as she describes, is “about both what you teach and how you teach. The content can include things like media literacy, conflict resolution skills, human rights education, environment education, cultural awareness, tolerance and acceptance building, and social justice.” Gmitter hopes to find an organization in Santa Fe with which she can partner. I guess it’s safe to say Gmitter will be as involved exploring her newest direction as she was learning the ropes stage managing at Lookingglass. And with the addition of her upcoming wedding this summer, her plate will definitely be full. Directed by Jessica Thebus, In the Garden: A Darwinian Love Story stars ensemble member Andrew White as Darwin and Rebecca Spence as Emma, and also features Jonathan Babbo, Cindy Gold, Caroline Heffernan, and Austin Tichenor. Previews are April 16 - 25, 2014 and the regular run is April 27 – June 15 at Lookingglass Theatre’s charming home inside Chicago’s historic Water Tower Water Works in downtown Chicago Photos Courtesy of lookingglass Theatre Company

talking in front of people was a lot easier when you know exactly what you’re going to say and what they’re going to say back. When the night of the performance came and I was in costume—this complete clown suit with a wig and makeup—I looked in the mirror and I was a completely different person. I remember my legs shaking when I walked out on stage for the first time and being afraid they wouldn’t hold me up—but once I said my first line, it was like something magic had happened. Then at the end, there was all this applause and compliments, and I was hooked.” Gmitter stuck with drama classes throughout high school, then began building an impressive, and well rounded, background in theater education, working an internship at the famous Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, and then majoring in theater at the College of William and Mary in Virginia. “In college, I tried some of everything—I acted, directed, stage managed, designed sound, ran crew, built costumes, worked in the box office. In fact, I think I did just about everything except write!” After graduation, Gmitter moved to Chicago and got involved with Lookingglass Theatre having seeing their production of Arabian Nights. Operating behind the scenes at the theater, she saw an inroad to working in the field she loved. “Becoming a stage manager seemed like a great way to experience all aspects of production, and I found it much easier to get paying work as a stage manager than as an actor. I have come to love it for its own sake, but I feel that stage managing for Lookingglass is the apex of what I could want in (that) career…So I reached a point when I felt I needed to turn to other areas of interest (in the theater).” After more than 40 productions, Gmitter is now presenting her first major stage play to the public. For a long time, Gmitter had already fancied herself a writer,

(Opposite page): Andrew White as Darwin and Rebecca Spence as Emma in Sara Gmitter's world premiere stage play In the Garden: A Darwinian Love Story at Lookingglass Theatre; (Left and above) Sara Gmitter is getting her first play produced by the Lookingglass Theatre Company, where she has worked as stage manager for 15 years. Spring 2014CNCJA•39


POETIC license By DONNA ROBERTSON

40•CNCJASpring 2014

Acclaimed Grammy-winning contemporary chamber music sextet eighth blackbird.


Photos By Luke Raytray

T

The red-hot, Grammy-winning, Chicago-based contemporary chamber music ensemble, eighth blackbird, is firmly at the forefront of reshaping classical music for a modern audience, and listeners the world over have taken notice. Bold and innovative from the very start, eighth blackbird was formed in 1996 by six alumni of Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio. The group’s origins, however, may be traced even further back to their undergraduate days when Tim Weiss, the director of Contemporary Music Ensembles at

Oberlin, first set the students together in a chamber music group to study more difficult works within the burgeoning repertoire. After winning a small local competition, they decided to stay together as an ensemble through graduate study and beyond. Four of the original six members are still with the group today. The ensemble consists of pianist Lisa Kaplan, percussionist Matthew Duvall, cellist Nicholas Photinos, clarinetist Michael J. Maccaferri, flutist Tim Munro, and violinist/violist Yvonne Lam (the latter two, newest members of the ensemble, joining in 2006 and 2011, respectively). In 1998, two years after its founding, eighth blackbird became

Spring 2014CNCJA•41


the first contemporary music group to win the Grand Prize at the Concert Artists Guild International Competition in New York City. Since then, the ensemble has been honored with numerous industry awards, including three Grammy Awards—their latest in 2013 for the ensemble’s album, Meanwhile. There is no shortage of critical acclaim for the group’s innovative work. The Los Angeles Times dubbed the sextet “super-musicians” for balancing wildly exigent performances with, at times, brassy, stylish choreography, creating a visceral connection with audiences other contemporary ensembles simply struggle to achieve. The New York Times described their performances as the “the picture of polish and precision,” and they continue to receive critical praise for an ever increasing, intensely virtuosic repertoire and the group’s innate ability to make that repertoire accessible to a growing contemporary 42•CNCJASpring 2014

audience—not an easy feat in the staid world of classical music. Add to that the challenge of performing new compositions from memory— and you’ve got a genuine phenom at the vanguard of the burgeoning contemporary classical music scene. The name eighth blackbird was inspired by one of the stanzas from Wallace Stevens’ modernist poem, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird. The poem suggests a new approach to seeing what is commonplace, with the eighth stanza (the one from which the group derives its name) referring to “noble accents” and “lucid, inescapable rhythms,” descriptions that could be appropriately applied to the group's artistic approach. eighth blackbird commissions, performs, and records a repertoire consisting almost entirely of works composed after 1980. Many of their commissioned works come from today’s more illustrious clas-


(Top left and right photos and second from top right): eighthblackbird in a performance of Columbine's Paradise; (Second up from bottom): the ensemble performs Arnold Schoenberg's Pierrott Lunaire; (Bottom): eight blackbird in a performance of Slide.

Photo by Robert Millard

Photo by Kipling Swehla Photography

Photos Courtesy of eight blackbird

sical composers, including Steve Reich, Jennifer Higdon, Stephen Hartke, and John Luther Adams. However, the group has also encouraged the development of lesser-known composers, beginning in 2011 with their first competition for new chamber music written expressly for their ensemble. In explaining the ensemble’s focus on contemporary compositions, Tim Munro, eighth blackbird’s flutist, jokes that “We don’t play any works from the Classical ‘canon’ because we mostly play as an indivisible sextet, and Beethoven just didn’t write anything for our instrumentation!” A fact indeed, but the real reason is that the ensemble members simply see themselves as new music specialists

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who “have the most to offer in the music of our time, music that speaks our contemporary language directly to a contemporary audience.” They work with composers who have life experiences similar to their own (iPhones, modern pop music, movies), so these composers are “speaking a language that is more directly intelligible” to the ensemble as modern players. Another aspect of the group that stands them apart from standard music chamber ensembles is that eighth blackbird also lends a very theatrical flair to its performances through engagement with a wide variety of artists, mediums and “instruments.” According to Munro, the group worked with theater directors, contemporary dance choreographers, puppet theater companies, and multimedia artists “to curate a whole ‘show’ experience” similar to what is done in popular music performances. In addition to an innate virtuosic facility, the modern compositions within eighth blackbird’s repertoire often call for the use of more unusual performance devices. Munro explains that on stage the ensemble has “sung, spoken, danced, acted, pulled curtains, tapped on car parts, played duck-calls, sawed wood . . . and played our primary instruments.” As a result, in the process of experimenting with new ways of presenting music, the genres within the ensemble’s repertoire have grown considerably. As Munro explained, one night, they may “work on music by a young indie rock guitarist, the next by a modernist Frenchman, the next by an older minimalist legend.” It all contributes to eighth blackbird’s goal, which is to “create an evening-length journey” for the audience that is “alternately thrilling, moving, confronting, whimsical, strange, and laugh-out-loud funny.” Peter McDowell has been managing director of the group just since October of 2013, but he worked with the ensemble on several occasions in the early to mid-2000s through his position as program director for the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs at

complex.” Although eighth blackbird now performs throughout the world and has three academic residencies in this country, it is still very much a part of Chicago’s classical music landscape. One of those residencies happens to be with the University of Chicago. There, they perform in Contempo concerts (the university’s contemporary music series that showcases today’s most innovative composers), work with graduate composers on their pieces (culminating in two concerts each spring) and conduct master classes, offer coaching, and give lessons as their schedule allows. The ensemble’s most recent Contempo concert took place on February 4 at the Logan Center for the Arts on the University of Chicago campus. Chicagoans will have yet another opportunity to see eighth blackbird at work when the group performs its program, Still in Motion, at the Museum of Contemporary Art’s MCA Stage series on March 8th and 9th. The program (which will include three world premieres) is comprised of a range of compositions, including a transcription of Études by György Ligeti; a nationally-acclaimed commission by Steve Mackey; and a piece by Richard Reed Parry of Arcade Fire.

One long-term vision the (eighth blackbird) has developed is the creation of a summer "young artists" festival, one that emphasizes learning by doing, in which ensemble members would rehearse and perform alongside the students, thus enabling them to learn from established, successful musicians. the Chicago Cultural Center. Looking back on the evolution of the ensemble over the past decade, McDowell points out that, although the ensemble “now supports a full-time nonprofit organization with a growing staff and expanding, exciting activities . . . its spirit and ethos remain the same: one of the things I liked about them was (and still is) their easygoing nature and their interest in making music that is beautiful, interesting, and forward-thinking; and their ability to jump it at various points along the spectrum of what we consider ‘new music,’ from serious to poppy to playful to unfathomably 44•CNCJASpring 2014


Photos by James Ewing

Photos Courtesy of eight blackbird

Still In Motion at MCA Stage will be followed by a discussion with the artists the first night and a benefit the second night. Never static in its artistic approach, eighth blackbird is continually seeking new ways to grow. One long-term vision the group has developed is the creation of a summer "young artists" festival, one that emphasizes learning by doing, in which ensemble members would rehearse and perform alongside the students, thus enabling them to learn from established, successful musicians. In their work with young musicians, Munro points out that eighth blackbird is there to provoke them “to take more responsibility for themselves and their play, to develop and put into practice their own musical ideas, to think in a more entrepreneurial way about their careers, to begin to consider the future for themselves and for classical music.” eighth blackbird’s music is not intended to replace traditional classical programming, of course, but to augment the landscape of the field. Munro explains that “there are so many amazing groups playing concerts of Brahms, Haydn, and Bartok,” and rather than join an already crowded field, eighth blackbird seeks to bring a contemporary face of classical music to a contemporary audience of all backgrounds and ages. As a result, eighth blackbird is broadening and expanding the traditional experience with its cutting-edge focus that helps to redefine what classical music means for the modern listener.

(Top left): eighthblackbird in a performance of inkusuit in Chicago' Millennium Park; (Top right): the ensemble performs at the Tune-In Festival at the Park Avenue Armory in New York (Bottom two photos): eight blackbird in a performance of inkusuit.

Spring 2014CNCJA•45


Cultural Happenings... Revealing Drama Elevator Repair Service, the acclaimed theater company that brought Gatz to the MCA Stage in 2008, is set to return to the innovative contemporary performing arts series with a new work that follows the 1991 Supreme Court case about go-go dancers at the Kitty Kat Lounge in South Bend, Indiana, who claimed a First Amendment right to dance totally nude. Arguendo revisits the landmark case by enacting the intelligent and hilarious Supreme Court oral arguments verbatim—along with an interview with one of the original erotic dancers. Arguendo (from the Latin “for the sake of argument”) explores the tension between two valued aspects of being American: the unquestioned freedom to express oneself and the moral code of society. Elevator Repair Service will be on the MCA Stage March 14-16.

Legendary Luminaries The Chicago Humanities

Festival (CHF) recently announced its spring 2014 programs featuring Alice Waters, Ruth Reichl, and Jessye Norman. On April 10, 2014, American chef, Chez Panisse restaurateur, and activist Alice Waters will be in conversation with six-time James Beard Award-winning culinary writer Ruth Reichl. The program will take place 6 p.m. at the Art Institute of Chicago, Rubloff Auditorium in downtown Chicago. On May 19, 2014, CHF will also host five-time Grammy Award-winning opera singer and Kennedy Center Honoree Jessye Norman. Norman comes to Chicago to discuss her career and forthcoming memoir, Stand Up Straight and Sing!, with opera dramaturg Colin Ure. The program will take place 6 p.m. at the School of the Art Institute Ballroom. "In welcoming three American icons to our stage, we are celebrating creativity on a truly visceral level," said CHF Artistic Director Matti Bunzl. "What is more elemental, after all, than food and song? And who has lifted them to a higher level of excellence than Alice Waters, Ruth Reichl, and Jessye Norman?" Who has, indeed? Tickets can be purchased online at chicagohumanities.org.

Bluegrass Davis' New Orleans Jazz Philharmonic, under Bonanza Chicago the artistic direction of Orbert Davis, makes its ensemble debut at

Innovative bluegrass band Steep Canyon Rangers— best known for their collaborations with banjo player Steve Martin and Edie Brickell—appeals at once to old timers, traditionalists, genre benders and contemporary envelope-pushers, stretching bluegrass boundaries with its use of drums and percussion. Their current album, Tell The Ones I Love, showcases the Rangers’ myriad talents: nimble instrumental agility, tight harmony vocals and inventive songwriting. The Grammy Award-winning Rangers make their City Winery Chicago debut on May 18 this spring.

the McAninch Arts Center (MAC) at College of DuPage with “Mardi Gras Carnival: A Salute to New Orleans” featuring Davis’ new work Survival of the Saints 8 p.m. Saturday, March 22. In this concert, Davis and his ensemble explore and celebrate the rich musical culture of New Orleans with ragtime melodies, brass band marches and more in a program of music drawing from legends like Louis Armstrong and King Oliver, who helped bring the signature New Orleans sound to the world. This concert is part of the MAC’s 2014 Grand Opening Season that marks the completion of a 14-month, $35 million renovation. For tickets and more information, call 630.942.4000 or visit AtTheMac.org.

Lyric Opera of Chicago has announced that soprano Ana Engaging With Opera María Martínez and bass-baritone Eric Owens will serve as the company's inaugural Community Ambassadors as part of the Lyric Unlimited initia-

tive. These two artists will work to strengthen and actively participate in new, ongoing, and future Lyric Unlimited programs that serve and engage schools and the larger community, including the Vocal Partnership Program, Youth Opera Council, Teen Opera Circle, Lyric’s ongoing relationship with Latino communities, and other collaborative community events. Martínez and Owens are currently starring in Lyric’s new production of Rusalka, which opened on Saturday, February 22 and runs through March 16.

(Clockwise from top): Opera legend Jessye Norman (photo by Carol Friedman); Trumpeter, founder and artistic director of the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic Orbert Davis (photo courtesy of the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic); Bluegrass band Steep Canyon Rangers (photo courtesy of City Winery); Elevator Repair Service in Arguendo (photo courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art). 46•CNCJASpring 2014


Cultural Almanac

Photos from left: Steve Wojtas from The Solid Sand (photo courtey of Goodman Theatre); Cast of the touring production of Wicked (photo by Joan Marcus); Juan Francisco Villa from The Upstairs Concierge (Photo Courtesy of Goodman Theatre); Timothy Edward Kane in An Iliad (photo courtesy of Court THeatre).

Spring 2014

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48•CNCJASpring 2014

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre l l l l l l l Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan - Dance of the Wanderers Houston Ballet - Aladdin Inside Amy Schumer's Back Door Tour Bella Voce (Tel. 877.755.6277, bellavoce.org) Bela Voce Camerata Baroque Band (Tel. 312.235.2368, baroqueband.org) Their Master's Voice: J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, Telemann, W.F. Bach Chicago a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) Youth Choral Festival l Chicago Chamber Musicians (Tel. 312.819.5800, chicagochambermusic.org) A Musician's Renaissance: Biber, Speer, Bertali, Fuchs and Mendelssohn City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americaan and roots=*, Jazz=**, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Joe Louis Walker with Special guest James Armstrong* l Bob Mould - 25 Years of Workbook* l King of Soul Acoustic Otis Redding and Spanish Guitar Duo - Chicago Flamenco Festival* l Ani Ve'Ata - Sharim Arik Einstein* l Tablao Flamenco with Auxi Fernández - Chicago Flamenco Festival 2014 * l The Music of Phish Beer Pairing w/ the Helping Phriendly Orchestra†† l Jay Farrar* l Jeff Austin (of Yonder Mountain String Band) & The Here and Now†† l Del McCoury Band†† l James McMurtry* l Sea Wolf Solo Acoustic - with Special guest Matt Sucich* l Mike Doughty's World-Renowned, Award-Winning Question Jar Show* l Pedrito Martinez* Glen Matlock & Sylvain Sylvain Sex Doll Tour - Punk Goes Acoustic * Birds of Chicago with Special guests The Ragbirds* Sharon Corr of the Corrs* Johnette Napolitano (of Concrete Blonde)* Rhett Miller w/special guest Nora O'Connor* Shemekia Copeland w/special guest Marty Sammon* David Wilcox and Vance Gilbert* David Wilcox and Vance Gilbert* 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Chicago Opera Theater (Tel. 312.704.8414, chicagooperatheater.org) Queenie Pie by Duke Ellington l Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago (Tel. 312.369-8330, colum.edu/dance_center) Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Eat to the Beat: ChiArts l Thodos Dance l l Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center - French Revelations Choreographer Wendy Whelan "Restless Creature" Giordano Dance Chicago: Spring Hubbard Street Dance Chicago (Tel. 312.850.9744, hubbardstreetdance.org) Spring Series Joffrey Ballet (Tel. 312.386.8905, joffrey.org) Winning Works: Annual Choreographers of Color Awards l Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.332.2244, lyricopera.org) Rusalka l l l La Clemenza di Tito l l l Renée Fleming and Jonas Kaufmann Subscriber Appreciation Concert The Family Barber

March 2014


Spring 2014CNCJA•49

March 2014 March 2014

Museum Museum of of Contemporary Contemporary Art Art (Tel. (Tel. 312.280.2660, 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) mcachicago.org) eighth eighth blackbird: blackbird: Stir Stir In In Motion Motion Music Music of of the the Baroque Baroque (Tel. (Tel. 312.551.1414, 312.551.1414, baroque.org) baroque.org) Handel Handel & & Bach Bach -- Italian Italian Style Style Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) The The Creation Creation eighth blackbird: StirPresents In Motion Symphony Symphony Center Center Presents w/Chicago w/Chicago Symphony Symphony Orchestra Orchestra (Tel. (Tel. 312.294.3000, 312.294.3000, cso.org) cso.org) Goodman Goodman Theatre Theatre (Tel. (Tel. 312.443.3800, 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) goodmantheatre.org) Music of the Baroque (Tel. 312.551.1414, baroque.org) CSO: CSO: Ravel Ravel and and Stravinsky Stravinsky Buzzer Buzzer & Bach - Italian Style Handel Piano Piano Series: Series: Evgeny Evgeny Kissin Kissin Venus Venus In In Fur Fur The Creation CSO: CSO: Dutoit Dutoit and and Dufour Dufour Greenhouse Greenhouse Theater Theater Center Centerw/Chicago (Tel. (Tel. 773.404.7336, 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) greenhousetheater.org) Symphony Center Presents Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) Pink Pink Martini Martini w/special w/special guests guests The The Von Von Trapps Trapps Corpus Corpus Delicti Delicti Stravinsky CSO: Piano PianoRavel Series: Series:and Uchida Uchida Plays Plays Schubert Schubert and and Beethoven Beethoven Macbeth Macbeth Piano Series:Pat Evgeny Kissin Jazz Jazz Series: Series: Pat Metheny Metheny Unity Unity Group Group Quark QuarkDutoit and Dufour CSO: Uchida Uchida Plays Plays Schubert Schubert American American Myth Myth Pink Martini w/special guests The CSO CSO Chamber Chamber at at the the Art Art Institute Institute Von Trapps Ghost GhostSeries: Bike Bike Uchida Plays Schubert and Beethoven Piano Piano Piano Series: Series: Andsnes Andsnes play play Beethoven Beethoven Lifeline Lifeline Theatre Theatre (Tel. (Tel. 773.761.4477, 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Jazz Series: Pat Metheny Unity Group lifelinetheatre.com) Orchestra Orchestra Series: Series: Israel Israel Philharmonic Philharmonic AA Tale Tale of of Two Two Cities Cities Uchida Plays Schubert CSO: CSO: Muti Muti and and Uchida Uchida Lyle Lyle Finds Finds His His Mother Mother CSO at theChaplin's Art Institute CSO CSO Chamber at at the the Movies: Movies: Chaplin's City City Lights Lights Lookingglass Lookingglass Theatre Theatre (Tel. (Tel. 773.477.9257, 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) lookingglasstheatre.org) Piano Series: play Beethoven Family: Family: Once OnceAndsnes Upon Upon aa Symphony Symphony -- Three Three Little Little Pigs Pigs The The Little Little Series: Prince PrinceIsrael Philharmonic Orchestra Chamber Chamber Music: Music: Australian Australian Chamber Chamber Orchestra Orchestra Museum Museum of Contemporary Contemporary Art Art (Tel. (Tel. 312.280.2660, 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) mcachicago.org) CSO: Mutiof and Uchida Muti Afterwork Afterwork Masterworks: Masterworks: Muti and and Sharp Sharp Arguendo Arguendo Elevator Elevator Repair Repair Service Service CSO the--conducts Movies: Lights CSO: CSO:atMuti Muti conductsChaplin's Schubert SchubertCity Unfinished Unfinished Northlight Northlight Theatre Theatre in Skokie Skokie (Tel. (Tel. 847.673.6300, 847.673.6300, northlight.org) northlight.org) Family: Once Upon a in Symphony - Three Littlewith PigsWynton Jazz Jazz Series: Series: Jazz Jazz at at Lincoln Lincoln Center Center Orchestra Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Marsalis Chapatti Chapatti Music: Australian Chamber Orchestra Chamber University University of of Chicago Chicago Presents Presents (Tel. (Tel. 773.702.8068, 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) RedTwist RedTwist Theatre Theatre (Tel. (Tel. 773.728.7529, 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) redtwist.org) Afterwork Muti and and Sharp Contempo: Contempo:Masterworks: New New Music Music for for Violin Violin and Piano Piano 44 44 Ways Ways To Toconducts End End Your Your Sex Sex Life Life CSO: Muti Schubert Unfinished Listening Listening Party Party with with Ambrose Ambrose Akinmusire Akinmusire Love Love & & Understanding Understanding Jazz Series: Jazz at Lincoln Quartet Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis The The Ambrose Ambrose Akinmusire Akinmusire Quartet Happy HappyEnsemble University of Chicago Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) Black Black Ensemble Theater Theater (Tel. (Tel. 773.769.4451, 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) blackensembletheater.org) Step Step Up Up Productions Productions (Tel. (Tel. 312.335.1650, 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Contempo: New Music for Violin and Pianosteppenwolf.org) The The Curtis Curtis Mayfield Mayfield Story Story Darlin' Darlin' Listening with Ambrose Akinmusire Chicago's Chicago'sParty Golden Golden Soul Soul Steppenwolf Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. (Tel. 312.335.1650, 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) steppenwolf.org) The Ambrose Akinmusire Quartet Broadway Broadway In InTheatre Chicago ChicagoCompany (Tel. (Tel. 312.977.1700, 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) broadwayinchicago.org) Russian Russian Transport Transport Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) Phantom Phantom of of the the Opera Opera Saturday Saturday Night/Sunday Night/Sunday Morning Morning The Curtis Mayfield Story Chicago Chicago Murdered MurderedGolden By ByHome The TheSoul Mind Mind Chicago's Heartbeat Heartbeat of of Home The The Wild Wild Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) Rock Rock of of Ages Ages reWilding reWilding Genius Genius Phantom of theAmazing Opera Technicolor Joseph Joseph and and the the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Dreamcoat Salonathon: Salonathon: Say Say Zoo My My Name Name Chicago Erth's Erth's Dinosaur Dinosaur Zoo Leveling Leveling Up Up Heartbeat of Home Chicago Chicago Shakespeare Shakespeare Theatre Theatre (Tel. (Tel. 312.595.5600, 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) chicagoshakes.com) Duo: Duo: of 11 isisAges 1, 1, 22 isis Math Math Rock Gypsy Gypsy Strawdog Strawdog Theatre Theatre Company Company (Tel. (Tel. 773.528.9696, 773.528.9696, strawdogtheatre.org) strawdogtheatre.org) Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat A A MidSummer MidSummer Night's Night's Dream Dream Miss Miss Marx Marx or or The The Involuntary Involuntary Side Side Effect Effect of of Living Living Erth's Dinosaur Zoo Road Road Show Show Best Best Beloved: Beloved: The The Just Just So So Stories Stories(Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Chicago Shakespeare Theatre Tristan Tristan & & Yseult Yseult Victory VictoryTheatre Gardens Gardensin Theater Theater (Tel. (Tel. 773.871.3000, 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) victorygardens.org) Gypsy Citadel Citadel Theatre in Lake Lake Forest Forest (Tel. (Tel. 847.735.8554, 847.735.8554, citadeltheatre.org) citadeltheatre.org) The The Gospel GospelSuite of of Night's Lovingkindness Lovingkindness A MidSummer Dream Hospitality Hospitality Suite Dessa Dessa Rose Rose Road Show Court Court Theatre Theatre (Tel. (Tel. 773.702.7005, 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) courttheatre.org) Applause Applause Tristan & The Yseult Water Water By By The Spoonful Spoonful Writers Writers Theatre Theatre in inLake Glencoe Glencoe (Tel. (Tel. 847.242.6000, 847.242.6000, writerstheatre.org) writerstheatre.org) Citadel Theatre in Forest (Tel. 847.735.8554, citadeltheatre.org) First First Folio Folio Theatre Theatre in in Oakbrook Oakbrook (630.986.8067, (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) firstfolio.org) Hedda HeddaCrossing Gabler Gabler Hospitality Suite Rough Rough Crossing Port Port Authority Authority Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Salvage Salvage Water By The Spoonful First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Rough Crossing Salvage

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Photos from left: Conductor RIccardo Muti leads the chicago symphony orchestra (photo by Todd Rosenberg); members of the contemporary chamber music ensemble eighth blackbird (photo by Nathan Keay); Louise Pitre (forefront), Keith Kupferer and Jessica Rush in Chicago Shakespeare's Gypsy (photo by Michael Brosilow). Andrew Durand and Patrycja Kujawska in Tristan & Yseult (photo by Steve Tanner).

Theater


50•CNCJASpring 2014

Theater

music and The crooner talks life, to Ravinia bringing his Large Band

Lyle's Large Life

SUMMER 2011

for the Arts Chicagoland Journal

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AP ro San Francisco Museum Me gr of the Am co rit M Art examines the impact the passion m ntrib usic’s of me Steins Family and and usic utio in tion of rit edu n to cred they inspired in the apprecia cati the ible on cit modern art.

a Legacy unveofiled Modern

Chicago Shakesp century celebrates a quarter celebrating Shakespeare.

YEARS G & COUNTIN eare Theatre

+ 25

A preview of the historic they Paris Opéra Ballet as kick off their American Tour at Harris Theatre.

Paris Comes to Millennium Park

RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) 44 Ways To End Your Sex Life Love & Understanding Happy Step Up Productions (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Darlin' Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Russian Transport Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Saturday Buzzer Night/Sunday Morning Murdered By Venus In Fur The Mind The Wild Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) reWilding Genius Corpus Delicti Salonathon: Say My Name Macbeth Leveling Quark Up Duo: 1 is 1,Myth 2 is Math American Strawdog Ghost BikeTheatre Company (Tel. 773.528.9696, strawdogtheatre.org) Miss Marx or The (Tel. Involuntary Side Effect of Living Lifeline Theatre 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Best Beloved: Just So Stories A Tale of TwoThe Cities Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) Lyle Finds His Mother The Gospel of Lovingkindness Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Dessa RosePrince The Little Applause Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) Writers Theatre in Glencoe (Tel. 847.242.6000, writerstheatre.org) Arguendo - Elevator Repair Service Hedda Gabler Northlight Theatre in Skokie (Tel. 847.673.6300, northlight.org) Port Authority Chapatti RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) 44 Ways To End Your Sex Life Love & Understanding Happy Step Up Productions (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Darlin' Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Russian Transport Saturday Night/Sunday Morning Murdered By The Mind The Wild reWilding Genius Salonathon: Say My Name Leveling Up Duo: 1 is 1, 2 is Math Strawdog Theatre Company (Tel. 773.528.9696, strawdogtheatre.org) Miss Marx or The Involuntary Side Effect of Living Best Beloved: The Just So Stories Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) The Gospel of Lovingkindness Dessa Rose Applause Writers Theatre in Glencoe (Tel. 847.242.6000, writerstheatre.org) Hedda Gabler Port Authority l

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Contact Account Executive Jason Montgomery Tel. 773.741.5502 or e-mail: Jason.Montgomery@ClefNotesJournal.com for special advertising opportunities.

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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Spring 2014CNCJA•51

Art Museums

March 2014

The TheArt ArtInstitute InstituteofofChicago Chicago(Tel. (Tel.312.443.3600, 312.443.3600,artic.edu) artic.edu) Nilima NilimaSheikh: Sheikh:Each EachNight NightPut PutKashmir KashmirininYour YourDreams Dreams The TheThrill Thrillofofthe theChase: Chase:Drawings Drawingsfor forthe theHarry HarryB.B.and andBessie BessieK.K.Braude BraudeMemorial MemorialCollection Collection Modern ModernMasters MastersReturn Return Ed EdClark Clark Hiroshige's Hiroshige'sWinter WinterScenes Scenes Isaac IsaacJulien: Julien:The TheLong LongRoad RoadtotoMazatlán Mazatlán The Art Institute of Chicago (Tel. 312.443.3600, artic.edu) The TheYear Yearofofthe theHorse Horse Nilima Sheikh: Each Night Put Kashmir in Your Dreams The TheCzech CzechAvant-Garde Avant-GardeBook Book The Thrill of the Chase: Drawings for the Harry B. and Bessie K. Braude Memorial Collection Africa: Africa:The TheModern ModernEye Eye Modern Masters Return Amar AmarKanwar: Kanwar:The TheLightning LightningTestimonie Testimonie Ed Clark Ugo UgoRondinone: Rondinone:we werun runthrough throughaadesert deserton onburning burningfeet, feet,allallofofususare areglowing glowingour ourfaces faceslook looktwisted. twisted. Hiroshige's Winter Scenes Renoir’s Renoir’sTrue TrueColors: Colors:Science ScienceSolves SolvesaaMystery Mystery Isaac Julien: The Long Road to Mazatlán Iterations: Iterations:John JohnRonan’s Ronan’sPoetry PoetryFoundation Foundation The Year of the Horse Christopher ChristopherWilliams: Williams:The TheProduction ProductionLine LineofofHappiness Happiness The Czech Avant-Garde Book Christopher ChristopherWool Wool Africa: The Modern Eye Dayanita DayanitaSingh Singh Amar Kanwar: The Lightning Testimonie Expanded ExpandedGallery Galleryfor forArthur ArthurRubloff RubloffCollection CollectionofofPaperweights Paperweights Ugo Rondinone: we run through a desert on burning feet, all of us are glowing our faces look twisted. The TheElizabeth ElizabethMorse MorseTouch TouchGallery Gallery Renoir’s True Colors: Science Solves a Mystery The The[Not [NotSo] So]Still StillLife Life Iterations: John Ronan’s Poetry Foundation Ugo UgoRondinone: Rondinone:we werun runthrough throughthe thedesert deserton onburning burningfeet, feet,allallofofususare areglowing glowingour ourfaces faceslook looktwisted twisted Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness When Whenthe theGreeks GreeksRuled: Ruled:Egypt Egyptafter afterAlexander Alexanderthe theGreat Great Christopher Wool Museum MuseumofofContemporary ContemporaryArt Art(Tel. (Tel.312.280.2660, 312.280.2660,mcachicago.org) mcachicago.org) Dayanita Singh Isa IsaGenzken: Genzken:Retrospective Retrospective Expanded Gallery for Arthur Rubloff Collection of Paperweights BMO BMOHarris HarrisBank BankChicago ChicagoWorks: Works:Zachary ZacharyCahill Cahill The Elizabeth Morse Touch Gallery Unbound: Unbound:Contemporary ContemporaryArt ArtAfter AfterFrida FridaKahlo Kahlo The [Not So] Still Life MCA MCAScreen: Screen:Leslie LeslieHewitt HewittininCollaboration Collaborationwith withBradford BradfordYoung Young Ugo Rondinone: we run through the desert on burning feet, all of us are glowing our faces look twisted CITY CITYSELF SELF When the Greeks Ruled: Egypt after Alexander the Great BMO BMOHarris HarrisBank BankChicago ChicagoWorks: Works:Lilli LilliCarré Carré Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) MCA MCAChicago ChicagoPlaza PlazaProject: Project:Amanda AmandaRoss-Ho Ross-Ho Isa Genzken: Retrospective The TheWay Wayofofthe theShovel: Shovel:Art ArtasasArcheology Archeology BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Zachary Cahill William WilliamJ.J.O’Brien O’Brien Unbound: Contemporary Art After Frida Kahlo MCA MCADNA: DNA:Alexander AlexanderCalder Calder MCA Screen: Leslie Hewitt in Collaboration with Bradford Young MCA MCADNA: DNA:Warhol Warholand andMarisol Marisol CITY SELF Smart SmartMuseum MuseumofofArt Art--University UniversityofofChicago Chicago(Tel. (Tel.773.702.0200, 773.702.0200,smartmuseum.uchicago.edu) smartmuseum.uchicago.edu) BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Lilli Carré Imaging/Imagining: Imaging/Imagining:The TheBody BodyasasArt Art MCA Chicago Plaza Project: Amanda Ross-Ho Interiors Interiorsand andExteriors: Exteriors:Avant AvantGarde GardeItineraries ItinerariesininPostwar PostwarFrance France The Way of the Shovel: Art as Archeology Judy JudyLedgerwood: Ledgerwood:Chromatic ChromaticPatterns Patterns William J. O’Brien Monster MonsterRoster: Roster:Existentialist ExistentialistArt ArtininPostwar PostwarChicago Chicago MCA DNA: Alexander Calder Performing PerformingImages: Images:Opera OperaininChinese ChineseVisual VisualCulture Culture MCA DNA: Warhol and Marisol Zachary ZacharyCahill: Cahill:USSA USSA2012: 2012:Wellness WellnessCenter: Center:Idyllic-affairs Idyllic-affairsofofthe theheart heart Smart Museum of Art - University of Chicago (Tel. 773.702.0200, smartmuseum.uchicago.edu) Mary Mary&&Leigh LeighBlock BlockMuseum MuseumofofArt Art(Tel. (Tel.847.491.4000, 847.491.4000,blockmuseum.northwestern.edu) blockmuseum.northwestern.edu) Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Art Work WorkPrint PrintProtest ProtestRepeat Repeat Interiors and Exteriors: Avant Garde Itineraries in Postwar France Steichen|Warhol: Steichen|Warhol:Picture PictureFrame Frame Judy Ledgerwood: Chromatic Patterns The TheLeft LeftFront: Front:Radical RadicalArt Artininthe the"Red "RedDecade," Decade,"1929-1940 1929-1940 Monster Roster: Existentialist Art in Postwar Chicago National NationalMexican MexicanMuseum MuseumofofArt Art(Tel. (Tel.773.738.1503, 773.738.1503,nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org) nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org) Performing Images: Opera in Chinese Visual Culture Fragmentos: Fragmentos:Pilar PilarAcevedo Acevedo Zachary Cahill: USSA 2012: Wellness Center: Idyllic-affairs of the heart Galería GaleríaSin SinFronteras Fronteras Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art (Tel. 847.491.4000, blockmuseum.northwestern.edu) Work Print Protest Repeat Steichen|Warhol: Picture Frame The Left Front: Radical Art in the "Red Decade," 1929-1940 National Mexican Museum of Art (Tel. 773.738.1503, nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org) Fragmentos: Pilar Acevedo Galería Sin Fronteras 1

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Ongoing Exhibit Opens March 16 Exhibit Closes April 6 Ongoing Exhibit

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Ongoing Exhibit Opens March 25 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensMarch March1616 Exhibit Closes March 16 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April66 Ongoing OngoingExhibit Exhibit Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensApril April1212 orExhibit Permanent Ongoing OngoingExhibit Opens OpensExhibits April April2929 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensMay May33 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensMay May1717 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April1313 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April1515 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April2323 Ongoing Exhibit Opens April 12 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMay May44 Ongoing Exhibit Opens April 29 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMay May1818 Ongoing Exhibit Opens May 3 Exhibit OpensExhibits May 17 Ongoing Ongoingor orPermanent Permanent Exhibits Exhibit Closes April 13 Exhibit Closes April 15 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensMarch March2525 Exhibit Closes April 23 Exhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMarch March1616 Exhibit Closes May 4 Exhibit Closes May 18 Ongoing OngoingororPermanent PermanentExhibits Exhibits Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Ongoing Exhibits Close April 20 Ongoing OngoingororPermanent PermanentExhibits Exhibits Ongoing Exhibit Closes April 27 Ongoing Exhibit Closes May 4

Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensMarch March88 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensMarch March1515 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitOpens OpensApril April1818 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMarch March99 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMarch March2020 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMarch March2020 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April66 Ongoing Exhibit Opens March 8 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April77 Ongoing Exhibit Opens March 15 Ongoing Exhibit Opens April 18 Ongoing OngoingExhibits ExhibitsClose CloseApril April2020 Ongoing Exhibit Closes March 9 Ongoing Exhibit Closes March 20 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesApril April2727 Ongoing Exhibit Closes March 20 Ongoing OngoingExhibit ExhibitCloses ClosesMay May44 Ongoing Exhibit Closes April 6 Ongoing Exhibit Closes April 7 20

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773.741.5502

Subscribe at ClefNotesJournal.com and get great quarterly cover to cover coverage of Chicago's amazing arts and culture.

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Just a short drive from the Windy City

Top Vineyards

Smart Museum exhibit focuses on the national identity

AMERICA'S Self-Image

Rest your head at the epicenter of dance this summer

at the

SUMMER PILLOW

We go one-on-one with the artist as she gets set to make her Ravinia debut this summer.

Summer 2013

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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Subscribe To Chicago's Premier magazine for Culture & the Performing Arts!

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4th Anniversary Issue

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

The crooner talks life, music and bringing his Large Band to Ravinia

Lyle's Large Life

SUMMER 2011

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Exhibit Opens April 5 l l Closes l Exhibit May 2 Exhibit Closes May 11

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Interview with Steppenwolf Theatre ensemble member K. Todd Freeman

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art examines the impact of the Steins Family and and the passion they inspired in the appreciation of modern art.

a Legacy unveiled

Lens of authenticity

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre celebrates a quarter century celebrating Shakespeare.

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Andreas Mitisek takes the helm of Chicago Opera Theater with a new collaborative model that just may take COT to a whole new level

A Tale of Two Cities

Stephen Petronio Company is just one of our picks for the best and the brightest in Chicagoland's amazing new cultural season!

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A preview of the historic Paris Opéra Ballet as they kick off their American Tour at Harris Theatre.

Paris Comes to Millennium Park

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Exhibit Closes March 30 Exhibit Closes April 6

25 YEARS & COUNTING

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Field Museum of Natural History (Tel. 312.922.9410, fieldmuseum.org) The Machine Inside: Biomechanics Bunky Echo-Hawk: Modern Warrior Opening the Vaults: Wonders of the 1893 World's Fair Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence Crown Family Play Lab Earnst & Young Three-D Theatre Evolving Planet DNA Discovery Center Grainger Hall of Gems Pacific Spirits Sue The T. Rex Get four great issues for $18. | Call Underground Adventure Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center (Tel. 847.967.4800, ilholocaustmuseum.org) for more details. Ruth Gruber: Photojournalist Karkomi Permanent Exhibition

March 2014

March 2014

Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Susan Kraut: "Looking in, Looking Out" Robin Denevan - New Encaustic Paintings ArchiTech Gallery (Tel. 312.475.1290, architechgallery.com) Alfonso Iannelli and the Studios ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org ) Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) The Women's Caucus for Art Best of 2014 Susan Kraut: "Looking in, Looking Out" Bert Green Fine Art (Tel 312.434.7544, bgfa.us ) Robin Denevan - New Encaustic Paintings Wall Batterton ArchiTech Gallery (Tel. 312.475.1290, architechgallery.com) Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Alfonso Iannelli and the Studios Marcos Bontempo: Spiritual Meandering ARC Gallery (Tel 773-252-2232, arcgallery.org ) Chris (CJ) Pile: Saints and Sinners The Women's Caucus for Art Best of 2014 Chicago Artist's Coalition ( Tel. 312.491.8888, Bert Green Fine Art (Tel 312.434.7544, bgfa.us )chicagoartistscoalition.org) HATCH PROJECTS: Feeling is Mutual Wall Batterton BOLT Residency: Preview Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel.3 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) HATCH PROJECTS: Foggy Fantasy/Zones of Privacy Marcos Bontempo: Spiritual Meandering BOLT(CJ) Residency: Augur Chris Pile: Saints and Sinners Deer Path Art League in Lake (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleage.org) Chicago Artist's Coalition ( Tel. Forest 312.491.8888, chicagoartistscoalition.org) EmergingPROJECTS: Artists HATCH Feeling is Mutual Jean Albano Gallery (Tel. BOLT Residency: Preview 3 312.440.0770, jeanalbanogallery.com) ∞REΔLITIES HATCH PROJECTS: Foggy Fantasy/Zones of Privacy BOLT JosephResidency: GlimmerAugur Gallery (Tel. 312.787.4640, josephglimmergallery.com) Deer Art League in Lake the Forest (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleage.org) LevanPath Stepanyan: Investigating Mundane Emerging Artists Gallery (Tel. 312.943.0530, jsaslowgallery.com) Judy A. Saslow Jean Albano Gallery (Tel. 312.440.0770, jeanalbanogallery.com) Edmond Engel and Michel Nedjar ∞REΔLITIES Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Joseph Glimmer Gallery (Tel. 312.787.4640, josephglimmergallery.com) Chris Cosnowski Levan Stepanyan: Investigating the Mundane Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Judy A. Saslow Gallery (Tel. 312.943.0530, jsaslowgallery.com) John Macfarlane: Stage and Costume Designs Edmond Engel and Michel Nedjar Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500,(Tel. lindawarrenprojects.com) Chicago Architecture Foundation 312.922.3432, caf.architecture.org) Darrel Morris Chris Cosnowski Chicago: City of Big Data Holly Farrell Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Chicago Model City Linda Warren Projects 312.432.9500, John Macfarlane: Stage and(Tel Costume Designs lindawarrenprojects.com) Take Me To The River: Building Chicago's New Waterfront Worlds Apart Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Lego Morris Architecture Studio Darrel Group Show Chicago History Museum (Tel. 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org) Holly Farrell Jane Freilicher Linda WarrenJack Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, Railroaders: Delano's Homefront lindawarrenprojects.com) Photography Lynn Saville: Vacancy Worlds ApartQueen Siam: The and The White City Reuben Wu: Distant Suns Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair Street Level Group Show Project Space - Stefano Cossu: Arson Abraham Lincoln (Tel. 312-922-7827, adlerplanetarium.org) Adler Planetarium Jane Freilicher Facing Freedom Astronomy and Culture Lynn Saville: Vacancy Unexpected Chicago Cyber Space Reuben Wu: Distant Suns Street Level Project Space - Stefano Cossu: Arson Hidden Wonders Vivian Maier's Chicago Adler Planetarium (Tel. adlerplanetarium.org) Historic Atwood Sphere DuSable Museum of312-922-7827, African American History (Tel. 773.947.0600, dusablemuseum.org) Astronomy and Culture Our System FiftySolar Years Forward Cyber Space Planet Explorers The Endangered Species: A Visual Response to the Vanishing Black Man Hidden Wonders Telescopes BeyondAtwood Swastika and Jim Crow: Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges Historic Sphere Shoot for the Moon A Slow Walk Greatness Our Solar System The Universe: AtoWalk Through Space and Time Planet AfricaExplorers Speaks Telescopes The Freedom Now Mural Shoot for the Moon Thomas Miller Mosaics The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time

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Spring 2014CNCJA•53

Museums

March 2014

Siam: The Queen and The White City Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair Abraham Lincoln Facing Freedom Unexpected Chicago Vivian Maier's Chicago Chicago Architecture Foundation (Tel. History 312.922.3432, caf.architecture.org) DuSable Museum of African American (Tel. 773.947.0600, dusablemuseum.org) Chicago: City of Big Data Fifty Years Forward Chicago Model City The Endangered Species: A Visual Response to the Vanishing Black Man Take MeSwastika To The and River: Chicago's New Scholars Waterfront Beyond JimBuilding Crow: Jewish Refugee at Black Colleges Lego Architecture Studio A Slow Walk to Greatness Chicago History Museum (Tel. 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org) Africa Speaks Railroaders: Delano's The FreedomJack Now Mural Homefront Photography Siam: TheMiller Queen and The White City Thomas Mosaics Inspiring Beauty:of50Natural Years ofHistory Ebony Fashion Fair Field Museum (Tel. 312.922.9410, fieldmuseum.org) Abraham Lincoln The Machine Inside: Biomechanics Facing Echo-Hawk: Freedom Bunky Modern Warrior Unexpected Opening theChicago Vaults: Wonders of the 1893 World's Fair Vivian Maier's Chicago Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence Crown Family Play Lab DuSable Museum of African American History (Tel. 773.947.0600, dusablemuseum.org) Fifty Forward EarnstYears & Young Three-D Theatre The Endangered Evolving Planet Species: A Visual Response to the Vanishing Black Man BeyondDiscovery Swastika Center and Jim Crow: Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges DNA A Slow Walk Grainger Hallto ofGreatness Gems Africa Speaks Pacific Spirits The The Freedom Sue T. RexNow Mural Thomas MillerAdventure Mosaics Underground Field Museum of Natural History (Tel. 312.922.9410, Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center (Tel.fieldmuseum.org) 847.967.4800, ilholocaustmuseum.org) The Machine Biomechanics Ruth Gruber: Inside: Photojournalist Bunky Echo-Hawk: Warrior Karkomi PermanentModern Exhibition Openingofthe Vaults:Gallery Wonders of the 1893 World's Fair Legacy Absence Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence Museum Science and Industry (Tel. 773.684.1414, msichicago.org) CrownExplorers Family Play Lab Earth Think Earnst & Young Three-D Theatre Evolving 80 at 80 Planet DNA Discovery Center All Aboard the Silver Streak: Pioneer Zephyr Coal MineHall of Gems Grainger Pacific Revealed Spirits Earth Sue The T. Rex Fast Forward…Inventing The Future Underground Future EnergyAdventure Chicago Genetics and the Baby Chick Hatchery Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center (Tel. 847.967.4800, ilholocaustmuseum.org) Science StormsPhotojournalist Ruth Gruber: Treasures of the WaltExhibition Disney Archives Karkomi Permanent Legacy of Experience Absence Gallery You! The Museum of Science and312.939.2438, Industry (Tel. 773.684.1414, msichicago.org) Shedd Aquarium (Tel. sheddaquarium.org) Earth Explorers Abbott Oceanarium Think Rising Amazon 80 at 80 Show Aquatic All AboardReef the Silver Streak: Pioneer Zephyr Caribbean Coal Mine Jellies Earth Play Revealed Polar Zone Fast Forward…Inventing The Future Waters of the World Future Energy Chicago Wild Reef GeneticsInstitute and the Baby Chick Studies Hatchery(Tel. 312.332.1700, spertus.edu) Spertus of Jewish Collecting Local: 10 New Acquisitions Science Storms Treasures of the Walt Disney Archives You! The Experience Shedd Aquarium (Tel. 312.939.2438, sheddaquarium.org) Abbott Oceanarium Amazon Rising Aquatic Show Caribbean Reef Jellies Polar Play Zone Waters of the World Wild Reef Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies (Tel. 312.332.1700, spertus.edu) Collecting Local: 10 New Acquisitions 1

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Anonymous 4 Pacifica Quartet w/Anthony McGill, clarinet Seraphic Fire and Spektral Quartet Rafal Blechacz, piano Contempo Double Bill: 10th Anniversary w/Patricia Barber

CSO: Mozart and Strauss Family: Once Upon a Symphony - Three Little Pigs Beyond the Score: Beyond the Score: Ives Symphony No. 2 University of Chicago Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) l l l

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Chick Corea and Bela Fleck l Carnival of the Animals and a ChiArts Showcase of Music and Dance l Bella Voce (Tel. 877.755.6277, bellavoce.org) Spring Renaissance Chicago a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) The Birth of Gospel l l l Chicago Chamber Musicians (Tel. 312.819.5800, chicagochambermusic.org) First Monday Concert: Works by Balcom & Harbison l City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz=**, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Sonny Landreth & Cindy Cashdollar* l l Tinariwen * l David Wilcox and Vance Gilbert* l Jay Farrar* l l Paris Combo l Willy Porter & Simon Townshend* Johnny Clegg w/special guest Jesse Clegg* John Gorka album release show w/ Special Guest Antje Duvekot* Suzy Bogguss - CD Release Show* Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago (Tel. 312.369-8330, colum.edu/dance_center) Reggie Wilson/Fist & Heel Performance Group l l l Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Trey McIntyre Project feat. Music Institute of Chicago l l l Mario Franjoulis Live l Chicago Bach Project: St. Matthew Passion l Eat to the Beat: Music Institute of Chicago Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra w/guest artists Zemlinsky and Schuller Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center: Cello Sonatas Joffrey Ballet (Tel. 312.386.8905, joffrey.org) Romeo and Juliet Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.332.2244, lyricopera.org) Itzhak Perlman l The Sound of Music Museum of Contemporary Rabih Mroué and Lina Saneh Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) 33 rounds and a few seconds l l l River North Dance Chicago (Tel. 312.944.2888, rivernorthchicago.org) Spring Engagement l Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) Chamber Music: Pinchas Zukerman and Zefim Bronfman l CSO: Salonen Conducts Sibelius l l l Special Event: Zakir Hussain and The Masters of Percussion l Chamber Music: CSO Chamber at the Art Institute l Piano Series: The Labèque Sisters Play Bernstein l CSO: Tetzlaff Plays Dvorák l l l l Chamber Music: All Access - The Villandry Trio l Family: Once Upon a Symphony - Three Little Pigs at The Community House l CSO: Gershwin An American In Paris Jazz Series: Mavis Staples/Regina Carter's Southern Comfort

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a r e J r. w / N i k k i L a n e

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Spring 2014CNCJA•55

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A Red Orchid Theatre (Tel. 312.943.8722, aredorchidtheatre.org) Mud Blue Sky Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) Peter and the Start Catcher Mowtown the Musical The Wizard of Oz Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Tristan & Yseult Road Show Henry V Citadel Theatre (Tel. 847.735.8554, citadeltheatre.org) Water By The Spoonful Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) Seven Guitars Eclipse Theatre (Tel. 773.728.2216, eclipsetheatre.org) Ruined First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) Salvage Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Venus In Fur Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Our Class American Myth Ghost Bike Cicada Without Trace Indie Boots Theatre Festival: The Olivia Plays Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) A Tale of Two Cities Lyle Finds His Mother Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) In The Garden: A Darwinian Love Story Northlight Theatre in Skokie (Tel. 847.673.6300, northlight.org) Chapatti RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) 44 Ways To End Your Sex Life Step Up Productions (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Darlin' Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Russian Transport Saturday Night/Sunday Morning The Wild reWilding Genius The Way West Strawdog Theatre Company (Tel. 773.528.9696, strawdogtheatre.org) Best Beloved: The Just So Stories Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) Dessa Rose Writers Theatre in Glencoe (Tel. 847.242.6000, writerstheatre.org) Hedda Gabler The Dance of Death

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56•CNCJASpring 2014

Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Susan Kraut: "Looking in, Looking Out" Robin Denevan - New Encaustic Paintings ArchiTech Gallery (Tel. 312.475.1290, architechgallery.com) Alfonso Iannelli and the Studios Bert Green Fine Art (Tel 312.434.7544, bgfa.us ) Wall Batterton Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Mary Lou Zelazny: New Work Chicago Artist's Coalition ( Tel. 312.491.8888, chicagoartistscoalition.org) HATCH PROJECTS: Feeling is Mutual BOLT Residency: Preview 3 HATCH PROJECTS: Foggy Fantasy/Zones of Privacy BOLT Residency: Augur HATCH PROJECTS: Three-Person Exhibition BOLT Residency: Solo Exhibition Deer Path Art League in Lake Forest (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleague.org) Emerging Artists Spring Fever Jean Albano Gallery (Tel. 312.440.0770, jeanalbanogallery.com) ∞REΔLITIES Joseph Glimmer Gallery (Tel. 312.787.4640, josephglimmergallery.com) Levan Stepanyan: Investigating the Mundane Judy A. Saslow Gallery (Tel. 312.943.0530, jsaslowgallery.com) Edmond Engel and Michel Nedjar Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312.432.9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Chris Cosnowski Joseph Noderer William Eckhardt Kohler Maya Polsky Gallery (Tel 312.440.0055, mayapolskygallery.com) John Macfarlane: Stage and Costume Designs Packer Schopf Gallery (Tel 312.226.8984, packergallery.com) Darrel Morris Holly Farrell Ian Scheller Anthony Adcock Project Onward (Tel 773.940.2992, projectonward.org) Worlds Apart Roy Boyd Gallery (Tel 312.642.1606, royboydgallery.com) Group Show Schneider Gallery, Inc. (Tel. 312.988.4033, schneidergallerychicago.com) Street Level Project Space - Stefano Cossu: Arson

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Our weekly byte-sized version of the something wonderful we put into every issue of Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts!

Want more Clef Notes? Sign up online at ClefNotesJournal.com for Snippets, our weekly e-newsletter with updates on arts and culture throughout Chicagoland. With Snippets, we bring you news, interviews, performance reviews and our weekly picks for Chicago's must-see arts & culture performances!

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Listings for permanent and onoing exhibits at museums listed within the Almanac may be found on pages 51-53.

Art Galleries


Spring 2014CNCJA•57

Music & Dance

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Avishai Cohen Trio* Jackopierce* Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Ballet Preljocaj: Blanche Neige (Snow White) CSO MusicNOW: Companions Eat to the Beat Lunchpass: Harris Theatre Presents Eat to the Beat: The Chicago Academy for the Arts Broadway Our Way: Chicago Gay Mens Chorus Joffrey Ballet (Tel. 312.386.8905, joffrey.org) Romeo and Juliet Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.332.2244, lyricopera.org) The Sound of Music Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) Maud Le Pladec (contemporary dance): "Democracy" Baryshnikov Productions: "Man in a Case" Music of the Baroque (Tel. 312.551.1414, baroque.org) 1 Royal Fireworks - Music and More: Works by Purcell, Vivaldi and Handel Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) CSO: Tchaikovsky Pathétique l Jazz Series: Terri Lyne Carrington’s Mosaic Project Chamber Music: CSO Chamber All-Access - Souvenir from Florence Piano Series: Lugansky Plays Rachmaninov CSO: Labadie Conducts Beethoven Family: Adventures with Aladdin Schubert Song Series: Susanna Phillips and Eric Owens CSO: Jurowski Conducts Strauss Chamber Music: CSO Chamber at the Art Institute Piano Series: Emanuel Ax: The Brahms Project CSO: Shostakovich Leningrad CSO: Van Zweden and Weilerstein Jazz Series: Jason Moran and Theaster Gates CSO: Prokofiev 5 University of Chicago Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) Shanghai Quartet Contempo: Tomorrow's Music Today I Contempo: Tomorrow's Music Today II Double Bill: Dick Hyman and Bill Charlap Trio A Red Orchid Theatre (Tel. 312.943.8722, aredorchidtheatre.org) Mud Blue Sky Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) The Wizard of Oz l Buyer and Cellar Mamma Mia! Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Road Show l Henry V l

Pat McGee*

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Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) The Idan Raichel Project l The Paul Taylor Dance Company l l Chicago a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) Swing!: An a capella Evening Featuring the Music of Basie and Ellington l Chicago Chamber Musicians (Tel. 312.819.5800, chicagochambermusic.org) Convivial Conversations: Beethoven, Rheinberger and Dvorak l First Monday Concert: Works by Rzewsky and Stephensen l Chicago Opera Theater (Tel. 312.704.8414, chicagooperatheater.org) The Emperor of Atlantis/The Clever One City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz=**, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Keren Ann* l

May2014


Shall We Dance?

Light

FINDING the

By EMILY DISHER

Pilobolus performs "Azimuth" by choreographer Alonzo King. 58•CNCJASpring 2014


This spring, the incredibly innovative performance collaborative, Pilobolus Dance Theater, brings its unique brand of acrobatic dance and performance art to the McAninch Arts Center in Glen Ellyn.

Photos By Grant Halverson

A

A dance company that names itself after a fungus immediately inspires curiosity. After learning more about the unending nimble and wildly imaginative Pilobolus Dance Theater, that curiosity blossoms into full-on fascination. The modern performance company, founded on principles of collaborative creativity, produces a unique combination of acrobatic and athletic performance art that will force you rethink the limits of the human body. On April 17, Pilobolus will enliven the McAninch Arts Center in Glen Elllyn with its unique brand of dance. Okay, it's true that Pilobolus shares its name with a fungus that grows on cow dung. What makes this tiny fungus remarkable, though, is the way it aims its spores at the sunlight, and can propel them up to ten feet away when ripe. Pilobolus Dance Theater cofounder Jonathan Wolken, whose father studied the fungus in the early 1970s, was inspired by the extraordinary ability of the organism to perform with such power and accuracy. Associate artistic director Renee Jaworski explains that Pilobolus (the fungus) displayed “properties that (the founding members) wanted to be as a company—strong, phototropic, always searching for the light.” As a result, beginning in 1971, “Pilobolus” became a name recognizable not just to mycologists, but to artists as well, when a group of Dartmouth College students—including Wolken—founded Pilobolus Dance Theater. Pilobolus was instituted on collaboration, and it becomes clear quite quickly that the collaborative nature of Pilobolus not only permeates the structure of the company, but also the creation process and the finished product. When explaining how the experience of dancing with Pilobolus might be different from dancing with other major modern companies, Jaworski insists that it is the dancer's vital contribution to the creative process that stands out. “The biggest thing is that our dancers are viewed as collaborators,” Jaworski explains. “When we get into the studio or out on the road, they are not just following orders. They are part of the conversation in a way that I don’t think happens everywhere.” Pilobolus hires their dancers not just because of their performance capabilities—dancing, acting, acrobatics—but also for their creative potential. Jaworski points out that Pilobolus dancers must have an innate interest in the world and in new ways of expressing themselves. They must have “genuine curiosity,” she says. The Pilobolus International Collaborators Project, an innovative dance incubator program, began in 2007 and has enriched the way the dance company interacts with other creatives. The project brings together Pilobolus performers with other artists to create unique works. Notable collaborators have included author/illustrator Maurice Sendak, magicians Penn and Teller, Taiko player Leonard Eto, the MIT Distributed Robotics Laboratory, and Maus cartoonist Art Spiegelman. Jaworski notes, “We collaborate with people who are from all different kinds of media, and who bring different (talents) to the table. It’s something that allows us to really explore more (ideas) with different perspectives than we naturally bring (to the table).” With so many expert artists assembling to collectively produce

Spring 2014CNCJA•59


a work of art, conflicting ideas naturally arise, and, in fact, this helps to mold a finished product. As Jaworski puts it, “Conflict is something we’re not scared of. It’s part of the process. Conflict exists to make a better piece. It’s good to question things.” When attending a Pilobolus performance, a quick glance at the evening’s program reveals the extensive partnerships that contribute to each work. Each piece in the playbill includes a lengthy list of the artists responsible for shaping it, as was the case when I had the pleasure of viewing Pilobolus at the Krannert Center at the University of Illinois UrbanaChampaign in April 2012. That unforgettable production of colorful acrobatics and astounding human configurations left me exhilarated and with a lasting impression. Every one of Pilobolus’ extraordinary programs stands as a testament to what’s truly possible when uniting so many creative backgrounds. Even if you've never seen Pilobolus perform on stage, you may very well have observed their commercial arm, Pilobolus Creative Services (PCS), at the 2007 Academy Awards; or perhaps you've spotted them on Sesame Street, 60 Minutes, or Late Night with Conan O’Brien. PCS, which provides movement design and production for business and advertising, has worked with clients such as Avon, American Express, IBM, Hyundai, and Google. Pilobolus has managed to successfully win over both arts aficionados and commercial audiences through a remarkable slate of specialized branches, including the Dance Theater, Creative Services, and the educational arm, Pilobolus Institute. Suffice it to say, Pilobolus never rests. They are so busy, in fact, that each branch employs its own distinct set of dance artists. “Because our schedule is so busy, we have Pilobolus Dance Theater—that is more of

Shall We Dance?

our repertoire company. Then we have Shadowland, (an evening-length, touring movement-theater piece that grew out of the 2007 Academy Awards presentation), which is a separate group of performers,” Jaworski explains. “We have adjunct dancers who do the Creative Services. For the education we have dancers who no longer tour full time.” Pilobolus Dance Theater, which will bring their singular creativity to the MAC this spring, performs anywhere from 90 to 130 shows touring each year. This season, they return to the newly renovated MAC at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, where they will light up the stage with a series of exciting collaborations (the specific works to be presented have yet to be announced). The performance comes on the heels of a 14-month, $35 million renovation, for the theater, which included updates to all three of its performance spaces, and the addition of an art gallery and outdoor patio stage. Pilobolus will perform in the updated, state-of-the-art, 800-seat Performance Hall, which promises new seats, sapele wood accents, and a stunning new aubergine stage curtain. Additionally, the new acoustic shell and custom designed auto-responsive HVAC system offers a beautifully enhanced audio experience. “This is an exciting time for lovers of the performing arts,” says newly appointed MAC executive director Diana Martinez. “The MAC has always had a strong reputation, but with updated performance spaces and public areas, and a new art gallery, the MAC promises to be the destination to experience the visual and performing arts in the western suburbs.” Well, that will certainly be the case on April 17, when Pilobolus Dance Theatre takes the stage. 

(Clockwise from top): Pilobolus in performances of "All' Not Lost" (photo by Nadirah Zakariya); "Automation"; "Skyscrapers"; and "Automation" (photos by Grant Halverson)

60•CNCJASpring 2014


Theater Review

Focus and Simplicity Propel Crime and Punishment By LESLIE PRICE we reap the reward. Playing multiple roles in this small-cast and streamlined adaptation are Jack McCabe and Maureen Yasko. McCabe is stoic and effective as Porfiry, the investigator charged with solving the murders at the heart of the story. Yasko is surefooted as Sonia, a prostitute and Raskolnikov's confidante, but less compelling in some minor roles. The production is relatively simple, relying on a basic box set to become a variety of locations with the help of only about a dozen lighting instruments. The power of Mary-Arrchie's Crime and Punishment lies in that simplicity, however. By allowing the 148 year-old story to unfold without fussing over it unnecessarily, the bleakness of the play's world is brought into sharp focus. Things aren't prettified, nor should they be. The economy of design is not only necessary in such a small theater space, it's essential to the show's effectiveness. Mary-Arrchie's Crime and Punishment is not without its challenges. Even in a brilliantly concise script, the pacing is slow in points. Likewise, the transitions from one scene to the next are occasionally clunky. However, these are challenges that are likely to be met as the run continues. With a talented supporting cast and a superb leading man, the production will only tighten. Crime and Punishment is an excellent take on a literary classic. Clever, well-acted, and well-deserving of the audiences that are sure to come and enjoy this fine bit of theater.

Photo By Emily Schwartz

While the Chicago winter churns along outside, the cold secondfloor space that houses the Mary-Arrchie Theatre Company heats up with Marilyn Campbell and Curt Columbus' three-person take on Dostoyevsky's classic tale, Crime and Punishment. Defying the expectations of many current (and former) high school students, this adaptation somehow feels incredibly relevant for today's audiences. By distilling Crime and Punishment into its most essential characters and plot points, Campbell and Columbus' script stays true to the original novel and is accessible to theatergoers who might otherwise be daunted by the title alone. The epic tale of Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, Crime and Punishment focuses on the struggle between morals and intellect, power and weakness, the ordinary and the extraordinary. Having committed one murder in the name of altruism and a second by happenstance, Raskolnikov is confused—too smart for his own good, more impulsive than he wants to admit. He doesn't know where to turn, and so he's tormented by his actions, punishing himself far more effectively than anyone else ever could. The entire production rests squarely on the shoulders of the immensely gifted and powerful Ed Porter as Raskolnikov. Porter is not only physically present in every scene, he's emotionally present, too. Moving through the production completely consumed by the character and circumstance, Porter is mesmerizing to watch. His emotion is palpable and raw, drawing the audience in with every word. Porter gives himself over to the role, and

Jack McCabe and Maureen Yasko, Ed Porter and Jack McCabe in Mary-Arrchie Theatre's winter production of Crime and Punishment. Spring 2014CNCJA•61


Theater

Citadel Theatre in Lake Forest (Tel. 847.735.8554, citadeltheatre.org) Cabaret Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) M. Butterfly Eclipse Theatre (Tel. 773.728.2216, eclipsetheatre.org) Ruined Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) The White Snake Ask Aunt Susan Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) Cicada Our Class Without Trace Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) In The Garden: A Darwinian Love Story Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Monstrous Regiment Northlight Theatre in Skokie (Tel. 847.673.6300, northlight.org) Lost In Yonkers Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Russian Transport The Way West Strawdog Theatre Company (Tel. 773.528.9696, strawdogtheatre.org) Charles Ives Take Me Home Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) Applause Writers Theatre in Glencoe (Tel. 847.242.6000, writerstheatre.org) The Dance of Death Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Susan Kraut: "Looking in, Looking Out" Robin Denevan - New Encaustic Paintings Carl Hammer Gallery (Tel. 312.266.8512, hammergallery.com) Mary Lou Zelazny: New Work Chicago Artist's Coalition ( Tel. 312.491.8888, chicagoartistscoalition.org) HATCH PROJECTS: Feeling is Mutual BOLT Residency: Preview 3 HATCH PROJECTS: Foggy Fantasy/Zones of Privacy BOLT Residency: Augur Deer Path Art League in Lake Forest (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleague.org) Emerging Artists Spring Fever Jean Albano Gallery (Tel. 312.440.0770, jeanalbanogallery.com) ∞REΔLITIES Joseph Glimmer Gallery (Tel. 312.787.4640, josephglimmergallery.com) Levan Stepanyan: Investigating the Mundane Joseph Noderer William Eckhardt Kohler Maya Polsky Gallery (Tel 312.440.0055, mayapolskygallery.com) John Macfarlane: Stage and Costume Designs Packer Schopf Gallery (Tel 312.226.8984, packergallery.com) Ian Scheller Anthony Adcock Project Onward (Tel 773.940.2992, projectonward.org) Worlds Apart

May2014

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Listings for permanent and onoing exhibits at museums listed within the Almanac may be found on pages 51-53.

Art Galleries

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Spring 2014CNCJA•63

Acclaimed flutist Sooyun Kim

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Acclaimed flutist Sooyun Kim has established herself as one of the rare flute soloists in the classical music scene. Since her concerto debut with the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra at the tender age of ten, she’s enjoyed a flourishing career performing with orchestras around the world including the Bavarian Radio, Munich Radio, Munich Chamber, and Boston Pops orchestras. She’s concertized in Budapest, Paris, Munich, Kobe, and Seoul; and at the Gardner Museum, Kennedy Center, and Carnegie, Alice Tully, and Jordan halls. An artist of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and a former member of CMS, Kim will perform Debussy’s Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp with other distinguished CMS guest artists at Harris Theater for Music and Dance on March 18. French Revelations promises to be an intriguing all-French program celebrating some of the great works and composers of the 20th century.

Around Town

Photo Kim Andrew


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exhibits

Spring 2014 Pickl List

Karyn Peterson's Exhibit Picks

Railroaders: Jack Delano's Homefront Photography The Chicago History Museum Railroads and rail workers were essential to America’s victory in World War II. In 1942, the Office of War Information issued photographer Jack Delano a new assignment: document “railroads and their place in American life.” During the next several months, Delano captured three thousand images, two-thirds of them in the nation’s rail hub—Chicago. Railroaders features more than sixty of Delano’s images, both black-and-white and early color photographs. Explore the stories of Chicago railroaders. Meet the men and women who hustled on the rails, in the stations, and at the yards. Step inside a caboose. Help rail yard workers get trains ready for the road. Discover the legacy of Jack Delano’s efforts through the contemporary photographs of his son, Pablo. Visit Railroaders at The Chicago History Museum when it opens April 5. Visit chicagohistory.org or call 312.642.4600 for more information.

Exhibits

The Machine Inside: Biomechanics The Field Museum Imagine if your jaws could crush over 8,000 pounds in one bite, your ears could act as air conditioners, and your legs could leap the length of a football field in a single bound. From the inside out, every living thing—including humans—is a machine built to survive, move and discover. The Field Museum invites you to investigate the marvels of natural engineering in The Machine Inside: Biomechanics. Try to “fly” and study the many different ways creatures jump, gallop, slither and swim. And see technological breakthroughs—like Velcro, wind turbines, and chainsaws—that were inspired by nature’s ingenuity. Discover how evolution is Earth’s greatest innovator and much, much more. The Machine Inside: Biomechanics opens March 4, 2014. Visit fieldmuseum.org or call 312.922.9410 for more details.

Exhibits

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The Thrill of the Chase: Drawings for the Harry B. and Bessie K. Braude Memorial Collection The Art Institute Chicago This past summer, Boston collector Dorothy Braude Edinburg presented the Art Institute with an extraordinary gift of more than 600 prints, 190 drawings, 150 Chinese and Korean ceramics, and her collection of Japanese illustrated books. Given in memory of her parents, Harry B. and Bessie K. Braude, who instilled in her artistic interests and high standards, these remarkable works are a landmark gift—not only for the museum but for all of Chicago. For the past 22 years, Edinburg has worked in active partnership with Art Institute curators both to bring the city the great works she has gathered throughout her life and to target and acquire new works for the museum’s collection. The exhibit opens at The Art Institute March 15. Visit artic.edu or call 312.443.3600 for more information.

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Andrew Schmidt's Theater Picks

Russian Transport Steppenwolf Theater A rowdy Russian family in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn is on a daily hustle to achieve the American Dream. When Uncle Boris arrives from the old country, his mysterious business ventures force the family to decide just how far they are willing to go to come out on top. A funny, passionate family drama that slyly transforms into a heart-pounding thriller, Russian Transport is a fascinating look at the contemporary American immigrant experience. The show runs at Steppenwolf Theater now through May 11. Visit steppenwolf.org or call 312.335.1650 for more details. Ruined Eclipse Theatre In war-torn Congo, Mama Nadi keeps the peace between customers on both sides of the civil war by serving everything from cold beers to warm beds. This shrewd matriarch both protects and profits from the women whose bodies have become battlegrounds "ruined" by the brutality of government soldiers and rebel forces alike. Inspired by interviews conducted in Africa, Ruined won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize Award for Drama. Ruined runs April 17 – May 25. Visit eclipsetheatre.org or call 773.728.2216 for more information.

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Gypsy Chicago Shakespeare Theater Boasting one show-stopping song after another—like “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” and “Let Me Entertain You”—this classic musical is inspired by memoirs of the burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee; and it marks Chicago Shakespeare Theatre associate artistic director Gary Griffin’s continued exploration of the Sondheim canon. Tony Award nominee Louise Pitre makes her Chicago Shakespeare debut as Rose, the most infamous of all stage mothers. A jewel of the American musical theater, Pitre has been described by The New York Times critic Frank Rich as “Broadway’s own brassy, unlikely answer to King Lear.” Gypsy runs at Shakespeare Theater now through March 23. Visit chicagoshakes.com or call 312.595.5600 for more details. Above Fennec fox (imagery from The Machine Inside: Biometrics exhibition (photo courtesy of the Museum of Science and Industry); (right) Louise Pitre in Gypsy playing at Chicago Shakespeare Theater (photo by Bill Burlingham).

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Danc

Dance Brittany Rice's Dance Picks

The Paul Taylor Dance Company Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University The Paul Taylor Dance Company returns to Chicago, bringing Mr. Taylor’s ever-burgeoning repertoire to the Auditorium Theater. Mr. Taylor is the last living member of the pantheon that created America’s indigenous art of modern dance, and continues to win public and critical acclaim for the vibrancy, relevance and power of his creations. The San Francisco Chronicle proclaims, “The American spirit soars whenever Taylor’s dancers dance.” Performances run May 17 and 18 at Auditorium Theatre. Visit auditoriumtheatre.org or call 312.922.2110 for more information. Belle Preljocaj (Blanche Neige) Snow White Harris Theater for Music and Dance Angelin Preljocaj’s French dance company from Provence gives its own contemporary take on "Blanche Neige" (Snow White). Based on the Grimm Brothers’ original fairy tale, this full-length story ballet choreographed by Preljocaj features costumes by legendary designer Jean Paul Gaultier created to be devilishly sexy, including brief nudity, and designs of warrior inspiration that are worth the journey in themselves. In "Blanche Neige," the characters’ bodies transcend through Preljocaj’s signature choreography to demonstrate space, energy and ultimately feelings, using inventive gestures, clever substitution and acrobatic wall climbing. See Blanche Neige May 2 – 4 at Harris Theater. Visit harristheaterchicago.org or call 312.334.7777 for more details.

dance

Hubbard Street Dance Spring Series Harris Theater for Music and Dance In Hubbard Street’s first all-Kylián program, see audience favorites Petite Mort and 27'52" alongside company premieres of celebrated choreographer Jiří Kylián’s Falling Angels and Sarabande. Acclaimed ensemble Third Coast Percussion performs Steve Reich’s driving score for Falling Angels live. See this vibrant program at Harris Theater March 13-16. Visit harristheaterchicago.org or call 312.334.7777 for more details.

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Fred cummings' Music Picks

Music

usic

Seraphic Fire & Spektral Quartet The University of Chicago Presents Under the baton of conductor Patrick Quigley, Grammy-nominated choir Seraphic Fire and Chicago's own Spektral Quartet join forces to perform Josef Haydn's Seven Last Words of Christ, a powerful, deeply moving work that tells the story of the crucifixion through music, during Holy Week. The piece comprises an introduction, seven slow movements corresponding to the seven phrases spoken by Christ on the cross, and a musical depiction of the earthquake following the crucifixion. Cello Sonatas by The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Harris Theater for Music and Dance Beethoven’s works are milestones of the cello repertoire. Esteemed co-artistic directors of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Wu Han and David Finckel, praised for the boldness, imagination, and collaborative intimacy of their performances, return to the Harris to join forces for this concert. Closing their 2013-2014 residency with a performance of the complete Beethoven Cello Sonatas. Han and Finckle note, “Performing the entire cycle in a single evening provides a journey from Beethoven’s fiery youth, through his heroic middle period, to the moving and momentous final sonatas of his late career.” Experience this thrilling journey April 29 at Harris Theater. Visit harristheaterchicago.org or call 312.334.7777 for more details. Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Winton Marsalis Symphony Center Symphony Center brings the unparalleled Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis for its an annual residency. Don't miss Marsalis, a musical icon, leading one of the world's greatest jazz bands in another unforgettable performance of original tunes and classic selections of the genre’s great legends. The concert takes place March 28 at Symphony Centery. Visit cso.org or call 312.294.3000 for more information.

Above Paul Taylor Dance Company (photo courtesy of the Paul Taylor Dance Company); (right) Winton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra (photo by Anthony Barboza).

Spring 2014CNCJA•65


Theate

Editor's Picks

Spring 2014 Pick List

Venus in Fur Goodman Theatre When Vanda arrives several hours late to her audition for a play based on a nineteenth-century erotic novel, the director, Thomas, is less than impressed. But Vanda’s masterful performance flips the script on Thomas’ expectations and turns the session into a tango for dominance between actress and director, woman and man. Hailed as “seriously smart and very funny” by The New York Times, Venus in Fur is a laugh-out-loud study of the politics of sex and power that’s guaranteed to charm and mesmerize. Venus in Fur runs at Goodman Theatre March 8 through April 13. Visit goodmantheatre.org or call 312443.3800 for more details.

Music theater

heater

John Gorka Album Release Show with Special Guest Ante Duvekot City Winery Now with his 11th studio album, John Gorka returns to his roots with his most compelling and traditional album to date. It has been widely praised as some of the acclaimed folk artist’s finest work. Many well known artists have recorded and/or performed John Gorka songs, including Mary Chapin Carpenter, Nanci Griffith, Mary Black and Maura O’Connell. He has graced the stage of Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage, etown and has appeared on CNN. His new song “Where No Monument Stands” is featured in the upcoming documentary Every War Has Two Losers, about activist, Oregon Poet Laureate William Stafford (1914-1993). Hear Gorka live at City Winery on April 25. Visit citywinery.com/Chicago or call 312.733.9463 for more details. The Chicago Bach Project Harris Theater for Music and Dance Grammy Award-winning conductor John Nelson returns to Chicago this spring to lead the fourth annual Chicago Bach Project performance, featuring Bach’s majestic St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244.

Many consider Bach's St. Matthew the most moving of all sacred works, portraying the musical narrative of the greatest story ever told. Maestro Nelson, who brings an outright reverential understanding of Bach’s nuanced score, will offer what is probably the season’s most emotionally valuable musical experience in what has become an honored annual tradition for the Chicago Easter season. The concert takes place 7:30 p.m., April 11 at Harris Theater for Music and Dance. Visit sdgmusic.org or call 630-984-4300 for more information.

Publisher's Picks

music

The Gospel of Lovingkindness Victory Gardens Theatre One mother sees her son struggle to find his place in the world, and another sees her son live his dream. When these proud women meet, everything— their lives, their families, their city—is sent over the edge. Inspired by true events, this drama about faith, family and loss is as fervent and poetic a theatrical experience as a gospel hymn. The show runs now through March 30. Visit victorygardens.org or call 773.871.3000 for more information.

Pink Martini with Special Guests The von Trapps Symphony Center Delightfully diverse “little orchestra” Pink Martini returns to Symphony Center with singer China Forbes in an adventurous evening of eclectic music. Enjoy classic tunes and selections from their upcoming album featuring exquisite arrangements by Thomas Lauderdale and unique four-part harmonies of The von Trapps, the great-grandchildren of the famous Sound of Music family. “This is rich, hugely approachable music, utterly cosmopolitan yet utterly unpretentious. And it seems to speak to just about everybody” (The Washington Post). The concert takes place March 7 at Symphony Center. Visit cso.org or call 312.294.3000 for more details.

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Above: Rufus Collins at Thomas in Venus in Fur at Goodman Theatre this spring (photo courtesy of Goodman Theatre); (left) members of the acclaimed Pink Martini orchestra (photo courtesy of Pink Martini).


Ballet preljocaj

snow white A contemporAry tAke on the Grimm Brother’s fAiry tAle Devilishly sexy costumes by Jean paul Gaultier spotlight preljocaj’s mesmerizing choreography.

may 2 - 7:30pm may 3 - 7:30pm may 4 - 2:00pm

may 2 and 3 performances will include brief nudity.

tickets start at $40 harristheaterchicago.org | 312.334.7777

Ballet preljocaj photo By: Jc carbonne

Chauncey & Marion D. McCormick Family Foundation Presenting Sponsor

The Harris at 10 Season Sponsor

Official Airline of the Harris Theater

The Harris at 10 Hotel Sponsor Spring 2014CNCJA•67


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DirecteD By en le members Tim hopper, Mariann Maybeeilrran n Featuring ensemb elstein and Melanie n him

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tickets start at just $20. Buy online at steppenwolf.org or call 312-335-1650.

Corporate Production Sponsor

2013 /14 Grand Benefactors

2013 /14 Benefactors

Clef Notes Journal's Spring 2014 Issue  

The spring 2014 Arts & Education Issue of Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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