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BeSafe Child Longview Area Spring 2008

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Since 1994

Child Care Guide Compiled by

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are thankful Wtoeall the organizations that

participate in our efforts to keep our children safe and healthy.

Longview Water Utilities 300 W. Cotton Longview, Texas 75602 Office: 903-237-1030 Fax: 903-237-1004

Pay Your Bill Online At www.cityoflongview.com Accountability  Teamwork  Integrity  Professionalism

Special Health Resources for Texas, Inc. offers the following services in our 23 county service area: School Based Drug Testing Program in partnership with LISD Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment, Adolescent Alcohol Reduction Program, HIV Medical and Dental Services, HIV Case Management Services and Mental Health Services, Prevention of HIV, Substance Abuse and Hepatitis C for ages 12-17 FREE and ANONYMOUS HIV TESTING FREE and CONFIDENTIAL HEPATITIS C AND SYPHILIS TESTING TOLL FREE NUMBERS Longview Texarkana Paris 877-234-0936 888-295-3083 877-446-4712 Longview offices: 903234-8808 903-234-0936 2


Inside BeSafe Child Delayed Vaccinations - Children at Risk........................................................ 4 Alcohol and Energy Drinks; Know The Facts . ............................................ 5

ON THE COVER: Children from Triumphant Christian Center.

How Do You Raise Healthy, Safe and Wise Children?..................................... 6 Getting Yourself And Your Kids Into Shape..................................................... 7 Parental Involvement Is Key To Teaching Good Sportsmanship........... 8

FREE BOOKLETS AVAILABLE CALL 581-5704 OR 1-800-443-0131

Perinatal Program............................... 9 Allergies And Emergencies................ 10 Rules Of The Road..............................11 Sustaining A Healthy Marriage........ 12 Poison And What To Do.................... 13 Prescription Drug Abuse................... 15 Routine Doctor Visits - Good............ 16 Kids and Pets; Introducing A New Resource For Parents......................... 17 Making The Right Entertainment Choices................................................ 18 Protect Your Kids From The Sun..... 19 Child Care Center Guide.................. 20 Children’s Health Insurance Program.............................................. 23

BeSafe Publications 566 C.R. 4103, Jacksonville, TX 75766 903586-3767  1-800-233-8568 Fax 903-586-0333 www.besafechild.com

email: info@besafechild.com Publisher/Editor: Royce Ewing Area Coordinator: Samantha Clark Graphic Design/Layout: Claudette Wooddell Office: Patricia Goar ©Copyright 2008

BeSafe Publications

We make every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information within these pages. We cannot, however, assume any liability for any kind of its validity or completeness or for additional or changed information subsequent to the date the information contained herein was submitted for publication. BeSafe Publications welcomes your suggestions and inquiries. Articles from professionals in child safety are also encouraged. While we retain our copyright position, we do grant permission to responsible parties to duplicate our articles in the interest of child safety, health and good character.

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Delaying Vaccinations - Children At Risk

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ecent outbreaks in the U.S. of measles, whooping cough and the flu among young children have refocused Americans’ ideas about the importance of vaccinations. This is especially true because diseases such as mumps, measles, polio and rubella-virtually eradicated in this country-are just a plane ride away. In fact, the spread of measles went from 0 cases in 2000, in the United States, to 64 cases in 2007. For a young child, regular vaccinations are an important part of ensuring overall health. Vaccines have been shown to protect and save lives. Yet despite the overwhelming scientific evidence proving the benefits of immunizations, there are still parents who question the value of vaccines. Why Vaccinate? Before the development of vaccines, thousands of babies died or were

seriously disabled every year from a variety of now-preventable diseases. But because immunization programs of the 20th century were so successful, many of today’s young parents have never seen these diseases and do not understand that the risk for them is still real. Children should be protected from 14 preventable diseases by age 2. Yet 2.1 million children in the United States are not vaccinated on time, putting them at risk for serious illness. It is critical for parents to realize that today’s vaccines are safe for children. In fact, when it comes to vaccines, the biggest risk is being misinformed. For more information, including the immunization schedule, visit the Web site at www. ecbt.org.

Do You Need Assistance In Paying For Your Child Care? If you are working, training and/or going to school you may be eligible.

. . .. .

Must be working or have a combination of school and employment that equals 25 hours per week. Must pay a portion of the cost of care based on family gross monthly income. Must meet income guidelines. Must meet other program criteria. May be placed on a waiting list.

CCS Income Guidelines Gross Monthly Family Size Income (Up To) 2 $2770 3 $3422 4 $4074 5 $4725 6 $5377 7 $5499

Counties served: Anderson, Camp, Cherokee, Gregg, Harrison, Henderson, Marion, Panola, Rains, Rusk, Smith, Upshur, Van Zandt, and Wood. For more information please call Workforce Solutions at 800.676.8283 Equal Opportunity Employer/Program 4

Auxillary Aids and Services are available upon request. TDD 800.735.2989


Alcohol & Energy Drinks: Know the Facts Source: The Coalition, Lufkin, Tx. www.angelinacoalition.org

arents: Do you know what P your kids are really drinking? Some of the ever popu-

lar energy drinks that kids are purchasing at record levels are now being laced with alcohol. Which ones? Well, it’s difficult to tell because they look identical to the energy drinks with flashy can designs. Alcoholic energy drink producers have built on the popularity of nonalcoholic energy drinks. The beer industry is banking on brand confusion by marketing to youth who already are drinking energy drinks that contain record levels of caffeine. Chris Lilly, Kentucky Alcoholic Beverage Control said, “This new line of alcoholic beverage product is extremely similar in look and feel to the popular energy drinks that contain no alcohol. Our youth are at risk when clerks and retailers cannot differentiate between

nonalcoholic and alcoholic beverages being sold.” Some energy drink brands are even owned by beer companies like the energy drink MONSTER and 180 are owned by Anheuser-Busch. What’s even scarier is that parents are not aware that you can buy alcohol in the energy drinks and don’t question their kids when they see them drinking them. They look so much like typical energy drinks that it would make it very difficult for parents to know that what their kids are actually drinking has alcohol in it. Plus, the type of marketing for these drinks includes the internet, text messaging, MySpace and Facebook. How many parents have a MySpace page or use text messaging as much as teens? This is how the beer industry is reaching out to youth to inform them of their products. And guess what?

It’s even cheaper to buy than their nonalcoholic counterparts – 25% cheaper in most cases. So what’s exactly inside one of those alcoholic energy drinks? How about enough alcohol to equal two beers and enough caffeine to equal six Cokes. They are also concocted with a sugary sweet taste to mask the taste of beer. What can parents do? Be aware of what your kids are drinking – always check the labels. Energy drinks have nutritional values on them. Alcoholic ones don’t. Be aware of the health risks. Caffeine and alcohol are not a good mix. The two combined together results in being drunk wide awake. Never assume it’s just an energy drink – looks can be extremely deceiving.

Can you tell which can of energy drink has alcohol in it?

The beer industry is hoping that you can’t. If you guessed Rock Star 21 and Sparks, you guessed right. But how are parents to be able to tell the difference when they are marketed to look just like a typical energy drink? 5


How Do You Raise Healthy, Safe, and Wise Children?

By: Samantha Clark doing things, that bring about the same his is a question that many new, old and results and gives them a sense of accomare to be parents ask. As we look at the plishment. beautiful gardens of the spring, let us compare our children as precious seeds to be planted in • There is a need for sunshine. Children should be encouraged daily to run and the garden of life. play outside. Seeing that our children are • First we want good physically healthy is an important part of soil. Parents are how they will grow up and sets a standard to provide a good positive atmosphere for them to pattern their life. • Just like a garden must be fenced to keep where children can out unwanted damage, our children need grow. One way can restrictions and rules to give them a sebe school, day-care, curity. This is not always easy to enforce Church, or just play and becomes more difficult as the child dates but must give gets older, but the rewards are worth the your child a strong self worth not based effort. Children learn to live with a safe on things but character. boundary that includes authority, the laws • Watering your seed daily with words of of the land as well as the law of fair play encouragement like “Good Job” can help and other children’s rights. your child to know what is expected of We as parents have an awesome opportunity them in a positive way. to see things grow in our children’s lives and • We must give children room to grow. know we have been an important part of our This is room to be creative. Just the way children’s success. we were taught is only one way of doing things. Children often see other ways of

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Samantha Clark is the BeSafe Child, Area Coordinator in Gregg County. She is mother of six, grandmother of 20, and great-grandmother of two.

City of Longview Compost Site (Available to Residential Sanitation Customers Only)

Visit the City of Longview Compost Site to recycle your yard waste (leaves, grass clippings, pine straw, limbs, branches, vines or other vegetative waste) and/or stop by to pick up free quality compost. We are open Tuesday through Saturday from 8:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Please bring your current water bill as proof of residency.

For additional information or directions to the Site, please call 903-236-3066

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Getting Yourself And Your Kids Into Shape

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wo in three Americans are overweight. Experts now say that weight problems, when they happen, start young. That’s why it’s important to find ways to make exercise fun for your kids. One way is to incorporate it as a regular part of family life. Kids imitate their parents-if they see you working out, they’ll want to work out too. Fortunately, it can be easier than you think to get in a workout at home. Walking is a great way to get fresh air, meet the neighbors and build up your legs. Doctors say walking is one of the most important and most overlooked forms of exercise. Make sure your kids have healthy snacks available to them. Keep fresh fruit in the house, or vegetables such as carrot sticks and celery. Not only is it better for your kids, but they learn healthy habits that will carry over into adulthood. Family dinner time gives you a chance to

connect with your kids. The family dinner table is where kids eat more fruits, vegetables and fiber and less fried food, soda and saturated fats. Steal a few moments throughout the dayjumping jacks here, skipping rope there-and your fitness level will show improvement. Dancing is a great way to have fun and burn excess calories. Dance games and video games in which the “controller” is a vinyl mat you put on the floor and points are scored with energetic dance moves are becoming more and more popular for both fun and exercise. Players are no longer limited to games with preset track lists or music genres. Mom can dance to Madonna while the kids tear up the dance mat with hits from The Wiggles to High School Musical. To learn more, visit www.code masters.com/ dancefactory.

www.lacks.com 3110 H.G. Mosley Pkwy. Longview, TX 75601 Tel: 903-758-8536 Fax: 903-758-0852 7


Parental Involvement Is Key To Teaching Good Sportsmanship

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ith more than 30 million children participating in organized sports each year, teaching good sportsmanship to child athletes is an important parental responsibility. In fact, more than 86 percent of Americans believe that a parent is the best person to teach sportsmanship, according to a recent survey conducted by the Awards and Recognition Association (ARA) and TNS/NFO Research. “There is no doubt that all the rules, coaching and education can’t replace what happens at home,” said LaVell Edwards, former Brigham Young University football coach, parent of three children and chair of a selection panel for the ARA Sportsmanship Award. “Teaching good sportsmanship starts with parents, and they need to model behavior throughout the entire process.” To help teach sportsmanship, Coach Edwards and other former coaches created a list of tips, which include: • Remind kids of the importance of sportsmanship and model it during all competitive activities, whether in the backyard or

at the kitchen table. • Do not put pressure on kids to be the best; instead, teach them to enjoy the game. • Model good sportsmanship and ask others to do the same. • Discuss the need for good sportsmanship with your child’s teacher or coach and know their action plan. As a parent coach: • Establish a sportsmanship award at the start of the season, letting parents and athletes know that good on-field behavior will be recognized. Visit www.ara.org for examples. • Set an example by treating all athletes, coaches, officials and parents respectfully, and cheer on good plays when you see them, even if they’re by the other team. • Don’t emphasize winning; rather, emphasize skills and fair play. • Praise positive and correct negative behavior. • Demonstrate how to celebrate victory without humiliating competitors, and how to lose with dignity.

101 East Whaley Street, Longview, Texas 75601 903-757-7000 800-730-0099 8


Children’s Health Insurance Keeps Growing CHIP “Perinatal Program”

Texas residents who are pregnant, uninsured and not eligible for Medicaid may qualify for CHIP “Perinatal Program” benefits. Coverage starts before the child is born and continues after the child is enrolled. Benefits include: Up to 20 prenatal visits. Prescription drug coverage based on current CHIP formulary. Hospital facility charges and professional services charges related to labor with delivery only. Preterm labor that does not result in a birth and false labor are not covered benefits. Two postpartum visits for the mother. Regular check-ups, immunizations and prescriptions for the baby. A full list of covered benefits is available at http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/chip/perinatal/indes.htm. If you would like to apply for any State Programs CHIP/Medicaid, CHIP “Perinatal Program,” Women’s Health Program, Food Stamps, TANF or long term care please contact any of the Outreach Assistance Contact Numbers below in your county. Or you can call 1-800-647-6558. You can also visit our website @ www.chipmedicaid.org.

. . . . . . .

New Ways To Apply for Any of the State Of Texas Programs

CHIP (Children’s Health Program) CHIP “Perinatal Program” Women’s Health Program (Medicaid)

Medicaid Food Stamps Long Term Care TANF

Please Contact Us For More Information Cynthia (Abby) Farias Outreach Assistant (Covering Smith, Camp, Rains, Van Zandt, Wood Counties) (903) 535-0028 1-866-903-0028

Arnetta Garner Outreach Assistant (Covering Cherokee, Rusk, Anderson, Henderson, and Panola Counties) (903) 541-2454 1-866-903-0028

Or go to our website: www.healthyeasttx.org 9


Allergies And Emergencies

In a medical emergency, every second countsand this is especially true for children who live with food allergies. According to AllergicChild.com, food allergies affect 6 to 7 million Americans. Eight foods in particular account for 90 percent of all allergic reactions: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, soy and wheat. Food allergies are the leading cause of anaphylaxis, the immediate and severe reaction to certain foods that accounts for approximately 30,000 emergency room visits annually. An allergic reaction from food proves fatal for 100 to 200 people each year. Most school-age children eat two meals a day unsupervised by their parents. Without knowing it, children may consume ingredients that cause allergic reactions, and in some cases it only takes a tiny amount for a person to have a severe reaction. Without proper supervision, children can experience symptoms ranging from hives, swelling, nausea and loss of consciousness to even death. In case of just such an emergency, the child’s personal health information should be available to his or her caretaker and emergency

personnel. One simple solution is the MedicAlert’s Kid Smart(r) program, a successful child-specific program that safeguards and identifies children during an emergency. By wearing a personalized MedicAlert bracelet, children are provided with 24-hour child emergency ID and family emergency notification services. If a child experiences a life-threatening allergic reaction, it’s important to dial 911 and notify them about the situation. There are other efforts to consider: • Inform your circle of friends, family, teachers, nurses and other school or day care officials about the seriousness of your child’s allergy. • Define a clear action plan with your pediatrician or the simple plan outlined by the program. • Take control of your children’s diet and help them take control of their own diet. Try to pack children’s lunches every day to help regulate their diet and continue to teach them which foods to avoid, especially those with hidden ingredients. For more information, visit www.medicalert. org/kidsmart.

7 Office hours: MondayFriday 8 am to 5 pm Seasonal Saturday Clinic Oct.- March 9 am to 12 noon.

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LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

1479 E. Harrison Road Longview * (903) 236-7730 3123 S. Eastman Road Longview * (903) 757-4927

SERVING HOT, FRESH, MADE-TO-ORDER 3308 N. 4th Street BURGERS Longview * (903) 663-2267 24 HOURS A DAY EVERYDAY. 2401 Gilmer Road BREAKFAST Longview * (903) 759-8858 SERVED FROM 2010 Victory Drive 11:00 PM Marshall * (903) 938-2064 TO 11:00 AM 2406 E. End Blvd. S. Marshall * (903) 935-6161 105 N. Spur 63 Longview * (903) 753-7231


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Rules Of The Road

ccording to Safe Kids Worldwide, studies have shown that four out of five car seats are used incorrectly. Parents need to educate themselves on all aspects of car seat safety to learn how to keep little ones safe and happy while on the road. “Car seats are only effective if they are installed and used correctly,” said Dr. Laura Jana, child passenger safety technician and pediatrician. “Fortunately, there are many new products and resources now available to parents that help make car seat safety as easy as possible.” When looking to purchase a car seat, Dr. Jana recommends keeping safety, comfort and convenience in mind. Choose the appropriate car seat for your child based on his age, height, weight and fit with your vehicle.

Here are some tips to help you decide among the wide range of car seats available: ·For your baby’s safety and comfort, consider an infant car seat that has a five-point harness system and padding throughout the seat. ·Consider a convertible car seat with a 50-pound weight rating, designed to allow extended use of the seat’s fivepoint harness system. ·Consider picking a car seat that includes “kid-friendly features,” such as retractable cup and snack holders. Keeping children safe in the car is unquestionably one of a parent’s most important daily responsibilities. Parents should remember to keep an eye out for the latest car seat innovations and improved features designed with ease of use in mind. Evenflo is an innovative, simple and safe feature that makes proper harness placement significantly easier as your child grows. For more information go to www. evenflo.com

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Sustaining a Healthy Marriage

the

“C’s�

Keeping a strong marriage takes work, but making it happen is possible. Couples tend to forget basic components that make a big difference in their relationship. VOW assists couples with tactics such as these to enrich their relationship and maintain a strong marriage.

Companionship (or Friendship)

More and more, researchers are coming to think that at the heart of a healthy, successful marriage is a deep friendship. This means the two people have a deep respect for each other and sincerely enjoy each other's company. They know each other's likes and dislikes and their hopes, dreams, and fears. They regularly express appreciation and fondness for each other. They take time on a daily basis to "catch-up" and "reconnect." They see themselves as on the same team and share a vision of where they are going.

Communication and Effective Problem-Solving

Couples who can talk to each other and resolve differences in a positive manner are much more likely to have a healthy and successful marriage. Good communication involves things such as: avoiding harsh criticism and contempt; not being defensive or unwilling to discuss a problem; being humble and open to change; starting a disagreement in a "soft" way rather than "blasting away"; and using appropriate humor to keep things "light." Effective problem-solving involves such things as: knowing that some problems can't be solved right now and learning to live with that; working on the differences and problems that are solvable; knowing when you need to calm down and disengage for a while to avoid saying or doing something hurtful; accepting differences and imperfections, and being willing to forgive.

Commitment

Commitment helps couples stay together despite temporary difficulties in their relationship because of the time and energy they have invested in the relationship. Most marriages go through hard times, but a large majority of couples who stick together through these hard times find happiness again. The security that commitment creates may help couples sacrifice for their relationship without resenting it. Commitment makes sacrifice possible because when individuals know that their relationship will continue, they are able to delay their own needs to meet another's because they know that their needs can be met later. Research suggests that people put "lack of commitment" as the most common reason for the failure of their marriage.

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article source: http://www.healthymarriageinfo.org/indiv_couple/keepstrong.cfm#sustaining The VOW Marriage Enrichment Program, provided by the Longview Wellness Center, offers a free premarital education course. VOW is the product of a grant received by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration for Children and Families. The program is an innovative and interactive program designed to help young adult single persons and couples access information that will enable them to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to foster and sustain healthy marriages. Serving an eight county region including Camp, Gregg, Harrison, Marion, Panola, Rusk, Smith and Upshur, VOW is able to meet the needs of people from all ages and ethnic backgrounds.

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Poison And What To Do By: Dr. Kathleen Butler, Pediatrician ETMC First Physician in Lindale

There are approximately 2 million poisoning exposures reported in the United States per year. Most poisonings occur in the home and most are unintentional. Often these accidents occur when parents are busy and children are unsupervised or are visiting older relatives. In the majority of these cases the poison is ingested. Half of these incidents occur in children six years and under with only 2% of these resulting in deaths. In 2006, 89% of the teenage deaths from poisoning were intentional, and this same group accounted for 170,000 poisoning exposures. Adults aged 20-59 account for over 70% of poisoning fatalities and adults over 60 years of age account for 16% of fatalities. A poisoning is defined as any substance that enters the body through ingestion, inhalation or absorption through the skin and that cause or has the potential to cause harmful effects. Poisons come in many forms, such as plants, medications, vitamins or herbal substances, pesticides, household cleaners, cosmetics, etc. Symptoms to look for in poisoning are: nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, abdominal pain, seizures. If you suspect this has happened, stay calm and do not give the child anything by mouth. If the child is alert, call Poison Control at 1-800-222-1222; if the child is unconscious or not breathing call 911. If your child is poisoned through swallowing something do not give them anything by mouth unless instructed by the Poison Control Center. If they have inhaled a substance get them out into the fresh air and away from fumes. If it is through skin contact, then remove contaminated clothing and place the affected area under running water for at least 10 minutes. If poison gets into the eyes rinse the eyes with lukewarm water for 15-20 minutes and call poison control for specific instructions. (Continued on next page)

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Do not give Syrup of Ipecac unless explicitly instructed to do so by the Poison Control Center. When you call the Poison Control Center they will want to know your name and phone number, the child’s age and weight, the name of the poison, the amount taken and the time taken, as well as any symptoms the child is having. Keep your child and others safe by following these guidelines: keep products in original containers; use products as directed; store potential poisons out of the reach of children – locked up; install child safety locks; store foods and dangerous substances in separate places; dispose of old medications or hazardous products properly. Keeping children safe from poisonings is not difficult, it just takes some simple guidelines: Don’t give medications to a child in the dark; Do not tell a child that medicine is candy; Do not assume that child safety caps will prevent a child from getting into a medication; Do not place hazardous substances in food containers; Do not underestimate your child’s curiosity or ingenuity – just because they never have gotten into anything doesn’t mean they never will. More information is available through the Texas Poison Center Network at www.poisoncontrol.org or the American Academy of Pediatrics at www.aap.org/family/poistipp.htm

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Prescription Drug Abuse

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By: Lt. David Young, Lufkin Police Dept.

buse of prescription and over the counter drugs is at an all time high and is probably is the fastest growing drug trend in East Texas. Prescription pain killers and mood enhancing drugs are among the most popular drugs of abuse, but over the counter medications are being abused too. As is so often the case, the same trend is being seen in our children and teenagers. In this area, prescription drug abuse is rapidly becoming the biggest drug abuse problem. The person often begins taking the drugs under a doctor’s care and slips to abuse from there. These persons become addicted to the drugs and often resort to prescription fraud, doctor “shopping”, and outright stealing to support what becomes a drug habit. When children are allowed access to these drugs they can think the drugs are safe because a doctor prescribed them. “Pharm” parties have emerged on the teen scene. “Pharm” in this case is short for pharmaceuticals. At a “pharm” party, kids bring whatever medications they can find in their home medicine cabinet and pour all the medications into one big bowl and take pills until something happens. This activity is a tragedy waiting to happen. Kids taking medications meant for others, and having no idea what all the pills are, is a recipe for disaster. Over the counter (OTC) medicines are being abused too. Cough syrup is abused for the “high” that can be obtained from taking large doses. OTC cold medicines, when taken in quantity, can cause an effect that makes some

kids repeatedly seek that feeling. Taking a larger than recommended dose of some diet pills can cause a high similar to the effects of methamphetamine. “Cheese”, a dangerously addictive combination of OTC cold medication and a small amount of heroin has resulted in a frightening number of emergency room visits in the Dallas area during the past two years. It’s being sold in some schools in that area for $2 per dose. That makes it affordable for kids of most ages. Much of the child’s attitude about medication comes from what they see at home. If they see parents and relatives doing it, or if they see the drug seeking behavior of someone addicted to prescription medications, they are much more likely to imitate that behavior. These addictions have an effect on the entire family. Prescription drugs have become so common that people lose sight of the danger that comes with any drug. All drugs have effects and side effects on the body. Some are toxic if taken on the wrong dosage and others can be addictive. Because they are prescribed by a doctor some people think that prescription drugs are always safe, even if they are prescribed for someone else. That is not true. Remember; never take drugs that are prescribed for someone else. Never take more than the recommended dosage of any medicine. If you know of someone who has a problem with any drug, tell a trusted friend, adult, or school counselor.

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Routine Doctor Visits Are Good

Source: Brenda Elrod, R.S., Deputy Director NETPHD Routine doctor visits have proven to be a great benefit to children, teenagers and adults. The idea is to have a family physician and have routine “well visits”. A routine well visit is designed to evaluate your child’s current health status and verify he or she is growing into a healthy adult. These “well visits” should not end when the child becomes a teenager and certainly needs to continue when the teenager becomes an adult. A “well visit” with your doctor is a great time to ask questions about your well being or your child’s well being. You can find out what to expect as the child grows into a teenager. Young mothers use the “well child” visit as a time to be reassured their child is healthy. The doctor visit is also the perfect time for the child to receive routine disease preventing immunizations. Immunizations have proven to protect children from childhood diseases that historically caused premature death. Chicken pox, whooping cough, tetanus, and Hepatitis B are diseases that can be prevented with proper immunizations administered in the prescribed time frames. A “well visit” with you doctor is also the perfect time to spot problems with you child’s health. Allergies, seeing, hearing or growth development issues can be diagnosed and interventions can be started that will make the child healthier. Prevention is always the best policy. By taking your child to routine doctor visits and establishing a medical history you may prevent unnecessary illness and suffering for your child. “Well child” is usually for children from birth to about 7 years old. The next phase would be well-preteen for the child 8 years old to 12 years old. Preteen is the time when the child begins to transition form a baby to a teenager. The next phase is the “well-teen” for 13 year olds to 18 year olds. The “well teen” visits are crucial to evaluate the individual’s development into an adult. This is a time of change for each child as they

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grow older, become more independent, experience new emotions and are exposed to the temptation of risky behaviors. Risky behaviors include the use of tobacco, alcohol, drugs and even sexual activity. As your child travels through life, it is very important to establish this routine of well visits and personal awareness of his or her health. Each individual has a tremendous amount of control over his or her health. As parents, we must establish this control by being responsible for the “well child”, “well pre-teen”, “well teenager” visits so our children will establish this as young adults and continue the process for their children.

Healthier children can make healthier adults who in turn may have healthier children. The Northeast Texas Public Health District strives to make our community the healthiest community in Texas. We can join together to make this happen. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact the District and every effort will be made to connect you to a medical home. You may qualify for access to our Community Health Clinics of Northeast Texas providing well care services for our community. Please call our Community Outreach Department at 903-535-0028 or visit our website at www.healthyeasttx.org for more information.

Kids And Pets: Introducing A New Resource For Parents

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here are some facts parents should bone up on before welcoming four-footed friends into the family. “Pets have always been very special to children and are important for childhood development, but parents need to play an active role in ensuring a healthy environment and interaction between children and pets,” said Dr. Lynn Buzhardt, a nationally recognized veterinarian on family/ pet concerns and consultant to a new resource, GrowingUpWithPets.com, presented by Novartis Animal Health US, Inc. For example, did you know that dogs and cats are susceptible to parasites? These five parasites pose a threat to a dog’s health: heart worms, roundworms, hookworms, whip worms and fleas. Intestinal parasites can also be life-threatening to dogs and some can transfer diseases to humans, which is known as zoonosis. Children are especially susceptible to zoonotic diseases because they often touch things and stick their hands in their mouths without washing them first. As many as 20 percent of

American children contract roundworms from their pets each year. Fortunately, there are easy ways to protect your children and pets from parasites: • Have your pet’s stool examined by you veterinarian every six to 12 months. Have your veterinarian place your dog on a year-round heart worm, intestinal parasite and flea preventive, as recommended by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Companion Animal Parasite Council. Ask your veterinarian about a convenient oral 5-in-1 product that prevents heart worms, intestinal parasites and fleas.

·Use

a pooper-scooper. As feces breaks down, parasite eggs are deposited into the soil. This is one of most common ways of contracting parasites.

·Always

wash your children’s hands after playing outside and before eating. GrowingUpWithPets.com provides helpful information on topics such as pet health, behavioral issues, training tips, how to choose the right pet for your child and integrating pets into a home with children. The site was created with the help of veterinarians, OB/ GYNs, pediatricians and parents. 17


Making The Right Entertainment Choices

America’s children are avid consumers of movies, music and video games. But sometimes their entertainment choices may not be appropriate for them. How is a parent to make sure that the latest hit movie, hot video game or chart-busting album is right for their child? The Coalition of Entertainment Retail Trade Associations (CERTA), an umbrella group for movie theatres, video and video game stores and music retailers, encourages parents to take a few simple steps to ensure that entertainment is appropriate for their family: * Look for the advisory. Video games and motion pictures carry a rating. Complementing the rating is a “content descriptor” that explains why the game or movie got the rating that it did. Music that contains explicit content displays a “parental advisory” sticker on the album cover or an “explicit” warning in the online download catalogue. Use these advisories to make sure the video game, movie or music is appropriate for your child. * Watch movies, listen to music, and play

video games with your children. (Sure, it may not always be easy or even welcomed, but it is important.) Talk to your children. Make sure they understand what the ratings and labeling are about, and what they can learn from them. * Set appropriate limits. Like any form of entertainment, music, movies and video games should not be permitted to interfere with schoolwork, exercise and other important activities. * For those lucky enough to have an Xbox 360 video game console, check out the parental controls. You can set the console so that Mature- and Adult Only-rated video games will not play on the system. (PlayStation 3 and Nintendo Revolution will also contain parental-control mechanisms.) Entertainment can educate, amuse, inspire and challenge. There are movies, video games and music for every age group and interest, but not every choice is right for every audience. Using these guidelines, parents can make sure that their choices are the right ones for their family. For more information, go to www.erlam.org.

WAL MART SUPERCENTER

Caring About Our Children’s Health & Safety

“Health and Safety Fair” June 21, 2008 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

18

2440 Gilmer Rd., Longview, Tx. 903-297-1121


Protect Your Kids From The Sun

nyone who has ever taken kids to the A beach knows that it’s fun for the kids, but can sometimes be a hassle for whoever is in

charge. For parents it can mean the constant chore of sunscreen application and reapplication. To curb the sun care battle and make sun protection a routine part of outdoor play, parents can take a few simple steps now to help ensure sun safety all summer long. Sun protection is an essential part of any outdoor activity because the sun produces invisible rays known as ultraviolet-A (UVA) and ultraviolet-B (UVB), which cause sunburn and sun damage. Harmful UV rays are more intense in the summer, which makes right now the perfect time for parents to develop their summer sun care strategy. “The more sun exposure children get, the greater their chances of long-term skin damage,” said Dr. David Leffell, Professor of Dermatology & Surgery at Yale School of Medicine. “When children are playing in the sun and surf, they have specific sun care needs.”

Here are some sun care tips to help create your family’s sun care strategy: • Cover all the bases-It’s easy to overlook spots like your ears, neck, shoulders and the back of your neck, but they need sunscreen, too. So does your scalp, if your child has thin or short hair. • Reapply, reapply, reapply -Slap on another coat of sunscreen as needed-and be sure to reapply after swimming, perspiring, vigorous activity or toweling off. • Select sunscreens that can keep up with kids-When children are playing in the sun and surf, they have specific sun care needs. Use waterproof sunscreens with SPF 30 or higher, and look for products that are quick and easy to apply to squirmy kids. (Keep babies under 6 months of age out of the sun and consult a doctor before applying sunscreen.) Families can enjoy the outdoors while staying safe by having a solid action plan in place that includes cover-up clothing, timely activities and the right sunscreen. Additional sun care tips and information for better summers can be found at coppertone.com/sum mers.aspx.

Kids Eat Free 5 to 9 on Tuesdays

Buy A Combo Meal Get A 4 pc. Kids Meal Free Loop 281 & Gilmer Rd.

903-295-6633

Loop 281 & 4th St.

903-663-6631

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Innovation is in the Details. ENGINEERS

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“Together, we can make our community safer for our children.”

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19


Guide to Licensed Child Care Centers

This Directory was produced by the Better Business Bureau Foundation as a public service to assist parents in their search for a licensed child care facility. The Better Business Bureau does not endorse or recommend any product, service or company; therefore, parents should not consider this Directory a recommendation of any child care center. Any portion of the listing is subject to change at any time. The Better Business Bureau suggests you visit and tour the facility before making a decision. Check the current status of the facility’s license with the Department of Protective & Regulatory Services at 533-4173. This license should be posted in a conspicuous place and reflect the correct address of the facility. The Monitoring Plan set by the Department of Protective & Regulatory Services is a good guideline when looking into a facility. It is indicative if the facility’s compliance with state guidelines. Ask to see their latest compliance report. It is a good idea to find out which items, if any, your facility was not in compliance with when corrections were made by the facility. Remember, this information can also change at any time. Make sure to check their current monitoring plan with Protective Services. Here are some things to look for when choosing a child care service: • Is the facility clean? Are the children clean? • Is there a safe place to play both indoors and outdoors? • Does caregiver share your views on discipline and religion? • Can they provide special care such as diet and medication? • Is this facility open to you and welcome to visits anytime? If you have questions or would like a brochure from the Better Business Bureau on choosing child care, please call us at (903) 581-5704 or toll free 1-800-443-0131.

Indicates Accredited BBB Member

Name, Address (Listed by Zip Code)

Phone

Capacity

Hours & Days Open

Zip Code 75601

Drop After School Ins Care

Ages Accepted

Alpine Christian Academy 610 E. Loop 281, Longview, 75601

758-0161

170

Mon.-Fri. 8:30-2:30

No

No

18 mos. - 2nd Grade

Applewood Academy & Day Care 1512 Judson Rd., Longview, 75601

753-3737

137

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 10 years

Asbury House Child Enrichment 320 S. Center, Longview, 75601

758-7062

34

Mon.- Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

No

Preschool, Qualified

Camp Fire Kids Care-Bramlette 111 Tupelo, Longview, 75601

758-2060

55

Mon.-Fri. 2:30-6:00

No

Yes

Pre-K -7th Grade

Generations of the Future Day Care Ctr. 450 S. High St., Longview, 75601

238-8765

28

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

Infant - School Age

Kandyland Kampus Day Care 115 Tupelo, Longview, 75601

758-8247

85

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

18 mos. - 12 years

Oakland Heights Child Dev. Center 1600 Judson Rd., Longview, 75601

753-1592

131

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

No

No

6 mos. - 5 years

Oakland Heights Baptist Church 1607 Judson Rd., Longview, 75601

753-9578

100

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-6:00

Yes

Yes

K - 5th Grade

The Prep School 720 N. Sixth St., Longview, 75601

758-0320

162

Mon.-Fri. 9:00-2:30

No

No

6 mos. - K

Preschool Learning Academy 314 E. Cotton St., Longview, 75601

753-6186

51

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

18 mos. - 13 years

Treazure Chest Daycare Learning Ctr. 1809 Alpine, Longview, 75601

758-4868

102

Mon.-Fri. 6;30-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 10 years

School for Little Children 400 N. Freedonia, Longview, 75601

753-3121

250

Mon.-Fri. 7:15-6:00

No

No

6 wks. - K

Sharon’s Kids Korner 503 E. Methvin, Longview, 75601

758-6876

129

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

Yes

Yes

Birth - 13 years

Serving Children From Birth To Age 3 With Developmental Delays or Disabilities

1-888-504-2229 20


Name, Address (Listed by Zip Code)

Phone

Capacity

Hours & Days Open

Zip Code 75601

Drop After School Ins Care

Ages Accepted

Trinity Extended Day 215 Teague St., Longview, 75601

753-0612

149

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-6:00

No

Yes

2 years - 6th Grade

Trinity House Day Care 906 Padon St., Longview, 75601

753-3399

65

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

No

No

6 wks. - 2 years

Wee Learn Center 209 E. South, Longview, 75601

758-0153

150

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

No

6 wks. - Grade K

Zip Code 75602, 75603

Almost Angels Day Care Center 1809 S. Mobberly, Longview, 75602

236-7134

97

Mon.-Fri. 5:30-7:00

Yes

Yes

3 wks. - 13 years

Bethel Temple Child Care 1400 Mobberly Dr., Longview, 75602

758-0068

100

Mon.-Sun. No 6:00-6:30

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Camp Fire Kids Care, J.L. Everhart 1000 S. MLK Blvd., Longview 75602

234-8560

68

Mon.-Fri. 2:30-6:00

No

Yes

Pre-K - 7th Grade

Garret Tender Loving Care 1600 S. Mobberly, Longview, 75602

757-6080

121

Mon.-Fri./ Sat. Yes 6:30-mid./7:30-mid

Yes

18 mos. - 12 years

House of Tots Creative Schools 434 S. Center, Longview, 75602

757-5753

50

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

Birth - 13 years

Longview Agape Learning Academy 2717 S. MLK Blvd., Longview, 75602

753-7390

166

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

18 mos. - 13 years

Longview Child Development Center 1230 S. High, Longview, 75602

758-3861

238

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30

No

No

6 wks. - 5 years

3-D Children’s Center 4984 FM 2011, Longview, 75603

643-9566

98

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 13 years

Zip Code 75604 ABC Son Shine School 202 W. Niblick, Longview, 75604

759-6365

43

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

Toddler - School Age

Campfire Kids Care - Pine Tree Middle 1707 Pine Tree Rd., Longview 75604

759-1015

126

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

Pre-K - 7th Grade

Fairmont Children’s School 1450 W. Fairmont, Longview, 75604

297-3393

85

Mon.-Fri. 6;00-6:00

No

Yes

18 mos. - 10 years

First Step 2307 Kingston, Longview, 75604

295-9999

96

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

Birth - 13 years

Jordan Country Day School 1208 Pine Tree Rd., Longview, 75604

759-3085

120

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 10 years

Kid Connection 200 Pine Tree Rd., Longview, 75604

759-4630

47

Mon.-Fri. 6;30-6:00

Yes

Yes

Birth - 12 years

Primary Colors Preschool #1 3605 Gilmer Rd., Longview, 75604

297-9494

109

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

pre-k

Yes

12 mos. - 11 years

Primary Colors Preschool #2 1901 Toler Rd., Longview, 75604

297-9595

128

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

pre-k

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Pure Hart Child Care Center 471 Jamerison Rd., Longview, 75604

297-6208

34

Mon.-Sun. No 6:30-6:30

Yes

Birth - School Age

The Toy Box Day Care 3833 Gilmer Rd., Longview, 75604

297-3374

82

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:30

Yes

Birth - 13 years

Yes

21


Name, Address (Listed by Zip Code)

Kid Kountry 476 Henderson Ln., Longview, 75605

Phone

Capacity

Hours & Days Open

Drop After School Ins Care

Zip Code 75605, 75606

Ages Accepted

663-6565

242

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

Birth - 12 years

Mobberly Child Development Center 625 E. Loop 281, Longview, 75605

663-3000

200

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 10 years

Oak Forest Montessori School 2000 Greenleaf, Longview, 75605

297-0634

175

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

18 mos. - 11 years

A Step Ahead Learning Center 401 N. 5th St., Longview, 75606

757-4200

51

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

Toddler - School Age

Presbyterian Children’s Center 301 N. Center, Longview, 75606

757-8672

110

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30

No

No

8 wks. - Grade K

Blocks In Your Socks Child Care Center 318 W. Quitman, Gladewater, 75647

845-4709

81

Mon.-Fri. 5:30-6:00

No

Yes

Infant - School Age

Center Street Day Care 405 S. Center St., Gladewater, 75647

844-8899

37

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

Yes

Yes

6 wks. - 13 years

The Learning Academy 1600 W. Upshur, Gladewater, 75647

845-1543

85

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Zip Code 75647

Zip Code 75662

Calvary Way Day Care Center 106 Woodlawn, Kilgore, 75662

981-9011

35

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

Yes

Yes

Birth - 13 years

First Baptist Church 501 E. North, Kilgore, 75662

986-9064

130

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Grace Day Care 119 Peavine Rd., Kilgore, 75662

984-0626

132

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Kids World Learning Center 405 Kay St., Kilgore, 75662

984-1400

94

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

Infant - School Age

Tates Cuddly Bear Daycare, Inc. 303 Powderhorn Rd., Kilgore, 75662

984-1116

69

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Kilgore College Child Development Center 1009 Brook., Kilgore, 75662

983-8293

36

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30

No

No

18 mos. - 5 years

Little Cardinal Dayschool 807 Access, Kilgore, 75662

984-3280

25

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:30

Yes

Yes

Infant - School Age

Meadowbrook Preschool & Children’s Ctr. 1011 Houston St., Kilgore, 75662

984-0828

44

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00

No

No

Infant - Pre-K

Sails Day Care 112 Luder, Kilgore, 75662

984-1239

22

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30

No

No

6 wks - 3 years

Stepping Stone 2920 Green Hills Dr., Kilgore, 75662

983-3126

102

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-5:30

No

Yes

18 mos. - Pre-K

Zip Code 75693

Hugs & Kisses Day Care 1709 N. White Oak Rd., White Oak, 75693

291-9300

66

Mon.-Fri. 6:00-6:00

No

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Toy Chest Daycare and Learning Center 208 Old Hwy. 80, White Oak, 75693

297-3622

41

Mon.-Fri. 6:30-6:30

No

Yes

Infant - School Age

Redonia Harper, President

678 N. Main Gladewater, TX 75647-0027 903/845-5566 (Fax) 903/845-1716 22


Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

$50 or less covers all your children for one year. Most families pay little or nothing at all. .Extend the enrollment from 6 months to 12 months. .Eliminate the 90-day waiting period for most children. .Increase the asset limit from $5,000 to $10,000 per household. .Increase the amount cars can be worth when determining eligibility. .Allow childcare expenses to be deducted from household income when determining whether children are eligible for the program.

Children’s Medicaid Children’s Medicaid provides free coverage for a wide range of health care services for children who qualify. It helps nearly 2 million Texas children stay healthy and get the care they need. CHIP If your children get CHIP coverage, Your family will pay no more than $50 every year, and many families pay nothing. Depending on your income, you may have copayments for some services, such as prescriptions and visits to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Most copays range from $3 to $10. Benefits Include: .Choice of doctors .Regular check-ups and office visits .X-rays and lab tests .Prescription drugs and medical supplies .Mental health care .Dentist visits, cleaning and fillings .Coverage for special health needs .Access to medical specialists .Coverage for pre-existing conditions .Shots and immunizations .Eye exams and glasses CHIP now offers prenatal care for unborn children of low-income women who do not qualify for Medicaid. One application covers both programs. We will look at your application and let you know if your children qualify for Children’s Medicaid or CHIP. Go to www.CHIPmedicaid.org and print an application, or call us at 903-535-0028 or 1-866-903-0028 NETPHD Website: www.healthyeasttx.org

Income Guidelines for CHIP/Children’s Medicaid Family Members (Adults plus children)

May Qualify For Children’s Medicaid Annual Family Income

May Qualify For CHIP Annual Family Income

1

$10,210

$20,420

2

$13,690

$27,380

3

$17,170

$34,340

4

$20,650

$41,300

23


Gilmer

Henderson

Longview

It’s about making

Marshall

Tyler

Time for Each Other

Raising children together as a couple is an adventure, but sometimes it can be stressful for Mom and Dad. You no longer have that quality time together and the needs of your children always seem to come before the needs of your relationship. No matter how busy you get in life, it’s always important to keep your relationship strong. Take time out to enrich your marriage by joining VOW, a free marriage education course that is personalized just for you. Free on-site childcare for children 18 months and older.

For more information, call 903.232.1700

or visit us online at

wevownow.com

Funding for this project was provided by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Grant: #90FE0091. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.

24


LongviewSpring2008Revised