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Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Summer Fine Arts Festivals Preview

BACON BROTHERS

Kevin and Michael Bacon have been keeping things honest on the concert stage and winning listeners for more than 20 years.

CATCHING WHALES

Lookingglass Theatre pits man against his obsessions in a world premiere adaptation of Moby Dick on stage this summer. Summer 2015

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A REGAL DEBUT The Royal Ballet is introducing Auditorium Theatre audiences to a fresh new vision of Don Quixote.

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Contents Summer 2015

CNCJA

FEATURES

14 Catching Whales

Lookingglass Theatre sinks its creative teeth into one of the biggest classic works in literature and the live stage, Moby Dick.

18 One Man Act

22 Summer Fine Arts Festivals Preview Photo courtesy of The Field Museum

Photo by Quinn B. Wharton

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago sets the stage for its summer series, shining the spotlight of the entire performance on the work of one man, the company’s heralded and innovative resident choreographer, Alejandro Cerrudo. We get a guided tour of the highly anticipated program from the man himself.

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Photo Courtesy of the Ravinia Festival

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From world music to fashion to sausages (yes, sausages), Chicago’s summer fests are a mix as eclectic as the city itself. And we’ve got your lineup of the can’t-miss celebrations that will make your summer sing (and dance, too).

30 Treasures from Afar

New Field Museum Exhibit Cyrus Tang Hall of China examines 5,000 years of Chinese history and culture in a massive exploration and the most extensive permanent exhibition of Chinese artifacts in North America.

From Top: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago's Kellie Eppenheimer and Jason Little in Little mortal jump by Hubbard Street resident choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo; Jade Congo Tube from the Cyrus Tang Hall of China exhibition at the Field Museum this summer; Ravinia Festival's opening gates.

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From the Publisher’s Desk

Photo by Diane Mentzer

I remember the first time I saw Stomp. The show had already received rave reviews throughout Europe and was making its way through the U.S. when I saw it, and I honestly can't say I knew what to expect of it. A full-length show based entirely on the dynamism of percussive dance was not all that common at the time, but I was certainly excited at the creative possibilities. Like those before me, I was blown away by the boundless creativity and skill I witnessed that night. Synchronistic movement is nothing new in live theater. But the mastery of movement, sound and story-telling all woven into one explosive live stage experience was. My expectations led me down the primrose path that day. I took what I knew about percussive dance (which wasn't enormous at the time) and let that frame my anticipation of what was possible in a more than 90 minute live stage experience. The show's producers used those expectations to their advantage and turned what I, and every other audience member in the theater that night, expected on its ear, expanding our framework for what really is a time-honored art with a universe of possibilities. Expectations are funny that way. When it comes to arts and culture, it's almost impossible to suspend them. Yet, when we do, we absorb so much more of the creativity that comprises the experience. We see so much of what the artist sees. Kevin and Michael Bacon deal with expectations all the time. Touring and recording with the Bacon Brothers Band for the past 20 years has not eliminated that phenomenon. In our interview with the brothers, Kevin himself admitted that people have set expectations when they go out to hear a band with a famous actor as the front man. But the music the band Above: Michael Bacon and Kevin Bacon perform on stage. has churned out the last two decades has turned those expectations into loyal listeners who appreciate the honesty they bring to the concert stage. Perhaps it's the job of all artists to defy expectations on some level. That's what gives the arts its wonder. This Chicago summer has a world of surprises in store for lovers of the arts far and near. With the vast festival season taking over where theaters and concert halls leave off, and with nature playing its own part in the art around us, here's hoping your expectations are surpassed with the boundless creativity that awaits you this summer season. Sincerely,

D. Webb Publisher

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Clef N tes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts Summer 2015

Publisher D. Webb

Editorial Editor in Chief

Patrick M. Curran II

Associate Editors Fred Cummings Scott Elam Christopher Hopper

Editorial Support Rachel Cullen Vickie Moore

Staff Writers and Contributors Kathryn Bacasmot David Berner Martin Henke Laura Kinter Leslie Price Jordan Reinwald Donna Robertson Andrew Sheffield Betsy van Die

Art & Design Art Director

Carl Benjamin Smith

Contributing Photographers Colin Lyons Lorenzo Gregorio

Graphics & Design Chelsea Davis Angela Chang

Social Media Manager Mary Henley

Advertising

Jason Montgomery Jason.Montgomery@ClefNotesJournal.com

Subscriptions Clef Notes is published quarterly (March, June, September and December) each year. An annual subscription to the magazine may be purchased by mailing a check or money order for $18 to Clef Notes Publishing, Inc., 5815 N. Sheridan Road, Suite 1107, Chicago, IL 60660. Bulk rates are also available. Credit card purchases may be secured online at ClefNotesJournal.com or by calling 773.741.5502. © 2015 Clef Notes Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the USA.


Contents

Photo by Johan Persson

Summer 2015

46 CNCJA

DEPARTMENTS

10 Luminary: Q&A with Actor Jordan Brown Want to talk range? Try going from dancing a Scottish jig in Brigadoon to halfnaked boy-toy in this summer's Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike at The Goodman Theatre. We got the lowdown on this summer's craziest role straight from the horse's mouth.

32 Artist Conversational: Bacon Brothers

Kevin and Michael Bacon take a very personal approach to the music they make, and that’s why the Bacon Brothers Band has etched out a solid 20-year run with a singular sound that seamlessly fuses rock with folk, R&B and even Country, giving audiences music to connect with, serving as an open book on the brothers’ lives.

46 Shall We Dance?: A Regal Debut On the Cover: Singers/songwriters Kevin and Michael Bacon are the nucleus of the Bacon Brothers Band, celebrating 20 years this year and performing July 6 at Chicago's City Winery. Above: The company of The Royal Ballet in Carlos Acosta's Don Quixote.

Chicago will play host to royalty this summer when the acclaimed Royal Ballet makes its long-awaited return to the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University. We sit down with Kevin O’Hare, the company’s artistic director, to survey the terrain of their celebrated new production, Carlos Acosta’s Don Quixote, adding a new vision to a familiar story.

56 Curator's Corner: Nature In Focus

The work of artist Jean-Luc Mylayne is the subject of an upcoming three-part exhibition presented by the Art Institute and The Arts Club of Chicago this summer that focuses on the acute nature of nature.

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chatter room

Letters from our readers...

Robotics Appreciation

Thank you for the article you presented on the Museum of Science and Industry exhibit on robots (Robot Revolution – Spring 2015 Issue). It was the only article I’ve found in Chicago on the exhibition and I was excited to read about the show's launch this summer. I love that you cover so much of the “off-the-beatenpath” arts events in the city as well as the major ones...I’m a big fan of Chicago arts scene, and with all that’s going on in the city, it’s nice to catch the ones that don’t make enough noise to be heard above the screaming that goes on in the media here. Raymond Fitzgerald Wilmette, IL Baxter is a functioning and highly adaptable robot that already is in use in manufacturing facilities today. Baxter is a feature of the new exhibition, Robot Revolution, at the Museum of Science and Industry

Her Highness Front and Center What a stunning spring issue cover photo! I loved it almost as much as the very imaginative show (Marie Antoinette at Steppenwolf Theatre this spring)... Carrie Dunhill Chicago – Lincoln Park You guys put out a gorgeous magazine...The Marie Antoinette cover (Spring 2015) looks fabulous. Thanks for what you do for Chicago arts. Terry Nulte Chicago - Downtown

Photo Courtesy of Carrie Newcommer

More Than Meets the Eye

Singer/songwriter and poet Carrie Newcommer.

Readers may submit letters to Feedback, Clef Notes Publishing, Inc. 5815 N. Sheridan Road, Suite 1107, Chicago, IL 60660 or via E-mail to Scuttlebutt@ClefNotesJournal.com.

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No portion of this publication may be reproduced without the express written consent of the publisher. Clef Notes Publishing makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the magazine’s content. However, we cannot be held responsible for any consequence arising from errors or omissions.

So I'm a fan of Carrie Newcommer, have been since her early recordings. I read with great interest your interview with her this spring (Spring 2015 Issue of Clef Notes). While she is certainly an accomplished singer, the interview pointed out she was a poet too. I wish you had explored that a bit more. Every singer tours and records. But an accomplished writer adds a new dimension to the picture, don't you think? I realize the piece served as a preview for an upcoming concert, but perhaps your writer could have explored her writing more as a way of drawing interest to her overall artistry…Just a thought. Maggie Egan Elmhurst, IL


HARRIS THEATER THEATER PRESENTS PRESENTS HARRIS

Hear the the Music Music 2015–16 2015–16 Hear Joshua Bell • Pinchas Zukerman • Gil Shaham • Itzhak Perlman • Kronos Quartet

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Joshua Bell + Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Photo byBell Ian Douglas Joshua + Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Photo by Ian Douglas

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Sharon Isbin, guitar, Isabel Leonard, Sharon Isbin, guitar, Isabel Leonard, mezzo-soprano mezzo-soprano November 16, 2015

Juilliard Orchestra, Itzhak Perlman, Juilliard Orchestra, Itzhak Perlman, conducting, cellist TBA conducting, cellist TBA January 6, 2016

Gil Shaham, violin, The Knights, Gil Shaham, violin, The Knights, Eric Jacobsen, conductor Eric Jacobsen, conductor February 18, 2016

November 16, 2015of classical guitar and voice The thrilling sound

January 6, 2016 All Tchaikovsky

February 2016 Jean-Féry18, Rebel Les élémens

The thrilling sound of classical guitar and voice Lorca Canciónes españolas antiguas Lorca Canciónes españolas Granados Spanish Dance #5antiguas Granados Spanish Dance #5 Albeniz Asturias Albeniz Asturias Danielpour …Of Love and Longing (Chicago Premiere) Danielpour …Of Love Longing (Chicago Premiere) Rodrigo Aranjuez maand pensée Rodrigo Aranjuez ma pensée Montsalvatge Selections from Montsalvatge Selections Cinco canciónes negras from Cinco canciónes negras Tarrega Recuerdos de la Alhambra Tarrega de la Alhambra De Falla Recuerdos Siete canciónes populares españolas De Falla Siete canciónes populares españolas

All Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Overture-Fantasie Romeo Juliet Overture-Fantasie Rococoand Variations (with Juilliard student Rococo (with Juilliard soloist,Variations TBA in November 2015) student soloist, TBA 2015) Symphony No.in6November (“Pathetique”) Symphony No. 6 (“Pathetique”)

Jean-Féry RebelConcerto Les élémens Prokofiev Violin No. 2, Op. 63 Prokofiev Violin Concerto 2, Op. 63 Beethoven Symphony No. No. 3, Op. 55 Eroica Beethoven Symphony No. 3, Op. 55 Eroica

Chicago Children’s Choir and Chicago Children’s Choir and Sphinx Virtuosi Sphinx Virtuosi December 7, 2015

December Celebr a t e7,t2015 he season w i t h t he na t ion ’s Celebr a tfteed t he season w i t h t heinna mos t gi young musicians ant ion ’s mos gi ft ed young musicians ex t rtaor dinar y collabor a t ion in an ex t r aor dinar y collabor a t ion

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Brandenburg Concertos Center: Brandenburg Concertos Center: December 17, 2015 December 17, 2015 Bach Bach Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Concerto No. No. 12ininFFmajor major Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Concerto No. No. 23 in in FGmajor major Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Concerto No. No. 34 in in GG major major Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Concerto No. No. 45in inGDmajor major Brandenburg 5 in B-flat D major Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 major Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B-flat major

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Philharmonic Pinchas Zukerman, Orchestra, conductor Pinchas Zukerman, conductor and violin and violin January 13, 2016 January 13,Egmont 2016 Overture Beethoven Beethoven Overture Beethoven Egmont Violin Concerto Beethoven Violin Concerto (Pinchas Zukerman, violin) (Pinchas Zukerman, violin) Elgar Enigma Variations, Op. 36 Elgar Enigma Variations, Op. 36

My Lai My Lai Quartet, Rinde Eckert, Kronos Kronos Quartet,Vanessa Rinde Eckert,  tenor, Vân-Ánh Võ, tenor, Vân-Ánh Vanessamusician Võ, traditional Vietnamese traditional Vietnamese musician January 29, 2016 January 2016e o f Jona t han Ber ger ’s Wor ld P29, r emier Wor ld P r emier e o ft rJona han oper Ber ger power ful and con overtsial a t ic’s power fulama and con t r over sial oper a t ic monodr monodr ama

Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Academy of St. Martinand in the Fields, Joshua Bell, Director violin Joshua Bell, Director and violin March 12, 2016 March 12, Classical 2016 Prokofiev Symphony, Op. 25 Prokofiev Classical (Symphony No. 1) Symphony, Op. 25 (Symphony No. 1) Concerto, Op. 35, Tchaikovsky Violin Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto, Op. 35, TH 59, D major TH 59, D major Beethoven Symphony No. 8, Op. 93, F major Beethoven Symphony No. 8, Op. 93, F major

Javier Camarena, tenor, Javier Camarena, piano tenor, Ángel Rodríguez, Ángel piano March Rodríguez, 30, 2016

March 30, 2016presented in association Chicago Debut, Chicago Debut, presented in National association with Lyric Unlimited and the Museum with Lyric Unlimited and the National Museum of Mexican Art of Mexican Art Beethoven Selections from 3 Songs, Op. 83 Beethoven Selections from 3 Songs, Op. 83 (texts by Goethe) (texts by Goethe) Liszt Petrarch sonets Liszt sonetsd’Amaranta TostiPetrarch Quatro canzoni Tosti Quatro canzoni d’Amaranta

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Out and About

Photos by Tina Smothers

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ore than 350 of Chicago’s most influential young professionals gathered at Venue One in the West Loop on Friday, April 10 for the 2015 Red or White Ball, the Steppenwolf Auxiliary Council’s annual spring event. The evening kicked off with a VIP Reception at 7:30 p.m., featuring tasting stations from the likes of Arami and Chef Frederick Despres; Cantina de la Granja and Chef Diana Davila; and CH Distillery, among notable others. The main event opened at 9 p.m. and included open bars, delectable tasting stations, priceless auction and raffle packages and D.J. Matt ROAN spinning late into the night. The celebration raised nearly $60,000 for Steppenwolf ’s nationally recognized arts education program, Steppenwolf for Young Adults (SYA), which annually impacts more than 15,000 students, teachers and families.

Katherine Thomas, Viki Conner and Harriet White.

Molly Hamilton and Akin Owolabi.

Kari and Alberto Herrera.

David Blowers, Lauren Zessin, Joe Duffy, Melissa Spiegal, John Ratliff and Lauren Reaumond.

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Shilpa Rupani and DJ Matt Roan.

Julia Luscombe, Tanya Stanfield, Isaac Colunga and Jon Blanc.


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n Saturday, April 18, more than 300 guests attended Court Theatre’s 60th Anniversary Gala, celebrating Court’s six decades in Chicago. Guests enjoyed a festive cocktail hour, followed by an exquisite threecourse dinner and live performances by some of Chicago’s finest artists. Guests also participated in a raffle and silent auction, with the opportunity to bid on an array high profile items including vacation packages in Tuscany, Hong Kong and Shanghai, and backstage tours to Broadway’s hit musical, Aladdin. The elegant black-tie affair raised more than $330,000 to support Court’s artistic, education and outreach initiatives.

Adrienne Walker singing I could have danced all night from My Fair Lady.

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Karen Lewis, James Noonan and Dana Levinson.

Almond Alpaca and Wool Blend Cape with Blush Fox Trim

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Professional, On-Premise Services

Court Theatre's artistic director, Charles Newell, and founding artistic director, Nicholas Rudall.

It’s time for essential care for all your fur and fine outerwear garments. For minor repairs, a better fit, or to completely restyle an older fur garment, the York Furrier Staff and talented Design Team look forward to assisting you. ALL STORE LABELS WELCOME! And, now is a great time to shop for next winter wear. Ask about the York Furrier Summer Layaway Plan and Annual Trade-In Event. To Learn More Visit: www.YorkFur.com

S T O R AG E • C L E A N I N G • R E PA I R S • A LT E R AT I O N S • R E S T Y L I N G

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Luminary

Jordan Brown, actor

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By ANDREW MCKINNON Photos By ALEXA LOPEZ

ff the wall? Maybe. Wacky? Sure. But this Chicago actor's got range to spare. Hot off the heels of last summer's Goodman Theatre revival of the Lerner and Lowes Broadway classic, Brigadoon, actor Jordan Brown is turning his creative attention 180 degrees to play irreverent boytoy Spike in Goodman's summer production, Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike. Christopher Durang's wacky, but brilliant Broadway hit is far afield of this Jeff Award-nominee's standard fare. Having explored roles in works from Profiles Theatre’s In the Company of Men to Northlight’s Sense and Sensibility and done television stints with TV’s Sirens and Crisis, Brown knows his way around meaty roles. But he isn’t shying away from the challenge of a comedic jaunt into the mind of Spike. The scantily clad play-thing of Durang’s middle-aged stage actress, Masha,is certainly “out there.” But Brown is embracing it. He’s worked extensively on creating a physique to fit the character, working with a personal trainer for all that shirtless stage time. And, trust me, he’s all-in on Durang’s madcap script. Truth be told, Spike just may give Brown a chance to savor the other end of the spectrum on the live stage, but as he told me, it’s all just another thread of the fabric of the theater. You’ve had a string of very diverse roles in your stage career in plays from Brigadoon to In The Company of Men. This new role, Spike, essentially a muscled up boy toy for a middle-aged celebrity, is about as over-the-top as anything you’ve done before. How have you prepared for bringing Spike to the Goodman stage? It's a real privilege as an actor to get the opportunity to try your hand at such different roles. Even though I approach each and every role with equal importance, whether it's In The Company Of Men or Charlie in Brigadoon, the preparation varies depending on the demands of that particular story and where you fit in the ensemble. My study and breakdown of the script is the same for Durang as it is for LaBute: asking questions, digging for clues—just doing my homework. In this case, the first step was really just prepping my body for the role. Working out. I have a fantastic trainer, Adrian Aguilar of Peoples' Champ Fitness. I actually began training with him last fall to prepare for another role at Court Theatre that required similar demands. He's the man. So Spike shakes things up a bit for Masha’s family reunion of sorts. How much fun has it been to flex your muscles (no pun intended) so much in the comedic end of the acting pool?

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It's been great! You know, regarding comedy, I really have


been given a priceless education working in Chicago. This town is filled with a lot of fantastic storytellers who have an acute awareness of how things land with an audience. I don't claim to be any sort of expert in comedy, because comedy is tough stuff. But in this case, I certainly get to lean into it and embrace my impulses, which is awesome. Tell me about those famous dancing scenes. What's it like preparing for those? (Laughing) Well too much prep for moments like that can kill the spontaneity, which I think is kind of crucial to the scene and my scene partners. I guess I'll know once we explore that in rehearsal. This is nothing like the dancing I did in Brigadoon, which required technique and lots and lots of practice. For the first audition I had to come in and do the reverse striptease dance, and my goal was to seduce everyone in the room. That'll be my aim, I suppose. Amidst the insanity of all that’s going on in the play, particularly with Spike and Masha, there’s a little heart to the role you play in the budding relationship that starts to form between Spike and Nina. How do you balance the camp with the sincerity necessary to pull it all off? The answer is that the sincerity is there the entire time for a character like Spike. I think he's sincere to the moment, and all that entails. Spike i s spontaneous, highly impulsive, and incapable of stillness. I think he fears being invisible. He feeds off of other peoples' perceptions of him. His energy, or that camp, if you will, is simply an offshoot of his excessive personality. I don't think he in-

tends anyone ill will. He just has an extremely short memory. It's like a dog with a ball. He's playing with it and he's playing with it, then someone throws a different, bright, beautifully colored ball into the picture (Nina). And he's like WOAH! What guilty pleasures can you admit to away from the live stage? I can admit to a lot of pleasures! I don't know how many of them are guilty...I suppose that's a very "Spike" thing to say! I love sports, so ESPN Sports Center is literally on first thing in the morning while I'm brewing my coffee. My wife and my two little doggies (Valentino and Pippin) bring me immense pleasure. I collect comic books and I'm a total nerd for DC and Marvel; I saw Avengers: Age Of Ultron and geeked out, but Batman will always remain closest to my heart. You’ve had considerable experience Off-Broadway and you are a staple at some of Chicago’s iconic theater companies. What have you learned about Chicago audiences? They are sharp, man! I must say, Chicago is home to some of the best theater in the country. So when you're treated to that kind of work on a consistent basis, you develop a really great eye for what great theater can be. I don't think anything gets past these audiences. You can catch Brown when he stars as Spike in Christopher Durang's Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike, running at the Goodman Theatre June 20 through July 26. Photos: Actor Jordan Brown both in and out of character (Spike, the shirtless boy-toy in Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike).

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AMAZING AMPHIBIANS Amphibians may have faces only a mother could love, but they’re fascinating, dynamic creatures, and a new special exhibit at the Shedd Aquarium will shine light on the wild diversity among their many species. On view at the Shedd, Amphibians features more than 40 species of salamanders, frogs, toads and worm-like creatures called caecilians. The exhibit runs through 2017 and opens the door to discovery in a field most know little about. Amphibians are pretty well rounded creatures and you’d be surprised at some of the interesting traits they exhibit.

Fire Down Below The bright red or orange belly of the Fire-Bellied Newt serves as a signal to predators to halt. Like all newts, the fire-bellied newt excretes a toxin through its skin that paralyzes, and sometimes kills the predator that eats it. Yikes!

Forbidden Fruit? The Strawberry Poison-Dart Frog is found most frequently in areas of Central America. In its common form, the head and body are strawberry-red or orange-red with blue or black hinder parts. Unlike the sweet fruit for which it’s named, the frog’s bright coloration is a warning to predators that eating it just may kill them. In parts of Puerto Rico during the wet months, densities sometimes reach up to 400 frogs per acre, the forest resounding with loud chirping trills that males make all year round. Now that’s a strawberry patch you don’t want to sample. Slippery When Wet Ever feel like a Slip 'n Slide™? The Mudpuppy Salamander can relate. This amphibian lives in fresh waters throughout middle America. It has external gills shaped like dog ears, hence the mudpuppy name. Its unique defensive system of slime, yes slime, makes the mudpuppy often just too slippery for predators to grasp or seize.

Icicles for Veins The Wood Frog is the only species of amphibian found north of the Arctic Circle. Able to withstand temperatures as low as 23 degrees Fahrenheit, the Wood frog's bodily fluids can even be frozen without causing harm to the amphibian. Special proteins in their fluids keep ice crystals small and prevent the cells from freezing. Gives new meaning to the term "cold-blooded."

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SUMMER 2015

SUMMER CAMPS & CLASSES EARLY CHILDHOOD JUNE 19 – AUGUST 9 Movers & Shakers Music Masters I

Recorders Rule! Shake, Rattle & Roll

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC JUNE 22 – AUGUST 6 Children’s Choir Guitar Piano

Newts of the Roundtable? The Iberian Newt is an aquatic animal generally found in ponds, temporary rivers, streams, lakes and ditches. Like others in the salamander family, the Iberian newt has poison glands to deter predators. But what's really cool about it is that the Iberian newt can also push its ribs through the warts along its sides for added protection, making it the armored knight of amphibians. Truth in Advertising Not only do their bright colors state, “BACK OFF,” Green and Black Dart Frogs also have glands all over their skin that secrete poison that can kill their predators. Their bright coloration warns potential attackers of this danger, kind of like consumer protection labels for the animal kingdom.

SUMMER CAMPS

JUNE 22 - 26 Guitar Camp Trombone Camp Tuba/Euphonium Camp JUNE 27 – JULY 2 Chamber Music Camp (no class June 28)

JULY 6 – JULY 10 Horn Camp Introduction to Band Instruments Piano Camp, Session 1 Saxophone Camp Trumpet Camp JULY 7 – AUGUST 13 Summer Conservatory Wind Ensemble

Strings Summer Band

JULY 13 – 17 Flute Camp Jazz Camp Percussion Camp Piano Camp, Session 2 JULY 20 – 31 Band Camp String Camp AUGUST 3 – AUGUST 7 Summer Conservatory Orchestra Voice Camp AUGUST 10 – 14 Solo String Workshop

REGISTER ONLINE www.meritmusic.org

Merit School of Music | Joy Faith Knapp Music Center 38 South Peoria Street, Chicago Illinois 60607 | 312.786.9428 | www.meritmusic.org

GREAT MUSIC • GREAT STORIES • GREAT SHOWS June 6–14

August 15–30

Aztec Amphibians

A frilly-gilled salamander, the Axolotls (sometimes called the “Mexican walking fish”) lives only in Xochimilco, Mexico—near Mexico City— in a network of lakes and canals built by the ancient Aztecs. Harvested by the local population for medicinal purposes, the extremely rare amphibians are now listed as a critically endangered species. Opposite Page: (Center) Kid's enjoy a downhill water slide (photo from Getty Images); (lower right) Ancient Aztec pyramid located near Mexico City, Mexico (photo by Getty Images); all images of amphibians courtesy of the Shedd Aqaurium.

October 2–11

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Summer 2015CNCJA•13


CATCHING WHALES

WITH ITS SIGNATURE FEARLESSNESS, LOOKINGGLASS THEATRE TAKES ON THE EPIC TALE OF MOBY DICK THIS SUMMER, PITTING MAN AGAINST HIS GREATEST OBSESSIONS IN A FIGHT TO THE FINISH. By LESLIE PRICE

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“Call me Ishmael.” Many readers never get very far past the famous first sentence of Moby Dick, but David Catlin and Lookingglass Theatre Company are diving head-first into a world-premiere adaptation of Herman Melville's epic seafaring novel and aim to introduce theater-goers to the classic story through stunning visuals, breathtaking acrobatics, and a stirring iteration of the centuries-old tale. Though Catlin knows firsthand that lots of audience members probably never made it through the novel back when they were assigned it in high school (he didn't finish it, himself, until he was about to cover it in a class he was teaching), he's confident that they'll have a much different experience exploring the story at Lookingglass. “It's not going to feel like a massive 800 page book that you were supposed read,” he told me. Instead, his goal is to draw the audience into the story by creating a world that is both true to the novel and exciting for the viewer. “I'm a big fan of physical theater storytelling,” explains Catlin, who adapted the script and is also directing the production. “To practice theater is to explore and investigate what it is to be human. As hu14•CNCJASummer 2015

man beings, we experience the world in a visual way; we perceive it in a kinesthetic way, in a visceral way.” The audience is absolutely meant to experience Moby Dick in a very visceral way with scenes that, at various times, have actors and spectators plunging under the sea, getting trapped in the belly of a whale, and coming along on Ahab's quest for vengeance. “Ahab is very persuasive,” says Catlin. “We think of him as this madman, but there's something persuasive about him. He persuades people who are, at some point in their lives, rational.” Catlin, himself, is pretty persuasive, though his quest (for an outstanding production rather than for exacting vengeance on a sea creature) is much more reasonable than Ahab's. His passion for Moby Dick is infectious, and if his enthusiasm for the production is any indication, audiences will be mesmerized by what's in store. “I hope that they will find themselves in the story,” he says, “and that they will find themselves laughing and hopefully have their breath taken away.” Considering Lookingglass is, once again, teaming up with The Actors Gymnasium, it's pretty much a guarantee that Moby Dick will have some breathtaking moments. Anyone familiar with Catlin's


beloved Lookingglass Alice knows that he's more than capable of leaving the audience breathless, and his work with the artists from The Actors Gymnasium makes for some thrilling theater. “At times I like to use circus because I feel that hits us in a visceral level,” says Catlin. Although Moby Dick is certainly not “circus-y” in the traditional sense, Catlin's take on the adventure novel is that there's plenty of room for lots of movement and a healthy dose of gasp-inducing stunts. “We've got these great sequences where the cast is in these lovely swinging boats when we're flying across the water in pursuit of whales.” He adds, “I am interested in finding moments and passages in our production where it can be a movement sequence... when we go out and hook the whale. That might be a long silent sequence that the audience can experience on a muscular level.” Certainly, thrill-seekers will be entertained by the high-flying action, but audiences looking for depth of character and powerful storytelling will be completely captivated by Moby Dick. The production—even with Catlin's penchant for spellbinding aerials and gorgeous visual effects—is about much more than spectacle. “The characters are very compelling,” he explains. “There's madness and obsession. It's bloody and adventurous.” While the book is, in some ways, the Great White Whale of high school reading lists, Catlin thinks that teenaged audiences, especially, will be able to connect with Ishmael's struggle to find his place in the world. “This idea of feeling lonely, disconnected, unmoored, without a purpose, discontented, I feel like we all, at some point— especially in high school—we just don't feel connected to things. That's Ishmael in the beginning. He's in a dark place.”

Ahab, too, is a very dark character in a very dark place. And while most people would prefer not to identify with a character that, at times, is incredibly evil and unlikable, Catlin insists, “We all understand Ahab. We understand that want to be totally immersed in something, to be totally consumed by something— whether it's love; or our job teaching students; whether it's having that kind of focus with our kids.” The problem, says Catlin, isn't that Ahab is pursuing something that may be unattainable. It's that Ahab “gets too consumed.” Even more than identifying with the characters in the story, Catlin hopes audiences will appreciate that Moby Dick is about something deeper within us all— a connection to the water that so many humans feel. Catlin chose to attend Northwestern University in part because of its fantastic theater program. “But more than that,” he explains, “was this massive body of sharkless water right next to it. We are drawn to the water's edge. For we (sic) human beings, there's something so beautiful and humbling and settling about standing at the water's edge. But then you don't know what lies beneath the surface. You don't know what monsters lurk beneath.” Catlin feels that we all share that experience of being drawn to water, being calmed by it, and being stirred by it. Mid-conversation, he is compelled to share a quote from JFK: “All of us have in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean and, therefore, we have salt in our blood, in our sweat, in our tears. We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea— whether it is to sail or to watch it—we are going back from whence we came.” Catlin is not the only theater artist in Chicago who shares a connection to the sea and to Moby Dick. Blair Thomas and Company (known for contemporary puppets and unique storytelling) won a grant from Boeing to collaborate with Lookingglass Theatre and The House Theatre on three distinct adaptations of Moby Dick. That collaboration initially took place in 2012. “It was a lovely experience,” Catlin recalls. “We would get together every four to six weeks over the course of about a year. We'd meet at the Lill Street Art Center. The First Slice Pie Company has a store over there. We would have pie and we would talk about chapters from Moby Dick and share ideas and steal ideas.” Above: Anthony Fleming III will star as Queequeg in the new David Catlin adaptation of Moby Dick on stage at the Lookingglass Theatre in the Water Tower Water Works on Michigan Avenue this summer.

Summer 2015CNCJA•15


Photos by liz lauren

sult in death for some—possibly because of the rigors of life at sea Though all three adaptations have had workshops across the and possibly at the hands of “cannibal savages” they expect to meet Chicago area since that time, The House Theatre was the first to throughout their travels. Remarks Catlin, “That these men would fully produce a script. Shawn Pfautsch's Season on the Line was prowillingly say goodbye to their wives and families, go out on ships duced earlier this season and used Moby Dick as inspiration for a in search of whales...that within them contain oil, this precious light story about a monomaniacal theater director still trying to redeem that allows for safety...it feels like this valiant, brave impossible himself after a disastrous production of Moby Dick twenty years bequest that these men are going on.” fore. Catlin's version is more of a true adaptation of Melville's story As the men—Ishmael in particular—encounter and slaughter but with many layers of theatricality to help bring audiences into whales, they sense “that the world of the play these creatures have and the minds of the some sense and some characters. humanity about them. “The House verIn that moment for me sion was decidedly onstage,” says Catlin, updated,” says Catlin. “the men are just coated “Ours is a little bit in blood... These 'civimore literal. Costumes lized' men...have become will have a period feel these savages that they've to them. We're tellfeared.” ing the story in hindIndeed, Catlin says sight, and the set will that, in addition to all of reflect that time and the aerials and acrobatdistance.” ics, there will be “lots Also reflective of of blood” in this producthe time and distance tion of Moby Dick. After is the heightened, alall, it's a gruesome story. most Shakespearean Whaling is a gruesome language of the protrade, and Catlin doesn't duction. Catlin beplan to skirt around the lieves that “the charissue. Struggling with the acters need that kind moral issue of whaling of language to process is part of Ishmael's jourthe heighten experiney as is his ever shifting ences they are havview of the world. ing.” He reminds us Just as Ishmael takes that Melville himself us along on his travincluded a remarkable els through the novamount of theatrical el, Lookingglass and language throughCatlin's visceral, visual, out the novel, such and thoughtful adaptaas Ishmael's musings tion of this American upon why he ended masterpiece aims to up going whaling: send the audience on a “Though I cannot tell journey that will at once why it was exactly that have them hopeful with those stage managthe prospect of adventure ers, the Fates, put me and appalled by the hordown for this shabby rors they encounter along part of a whaling voythe way. age, when others were As always, the story set down for magnifi- Top: Members of the Actors Gymnasium in La Luna Muda; Bottom: Cast members of The Baron in the Trees. of Moby Dick is certain cent parts in high tragto challenge us, to make us think, to make us question who we are edies, and short and easy parts in genteel comedies, and jolly parts and where we are going. We are all Ishmael, and we should all be so in farces.” lucky to live to tell our tales. While the language and design elements reside, in many ways, firmly in the past, the story is as relevant today as it was when Moby Moby Dick begins June 10 at Lookingglass Theatre's Water Tower Dick was first published in 1851. Originally a commercial failure, Water Works space and is recommended for “seafarers” ages 12 the novel has become a classic in part because Melville's skillful and up. writing, and in part because the story of adventure and revenge, life and death is one that resonates with readers of all backgrounds. The men aboard the Pequod are on a quest that will surely re16•CNCJASummer 2015


GCrand oncourse

BY HEIDI SCHRECK DIRECTED BY ENSEMBLE MEMBER

YASEN PEYANKOV

With both humor and heart, Grand Concourse asks big questions about the value of compassion and the limits of forgiveness.

Featuring ensemble members Francis Guinan (8/14 – 8/30), Tim Hopper (7/2 – 8/13) and Mariann Mayberry with Brittany Uomoleale and Victor Almanzar 2014/15 Grand Benefactors

Tickets start at just $20.

steppenwolf.org | 312-335-1650

2014/15 Benefactors

Summer 2015CNCJA•17


Photo by Todd Rosenberg

MAN ONE ACT

Above: Hubbard Street resident choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo in rehearsal for his Season 37 world premiere with Hubbard Street dancers Jessica Tong (left) and Jonathan Fredrickson.

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago sets the stage for an exciting all-Cerrudo program this summer featuring his latest world premiere work.

O

By JORDAN REINWALD

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On June 11, 2014, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago will present its Summer Series highlighting the work of its wildly celebrated resident choreographer, Alejandro Cerrudo. Cerrudo will see his fourteenth Hubbard Street Dance Chicago original, alongside two of his older crowd favorites. His choreographic work with Hubbard Street encompasses nine years and makes history for the company matching in number the amount of dances Founder Lou Conte, himself, set on the company in the 1970s and '80s. Cerrudo was named Hubbard Street’s first-ever resident choreographer in 2009, and the upcoming Summer Series is just the second time the company has dedi-


“I don’t want to compare this new piece to anything I’ve done in the past. I always take a different approach when I start something new and I don’t know how it will turn out. This can be scary.” —Alejandro Cerrudo Hubbard Street Resident Choreographer

cated an entire series to the work of one choreographer. In each of his unique works for Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, it can be seen that Cerrudo has undoubtedly grown over the years. When asked about his evolution he insists, “I certainly hope I have grown, but I try not to think of it like that. I want to approach each new work, one at a time.” Cerrudo’s past works, Extremely Close, and Little Mortal Jump will accompany his yet-to-be-titled world premiere for the June showings. Cerrudo says of the engagement, “I hope this summer will feel like a celebration, not a test for my work.” First up is Cerrudo’s 2007 work, Extremely Close. Large white walls, white feathers, and a series of signature Cerrudo-style partnering masterpieces remind audiences of Cerrudo’s incredible ability to create a big picture in each of his dances. Inspired by mu-

sic by composers Philip Glass and Dustin O’Halloran, Extremely Close was originally developed with students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Walls open swiftly, spin through space, reveal and conceal dancers, “dancing almost as much as the dancers themselves,” Zachary Whittenburg, Hubbard Street Manager of Communication, explains. Close debuted with the company in 2007 and has since been performed by Madrid’s Compañía Nacional de Danza and by ballet companies in Cincinnati, Milwaukee and Tulsa. Little mortal jump, a 2012 favorite and Cerrudo’s tenth Hubbard Street creation, is the most light-hearted of the three works. The finale to a full evening of complex ideas and intense dancing, Little mortal jump incorporates enormous black boxes, and stylized lighting—once again showing the immensity of Cerrudo’s style. The work takes the audience on a journey that includes dancers running through the audience, jumping (and sticking!) onto walls of velcro, and a movement template that is quirky and fun. The climax of this work provides epic emotion, despite the light-heartedness of the piece as a whole. Sandwiched between the older works, is his new world premiere, pared down and meant to bring audiences back to the simplicities that make Cerrudo’s choreography relatable. Cerrudo’s in-progress work, with costumes by Branimira Ivanova and lighting design by Michael Korsch, demands attention to detail and a simple focus on the physical bodies of the dancers. In crafting, Cerrudo meticulously obsesses over the mechanics a single lift for ten full minutes. While viewing the piece in-progress, it is apparent that this work for four men and four women, will be a testament to the power of simplicity. Cerrudo’s insistence on perfect detail illustrates his clear intention for the new work. Summer 2015CNCJA•19


Photo by Liz Lauren

The eight dancers cast for the premiere, Jacqueline Burnett, Alice Klock, Ana Lopez, Jessica Tong, Garrett Patrick Anderson, Jonathan Fredrickson, Michael Gross and Andrew Murdock stand in a single line, highlighting the width of the stage, in what will presumably be the opening of the piece. The piece builds slowly to music by the band Tosca, as movement motif squiggles its way across the line. Little quirks, such as one finger pointed into the air demonstrate this choreographer’s profound ability to take otherwise arbitrary movement details and give them meaning that is at once undefined and incredibly important. Another section of the new work, a trio for three women, sees dancers Jaqueline Burnett, and long, leggy Ana Lopez, slithering on the floor, belly down, like earthworms as Jessica Tong stoically makes her way down the center of the stage. In rehearsal, Cerrudo

20•CNCJASummer 2015

is challenged to fit the steps of this section precisely to the music, a hallmark of his work, and spends additional time adjusting individual footsteps, to ensure smooth, unison movement between the women. In discussing the work, Cerrudo explains, “I don’t want to compare this new piece to anything I’ve done in the past. I always take a different approach when I start something new, and I don’t know how it will turn out. This can be scary.” And with a sly grin, he adds, “It is scary, but I always hope it is worth it in the end.” Hubbard Street’s Summer Series runs June 11-14 at The Harris Theater at Millennium Park, 205 East Randolph Drive. Above: Hubbard Street dancers Kevin J. Shannon and Alice Klok in Little mortal jump by Alejandro Cerrudo (March 2012). Below: Hubbard Street alum Jamy Meek and current dancer Jessica Tong in Cerrudo's Extremely Close (2008).


Stream more than 800 hours of music history.

EXPLORING MUSIC.ORG debuts!

Bill McGlaughlin, host of Exploring Music

After 10 successful years, WFMT’s flagship program, EXPLORING MUSIC with BILL McGLAUGHLIN, is going online! Now every program can be heard at your convenience at our new streaming web site. Listen to more than 800 hours of personable, insightful, entertaining programs on the history of classical music, featuring entire weeks (5 hours of programs) devoted to specific composers (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Mahler…), genres, cities, historical periods, and much more on this unparalleled subscription streaming website. Visit exploringmusic.org to secure your membership for unlimited listening anytime, anywhere.

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Summer 2015CNCJA•21


The Best in Summer Fine Arts Fests!

Our top picks for can't-miss Windy City fine arts festivities this summer season.

Pivot Arts Festival (pivotarts.org) May 28 through June 7 $21-$45 Back for its third year, the annual Pivot Arts Festival is a celebration of innovation in live theater with multidisciplinary performances enlivening Chicago’s Uptown and Edgewater neighborhoods this summer. This year’s theme, “Celebrate Community!,” will inspire diverse communities to come together with a first-ever parade that includes puppets created by Swift School students and culminating with performances on Loyola University’s St. Ignatius Community Plaza. The 10day festival will give audiences the opportunity to attend cutting-edge, first-time performances and enjoy everything from live music, theater and dance to discussions, wine tastings, workshops and performances for the kids. Participating creatives include Lifeline Theatre, Storytown Improv, Neo-Futurists, RE Dance, Tsukasa Taiko and a host more.

International Cultural Festival (blackensemble.org) June 1 through 6 $10

Also On Our Radar!

June

Black Ensemble Theater will launch its first annual International Cultural Festival this June with a weeklong celebration of music, theater, film and dance from around the world. It all takes place at Black Ensemble Cultural Center in Chicago’s Uptown. Highlighting a variety of art forms with a worldwide perspective, the festival is meant to open up a global-scale dialogue about how we, as human beings, can help diminish the injustices of a racist world. The festival lineup includes multi-generational Japanese drumming ensemble performance group Tsukasa Taiko; a performance of the awardwinning play Empanda for a Dream, written by and starring Juan Villa; the presentation of two international films; The Chicago Association of Black Storytellers presents ASE, a storytelling form from West Africa; and Chicago’s Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago, which performs selected works from its repertoire, including traditional West African and contemporary dances.

6 & 7 - Pilsen Food Truck Social (pilsenfoodtrucksocial.com) 11 through 25 - Eye on India Music and Dance Festival (eyeonindia.org) 12 through 14 - Andersonville Midsommarfest (andersonville.org/events/midsommarfest) 12 through 14 - Ribfest Chicago (ribfest-chicago.com) 12 through 14 - Chicago Blues Fest (choosechicago.com/chicago-blues-festival) 18 through 21 - Women's Funny Festival (chicagowomensfunnyfestival.com) 19 through 21 - Windy City Lake Shake Country Music Festival (lakeshakefestival.com) 20 & 21 - Six Corners BBQ Fest (6cornersbbqfest.com) 20 & 21 - Green Music Fest (greenmusicfestchicago.com) 23 through August 25 - Millennium Park Summer Film Series (cityofchicago.org)

July 11Festthrough 12 - Roscoe Village Burger

Taste of Little Village: Flavors of Mexico (choosechicago.com) June 5 through 7 Free admission/Various pricing at vendor stations Are you mad for the flavors of Mexico? If so, you’re not unlike many of Chicago’s dedicated From Top: Dean Evans as Hunny Buns (photo courtesy of Pivot Arts Festival); Tusakasa Taiko Japanese Drumming Company (photo courtesy of Tusakasa Taiko and Taiko Legacy). Opposite Page From Top: Visitors to the annual 57th Street Art Fair (photo courtesy of the 57th Street Art Fair); Table and Chair from Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival (photo courtesy of the Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival); conductor Christoph Konig (photo courtesy of the Grant Park Music Festival).

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1 through August 27 - Millennium Park Music Series (cityofchicago.org)

(roscovillageburgerfest.com)

17 through 19 -Pitchfork Music Festival (pitchforkmusicfestival.com) 18 & 19 - Summer on Southport (southportneighbors.com/sos_festival.html) 18 & 19 - Sheffield Music Festival & Garden Walk (sheffieldgardenwalk.com)


This two-day outdoor celebration of the visual arts, the oldest juried art fair in the Midwest, is held in Chicago’s historic Hyde Park. The fair typically features the work of 200 exhibitors, most of which are returning artists. The goal of the fair: to provide a venue for creators of quality fine art and fine craft to meet with Chicago’s sophisticated (and growing) art-buying public. Year after year, it achieves that in droves. This year look for an abundance of family-friendly fun, including good music, great food and everything art-lovers enjoy from ceramics to jewelry to prints to carvings, all in one place. Grant Park Music Festival (grantparkmusicfestival.com) June 17 through August 22 Free admission As the nation’s only

Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival (chicagocontemporarycircusfest. com) June 17 – 21 $22-$51 Since its inception, the American circus has been seen as little more than hoopla, clowns with big shoes, glittery show girl costumes and elephants galore. The Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival (CCCF) lives in stark contrast to this model. Like well established and respected global contemporary circuses, the Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival proffers a mix of skill, theater, dance and music, provoking thought and emotion rather than spectacle alone. Based out of the beautiful and historic Athenaeum Theatre in the middle of Lakeview, the festival will fill 3 theaters with shows, workshops and community outreach, featuring nationally renowned, definition-defying artists from around the US and abroad. The CCCF encourages an appreciation of all arts through the discovery

JULY 27 8:00 PM

Jazz Showcase Club

Photo by Matt Glavin

JAZZ SHOWCASE

TOMMY TUNE C

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JULY 30

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5:30 PM

Photo by Preston Chaplin

57th Street Art Fair (57thstreetartfair.org) June 6 and 7 Free Admission/Various pricing at vendor stations

free, outdoor classical music series of its kind, Grant Park Music Festival presents 10 weeks of free classical concerts of the highest caliber to all of Chicago at the sprawling and spectacular Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park. This summer one to watch will be red-hot guest conductor Christoph König making his GPMF debut, leading the venerable Grant Park Orchestra in Bruckner's noble Symphony No. 6. König is making a name for himself as a conductor who delivers fresh performances of orchestral favorites and enlightening readings of rarer jewels. Typically an outdoor concert, this concert takes place in the state-of-the-art Harris Theater for Music and Dance and on July 31 and August 1.

JUBA!

JULY 31AUG 1

Photo by Richard Termine

food-lovers that enjoy a great culinary and cultural experience. You’ll be happy this June when the Windy City hosts the first ever Taste of Little Village: Flavors of Mexico. Mouth-watering authentic Mexican cuisine is the event’s focus. And Chicago’s award-winning Mexican restaurants and chefs will be on hand with awe-inspiring flavors for you to savor. It all unfolds in three stages: Main Stage with big entertainment; Culinary Stage with participant chefs demonstrating recipes and competing for Top Chef award; and a Showcase Stage, where dance troupes, orchestras and brass bands from area high schools and colleges will perform. It all makes for a wonderful two-day event you will not soon forget.

7:30 PM

For info and tickets to all events, go to:

ChicagoTap.org or call 312-542-2477 Summer 2015CNCJA•23


SUMMER FINE ARTS FESTIVALS PREVIEW of contemporary circus in the hopes that audiences and artists will ultimately search out and support a greater variety of arts, be it classical or modern art, dance, music, theater or cinema. Taste of Randolph (tasterandolph.com) June 19 through 21 $10 (suggested donation)

es the gamut from $25 to $25,000. Celebrating their 58th annual fair, the Gold Coast offers live demonstrations by artists, music, interactive projects and fabulous food, live music and Chicago’s incredible skyline. With a little bit of luck, the Chicago sun will make the whole experience complete.

and 26 - Taste of Lincoln Avenue July 25(tasteoflincolnchicago.com)

Chicago SummerDance (cityofchicago.org) Foodies in Chicago need no introduction to June 26 through September 13 one of the city's summer food mainstays. Free admission The Taste of Randolph gives all comers the once a year opportunity to “get a taste If you’re a fan of dance, you’ll enjoy being of Restaurant Row without the reserva- a part of the metamorphosis of the Spirit of tion.” Celebrating its 19th Music year as one of the city’s leadGarden ing annual celebrations, the in Grant three-day, cross cultural parP a r k ty will blend incredible bites with amazing artisans and diverse music. Top restaurants will bring their ‘A’ games into an with bold flavors as eclecurban tic as the bands (from indie dance folk to rock to space t h i s s u m dance) that mer. Move to the beat of 44 different live will rule bands and brush up on your technique the festival with dance lesions from the professionals stage. before you show your moves on the reFestival stored 4,900-square-foot, 100 percent reentry is a cycled, open-air dance floor, all designed suggested dona- by Chicago artist Dan Peterman. tion, and it benefits the Best part is it’s fun and it’s free. West Loop Community Organization, where residents, visitors and businesses Taste of Chicago Concerts have an active voice in decisions affect- – Paddy Malony and The ing the neighborhood parks, development, Chieftans schools, traffic, safety and more. Good (cityofchicago.org) food, good music…good cause. Friday, July 10, 5:30 p.m. $15-$30 Gold Coast Art Fair (amdurproductions.com/ Ireland’s offigold-coast-art-fair-at-grant-park) cial “Musical June 20 through 21 Ambassadors,” Free admission/Various pricing at vendor The Chieftains stations will be bringing their exhilaratWelcoming more than 300 artists from ing brand of traaround the world to Chicago’s down- ditional Irish music town, this “Grandaddy of American Art to Taste of Chicago Festivals” is rated one of the top 40 juried From Top: Guests of ChicagoSummerdance art festivals around the country. Expect enjoy a group dance event in Grant Park (photo courtesy of outstanding art works from all mediums to the City of Chicago); Taste of Randolph hard at work feeding guests in the annual celebration (photo courtesy of the bring hundreds of thousands of art lovers West Loop Community Organization); The Chieftans (photo and collectors to Grant Park. Pricing rang- courtesy of the City of Chicago).

25 through August 9 - Woodstock Mozart Festival (mozartfest.org) 30 through August 2 - Fiesta del Sol (fiestadelsol.org) 30 through August 2 - Edge Fest (edgewater.org/programs-and-events/edgefest) 31 - JUBA! Tap Dance Festival (chicagotap.org) 7 through 9 - Chicago Hot Dog Fest (chicagohotdogfest.com)

August 7 through 9 - Retro on Roscoe

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(chitownfestivals.com/ retro-on-roscoe) 8 and 9 - Wrigleyville SummerFest (wrigleyvillesummerfest.com) 13 through 16 - Festa Italiana (chicagofestaitaliana.com)

14 through 16 - Glenwood Avenue Arts Fest (glenwoodave.org) 14 through 16 - Great American Lobster Fest (americanlobsterfest.com) 14 through 16 - Reggae Fest Chicago (reggaefestchicago.com) 15 and 16 - Albany Park World Fest (albanyparkneighbors.wordpress.com/ world-fest/) 22 through 23 - Chicago Food Social (chicagofoodsocial.com) 25 through 29 - Chicago Dancing Festival (chicagodancingfestival.com) 28 through 30 - SausageFest Chicago (http://www.choosechicago.com/event/ SausageFest-Chicago/21599/) 29 through 30 - Bucktown Arts Festival (bucktownfest.com)


2015

Jazz legend RAMSEY LEWIS makes his CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA debut on August 8, performing the world premiere of his Raviniacommissioned Concerto for Jazz Trio and Orchestra, part of an all-star jazz weekend.

CLASSIC RAMSEY

Lead Classical Sponsor:

2015 RAVINIA.ORG

Sponsor: Ravinia Women’s Board

Summer 2015CNCJA•25


SUMMER FINE ARTS FESTIVALS PREVIEW this July. Since 1962, they have amassed a worldwide following, including a strong fan base right here in the Windy City. The six-time Grammy Award-winning group celebrated their 50th anniversary in 2012. During their long career they were the first western artists to perform in China at The Great Wall and have performed with Tom Jones, Sting, Van Morrison, The Rolling Stones, The Who and R o g e r Daltry, a m o n g countless others. The Chicago-based, Grammynominated bluegrass band, Special Consensus led by banjo-virtuoso Greg Cahill will open for the group, bridging old world and new all in one night. Square Roots Festival (squareroots.org) July 10 through 12 Suggested Donation: $5-$20 The Old To w n

School of Folk Music and Lincoln Square Ravenswood Chamber of Commerce are back this year with their craft beer and music experience, Square Roots Festival. The annual Lincoln Square celebration brings multiple music stages with a vibrant mix of artists from local indie rockers to world music stars to Old Town School teaching artists and students. Add to that some of the premium regional craft breweries with an array of beers and you’ve got a party nobody wants to miss. Lincoln Square restaurants will be in the house (so to speak) also. Dancing is 26•CNCJASummer 2015

encouraged. And bring the kids because lots of family fun awaits. Celebrate Clark Street World Music Festival (celebrateclarkstreet.com) July 18 and 19) $5-$10 Though it’s one of the last indie street festivals in Chicago that’s locally managed and organized by folks in the community, the Clark Street World Music Fest thrives as one of the very best global world music arts festival this side of New York City. The festival reflects the unique diversity in Rogers Park by presenting music from all four corners of the world and all while daring you not to dance. Come hear bands on two live stages; eat food from local eateries and bars, and imbibe with beer, wine and micheladas from local bars. Interactive entertainment will keep you and the kids swimming in smiles. And arts endeavors abound. Get out to Rogers Park and enjoy a slice of global fun this summer. Wicker Park Fest (wickerparkbucktown.com) July 25 and 26 $5 Donation As neighborhood street fests go, this is a big one. Three main stages and two days of the best music, food, arts, kids fun and shopping you’ll enjoy in one sitting is all you need to know about this outdoor celebration. The Wicker Park Fest may very well be the nirvana of summer festivals, and you’ve got a front row seat. Don’t miss it!

Lollapalooza (lollapalooza.com) July 31 through August 2 Price/Packages available $110 and up Probably the most popular and internationally recognized music festivals the city hosts each year, Lollapalooza is definitely more than just a music festival. It’s an experience! The three-day cultural explosion taking place in Grant Park, “Lolla,” as it’s affectionately called, covers 115 acres between Downtown and Lake Michigan. Artists and bands from local favs to the biggest names in the business make the rounds and the fest’s “Chow Town” features over 30 premiere, local food vendors serving grub for every taste bud. The Farmers Market offers special options for fans with special dietary restrictions, too. Get set for good music, giveaways and lots of Grant Park’s famous “Lolla” mud— that’s if the customary rain arrives. Fans love to set up belly mud slides to past the time between sets—it’s part of the experience, folks. Ravinia Festival – Harry Connick Jr. (ravinia.org) August 7 $38-100 The pre-eminent fine arts festival of the Midwest, Ravinia is a summertime lightening rod for the finest artists and legends to grace the concert stage. With the inimitable Chicago Symphony Orchestra in residence, the Ravinia podium is a magnet for the w o r l d ’s greatest conductors and


a draw from perennial classical and jazz artists from across the globe. On August 7, world renowned pianist and vocalist Harry Connick Jr. will bring his phenomenal command of jazz and popular music styles to the Ravinia stage. This will undoubtedly be the biggest concert of the summer season. Chicago Food + Wine Festival (chicagofoodandwinefestival.com) August 28 through 30 $75 and up Presented by Food & Wine Magazine, this culinary and wine spectacular brings tastings, wine and cocktail samples, insightful seminars and much, much more. The fest brings together acclaimed chefs, wine & spirits experts, and winemakers from all over the country and don’t forget Chicago’s own sterling restaurant community. The festival is a true experience. Get up-close-and-personal access to great food, great wine and great luminaries from the food and wine industry with cooking demos and wine and cocktail seminars showcasing over 90 wine, spirit and artisanal food exhibitors and celebrated local regional eateries, too. If great food and wine is constantly on your radar, the Chicago Food + Wine Festival should be also. Chicago Fashion Fest (chicagofashionfest.com) August 29 through 30

$TBD Probably the one fest of its kind in the Windy City, the Chicago Fashion Fest is now celebrating its 7th season.. The popular event shuts down East Division Street to bring fashionistas, families and fest-lovers alike two days of nonstop local fashion and live bands that make the whole experience electric. Oh, and like many of the Windy City fests we spotlight, guests will find an abundance of craft beers, wine, sangria and local artists to round out the entertainment.

Opposite Page Counterclockwise From Top Left: The Special Consensus Bluegrass Band (photo courtesy of The Special Consensus); Roots band Moon Hooch performs at the annual Square Roots Festival in Old Town (photo courtesy of the Square Roots Festival); Pianist and singer Harry Connick, Jr. (photo courtesy of Harry Connick Jr.); Cap'n Jack performs at Chicago's Wicker Park Fest (photo courtesy of Wicker Park Fest); Guests enjoy the Celebrate Clark Street World Music Festival (photo from Celebrate Clark). Above From Top: Some of the top fair at the Chicago Food + Wine Festival (photo courtesy of Food + Wine Magazine); A model walks an outdoor runway at the Chicago Fashion Fest (photo courtesy of the Chicago Fashion Fest).

September

9-12, 2015

Featuring the Chicago Recital Debut of acclaimed bass-baritone,

Luca Pisaroni visit

www.caichicago.org

for ticekts & more information

Summer 2015CNCJA•27


Around Town

Who: Violinist Carolyn Widmann When: June 16, 2015 Where: Ravinia Festival's Bennett Goodman Hall How: Visit ravinia.org or call 847.266.5100

28•CNCJASummer 2015

Photo courtesy of Carolyn Widmann

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Munich-born violinist Carolyn Widmann has her hands in just about every region of the classical music hemisphere. A professor of violin at Leipzig’s University of Music and Theatre “Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy,” Widmann is a frequent recitalist performing solo and chamber concerts in the world’s finest concert halls. She’s best associated with contemporary violin repertoire and has a considerably strong reputation as a sensitive and expressive artist within that realm. But in recent years, Widmann has begun to turn her considerable talents and delicate touch to period works. Chicagoans will get an opportunity to hear the phenom in all her glorious versatility when she performs a wideranging concert in Ravina Festival’s Bennett Gordon Hall. Among the diverse works slated for the impressive program are the American Premiere of Pascal Dusapin’s In Vivo and Bach’s resplendent Partita No. 2 in D Minor for Solo Violin, BWV 1004, quite a range of styles to hear on that 1782 G.B. Guadagnini violin she’s famous for playing.


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Hubbard Street Dancer Jason Hortin in A Picture of You Falling by Crystal Pite. Photo by Todd Rosenberg.

Summer 2015CNCJA•29


TREASURES from afar New Field Museum exhibition opens the door to anthropological exploration of 5,000 years of Chinese history and culture

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By PATRICK M. CURRAN II n Wednesday, June 24, 2015, Chicago’s Field Museum will open a door to more than 5,000 years of Chinese history. The new exhibition, Cyrus Tang Hall of China, will be the first and only one of its kind on permanent display in the U.S. that examines Chinese culture and history from an anthropological perspective. Drawing from a collection of over 33,000 archaeological, historical and ethnographic artifacts, the curatorial team at the Field has assembled 350 historical objects for display within the five galleries of the China exhibit. Some of the historical objects include Neolithic pottery and jades, Shang and Zhou Dynasty bronzes, Han and Tang Dynasty burial objects, Buddhist and Daoist sculptures and a collection of exquisite rubbings, textiles and paintings from centuries of Chinese culture. Field Museum curators, coupled with its extensive collections, provide visitors with a unique perspective on the cultural traditions that underscore modern-day China. Gary Feinman, PhD., the museum’s East Asian Anthropology curator, explains, “While art museums typically highlight the aesthetic and contextual qualities of specific objects, the Cyrus Tang Hall of China will tell stories of the people who used them, the traditions they forged, and the legacies of that history.” One of the underlying themes of the exhibit that officials want visitors to understand is that there is no one distinct China. They point out that the history of China is one of constant change coupled with strong cultural traditions that have managed to survive for thousands of years. The exhibit's layout reinforces this theme. Combining a thematic and chronological approach to their plan of the exhibit, museum cura30•CNCJASummer 2015

tors structured China’s five galleries around particular subjects, ranging from the country’s diverse landscapes to political systems to traditional beliefs and practices. The two large Guardian Lion statutes that greet visitors at the entryway are commonly situated in front of Imperial Chinese buildings, temples, and homes of the wealthy. Steps away, the intricate beauty and symbolism found in a Qing Dynasty Official Rank Badge artifact stand in stark contrast to their use during their time as a ranking system of the dynasty’s civilian and military officials. Civilian officials wore badges with images of birds that represented virtues like dignity and loyalty to the Emperor. A badge worn by a civilian official of the first and highest rank within the Qing Dynasty revealed the image of the red-capped crane, representing the official’s diligence and devotion to the emperor. Military badges of this period often featured images of lions, tigers and animals that symbolized ferocity, bravery, and vigor. A large portion of the exhibit’s artifacts were already part of the Field’s large in-house Chinese collection. Dr. Berthold Laufer, the first Curator of Asian Anthropology at the Field Museum from 1908 to 1934, led two large expeditions to China in the early 20th century. Acquiring close to 19,000 archaeological, historical, and folk objects spanning from the early Neolithic period to the early 1900s, Laufer was driven by a great love for Chinese culture and history. In addition to the Laufer collection, the China exhibit also showcases the Field’s spectacular collection of artifacts from the Java Sea shipwreck, highlighting the exchange of Chinese ideas and goods through trade. The artifacts on display, largely cargo and personal effects of the ship's crew, were evacuated from the wreck of 12th and 13th century trading vessels, revealing the complex and


sometimes daunting trade relationships that existed during this time between China and its Southeast Asian neighbors. Continuing its vast platform of educational outreach, the Field Museum has launched a new online educator toolkit to provide free multimedia resources to educators and their students as an educational compliment to the Cyrus Tang Hall of China. As for families and curious teens visiting the exhibit, the museum has also curated a number of free and premium lab programs intended to broaden the scope of learning associated with the exhibit. Arts and Spotlight-China will highlight the beauty of Chinese art forms, ancient music and dance traditions and the Giant Panda. There are also three more technical, hands-on labs targeting the interests of teen visitors. The first program, Gaming Through the Ages: Exploring the Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations, will allow visitors to explore two of the museum’s exhibits, the Cyrus Tang Hall of China and Vikings. Teens will meet the scientists behind the development of the two exhibits and go behind-the-scenes and examine what life was like thousands of years ago in China or even amongst the Vikings. In addition, lab participants will play board games throughout the week-long program based on life in ancient civilizations. Game Design: Exploring the Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations, will take teens back in time and investigate the culture and society of daily life in ancient China through the new exhibition. Participants will learn how China and other ancient civilizations progressed through warfare, political upheaval, trade and cultural advancement. Teens can play games and learn about ancient civilizations and then design their own analog or digital versions. Designing Objects with Meaning: Cultural Symbolism in Ancient Civilizations will explore artifacts recovered from the 13th century Java Sea shipwreck. Teens will learn about the meaning behind the symbols that adorn the objects and clothing that were used in daily life in ancient China. Using 3-D design tools, participants will then design and create objects that tell their own individual stories. So there's more than enough to spark your curiosity for a taste for the Far East. Just one visit and your journey begins. For more information about these programs and the Cyrus Tang Hall of China, visit fieldmuseum. org. The price of admission to the new exhibit will be included in the Field Museum’s Discovery and All-Access ticket packages.

Opposite Page From Top: Kingfisher Feather Headdress, made from kingfisher feathers; Official's Rank Badge from the Quing Dinasty; Guardian Lions which traditionally stood in front of Chinese imperial buildings and temples. Top Right: Dragon Lid Box from the Java Sea Shipwreck; Qingbai Ceramic Ewer from the Java Sea Shipwreck; Jade Bi Disk, stone discs used as grave goods buried with high-ranking people during the Neolithic period (c. 8000-1900 BC). All photos courtesy of Field Museum.

Summer 2015CNCJA•31


Artist Conversational

BACON B

After 20 years on the concert stage, brothers Kevin and Michael Bacon are still keeping things honest with their listeners and giving performances that read like an open book on their lives. By FRED CUMMINGS Photos by DIANE MENTZER

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At the end of the day, the most genuine, authentic artist is simply an open book. You may not know much about them personally; you may not know their likes, their dislikes or their favorite foods, but none-the-less you know them. And that’s because for the most genuine, authentic artists, we know them by their art. They use their art as a tool for release, for expression. And the honesty it takes to be that genuine is what garners our appreciation as much as anything else we admire about their work. “Genuine” and “authentic” are terms that readily come to mind when describing the Bacon Brothers Band. A charismatic mix of folksy rock and soulful, heartfelt sincerity, singers/songwriters Michael and Kevin Bacon (and yes, that Kevin Bacon) have built an impressive 20year career on the concert stage as one of the most authentic American bands you’ll hear. Their signature sound is anything but signature. While mildly ensconced in rock, their music is a versatile blend with influences from acoustic folk to Country to Rhythm and Blues, with even a few bars of classical chamber music thrown in for good measure (Michael’s versatility as an instrumentalist—as well as composer—often on display). What’s interesting is how organically these styles blend to form that signature Bacon Brothers sound. And the versatility it provides lends itself nicely to that open book their music is. From the warm acoustics of the contemplative “Sooner or Later” to

Their signature sound is anything but signature. While mildly ensconced in rock, their music is a versatile blend with influences from acoustic folk to Country to Rhythm and Blues, with even a few bars of classical chamber music thrown in for good measure (Michael’s versatility as an instrumentalist—as well as composer—often on display).

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BROTHERS

Summer 2015CNCJA•33


Artist Conversational the crisp edge of the rock ballad, “Wonderful Day” (36 Cents), the diverse musical language so evident in the Bacon Brothers’ music flood a listener like a heavy tide washing over a rough sandy shore: seamlessly, fluid and unforced. So inherent in their writing, it seems the many sounds that influence the Bacon Brothers’ music must have made their marks early on. Growing up in Philadelphia, the brothers certainly had access to a world of music. Kevin has noted musical influences from Springstein to James Taylor to Stevie Wonder and Earth Wind and Fire. Michael launched his music career early on back in Philly with a junk band that included one of the brothers’ sisters. He then went on to college and joined a cover band that he admits engaged his interests quite a bit more than the curriculum, but then he got an opportunity to sing lead (and play guitar) for a rock band that found a bit of early success, eventually signing with Columbia Records. After a couple of years, that band fell apart and Michael made his way, as so many artists do, to Nashville, where he would cut his teeth gigging, growing as a musician and as a songwriter. Kevin got his start in one of the early bands Michael had established back in Philly. He’d played percussion (congo and drums) in an acoustic set with bass, female vocal and Michael on guitar. It was apparently enough to get the younger brother’s musical juices flowing as he went on to play in a number of other local bands around town. But to Kevin, it was just a normal part of growing up in Philly, “It was fun,” he told me. “I liked it a lot…You know, it was a big part of kind of being a kid, in a way, at that time. It was just like, you play in a band, like a natural thing. It seemed like everybody was doing that.” Not everybody, however, would go on to emerge as an awardwinning Hollywood actor. Kevin’s first early film success, Footloose (1984), was just the start of a string of Hollywood megahits he’d star in from the likes of JFK (1991) to A Few Good Men (1992). He currently stars on the hit Fox television series The Following. Yet for all his acting success, the seeds planted back with Michael in Philadelphia coffee houses and clubs would still hold root deep enough for the brothers to come together in 1994 to start the Bacon Brothers Band. After hearing a demo of the brothers’ music in the early ‘90s, a friend proposed booking a Bacon Brothers show, even coming up with the name, which the brothers hadn’t yet even considered. So Michael and Kevin put together a quartet for the one appearance.

little coffee houses, they really were.” Kevin explained. “I mean we didn’t have someone that just swept in and said, ‘Here’s a great idea. Let’s create this band.’” But that was fine for the brothers. As Kevin admits, “It was a good way for me to be introduced to the idea of being a front man because it went really slowly…it was we carry the gear, we set up, we plug everything in and find some place to eat.” That early start would help the band evolve naturally. Hauling their gear in the back of Kevin’s station wagon, playing to what they hoped would be 150 sets of ears in the room, the band would grow naturally gaining experience with their audience and with each other. As time went on, the band began to write its own music. Playing that music live led to recording it, which Kevin points out led to more new music, part of the cycle of the songwriter to “get rid of that thing you just wrote.” Twenty years later, the Bacon Brothers have etched out an eclectic sound performing songs

As time went on, the band began to write its own music. Playing that music live led to recording it, which Kevin points out led to more new music, part of the cycle of the songwriter to “get rid of that thing you just wrote.” Twenty years later, The Bacon Brothers have etched out an eclectic sound performing songs from the heart that make up the open book on their lives and music. That show led to another, which led to still another. And before they knew it, they were getting calls from coffee houses and clubs all over the circuit. But as Kevin points out, they had to earn their stripes like any other band would. “When I say that they were really tiny 34•CNCJASummer 2015

from the heart that make up the open book on the brothers' lives and music. The band’s makeup is as diverse as its influences. There’s Michael on vocals, guitar, and cello; Kevin on vocals, guitar and percussion; bass guitarist Paul Guzzone; keyboardist Joe Mennonna; drummer Frank Vilardi; and lead guitarist Ira Siegel. In any given set, band members add accordion and even mandolin to the mix. That’s a lot of diversity for a contemporary rock band, a lot of instrumentation. The assorted mix


seems a risk for a group like the Bacon Brothers. Without a clear musical focus, the injection of textures like the accordion, mandolin and even cello might verge on kitschy for some listeners. But, truth be told, the breadth of textures they include only broaden the band’s voice, which in turn broadens the scope of expression the band is able to achieve. It’s also a real reflection of the natural versatility inherent in the band’s songwriters. Michael has an incredibly broad songwriting range. Photos: Kevin and Michael Bacon in concert. Kevin on lead vocals, guitar and percussion and Michael on guitar and cello.

Summer 2015CNCJA•35


Artist Conversational

Above: The full compliment of the Bacon Brothers band in concert.

Years working the circuit in Nashville can have that kind of effect. You encounter a wide range of music and musicians down in Music City, USA. Being an Emmy Award-winning composer for film and television only broadens that range, drawing upon a vast musical reference instilled by his very arts oriented family. But film scoring and songwriting are two very distinct camps for him, as he told me “The scoring part of what I do is (from) a completely different source that I draw on every day,” Michael explained. “It was actually a source that my parents planted into me at a very early age. So when I’m sitting looking at film or video I need to write music to, I just tap this source that goes right back to my childhood. It’s always there. It’s never let me down.” That musical honesty is the only real aspect of Michael’s scoring work that bleeds into his songwriting for the band. For that, Michael, like Kevin, draws upon his own experiences providing the sort of, “personal, confessional-style song-writing” that has defined the 36•CNCJASummer 2015

band’s sound from the very beginning. Says Michael, “When we first put the band together, we weren’t writing songs to be cut by other people. We weren’t writing songs about fads or songs for movies. It had to be songs that we would put in front of people that were sort of revealing of ourselves.” That kind of openness can admittedly be a big draw for a band with a celebrity actor at the mic, but for the brothers, it’s simply a natural creative outlet, and thus the seamless authenticity you hear in their music. The band’s evolution has really only seemed to cement the direction it began back in the early ‘90s. They’ve taken a seasoned approach to acoustic textures, two- and three-part harmonies, and brash indifference for genre limitations and turned the “quirky little band” Michael describes from 20 years ago into a “fully fleshed out rock band” with well thought-out instrumentation and themes that are personal and easy to connect with. The band is currently touring the US with stops in Nashville, Las


Vegas and New York City. And as usual, they’re hitting venues as diverse as the band’s makeup, from concert halls to beach pubs. City Winery, where they’ll play here in July, has booked the Bacon Brothers in their venues in New York and San Francisco, and that suits the brothers just fine, as Kevin told me, because along with that confessional style of music they do so well, there’s a song list of fun tunes fans can rock out to. “City Winery is a place where people come because there’s somebody that they want to listen to. It’s not like you're coming to pick somebody up or (you) hope you get to pick somebody up. But it’s a listening room, you know, and a nice combination of a listening room and a place where you can feel okay about rocking out a little bit.” The July 6 concert will include a meet and greet amid the ambiance for which City Winery has come to be known. It will include songs from the Bacon Brothers latest album, 36 Cents. Audiences will hear that eclectic sound mix from acoustic to electric harmo-

nies and mellow tunes to songs that will get you on your feet. It will be a great evening to get to know the brothers and their band through their music. Because that’s what a Bacon Brothers concert is all about, that honest authentic music you love to hear and connect with right away. As Michael explains, “When you see us, by the time the set is finished, I think you have a pretty good sense of who we are as people—the same as if we had dinner together and sat around the living room talking. I think that’s kind of the way we operate because I think that’s what we do best.”

Summer 2015CNCJA•37


Who: Pink Martini When: July 1, 2015 Where: Ravinia Festival How: Visit ravinia.org or call 847.266.5100 38•CNCJASummer 2015


Photo Courtesy of Pink Marini

Around Town

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The smartly dressed and incredibly versatile “little orchestra” that calls themselves Pink Martini has an awful lot to say. They cross genres about as frequently in one performance as a letter carrier crosses the street. Which styles influence their music? A better question is "Which styles don’t?" Their musical style sits neatly within the classical genre and yet they comfortably blend jazz, Latin, pop and even a bit of world music to sharpen the taste ever so much. Add a mix of crisp vocal fun from lead singer China Forbes and onstage exuberance that only a live stage performance from 11 imaginative musicians can bring and you’ve got Pink Martini—shaken, not stirred.

Summer 2015CNCJA•39


Happenings...

Reaching & Teaching

Extended Collaboration Lyric Opera’s

general director, Anthony Freud, announced this spring that Lyric Opera of Chicago has extended its agreement with world-famous soprano Renée Fleming to serve as its creative consultant through 2017. Ms. Fleming’s original five-year contract with Lyric began in 2010, and she is Lyric’s first creative consultant. This contract renewal allows for a seamless continuation of her work with Lyric, where she serves on the Lyric Board of Directors, the Executive Committee and as an advisor to The Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Opera Center, Lyric’s professional young artist development program. As creative consultant, Fleming will continue with her performance schedule while playing an active leadership role in conceiving and implementing projects designed to increase the relevance of opera for a variety of audiences—which has been a key priority for Lyric. Plans for the extended consultancy include curating the December 7, 2015 world premiere of the opera Bel Canto (based on the acclaimed novel by Ann Patchett), with composer Jimmy López, librettist Nilo Cruz, and director Kevin Newbury.

New Work for Young Audiences Chicago Children's Theatre (CCT) announced its full 2015-16 season this spring, revealing it will jump from four plays next season to seven terrific opportunities for families, school kids and children with special needs to experience the magic of live theater in 2015-16. One of the CCT new season highlights is a yet-to-be-titled world premiere play about the civil rights movement by celebrated Chicago playwright and actress Nambi E. Kelley and directed by Lili-Anne Brown. Kelley starred this spring in Goodman Theatre’s production of Two Trains Running by August Wilson. The new work looks to be a promising addition to the CCT's season. To learn more about the upcoming season and the new commission by Kelley, visit chicagochildrenstheatre.org.

This summer the Grant Park Music Festival is expanding its comprehensive initiative aimed to increase music education and engagement opportunities for audiences of all ages. Titled Festival Connect, the initiative complements the festival’s ten week concert series at the Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago’s Millennium Park, June 17 - August 22, 2015. The initiative includes the Classical Campers arts immersion camp; a weekly pre-concert series by young music students from Chicago; open lunchtime rehearsals and docent programs; and the newest component to Festival Connect, Club 615, a popular free pre-concert lecture series that takes an in-depth look at the festival’s programs and performers. If you’re looking for an opportunity to introduce your youngster to the world of classical music this summer, here’s a great way to do it.

CONCERT for NEPAL City Winery Chicago, 1200 W. Randolph, will present Help Rebuild Nepal, a benefit concert to support an imperative and urgent cause to offset the devastation caused by the recent earthquakes in Nepal and their aftershocks. Caring and talented artists who are passionate about this cause, including powerhouse chanteuse Lynne Jordan, legendary blues guitarist Wayne Baker Brooks, the handcrafted rock and roll of The Empty Pockets, and funk, blues and soul combo Rick King's Royal Hustle will share the stage in what is bound to be an unforgettable night. City Winery Chicago sets the stage for Help Rebuild Nepal, Tuesday, June 16 at 8 p.m. Reserved seats are $25. Net proceeds from ticket sales benefit Revolutions Per Minute’s When Disaster Strikes fund.

Wheater Honored

Joffrey Ballet’s artistic director, Ashley Wheater, will be awarded the prestigious University of Chicago Jesse L. Rosenberger Medal at UChicago’s 523rd Convocation, Saturday, June 13. Wheater is the 51st recipient of the Rosenberger Medal, established in 1917 by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Rosenberger. The medal recognizes achievement through research, in authorship, in invention, for discovery, for unusual public service or for anything “deemed of great benefit to humanity.” Under Wheater’s direction, The Joffrey Ballet has undertaken possibly the most extensive touring schedule of any dance company in history. Wheater also founded the Academy of Dance, which sees its more than 800 students from across the country join leading dance companies around the world. Clockwise from top right: Garnt Park Orchestra in the Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park (photo courtesy of City of Chicago); jazz chanteuse Lynne Jordan (photo courtesy of City Winery); Joffrey Ballet artistic director Ashley Wheater (photo by Cheryl Mann); actress and playwright Nambi E. Kelley (photo courtesy of Chicago Children's Theatre); soprano Renée Fleming (photo by Todd Rosenberg).

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cultural almanac summer

Photo by M. Walton

2015

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Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Royal Ballet l l l l Jake Shimabukuro l Baroque Band (Tel. 312.235.2368, baroqueband.org) Water Works: Handel and Telemann l Chicago Children's Choir (Tel. 312. 849.8300, ccchoir.org) Rogers Park Spring Concert l Target Community Concert - Hyde Park l Lincoln Park Spring Concert l City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Ian Maksin & Goran Ivanovic Trio† l Charlie Mars & Clarence Bucaro* l Griffin House with special guest Jenn Grant* l Graham Parker & the Rumour with special guest Lowell Thompson†† l l Sam Bush Band with special guests Old Salt Union†† l The Pine Hill Project - Lucy Kaplansky & Richard Shindell* l Help Rebuild Nepal Benefit Concert with Lynne Jordan, Wayne Baker Brooks and more * l Ryan Montbleau Band with special guests The Crane Wives* l l Martha Davis & the Motels * l Grant Park Music Festival with Grant Park Orchestra (Tel. 312.742.7638, grantparkmusicfestival.com) Beethoven Symphony No. 7 l Moaart and Shostakovich l l Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 l Mendelssohn Reformation Symphony Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) Mayfair Academy of Dance: Horray for Hollywood l MusicNOW: Myra Melford & John Zorn l South Shore Drill Team - 35th Anniversary Show Hubbard Street Dance Chicago (Tel. 312.850.9744, hubbardstreetdance.com) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Summer Series l l l l Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.386.8905, lyricopera.org) Morrissey at Civic Opera House l North Shore Center for the Performing Arts in Skokie (Tel. 847.673.6300, northshorecenter.org) Ensemble Español Spanish Dance Theater 39th Annual American Spanish Dance and Music Festival l l Ravinia Festival - All events are scheduled for the Pavilion unless otherwise noted (Tel. 847.266.5110, ravinia.org) [Fol/Americana/World Music=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^, Blended/Pop, Rock or Soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Dan Zanes and Friends Kids Concert l Mariachi Divas Kids Concert l Carolin Widmman, violin (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Gypsy Kings* l Golden Dragon Acrobats from China l RMSI Jazz Grandstand** (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Alan Cummings Sings Sappy Songs^ (Martin Theatre) l A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor* l Misha and Cipa Dichter and Friends (Martin Theatre) l Tedeschi Trucks Band / Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings† l Sheryl Crow† Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga^ David Gray & Amos Lee* Juilliard String Quartet The Doobie Brothers†

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

(L-R): The Royal Ballet's Yuhui Choe and Beatriz Stix-Brunell in Don Quixote by Carlos Acosta (photo courtesy of the Royal Ballet); Hubbard Street resident choreographer alejandro cerrudo in rehearsal (photo by Todd Rosenberg); Singer/Songwriter Sheryl Crow (photo courtesy of Sheryl Crow); julliard String Quartet (photo courtesy of the Julliard String Quartet)

Music & Dance


Summer 2015CNCJA•43

Music & Dance

Theater

Chalk The Who and The What

The Time of Your Life

Symphony Center Presents w/Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Tel. 312.294.3000, cso.org) Afterwork Masterworks: Clyne and Beethoven 3 CSO Chamber: Guadagnini Ensemble CSO: Gershwin and Ravel Beyond the Score: Ravel: A Portrait CSO: Muti Conducts Tchaikovsky Manfred Symphony CSO Chamber at the Art Institute: Russian Soul Volunteer/Subscriber Event: Sarah McLachlan with Members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra CSO: Muti Conducts Tchaikovsky 5 SCP Jazz Series: Riffin' and Signifyin(g) on Richard Wright's Native Son CSO: Hollywood Heroes and Superheroes (Iconic Heroic Film Scores) at The Morton Arboretum CSO Special Event: Russian Splendor at The Morton Arboretum CSO Special Event: Berlioz Symphonie fantastique at The Morton Arboretum University of Chicago Presents (Tel. 773.702.8068, chicagopresents.uchicago.edu) Contempo at 50: Now and Then II Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) A Tribute to the Incomparable Bill Withers Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) Once On Your Feet Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) Sense and Sensibility Court Theatre (Tel. 773.702.7005, courttheatre.org) The Secret Garden Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) The Little Foxes stop.reset. Fertile Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) El Stories: Talking to Strangers The Divine Order of Becoming Porcelain Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Soon I Will Be Invincible Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Moby Dick Northlight Theatre in Skokie (Tel. 847.673.6300, northlight.org) Shining Lives Profiles Theatre (Tel. 773.549.1815, profilestheatre.org) Our New Girl Raven Theatre (Tel. 773.338.2177, raventheatre.com) Beast On The Moon RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) Good People Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) The Herd Theater Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Bad Jews Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Inana Don't Go Gentle The Birds Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org)

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Exhibit Closes August 23

Ongoing or Permanent Exhibits

Ongoing Exhibit Opens June 6 Ongoing Exhibit Opens June 20 Exhibit Closes June 28 Exhibit Closes July 5 Exhibit Closes July 12 Exhibit Closes July 19 Exhibit Closes August 16 Exhibit Closes August 23 Exhibit Closes August 30

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Our weekly byte-sized version of the something wonderful we put into every issue of Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts!

Want more Clef Notes? Sign up online at ClefNotesJournal.com for Snippets, our weekly e-newsletter with updates on arts and culture throughout Chicagoland. With Snippets, we bring you news, interviews, performance reviews and our weekly picks for Chicago's must-see arts & culture performances!

Art Institute of Chicago (Tel. 312.443.3600, artic.edu) Figures of the Chinese Imagination, Part II l l Ireland: Crossroads of Art and Design, 1690–1840 l l Spreading Devotion: Japanese and European Religious Prints l l David Hartt: Interval Whistler and Roussel: Linked Visions Korean Painting: Art of the Joseon Dynasty The Midcentury Mood: Milton Schwartz in America, 1953–1965 Chatter: Architecture Talks Back Off the Bolt: Robert Allerton's Designer Fabrics Puppets! Jean-Luc Mylayne: Mutual Regard Frances Stark: Intimism A Voyage to South America: Andean Art in the Spanish Empire Caillebotte's "Paris Street; Rainy Day" Returns Charles Ray: Sculpture, 1997–2014 Conservation Live: Francis Picabia's "Edtaonisl" Cy Twombly: Sculpture Selections, 1948-1995 Elena Manferdini: Building the Picture Expanded Gallery for Arthur Rubloff Collection of Paperweights Liz Larner New Galleries for Islamic Art Of Gods and Glamour: The Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Art The Elizabeth Morse Touch Gallery Elmhurst Art Museum (Tel. 630.834.0202, elmhurstartmuseum.org) New American Paintings: Midwest Edition Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University (Tel. 847.491.4000, blockmuseum.northwestern.edu) The Last Supper: 600 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates Compression: Recent Gifts to the Block from Bill and Sheila Lambert Museum of Contemporary Art (Tel. 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) l l MCA Screen: Clemens von Wedemeyer MCA DNA: Alexander Calder BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Faheem Majeed The Freedom Principle: Experiments in Art and Music, 1965 to Now MCA Chicago Plaza Project Alexandre da Cunha MCA Screen: Jos de Gruyter and Harald Thys BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Ania Jaworska Keren Cytter Out of Office S, M,L, XL Smart Museum of Art - University of Chicago (Tel. 773.702.0200, smartmuseum.uchicago.edu) l l GalleryX l l Objects and Voices: A Collection of Stories Judy Ledgerwood: Chromatic Patterns for the Smart Museum The Renaissance Society (Tel. 773.702.8670, renaissancesociety.org) Gabriel Sierra

J une2015

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Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Tom Torluemke Lora Fosberg Group Exhibition McCormick Gallery (Tel 312-226-6800, thomasmccormick.com) New Work - Darrell Roberts New Work - John Himmelfarb Michael LaConte Gallery (Tel. 312.455.1110, michael-leconte.squarespace.com) Urban Collages Packer Schopf Gallery (Tel. 312.226.8984, packergallery.com) Brian Dettmer: Antisocial Media Mary Porterfield: Dual Natures Perimeter Gallery (Tel. 312.266.9473, perimetergallery.com) Barbara Cooper - Repurposing: Small Sculpture Rangefinder Gallery at Tamarkin Camera (Tel. 312.642.2255, rangefindergallery.com) Daniel Stranahan Looking Back On It - Vintage Photographs by Jay King Vertical Gallery (Tel. 312.642.2255, verticalgallery.com) Hebru Brantly Memoirs of the Minimum Wage Western Exhibitions (Tel. 312.480.8390, westernexhibitions.com) Richard Hull Eddie Fake

Jimwaid

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Just a short drive from the Windy City

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5 Top Vineyards

Smart Museum exhibit focuses on the national identity

AMERICA'S Self-Image

Rest your head at the epicenter of dance this summer

at the

SUMMER PILLOW

We go one-on-one with the artist as she gets set to make her Ravinia debut this summer.

Summer 2013

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Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Sandra Dawson - New Paintings Andrew Bae Gallery (Tel. 312.335.8601, andrewbaegallery.com) Keysook Geum Aspect/Ratio (Tel. 773.206.7354, aspectratioprojects.com) Jillian Mayer Cleve Carney Art Gallery at McAninch Arts Center at College of DuPage (Tel. 630.942.2321, cod.edu/gallery) New Acquisitions from the Collection of Andree Stone Deer Path Art League in Lake Forest (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleague.org) Skip Weise Gallery 400 (Tel. 312.996.6114, gallery400.uic.edu) After Today Jean Albano Gallery (Tel 312-440-0770, jeanalbanogallery.com)

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Subscribe To Chicago's Premier magazine for Culture & the Performing Arts!

Art Galleries

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The crooner talks life, music and bringing his Large Band to Ravinia

Lyle's Large Life

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A preview of the historic Paris OpĂŠra Ballet as they kick off their American Tour at Harris Theatre.

Interview with Steppenwolf Theatre ensemble member K. Todd Freeman

Lens of authenticity

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre celebrates a quarter century celebrating Shakespeare.

25 YEARS & COUNTING

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Paris Comes to Millennium Park

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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art examines the impact of the Steins Family and and the passion they inspired in the appreciation of modern art.

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Andreas Mitisek takes the helm of Chicago Opera Theater with a new collaborative model that just may take COT to a whole new level

A Tale of Two Cities

Stephen Petronio Company is just one of our picks for the best and the brightest in Chicagoland's amazing new cultural season!

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A Regal Debut Shall We Dance?

By JORDAN REINWALD Photos By JOHAN PERSSON

At the Auditorium Theatre this summer, The Royal Ballet will launch the American Debut of dancer and choreographer Carlos Acosta's new vision for the iconic ballet, Don Quixote.

I

In a highly anticipated weekend event, The Royal Ballet will bring several star-studded casts to perform three nights of Carlos Acosta’s Don Quixote at the Auditorium Theatre this June. Don Quixote, newly created for the historic London-based ballet company last season by principal guest artist, and Cuban-born bal-

“We’re really looking forward to coming to Chicago. The company hasn’t been there for many, many years.” Many are familiar with the story of Don Quixote, based on the classic book by Miguel de Cervantes. The famous and enduring traditional ballet version of the story (choreographed, most famously by Marius Petipa) shows the adventures of Don Quixote and his simple squire, Sancho Panza. Quixote, convinced that chivalry is not dead, sets out to revive it, undo wrongs, and provide justice to the world. Along the way, Quixote and Panza encounter young lovers, Kitri, and Basilio who, fleeing from Kitri’s father, run into a camp of gypsies. Don Quixote falls asleep at the camp, prompting the iconic ballet dream scene and the dance of the Queen of the Dryads. Basilio then tricks Kitri’s father into giving his blessing for the two to marry, and Quixote and Panza attend the wedding of the lovers. The ballet traditionally ends as Quixote and his sidekick set off again to continue their righteous journey. By special commission, Petipa mounted this work for the Ballet of the Imperial Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. The company premiered the work in December, 1869. Following that premiere, interestingly enough, the first full-length production constructed outside of Russia was a completely Above: The Royal Ballet's Marianela Nuñez as Kitri, Carlos Acosta as Basilio with the company in Acosta's Don Quixote. new staging, produced and choreographed let superstar Acosta, is the choreographer’s first full-length ballet for by Ninette de Valois for the Royal Ballet in 1950. Legendary dancer the company. The ballet draws inspiration from the 1860s version and choreographer Mikhail Baryshnikov mounted his own version by Marius Petipa, with music by Ludwig Minkus, and arrangement in 1980 for American Ballet Theatre, for the first time bringing the and orchestration by Martin Yates. Brand new designs for the show familiar and iconic work into the repertory of an American ballet are produced by Tony Award-winning designer Tim Hatley, known company. Baryshnikov's version has also been staged on The Royal for his work on Shrek The Musical, with lighting designed by Hugh Ballet, which has most recently presented Nureyev's version of the Vanstone. To enhance this impressive list of technical and production work. So it's safe to say, having explored its concepts in a variety of veterans is a cast of dreams. The June 18 opening night performance famous iterations, Don Quixote runs deeply in the life's blood of The in Chicago will see Acosta himself dancing alongside The Royal Royal Ballet. Ballet’s darling, Argentine dancer Marianela Nuñez. Royal Ballet diSpeaking of the new Acosta production, Royal Ballet dancer rector Kevin O’Hare readily anticipates the engagement, explaining, Thiago Soares has noted an appreciation for, “the fact that it is a tra46•CNCJASummer 2015


Summer 2015CNCJA•47


The Royal Ballett cast and members of the company in Acosta's Don Quixote.

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ditional classical production but also reflects today. The mimes and gestures relate to us, and this freedom of character is a fantastic vehicle for the artists performing.” To shed a little more light on Don Quixote’s latest iteration, O’Hare explains, “Acosta has really honed in on the dramatic talents of The Royal Ballet. Having been a dancer with (the company) for so long, he really knows the company, and he has brought different elements into the way of presenting the story.” People shouting, dancing on tables and counters, live musicians and flamenco guitarists on the stage, comprise the ‘different elements’ of which O’Hare speaks. Some of these elements, especially the vocalizations by dancers on stage, and the freedom of setting dancers atop tables and inviting live musicians onto the stage, are distinct signs of the modernization of this ballet. O’Hare reminds audiences though, that this production is certainly still presented largely in the traditional fashion. It has not been modernized in such a dramatic way as Balanchine’s version at New York City Ballet in the 1960s, which saw no ties to the regularly staged Russian production. O’Hare elaborates, “All (female) dancers (will be) on pointe, you get the tutus, the traditional character dancers, so in that sense, the ballet is sort of traditional with a bit of a twist. Acosta is bringing it a sense of steam, you know, it’s a fun story, so he’s just adding to the whole Spanish flavor of it, I think.” Soares has noted, ‘The challenge of (Acosta’s) Don Quixote is the technical demand and the level of energy required, but this (flavor) and freedom is why the audience will love it!” Acosta, himself, has pointed out a delicate play between classical traditions and a true modernization of Don Quixote. In the second act, for instance, he has said that the choreography moves significantly “away from the classical manners of moving,” as a contemporary approach conveys the boisterous and lively gypsy encampment depicted in the Queen of the Dryads dream scene. Audiences can expect precise technique from this summer's American premiere. The Royal Ballet, known to

Summer 2015CNCJA•49


Shall We Dance?

have incredibly technically proficient ballet dancers, is heralded as a company for its dramatic and artistic ability. Yet Acosta's florid and unrestrained choreography has presented a challenge to The Royal as note by The Guardian, “As past productions attest, Don Quixote suits the Royal Ballet dramatically but not stylistically. The flamboyant choreography, with its sinuous upper-body work and extravagant back-bends, has always sat uneasily on the decorously schooled Royal dancers.” The production has been admired for its color, its flair, and its joie de vivre, none-the-less, by enthusiastic audiences since its inception, and Chicago dance-lovers can expect nothing less. In creating the spectacle, rehearsals for the production actually be-

Marianela Nuñez as Kitri with company members in Don Quixote.

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gan as early as 2012, with Acosta having a “rather long” time to develop the work, according to O’Hare. “This was the first big, full length production (Acosta) ever tackled. The year before we premiered the production, wherever we had some free time, we let him go into the studios with some of the dancers and let him just try out different elements of things, and so by the time we came to do the whole rehearsal schedule, which was eight weeks before the premiere, he had actually tried a lot of the material already.” In addition to a long rehearsal process, musicians and the technical team also spent many months prior to the premiere preparing for the remount. As Yakes points out, Minkus' original score was largely considered to be quite the achievement musically and historically.


After all, it was “the first piece of music made specifically to accompany a story ballet.” While variations have been added throughout the years—and The Royal Ballet’s version does include some of these— Yates emphasizes that Minkus's original work “is a most integral part of the tradition of classical ballet.” In casting, Kevin O’Hare expresses excitement for The Royal’s Chicago stay, as Acosta himself and Marianela Nuñez (an Argentine ballerina known for her performance of the ballet’s prima ballerina role, Kitri) will provide Thursday’s opening night lead couple. Other highlights of casting for the weekend include American Ballerina and Boston native Sarah Lamb, and principal Berlin State Ballet dancer Iana Salenko with the striking Australian Steven McRae.

Acosta sums up what audiences can expect from his new work succinctly: “It’s funny, full of great characters, the music, the score, it produces a terrific effect with the steps. It’s full of Spanish flavor and it’s very exotic, and very colorful...” Unlike the great tragic ballets, Romeo and Juliet and Swan Lake, this new production absorbs the audience into its frivolity, full of energy and excitement. Acosta insists,

“You’re going to leave with your heart just soaring,” great promise for another delightful evening at The Auditorium Theatre. The Royal Ballet performs Don Quixote at The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, June 18 to 21. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday performances are offered at 7:30 p.m. with 2 p.m. matinees on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets run $40 upwards.

From Top: Marianela Nuñez and company; Christopher Saunders as Don Quixote, Philip Mosley as Sancho Panza, Hayley Forskitt, Jacqueline Clark, Camille Bracher as Town Ladies; Ryoichi Hirano as Espada and members of The Royal Ballet.

Summer 2015CNCJA•51


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Museums

Cyrus Tang Hall of China Africa Ancient Americas Bunky Echo-Hawk: Modern Warrior City Windows: The Chicago/Beijing Panoramic Paper Cuts of Professor Qiao Ziaoguang Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence Crown Family Play Lab Earnst & Young Three-D Theatre Evolving Planet Extinct Madagascar: Picturing The Island's Past Extreme Mammals DNA Discovery Center Grainger Hall of Gems Hall of Jades Inside Ancient Egypt Maori Meeting House, Ruatepupuke II Mammoths and Mastodons McDonald’s Fossil Prep Lab Pacific Spirits Pawnee Earth Lodge Sue The T. Rex Titan's of the Ice Age Underground Adventure Vikings

Adler Planetarium (Tel. 312-922-7827, adlerplanetarium.org) Astronomy and Culture Clark Family Welcome Gallery Hidden Wonders Historic Atwood Sphere Mission Moon Our Solar System Planet Explorers Telescopes The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time Worlds of Chesley Bonestell Chicago Architecture Foundation (Tel. 312.922.3432, caf.architecture.org) Chicago: City of Big Data Chicago Model Presidential Libraries: Designing a Legacy Skyline Stories Chicago History Museum (Tel. 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org) Abraham Lincoln Chicago: Crossroads of America Chicago Styled: Fashioning The Magnificent Mile Facing Freedom Lincoln's Chicago Railroaders: Jack Delano's Homefront Photography Sensing Chicago The Dioramas The Secret Lives of Objects Treasures Vivian Maier's Chicago DuSable Museum of African American History (Tel. 773.947.0600, dusablemuseum.org) Freedom, Resistance and the Journey Towards Equality A Slow Walk to Greatness: The Harold Washington Story Africa Speaks A Slow Walk to Greatness: The Harold Washington Story Free At First: The Evolution of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians Red, White, Blue & Black: A History of Blacks in the Armed Services The Freedom Now Mural Thomas Miller Mosaics Field Museum of Natural History (Tel. 312.922.9410, fieldmuseum.org) Vikings

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Ongoing Exhibit Begins June 24

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JEWEL at the

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Just a short drive from the Windy City

Top Vineyards

Smart Museum exhibit focuses on the national identity

AMERICA'S Self-Image

Rest your head at the epicenter of dance this summer

SUMMER PILLOW

We go one-on-one with the artist as she gets set to make her Ravinia debut this summer.

Summer 2013

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

Clef N tes

the Uncommon DivA A look at opera star Frederica von Stade as she prepares for her last staged Chicago performance

A ProgrAm of merit Merit Music’s incredible contribution to the city’s music education legacy

By Patrick M. Curran II

Mayor Daley’s grand vision for a revitalized Chicago Theater District has been a long time coming, and Broadway In Chicago has had a significant role in making that a reality.

Bringing Broadway to chicago

Winter 2010

Clef N tes

Co Cele ve br rin ati n Ar g Ch g 5 ts ica Gr & go ea Concert Journal for the Arts Cu 's A t Y ltu m ear re azin s g

Emily Disher chats it up with Hubbard Street Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo.

Up Close & Personal

with hot young symphonic conductor Andrew Grams

Q&A

Gene Siskel Film Center Under Glass

Feast for the Eyes

Goodman Theatre will transport audiences this summer to that enchantingly wistful Scottish village with the first major US revival of the beloved Lerner and Lowes classic in 30 years.

BRIGADOON!

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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4th Anniversary Issue

Stirring UP LAUghter Chicago’s 2009 Humanities Festival and its celebration of the many sides of laughter

Cultivating a genuine corporate sponsor partnership based on shared values and mutual goals

Philanthropy & The Arts

Alonzo King's LINES Ballet returns to the Windy City

BETWEEN the LINES

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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World's finest cultural newborns slated for Chicago audiences this winter

NEWBIES

Preeminent Sondheim interpreter Gary Griffin mounts two highly anticipated productions of the composer's works at Shakespeare Theater this season.

Griffin's Take

JOAN ALLEN

YOUR

to the 2013-2014 season of fine arts in Chicagoland!

Guide

A global spotlight on Chicago's culture scene

EXPO CHICAGO

Back on the Steppenwolf stage

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Meet the international dream team that will design Chicago's new Lucas Museum

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The Adler Planetarium gets downright theatrical in its newest tour of the cosmos.

Transgalactic Journey

Questions for Steppenwolf Theatre's Francis Guinan

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Your guide to Chicago's new fine arts season, packed with our editors' picks for the 'Best of the Best' performances and exhibitions in the new season.

Guide

The

Chicagoland Journal for the Arts

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A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York

Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies (Tel. 312.332.1700, spertus.edu)

Abbott Oceanarium Amazon Rising Amphibians At Home On The Great Lakes Caribbean Reef Polar Play Zone Waters of the World Wild Reef

Shedd Aquarium (Tel. 312.939.2438, sheddaquarium.org)

Animal Inside Out Coal Mine Earth Revealed Fast Forward…Inventing The Future Genetics and the Baby Chick Hatchery Materials Science NetWorld Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze Robot Revolution Science Storms The Great Train Story The Idea Factory Things Come Apart Think Toymaker 3000: An Adventure in Automation Transportation Gallery U-505 Submarine You! The Experience

Museum of Science and Industry (Tel. 773.684.1414, msichicago.org)

Karkomi Permanent Exhibition Legacy of Absence Gallery The Harvey L. Miller Family Youth Exhibition The World Knew: Jan Karski's Mission for Humanity Three Years, Eight Months, and Twenty Days: The Cambodian Atrocities and The Search for Justice Rescue and Renewal

Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center (Tel. 847.967.4800, ilholocaustmuseum.org)

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Dvořák Symphony No. 6 w/Guest Conductor Thomas Wilkins Bruckner's Symphony No. 6 Harris Theater for Music and Dance (Tel. 312.334.7777, harristheaterchicago.org) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Tamo Daleko - Dance and music concert by Serbian Cultural Association l Ravinia Festival - All events are scheduled for the Pavilion unless otherwise noted (Tel. 847.266.5110, ravinia.org) [Fol/Americana/World Music=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^ Pop, Rock or Soul=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Pink Martini & Aimee Mann l Blondie & Melissa Etheridge† l Midori, Miriam Friedman & Frinds: Brahms and Schubert l Yundi, piano: Beethoven's Appassionata Sonnata (Martin Theatre) l The Knights: Dvořák, Ligeti and Schubert (Martin Theatre) l Brian Wilson & Rodríguez† l Jeffrey Kahane, piano: Bach's Goldberg Variations (Martin Theatre) l CSO w/Bobby McFerrin, conductor: Gershwin's Porgy and Bess l A Schumann Showcase with Vladimir Feltsman (Martin Theatre) l Steve Miller Band† l Aretha Franklin† l CSO: Disney's Fantasia and Fantasia 2000 l RSMI Program for Piano & Strings (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Danny Elfman's Music from the Films of Tim Burton l Igor Levit, piano: Bach's Complete Keyboard Partitas (Martin Theatre) l CSO: Symphonie fantastique l CSO w/Carlos Miguel Prieto, conductor: Emperor Concerto and Three Cornered Hat l Ko-Thi Dance Company (Martin Theatre) l Rob Thomas w/Plain White T's† l Unity: The Latin Tribute to Michael Jackson† l RSMI Program for Piano & Strings (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Emerson String Quartet: Beethoven and Dvořák (Martin Theatre) l CSO: Mahler's First Symphony l

Grant Park Chorus: Songs of the Heart Barber and Menotti Saint-Saëns Piano w/Andrew von Oeyen, piano

Chicago a Cappella (Tel. 773. 281.7820, chicagoacappella.org) Beatlemania - The Songs of The Fab Four City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Steve Kimock and Jerry Joseph * l Railroad Earth†† l Bacon Brothers Meet and Greet†* l Amy Helm & the Handsome Strangers* l Johnette Napolitano of Concrete Blonde* - Rescheduled from 3/27 l Pat McGee* - album release show l Fred Eaglesmith with Tif Ginn† l Paris Combo† l Ray Wylie Hubbard†† Marty Stuart and the Fabulous Superlatives with Sam Lewis† Delbert McClinton†* Grant Park Music Festival with Grant Park Orchestra (Tel. 312.742.7638, grantparkmusicfestival.com) CYSO's Symphony Orchestra l Independence Day Salute l l Schumann Rhenish Symphony l Bernstein Fancy Free l Sondheim Celebration l l Prokofiev Romeo and Juliet l Brahms Requiem l

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Ravinia Festival - All events are scheduled for the Pavilion unless otherwise noted (Tel. 847.266.5110, ravinia.org) [Fol/Americana/World Music=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^ Pop, Rock or Soul=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] CSO w/Lise de la Salle, piano: All Russian Program l Steely Dan† l l CSO: "Play it Again, Marvin!": A Marvin Hamlisch Celebration l Stanislav Khristenko, piano: Gottschalk, Barber, Glass & Gershwin (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Alisa Weilerstein, cello (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Thomas Hampson, Baritone (Martin Theatre) CSO: Brahms First Piano Concerto Igudesman & Joo (Martin Theatre) lBrandi Carlile and Old Crow Medicine Show* Woodstock Mozart Festival (Tel. 815.338.5300, woodstockoperahouse.com) Program feat. Mozart Cosi fan Tutte Overture, K. 588 l l Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) A Tribute to the Incomparable Bill Withers l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) On Your Feet l l l l Kinky Boots l l l l l l l l l l Fancy Nancy The Musical l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Pippin Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) The Little Mermaid l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Commedia Beauregard (312.487.1893, cbtheatre.org) Bard Fiction l l l l l l l l l l l l Eclipse Theatre (Tel. 312.869.4870, eclipsetheatre.com) A Perfect Ganesh l l l l l l l l l l First Floor Theater (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) 2015 Lit Fest l l l l l l l l l l l First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) The Winter's Tale l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Churchill Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Feast l l Greenhouse Theater Center (Tel. 773.404.7336, greenhousetheater.org) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Porcelain l l l l l l l l Kokandy Productions (Tel. 773.904.0642, kocandyproductions.com) Loving Repeating: The Life and Loves of Gertrude Stein l l l l l l l Lifeline Theatre (Tel. 773.761.4477, lifelinetheatre.com) Soon I Will Be Invincible l l l l l l l l l l l l Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Moby Dick l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) Good People l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Grand Concourse l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Theater Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Don't Go Gentle l l l l l l l The Birds l l l l l l l l l l l Timeline Theatre (Tel. 773.327.5252, timelinetheatre.com) Inana l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Victory Gardens Theater (Tel. 773.871.3000, victorygardens.org) The Who And The What l l l l l l l l l l l

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nature in Curators Corner

focus

The work of French artist Jean-Luc Mylayne is the subject of an upcoming three-part exhibition presented by the Art Institute and The Arts Club of Chicago this summer that focuses on the acute nature of nature. By BETSY VAN DIE

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Two venerable Chicago art institutions and a popular outdoor venue are presenting collaborative exhibitions of the large-scale color photographs of captivating French artist Jean-Luc Mylayne, and this is a distinct first for Chicago. Mylayne has exhibited his photographs worldwide, is represented by the Gladstone Gallery in New York City, and his work was included in a 2007 traveling group show at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. For his inaugural exhibition in the Windy City, among the pieces he chose are a selection of never-before printed photographs. Jean-Luc Mylayne: Mutual Regard is currently on display through August 23, 2015 at the Art Institute of Chicago, The Arts Club of Chicago, and Millennium Park. A dozen pieces are on display in Galleries 188189 in the Modern Wing of the Art Institute, including two diptychs, with an equal number presented in the first floor gallery at The Arts Club, including a quadriptych. Predominately featured are photographs from Mylayne’s trips to the United States, created from 2004 to 2008. Since 1976, Mylayne and his wife and close collaborator, Mylène Mylayne, have focused their singularly unique and intent vision on birds in natural habitats. The highly contemplative photographic compositions that result from painstaking resolve and fortitude demonstrate great respect for past tradition, while also reflecting philosophies exemplified in conceptual art. Mylayne eschews digital technology, using a large format film camera—typically an 8 x 10inch box camera on a tripod with custom-made lenses. His images capture moments in nature, while embodying the transient nature of time. Their subtle, quiet beauty provides soulful respite from the near continual onslaught of selfies and mediocre digital imagery that assault our senses each and every day. The Art Institute and Arts Club are intrinsically linked through a shared history harkening back nearly a century, as well as a shared tradition of visionary programming. The idea for organiz-

56•CNCJASummer 2015

ing a Chicago Mylayne exhibition can be traced back to 2010, when Matthew Witkovsky and Janine Mileaf met the artist on the occasion of his Lannan Foundation show in Santa Fe—for which Witkovsky wrote the catalogue essay, To Go Very Softly: Jean-Luc Mylayne. Subsequently, Witkovsky co-authored a book on Mylayne entitled, Into the Hands of Time, published in 2011. Witkovsky is Richard and Ellen Sandor Chair and Curator of Photography at the Art Institute and Mileaf is executive director of The Arts Club—and they happen to be husband and wife, further extending the longstanding relationship between the institutions. An elegant 64-page exhibition catalogue edited by Mileaf and Witkovsky includes an insightful essay that they co-wrote. Additional essays by Daniel M. Abrams, Christie Davis, Julian Helfenstein and Jeffery Walk—and poem by Mylayne—illuminate the work with scholarly expression. The co-curators state, “Beyond the reach of conventional human dialogue, his avian actors must ‘play their part’ of their own volition. Collaboration born of free will is, in this argument, the highest demonstration of mutual regard.” The idea for the title reflects duality on many levels, according to Mileaf: “Mylayne works collaboratively with his life partner, Mylène, and the two exhibitions are designed to mirror each other in this regard. It is from the idea of shared and complementary work, as well as from Mylayne’s reciprocal approach to his aviary subjects, that we take the title Mutual Regard.” Mylayne captures the ephemeral facets of nature, however, he deliberately sets up his tableaux, his artistic vision and passion focused on birds—in a theater defined by him and them. A single shot can take weeks of preparation and months of waiting patiently until Mylayne’s feathered actor takes center stage in the preordained tableau. In No. 524, February/March/April 2007 (Art Institute), the bird looks purposeful, as if he was cued to pose perfectly within a branch that resembles a fanciful headdress or crown. His open beak sugOpposite Page: Jean-Luc Mylayne (French, born 1946) No. 524, February/March/April 2007 Chromogenic print ©Jean-Luc Mylane. Courtesy of the artist; Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels; and Sprüth Magers.


Summer 2015CNCJA•57


Curators Corner gests that he is reacting to the prop— the symbiotic mutual regard between the bird and photographer is almost palpable in this composition. “His approach to an image is both conceptual and poetic, rather than documentary or activist.” Says Mileaf. “By deliberately staging a scene and then waiting for the bird to alight within the framed view, and by using customized stacked lenses that regulate focus, Mylayne opposes the vagaries of chance and opportunity that guide traditional forms of nature photography.” The photographs do not attempt to duplicate nature, rather they require the viewer to interpret and piece together nuanced, purposely mysterious circumstances. The artistic manipulation and shallow and long depth-offield vistas, captured in a single moment in time, infuse many pieces with a magical allure. This special kind of magic is personified in No. 407, April May 2006 (Arts Club), in which it looks like something truly mystical is transpiring—an aura of light emanating from the center. One gets the feeling that the birds are not mere spectators standing guard, but willing conspirators. This image is quite different in that the mirrored images were created from a single negative printed twice, once normally and once backwards. Sunlight falling on the grass in the center creates a mysterious apparition with outstretched wings and what resembles a bird-shaped topiary levitating above it. In each of the exhibitions, there are two different photographs of a robin perched on a cubic granite stone C8, March 1987, (1/3) at The Arts Club and C9, March 1987 (1/3) at the Art Institute. A resin replica sculpture of the stone is placed in each of the garden spaces that lie directly outside the institutions’ respective gallery spaces. When you first see this image, the topography is prominent with large tree branches dominating the foreground. Your eye is inevitably drawn to the white stone. The robin appears as a passerby, an integral, but unobtrusive visitor in a natural setting. At Millennium Park, a simple structure designed by Chicago architects Dan Wheeler and Joy Meek has been erected in the Lurie Garden. Small Chapel for One Person or at Most a Couple, was originally conceived in 1987, but not fully realized until 2015 with this installation. It features 10 large photographs that give the impression of a single 30-foot fresco. Sparrows in a brilliant, cloud58•CNCJASummer 2015

less blue azure sky, punctuated by black squares, gaze down directly above the viewer’s head. The bird’s position changes in each view, thereby resulting in what looks like a lone sparrow moving through time, while also existing simultaneously in space. The artist’s intent is to create a contemplative place—a sanctuary that takes viewers far afield (at least in spirit) from the world outside—and in this sitespecific setting, away from instant visual gratification and the fastpaced urban surroundings of downtown Chicago. “While the birds with which he works are almost always members of commonly found species, such as sparrows or robins, and his


“By deliberately staging a scene and then waiting for the bird to alight within the framed view, and by using customized stacked lenses that regulate focus, Mylayne opposes the vagaries of chance and opportunity that guide traditional forms of nature photography.” — Janine Mileaf Executive Director The Arts Club of Chicago Club of Chicago is located at 201 East Ontario Street and this exhibition is free and open to the public. For more information and gallery hours, visit artsclubchicago.org. The Lurie Garden is located at the southeastern end of Millennium Park and the chapel is free and open daily to the public during the duration of the exhibition. For more information visit luriegarden.org.

scenes, for all their rigor, appear disarmingly casual, Mylayne presents, almost without exception, extraordinary moments,” conclude Mileaf and Witkovsky. The large format color prints can be appreciated solely for their beautiful visual aesthetics, however, for those who take the time to explore his intriguing methods and contemplate nature as Mylayne intended, additional layers of meaning eloquently unfold. You may not look at birds the same way again. The Art Institute is located at 111 South Michigan Ave. For more information, admission fees, and hours, visit artic.edu. The Arts

Top Left: Jean-Luc Mylayne (French, born 1946) No. 560 January/February 2008 Chromogenic print The Art Institute of Chicago, restricted gift of Lannan Foundation; through prior gifts of the Vision Gallery, John Szarkowski and Pace MacGill Gallery, Mrs. Daniel Brenner, and Helen Harvey Mills, 2015.73 ©Jean-Luc Mylane. Courtesy of the artist; Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels; and Sprüth Magers. Top Right Jean-Luc Mylayne (French, born 1946) C9, March 1987. ©Jean-Luc Mylane. Courtesy of the artist; Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels; and Sprüth Magers.

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Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Lora Fosberg Group Exhibition McCormick Gallery (Tel 312-226-6800, thomasmccormick.com) New Work - John Himmelfarb Michael LaConte Gallery (Tel. 312.455.1110, michael-leconte.squarespace.com) Urban Collages Perimeter Gallery (Tel. 312.266.9473, perimetergallery.com) Barbara Cooper - Repurposing: Small Sculpture Rangefinder Gallery at Tamarkin Camera (Tel. 312.642.2255, rangefindergallery.com) Daniel Stranahan Looking Back On It - Vintage Photographs by Jay King Limbo - Nicholas Pinto Vertical Gallery (Tel. 312.642.2255, verticalgallery.com) The Nomadic Experiment Lie Versus Western Exhibitions (Tel. 312.480.8390, westernexhibitions.com) Eddie Fake

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Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) l l l Sandra Dawson - New Paintings Robin Denevan - New Encaustic Paintings Pintura Fresca (Works by Various Artists) Andrew Bae Gallery (Tel. 312.335.8601, andrewbaegallery.com) l l l Keysook Geum Aspect/Ratio (Tel. 773.206.7354, aspectratioprojects.com) l l l Jillian Mayer Cleve Carney Art Gallery at McAninch Arts Center at College of DuPage (Tel. 630.942.2321, cod.edu/gallery) New Acquisitions from the Collection of Andree Stone l l l Deer Path Art League in Lake Forest (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleague.org) l l l Skip Weise Portraiture Gallery 400 (Tel. 312.996.6114, gallery400.uic.edu) After Today l l l Jean Albano Gallery (Tel 312-440-0770, jeanalbanogallery.com)

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The crooner talks life, music and bringing his Large Band to Ravinia

Lyle's Large Life

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Just a shortadrive Legacy unveiled from the Windy City San Francisco Museum of Modern Art examines the impact of the Steins Family and and the passion they inspired in the appreciation of modern art.

Top Vineyards

Smart Museum exhibit focuses on the national identity

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre AMERcelebrates ICA'S a quarter century Self-Imcelebrating age Shakespeare.

YEARS & COUNTING

Rest your head at the epicenter of dance this summer

at the

SUMMER PILLOW

kick off their American Tour at Harris Theatre.

We go one-on-one Paris with Comes to the artist as she gets set Millennium Park to make her Ravin ia debu of the t historic this summer. A preview Paris Opéra Ballet as they

2013

Chicagoland Jour nal for the Arts Summer

A ProgrAm of

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Merit Music’s incredi ble contribution to the city’s music education legacy

By Patrick M. Curran

the Uncommo

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A look at opera star Frederica von Stade as she prepares for her last staged Chicago performance

Mayor Daley’s grand vision for a revitalized Chicag o Theater District has been a long time coming, and Broadway In Chicag o significant role in making has had a that a reality.

Bringing Broadway to chicago

Winter 201 0

Concert Journal for the Arts

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4th Anniv ersary Issue

Stirring UP LAUg hter Chicago’s 2009 Human Festival and its celebra ities tion of the many sides of laughter

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Contact Account Executive Jason Montgomery Tel. 773.741.5502 or E-mail: Jason.Montgomery@ClefNotesJournal.com for special advertising opportunities.

For advertisers looking to reach an audience that is cultured, sophisticated, and values strong branding, there's no better place for your message than Clef Notes. Our readers open our pages for the best in Chicagoland arts and culture.

Advertise with Clef N tes

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Listings for permanent and ongoing exhibits at museums listed within the Almanac may be found on pages 45, 48 & 49.

Art Galleries


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Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University (Tel. 312.922.2110, auditoriumtheatre.org) Dance for Life Benefit l Grant Park Music Festival with Grant Park Orchestra (Tel. 312.742.7638, grantparkmusicfestival.com) Bruckner's Symphony No. 6 l Mozart Piano Concerto No. 17 w/Inon Barnatan, piano l Handel Harmony Mass l l An Evening with Kurt Elling l Strauss Ein Heldenleben l l City Winery (Tel. 312.733.9463, citywinery.com/chicago) [Folk/neo-folk/Americana=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^, Blended/Pop, rock or soul fusion=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] Dwele† l Howie Day* l l Bryan Sutton with The Barefoot Movement* l Maceo Parker† l The Steel Wheels* l Anne Heaton & Callaghan* Jimmie Vaughan & Tilt-A-Whirl featuring Lou Ann Barton† l KT Tunstall† l l Leo Kottke† l l Lyric Opera of Chicago (Tel. 312.386.8905, lyricopera.org) Second Nature (kid-friendly opera) at the Lincoln Park Zoo l l Ravinia Festival - All events are scheduled for the Pavilion unless otherwise noted (Tel. 847.266.5110, ravinia.org) [Fol/Americana/World Music=*, Jazz**, Big Band=^ Pop, Rock or Soul=†, Country/Blue grass = ††] CSO: All-Tchaikovsky Program With Live Cannons l CSO: Gladiator Live l Maxim Vengerov, violin: Elgar, Prokofiev & Brahms (Martin Theatre) l Nikolai Lugansky, piano: Schubert, Grieg and Tchaikovsky (Martin Theatre) l CSO: Scottish Symphony l CSO: Pinchas Zukerman, violin l Harry Connick, Jr.^ l CSO: Classic Ramsey Lewis** (CSO Debut) l Yefim Bronfman: Complete Prokofiev Piano Sonatas, Part 1 (Martin Theatre) l Diana Krall** l RMSI Program for Singers (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Karita Mattila, soprano: Strauss, Brahms & Sibelius (Martin Theatre) l Yefim Bronfman: Complete Prokofiev Piano Sonatas, Part 2 (Martin Theatre) l Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club* l Yefim Bronfman: Complete Prokofiev Piano Sonatas, Part 3 (Martin Theatre) l Umphrey's McGee† l CSO: Wagner's The Flying Dutchman l CSO: Star Trek l RMSI Program for Singers (Bennett Gordon Hall) l 3 Doors Down & Collective Soul† l Frank Fernández, piano: Frank Fernández (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Under the Sun Tour† l David Kaplan, piano: Beethoven and Schumann (Bennett Gordon Hall) l NEEDTOBREATHE* l Lang Lang’s International Scholars Take Stage with Midwest Young Artists l Peter Jablonski, piano: Chopin and Rachmaninoff (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Spider Sings Sondheim (Bennet Gordon Hall) l Augustin Hadelich, violin: Schumann, Lang & Previn (Bennet Gordon Hall) l An Evening with Chicago† l l Laurie Berkner Kids Concert l Joel Fan, piano: Ginastera and Liszt (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Richard Glazier From Broadway to Hollywood (Bennett Gordon Hall) l Sybarite5 Chamber Ensemble: Everything In Its Right Place (Bennett Gordon Hall) l The Piano Guys l Llyr Williams, piano: Schubert and Chopin (Bennett Gordon Hall) l ZZ Top† l Little Big Town† l Opera for the Young presents Beauty And The Beast Kids Concert (Martin Theatre) l "Jelly, Rags and Monk" ** (Bennett Gordon Hall) l An Evening with Santana† l Liincoln Trio: Babajanian, Martin and Clarke l Alan Jackson†† l Woodstock Mozart Festival (Tel. 815.338.5300, woodstockoperahouse.com) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Program feat. Bach Concerto for Violin and Oboe, BWV 1060 l l Program feat. Mozart Divertimento in D., K. 136 l l

Augus t2015


Theater

Black Ensemble Theater (Tel. 773.769.4451, blackensembletheater.org) A Tribute to the Incomparable Bill Withers Broadway In Chicago (Tel. 312.977.1700, broadwayinchicago.org) Fancy Nancy The Musical Pippin Dirty Dancing Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (Tel. 312.595.5600, chicagoshakes.com) The Little Mermaid Commedia Beauregard (312.487.1893, cbtheatre.org) Bard Fiction Eclipse Theatre (Tel. 312.869.4870, eclipsetheatre.com) A Perfect Ganesh First Folio Theatre in Oakbrook (630.986.8067, firstfolio.org) The Winter's Tale Goodman Theatre (Tel. 312.443.3800, goodmantheatre.org) Feast Kokandy Productions (Tel. 773.904.0642, kocandyproductions.com) Loving Repeating: The Life and Loves of Gertrude Stein Lookingglass Theatre (Tel. 773.477.9257, lookingglasstheatre.org) Moby Dick RedTwist Theatre (Tel. 773.728.7529, redtwist.org) Good People Steppenwolf Theatre Company (Tel. 312.335.1650, steppenwolf.org) Grand Concourse Theater Wit (Tel. 773.975.8115, theaterwit.com) Don't Go Gentle The Birds Addington Gallery (Tel. 312.664.3406, addingtongallery.com) Robin Denevan - New Encaustic Paintings Pintura Fresca (Works by Various Artists) Aspect/Ratio (Tel. 773.206.7354, aspectratioprojects.com) Jillian Mayer Deer Path Art League in Lake Forest (Tel. 847.234.3743, deerpathartleague.org) Portraiture Gallery 400 (Tel. 312.996.6114, gallery400.uic.edu) After Today Linda Warren Projects (Tel 312-432-9500, lindawarrenprojects.com) Lora Fosberg Group Exhibition McCormick Gallery (Tel 312-226-6800, thomasmccormick.com) New Work - John Himmelfarb Michael LaConte Gallery (Tel. 312.455.1110, michael-leconte.squarespace.com) Urban Collages Rangefinder Gallery at Tamarkin Camera (Tel. 312.642.2255, rangefindergallery.com) Daniel Stranahan Looking Back On It - Vintage Photographs by Jay King Limbo - Nicholas Pinto Cumberland: Island of Conflict and Change Jeff Kauck Vertical Gallery (Tel. 312.642.2255, verticalgallery.com) EINE - Word to Mother - Sickboy The Great Eastern

August2015

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The CNCJA Cultural Almanac listings are representative of schedules from participating institutions available at time of publication.

Listings for permanent and ongoing exhibits at museums listed within the Almanac may be found on pages 45, 48 & 49.

Art Galleries

62•CNCJASummer 2015


Summer 2015CNCJA•63

Who: The Steel Wheels When: August 14, 2015 Where: City Winery How: Visit citywinery.com/chicago or call 312.733.9463

Around Town

A

Americana/Roots band The Steel Wheels is every bit what you’d expect from a band given such an earthy moniker. In fact, they’re a fair bit more. Emanating from the Blue Ridge Mountains of West Virginia, the quartet of sterling instrumentalists create a heartfelt lexicon of story-based music that blends striking instrumentation with seamless chamber-like synchronicity and tops it with crisp, refined vocals that shoot their brand of musical medicine right to the heart of the listener.

Photo by Rubysky Photography


Karen Peterson's Exhibition Picks

Summer 2015 Picklists

Robot Revolution Museum of Science and Industry Explore a cutting-edge collection of robots from all over the world in Robot Revolution, supported by Google. You’ll have the chance to interact with robots that have rarely been shown to the public before and discover their astonishing skills. Control an all-terrain crawling robot, go head to head with a tic-tac-toe-playing ‘bot, or watch a competitive game of robot soccer. Feel a therapeutic baby seal robot react to your touch, and participate in a live drone show. In this immersive experience, you’ll step into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity, but an amazing asset. Robot Revolution is an ongoing exhibition at The Museum of Science and Industry. Visit msichicago.org or call 773.684.1414 for more details.

Whistler and Roussel: Linked Visions The Art Institute of Chicago After seeing Theodore Roussel’s watercolor The Thames Embankment, Chelsea at a London gallery in 1885, the already well-established James McNeill Whistler met with the younger artist, sparking more than a decade of professional collaboration that included side-by-side working sessions and camaraderie in both public and private settings. As a result of this communal creativity, Whistler, Roussel, and their artistic circle made remarkable technical and aesthetic developments in lithography and color etching. This exhibition—built around the Art Institute’s exceptional holdings of works on paper by Whistler and a recent major gift of works by Roussel—offers a new perspective on this artistic network and the resulting innovation through 175 objects, including etchings, lithographs, drawings, paintings and artist-designed frames. Displayed throughout the Jean and Steven Goldman Prints and Drawings Galleries in the Richard and Mary L. Gray Wing, this exhibition will run June 20 through September 7 at the Art Institute. Visit artic.edu or call 312.443.3600 for more details. Mammoths and Mastodons Field Museum Journey back millions of years ago to when mammoths and mastodons roamed the Earth. Joust with mammoth tusks. Touch colossal mastodon teeth. Confront their fierce neighbors—dire wolves and saber-toothed cats. Discover ancient cave drawings and learn why early humans both hunted and honored these majestic animals. Walk among these larger than life creatures for a day, in the most captivating exhibition since the Ice Age, back at The Field Museum by popular demand. Visit Mammoths and Mastodons at the Field starting May 30. For more information, visit fieldmuseum.org or call 312.922.9410. Adam McKinney's Theater Picks Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike Goodman Theatre Siblings Vanya and Sonia have spent their adult years trapped in mundane lives at their family’s cottage, caring for their ailing parents. Meanwhile, their self-involved sister Masha, a glamorous movie star, has traveled the world in decadent style. After their soothsayer/cleaning woman, Cassandra, warns Vanya and Sonia of impending doom, Masha arrives unannounced, accompanied by her hunky young lover, Spike. When Masha reveals plans that will upend the family, long-repressed resentments bubble over in a weekend full of wild costume parties, voodoo dolls and surprise romance. Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike runs June 20 through July 26. Visit goodmantheatre.org or call 312.443.3820 for more details. Grand Concourse Steppenwolf Theatre Shelley runs a Bronx soup kitchen with unsentimental efficiency, but lately her heart is not quite in her job—or her faith. When Emma—a driven yet erratic college dropout—arrives to volunteer, her volatile mix of generosity and self-involvement brings Shelley’s bubbling midlife crisis to a boil. Warm, funny and compassionate, Grand Concourse introduces you to some fascinating everyday people trying to figure out the enigma of faith, the limits of forgiveness and how to find a little peace. Grand Concourse runs at Steppenwolf July 2 through August 30. Visit steppenwolf.org or call 312.335.1650 for more information. Moby Dick Lookingglass Theatre Madness rages like the angry sea when man pits himself against leviathan in Melville’s epic and poetic tale furiously reimagined on the Lookingglass stage by director David Catlin (Lookingglass Alice). Set sail with Captain Ahab and the crew of the Pequod in this harrowing and intoxicating exploration of fate vs. free will. Moby Dick runs at Lookingglass Theatre’s Water Tower Theatre July 10 through August 9. Visit lookingglasstheatre.org or call 312.337.0665 for more details.

From top: Guests can see how a variety of robotic grippers like the FESTO gripper can pick up an assortment of things at the Robot Revolution exhibition at the Museum of Science and Industry (photo by J.B. Spector); Esteemed Chicago actor E. Faye Butler will play the sootsayer/cleaning woman in Goodman's summer run of Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike (photo courtesy of Ms. Butler).

64•CNCJASummer 2015


Brittany Rice's Dance Picks Hubbard Street Dance Summer Series Harris Theater for Music and Dance Hubbard Street celebrates its second-ever program devoted to a single artist, the company’s resident choreographer, Alejandro Cerrudo, with his 14th world premiere alongside two audience favorites. Created in 2007 and inspired by poignant, intimate music for solo piano by composers Philip Glass and Dustin O’Halloran, Extremely Close was developed in part with students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Little mortal jump, which premiered in 2012, was Cerrudo’s tenth creation for Hubbard Street, for four female and six male dancers, with costumes by Branimira Ivanova inspired in part by Alexander McQueen. Little Mortal Jump is “technically rich and emotionally gripping,” says the Chicago Tribune. See the performance June 11 through 14 at Harris Theater for Music and Dance. Visit harristheaterchicago.org or call 312.334.7777 for more details. The Royal Ballet – Don Quixote by Carlos Acosta Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University The Auditorium Theatre closes its 125th Anniversary Dance Season by bringing The Royal Ballet back to Chicago after a 37-year absence. Led by director Kevin O’Hare, the company will present Carlos Acosta‘s production of Don Quixote, which The Guardian says “rediscover(s) the ballet’s fun” and DanceLondon says “Acosta has done a fine job in giving The Royal Ballet’s (Don Quixote) a completely new lease on life.” The company makes their Auditorium debut during a three-city tour of the U.S. that includes The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. See the performance June 18 through 21, 2015. Visit auditoriumtheatre.org or call 800.982.ARTS (2787) for more information. Dance for Life Auditorium Theatre Dance for Life Chicago benefits the AIDS Foundation of Chicago and The Dancers’ Fund, an emergency fund for those in the dance community. It is the only performance of its kind in which Chicago’s finest dance companies, including Giordano Dance Chicago, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Joffrey Ballet and River North Dance Chicago, come together on the same stage for an evening of performances. The mission is to mobilize Chicago’s dance community to support organizations and dance community professionals dealing with critical health issues, including, but not limited to HIV/ AIDS, through the art of dance. See the extraordinary benefit performance August 15, 2015. Visit DanceforlifeChicago.org or call 312922-5812 for more details. Fred Cummings Music Picks Tanja Tetzlaff, violin Grant Park Music Festival Acclaimed cellist Tanja Tetzlaff makes her return to the Grant Park Music Festival to perform celebrated 19th century French composer Édouard-VictoireAntoine Lalo’s Cello Concerto. Schumann's joyful and exuberant Rhenish Symphony and David Diamond's Rounds for String Orchestra will complete a lush and harmonically rich program. The concert takes place July 6, 2015. Visit grantparkmusicfestival.com or call 312.742.7638 for more information. Classic Ramsey Lewis Ravinia Festival Legendary jazz pianist and composer and three-time Grammy Award-winner Ramsey Lewis will make his CSO debut when he performs the world premiere of his Concerto for Jazz Trio and Orchestra. Artistic director of Jazz at Ravinia, the new work was commissioned by Ravinia and promises to be one of the premiere jazz performances of the summer season. Also on the program will be collaborations by Lewis and a few of his highly esteemed colleagues in the field. The concert takes place August 8, 2015 at Ravinia Festival in Highland Park, IL. Visit ravinia.org or call 847.266.5100 for more details. Bacon Brothers City Winery Long before Kevin Bacon launched his prolific stage and screen career, and before Michael Bacon became known as a go-to composer for film and television, they were just two brothers, born nine years apart, coming of age in Center City Philadelphia. That’s where they began their work together on stage. Today 20 years have elapsed since forming the Bacon Brothers Band and they’ve seasoned into one of the most authentic bands on the circuit today. Their music is a seamless mix of rock, acoustic folk, R&B and even a bit of Country, and their fan base is a devoted group that understands the brothers’ are the purest of musicians. Hear the Bacon Brothers on stage at City Winery July 6. Visit citywinery.com/Chicago or call 312.229.5991 for more details. From top: Hubbard Street dancers Jesse Bechard and Ana Lopez in Little mortal jump by resident choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo, March 2012. Photo by Todd Rosenberg; The Royal Ballet's Christopher Saunders as Don Quixote, Christina Arestis as Dulcinea in Don Quixote; Singers/Songwriters Michael and Kevin Bacon (photo by Denise Mentzer).

Summer 2015CNCJA•65


Summer 2015 Picklists

Editor's Picks

Sheryl Crow Ravinia Festival A nine-time Grammy Award winner who has sold more than 50 million albums around the world, Sheryl Crow has been a Chicago audience favorite since her 1996 single "All I Wanna Do" became a smash hit. Crow will be back at Ravinia this summer with songs from her latest album, Feels Like Home. The release captures the sound of a great and established artist enjoying a kind of fresh start, a sort of musical redo, if you will. You can hear songs from the new album when she performs June 25 at Ravinia Festival in Highland Park. Visit ravinia.org or call 847.266.5100 for more details.

The Little Mermaid Chicago Shakespeare Theater This summer, venture under the sea with Ariel and her aquatic friends. Chicago Shakespeare’s newly adapted 75-minute production of Disney’s The Little Mermaid is based on the full-length Broadway musical and staged by Jeff Award-winning director and choreographer Rachel Rockwell. Featuring the Academy Award-winning song “Under the Sea,” children and adults alike will delight in a dazzling production and unforgettable music following Ariel’s adventure to find true love—and her voice. Each performance features special opportunities for audiences to interact with the actors for one-on-one conversations and photos. See The Little Mermaid at Chicago Shakespeare Theater July 3 through August 16, 2015. Visit chicagoshakes.com or call 312.595.5600 for more information.

Publisher's Picks Amy Helm and The Handsome Strangers City Winery Amy Helm’s deep musical roots were enriched by a lifetime of exposure to the finest expressions of the American musical tradition. Combined with her stunning vocal and other creative gifts, those roots have grown up to reveal a spellbinding artist who moves easily through a broad range of musical styles. A founding member of the roots band Ollabelle, with whom she has recorded three CDs, Helm has also performed live with scores of notable musicians like Warren Haynes, The Wood Brothers and Donald Fagen, and her distinctive voice can be heard on recordings by artists ranging from Mercury Rev to Marc Cohn. While beginning her solo career, she continues to perform with both Levon Helm's band and the Dirt Farmer Band as they carry on the eclectic roots music traditions from the Midnight Rambles. With her first solo album having been released this spring, she will perform with her roots band The Handsome Strangers at City Winery on July 7, 2015. Visit citywinery.com/Chicago or call 312.229.5991 for more details. BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Ania Jaworska Museum of Contemporary Art This exhibit is the first in the BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works series to present the work of a trained architect, and it runs concurrently with the city’s first Architecture Biennial. Ania Jaworska (Polish, b. 1979) explores the history of architecture and the relationship between the built environment and society through prints, drawings, scale models and functional objects. Yet, despite the weight of these issues, Jaworska’s approach is marked by humor, irony and a use of bold, minimalist forms. The exhibit opens August 25, 2015. Visit mcachicago.org or call 312.280.2660 for more details. From top: Singer/songwriter Sheryl Crow (photo courtesy of Ms. Crow); Amy Helm and The Handsome Strangers (photo courtesy of City Winery).

66•CNCJASummer 2015


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Clef Notes Summer 2015 - Digital Edition  

The digital edition of the Summer Issue of Clef Notes Chicagoland Journal for the Arts. It features our interview with Kevin and Michael Bac...

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