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Foreword The etched line can be traced back in time to 15th century Germany. At first employed in the decoration of arms and armor, the practice slowly evolved into a technique for the creation of fine art. From the earliest attempts, in which artists crudely etched on iron, to the more refined techniques used today, the art of etching has inspired many of the world’s greatest draughtsmen and painters. When surveying the evolution of etching, there is one undisputed master of the medium: Rembrandt van Rijn. Rembrandt’s virtuosic technique is still considered state of the art after 350 years, and his impressive oeuvre continues to inspire collectors and artists alike. Rembrandt’s affinity for the technique, combined with his extraordinary talent and ingenuity, resulted in a body of work that has yet to be surpassed. The impact of his etchings has been remarkable, as they have been studied, disseminated and appropriated for multiple generations. Today, scholars continue to explore the more subtle layers of Rembrandt’s work in an attempt to unravel the mystery behind his prodigious talent. We are very pleased to have one of the world’s leading experts, Gary Schwartz, join us for the opening of our special exhibition, Etched in Time: Rembrandt the Printmaker. The author of a number of important tomes on the artist, including the widely referenced The Complete Etchings of Rembrandt and the newly released The Rembrandt Book, Mr. Schwartz has made a tremendous contribution to the understanding of this great artist. To celebrate the 400th anniversary of Rembrandt’s birth, we have assembled an impressive collection of his masterful etchings. Exploring themes ranging from self-portraits and landscapes to Old and New Testament subject matter, the astonishing depth of Rembrandt’s creativity and skill is very much evident. We hope you will enjoy Etched in Time: Rembrandt the Printmaker. Mark Miles Director


Rembrandt as a Celebrator of Other Artists

D

uring a year like the present 400th birthday of Rembrandt, when we hang out the flag to celebrate the achievements of a great artist, there are always spoilsports who refuse to salute. “This has nothing to do with Rembrandt,” they tell us sourly. “He would have been embarrassed by all this hype.” This sounds like praiseworthy, art-loving purism, and your first reaction may be to concede the point. Do not! There is in fact good evidence that the very person who inaugurated the centennial celebration of an artist in the Northern Netherlands was none other than Rembrandt van Rijn himself, in the year 1633. The idea that the centennial of an artist would have been celebrated in the 17th century is not far-fetched. The earliest documented example that I know dates from that very period, four years earlier, in 1629, in Antwerp. The artist who was honored was Quentin Massys (1456 or 1466-1530), one of the founders of the Antwerp school of painting. The story behind this is touching. During repair work on an old Antwerp church, the Klarissenkerk, the workers came upon burial remains that were thought to be those of Massys. This so moved a wealthy and sentimental patron of the arts named Cornelis van der Geest that he took special measures to honor the remains of the great artist. As it happened, the 100th anniversary of Massys’s death was approaching. To mark it, van der Geest had Massys’s remains moved to the cathedral, where on 17 November 1629, 100 years to the day after the artist’s death (at least according to the sources then known) they were reburied in the base of the tower. The artist who according to my theory was commemorated by Rembrandt was a younger contemporary of Massys’s, Lucas van Leyden. Lucas lived from 1494 to 1533 in Rembrandt’s home town, Leiden, from which he took his name. The benefits were mutual. With his fabulous talent, Lucas put Leiden on the map of European art. His apotheosis was the recognition he received from the German artist Albrecht Dürer, the biggest star of the day in northern European art. This fact was not only recorded by Dürer in his private notes, but also published by the leading authorities on Italian and northern European art, Giorgio Vasari (1511-74) and Carel van Mander (15481606), in their lives of the artists. Vasari writes of the two in terms of rivalry. Lucas imitated compositions by Dürer and Dürer responded with new inventions of greater technical mastery. “Albert,” he wrote, was “determined not be surpassed by Lucas in either the quantity or the quality of his work. … Albert’s works incited Lucas to renewed efforts.” Weighing the qualities of the one against the other, Vasari concludes that “Lucas, although unequal to Albert in design, was his peer with the burin.” When it came to composition, though, Lucas worked “more in conformity with the rules of art than Albert.” The Flemish-Dutch artist and historian of art Carel van Mander repeats Vasari’s judgment proudly. However, his text on the two masters is very different than Vasari’s. Putting a Dutch spin on the story, he sketches the relationship between Dürer and Lucas not in terms of rivalry but of mutual admiration. He wrote that Dürer came to Leiden especially to work with Lucas, and that they painted each other’s portraits. This story was untrue, but it was believed by all. Lucas van Leyden was a model and hero for Rembrandt in more ways than one. Rembrandt collected drawings and prints by Lucas in a conspicuous fashion, paying record prices for them. Two of his purchases made such an impression that they were noted by contemporaries in their private records. In 1642, the burgomaster of the town of Harderwijk, a man named Ernst Brinck, noted the following in his album of noteworthy events: “Recently a painter in Amsterdam named Rembrandt bought a small print by Lucas van Leyden, being an Uilenspiegelken, for which he paid 179 guilders, because the print can hardly be found any more.” (That engraving shows a family of beggars on the tramp.) Later in the century, the collector Joannes Wtenbogaert wrote of a Lucas van Leyden curiosity, “For this print Rembrandt in his time paid 250 guilders.” How much was 250 guilders? At the time it was equivalent to the annual income of an unskilled worker. The object for which Rembrandt paid that price I called a Lucas curiosity. It was a montage of clipped-out details of various engravings by Lucas that were pasted onto a new sheet and connected with new drawn lines. Today no one I hope would dream of desecrating precious works of art this way. But Rembrandt apparently thought of it as a compliment to Lucas. Rembrandt clipped and pasted Lucas in another way, by adapting motifs and compositions by his predecessor in his own work, from early to late. The etching in the present exhibition of the triumph of Mordechai 6


is an excellent example. In 1515 Lucas engraved the subject in a magisterial print evocative of an ancient Roman triumphal entry. In its turn, Lucas’s print was based on Dürer’s famous engraving of 1513, Knight, Death and Devil. The audience for Rembrandt’s print will have seen this. They would have known that Rembrandt was demonstratively taking his place as a worthy successor to those legendary giants of art. Two particular ways that Rembrandt imitated Lucas lie behind my suggestion that he marked the 100th anniversary of Lucas’s death with a commemorative gesture. One is the creation of self-portraits. A century before Rembrandt, Lucas was famous for portraying himself in prints and drawings and paintings. One painting believed to be a self-portrait of Lucas was re-popularized in Rembrandt’s own time. In 1621, when Rembrandt was 15 years old, around the time that he left school to become an artist, that portrait, which is now in the museum of Braunschweig, was published in an engraving. The inscription under the print reads, in Latin: “The portrait of Lucas van Leiden, the incomparable painter and engraver, when he was 15 years old, depicted from a portrait of himself by his own hand. He died in Leiden in the year 1533 at the age of 39.” Within a few years Rembrandt too was painting and etching portraits of himself by his own hand, an activity that was to become a lifelong practice.

Andries Jacobsz Stock After a self-portrait by Lucas van Leyden

Another way in which Rembrandt conspicuously emulated Lucas was in the use of his first name as his nom d’artiste. Art historians have referred to Leonardo and Titian as a model for Rembrandt in this respect, but Lucas is closer to home. Rembrandt did not go as far as Lucas in adopting an abbreviated identifying mark. Lucas signed his works only with the letter L. But in choosing to sign his works by his first name only, Rembrandt would have been reminding not only his Dutch but also his international audience that he was Rembrandt van Leyden, the successor of Lucas. Now comes the really intriguing part. Rembrandt did not start off signing with his first name. In the first seven or eight years of his career he signed RHL, for Rembrandt Harmenni Leidensis. The year when he switched to Rembrandt f., for Rembrandt fecit, was 1633, 100 years after Lucas’s death. And the first self-portrait he signed that way is the one that looks the most like the self-portrait of Lucas in the print after that painting in Braunschweig. It is called Self-portrait in a cap and scarf with the face dark: bust (Bartsch 17). In the second state of the etching, the signature and the date are put on very prominently, in a space reserved for them below the portrait: Rembrandt f. 1633. That signature and that date and that self-image on the Self-portrait in a cap and scarf, I submit, constitute a celebration by Rembrandt of the 100th anniversary of the death of Lucas van Leyden. Rembrandt’s celebratory attention for Lucas van Leyden was not exceptional for him. His identification with Lucas went further than that with most of the artists with whom he associated himself, but it was far from unique. With Peter Paul Rubens as well Rembrandt came into close artistic quarters. Rembrandt modeled himself after a self-portrait by Rubens in a self-portrait of his own and perhaps even in his dress and comportment in real life.

Rembrandt van Rijn Rembrandt in a Cap and Scarf with the Face Dark: Bust Etching 1633 Bartsch 17 ii/ii

Those two instances are fairly conventional. What ambitious artist of the time did not know Lucas van Leyden and Rubens and refer to them in his work? However, Rembrandt’s borrowings go much further than that, far beyond the bounds of convention. Ben Broos has extracted from the writings of art historians what he calls the formal sources of Rembrandt’s art. Eliminating ideas that were broached only once or are not very convincing, we are still left with borrowings by Rembrandt from the work of more than 110 different artists. They include references to contemporaries and other Netherlandish artists, but as Rembrandt grew older he looked more and more at the work of 16th century Italian artists. 7


In The Rembrandt Book I analyze these borrowings quantitively in terms of school and period. What I did not analyze in the book is the breakdown by technique within Rembrandt’s work. If one looks at the borrowings by medium, one discovers strikingly disparate figures for the drawings, paintings and etchings. In the drawings, art historians have found references to the work of other artists in only about six percent of the sheets. In the paintings, 18 percent. But in the etchings, Rembrandt made use of motifs by other artists in some 42 percent of his own graphic works. To put these numbers into words: the count reveals that when Rembrandt was working in the medium of etching he was far more intensely in touch with his predecessors than when he was drawing or painting. One possible explanation for this springs to mind. Most of the sources from which Rembrandt derived his knowledge of the art of other masters were prints. He had a large, important collection of prints by Netherlandish, German and Italian artists, including many of those 110 from whom he borrowed motifs. We can surmise that it was more natural for him to delve into his collection when making prints of his own. The present exhibition includes one of the classic examples of a borrowing by Rembrandt, an etching dated 1635 of Christ driving the money-changers from the Temple. His source for the figure of Christ is a woodcut of 1508 by Albrecht Dürer. In his adaptation of Dürer’s strident Christ, Rembrandt looks past the differences in technique between woodcut and etching and the differences in spatial construction and figure placement that distinguish early 16th century from mid-17th-century art. What he is interested in was Dürer’s conception of the theme. Nine years earlier, as a 20-year-old beginner, Rembrandt had painted the same subject, on a panel now in the Pushkin Museum in Moscow. There he shows an infuriated Christ, his face contorted with rage. In the etching, Rembrandt lets himself be convinced by the German master that Christ was acting not out of personal anger but with contained violence. From the way he interrogates and appropriates work of his predecessors, we see that Rembrandt regarded artists like Lucas van Leyden and Albrecht Dürer not as figures from a closed-off past but as colleagues taking on the same challenges with which he was wrestling. In that sense we can grant a point to the critics of celebration. Perhaps for Rembrandt as well, appropriation was a higher form of recognition than tribute. But as we have seen, they were not mutually exclusive. Rembrandt’s tribute to his predecessors was never empty tribute and there is no reason why our celebration of Rembrandt’s birthday, if like the present exhibition it has fresh content and new openings toward his work, should be looked down on. So here’s to you, Rembrandt, and many happy returns of the century!

Gary Schwartz Holland

8

Albrecht Dürer Christ Driving the Money-Changers from the Temple Woodcut, 1508-9, Meder 131

Rembrandt van Rijn Christ Driving the Money-Changers from the Temple (Detail) Etching, 1635, Bartsch 69 i/ii


Contents

Self-Portraits

8

Biblical Works

12

Saints

28

Beggars, Nudes & Daily Life

32

Allegorical Works

38

Landscapes

42

Portraits & Studies of Men & Women

46


10

Self-Portraits


Self-Portrait with Raised Sabre Etching with touches of burin printed in black ink on laid paper 4-13/16 x 3-15/16 inches 1634 Bartsch 18 ii/ii

Self-Portrait in a Velvet Cap with Plume Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-1/4 x 4-1/8 inches 1638 Bartsch 20

11


Left

Self-Portrait Drawing at a Window Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 6-3/8 x 5-3/16 inches 1648 Bartsch 22 v/v

Bottom Left

Rembrandt in a Flat Cap and Embroidered Dress Etching printed in black ink on thin laid paper 3-13/16 x 2-1/2 inches c. 1642 Bartsch 26

Bottom Right

Self-Portrait with Saskia Etching in black ink on laid paper 4-1/4 x 3-11/16 inches 1636 Bartsch 19 ii/ii

12


Self-Portrait Leaning on a Stone Sill

Original etching printed in black ink on laid paper 7-11/16 x 6-3/16 inches 1639 Bartsch 21 ii/ii 13


Biblical Works


Abraham Casting Out Hagar and Ishmael Etching with touches of drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 4-15/16 x 3-13/16 inches 1637 Bartsch 30

The Angel Departing from the Family of Tobias Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 4-1/16 x 6-1/8 inches 1641 Bartsch 43 iii/iv

15


Jacob Caressing Benjamin (formerly known as “Abraham caressing Isaac�) Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 4-11/16 x 3-9/16 inches c. 1637 Bartsch 33 ii/ii

Abraham Entertaining The Angels Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 5-1/4 x 5-3/16 inches 1656 Bartsch 29

16


Abraham’s Sacrifice Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 6-1/8 x 5-3/16 inches 1655 Bartsch 35

17


Joseph Telling His Dream Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-3/8 x 3-3/8 inches c. 1638 Bartsch 37 iii/iii

Joseph’s Coat Brought to Jacob Etching with touches of drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 3-3/16 x 3-1/8 inches c. 1633 Bartsch 38 i/ii

18


Top

The Triumph of Mordecai Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 6-3/4 x 8-3/8 inches c. 1641 Bartsch 40

Bottom

Joseph and Potiphar’s Wife Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-9/16 x 4-1/2 inches 1634 Bartsch 39 ii/ii

19


The Adoration of the Shepherds: With the Lamp Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-1/6 x 5-1/16 inches c. 1654 Bartsch 45 ii/ii

The Adoration of the Shepherds, a Night Piece Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 5-7/8 x 7-13/16 inches c. 1652 Bartsch 46 viii/viii

The Circumcision in the Stable Etching printed in black ink on laid paper  3-3/4 x 5-3/4 inches 1654 Bartsch 47 i/ii

20


Top

The Flight into Egypt: Altered from Seghers Etching with burin and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 8-1/16 x 11-1/8 inches c. 1653 Bartsch 56 vi/vii

Right

The Holy Family Etching in black ink on laid paper 3-3/4 x 2-7/8 inches c. 1632 Bartsch 62

21


Top

The Presentation in the Temple: Oblong Print Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 8-7/16 x 11-3/8 inches c. 1639 Bartsch 49 iv/iv

Left

Presentation in the Temple with the Angel: Small Plate Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 4 x 3-1/16 inches c. 1630 Bartsch 51 ii/ii

22


Top

Christ Disputing with the Doctors: A Sketch Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 4-15/16 x 8-1/2 inches 1652 Bartsch 65 i/iii

Bottom

Christ Preaching (‘La Petite Tombe’) Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 6-1/4 x 8-1/8 inches c. 1652 Bartsch 67

23


Top

The Return of the Prodigal Son Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 6-3/16 x 5-5/16 inches 1636 Bartsch 91

Bottom

Peter and John Healing the Cripple at the Gate of the Temple Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black on laid paper 7-1/8 x 8-9/16 inches 1659 Bartsch 94 iv/iv

24


Top

Christ Driving the Money Changers from the Temple Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-3/8 x 6-11/16 inches 1635 Bartsch 69 i/ii

Bottom

Christ and the Woman of Samaria, Among Ruins Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-5/8 x 4-3/16 inches 1634 Bartsch 71 ii/ii

25


The Raising of Lazarus: Small Plate Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-15/16 x 4-1/2 inches 1642 Bartsch 72 i/ii

The Agony in the Garden Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on thin laid paper 4-3/16 x 3-1/8 inches c. 1657 Bartsch 75

26


The Raising of Lazarus: The Larger Plate Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 14-5/8 x 10-1/16 inches

c. 1632

Bartsch 73 x/x

27


Christ Crucified Between the Two Thieves: An Oval Plate Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on tissue weight laid paper 5-1/4 x 3-7/8 inches c. 1641 Bartsch 79 ii/ii

The Descent from the Cross: By Torchlight Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 8-1/4 x 6-5/16 inches 1654 Bartsch 83

28


Descent from the Cross: Second Plate

Etching and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 20-7/8 x 16 inches

1633

Bartsch 81 II v/v

29


Saints


Top

The Baptism of the Eunuch Etching printed in black ink on China paper 7-3/16 x 8-1/2 inches 1641 Bartsch 98 ii/ii

Bottom

The Death of the Virgin Etching with drypoint printed in black ink on heavy laid paper 16-3/16 x 12-3/8 inches 1639 Bartsch 99 iii/iii

31


Top

St. Jerome in a Dark Chamber Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-3/4 x 6-5/8 inches 1642 Bartsch 105 ii/ii

Left

Saint Jerome Kneeling in Prayer, Looking Down Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-7/16 x 3-1/8 inches 1635 Bartsch 102

32


Top

St. Francis Beneath a Tree, Praying Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 7-1/8 x 9-5/8 inches 1657 Bartsch 107 ii/ii

Right

Saint Jerome Reading Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-5/16 x 3-1/2 inches 1634 Bartsch 100

33


Beggars, Nudes & Daily Beggars & Daily Life L ife


Top Right

The Card Player Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-9/16 x 3-1/4 inches 1641 Bartsch 136 i/ii Bottom Left

The Goldsmith Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 3 x 2-3/16 inches 1655 Bartsch 123 ii/ii Bottom Right

The Persian Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-1/4 x 3 inches 1632 Bartsch 152

35


Top Left

Beggar Man and Woman Behind a Bank Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 3-15/16 x 2-11/16 inches c. 1630 Bartsch 165 ix/ix

Top Right

A Peasant in a High Cap, Standing Leaning on a Stick Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-5/16 x 1-3/4 inches 1639 Bartsch 133

Bottom Left

Man in a Coat and Fur Cap, Leaning Against a Bank Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-7/16 x 3-1/8 inches c. 1630 Bartsch 151 ii/iii

36


The Rat Catcher (‘The Rat-Poison Peddler’) Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-3/8 x 4-7/8 inches 1632 Bartsch 121 iii/iii

37


Top Right

A Woman Making Water Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-1/4 x 2-9/16 1631 Bartsch 191

Top Left

The Artist Drawing from a Model Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on thin laid paper 9-3/8 x 7-1/4 inches c. 1639 Bartsch 192 ii/ii

Bottom Left

Beggar Woman Leaning on a Stick Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 3-1/8 x 2-1/2 inches 1646 Bartsch 170

38


Top

Nude Man Seated Before a Curtain Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 6-7/16 x 3-13/16 inches 1646 Bartsch 193 i/ii

Bottom

Nude Man Seated on the Ground with one Leg Extended Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-13/16 x 6-9/16 inches 1646 Bartsch 196 ii/ii

39


Allegorical Works Beggars & Daily Life


The Star of Kings: A Night Piece Etching with touches of drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 3-11/16 x 5-5/8 inches

c. 1651

Bartsch 113

The Ship of Fortune Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-3/8 x 6-1/2 inches

1633

Bartsch 111 ii/ii

41


Medea; The Marriage of Jason and Creusa Etching printed in black ink with touches of drypoint on laid paper 9-1/12 x 7 inches 1648 Bartsch 112 iv/v

42


Faust Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 8-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches c. 1652 Bartsch 270 iii/iii

43


Landscapes Beggars & Daily Life


Landscape with a Cottage and a Large Tree Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-15/16 x 12-11/16 inches c. 1641 Bartsch 226

Cottage Beside a Canal: A View of Diemen Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-5/8 x 8-5/16 inches c. 1645 Bartsch 228 45


Cottages and Farm Buildings with a Man Sketching Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-3/16 x 8-5/16 inches c. 1645 Bartsch 219

Landscape with an Obelisk Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 3-5/16 x 6-3/8 inches

46

c. 1650

Bartsch 227 ii/ii


Portraits & Studies of Men & Women


Jan Antonides Van Der Linden Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on thin laid paper 4-7/8 x 4-1/16 inches 1655 Bartsch 264 v/v

Man At a Desk Wearing a Cross and Chain Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 6-1/8 x 4-1/16 inches 1641 Bartsch 261 iv/iv

49


Old Man with a Beard, Fur Cap, and Velvet Cloak Etching printed in black ink on thin laid paper 5-7/8 x 5-3/16 inches 1632 Bartsch 262 ii/iii

Bearded Man, In a Furred Oriental Cap and Robe: The Artist’s Father Etching and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 5-9/16 x 4-13/16 inches 1631 Bartsch 263 iv/iv

50


Old Man Shading His Eyes With His Hand Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 5-3/8 x 4-7/16 inches c. 1639 Bartsch 259

Old Man with a Divided Fur Cap Etching with some drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 6 x 5-1/2 inches 1640 Bartsch 265 i/ii

51


Jan Cornelis Sylvius Etching with drypoint printed in black ink on thin laid paper 6-5/8 x 5-5/8 inches 1623 Bartsch 266 ii/ii

Samuel Manasseh Ben Isreal, Jewish Author Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-15/16 x 4-1/4 inches 1636 Bartsch 269 iii/iii

52


Cornelis Claesz Anslo, Preacher Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 6-7/8 x 6-1/8 inches 1641 Bartsch 271 i/ii

Clement De Jonghe Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 8-1/8 x 6-3/8 inches 1651 Bartsch 272 v/vi

53


Jan Lutma, Goldsmith Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 7-7/8 x 5-15/16 inches 1656 Bartsch 276 ii/iii

Jan Asselyn, Painter (“Krabbetje�) Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 7-1/2 x 6-5/8 inches c. 1647 Bartsch 277 iii/iii

54


The Second Oriental Head Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-15/16 x 4-15/16 inches c. 1635 Bartsch 287

55


Lieven Willemsz. van Coppenol, The Smaller Plate Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 9-1/8 x 7-3/4 inches c. 1658 Bartsch 282 v/vi

Jan Uytenbogaert, Preacher of the Remonstrants Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 8-7/8 x 7-3/8 inches 1635 Bartsch 279 v/vi

56


Jan Uytenbogaert, The Gold-Weigher Etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 10 x 8 inches c. 1639 Bartsch 281 ii/ii 57


Top

Bust of a Man Wearing a High Cap, Three-Quarters Right: The Artist’s Father (?) Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 4-1/16 x 3-5/16 inches 1630 Bartsch 321 ii/ii

Bottom

Abraham Francen, Apothecary

Etching with drypoint and burin printed in black ink on laid paper 6-1/8 x 8-1/16 inches c. 1657 Bartsch 273 x/x

58


Top

The First Oriental Head Etching with some drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 5-15/16 x 4-15/16 inches 1635 Bartsch 286 ii/iii

Bottom Left

Old Man with a Flowing Beard: Bust Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 2-11/16 x 2-5/8 inches 1631 Bartsch 315 ii/ii

Bottom Right

Bust of an Old Man with a Flowing Beard: The Head Bowed Forward; Left Shoulder Unshaded Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-11/16 x 3-1/8 inches 1630 Bartsch 325

59


Top Left

The Artist’s Mother, Head and Bust: Three Quarters Right Etching printed in black ink on China paper 2-9/16 x 2-1/2 inches 1628 Bartsch 354 ii/ii

Top Right

The Artist’s Mother with her Hand on her Chest: Small Bust Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 3-3/4 x 2-11/16 inches 1631 Bartsch 349 i/ii

Bottom

The Artist’s Mother Seated at a Table, Looking Right: Three Quarter Length Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-7/8 x 5-1/8 inches c. 1631 Bartsch 343 ii/ii

60


Top Left

The Little Jewish Bride (Saskia as St. Catherine) Etching with touches of drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper 4-7/16 x 3-1/16 inches 1638 Bartsch 342

Top Right

Old Woman Sleeping Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 2-11/16 x 2-1/16 inches c. 1635-7 Bartsch 350

Bottom

Three Heads of Women, One Asleep Etching printed in black ink on laid paper 5-9/16 x 3-3/4 inches 1637 Bartsch 368

61


Front Cover: Self-Portrait with Raised Sabre (Detail) Etching with touches of burin, 1634 Back Cover: Old Woman Sleeping Etching, c.1635-7 Etched in Time: Rembrandt The Printmaker Published by Christopher-Clark Fine Art, San Francisco Art Direction by Mark Miles Layout by Mike Bennewitz Š 2006 Christopher-Clark Fine Art


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Etched In Time: Rembrandt The Printmaker  

A retrospective of Rembrandt's Etchings for his 400th birthday featuring works from Christopher Clark Fine Art's collection

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