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Cook Book


Allotment: Allotment: A A plot plot of of land land let let by by WAM WAM for for the the cultivation cultivation of of herbs, herbs, flower, flower, fruit and vegetable crops andcrops recreational gardening. fruit and vegetable and recreational gardening. 1.1 These rules and conditions are made under Section 28 of the Small Holdings and Allotments Act 1908 and apply to all allotment Tenants, and members of Groups to whom Group tenancies have been granted.

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10.1 Tenants may erect one shed and one greenhouse on their plot. (Allotment rules and conditions As from 1st October 2013) The structure will not, (a) straddle any path on site (b) cast any shade on another plot or obstruct access to it (c) use materials considered by WAM to be dangerous (e.g. asbestos). Proposed dimensions: Length: max 8 ft – circa 2.4m Width max 6 ft – circa 1.8m Height: max 8ft WAM form Permission to erect a structure

Building a Shed Take a large secondhand Shed, Cut it in half, Choose suitable location. Lay down foundations: Erect and preserve

Type of base: Concrete strips Paved Hard core and paved Raised on blocks (protected by wire mesh)

Other (please specify)


Rhubarb is a rhizomatous perennial whose stems (‘sticks’) grown as vegetable but used mainly as a dessert. It crops over a long period, is completely hardy and grows in any garden soil. Common name: Rhubarb Botanical name: Rheum x hybridum Group: Vegetable Flowering time: Early spring to late summer (April until July) Planting time Winter (November until March) Height and spread Up to 1m (5ft) high and 1m (5ft) wide Aspect Sun Hardiness Fully hardy Difficulty Easy

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Advice/profile?PID=544

Rhubarb Crumble Ingredients

method

filling:

Combine the filling ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat and cook, until rhubarb is soft but firm.

rhubarb, cut into 1cm pieces caster sugar

Turn out into a small oven-proof dish (the rhubarb must cover the bottom of the dish)

topping: whole wheat flour caster sugar unsalted butter, cold and diced

Combine the flour and baking powder in a mixing bowl. Add the butter and rub into the flour mixture with your hands until you achieve a coarse texture like breadcrumbs.

Demerara sugar chopped almonds

http://www.cooksister.com/2007/04/easter_2007_rhu.html#sthash.5ut00j0y.dpu


Beetroot are easy to grow and ideal for anyone new to vegetable gardening. For best results, sow beetroot little and often, harvesting the roots when they are young, tender and the size of a golf ball. For best results, sow beetroot little and often, harvesting the roots when they are young, tender and the size of a golf ball. The leaves can also be eaten. Common name: beetroot Botanical name: Beta vulgaris ‘Regala’ Group: Vegetable Planting time: When the seedlings are about 2.5cm (1in) high thin out to leave one seedling per 10cm (4in) station. Water every 10-14 days in dry spells.

Roast Beetroot Soup

ingredients

500g beetroot 2-3 large Swiss chard or beetroot leaves 1.5 litres homemade chicken stock 1 tbsp olive oil 4 shallots or 1 onion finely chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 celery sticks, chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed salt and pepper yoghurt or sour cream to serve Preheat oven to 180 degrees. Tear the leaves off the beetroot, but don’t cut off the roots. Scrub the roots clean and roast for about an hour. Chop up the chard or beetroot leaves and boil in half the stock for 5 - 10 minutes. In a pan gently fry the onion, celery, carrot and garlic being careful not to burn them. Add to the saucepan with the stock. Cover and simmer for 8 minutes. Rub the skins off the beetroot and and chop. Put in a food processor or blender with some of the stock and blend, slowly adding the rest of the stock. Put through a sieve. Add water if the soup is too thick. Season to taste and serve with a spoonful of yoghurt or sour cream.

The recipe comes from Sarah Raven’s Garden Cookbook (All Rights Reserved.) http://www.sarahraven.com/seasonalrecipes


Photograpy courtesy of Joannie Magill (All Rights Reserved.) http://springsummerautumnwinterspring.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/beetroot


These cool-climate plants do well in northern regions and will tolerate part shade, although the fruits will ripen more quickly and taste sweeter if given some full sun.

Common name: Redcurrant Botanical name: Ribes rubrum Group: Fruit Planting time: November and March Water during long, dry spells and weed regularly. http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/fruit/redcurrants

Red Currant Jelly Ingredients: 2 lb (900 g) redcurrants 2 lb (900 g) sugar (to speed dissolving, this can be warmed in the oven) You will also need 1 pack muslin from the chemists, 1 large nylon sieve, waxed discs and two 0.5 litre jars.

Method: The first easy thing is that there’s no need to go through the tedious business of stripping the currants from the stalks. Just place the washed fruit – stalks and all – in a preserving pan, bring slowly to the boil and stir, pressing the redcurrants to break down the fruit and release the juice. As soon as the fruit is cooked (about 10 minutes), add the sugar, stir until absolutely dissolved, then bring the mixture up to a rapid boil, and boil for 8 minutes. Meanwhile, place a large nylon sieve over a bowl and line it with a double layer of gauze. Then, when the 8 minutes are up, tip the whole lot into the sieve and let it drip through. If you don’t mind not having a completely clear jelly, you can press to extract as much as possible. Then pour the jelly into the jars, which have been washed, dried and heated in a moderate oven for 5 minutes, cover with waxed discs and seal while still hot.

This recipe is taken from Delia Smith’s Complete Cookery Course, Delia Smith’s Complete Illustrated Cookery Course and How to Cook Book Two. http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/type-of-dish/preserve/redcurrant-jelly.html


The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is an herbaceous annual that grows up to 100 cm (40 inches) tall and produces a tuber, also called potato - so rich in starch that it ranks as the world’s fourth most important food crop, after maize, wheat and rice. The potato belongs to the Solanaceae - or “nightshade”- family of flowering plants, and shares the genus Solanum with at least 1,000 other species, including the tomato and eggplant. http://seeog.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Cheap-as-chips-factsheet-feb-2012.pdf

Bombay potatoes Anjum Anand's Bombay potatoes, just like you find in your local Indian restaurant, are simple to recreate and go with almost anything. TIPS AND SUGGESTIONS If you like your food extra spicy, feel free to add two or more teaspoons of chilli powder to the potatoes. Ingredients

method

3 large potatoes, halved 15 g fresh ginger 3 garlic cloves 2 large tomatoes, 1 quartered and the 1 cut in to slim wedges 4 tbsp vegetable oil ¾ tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp mustard seeds 1 large onion, roughly

1. Bring a large pot of water to the boil and salt it well. Place in the potatoes and boil until just tender (up to 30 minutes). When cool enough to handle, peel and chop into 2.5cm cubes. 2. Blend together the ginger, garlic and quartered

http://goodfood.uktv.co.uk/recipe/bombay-potatoes/


Quintessentially British, runner beans are one of the easiest of all vegetables to grow. To many people summer is incomplete without them. From the classic wigwam of redflowered, green-podded beans to dwarf cultivars and white or bi-coloured flowers, ‘runners’ can add an ornamental as well as productive dimension to the garden. Common name: Scarlet runner bean Botanical name: Papilionaceae Group: Vegetable Planting time: mid-May until July Flowering time: Early spring to late summer (April until July) Length: 15-20cm (6-8in) long Aspect Sun

http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=667

Masaledar Sem (Spicy Green Beans) Sowing seeds indoors gives a faster and more reliable germination rate, particularly for runner beans.

Masaledar Sem (Spicy Green Beans) Ingredients 1 1/2 lb green beans, trimmed and cut in half crosswise. 2 inches fresh ginger, peeled and chopped coarsely. 10 cloves garlic peeled 1/2 cup chopped onions 1 cup water 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 3 teaspoons whole cumin seeds 2 teaspoons ground coriander seeds 2 medium tomatoes, peeled and finely chopped 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne Freshly ground pepper 3 tablespoons lemon juice

method Heat the oil in a wide, heavy saucepan over a medium flame. When hot, put in the cumin seeds. Stir for half a minute. Add the ginger-garlic paste. Stir and cook for about two minutes. Put in the coriander and stir a few times.Add the chopped tomatoes. Stir and cook for 2 minutes, mashing the tomato pieces with the back of a slotted spoon. Add the beans and salt and one cup of water. Bring to simmer. Cover, turn heat to low and cook for 8-10 minutes or until the beans are tender enough. Remove the cover. Add the lemon juice and lots of freshly ground pepper. Turn up the heat and boil away the remaining liquid, stirring the beans gently as you do so.

Put ginger, garlic and onion into a food processor and add 1/2 cup water. Blend until fairly smooth. http://dinnercoop.cs.cmu.edu/dinnercoop/Recipes/sanjiv/MasaledarSem.html


Leeks are a flavoursome winter vegetable that can be steamed or boiled, braised in a cheese sauce and used in soups and stews. Leeks are easy to grow, but need looking after, you need to sow them in containers or a separate part of the garden before moving them to their final position. Sow leek seed in spring and you will be picking leeks from autumn to late winter. Common name: leek Botanical name: Allium ampeloprasum Group: Vegetable Planting time: Februray - April Water during long, dry spells and weed regularly. http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/leeks?type=v#harvest

leek, potato and cheese soup By Emily Christopher Serves: 6 Hands-on time: 10 minutes Total time: 30 minutes INGREDIENTS: 2 tsp olive oil 3 large leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and finely sliced into semicircles Pinch each sea salt and fresh ground black pepper 3 Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and diced 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth 2 cups low-fat milk Pinch ground nutmeg 1/2 cup grated low-fat sharp cheddar cheese INSTRUCTIONS: In a large saucepan, heat oil on medium-high. Add leeks, salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until very soft, about 5 minutes. add potatoes and broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until potatoes soften, 8 to 10 minutes. Add milk and nutmeg, stir and cook until heated through, about 3 minutes. Using a ladle or large spoon, carefully remove 2 cups soup and transfer to an upright blender; purée until smooth, about 2 minutes. Return purée to saucepan, add cheese and stir just until cheese melts. Ladle into serving bowls, dividing evenly. Nutrients per 1-cup serving: Calories: 202, Total Fat: 4 g, Sat. Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 32 g, Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 7 g, Protein: 11 g, Sodium: 176 mg, Cholesterol: 6 mg OPTION: If you’d like to add a bit more color and texture to this puréed soup, garnish it with 2 tbsp chopped fresh Italian parsley or an additional sprinkling of nutmeg.


Globe artichokes are large, architectural perennial plants, related to the thistle. A robust herbaceous perennial to 2.5m forming a clump of silvery-grey, pinnatifid, spiny leaves up to 1m in length. which are grown for their large edible flower buds and ornamental enough for the flower garden. Its leaves are edible, as is the bottom part of the flower, called the heart (which you can also buy canned or frozen). Common name: Globe Artichoke Botanical name: Cynara scolymus Plant Range: Mediterranean Large thistle-like purple flowers in late summer and autumn https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/76926/i-Cynara-cardunculus-i/Details

Herby Artichoke Casserole Ingredients 2 tbsp olive oil 1 stalk celery, chopped 1 onion, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 1 parsnip, chopped 1 turnip, peeled and chopped 1 tbsp chopped fresh oregano 1 tbsp fresh rosemary leaves 1 tsp lemon thyme leaves 500ml/18fl oz vegetable stock 400g/14oz canned flageolet beans 200g/7oz jar artichoke hearts, drained 2 tbsp chopped parsley Preparation method Add the oil, celery, onion, carrots, parsnip and turnip to a large pan. Put the herbs into the pan and fry until soft and browning slightly. Add the stock and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the beans and artichokes and simmer for another five minutes. Add the chopped parsley at the end and serve. Recipe: Nigel Slater - http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/herby_artichoke_25299

Globe artichokes make a delicious starter simply boiled whole and served with melted butter, mayonnaise, hollandaise or vinaigrette for dipping the leaves. Break off each leaf and draw the soft fleshy base through your teeth. Once you’ve removed all the leaves, you can pull or slice off the hairy ‘choke’ and then eat the heart and the meaty bottom with the remaining sauce.


These cool-climate plants do well in northern regions and will tolerate part shade, although the fruits will ripen more quickly and taste sweeter if given some full sun.

Common name: Redcurrant Botanical name: Ribes rubrum Group: Fruit Planting time: November and March Water during long, dry spells and weed regularly. http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/fruit/redcurrants

Strawberry Eton Mess Eton mess is a traditional English dessert consisting of a mixture of strawberries, pieces of meringue, and cream, which is traditionally served at Eton College's annual cricket game against the pupils of Harrow School. This recipe uses bottled fresh pomegranate juice to encourage the strawberries to ooze out their fragrant summery juices. If you're making this with out-of-season strawberries, then you stand a chance of using freshly squeezed pomegranate juice, in which case, sprinkle some seeds on top of this voluptuous mound of meringue and berryspiked cream.

Ingredients 500 grams strawberries 2 teaspoons caster sugar (or vanilla sugar) 2 teaspoons pomegranate juice 500 ml whipping cream 4 small meringue nests (from a packet) Chop the strawberries and put into a bowl. Add the sugar and pomegranate juice and leave to macerate while you whip the cream. Whip the cream in a large bowl until thick but still soft. Roughly crumble in 4 meringues nests - you will need chunks for texture, as well as a little fine dust. Take out a ladleful, or about 100g / ½ cup, of the chopped strawberries, and fold the meringued cream and rest of the fruit mixture together. Arrange on four serving plates or glasses, or in a mound, and top each one with some of the remaining macerated strawberries. http://www.nigella.com/recipes/view/eton-mess-19


Allotment Plot 291


Weeding and Rotavating and laying down paths

Traditional gardeners were very keen on digging over ground with a spade and this method can still be useful for small areas or where extra depth of cultivation is needed. Modern rotavators though, are much quicker. Royal Horticultural Society advice on Rotavating: Consider hiring a mechanical rotavator to do the cultivation for you if time runs short. Light soils can be handled by a two to five horse power model, but hard or heavy soil needs a larger model. Rotavating wet soil is extremely damaging; wait for drier conditions


Courgettes are so easy to grow – and you get so many courgettes from each plant. Courgette plants do like to spread out (about a square metre/yard each) Keep the soil constantly moist by watering around the plants, not over them. Harvest courgettes when 10-12.5cm (4-5in) long. Regularly picking courgettes while they are small will ensure a long cropping period. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/courgettes?type=v

slow cooked courgette pasta Watch as the pan full of courgettes collapses into a thick and unctuous sauce. Very low and very slow is the key. Don’t be shy of having a play by adding some fresh herbs to the final mix or a pinch or 2 of dried chilli.

Ingredients

method

500g courgettes, very finely sliced 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped lemon 1 tablespoon crème fraiche 200g pasta of your choosing parmesan or pecorino

Heap the slices into a sauce pan with 2 tbsps of olive. Add a pinch of salt and cook on a low heat for about 20 mins, they should start to cook and reduce. Stir every so often and make sure they aren’t catching on the bottom of the pan. Add the garlic and continue to cook for another 15 mins, adding a dash of water now and then if it starts to catch. Meanwhile cook your pasta. Season the courgettes with salt, pepper and a squeeze or 2 of lemon juice. Stir in the crème fraiche, some good olive oil and a dash of the pasta water to loosen. Mix with the drained pasta and top with a generous grating of cheese.

Recipe by Riverford cook Bob Andrew http://www.riverford.co.uk/recipes/view/recipe/slow-cooked-


Carrots come in shapes and colours other than long and orange – look out for round carrots, as well as unusual colours such as red and yellow, there are even purple carrots. Carrots can be grown in containers if you are short on space, or if your soil is heavy clay or very stony. Sow regularly for prolonged cropping.They freeze and store well too, but like most vegetables, carrots taste best freshly picked from the garden. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/carrots?type=v

Carrot & Parsnip Shepherd’s Pie Ingredients

method

2 cups roughly chopped and peeled carrots 3 cups roughly chopped and peeled parsnips 3 tablespoons butter 1/2 cup whole milk or heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon salt black pepper

Place the carrots and parsnips in a pot and cover with water. Add a pinch of salt and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 30 -40 minutes until very soft. While the roots are simmering melt the 3 tablespoons of the butter and milk together. Purée the cooked roots and melted butter/milk mixture together in a food processor or with an immersion blender. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and as much black pepper as you’d like. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Place the lentils and stock in a pot. Bring to a boil, then simmer uncovered for about 20 minutes until the lentils are very soft. Add more liquid if necessary, drain the lentils at the end of cooking. In a cast iron skillet, cook the onions, garlic, and rosemary over medium low heat until onions are softened. Add wine, water or stock, and tomato paste. Stir to incorporate tomato paste. Cook over low heat until the liquid thickens and the mixture is moist, but not watery. Taste and adjust salt and pepper if necessary. Spread the purée over the top and broil for 2 -3 minutes or until the crust starts to brown.

Filling: 1 1/2 cups lentils 4 cups vegetable stock 1 onion 3 cloves garlic 1 tablespoon butter 1/4 cup dry red wine 1 teaspoon dry or 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary 2 tablespoons tomato paste

http://www.earlymorningfarm.com/vegetarian-carrot-parsnip-shepherds-pie/


Chard needs an open sunny site in rich, moisture-retentive free-draining soil, although it can tolerate some shade in summer. It is similar to, but easier to grow, than spinach as it is less likely to go to seed in dry weather and one sowing produces a crop that lasts many months. Water before the onset of drought; mulch when the soil is warm and moist. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/chard?type=v

Cheesy chard gratin Double cream turns green and flavoursome chard into something super-indulgent- be sure to mop up all the Gruyère sauce with some crusty bread

Ingredients

Method

bunch chard, about 340g 150ml double cream 1 tbsp wholegrain mustard (or gluten-free alternative) 140g Gruyère, coarsely grated butter, for greasing 2 tbsp finely grated Parmesan (or vegetarian alternative)

Heat oven to 200C/180C fan/ gas 6. Strip the chard leaves from the stalks, then cut the stalks into sticks. bring a pan of water to the boil and cook the stalks for 3-4 mins until starting to soften. Then throw in the leaves for a few moments too so that they just wilt.

Recipe from Good Food magazine, November 2013

Drain well. Mix the cream with the mustard, then toss through the chard with most of the Gruyère. Grease a medium gratin dish, spread the chard mix over, then scatter with the remaining Gruyère and the Parmesan. bake for 30 mins until bubbling and golden. Serve straight from the dish.

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/cheesy-chard-gratin


Onions need a sunny, sheltered site with fertile, well-drained soil. Plant onion sets 10cm (4in) apart in rows 30cm (12in) apart from mid-March to mid-April. Gently push the sets into soft, well-worked soil so that the tip is just showing, and firm the soil around them. Water if the weather is dry and give an occasional feed with a general liquid fertiliser. A light feed of sulphate of potash in June will help ripen the bulbs ready for storage. Mulching the soil will help conserve soil moisture and keep down weeds. Stop watering and feeding once the onions have swollen, and remove any mulch or soil to expose the bulb to the sun. Remove any flower spikes as soon as you see them https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/onions/

Caramelised red onion chutney Ingredients

Method

8 red onions 1 red chilli 2 bay leaves 25ml olive oil 200g brown sugar 150ml balsamic vinegar 150ml red wine vinegar

Step 1: Cut your onions and chilli into short, thin slices and put them into a pan with the bay leaves and oil. Cook gently over a low heat for about 20 minutes.

This recipe is taken from The SuperJam Cookbook by Fraser Doherty (Ebury, ÂŁ10.99)

Step 2: Once the onions are dark and sticky, add the sugar and the vinegars and simmer for 30 minutes or so, until the chutney is thick and dark. Step 3: Pour the chutney into hot, sterilised jars and let it cool. Ideally, you should leave it for a month or more before you eat it, to mature in flavour. http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/aug/03/caramelised-red-onion-chutney-recipe


Pumpkins need a sunny position, plenty of water and shelter from cold winds.. The fruit of pumpkins should be supported off the soil on a piece of tile or glass. Let the fruit mature and colour on the plant and remove before the first frost strikes. If storing, allow skins to harden in the sun.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/pumpkin

Mussel, pumpkin and saffron soup Ingredients

Method

I50g/1¾oz butter 1 onion, roughly chopped 250ml/9fl oz white wine 500g/1lb 2oz mussels (rinsed, de-bearded, discard any mussels that do not close tightly when tapped) 500g/1lb 2oz pumpkin, peeled, seeds removed, roughly chopped 2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped 2 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only 400ml/14fl oz vegetable stock 125ml/4½fl oz double cream 2 star anise small pinch saffron 1 lime, juice only salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 tbsp red-veined sorrel cress or chopped fresh herbs, to garnish (optional)

Melt 2 tbsp. of the butter in a heavy-bottomed medium pot over medium heat. Add shallots, and cook until soft, about 2 minutes. Add mussels, wine, and 1 cup water; increase heat to medium-high and cook, stirring frequently, until mussels open, about 5 minutes. Strain mussels through a colander set over a medium bowl. Set broth aside. Remove mussels from their shells (discard any that don’t open), and discard shells. Set mussels aside.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/mussel_pumpkin_ and_73735

Melt remaining 4 tbsp. butter in same pot over medium heat. Add pumpkin, and cook, stirring often, until soft and lightly golden, about 15 minutes. Add reserved mussel broth, and simmer until pumpkin is very soft and broth thickens slightly, about 10 minutes. Working in batches, puree pumpkin in a blender until smooth. Return puree to pot over medium-low heat, add mussels, season to taste with salt and pepper, and heat until warm (do not boil). Serve in warmed soup bowls, and garnish with parsley. http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Light-Musseland-Pumpkin-Soup


Raspberries are really popular summer fruits and are very easy to grow. Just a few raspberry plants will reward you with plenty of fruit from midsummer until mid autumn. If you end up with a glut, raspberries also freeze well. Raspberries can be grown in any size garden, Raspberries thrive in moisture-retentive, fertile, slightly acidic soils, which are welldrained and weed free. They dislike soggy soils and shallow chalky soils. For best results, plant in a sheltered, sunny position; although they will tolerate part shade. Raspberries can be planted any time during the dormant season, between November and March, providing the soil is not frozen or waterlogged. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/fruit/raspberries

Elderflower & raspberry jelly Method A delicate dessert bursting with berry fruit flavours, subtle floral notes and the sparkling fizz of Prosecco Ingredients 300g raspberry juice 1 lemon 1 tbsp golden caster sugar 2 leaves gelatine 50ml elderflower cordial 250ml Prosecco a few elderflowers, to decorate (optional)

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/3159685/ elderflower-and-raspberry-jelly

Arrange half of the raspberries (choose similar-sized ones) in 2 x 150ml darioles or moulds. Cut the remaining raspberries into halves and place in a mixing bowl. Squeeze over the lemon juice and sprinkle with caster sugar, then toss. Cover and chill in the fridge. Put the gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water to soften. Pour the cordial and 50ml of the Prosecco into a saucepan. Heat until just simmering, then take off the heat. Take the softened gelatine leaves out of the bowl and squeeze out the excess water. Put them in the saucepan and whisk together to combine. Reduce the temperature until it’s cool enough to touch (try placing the pan in a shallow sink of cold water). Once the liquid is cool, gently add the remaining Prosecco and stir. The more gently you stir, the more fizz you will have in your jelly. Carefully pour into the jelly moulds. Put the moulds onto a metal tray and place in the fridge. They will take 3-4 hrs to set. To serve, turn out the jelly onto a plate and spoon over the macerated raspberries. Decorate the plate with a few elderflowers or try sprinkling a little cracked black pepper over the top, if you like.


http://www.chrisbowers.co.uk/product/rasp-glenlyon/


Cook Book

CJ Taylor and Catherine Mayo

2015

Allotment book  

version 4