CLC Connects Magazine - January 2023

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CLC CONNECTS

JANUARY 2023

COVER: Elizabeth Cannon graduated from CLC’s legal studies program before studying at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago to earn her law degree.

02 Message from CLC President Dr. Lori Suddick 24 Any Gift Can Bring Big Change 26 Celebrating a CLC First: Mid-Year Commencement 03 Dr. Kristen Jones Named Chief Academic Officer 04 Putting the “Student” in Student-Athlete 10 Making a Dream Career a Reality 17 Student Wins Creative Writing Award in Her Second Language 20 Training Future Healthcare Workers by Expanding Tuition-free Access to College 21 Discovering a New Path 12 Lifting Up Lake County’s Youngest Learners 05 A Closer Look at CLC’s Advanced Technology Center 08 Sparks Fly at ATC Ribbon Cutting 11 Prepping the Hospitality Industry for What’s Next 14 Dual Credit Grows Partnership with Local High School Districts 18 Supplying Students and the Community with Food and Necessities 22 Charging our Green Initiatives JANUARY 2023 01 table of contents Access and Success for Students Teaching and Learning Excellence Equity and Inclusion Community and Workforce Partnerships Strategic Use of Resources

MESSAGE FROM CLC PRESIDENT DR. LORI SUDDICK

Each year the College of Lake County uses a theme to center faculty and staff on a mindset on how we can work together as a community toward our mission and strategic goals. This year, we are focused on the message of “Reflect – Reset – Reconnect.” The January 2023 issue of CLC Connects carries this message to our community through the stories shared.

You’ll read stories of students who are resetting their lives by launching careers and advancing their dreams and creativity through discovered vocational directions. You’ll understand how CLC teams reflect on and expand academic programs by opening up new pathways to achieve success, often with funding received from grants and gifts from our community. You will see the commitment of CLC teams to refresh partnerships and reignite initiatives.

All of the stories reveal the “why” that connects us all in our work: a shared dedication to and passion for doing transformative work that benefits CLC students and the Lake County community. We remain focused on our vision to be a leader in providing innovative education and workforce solutions and steadfast in our pursuit to be a place where every student succeeds, every employee thrives so that every business and community grows.

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Dr. Kristen Jones Named Chief Academic Officer at College of Lake County

College of Lake County introduces Dr. Kristen Jones as the next Vice President of Education and Chief Academic Officer. As an equity-minded, visionary leader committed to advancing student access to high-quality, active and collaborative learning experiences, she will help drive success outcomes for CLC’s diverse student body.

“My leadership is built on a foundation of empathy, collaboration, equity and belief in the power of community colleges, an excellent match for CLC’s institutional values.”

- Dr. Kristen Jones

“I’m honored to have been chosen as the next VP of Education at CLC,” said Jones. “CLC’s commitment to teaching and learning excellence and focus on equity and sustainability is remarkable. I’m excited about joining the collaborative, student-centered culture and working with faculty and staff to support students in achieving their goals.”

As the head of academic operations, Jones will lead the dedicated and high-quality faculty and staff who provide the education students need to find their next step in life. CLC delivers affordable education through nine fields of interest in a wide variety of academic programs.

CLC President Dr. Lori Suddick said, “I believe the breadth and depth of Dr. Jones’ academic and leadership experience along with the partnership of CLC’s high-caliber faculty will be instrumental in advancing the transformative change that is necessary to achieve the college’s mission and vision on behalf of our community.”

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TEACHING AND LEARNING EXCELLENCE

Ryan Risch

PUTTING THE “STUDENT” IN STUDENT-ATHLETE

Ryan Risch loves playing baseball at CLC. He’s been playing the sport since he was a kid watching his dad play in a travel league. When he made the decision to attend CLC to continue his education, he was excited about the athletic and educational opportunities that were in front of him.

At a young age, one of Risch’s family members was sick. That was when he realized how much he cared about helping and being there for others. This led him to pursue a nursing career.

Nursing requires a lot of study time outside of class. Risch spends much of his time reading and studying after he finishes classes and practice.

“There are a lot of late nights, especially in season,” he said. “Time management is always a big thing.

My professors and coach have always been understanding and have helped me.”

At CLC, first-year athletes are required to attend study tables three hours a week. After that first year, students with grade point averages below 3.0 continue to have this requirement until their grades improve. Risch enjoyed having this system in place as a first-year student because it not only helped him manage his time, but it also helped him keep his grades up.

“For athletes at community colleges, this might be our last chance to play,” Risch said. “You need to make sure you do your schoolwork and do it to the best of your ability.”

After graduating from CLC, Risch plans to transfer to finish his nursing degree and continue playing baseball.

04 CLC CONNECTS ACCESS AND SUCCESS FOR STUDENTS STUDENT SPOTLIGHT
JANUARY 2023 05 COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE PARTNERSHIPS

MEETING STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE

The Advanced Technology Center created from a vacant big-box store in Gurnee is not only a tech resource for the local manufacturing workforce but also an educational homebase for students working toward a secure future. Jobs that pay a family-sustaining wage sit on the other side of their skills-based training, and with stackable credentials, students can build their careers through continued training at CLC. Strategically created with a vision of training a sufficient and diverse skilled talent pipeline for the manufacturing industry, the ATC is loaded with features to help students succeed.

Dr. Ali O’Brien, CLC Vice President of Community and Workforce Partnerships, a pivotal player in the creation of the ATC, shared some of her thoughts:

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COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE PARTNERSHIPS

Q. WHAT EXCITES YOU THE MOST ABOUT THE ATC?

It’s really going to change lives. Every part of this project focuses on making our communities stronger, with Industry 4.0 careers and family-sustaining wages. The manufacturing industry is a major employer in Lake County and offers each student who wants to take up the reins a high-skill, high-pay and in-demand job. Concerted efforts to diversify the manufacturing workforce are also exciting. CLC is part of an Industry and Inclusion 2.0 cohort, sponsored by The Century Foundation and organized by the Urban Manufacturing Alliance. This partnership helps us meet students where they are and helps students see themselves as a talented part of this growing network.

Q. HOW DOES CLC MEET STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE?

Students are busy, working people so we make classes flexible, build a curriculum rich with life skills and support students beyond the classroom with whatever they need to succeed – bus passes, food for their families, mental health services and more. We even have shower facilities on-site. The ATC offers hands-on learning, and we want to help fit those learning opportunities into our students’ schedules.

Q. HOW ARE THESE COURSES DIFFERENT FROM THE TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE?

Students taking industrial technology courses at the ATC will benefit from a new delivery method. Students independently study online modules that mimic situations in the manufacturing industry, and then come to the labs to practice. Each course has an instructor who takes the role of mentor or coach, because that’s what students will experience when they’re on the job. If we can help students know what to expect and feel comfortable working in that environment, we’ve done our job well.

Q. WHAT IF STUDENTS DON’T HAVE THE TECHNOLOGY?

We know not everyone has access to reliable internet or a computer that isn’t shared with others in their family, so we built free and accessible computer lab spaces into the ATC. The facility is open morning, noon and night. Students can come in whenever they have time to do their work at their own pace.

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08 CLC CONNECTS COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE PARTNERSHIPS

SPARKS FLY AT ATC RIBBON CUTTING

College of Lake County’s new Advanced Technology Center in Gurnee was a prime backdrop for the annual State of the College address. Accompanied by welding instructor Karsten Illg and welding student Kyle Thorne, President Dr. Lori Suddick helped slice through a fabricated metal ribbon using a welding torch, a surprising presentation suitable for a technology center.

OCTOBER

COMMUNITY GRAND OPENING

The ATC opened its doors to the community for a grand opening event fitting for the whole family. Culinary students served free food, radio station WXLC broadcasted live and faculty demonstrated their expertise. The event was a great opportunity to see the new welding, fabrication, industrial technology and hydraulics labs up close.

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Joshua Cardin

MAKING A DREAM CAREER A REALITY

Joshua Cardin dreamt of becoming a firefighter when he was a kid. Thanks to CLC’s fire science technology program, he finally realized that dream.

Originally from Indiana, Cardin spent five years in the Coast Guard in Washington and Ohio. He thought about a career in business following his enlistment, but that life didn’t suit him well.

Cardin, while living in Ohio, knew he’d eventually be relocating to the Lake County area. He discovered the CLC fire science program while searching online. He reached out to Fire Science Department Chair Jeff Howell, whose dedication sold Cardin on attending CLC.

“He showed up to my tour of CLC and afterward, he talked to me for 30 minutes,” Cardin said.

“That conversation was invaluable to me. He wanted to answer all my questions. He even called me after I returned to Ohio.”

Cardin got his start at CLC in 2020 when classes were all online. Then, in 2021, he was able to do hands-on work in the classroom. At CLC, fire science students work with the Grayslake Fire Department to gain real-world experience. The station is located on the CLC campus.

After graduating last May, Cardin was one of several students selected to work part-time with the Grayslake Fire Department. He recently applied for a paramedic program to bolster his skill set. His plan is to be a full-time firefighter in Lake County, whether it’s with Grayslake or another department.

10 CLC CONNECTS ACCESS AND SUCCESS FOR STUDENTS STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

thePreppingHospitality Industry for What’s Next

“Visit Lake County is pleased to form a year-round, ongoing partnership with CLC,” said Visit Lake County President Maureen Riedy. “We’ve always collaborated to publicize events, performances and facilities; however, to address today’s shifting workforce challenges, we want to elevate recognition of the crucial role of the hospitality industry.”

The scholarship helps achieve the shared goal of revitalizing the hospitality workforce. The U.S. Department of Labor reports over 300,000 new jobs are expected to arise in the field through 2026.

The scholarship awards students $2,500 per year toward an already affordable degree. The first two recipients were awarded scholarships at the beginning of the fall 2022 semester.

To shine a light on the promising possibilities for those pursuing a culinary career, CLC Culinary Instructor Chef William Vena shares the following sentiment with all his students: “You are not just receiving a quality education and degree in a career program, you are learning a life skill that you can go out and use anywhere in the world for the rest of your life. Everybody, anywhere you go loves to eat.”

JANUARY 2023 11 COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE PARTNERSHIPS

Lifting Up Lake County’s Youngest Learners

Early childhood professionals are sometimes described as “the workforce behind the workforce.” Their “essential worker” status became even more apparent during the pandemic, when COVID shuttered early childhood centers, creating a childcare crisis for working parents.

“The entire nation is underserved in this area,” says CLC Early Childhood Education Department Chair Dr. Diane Schael. “There are more jobs out there than early childhood professionals to fill them—and many individuals already in the workforce lack the credentials they need to qualify for these positions.”

To boost access to the educational opportunities students and current childcare professionals need to get credentialed, Schael participated in the Infant and Toddler Competency Project. She served on a group of eight faculty members from five Illinois colleges charged to develop 53 online modules leading to the Infant-Toddler Credential.

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“We started writing the curriculum in June 2021 and completed the modules in December 2021,” Schael reports. “The Infant-Toddler curriculum is currently being piloted for a statewide rollout in 2023.”

CLC also partnered with North Chicago Community High School to launch an Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship program in Fall 2022. The partnership enabled graduates from the high school’s Class of 2022 to work as paid classroom monitors at the Green Bay Early Childhood Center while pursuing an associate degree in early childhood education at CLC. Tuition is covered by an anonymous donor. Philanthropy is also paving the way for a groundbreaking early childhood education program for Spanish-speaking students. A generous gift to CLC from John and Kathy

Schreiber is funding the development and 2023 rollout of a Spanish-language curriculum with a full-time bilingual instructor, as well as tuition, fees and expenses for the first three cohorts of students.

“By removing this language barrier, we are enabling Spanishspeaking members of the early childhood workforce to earn the credentials they need to provide culturally relevant care and education for Spanish-speaking Hispanic families,” says Schael. “We are grateful to John and Kathy Schreiber for investing in this new educational pathway, which will be a game-changer for Lake County’s growing Latinx community.”

JANUARY 2023 13

Dual credit grows partnership with local high school districts

14 CLC CONNECTS COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE PARTNERSHIPS

College credit classes for high school students achieve equity in access to a higher education degree and a way for individuals to reduce their time and cost to degree completion. In dual credit classes, students gain the enhanced ability and skills to successfully accomplish college-level work. The collaborative program also brings CLC faculty and local high school administrators and teachers together. They work together to develop curricula, share instructional methods and ideas, plus gain practice experiences benefiting their teaching.

Record Setting Year!

Dual credit enrollment INCREASED BY 43%

in 2022, beyond a 42% increase in 2019!

CLC has dual credit partnerships with 24 high schools in 40+ academic departments

2,200+ high school students enrolled in dual credit classes reducing time and cost to degree completion - a savings of approximately $1.5 million for students and families last year

Lake Zurich High School District has experienced an increase in students taking dual credit courses, while AP class enrollment has held steady, demonstrating that the dual credit program meets the needs of students across the curriculum.

“Recognized for their expertise, our dual credit teachers work confidently to progress their professional development

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to better engage students in learning that prepares them for post-secondary education,” said Zach Gimm, Director of K-12 Curriculum at Lake Zurich Community Unit School District 95. “Our teachers create supportive relationships to better help students explore what they’re interested in.”

Lake Zurich High School instructor Nicole Sharratt said teaching dual credit classes has made her a stronger educator because it challenges her to open the curriculum beyond the walls of the high school.

“Students enjoy talking about their personal lives and asking career questions,” said Sharratt. “After teaching dual credit courses, I’ve found myself helping students navigate what they want to do after high school more than I ever did before. Often students learn which direction they don’t want to pursue just as often as they learn what direction they want to pursue. Both are very valuable lessons.”

Maddie Parisi is a senior at Lake Zurich High School who plans to attend Illinois State University and then become an elementary school teacher. Her dual credit classes helped shape her career expectations.

“This course helped me tremendously because it provided me with some unexpected details about being a teacher. We explore all the details about being a teacher from lesson planning and differentiation to salary schedules and differences between public and private education.”

Lake Zurich senior Brooke Roben says, “Being in dual credit classes has given me the opportunity to get college credits without the cost. This is very beneficial for me because I have three older siblings who are also going to college which costs a lot.”

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“Having the ability to see what college is really like in advance is critical to the development of student expectations. The more students understand what they want to do and can step into college with some credits in their pocket, the more successful they’re going to be.”

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Tomoko Funahashi

STUDENT WINS CREATIVE WRITING AWARD IN HER SECOND LANGUAGE

Communicating in a language that isn’t your first can be a real challenge, but it was one Tomoko Funahashi faced head on by competing in the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference Creative Writing Competition. Not only did she compete, she won on numerous occasions.

Funahashi has lived in the United States since 1995 after being born in Japan. She started as an English as a Second Language student at CLC 10 years ago and has been taking classes since, none more impactful than her first creative writing course with English Instructor Michael Latza.

Creative writing was a perfect fit for Funahashi because many of her interests are creative, including drawing and playing music. However, the language barrier made this endeavor challenging. She credits spending time in the CLC tutoring center with helping her more effectively use her new language skills.

Submitting her work to be judged was the next step for Funahashi to gauge how well she was able to write.

“It was kind of a test for me,” she said. “First, can everybody understand my writing? And then, does somebody enjoy my writing?”

Though she didn’t win for her first submissions, Funahashi kept at it, winning first place her second year for her nonfiction piece, “Rain Must Fall.” Funahashi has placed in the top three a total of nine times in various categories.

The Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference Creative Writing Competition is a literary festival and writing competition. Students who submit winning entries in poetry, short fiction, nonfiction and drama are honored at the end of festival activities, which include an open mic session, readings and workshops.

JANUARY 2023 05 ACCESS AND SUCCESS FOR STUDENTS
JANUARY 2023 17

College students are constantly tested to find enough time and energy to pursue their educational journey. Many students also face the challenge of finding enough food every day to fuel their work in and out of the classroom. (Source: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/personalfinance/college-students-food-insecurity)

CLC recognizes the reality of food insecurity among students and offers easy-access help. Over the past year, CLC renovated and restocked its SHARE Market, an on-campus food pantry, at the Grayslake campus and opened a new station at the Lakeshore campus. The new storefront format provides a full-service variety of kitchen

18 CLC CONNECTS COMMUNITY AND WORKFORCE PARTNERSHIPS

staples, school supplies and personal items that match directly with our students’ needs.

CLC has also planted grab-and-go snack stations in convenient spaces across campus. Students can stop by and grab a free healthy snack or drink (and the occasional sweet treat).

In addition to these student resources, the entire Lake County community can benefit from CLC’s longstanding partnership with the Northern Illinois Food Bank, which routinely hosts pop-up food markets on CLC’s Grayslake Campus. Anyone in need of assistance can drive through the parking lot on

the dates scheduled by the NIFB, and volunteers (some of whom may even be CLC employees) deliver food directly to cars. Check the NIFB website for pop-up market dates or to volunteer (https://solvehungertoday.org).

Another way CLC helps the Lake County community find resources it needs is by promoting the United Way of Lake County’s 211 program. 211 is a free, confidential, 24-hour informational helpline connecting individuals and families in need with access to available health and human services. Learn more at the UWLC website (https://www.liveunitedlakecounty.org/portfolio/211).

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TRAINING FUTURE HEALTHCARE WORKERS BY EXPANDING TUITION-FREE ACCESS TO COLLEGE

With urgent healthcare workforce needs now and in the future, the Illinois legislature has turned to community colleges to efficiently train the new workforce. The Pipeline for the Advancement of Healthcare Workforce (PATH) grant is reducing financial barriers for CLC students looking to enter the healthcare industry. The Illinois Community College Board allocated more than $1.5 million to CLC for student scholarships and support.

Demanding work conditions were created by the pandemic, causing positions, though well-paying, to become less attractive. The conditions also pushed many workers toward retirement, creating gaps to be filled to ensure quality medical care.

Students enrolled in eligible healthcare program courses can receive PATH grant funding for tuition, fees, books and uniforms used in clinical education, plus a stipend for childcare, technology and other essential costs.

“If there was a financial barrier for anyone to pursue these programs, it’s no longer there,” said Biological and Health

Sciences Dean Jeet Saini. “This program gives a generous, all-around financial package to somebody who wants to get a job in healthcare.”

Lake County has a vast healthcare system, so students completing healthcare programs can easily find jobs close to home. Programs supported by the grant have potential for career growth, including nursing, healthcare office assistant, emergency medical technician, nursing assistant and phlebotomy technician.

The grant also funds CLC’s efforts to enhance students’ access to personal laptops and to purchase modern supplies and equipment for use in healthcare labs.

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ACCESS AND SUCCESS FOR STUDENTS

Elizabeth Cannon

DISCOVERING A NEW PATH

When Elizabeth Cannon first came to CLC in 2005, her goal was to become a graphic designer. After taking courses, she began rethinking her aspirations. She got a job at a collections law firm where she realized her interest in studying law.

Cannon had already explored careers by taking a wide variety of courses, and she discovered CLC had a legal studies program.

“Anyone that doesn’t find the right career on their first attempt may get shy and slow down,” Cannon said. “For me, changing was the perfect call, and I found my dream job.”

What Cannon enjoyed most about her time at CLC was the expertise of her instructors and the connections she

made. Many of the faculty are practicing attorneys in Lake County.

After graduating from CLC, Cannon earned a bachelor’s in Criminal Justice Administration in August 2018 from Columbia College of Missouri, taking courses at the satellite campus in Gurnee. Thanks to a transfer agreement with CLC, all her credits transferred, and she was able to finish quickly.

As a student, Cannon routinely attended Lake County Bar Association networking events, something she still does today. There, she makes new connections and keeps in touch with her former instructors.

In December, she earned a law degree from the Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law.

JANUARY 2023 21 ACCESS AND SUCCESS FOR STUDENTS
STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

CHARGING OUR GREEN INITIATIVES

CLC, a 2023 Green College according to Princeton Review, recently adopted a renewed 3-year college-wide sustainability plan to conserve energy, aiming for carbon neutrality by 2042. One way CLC accomplishes its sustainability goals is by encouraging the use of low carbon transportation by providing electric vehicle charging stations.

CLC installed its first electric car charging station in 2018 during the construction of the LEED Platinum science building. The college has two dual-port stations at the Grayslake Campus with another on the way. The plan is to also install a charging station at the Lakeshore Campus in Waukegan.

Battery charging at CLC is free for the first three hours and $2 every hour after. Students and faculty can charge up while on campus and community members can stop by to recharge anytime.

“When we think about the threats of climate change in our future, it is super important to make sure we, including CLC, do all we can to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build resilience,” Sustainability Manager David Husemoller said.

CLC is also working toward reducing overall energy usage. Grant funding from the Illinois Green Economy Network is being used to meter buildings to help understand how energy is used around the college.

STRATEGIC USE OF RESOURCES 22 CLC CONNECTS
JANUARY 2023 23 STRATEGIC USE OF RESOURCES

The word philanthropy comes from the Greek language and means “lover of humanity.” It’s used to describe anyone who contributes to making the world a better place.

Who comes to mind when you think of philanthropy?

Oprah Winfrey?

Bill Gates? People who can give millions of dollars to change the world?

CLC Foundation Executive Director and Chief Development Officer Kurt Peterson is on a mission to challenge this notion.

That means anyone can be a philanthropist. Even you and me. How will we change the world with the resources we have to share?

Learn more about Peterson’s mission in episode three of the CLC Connects podcast. CLC Connects Podcast brings the expert knowledge of our faculty and staff to you. Have a question? CLC has an expert for that. New episodes of CLC Connects come out every other Tuesday. Find it wherever you listen to podcasts.

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Any gift can bring big change. Anyone can be a philanthropist.
“I think it’s more helpful to think about philanthropy as using whatever resources you can or that you have to help others, to be a person for others, to reach deep into your own resources, and gift to others.”
JANUARY 2023 25 www.clcillinois.edu/podcast
C
elebrating a CLC First: Commemorating mid-year commencement

CLC held its first mid-year commencement to celebrate summer and fall graduates in 2022. More than 1,200 graduates, including 44 with military affiliation, received degrees and certificates from 40 different academic programs.

“It’s been an amazing experience. The teachers here are amazing and helped me excel in my career more than I ever anticipated or even knew was possible. I’ve made lifelong friends, and I’m really proud to be here tonight.” -

“I’m just so happy and blessed to be a college student and to have such wonderful people at CLC to help me through it. I don’t think I would have made it without their support.”

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QUOTE ME!

“At CLC, I didn’t just learn from instructors but from industry professionals. They know what employers are looking for, and they teach with that mindset.”

“CLC’s small class sizes felt like a community because there were actually those teachers that have time for you. During class, I knew I could have that relationship with them.”

“While I was in the Coast Guard, I’d take a class here or there online with other colleges. None of them hold a candle to CLC. It’s unbelievable how far the college is looking forward and how many opportunities are available for the people of Lake County.”

“I’m just so happy and blessed to be a college student and to have such wonderful people at CLC to help me through it. I don’t think I would have made it without their support.”

19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake, IL 60030-1198

CLC Connects is published biannually by the Public Relations and Marketing department. To subscribe, unsubscribe or update an address, email PR@clcillinois.edu or call (847) 543-2094.

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Volume 2, Issue 2 January 2023

FOLLOW CLC ONLINE:

www.clcillinois.edu

Board of Trustees

Amanda D. Howland, J.D. Chair

Julie B. Shroka, M.A. Vice Chair

Torrie Mark Newsome, J.D. Secretary

Gerri Songer, M.A.

Matthew J. Stanton, J.D.

Robert J. Tomei, Jr., J.D.

Paul G. Virgilio, B.S., S.E., P.E.

Germán Xiuhcoatl Tuz Student Trustee

Lori Suddick, Ed.D. President

COMMUNITY CENTER AT LAKESHORE HONORS ELEANOR MURKEY

In celebration of Black History Month and the opening of the Lakeshore Campus Student Center in Waukegan, a special event to dedicate the Eleanor Murkey Community Center will be held in February. Named in honor of former Lakeshore Campus Dean Eleanor Murkey, the top floor of the Student Center is a gathering space for meetings and events hosted by CLC, community organizations and others.

DESIGNATED HISPANIC-SERVING INSTITUTION

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

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