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ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

O U T W A R D

R E B O U N D

R E C H A R G E , R E N E W, A N D R E E N E R G I Z E IN THE WONDER OF THE WILD

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Carolina Hook & Line Co.’s fishing charter takes to the waters near Murrells Inlet. For more, see “Coastal Bounty,” page 58.

JULY 2021

TOWNCAROLINA.COM


WANDER.. WANDER U.S. NATIONAL WHITEWATER CENTER

Charlotte. A lot of pockets of this city are simply begging to be explored. You’ll quickly find that those who wander are never lost in this humming metropolis surrounded by natural beauty that boasts lush landscapes, natural havens, and even whitewater rapids. Plan your trip at charlottesgotalot.com.


@ charlottesgotalot

charlottesgotalot.com


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MAGNOLIA HALL

ELGIN, SC

455 McKinney Road $10,399,681 102 Island View Circle $5,999,045 5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 4 Half Bathrooms

6 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms, 4 Half Bathrooms

5 Bedrooms, 8 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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SIMPSONVILLE

ALTA VISTA

1908 Roe Ford Road $3,950,617

209 Privello Place $2,200,681

711 Crescent Avenue $2,200,601

5 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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THE FAIRWAY AT GREEN VALLEY

228 Byrd Blvd $2,100,605

58 Rock Creek $1,950,605

14 Tall Poplar $1,175,617

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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201 Kilgore Circle $1,099,681

DOWNTOWN

AUGUSTA ROAD

1027 S Main Unit 100 $999,601

104 Tomassee Ave $925,605

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

SIMPSONVILLE


Marketing said to soften her image.

One McDaniel Greene, Greenville, South Carolina 29601

864-325-2112 Joan Herlong, Greater Greenville’s Number One Realtor of the Decade. Source: MLS Sales Volume 2010-2019. Each affiliate independently owned and operated.


BECAUSE YOU K NOW TH E SE MOM E N TS D ON ’ T LAST FOR EVE R ... OWN TH E O NE S TH AT D O.

Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 and 3430 Walhalla Highway, Six Mile, SC 29682, Lauren Fine Buckland, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales NC, LLC, 1908 Brevard Road, Arden, NC 28704, Lauren Fine Buckland, Broker-in-Charge. Copyright: © 2021 Cliffs Land Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.


THE CLIFFS AT KEOWEE SPRINGS

126 Waterfern Court | $6,500,000 5 Bedrooms | 5 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bath | 4,500+ sq. ft.

THE CLIFFS AT GLASSY

8028 Glassy Ridge Road | $2,795,000 3 Bedrooms | 3 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bath | 5,000+ sq. ft.

THE CLIFFS VALLEY

39 Mountain Oak Lane | $1,900,000 5 Bedrooms | 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bath | 7,000+ sq. ft.

THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK

125 Duck Hawk Way | $1,350,000 3 Bedrooms | 3 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bath | 4,200+ sq. ft.

Mountain & Lake Keowee Real Estate in Seven Private Club Communities. An Active and Elevated Lifestyle Awaits You and Your Family. Plan Your Real Estate Tour | 864.326.3126 | cliffsliving.com/town

I N S P I R I N G I N EV E RY D I R E C T I O N


First Glance

Photograph by Blair Knobel

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Dawn breaks over the Blue Ridge Mountains at Blue Ridge Mountain Club in the High Country of North Carolina. For more, see “Mountains Beyond Mountains,” page 52.

southerngirlchic.com 2815 Woodruff Road, Suite 106, Simpsonville @southern_girl_chic

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PLACES TO PLAY DISCOVER T HE WONDERS OF HART NESS


EMBRAC E T HE F UN YOU C RAVE Whether you’re young or old, everyone needs a place to play. From a competitive match to a leisurely outing, play brings balance to your life. But let’s be honest, loading up and heading out often makes us postpone the fun we desire. That’s why Hartness created a community that makes playing easy. From pools, ponds, and trails to a sports garden, racquet club, and fitness center, new pleasures await you daily. So ride, fish, hike, kayak, volley, and hoop to your heart’s content. And then stroll to your back door, with the satisfaction of knowing you’ve found a place to play.

HARTNESS -LIVE THE LIFE YOU LOVE 864.920.0375 / HARTNESSLIVING.COM Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal notice. Prices and availability subject to change. All specifications supplied by builder/seller, and subject to change or modification. It is the responsibility of the buyer or buyer’s agent to verify. Equal housing opportunity – Dan Collins, Broker-in-Charge / Collins & Fine, LLC


Contents

JULY 2021

78 CALL OF THE WILD

The allure of the outdoors never gets old. From flyfishing on the Chattooga to tubing on the French Broad River, we present six Southeastern adventures for every bucket list. by John Jeter, Lauren maxwell,

Libby mcMillan Henson, J. Morgan McCallum & Jac Valitchka

“The river’s rush is soothing and stimulating at once, and you understand why it is that this river runs through the hearts and dreams of many a fisherman (or woman).” —Jac Valitchka

Illustration by Jamie Green

ON THE COVER

Experience an Atlantic adventure through Murrells Inlet’s Carolina Hook & Line Co. For more, see “Coastal Bounty,” page 58. Photograph by Stephen Christopher.

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A bold step forward for the next generation.

The 2021 C 300 Sedan

The C-Class wraps technological advances in seductive style. With turbo power, nine speeds, and the year-round grip of available 4MATIC® allwheel drive, the C-Class has the agility, strength and confidence to match the beauty of its well-toned body.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com (864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road | Greenville, SC 29607


Under the guidance of Thomas Keller–trained chef Drew Erickson, CAMP takes patrons on a culinary adventure. by m. Linda Lee

16 EDITOR’S LETTER 21 THE LIST 27 ON THE TOWN 35 WEDDINGS 70 ESSAY 72 MS. BEA WRIGHT 74 MAN ABOUT TOWN 76 TOWN EXTRA 95 DINING GUIDE 102 TOWNSCENE 108 SECOND GLANCE

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Contents

INSIDE SCOOP Escape the heat with a smooth treat from Clare’s Creamery, now open in Overbrook. by Ruta Fox

41 5155 57 6355 87 TOWNBUZZ

ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

EAT + DRINK

Artist Samara Phillips crafts delicate chimes that make meaningful gifts; C.O.R.E. Grow Strong’s Currie Gossett launches her wellness studio in Overbrook; get lost in a Zen state via The Labyrinth Company’s peaceful paths.

Nestled between Boone and Blowing Rock, Blue Ridge Mountain Club is a High Country paradise, perfect for weekend retreats (or even a second home).

With owner Stephen Christopher and Captain Caleb Hartley helming the adventures, Carolina Hook & Line Co. guarantees an exciting day out on the water.

Stay shaded and sleek with these multiuse summer hats; fashion blogger Jenny Hall offers clothing for all at her new Augusta Street boutique, Harringtons.

Table 301’s CAMP serves up modern American fare in the Camperdown Plaza; ice cream at Clare’s Creamery in Overbrook is an exquisite experience; this is not your mama’s chicken salad recipe, but it might be yours.


The Smart Money is on The Furman Group

2 AND 3 BEDROOM OPTIONS Finished units available NOW Prices starting at $534,605

Visit our website for NEW incentives and NEW pricing!

AugustaRowTownhomes.com

Realtor

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SAMANTHA SNYDER 864.601.4862

Each affiliate independently owned and operated.

PATRICK FURMAN 864.283.4560


Editor’s Letter

Photograph by Kim McMillin

LOSE YOURSELF

G

et lost. Two words usually fired in the heat of the moment, yet perhaps the best directive anyone could give. We should get lost more often. Too many of our days are spent checking the boxes, marking the to-dos, feeling sorry about not getting it all done. But when you allow yourself to do nothing? Everything comes into sharp focus. Here, we present stories on the beauty—yes, beauty—of letting go. Life isn’t only shaped by what’s done; it’s defined by what is. We should be proud of our accomplishments, but we’re missing the point of it all when we overlook the simple pleasures of life, like walking in the woods, being on the water, laughing with friends and family, digging in the garden, tasting the fruits of our labor. My dear friend and contributor Lauren Maxwell sparked the idea for this issue with an essay she penned about her “aimless April”—when she made an intentional decision “to let herself off the hook.” She writes on this theme in this edition (see “The Beauty of Aimlessness,” page 70): “Getting lost makes room in my brain for new connections between seemingly unrelated things, or as psychologists might call it, free association. When those sparks fly, it helps me push my thinking, or conscious brain, aside to make room for all that is unconscious—

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the part of our mental composition that facilitates processes like creativity, healing, and memory.” The stories in this edition are about connecting to the moment, about being present in the mundane goodness of our lives. July is a near-perfect time for this, especially in this part of the country. In “Call of the Wild,” page 78, we present six outdoor experiences, like fly-fishing on the Chattooga, lazy river rides down the French Broad, and scuba diving off the coast of Wilmington: access points to pure relaxation and staying in the moment. Just like walking a labyrinth, these activities elevate your awareness of your surroundings, grounding you in the present. No need to worry about where you’re going—you’re already there (see “No Wrong Turns,” page 46). This month, I encourage you to reconnect to your inner child, when agendas were about building sand castles and perfecting cannonballs. Lose the list and let loose—it’s your one precious life to live. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com


SOUL DEEP.

Growing up in Florence, South Carolina, William H. Johnson  (1901-1970) dropped out of school to work for the railroad, helping his family and saving to go to New York. Once there, he took a series of odd jobs to pay for classes at the National Academy of Design. One of his instructors, Impressionist painter Charles Hawthorne, helped fund Johnson’s first trip to Paris. From there he traveled throughout Europe and North Africa, experimenting with modernist styles and palettes. After years of critical and commercial success in Scandinavia, Johnson and his wife returned to the U.S. just ahead of World War II. The GCMA is home to the largest collection of work by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. Since 1986, the Museum’s annual fund-raising campaign, Art for Greenville, has raised more than $11 million to purchase important works by America’s greatest artists. The 2021 campaign will help underwrite the addition of more than 30 artworks by 18 African-American artists. The exhibition Soul Deep: African-American Masterworks includes such well-known artists as David Drake, Leo Twiggs, William H. Johnson, Henry Ossawa Tanner, and Hale Woodruff along with many others. Please help us continue to grow this extraordinary educational and cultural asset—a world-class collection that’s right at home in Greenville. To learn more, visit gcma.org/support.

William H. Johnson, 1901-1970 Flowers in a Gray Vase, circa 1933

The GCMA is grateful for the continuing support of United Community Bank Foundation.

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Corporate Partner

GCM-21-09-Johnson_Flowers Soul Deep TOWN Ad.indd 1

Temporarily closed for construction

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Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

Abby Moore Keith

MANAGING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox Andrew Huang M. Linda Lee Laura Linen Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

MOVE MORE NOW One-on-One, Duo, Small Group, or Virtual Personal Training

Group Classes like Yoga or Beast Mode at ZERO EXTRA COST ™

FREE childcare for household memberships while you workout & so much more!

Beth Brown Ables, John Jeter, Lauren Maxwell, J. Morgan McCallum, Libby McMillan Henson, Kathryn Norungolo, Angie Toole Thompson & Susie White CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS & STYLISTS

Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Jack Connolly, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Jamie Green & Jason & Tara Massey Maddie De Pree

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Aria Surka

EDITORIAL INTERN

Holly Hardin

VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Kristy Adair & Michael Allen Donna Johnston

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Sangeeta Hardy, Billy Leach, Mary Placito & Heather Propp Hays Sligh

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER

Allison Gambone

ACCOUNT MANAGER CLIENT SERVICE MANAGERS

Lizzie Campbell, Sheldon Hubbard & Camden Johnson Kristi Fortner

ACCOUNTING & HUMAN RESOURCES

Sue Priester

Start today & join the Y!

ymcagreenville.org/join

CONSULTING MEMBER

Susan Schwartzkopf

GENERAL MANAGER

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 11, No. 7) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65 at towncarolina.com/subscribe. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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Tranquility and calmness. Cascade Collection - The Cascade Collection creates an elegant - yet livable retreat from our modern day, fast-paced lifestyles. Characterized by its light and airy neutral color palette and use of mixed materials including oak, lacquered burlap, metal accents and champagne-tone hardware.

NO DOWN PAYMENT AND NO INTEREST ‘TIL AUGUST 2023*

*0% interest for up to 24 months applies to qualifying furniture purchases $3,500 & up. Custom furniture orders require a 25% deposit. Lower priced sales may qualify for other 0% Interest Financing programs. All Financing Programs are subject to credit approval. Equal monthly payments required. If original balance is paid in full by the due date, then no interest is charged. Current APR is as low as 23.91% and will vary by plan and financing partner. Other plans require minimum payment of 6% of remaining balance. Rate is subject to change without notice. See store for full details.


Downsize Without Compromise

Maintenance Free Yard • Homesites from the $130s • Custom Cottage Community Built by Exclusive Preferred Builders • Walk to Legacy Park & Legacy Square • Close to the Future Swamp Rabbit Trail Extension

Contact the Sales Office for a Personal Tour 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 • Greenville

(864) 329-8383

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12/8/2020 7:23:11 PM


THE LIST THE MONTH’S MUST-DOS

ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES Southern minister Paul Janeway traded the pulpit for a concert stage in 2012, when he left the ministry to form his Birmingham, Alabama–based band, St. Paul and the Broken Bones. Their debut album, Half the City, released in 2014, followed by Sea of Noise two years later, catapulted the eight-member soul band to national fame. Janeway’s powerful voice and personal magnetism will fire up the TD Stage in a summer concert you won’t want to miss. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, July 23, 7:30pm. Lawn, $50; Genevieve’s, $70. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph of Paul Janeway courtesy of Red Light Management

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The List SALLEY MAVOR: SOCIAL FABRIC

TD SATURDAY MARKET

TAPAS & TINIS

The Upcountry History Museum has partnered with award-winning fiber artist Salley Mavor on a second exhibition project: Social Fabric. Salley’s rich miniature worlds are bursting with hand-stitched characters, props, and scenery, all crafted with her distinctive blend of materials and personal style. The exhibition offers a threedimensional look at cultural diversity, migration, and the beauty of humanity—making it a perfect artistic experience for all ages. Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. Thru Sept 4. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10; children (4–18), $8. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Set your alarm on Saturday mornings and get downtown early to shop for a variety of summer produce, including seasonal delights such as blueberries, peaches, squash, and tomatoes. Being healthy never tasted so good.

It’s never too early to rev up for Euphoria, and you can get the party started at the festival’s signature summer event. Chef Tony Schmidt of Performance Food Service will provide the tapas, while the ’tinis come complements of Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Larceny Bourbon. With a mix of music from jazz to rock and Motown to hip-hop, Java Entertainment will keep your feet moving on the dance floor.

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Zen, 924 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, July 9, 7–10pm. $60. (864) 617-0231, euphoriagreenville.com

Photograph of Java Entertainment courtesy of Euphoria

Fabric relief, Displaced by Salley Mavor

Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Thru Oct 30. Sat, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com


COOKING CLASSES: BALLPARK HOME RUNS AND LOWCOUNTRY LEGENDS Sharpen your cooking game this summer by signing up for these two hands-on classes at Greenville Tech’s new commercial kitchen in Poe West. On Thursday, it’s all about the ball game, as you learn to make kicked-up corndogs and funnel cakes from scratch. South Carolina classics Frogmore stew (aka Lowcountry Boil) and banana pudding are on the menu for Friday, along with foolproof techniques for frying green tomatoes. Truist Hospitality and Innovation Center, 556 Perry Ave, Ste B114, Greenville. July 1 & 2. Ballpark Home Runs: Thurs, 5:30–9pm. $79. Lowcountry Legends: Fri, 5:30– 9pm. $99. (864) 250-8835, poewest.com/events-stories

THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB

MY WAY AT CENTRE STAGE

Five Southern women, whose lifelong friendships were forged on their college swim team, take a break from their husbands, kids, and jobs every summer at the same cottage on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Spanning a period of 30 years, this witty and touching comedy dives into the dynamics of friendship, as the women ride the waves of ups and downs in their lives. Greenville Theatre, 44 College St, Greenville. July 29¬–Aug 15. Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri & Sat, 8pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvilletheatre.org

At long last, Centre Stage is thrilled to be reopening its theater with a musical tribute to Frank Sinatra. This intimate, jazz-club-style revue, conceived by David Grapes and Todd Olson, features a live jazz band and the smooth stylings of a small cast of virtuoso performers singing some of the tunes that made “Ol’ Blue Eyes” a legend. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. July 15–Aug 8. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $32-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

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Greenville’s Salon

hair makeup nails accessories

WILSON’S ON WASHINGTON 794 E Washington Street

864.235.3336

wilsonsonwashington.com @wilsononwashingtonsc JU LY 2020 I 23


The List

Quick HITS SIERRA HULL & JUSTIN MOSES

z Singer/songwriter and virtuoso mandolinist Sierra Hull made a name for herself early in life, playing the Grand Ole Opry at age 10 and performing at Carnegie Hall two years later. For Justin Moses, his musical journey began at age six when he started playing the mandolin. Now the award-winning multi-instrumentalist is hailed as one of the most versatile musicians in acoustic music. Count on a memorable evening when this husband-and-wife duo get together on stage. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, July 10, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

GREENVILLE VIRTUAL CHAUTAQUA: ANN LOWE

z As told in this virtual talk, the story of fashion designer Ann Lowe will inspire anyone with big dreams. Born in Clayton, Alabama, and descended from enslaved people, Lowe learned her dressmaking skills from her mother and grandmother. She rose to fame after designing the ivory silk taffeta wedding dress that Jacqueline Bouvier wore when she married John F. Kennedy in 1953. Tues, July 13, 7–8:30pm. Free. (864) 244-1499, historycomesalive.org/event/ann-lowe

FRESH FRIDAYS AT HARTNESS

zHHHead over to the Hartness community on Greenville’s

Photograph courtesy of Greenville Triumph.

eastside to check out the farmers market on the Grand Lawn. Held on the third Friday of each month this summer, Fresh Fridays will feature produce from the community’s on-site garden plot, plus food vendors such as Chocolate Artworks and Blue Ridge Creamery. You can even shop for hand-crafted items including soap, soy candles, and reuseable market bags. Hartness, 2000 Society St, Greenville. Fri, July 16, 5:30–8:30pm. (864) 920-0375, hartnessliving.com

POTTERY WORKSHOP WITH HOLLOWED EARTH

z How about a stein with that beer? The artisans from Hollowed Earth Pottery are teaming up with 13 Stripes to show you how to hand-build your own beer stein. After watching a demonstration, each participant will design their own dishwasher-safe stein, which will be fired at Hollowed Earth’s studio (you can pick it up two weeks later). Cost of the class includes all materials—except the beer. 13 Stripes Brewery, 250 Mill St, Ste PW3010, Taylors. Wed, July 28, 7pm. $40. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com/event-details/ stein-workshop-with-hollowed-earth-pottery-2

THE FRONTMEN OF COUNTRY

z With more than 50 Top 40 hits between them, when Larry Stewart (Restless Heart), Richie McDonald (Lonestar), and Tim Rushlow (Little Texas) pool their outstanding talents, the result is a country music super-group. For one night, the Peace Center Concert Hall will ring out with fan faves from their former bands, such as “The Bluest Eyes in Texas,” “Amazed,” and “God Blessed Texas.” Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, July 31, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Greenville Triumph If you’re searching for the perfect summer evening, look no further. Our advice? Ditch midweek worries and head to the Greenville Triumph stadium (family and friends optional). Once you’re there, take it easy: grab a beer, kick back, and admire the fancy footwork of Greenville’s favorite soccer superstars. Greenville Triumph, 22 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, July 10 & 17, 7pm. $10-$25. (864) 203-0565, greenvilletriumph.com

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THE MUSICAL

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN FOREVER Broadway magic returns to Greenville! Become a season ticket holder to experience it all with the best prices, extended payment plans, and guaranteed seating for nine spectacular shows.

SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW! For performance dates and more information, scan the QR code with your phone’s camera.


TAKE CONTROL.

LIVE PAIN FREE.

At Carolina Orthopaedic and Neurosurgical Associates, we are committed to getting you back to doing what you love. Our fellowship trained Orthopaedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Pain Specialists, and Physical Therapists understand and cater to your unique needs. From sports injuries, to joint replacement, to advanced spine surgery we can offer you a care and rehabilitation plan that gets you the results you want. Call today for an appointment with one of our highly trained specialists at one of our three convenient upstate locations. We also offer Ortho Urgent Care at our Greenville and Spartanburg locations from 8 am – 4 pm Monday through Friday for unexpected orthopaedic injuries.

Total quality care, now with multiple convenient Upstate locations Spartanburg 1330 Boiling Springs Rd., Suite 1600 Spartanburg, SC 29303

CAROLINA ORTHOPAEDIC & NEUROSURGICAL ASSOCIATES

Greenville 220 Roper Mountain Rd. Extension Greenville, SC 29615 Duncan 115 Deacon Tiller Ct. Duncan, SC 29334

864-583-CONA | www.cona.care


On theTown Catherine Eberly & Caitlyn Mulholland

BMW CHARITY PRO-AM FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT JUNE 11, 2021

After a day on the course, players and spectators gathered at Camperdown Plaza in downtown Greenville for a sold-out concert presented by Magna. Guest jammed to tunes by Steel Toe Stiletto and musical tournament celebrities, and sipped on cocktails from CAMP and Juniper.

Holly Tokarczyk & Sophia Conwell

By DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Ryan & Susan Howard

Samsntha Destazio, Laura Hagen, Lauren Brooks & Jaime Hageman

Nikki Miller & Shawn Harris Hayley Bledsoe, Christie McDunkin, Heather Frazier, Taylor Haynes, Hayley Thrift & Beth Thomason Ethan, Thuy & Trung Phan

Kirsten Zinkann & Nancy Barrett

Morgan Allen & Alexandra Rutland

Briannea Rainey, Sharae Walker & Jessica Dawkins

Sophia Conwell, Holly Tokarczyk, Alex Dupre & Alex Dupre JU LY 2021 I

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On the TOWN

Brian Rogers & Kristen McLean

Kristine Pracht & Kennon Brandt

Cindy Cannon, Nori Morgan, Lauren Demosthenes, Megan Alexander, Carrie Ann Twedt, Rhonda Jackson, Salli Alexander & Traci Hughes

SHOES

Skelly Stevens, Mallory Daniel & Adrianna Gergley

HANDBAGS

Craig Lundgren

ACCESSORIES

2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE 864.271.9750 INSTAGRAM @ MUSESHOESTUDIO

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Mark & Deb Fullerton

Kate Gilreath & Betsy Norwood


On the TOWN

THE ROSE BALL TENNIS SOCIAL M AY 20, 2021

Ahead of its 50th ball in September, the Rose Ball hosted a Charity Tennis Social at the Greenville Country Club in May. More than 100 players and spectators had a Grand Slam of a time playing friendly matches, vibing to Cuban music, and enjoying food from the country club at the Havana Nights lawn party. The social benefited 12 local charities around Greenville.

Reschin Graham Moore & Chie Graham

By JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

Courtney & Ben Worley Charles & Miriam Butler

McFaddin & Deana Blanding with Leslie & Greg Ingram

Eric & Ann Whaley

Jennifer Coleman & Kristen McLean JU LY 2021 I

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On the TOWN

You can’t get anything past Matt.

Ian Conits, Eleni Conits, Elizabeth Bannio & Roger Clinkscales

Selena & Saniya Fields

Rory & Ernestine Lindsey

Mike Estadt, Michael Walters & Thomas Meyer

• 2020 President’s Circle Award • 2020 Skyrocket Award • Top 10% of All GGAR Agents in 2020 Sales Volume

864.906.1052 | mattnocks.com | Realtor® Matt.Nocks@JHA-SothebysRealty.com

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Tonya Peterson, Anthony Gladney & Gwen Scott


On the TOWN CHANGEMAKERS FINALE JUNE 3, 2021

Chosen for their professionalism, accomplishments, and willingness to give back, Multiplying Good’s ChangeMakers Class of 2021 was recognized at Fluor Field this month. After a semester of volunteering, fundraising, and raising awareness of Multiplying Good’s mission, the class attended a final ceremony to celebrate their work. The honorees threw the first pitch and had the opportunity to network at Fluor Field’s Fieldhouse rooftop with Multiplying Good board members, sponsors, and guests.

Rachel Bertram & Monica Lindsey

Compassion & Dedication

Photography by BONFIRE VISUALS

Mike Reynolds General Manager and Funeral Director Mackey Funerals and Cremations at Century Drive and Woodlawn Memorial Park

Breanna Leonard & Lisa Wilson

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ike Reynolds, a funeral director, celebrant, and now manager, has a passion for walking with people through life’s challenges. He spent many years honing these skills while serving as a minister and children’s counselor before moving to South Carolina to be near his grandchildren. A certified Life Tribute Specialist, Mike has additional training that allows him to conduct highly personal, individualized funeral services, tributes and memorials. His care for people and his dedication to providing meaningful experiences shows as he creates services that reflect the lives of loved ones. His dedication and excellence has recently led him to be appointed General Manager of both Mackey locations. He also enjoys Duke basketball, Appalachian State football, fishing tournaments and spending time with his beloved grandchildren Lindsay and Bella.

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On the TOWN

Michael & Samantha Zimmerschied

BARBARA STONE BINGO BASH

M AY 23, 2021

Guests of all ages joined to play bingo at Carolina Bauernhaus in support of the Barbara Stone Foundation. When they weren’t yelling “BINGO,” guests bid on silent auction items, enjoyed food from the FAM Pizza Food Truck, and sipped a variety of Carolina Bauernhaus craft beers. During the bash, the foundation awarded more than $242,000 to nonprofits in the Upstate to create and maintain programs for individuals with disabilities. Photography by BONFIRE VISUALS

Jessica & Mark Havens

LOCALLY

CONNECTED.

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Adam, Taryn, Charleston & Avery Scher

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Dana McConnell & Laura Ceisel


On the TOWN

ROCK THE LOT CONCERT JUNE 4, 2021

You’ve heard of a drive-in movie, but what about a drive-in concert? Benefiting Cancer Survivors Park Alliance, the Rock the Lot Concert welcomed numerous cars to an unusual concert experience. Yacht Rock Revue kicked it off Friday night with favorites from the ’70s and ’80s. On Saturday night, guests rocked to local favorite Darby Wilcox and indie alternative band, Houndmouth. Concessions were fueled by Winehouse and Fanfood, where guests ordered drinks and food from Larkin’s right to their parking space.

DOWNTOWN

Jamie Scharpenburg & Fran Moseley

By JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

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Beverly & Scott Jones with Keith & Cam Keriazakos

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Brad & Maggie Kitterman with Steve & Cathy Kitterman

Carolina Schroder & George McCall JU LY 2021 I

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weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

After waiting through the pandemic, MARY HILL & MATTHEW PLACITO said “I do” in a spring ceremony. By Hannah Decossas Photography

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Weddings

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GRACE HERLONG LOVELESS 864.660.3925

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ary and Matthew met on the first day of their first job out of college, in Upstate New York. Their relationship began as friends, but as the story goes, it quickly blossomed into more. After four years of dating, they knew they wanted to take the next step, but COVID turned that plan into a year-long wait. They were taking a first walk-through of their newly built townhome when Matthew got down on one knee on the front steps—the perfect start to their lives together. Looking radiant in a gown from The Dress in Mauldin, Mary married Matthew at The Venue at Falls Park, with just 30 of their closest friends and family in attendance. The newlyweds both work in sales in Greenville, Mary at our own Community Journals and Matthew at NVR Mortgage.—Kathryn Norungolo

110 WEST AUGUSTA PLACE 4 BR 3 BA | 1/4 ACRE LOT | $674,605 DISTRICTED TO AUGUSTA CIRCLE SO MUCH POTENTIAL FOR EXPANSION!

By Hannah Decossas Photography EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

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e opy, or’s

Weddings

LAUREN VALAINIS & JARED SAWYER FEBRUARY 6, 2021

For Lauren and Jared, their forever together started back in 2018 with an innocent conversation in an Orangetheory Fitness class in Washington, DC, where both were living. After that, it seemed like they were always bumping into each other. Jared spent six months hoping a mutual friend would set them up before he took matters into his own hands and asked Lauren on a date after a workout class. It was the day after Valentine’s Day, and they talked for hours over glasses of Hall wine at their favorite restaurant in DC, Le Diplomate. A year and a half later, Jared surprised Lauren with the proposal of her dreams at a vineyard overlooking the Blue Ridge Mountains and a crowd of family and friends waiting at her family’s lake house to celebrate afterwards. At St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church in Spartanburg, Lauren’s hometown parish, she said “I do” in an Anne Barge gown. Their reception at the Country Club of Spartanburg was a dance party that included an after-dinner snack of mini Le Diplomate burgers, a nod to their first date. The couple still lives in DC.—KN By Sposa Bella Photography

KYLE EDWARDS & ANDREW STEADINGS AUGUST 20, 2020 Kyle and Andrew recognized each other from passing in the hallway at work before their boss formally introduced them. Later that same week, they ran into each other at Connolly’s Irish Pub, where they got acquainted over a few pints of Guinness. Flash forward two years, and the pair had planned a trip to Seattle for a long weekend. After dropping their bags at the Airbnb, they headed to their first vineyard stop at Chateau St. Michelle. At the end of the tasting, Kyle was ready to head to the next spot, but Andrew insisted they walk around. He set up his GoPro and before she knew it, Andrew had dropped to one knee. Kyle and Andrew were married in an intimate ceremony at The Greystone Inn on Lake Toxaway. After reciting their handwritten vows in front of family, the couple, along with their guests, enjoyed a Champagne cruise around the lake on the inn’s vintage wooden boat before settling in for a cozy dinner. They now live in Greenville with their pup, Pinto.—KN By Carissa Scott Photo

SARA FORRESTER AND TRENT COX MARCH 20, 2021 Already together when they graduated from Wingate University, both with doctoral degrees in physical therapy, Sara and Trent dated for two years before Trent staged a couple’s photoshoot with his photographer friends. Sara assumed they were helping out the friends’ new business with a photo book for prospective clients. After snapping pictures all over Greenville, Trent popped the question at sunset at the very spot that would become their wedding venue, with the photographers capturing every moment of the proposal. The ceremony took place at Riverstead Barn in Marietta, where Sara walked down the aisle in a Lillian West gown and a lace sleeve from her mother’s wedding dress tucked into her bouquet. At the reception, s’mores were served instead of cake, and an artist created a live painting of the big day. Sara and Trent made their exit at the end of the night under a rain of white sprinkles.—Aria Surka By McKenzie Norman Photo hearing wedding bells? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

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town buzz INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Designer and artist SAMARA PHILLIPS repurposes pieces of glass into remarkable chimes.

Artwork by Samara Phillips; photograph by Will Crooks

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

In addition to her vivid seaglass chimes, Samara creates vibrant earrings and necklaces, as well as prints that pop with lively patterns and colors. Her chimes are also available at uncommongoods.com, an online marketplace for beautiful, handcrafted gifts.

UP CYCLE GREENVILLE ARTIST SAMARA PHILLIPS CREATES LIFE OUT OF LOSS WITH HER ARTFUL SEA - GLASS WIND CHIMES by Angie Toole Thompson • photography by Will Crooks

A

nyone who has inherited an heirloom knows that objects hold memories. A father’s old chair, an auntie’s ruby ring, a friend’s jean jacket—they carry stories with them, they transform from a simple thing into a living memory. When Samara Phillips’s sister passed away unexpectedly in her prime, Samara was gifted something that her sister poured her talent and soul into—her art supplies. Samara’s sister was a stained-glass artist.

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“I hated to see her glass just collecting dust,” Samara says, “so I had the idea one holiday to make all my family members a wind chime using her actual glass, in her memory.” Samara had long been an artist with a background in metalsmithing. The gift of her sister’s glass pointed her love of making in a new and meaningful direction—it pointed her to crafting the colorful chimes for which she’s known. “For me, it’s not necessarily about the physical chimes,” Samara shares. “Creating something from scratch also creates positive energy that can heal yourself and others.” Samara’s playful, sculptural chimes are born from her own personal connection to stained glass and what her chimes have come to mean for those who bring them into their lives. When she began to sell them on her Etsy shop, the feedback was often a similar story. “I noticed a lot of them [were gifted] to friends or family that had lost a loved one.” Her chimes are given as gifts—for Mother’s Day, birthdays, even from a surrogate to a new mother. “I hear these kind and beautiful stories over and over again—I feel so honored to be a part of their story,” Samara says. Samara’s artful glass and found-object chimes carry memories for every hand that touches them. From the former lives of her ethically sourced materials, through the thoughtful hands of the maker herself, to the lucky recipient of these jingling gems, Samara’s wind chimes are objects of beauty and of story. To purchase Samara’s glass chimes or to view more of her works, visit etsy.com/shop/SamaraDesignsStudio.


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TB • UPTOWNER

MAKING MOVES CURRIE GOSSETT EXPANDS HER RETAIL BUSINESS C.O.R.E. GROW STRONG INTO A MULTI-LAYERED WELLNESS STUDIO IN OVERBROOK VILLAGE by Stephanie Trotter • photograph by Will Crooks

S

ummer is here, and tan, toned bodies are dripping across sidewalks faster than soft-serve ice cream cones in the midday heat. But Currie Gossett is the first to admit that wellness runs deeper than a firm set of abs. The Greenville native has traveled the world, sampling various health routines and fitness regimes. After refining her methods and business strategy, she’s opened a boutique fitness studio in Overbrook Village. C.O.R.E. Grow Strong is adding facets far beyond retail, as it relocates from its current location on West Washington Street, and Currie can’t wait to help the community reach its peak potential.

The new space looks great! Thank you. After six years we have baby-stepped our way into it and now we’re ready to jump into the deep end. Tell us about the concept of a boutique fitness studio. My husband and I had been living in Europe, and then we moved back stateside to Charlotte and had children. I first noticed the boutique fitness experience there. My home studio there became my community, my therapy, my outlet, my social hour, my church, my happy place. I felt my best when I walked out of a class, when I breathed, and took time for myself.

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“My studio there became my community, my therapy, my outlet, my happy place. I felt my best when I walked out of a class and took time for myself.”—Currie Gossett


With the opening of her boutique fitness studio in Overbrook Village, Currie Gossett combines movement classes, nutrition, health, and retail to create a unique wellness experience.

Did you immediately think the concept would work in Greenville? Yep. Greenville needed something on the lighter side, that wasn’t as aggressive, with the competitive nature of lots of gyms. Even before we knew we were moving back here, I wanted to open a studio here that would include retail, movement, and nutrition and health. I’m passionate about what we put in our body because food is fuel and should never make us feel guilty. We took that first baby step and opened a retail establishment on West Washington, as I refined the boutique fitness concept that we’re opening now at Overbrook.

So, what does C.O.R.E. include? The designer retail folks have enjoyed downtown, but my goal all along was to have movement as the centerpiece of the business. The new space includes a mindful movement studio and plant-based market. Folks will be able to get great, locally sourced juices. The mat studio has room for 50 mats. We’ll also do yoga sculpt, TRX Training, breath work, and meditation. We’re offering reformer Pilates and mat Pilates. I’m really excited to bring accessible group classes and private Pilates to Greenville. How did you get into Pilates? I blame it on a case of wine! Actually, it’s even worse, it was a case of Bartles & Jaymes wine coolers! I was working for a distributor right out of college and was putting up a wine display. I was dressed in high heels and bent over lifting the entire case and didn’t use my legs. I popped a disc and it put me on the floor. I’ve been in and out of chronic pain for 20 years.

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But you were an athlete? I grew up in Mauldin playing basketball and volleyball. I played volleyball at Wofford. I’d never gotten hurt playing sports, and then this? I felt like an idiot. I did a lot of physical therapy because I didn’t want to have surgery. About a year later, I moved to Asheville and took my first Pilates course at a YMCA. It was eye-opening. To this day, I wish we’d had that kind of strength training and flexibility while I was a college athlete. I would have been a different athlete. You’re hooked. You just have to try it. They say you’ll feel different after one session and notice a difference after 10 sessions. My favorite things about it: the range of what you can do. It can be gentle and therapeutic. It’s excellent for golfers and the aging population. Or it can be a burning, kick-your-booty exercise. The benefits are truly endless.

After living in Europe and other areas, what’s it like coming home? I don’t feel like I’ve come home. I’ve returned to a much more progressive Greenville. It’s not the same Greenville I left in 1999. I’m definitely more of an urban soul. What I love the most is the unique charm and character of downtown. The Swamp Rabbit Trail, the parks, and the ability to get on bikes and go anywhere. That’s very European. For more information, visit coregrowstrong.com.

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TB • COMMUNITY

NO WRONG TURNS A LOCA L L A BY R INTH DESIGNER OUTLINES A PATH FOR GETTING LOST— A ND FINDING YOURSELF by J. Morgan M c Callum • illustration by Timothy Banks

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editation. At first glance, it looks easy. Just sit still, calm your mind, and find enlightenment. Piece of cake, right? If you’re rolling your eyes right now, David Tolzmann of Greenville-based The Labyrinth Company gets it—and he’s built a storied career and global company out of helping people find a different path. “In Western society, we’re not good at sitting still. We’re not good at turning things off,” Tolzmann says, pointing to the Buddhist tradition of walking meditation, which is similar to what a labyrinth is designed to do, only in a more concentrated


At The Labyrinth Company, David Tolzmann creates two-dimensional paths that give participants a peaceful, meditative experience.

“You get lost in the labyrinth, zone out. And that’s perfect. Just follow the path, and know that it’s going to lead you where you need to go.”—David Tolzmann MEDITATE NOW You can find one of Tolzmann’s Chartresstyle outdoor labyrinths at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 910 Hudson Rd, Greenville

GOTTA WALK ’EM ALL Want to explore more labyrinths around the Upstate? Don’t miss David’s list of favorite local paths at TOWNCAROLINA.COM

DID YOU KNOW? Unlike the pop-culture mazes, real labyrinths only have one path and no wrong turns. They aren’t puzzles; they are meditations.

form. “Fundamentally, a labyrinth is a two-dimensional, single path with no choices to make. Unlike a maze, which has walls or hedges and is meant to confuse someone, you can see the entire design of the labyrinth.” There’s a very real, very interesting psychological reason for that. “With a labyrinth, you can see the whole pattern, but your brain can’t accept that there’s nothing to solve, because it appears so complex.” Returning to the beehive-like nature of our thoughts, Tolzmann calls this subconscious distraction “taming the monkey mind,” which in turn induces a creative meditative state. “While

your right brain is trying to figure out where to go next, it frees up your left brain to free-associate, explore feelings, grieve, process,” he adds. From coast to coast and across continents, Tolzmann’s designs have helped people do just that. His company has installed custom labyrinths and shipped prefabricated kits to Hong Kong and Singapore, from Copenhagen to the Middle East, and to every state in the union. “One of our painted canvas labyrinths has been traveling the world nonstop for years now,” says Tolzmann. “It belongs to the chaplin on the Theodore Roosevelt aircraft carrier. He sets it up on the hangar deck and the soldiers walk it for meditation.” In fact, it was in the church—and on traditional painted canvas—where Tolzmann’s craft and company began to unfold. “Someone at the church I was attending in Baltimore read about the practice and wanted to create one on canvas. I’m good at math and geometry, so I got drafted into the project. We modeled it after the Chartres Cathedral in France, [a labyrinth that has been walked on since the year 1200].” As more and more churches—and eventually hospitals, spas, and wellness retreats—heard about his labyrinths, demand took off. “We’ve got about 46 unique designs now. And we keep creating more, because people have different needs,” Tolzmann reflects. Many of his designs can even be spotted on hospital rooftops, and at prestigious organizations and universities like Stanford, the Mayo Clinic, and Johns Hopkins. His latest product line-up includes brick paver and tile kits, garden templates, poly canvas mats, and stencil sets. “I love it when someone tells me, ‘It did what you said it’d do.’ When people actually use it, and don’t forget about it, that’s the key,” Tolzmann says with a smile. “Hundreds of thousands of people are walking on what we’ve built, and we hear some amazing stories—of healing, of transformation, of breakthroughs. And that’s pretty cool.” The Labyrinth Company, 110 N Markley St, #208, Greenville. (888) 715-2297 or (203) 832-3815, labyrinthcompany.com

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(HEAL). period (SLEEP) which allows their body time to recover recover we residents may have significant (HEAL). limitations limitations and and our our programs programs are are customized customized to to their their needs needs it is important it is important that we understand that we understand that some that residents some residents it is important that we understand residents may have significant limitations, and our programs are body time body to recover time to (HEAL). recover (HEAL). it is important that some residents body time to recover (HEAL). body time to recover (HEAL). (HEAL). (HEAL). limitations and our programs and our programs are customized areprograms customized to to their needs toneeds their needs specifically. may may have havelimitations significant significant limitations, limitations, and and our our programs are are (HEAL). limitations and our programs customized to their needs (HEAL). limitations are customized their specifically. specifically. may have may significant have significant limitations, limitations, and our programs and our programs areare are customized to their needs specifically. may have significant limitations, and our programs may have programs specifically. specifically. The basis oftheir our activity/wellness program is toare provide a specifically. customized customized to to their needs needs specifically. specifically. specifically. 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In aaddition one toto atoone one activity to one activities, activity specifically specifically designed designed around their around their individual needs. addition to the the planned planned activities, each each resident resident is is provided provided a one one activity designed around their a one specifically designed around their addition to addition theneeds. planned to thespecifically activities, planned activities, each resident each isresident provided is provided a one-to-one activity designed around their individual individual needs. addition addition to the planned activities, each resident resident is is provided provided individual individual needs. needs. individual needs. one-to-one one-to-one activity activity specifically specifically designed designed around around their their their aaaindividual one-to-one a one-to-one activity specifically activity specifically designed designed around their around individual needs. Our programs include active options (walking, gardening, one-to-one designed around aa one-to-one activity specifically around their their individual individual needs. needs. individual individual needs. needs. Our Ourprograms programs programs include include active active options options (walking, (walking, gardening, gardening, Our Our programs include include options active options (walking, gardening, gardening, scavenger hunt, chair active aerobics, chair(walking, yoga) and programs individual individual needs. Our programs active options (walking, gardening, Our include (walking, gardening, scavenger scavenger hunt, hunt,the chair chair aerobics, aerobics, chair chair yoga) yoga) and and programs programs scavenger scavenger hunt, chair hunt, aerobics, chair aerobics, chair yoga) chair and yoga) programs and programs that stimulate mind (trivia, current events, puzzles, scavenger hunt, chair aerobics, chair yoga) and programs scavenger yoga) and programs that thatstimulate stimulate stimulate the themind mind mind (trivia, (trivia, current current events, events, puzzles, puzzles, that that stimulate the the(trivia, mind current (trivia, events, current puzzles, events, puzzles, that stimulate the mind (trivia, current events, that events, puzzles, puzzles,

Contact us today at (864) 558-0383 or

Contact us today at (864) 558-0383 or Contact us us today at at (864) 558-0383 558-0383 oror v Contact Contact us ustoday today today at at(864) (864) (864) 558-0383 558-0383 or or Contact (864) 558-0383 Contact us today at or


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HILLTOP

Paid Paid Advertisement Advertisement Paid Advertisement Paid Advertisement Paid Advertisement Our programs include active options (walking, gardening, Our programs include active options (walking, gardening, InIn particular, petpet therapy is aisproven, powerful forfor those particular, therapy a proven, powerful tool those mind mind matching). matching). Our Our programs programs also also include include food food (cooking (cooking periods periods of of increased increased agitation agitation and and confusion confusion intool in those those with with Our programs include active options (walking, gardening, In particular, pet therapy is a proven, powerful tool for those Paid Advertisement Paid Advertisement Our programs include active options (walking, gardening, Inperiods particular, therapy is a is proven, powerful tool for those mind matching). Our programs also include food (cooking of pet increased agitation and confusion in with those with scavenger hunt, chair aerobics, chair yoga) and programs scavenger hunt, chair aerobics, chair yoga) and programs residents with Sundowners Syndrome—evening periods ofand residents with Sundowners Syndrome—evening of mind matching). Our programs also include food (cooking periods of increased and confusion in those Our programs include active options (walking, gardening, In particular, pet anon-verbal proven, powerful forperiods those Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s. Aagitation Atherapy dog’s dog’s non-verbal communication communication and programs, programs, visiting visiting chef, chef, wine wine and and cheese cheese tasting) tasting) and andfun fun mind matching). Our programs also include food (cooking periods of increased agitation and confusion intool those with scavenger hunt, chair aerobics, chair yoga) and programs residents with Sundowners Syndrome—evening periods of Alzheimer’s. 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Asoothing dog’s Anon-verbal dog’s non-verbal communication communication and and that stimulate the mind (trivia, current events, puzzles, increased agitation and confusion in those with Alzheimer’s mind matching). Our programs also include food (cooking mind matching). Our programs also include food (cooking Disease. A dog’s non-verbal communication and acceptance Disease. A dog’s non-verbal communication and acceptance with with their their own own communication communication skills. skills. Even Even severely severely card card games games and and of ofcourse course sporting sporting events) events) programs (live entertainment, bingo, bowling, fishing, acceptance is soothing for those experiencing difficulties mind matching). Our programs also include food (cooking Disease. Aown dog’s non-verbal communication andAlzheimer’s acceptance with their communication skills. 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Aown dog’s non-verbal communication and acceptance programs, visiting chef, wine and cheese tasting) and fun programs, visiting chef, wine and cheese tasting) and fun is their soothing for those experiencing difficulties with their is soothing for those experiencing difficulties with their card games and of course sporting events) with communication skills. Even severely affected residents display better cognitive stimulation, programs, visiting chef, wine and cheese tasting) and fun is soothing for those experiencing difficulties with their affected residents display better cognitive stimulation, mind matching). mind matching). Our programs Our programs also include also food include (cooking food (cooking Disease. 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Even severely affected residents own communication skills. Even severely affected residents Finally, we utilize pet therapy. It doesn’t take a scientist improved appetite, and more social behavior when with Finally, we utilize pet therapy. It doesn’t take a scientist improved appetite, and more social behavior when with affected affected residents residents display display better cognitive better cognitive stimulation, stimulation, programs (live entertainment, bingo, bowling, fishing, card own communication skills. Even severely affected residents programs, programs, visiting chef, visiting wine chef, and wine cheese and tasting) cheese and tasting) fun and fun is soothing is soothing for those for experiencing those experiencing difficulties difficulties with their with their programs (live entertainment, bingo, bowling, fishing, card own communication skills. Even severely affected residents pets. pets. It’s It’s yet yet another another way way that that Hilltop Hilltop delivers delivers happiness. happiness. to toknow know that that pets pets make humans humans feel good. good. Scientists Scientists have, have, Finally, we utilize pet therapy. Itfeel doesn’t take afishing, scientist appetite, andskills. more social behavior when with programs (live bingo, bowling, card improved own communication Even severely affected residents games, and ofmake course sporting events). games, and ofentertainment, course sporting events). display better cognitive stimulation, improved appetite, andand display better cognitive stimulation, improved appetite, pets. It’s yet another way that Hilltop delivers happiness. totoknow that pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, pets. It’s yet another way that Hilltop delivers happiness. know that pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, Finally, we Finally, utilize we pet utilize therapy. pet therapy. It doesn’t It take doesn’t a scientist take a scientist improved improved appetite, appetite, and more and social more behavior social behavior when with when with programs programs (live entertainment, (live entertainment, bingo, bowling, bingo, bowling, fishing, card fishing, card own communication own communication skills. Even skills. severely Even affected severely residents affected residents games, and of course sporting events). display better cognitive stimulation, improved appetite, and games, and of course sporting events). display better cognitive stimulation, improved appetite, and however, however, explained explained why: why: a a simple simple 15 15 minutes minutes with with an an to know that pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, pets. It’s yet another way that Hilltop delivers happiness. games, and of course sporting events). display better cognitive stimulation, improved appetite, andway more social behavior when with pets. 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It doesn’t take a scientist to animal lowers heart rate, blood pressure, and stress levels Stimulating the body and the mind, we cater to our residents however, however, explained explained why: a humans simple why: apressure, 15 minutes 15 minutes with anhave, with anthat animal lowers heart rate, blood and stress levels Stimulating the body and the mind, we cater to our social behavior social behavior when with when pets. with It’swe yet pets. another It’s yet way another Hilltop happiness. Finally, we utilize pet therapy. Itsimple doesn’t take aThe scientist to more thatmore Hilltop delivers happiness. know that pets make feel good. Scientists know that pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, Stimulating body and the mind, cater tothe our residents animal lowers heart rate, blood pressure, and stress levels and and raises raises the the feel-good feel-good hormone, hormone, serotonin. serotonin. The results results creating creating adelivers rich athe rich fulfilling fulfilling experience. experience. At At the end end ofresidents of theway the dayday that Hilltop delivers happiness. Finally, we Finally, utilize we pet utilize therapy. pet It therapy. doesn’t It take doesn’t a scientist take a to scientist to know that pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, creating a rich fulfilling experience. At the end of the day and raises thethat feel-good hormone, serotonin. The results Stimulating Stimulating the body the and body the mind, and the we mind, cater to we our cater residents to our residents animal lowers animal heart lowers rate, heart blood rate, pressure, blood pressure, and stress and levels stress levels know pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, and raises the feel-good hormone, serotonin. The results creating a rich fulfilling experience. At the end of the day that Hilltop that delivers Hilltop happiness. delivers happiness. know that pets make humans feel good. Scientists have, and raises the explained feel-good hormone, serotonin. The results a rich fulfilling experience. At end the day thethe more more joyjoy we we can can bring bring to the to our our residents, residents, provides provides them them for forour our residents residents are areastounding astounding lower lower cholesterol cholesterol levels, levels, however, why: 1515 minutes with an however, explained why:a asimple simple minutes with an creating Stimulating the body and the mind, wethe cater toof our residents Stimulating the body and mind, we cater to our residents know that know pets make that pets humans make feel humans good. Scientists good. 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At the endAt ofthe theprovides endprovides of the and raises the feel-good hormone, serotonin. Theand results theday, more joy we can bring to they our residents provides disease and stroke. and raises the feel-good hormone, serotonin. The results day, the more we can bring to our residents disease and stroke. and raises the feel-good hormone, serotonin. The results day, the more joy we can bring to our residents provides for our residents are astounding—lower cholesterol levels, for our residents are astounding—lower cholesterol levels, them with the quality of life that they deserve. them with the quality of life that they deserve. disease and disease stroke. and stroke. and raises and the raises feel-good the feel-good hormone, hormone, serotonin. serotonin. The results Thelevels, results day, the more day,with the joyquality more we quality can joy weofthat can tolife our bring residents to ourdeserve. residents provides provides for ourour residents are astounding—lower cholesterol levels, them with the ofbring life they deserve. for residents are astounding—lower cholesterol them the that they In In particular, particular, pet pet therapy therapy isis a aproven, proven, powerful powerful tool tool forfor them for our residents are astounding—lower cholesterol levels, with the quality of life that they deserve. 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NEW LISTING

105 Chamberlain Court | Chanticleer | $1,999,605 5 bedrooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | 10 ft ceilings on main Designed by renowned architect Mark Maresca | Inlaw suite

One McDaniel Greene, Greenville, South Carolina 29601

864.325.2112 • Call her, she always calls you right back. Joan Herlong, Greater Greenville’s Number One Realtor of the Decade. Source: MLS Sales Volume 2010-2019. Each affiliate independently owned and operated.


ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

Find your dream home at Blue Ridge Mountain Club, near Blowing Rock and Boone, North Carolina.

BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAIN CLUB is a private community reaching new heights.

Photograph courtesy of Blue Ridge Mountain Club

JU LY 2021 I

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ESCAPE • TOP BUNK

MOUNTAINS BEYOND MOUNTAINS BLUE R IDGE MOUNTA IN CLUB IS PA R A DISE -FOUND IN THE HEA RT OF THE HIGH COUNTRY by Blair knobel

P

icture this: It’s a cool mountain morning. You wake at dawn in your modern townhome, the scent of fresh lumber still in the air. The early light of day draws you from bed toward the window, where you pull back the shade and gasp: the sky is an inconceivable pink, band over band, as if God took a brushstroke to canvas. Ripples of the Blue Ridge become more pronounced as clouds change from deep magenta to fuchsia to orange. This is an experience in my journal of memories from a recent weekend at the Blue Ridge Mountain Club, a private community between Boone and Blowing Rock, in the heart of North Carolina’s

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J U LY 202 1 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m

High Country. I had the good fortune of time there, a veritable dreamscape with 360-degree ridge-line views. I simultaneously felt on top of the world and enveloped by majestic woodlands while hiking and trail cruising in my UTV (utility terrain vehicle). Blue Ridge Mountain Club has homes for rent, perfect for a weekend respite, but it is an ideal location for a second home, a haven of rest from day-to-day demands. There are three options for buying a residence here: available homes, semi-custom homes, and custom homes and home sites. The community blends pristine nature, activities, and a culinary program that offers something for everyone.

FOR THE ADVENTURER: On my first morning at BRMC, I hopped into a UTV, which I seized for the weekend to explore curated trails blazed throughout the private community’s sprawling 6,000-plus miles of acreage, an immersive and adrenaline-fueled ride on gravel and dirt paths.


Photography courtesy of Blue Ridge Mountain Club

Embraced by the peaks of the Blue Ridge between Boone and Blowing Rock, North Carolina, the private community Blue Ridge Mountain Club blends a spectacular setting with a host of activities.

FOR THE FAMILY: A private campsite near a crystal stream; live music, a food truck, and fire pits; boutique fitness options, including a stateof-the-art gym, sauna, yoga, cycling classes, and a spa; arts and crafts programs and diverse activities for kids—Blue Ridge Mountain Club has a keen focus on community and family-oriented activities at the club’s Watson Gap Village, Ascent Wellness & Fitness Center, and Jasper House.

FOR THE FOODIE: Gustatory bliss awaits at Lookout Grill, where the executive culinary team and certified sommelier pair farm-to-table cuisine and the perfect bottle or cocktail with a jaw-dropping view. Throughout the year, Blue Ridge Mountain Club hosts tasting events and wine dinners to sate curious appetites.

FOR THE NATURALIST: With more than 6,000 acres of woodland beauty, Blue Ridge Mountain Club takes the Eastern practice of forest

bathing to a new level. Nestled near Boone and Blowing Rock, the club is like one’s own private slice of the Blue Ridge Parkway. With a programs and recreation manager to lead residents and guests on hikes throughout 50 miles of trails, fishing excursions in creeks and streams, as well as rafting trips and zip-lining tours nearby, the club’s location, elevation, and outdoor recreation opportunities are prime aspects of its appeal.

FOR THE SPORTING ENTHUSIAST: Residents and guests at Blue Ridge Mountain Club have exclusive access to Chetola Sporting Reserve, a marksman’s paradise on 67 acres. Hone your shooting skills on its gun, rifle, and pistol ranges and sporting clay course, or try your hand at archery on its range. For the fly-fishing guru or wannabe, the reserve offers Orvis-endorsed fly-fishing guides to steer you toward brimming currents. FOR ANYONE ADDICTED TO SUNSET IN THE MOUNTAINS—ER, ON TOP OF A MOUNTAIN: Kicking my UTV into 4x4 gear, I hit the gas up a steep gravel incline to the top of Dugger Mountain, complete with a picnic and bottle of wine to take in the sublime sunset and 360-degree views of the Blue Ridge. It was the perfect way to end an ultimate getaway in the heart of the High Country—a dream location, to be sure. For more information, go to blueridgemountainclub.com.

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From exploring the scenic trails and landscape of the surrounding 6,000+ acres, spending countless hours around the fire with family and friends, to meeting neighbors old and new at one of our curated owner events—BRMC presents an elevated lifestyle paired with an outdoor haven for adventure all year long. Begin your journey to a life well-lived.

Escape To Your Own 6,000+ Acre Backyard 2.5 Hours from Greenville • World-Class Amenities • 50+ Miles of UTV & Hiking Trails Four-Season Community Near Blowing Rock • Three Paths to Ownership Homes from $800k I Homesites from $150k Schedule your Discovery Tour to begin a life well-lived. ExploreBRMC.com I sales@brmountainclub.com I 828.520.2508 Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This information shall not constitute a valid offer in any state where prior registration is required. © 2021 Blowing Rock Resort Venture, LLC.


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SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

Murrells Inlet’s CAROLINA HOOK & LINE CO. creates lasting memories on the water.

Photograph by Stephen Christopher

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SPORT • PEOPLE

COASTAL BOUNTY CA ROLINA HOOK & LINE CO. CR A F TS MEMOR A BLE FISHING EXCURSIONS FOR EVERY SK ILL LEVEL by J. Morgan Mc Callum • photography by Stephen CHRISTOPHER

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utside of a childhood obsession with mermaids, I never thought of myself as a “fish person.” This species of passionate, persistent people was foreign to me: I imagined a close-knit culture of water-whisperers caught somewhere between my grandfather’s murky basement aquarium tank full of minnows, and the shiny advertisements I saw for high-tech gear and flamboyant flies. Funny, how all it took for me to experience a dangerously fun identity shift was one person’s willingness to welcome me into the fold. That, and my own willingness to bite. Enter owner Stephen Christopher and Captain Caleb Hartley of Carolina Hook & Line Charters. Exactly the kind of good dudes who can’t wait for you to feel the rush of reeling in a trophy redfish or pile of flounder. And trust me—once you’re hooked, it’s easy to understand why so many people come back to Murrells Inlet time and again. “A lot of folks that book a trip with us have never been fishing before,” says Christopher. “They’ve never been on a boat out in the ocean. And they can be intimidated at first, and ask a lot of questions . . . and we’re here to facilitate that, to teach people, to share this passion with them. Some guides might get tired of answering the same questions day after day, year after year, but we never do. We always want people to think, ‘What an awesome experience, I’m never going to forget this.’” Like me, you might be so new to the sport that you squeal when the rod bows at an alarming, physics-defying angle, or your freshly dead catch decides to squirm in your hands. Maybe you’re an old man of the sea, having charted the waters before on many a company morale-building excursion. At Hook & Line, every day on the water is a chance to experience the rush again, no matter how many times you’ve caught it before. It doesn’t matter if this is your first trip or your fiftieth. Captain Caleb Hartley wants you to leave grinning. “I love when people are surprised at how much they enjoyed it, or how much fun their kids had driving the boat. Even small stuff like that, they’ll have forever. If you actually care about folks having a good experience on the water, and you’re not just on autopilot, treating it like another transaction . . . I think that’s why people come back to us. And at the end of the day, that’s what is most important,” Hartley reflects.

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Out on the sun-warmed, shimmering marsh creeks of Murrells Inlet, a rewarding sport and way of life casts a net of wonder for visitors and locals alike.

Murrells Inlet, home base to Hook & Line, isn’t huge, but the prime in-shore fishing that this historic village boasts has attracted a large number of charter companies—many of which have more guides or boats than Hook & Line’s modest outfit. Just down the coast, Charleston is an even bigger pond. And all that competition is precisely why Christopher and Hartley pour twice the heart, grit, and time spent on deck into their excursions. “There’s so much work that goes on behind the scenes to deliver a perfect experience,” says Christopher. “Rigging up the boat, setting rods and lines, gear and tackle, hauling hundreds of pounds of ice. Cleaning fish, catching bait. All before you even leave the dock. We’re lucky to have captains like Caleb, who put in countless hours. Even on his day off, he’s out looking to see where the fish are, where they might be hitting next. That takes love,” the owner adds, kindly finding another word for obsession. If it’s true that no trip is ever the same—after all, tides change, the weather shifts, the pressure in the inlet does a backflip—the gift of a day on the water is a constant. There’s the thrum of a boat engine under your feet, and the wind rushing through your hair. The smell of saltwater and marsh mud. Easy smiles, a cooler of cold beer, and the occasional visit from curious marine mammals—all in good company. “Especially in spring and early summer, when the bait rolls in, you’ll see dolphins every day, and massive leatherback turtles. We have these huge manta rays, ten- or twelve-feet wide, which leap

out of the water. Just seeing that stuff is insane. Never gets old,” Christopher laughs. These close encounters all follow the migration of schools of mullet and Atlantic menhaden (also known as pogies) into Murrells Inlet from the beach to spawn. Of course, if you’re like most of Hartley’s regulars and in possession of a healthy appetite, you’re most likely counting on his hard-earned, sherpa-like ability to track down “good eatin’ fish” like flounder and redfish. In the winter months, you’ll find black drum, sheepshead, and sea trout abundant; and in late spring, big schools of blue fish, king mackerel, and Spanish mackerel, as well as predator species like sharks. “Everything changes month to month, and that’s the challenge for guides,” Christopher points out. “Knowing when the bait is coming in, what tide you’re working with, what the moon phase is. There are so many different factors.” For these two lifelong friends and self-proclaimed “fish people,” it’s life off the water and the vibe around town that led them to drop anchor. “Murrells Inlet is a special place,” Christopher insists. “What’s really cool about this community is that it’s so tight-knit. We’re a small fishing village, but we’ve got world-class food, really cool bars—it appeals to a wide array of people, casts a wide net. There’s just something about being in a small inlet like this. People are friendly and happy.” Carolina Hook & Line Co, 4037 Hwy 17 Business, Murrells Inlet, SC; (704) 860-0548, carolinahookandline.com

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A Child’s Haven • Allen Temple CEDC • Alston Wilkes Society • Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate • Blue Tent • Camp Opportunity • Camp Spearhead • Camperdown Academy • Carolina Family Services • Catholic Charities, Diocese of Charleston • Center for Developmental Services • Children’s Cancer Partners of the Carolinas • City of Greenville Parks and Recreation Department • City of Greenville Police Department • Clarity • Clement’s Kindness Fund for the Children • Conestee Foundation • Diligent Hands Gracious Hearts • FAVOR Faces And Voices Of Recovery • Feed & Seed • Foothills Family Resources • Fostering Great Ideas • Friends of the Reedy River • Furman University Bridges to a Brighter Future • Gateway House • Generation Group Homes of Greenville • Girl Scouts of SC, Mountains to Midlands • Graduate Greenville • Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network • Greenville Center for Creative Arts • Greenville County Schools Food & Nutrition Services • Greenville County Schools Lifelong Learning • Greenville Free Medical Clinic • Greenville Literacy Association • Greenville Symphony Association • Greenville Tech Foundation • Greenville Theatre • Greenville Rape Crisis & Child Abuse Center • Greenville Zoo FoundationHArvest Hope Food Bank • Greer Community Ministries • Habitat for Humanity • Harvest Hope Food Bank • Homes of Hope • Jasmine Road • Julie Valentine Center • Legacy Charter School • Legacy Early College High School • LiveWell Greenville • Loaves & Fishes • Meals on Wheels of Greenville • Mental Health America, Greenville County • Metropolitan Arts Council • Meyer Center for Special Children • Mill Community Ministries • NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness, Greenville • Naturaland Trust • OnTrack Greenville • Pendleton Place • Phillis Wheatley Association • Pleasant Valley Connection • Project HOPE Foundation • Project Host • Public Education Partners Greenville County • Rebuild Upstate • Safe Harbor • Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club • SC First Steps to School Readiness • Senior Action • Soteria at Work • South Carolina Children’s Theatre • Speech, Hearing and Learning Center • St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School • Surgeons for Sight • SWITCH • Taylors Free Medical Clinic • The Family Effect • The Frazee Center • The Generous Garden Project • The Music Club of Greenville for Tanglewood Middle School • The Turning Point of South Carolina • The Warehouse Theatre • TreesGreenville • Triune Mercy Center • United Housing Connections • United Ministries • Upstate Forever • Urban League of the Upstate • Washington Center • Welvista • YMCA Teen Services Branch • YouthBASE • YWCA

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2020-2021 Partners:

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; styled by Chelsey Ashford

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HEAD SPACE TOP OFF YOUR SUMMER WARDROBE WITH THESE FASHION-FORWARD HATS

Millie Lewis model Jalisa Jefferson; hair and make-up by Katie Cotton / Cotton Rouge Makeup & Hair Studio

STYLE • THE LOOK

styled by Chelsey Ashford • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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riginally from Colombia and now making her home in Savannah, Georgia, designer Ana Barragan has created


agan has created the stylish ecological brand,

(left to right) Crosby by Mollie Burch Stella top, $168. From Monkee’s of the West End; Dorfman Pacific white hat, $22. From Mast General Store. C+D+M Collection ruffle dress, $37; Jeanne Simmons suede hat, $45. All from The Fringed Gypsy. KUHL Endurawax bush hat, $59. From Sunrift Adventures; GLAM white top, $39. From Vagabond Traders.

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STYLE • THE SHOP Jenny Hall (opposite far right) features clothing for both women and men in her new Greenville boutique, Harringtons. Granddaughter to famed restaurateur Vince Perone, she credits the in-store bar to her Italian ancestry. “You always offer someone who enters your home a glass of wine,” Jenny says. “Those who come here are family.”

SPIRITED STYLE FASHION BLOGGER JENNY HALL PURSUES HER PASSION AT HER NEW BOUTIQUE, HARRINGTONS by Stephanie Trotter • photography by Will crooks

W

Can you pinpoint reasons for your success? Greenville has amazing retailers, but I felt like something was missing. One of my many goals was to cater to everyone. I didn’t want folks to be intimidated. I wanted reasonable price points and high-end price points in the same location. I wanted the shop to be somewhere a college girl can find a top for $40 and her mom can shop here too for a special event.

When did you start in the fashion industry?

hether at work or play, color and fashion have always set the rhythm of Jenny Hall’s life. As she grew up the granddaughter of legendary Furman football player and restaurateur Vince Perone, you might think Jenny would sizzle in the kitchen. But the boutique is where she turns up the heat, showcasing the same business savvy as her Italian grandpa, while draping the masses in showy silks and pretty patterns. Her newest venture, Harringtons, at West Lewis Plaza, is as hot as July in Greenville. The fashion-forward entrepreneur and blogger shares ideas, trends, and how her boutique caters to all shoppers.

I went to JL Mann and my parents always said, if I wasn’t playing soccer, I had to work. My first job was at Limited Too, and then I moved up to Limited Express and Victoria’s Secret. I majored in retail management at USC. My sisters are also into fashion. My twin sister is the PGA rep for Southern Tide, and my baby sister owns Vann & Liv across the street.

Congrats on the new store. How’s it been going since you opened in April?

My twin and I sold vacation packages in Hilton Head right after graduating. We hated it, but loved the beach. I came back to Greenville about 2005 and did some other things. I was working at TPM as a digital strategist and content marketer when I started writing a fashion blog just for fun. My friends kept asking me to text them what to wear and put

Oh my. We were planning on opening in the fall. But local retail sales were strong, so we opened earlier. We did more in our first day than we expected to do in the first month. It’s been insane.

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Ever worked outside of retail?


outfits together for them, and then another friend suggested I start a blog. Before I knew it, businesses in town wanted to collaborate with me. I knew I’d end up back in fashion.

“What I love most about retail is the interaction with people, I want to make them feel good in their clothes, and when they leave, I want them to feel confident.”—Jenny Hall

What should shoppers look for in July? We start receiving early fall pieces in July. I like to start looking for fall staples and think about layering. Maxi skirts are good because you can wear them into fall. The cute sleeveless tops that tie at the shoulder? Pair those with jeans, or a maxi-skirt, and layer. Harringtons, 6 W Lewis Plaza, Greenville. (864) 509-1098, shopharringtons.com; check out the latest styles at @shopharringtons on Instagram.

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The need has always been there. This year, it happens to be greater. Every night in our community, a child goes to bed hungry. Every month, a single parent has to decide between paying rent and buying groceries. And every day, a man living on the street wakes up on an empty stomach and has no idea where his next meal will come from. Y ou can help meet the need in our community. When you give to the Salvation Army, you help us put meals on the table and into the hands of people in need. A $25 monthly donation helps sustain our food assistance programs, now and throughout the year. Consider giving at SalvationArmyGreenville.org.


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Essay From serendipitous encounters in Italy to making room to get lost in everyday moments, writer Lauren Maxwell discovers that creativity abounds while staying fluid.

THE BEAUTY OF AIMLESSNESS WHEN WE LET GO OF OUR AGENDA, LIFE HAS ROOM TO BLOSSOM by LAUREN MAXWELL

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ou should have seen the look on my husband’s face when I stuck my thumb in the air in Southern Italy. “What are you doing?” he asked. “Hitchhiking!” I said, feigning confidence. He was shocked into silence. But to our surprise, the first car that passed slowed to a stop. Someone inside cracked a window and I said in broken, overly enthusiastic Italian, “I need . . . to go . . . to Matera.” They gestured for us to get in. We’d visited a popular vantage point outside the city, and now two strangers in a mystery car were taking us back. Their generosity saved us from navigating public transportation, which seemed to exist, but in a mythical sense, since we hadn’t actually seen a bus appear all afternoon. We chatted amiably the whole way, peppering our conversation with whatever fragments of Italian and English seemed to work. Our driver ventured farther into the city than necessary just to leave us at a convenient spot. After we said goodbye, my husband and I looked at each other, eyes wide. We’d almost gotten stranded on a desolate road in a foreign country. Then we hitchhiked! And made friends. We were accidentally living the international adventure of our dreams. Getting lost is not something I do often—I am a person who always has a plan. I make plans for my plans. When traveling I build loose itineraries ahead of time so that once I arrive, I can relax—but still see everything. However appealing it might be to know where I am going and when, I have also come to understand that getting lost is not all bad. In some ways, it’s essential. Exploring a new city without a schedule brings a sense of discovery and lived experience that no itinerary can provide. Casually weaving through a set of streets allows you to get acquainted with neighborhoods in the way they were meant to be known—slowly, over time, devoting your full presence

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and attention to people and places in front of you—not by looking at a phone. Stumbling into the best focacceria in a small Italian town becomes more memorable, in my experience, than checking off boxes from some guidebook. You might be overwhelmed by local personalities or confusing lines—by trying to recall Italian vocabulary fast enough for it to be useful. By the woman in charge who remembers after one visit that you always want potato rosemary. Who every morning rattles off Italian, letting you know what time they’ll have more. Who— in her callous way—is happy to see you. Getting lost makes room in my brain for new connections between seemingly unrelated things, or as psychologists might call it, free association. When those sparks fly, it helps me push my thinking, or conscious brain, aside to make room for all that is unconscious—the part of our mental composition that facilitates processes like creativity, healing, and memory. Creativity, after all, is just another word for free association, or drawing unexpected links. It’s as important to our mental and emotional well being as it is to art. The good news is that getting lost does not require crossing an ocean. I treasure spacious, meandering days in South Carolina as much as I do in Europe. Their value became clear this spring after I was rejected from a program I hoped would define my next steps and everything to come. As someone who studied opera, of all things, for ten years, someone who entered the job market at the height of the recession, I am cozy with rejection. I understand making it through a selection process requires no small amount of luck. Still, this time felt different. All signs pointed towards yes, so I spent hours willing the opportunity into being. I was propelled by purpose and direction until one day, over email, my hopes were dashed. I retreated and asked the usual questions. Why? Where did I go wrong? Right away I started planning my next application. But then I did something unprecedented: I let myself off the hook. For two months now I have embraced a new sense of aimlessness, not unlike what I felt in the Italian countryside. Like, What should I do today? kind of aimlessness. Like, Of course I have time to go to the hardware store after lunch. Like telling friends, I puttered around my garden this week. Maybe I needed this, I realized. Maybe I’m lost. Either way, it’s refreshing. In a culture that encourages, among other things, checking email 74 times a day—a piece of data from 2014 that has almost certainly multiplied—maybe we could all benefit from more puttering. Sensing this, Germany and France have made it illegal to contact employees on vacation. If anyone emails


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the staff from one German automaker while they’re out of office, their note will automatically self-destruct. What if we normalized doing nothing? No guilt or secondguessing. We could give ourselves the cushion to be more human or move at a less frenetic pace. Here’s what I noticed about my aimless spring. The work that needed to be done still got done. I know what’s coming next and even took some interviews. But I am no longer clawing towards my future. For the first time in my life, I took myself out of the pressure cooker and put my ambition on the counter to cool. Getting lost—in another country, an antique shop, or the nearby woods—is an invitation to discover something of ourselves along the way. Aimless might be the wrong word, but for me—someone chronically preoccupied with forward motion, making progress, and doing something with my life— it feels just right. Lauren Maxwell is a writer living at the southern tip of the Blue Ridge Mountains. She publishes a weekly column called WE’RE ALL FRIENDS HERE.

540 Buncombe Street | 864-467-3100 | UpcountryHistory.org

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Ms. Bea Wright

NOTE WORTHY EVEN IN THE DIGITA L AGE, A WR ITTEN THA NK-YOU NEVER GOES OUT OF ST Y LE by SUSIE WHITE

A

s children, our first lesson in etiquette was learning to say “please” and “thank you.” And at some point, soon after we learned how to form letters with a crayon, our parents began to cajole/require/ bribe/insist that we write thank-you notes for presents received. Note-writing in general seems to be a dying art, especially handwritten thank-you notes. But expressing gratitude this way says so much more than “thank you.” A written note is tangible evidence that you truly care about the other person, not just the gift given or the thoughtfulness shown to you. I don’t know a soul who does not enjoy receiving a thank-you note in the mail—opening an envelope that isn’t junk mail or a bill is truly a treat. A dear friend of mine is masterful at letter writing, so much so that her notes deserve handwritten responses themselves. She sets the mark for how I want my expressions of gratitude to read, to be cherished, long after opening them. Writing a thank-you note gives me good feelings as well, because it requires me to reflect on both the giver and the kindness received. Here are just a few tips on thank-you-note writing: Keep good stationery or note cards, stamps, and writing pens on hand to eliminate that excuse at the outset. Express your thanks at the beginning of the note. You can say “thank you” or “It made my day to receive” or “I am grateful for”—just make sure to communicate that you received the gift. Thank-yous are not limited to acknowledging gifts given, but also to express appreciation for acts of kindness or generosity

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shown. Write a note when you have been included at a dinner party or a neighbor watered your plants for you while you were out of town. In professional situations, take time to handwrite a thank-you to someone for an introduction, an interview, an encouraging conversation or other business-related favor. Your handwritten note will foster good will and leave a positive, lasting impression. Don’t go overboard. Keep the message sincere and truthful. The note need not be long. As a general rule, three sentences are enough: 1) grateful for the gift; 2) how you are enjoying the gift/how the gift helped you; 3) thank them again. I’ve decided that this will be my last column, and I want to express my sincere, personal gratitude to TOWN for including Ms. Bea Wright in this well-crafted magazine. Four years ago, I pitched an idea about a monthly piece that would offer opinions and advice about relationships, etiquette tips, and an observation or two from a Southern woman’s perspective. Out of a joyful, collaborative effort with editor Blair Knobel, Ms. Bea Wright was born. I also appreciate the kind expressions of support from those few who knew Ms. Bea was my nom de plume. Writing as Ms. Bea has been a wonderful privilege and a lot of fun, and hopefully readers have gleaned a tidbit of wisdom or enjoyed a smile or two along the way. Signing off as Ms. Bea for the last time, I am, gratefully, yours truly. Y’all behave.


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Man About TOWN

NUMBER 100 THE M A N REFLECTS ON THE JOUR NEY OF THIS COLUMN OVER THE COURSE OF A LMOST A DECA DE by Steven Tingle

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t’s hard to believe, but this is my one-hundredth “Man About Town” essay. That amounts to more than 50,000 words of personal disclosure. Over the years I’ve written about everything from surviving a Disney Cruise, to turning fifty, to the indecency of hot tubs, to being mistaken for Jim Belushi. From the ups and downs of my romantic entanglements to my ridiculously codependent relationship with my mother. I’ve shared intimate stories involving my family and friends, some of whom are not all that thrilled to see their private moments memorialized in print. And I’ve repeatedly faced every writer’s worst fear—the stranger, or worse yet, friend, who says, “Hey, I’ve got a great idea for your next story.” But despite the variety of experiences I’ve chronicled in these pages, there is one common thread that runs through them—they are all true. If journaling is curative, then for me, Man About Town has been eight years of self-guided therapy. The opportunity to write this column, as well as pen other articles for this magazine has been a blessing. In fact, working as a freelance writer for TOWN has been a form of enlightenment. When I first moved to downtown Greenville

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in the summer of 2012, I felt like a stranger in a strange land. It was light years away from the patchouli-scented air and sideshow atmosphere of downtown Asheville, where I’d been living as an antisocial recluse while trying to figure out what to do with my life. But the assignments I received from TOWN forced me to break out of my cocoon and knock on stranger’s doors. The work took me from the ornate mansions of wealthy philanthropists to the chaotic studios of starving artists. Over the years I’ve interviewed CEOs and attorneys, musicians and chefs, inventors and designers, bartenders and doctors. It’s been a remarkable way to learn about an area and develop a sense of community. And each interview and article has solidified Greenville as my home. I owe a huge debt of gratitude to Blair Knobel, who is not only the editor in chief of this magazine, but also my drinking buddy and dear friend. How she and art director Paul Mehaffey produce this beautiful and thoughtful magazine each month, in the time I’m hard-pressed to cobble together 500 words, is a mystery to me. It’s why I refuse to enter the offices of Community Journals, for fear I might see how the sausage is made. But despite my detachment to the inner workings of this magazine, TOWN is a presence for which I am tremendously thankful. To date, it’s my longest-lasting relationship.


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Next-Gen Visionary Greenville THE

IN

Nick Van Gorp

MEET THE NEW KID IN TOWN DATA DRIVEN CLIENT FOCUSED DETAIL ORIENTED

864.663.2603 | Nick@JHA-SothebysRealty.com

Each office is independently owned and operated


TOWN Extra

GARDEN DELIGHT A WR ITER DISCOVERS THAT THE BEST USE OF SUMMER IS TO ENJOY IT by Beth brown Ables

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leven years ago, at the end of May, I updated my Facebook status: This summer, I’m going to be outside as much as possible. I’m going to read Infinite Jest. I’m going to write a poem every single day. I’m going to create, create, create. No pressure, right? I tell you what—I still haven’t, and probably will never, read Infinite Jest, making the title its own sort of joke. And a poem a day? That’s just not how poems work for me, especially since I am not a poet. Before kids, I was a high school English teacher who married a high school English teacher, making summers a glorious gift and a terrible pressure. Two months off after piles of grading and around-theclock parent emails (things that never take a day off, never disappear when the end-of-the-day bell rings) was a relief, a balm. But I felt that so much concentrated time off should result in something: I should produce, have a project—write. Two months was enough to create a young adult novel about private school kids, an idea I’d always dangle in front of my classrooms of . . . private school kids, trying to scare them into thinking that I’d write about their teenage intrigues. I think they knew better, watching their work pile up on my desk, ungraded week after week. Again and again, mid-August would arrive waving her Back to School flags and rest her judgmental gaze on me: what did you do with your entire summer? Year after year—nothing. I spent it and had nothing to show for it. Not a page, not a line. Empty, unaccomplished. A couple of years ago, my friend Ashley (a much wiser and more accomplished writer than I ever hope to be) listened to me bemoan another summer gone with no writing. She waved that thought away like a no-see-um and told me with a firm, factual voice, “Oh, I never get anything done in the summer. That’s not what that season is for anyway. I write in the winter when there’s nothing else to do.” With that, she gave me the keys to this season, set me free to walk out of my own jail of Getting Something Done. I don’t do any creative work in the summer, nothing really of substance or to a deadline. I have a husband and two kids! Friends to hang out with and cook for! I have a garden! I have too much time on my hands! Whatever the excuse that procrastination sings to me at the moment, I know this: summer is for soaking, for enjoying. I will produce nothing; I’ll waste it. These weeks ahead aren’t for plans—they’re made to enjoy.

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Forsaking her summer must-do list, writer Beth Brown Ables dives into three months of gardening, cooking, and treasured family time.

*** I’m a mother before I’m a writer. Maybe more than that, I’m a mother while I’m a writer. Either way, I have two mouths to feed. The kitchen has long been a refuge for me, a creative space where I can nurture myself and those I love in one fluid motion. When I’m not writing, I’m cooking. When the world is confusing and hurtful and all sharp edges, I know I can go into the kitchen and make sense of things. Our summer garden is both marvel and mystery: we’ll grow 38 eggplant when eight would’ve been fine, watch all summer for even one single watermelon to sprout with nothing but a scraggly vine no matter what we try, or harvest five solitary okra pods. After weeks of waiting for the Cherokee Purples to ripen, damn if those squirrels don’t take one bite and leave the rest as a taunt. Don’t get me started on the squash vine borer.


Before kids I was a high school English teacher who married a high school English teacher, making summers a glorious gift and a terrible pressure.

Always, the cherry tomatoes will keep going, long after my daughter tires of the backyard snack, they keep coming by the bowlful, productive when I’m not. A glut. In a chlorine haze, swimsuit damp on my body and dinner looming, I pour a bowlful of the red fruits into a roasting dish, douse them in olive oil—more than a few glugs, a drowning—poke a garlic clove or two in almost as an afterthought and garnish the entire thing with some scraggly tendrils of thyme from the herb plot outside the back door. I push the pan into a 300-degree oven (any hotter and who could stand it?), and walk off to get a shower or at least peel off the swimsuit. Forty minutes later, the aroma draws me back to the kitchen, a peek in the oven reveals the tomatoes have fallen into themselves all velvety and rich, the garlic golden brown and sweet. Tossed with pasta and some grilled veggies, it is a revelation. I trance

out as I lift the ruby fruits out of the oil, watching them, inhaling them, dreaming. The fragrant oil we use over the next week, drizzled over salads and crusty bread and scrambled eggs. I guess you’d call it tomato confit, but without thought or recipe or snooty culinary terminology. It was laziness with a payoff. It was what summer is for my creative self: soaking in the goldenness, becoming with not a lot of effort. Enjoyment. This is summer cooking, the ingredients at their peak, they need nothing to taste and look and be their best. All we have to do is . . . enjoy. Take in, be present. Luxuriate. Let me eat my fill of these lazy days—these days with my loved ones, these hours spent exploring and hiking and learning and reading and dozing and piddling around. What do I have to show for you in late August? My hands might be empty; my soul’s gonna brim right over. I’ll write in the winter, when the world shoves me inside to sit at my desk. Full once more, I’ll pour out on the page. But for right now, it’s a feasting season. Set the table—there’s a place here for you to enjoy too.

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by Libby McMillan Henson, John Jeter, Lauren Maxwell, J. Morgan McCallum & Jac Valitchka


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As our world reopens, the pull to explore feels stronger than ever. From fly-fishing the Chattooga River to scuba diving coastal shipwrecks near Wilmington, North Carolina, these six Southeastern adventures are a must for every bucket list.

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illustrations by Jamie Green

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Chattooga River Fly-Fishing

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ou are both being oddly chilled, and experiencing the sensation of getting wet simultaneously, without any actual cold or moisture touching your skin. The suction effect of the heft of the water as it surrounds your neoprene-encased legs is as strange a feeling as is each tenuous step of your felt-bottomed boot as you begin to appreciate the river’s rush. It’s soothing and stimulating at once, and you understand why it is that this river runs through the hearts and dreams of many a fisherman (or woman). The Chattooga River begins in the Blue Ridge Mountains in southern North Carolina and forms the border between South Carolina and Georgia. The main tributary of the Tugaloo River, the Chattooga is stocked by the Walhalla Hatchery with rainbow, brook, and brown trout. While just being there among the rhododendrons and ballet-slipper-pink mountain laurel that fringe the banks of the cold, clear Chattooga is a Walden Pond moment, to make a real day of it, book a half- or full-day guided flyfishing wade trip. You’ll emerge dry in your gear, if not victorious in your casting efforts. The Chattooga River Fly Shop in Mountain Rest couldn’t make it easier for the novice or pro alike by providing waterproof waders so you’re one with the water, and not just near it; a pair of felt-bottomed boots to prevent you from slipping on the mossy river rocks; fly rods and reels; and all the flies. Not to mention instruction on how to maximize your casts. “There’s a rhythm to it,” is how Brad Tarbert, one of the guides from the Fly Shop, explains fly-fishing. First there is the cast, then the “mend”—the quick flick of the wrist to loop your line back in order to get it behind the fly—and then line management, which preps you, hopefully, for the gleeful calls of “fish on!” Even so, your best asset, which even your guide or tackle box cannot give you, is patience. —JAC VALITCHKA

Chattooga River Fly Shop, 6832-A Highlands Hwy, Mountain Rest, SC; chattoogariverflyshop.com; half-day trip for two people, $325; full-day for two people, $450.

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STUMPHOUSE TUNNEL

In a secluded corner of Oconee County, near Walhalla, South Carolina, Stumphouse Tunnel cuts through 1,617 feet of blue granite under Stumphouse Mountain. Construction began in 1853 on what was to be a nearly 6,000-foot-long tunnel for the Blue Ridge Railroad, intended to connect Charleston with the Midwest, but that project ran out of steam with the advent of the Civil War, and the tunnel was never completed. In 1951, Clemson University bought the tunnel and used it to age the first of its now-famous blue cheese. Today Stumphouse Tunnel is open to visitors as a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. Stumphouse Tunnel Rd, off Hwy 28, Walhalla, SC; visitoconeesc. com/stumphouse-park

W AT E RY F U N I N OCONEE COUNTY

Taking its name from the Cherokee village, Aconnee (Ae-quo-nee), meaning “land beside water,” Oconee County encompasses the shimmering jewels of lakes Keowee, Hartwell, and Jocassee. But the area’s plentiful waterfalls—22, in fact, and all within a short drive—are also worth discovering. Take the easy 0.3-mile Issaqueena Falls hike, which is next to Stumphouse Tunnel in Sumter National Forest. As you gaze at the frothy chute, imagine the legend of the Native American maiden for whom the falls are named. According to Cherokee lore, Issaqueena jumped into the cascade to escape her tribesmen, who felt betrayed by her love for David Francis, a white trader who lived in what is now the town of Ninety Six. visitoconeesc.com

Scuba Diving WILMINGTON, NC

Not every bucket list features an item that includes “The Graveyard of the Atlantic,” and that’s where my brother, Stephen, and I took our annual bro-cation. Off the coast of Wilmington, North Carolina, hundreds of sunken vessels play host to sharks, barracuda, grouper, and scuba divers who can’t get enough of the intensely immersive experience. We chose the old port city, about a five-and-ahalf-hour drive from Greenville, for a two-day dive excursion to earn our Advanced Open Water certificate, to go deeper than we’d ever gone before.

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n the surface, Wilmington’s vibe is hard to figure out. It’s not Charleston, it’s not Savannah, and it’s not Greenville. It seems to be navigating toward . . . something: a tourist destination (without the horses and carriages), a foodies’ mecca, a living-history maritime museum? “It’s not sure what it wants to be yet,” a Wilmington native told us at the dive shop—we’ll spare his name here. During a Sunday morning stroll along the downtown historic district’s red-bricked streets, we came across a floating bar at the creaky boardwalk, only a few blocks long. A skull-and-crossbones drooped over the joint, named after notorious eighteenth-century pirate Anne Bonny. On deck, a couple dozen people bobbed to the rhythm of the Cape Fear River’s gentle current during a worship service. Gentrification is creeping up the numbered streets; an incongruous mix of beachy bungalows and trailers lies within walking distance of nineteenth-century mansions and $2 million homes rebuilt, probably more than once, after various hurricanes. “It was a little hard to get the full scope of Wilmington since we were focused on scuba and all the energy it takes to do that,” Stephen says, “but if you had the time, you could really enjoy what the city has to offer from an architecture and history standpoint.” —JOHN JETER

Book a dive at Aquatic Safaris Scuba Center, 7220 Wrightsville Ave, Ste A, Wilmington, NC; (910) 392-4386, aquaticsafaris.com


While a day on the Chattooga offers a water adventure closer to home, Wilmington, North Carolina, is a burgeoning seaside town with a fleet of sunken vessels along its coastline awaiting your subaquatic exploration.

+ NC DIVES Our first dives on Saturday took us to The Hyde, a 215-footlong dredge vessel about 18 miles offshore. The next day, we dived the Alexander Ramsey, which like the Hyde, was sunk intentionally as an artificial reef. While nowhere near as romantic as swimming through a pirate ship filled with pieces of eight or centuries-old bottles of wine or rum, the World War II-era ships still make for compelling, though you shouldn’t say “breathtaking,” sightseeing. If you’ve never experienced scuba, diving offers intense moments of Zen. You float in what feels like zero gravity. Bubbles accompany your Darth Vader breathing. Ocean life makes you wonder that much more about Nature’s overwhelming abundance. You are entirely engaged in The Present Moment. “A lot of people don’t know about North Carolina diving,” our dive instructor, Peyton Whisnant, tells our five classmates. “It’s the undiscovered gem.”

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With kids or without, activities abound during a weekend in Western North Carolina. Elk watching in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park is an unrivaled wildlife experience, but don’t miss out on a subterranean adventure inside Linville Caverns.

Elk Watching in Cataloochee Valley GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

Hemmed in by rugged 6,000-foot-high peaks, the secluded Cataloochee Valley is one of the hidden gems of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Beyond its rich history and wild beauty, the valley also offers an extraordinary opportunity to see majestic wild elk in their natural habitat. Elk, which once freely roamed the southern Appalachian Mountains, were decimated in the area through over-hunting by the mid-1800s, but a small herd was reintroduced to the Cataloochee Valley in 2001 and has now grown to over 150 head. Three seasons out of four, the elk congregate here, although they’ve also migrated to nearby Maggie Valley, and the Oconaluftee and Ravensford areas. You’ll have the best viewing success at sunrise or just before sunset, the prime grazing times. Calves are born through the end of June, so the earlier in summer you visit, the smaller they’ll be. (They grow quickly, packing on 140 pounds by their first winter).

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ummer is typically a good time for watching the herd; use your telephoto lens to see bulls “in velvet,” as they begin to grow new antlers. For optimal excitement, go in the fall rutting season, when large bulls bugle and fight for the right to mate. If you wait until spring to visit, stay out of the fields to avoid inadvertently angering a mama by walking near a new calf she’s left hidden in the tall grass. Be sure you have your phone charged, or your camera handy, as the valley affords once-in-a-lifetime photo opportunities. To be safe, stay at least 150 feet away from the herd at all times, and don’t be tempted to feed the elk—it’s dangerous to you and future visitors. Stay on the roadway during rutting season, and take advantage of your vehicle’s sunroof for a safe way to get fantastic photos.—LIBBY McMILLAN HENSON Cataloochee Valley Overlook, 274-304 Cataloochee Entrance Rd, Waynesville, NC. nps.gov/grsm

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You’ll pass historic structures from an original pioneer settlement on your way to the remote Cataloochee Valley, where campsites and miles of wilderness trails are also available. Don’t expect to find amenities of any kind once you leave Highway 276; you’ll need to head to Waynesville for those. PAT I O B I S T R O

This popular outdoortables-only deli serves lunch and brunch, and is about 45 minutes from the valley—a perfect stop after a sunrise adventure. 26 Church St, Waynesville, NC; patio-nc.com FROG LEVEL BREWERY

At this dog-friendly creekfront microbrewery, you’ll find tasty pub food, more than a dozen beers on tap, and live music. With plenty of outdoor seating, Frog Level makes a nice place to wind down under the stars. 56 Commerce St, Waynesville, NC; froglevelbrewing.com OAK HILL ON LOVE LANE

Linville Caverns MARION, NC

The best stories leave you in suspense—and Linville Caverns is brimming with unsolved mysteries. At the only show caverns in North Carolina, the adventure begins when you pull on sturdy boots and don a waterproof jacket to follow a guide half a mile into the belly of Humpback Mountain. Inside, with 2,440 feet of rock, soil, and shimmering minerals over your head, a different world emerges from the darkness. Towering, otherworldly limestone formations drip like flashfrozen waterfalls—some over a million years old. A bottomless pool ripples under your feet as you walk across water; no one knows how deep, but it’s

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Jaw-dropping views, delicious breakfasts, and a gracious hostess make this welcoming B&B—a half-mile walk from downtown Waynesville— stand out from the crowd. For exploring farther afield, 250 waterfalls lie within an hour’s drive of the inn. 224 Love Ln, Waynesville, NC; oakhillonlovelane.com PLEASANT PLACES

If your appreciation of nature extends to wild birds, you’ll find a tantalizing selection of goodies in this downtown shop. 90 N Main, Waynesville, NC; pleasantplaces-waynesville.com

at least 250 feet. And at the right time of year, bats nestle together, suspended in sleep overhead. Shhh, your guide might say, leave them to their dreams. Linville Caverns was first discovered in 1822, when local fishermen followed rainbow and speckled trout down an offshoot of the North Fork River only to see the fish disappear behind stone and into the mountain. Years later, during the Civil War, army deserters from both sides stumbled upon the same yawning entrance to the caverns, taking shelter for months before smoke from their campfire led to capture. Over the years it has passed hands from


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public to private ownership, been ravaged by floods, and is now protected and preserved as a natural habitat and historic site. While the cavern keeps a few secrets to this day—from the depths of rock-bottom and the age of its grandest stalagmites and stalactites, to the truth behind favorite hauntings and folktales—your guide is sure to leave you inspired and informed at the end of this exciting 30-minute tour.—J. MORGAN McCALLUM Linville Caverns. Open Thurs–Mon; admission, $10. 19929 US-221 North Marion, NC. (828) 756-4171, linvillecaverns.com

+ PRE- AND POST-SPELUNKING FUN Before your tour begins, take advantage of picnic tables for games or lunch, the on-property creek for wading and fishing, or the nearby public-access swimming pools. After your tour, don’t miss nearby Linville Falls for a moderate hike and spectacular views.

+ INSIDER TOUR TIP Ask your guide about the many ghost stories—they’re not always told on the usual tour.

+ BEST TIMES TO VISIT October–April: when Tricolor and Brown Bats are hibernating inside May: when wildflowers like Indian Paintbrushes and Lady Slippers bloom

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REFUELING STOPS W E D G E B R E W I N G C O M PA N Y

Exit the river at this local watering hole in Asheville’s River Arts District. After drying off and deflating your tubes, revive yourself with Wedge’s craft beer and a rotating roster of neighborhood food trucks. On a hot day, their Julian Price Pilsner is sure to hit the spot. 37 Paynes Way, Asheville; wedgebrewing.com

ALL SOULS PIZZA

Also in the River Arts District, All Souls highlights local ingredients and wood-fired pies made from fresh-milled flour and regionally grown grains. Dynamic starters and salads shine alongside their pizza, and all can be enjoyed outside in a laid-back garden setting. 175 Clingman Ave, Asheville; allsoulspizza.com

NEW BELGIUM BREWING

Around the corner from All Souls Pizza, this brewery offers a bigger window into the world of craft beer. Sit on their patio overlooking the river you just traveled while sampling classics like Fat Tire, their beloved amber ale, and Trippel, a big Belgian-style beer that’s had a cult following since the ‘90s.

+ RIDING THE RIVER Anything goes on the French Broad; you can rent tubes or bring your own. Rent from outfitters along the water or purchase your own ride from a sporting-goods store. Either way, here’s a tip: buying a tube for your cooler is always a good idea.

21 Craven St, Asheville; newbelgium.com/visit/asheville

Beat the heat this summer with a cool float down the French Broad River in Asheville, North Carolina, or a bike trip along the shady Virginia Creeper Trail in southwestern Virginia.

—LIBBY MCMILLAN HENSON

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French Broad River ASHEVILLE, NC

Steadying the inner tube with my right hand, I take a breath and jump in, hitting the water with a splash. No longer tethered to solid ground, I let the current pull me away. Now it finally feels like summer. Tubing down Asheville’s French Broad River is a quintessential way to survive the mid-year Carolina heat. I always know it’s time to float once it feels too hot to step outside. For my last trip, I gathered friends, sunscreen, and a few cold drinks and started driving north. After we arrived at Hominy Creek River Park, a popular “put-in” near downtown Asheville, our group approached the water and leapt in, one right after the other. Some were swept downstream quickly, while others lagged behind. I used a low-hanging branch to propel myself towards my fleet. Reaching for a friend’s hand, we tied ourselves together, adjusted our hats, and set sail. There’s a particular satisfaction that comes from guiding yourself down Asheville’s segment of the French Broad River State Trail, a 117-mile blueway designated by North Carolina in 1978. The trail starts in the southwestern part of the state and runs through four counties before fading into Tennessee. It’s lined with inviting picnic areas, access points, and campsites to encourage recreation.

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Some parts of the French Broad require real experience or skill, but floating through the heart of Asheville is an easy, soothing ride. There are no rapids, so kayakers, paddlers, and tubers are all free to wave hello, and the trip is undeniably refreshing. On our river ride, my group told stories of summer and listened to our laughter bounce off the banks. Together we admired the trees offering shade and shelter. We may have only gone an hour up the road, but to our delight, real life felt a world away. —LAUREN MAXWELL

Book a tub trip at Zen Tubing, 1648 Brevard Rd, Asheville, NC. (855) 936-8823, zentubing.com

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The Virginia Creeper Trail

DAMASCUS, VA

One of the prettiest multiuse trails in the entire country invites cyclists of all skill levels, while also attracting walkers, runners, horseback riders, and even cross-country skiers. Named for the steam engine that once chugged along its 34.3-mile length, the Virginia Creeper Trail runs between Abingdon, Virginia (near Bristol), and the Mount Rogers National Recreation area just above North Carolina. On it, you’ll discover no less than 47 trestle bridges, along with picnic shelters, hiking trails, and postcard views aplenty. Don’t be daunted by the trail’s length or its 1,100foot elevation change. Shuttle services in Abingdon and also at the halfway point of Damascus take visitors (and their bikes) to either end or to the midpoint. Want to coast the 17 miles downhill from Whitetop Station in the east to the low point of Damascus? No problem. Prefer to pedal either half of the trail then get a ride back to your car? Piece of cake. Dedicated cyclists can bike the Creeper’s entire length one-way, or tackle the impressive feat of a round-trip ride. The shuttle from end-to-end takes an hour and a half; pedaling the full length takes 5–8 hours. Bike-rental shops in both Abingdon and Damascus offer mountain bikes, cruisers, and even tandems. Personal bikes are welcome on the shuttles, and reservations are highly recommended.

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long the Virginia Creeper’s route lie fishing and geocaching stops, access to restrooms, and displays that recount the area’s rich history. The only remaining original train depot on the trail is Green Cove Station. No longer a community hub, Green Cove’s former post office and general store now serve as a comfort stop, offering soft drinks, snacks, and souvenirs. Your best bet for this gorgeous adventure is to set up base in lovely historic Abingdon, where all sorts of temptations—galleries, theaters, spas, and restaurants—await to entertain you when you’re not pedaling or trekking.—LIBBY McMILLAN HENSON

BIKE RENTALS BLUE BLAZE BIKE AND SHUTTLE

This shop even offers shuttles to/from a full-moon ride. Its location on the trail’s halfway point makes planning a breeze. 226 W Laurel Ave, Damascus, VA; blueblazebikeandshuttle.com

STAY THE MARTHA WASHINGTON I N N A N D S PA

The former estate of Gen. Robert Preston following the War of 1812, this welcoming Abingdon landmark offers weary trail-riders a place to unwind and be pampered. 150 W Main St, Abingdon, VA; themartha.com

EAT T H E TAV E R N

The eighth-oldest tavern in the US, this 1779 watering hole will have you looking over your shoulder for a revolutionary soldier. Be sure to ask about its roster of illustrious past visitors. 222 E Main St, Abingdon, VA; abingdontavern.net

128 PECAN

It’s difficult to categorize the wide-ranging menu at this quirky local favorite; just trust us and go. Lunch and dinner options are so appealing, you might even try it twice. 128 Pecan St SE, Abingdon, VA; 128pecan.com

Virginia Creeper Trail Welcome Center, 300 Green Spring Rd, Abingdon, VA. vacreepertrail.org

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Good food. Good music. Good people giving back. For you. For our community. For euphoria. TICKETS ON SALE NOW // SEPTEMBER �����

euphoriagreenville.com


eat drink FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

In addition to a diverse menu featuring creative twists on modern American fare, CAMP shakes up dreamy cocktails, like the Rose Colored Glasses with BarSol Pisco, lemon, lime, strawberry, rose, and aquafaba (below).

The newest kid on the Table 301 block, CAMP elevates modern cuisine with savvy dishes.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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E D • CITY DISH

CAMP OUT MODER N A MER ICA N CUISINE A ND COCKTA ILS SHINE AT TA BLE 301’S NEWEST DOW NTOW N JEWEL by M. Linda Lee • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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CAMP, 2 E Broad St, Greenville. (864) 514-2267, campgvl.com

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Chef’s Choice

A TASTE OF CHEF DREW ERICKSON’S FAVORITES FROM CAMP’S MENU

Dumplings

Roasted pork belly and shrimp are blended together to form the filling of these delicious dumplings, accompanied by cashews, ponzu dressing, micro cilantro, and Mexican chile oil.

Tuna Tartare

Break off pieces of the free-form puffed-rice crisp to scoop up the cool, chunky mix of raw tuna and avocado, garnished with crunchy watermelon radish “flowers,” stamped out with a mini biscuit cutter.

Roasted Lamb Chop

Two elegant Frenched lamb chops crown this entrée, alongside salt-baked beets and pomegranate seeds. Use the pita triangles to sop up the scrumptious Middle Eastern muhammara sauce, a purée of toasted bread, walnuts, and roasted red peppers.

Photograph of interior (above) by Savannah Bockus

tuffed with merguez, a single calamari body bathes in a pool of claret-red sauce, which achieves its remarkable depth of flavor from a purée of roasted tomatoes, garlic, and brulée onions, charred until they are caramelized and sweet. On another plate, mussels have been cooked in wine and aromatics, removed from their shells, then breaded and fried. Their crispy texture complements the silky potato purée that’s served alongside—a clever reversal of the Belgian standard moules frites. This is how Executive Chef Drew Erickson reimagines and elevates familiar dishes at CAMP, which opened in one of the “jewel box” spaces on Camperdown Plaza in late May. He calls his menu “modern American,” acknowledging that he sees America as a medley of people from around the globe. Small plates wander from pork tostadas—a recipe that sous-chef Diego Campos learned from his Mexican mother, and made with tortillas that are hand-pressed in-house—to croque monsieur croquettes, which reflect the classic French technique Drew learned while working with Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in Napa Valley for four years. Erickson is adamant about not pigeon-holing himself or his staff into cooking one particular type of cuisine. “My priority was to create an environment where everyone has the creative freedom to bring what they want to the table. We could have an amazing pasta dish one day and a tuna tartare the next. The food doesn’t fall under one category, but it’s all cohesive and works together. The menu is really expressive of our backgrounds as a team.” It’s also an expression of fresh, seasonal produce, much of which Upstate farmer Nathan Vannette at Growing Green Family Farms raises specifically for the restaurant. A light, mid-century-modern décor decks out the buzzing dining room, with its bamboo-dowl-lined walls, white-oak tables, leaf-green upholstered chairs, and a constellation of bubble-shaped light fixtures suspended overhead like full moons. On one side of the restaurant is the open kitchen and chef’s counter, while across the room, the long bar is backed by a window that can be opened like a garage door, weather permitting, to invite walk-up orders. Upstairs, the rooftop bar mixes cocktails with a city view. But it’s the chef’s counter that Drew is fired up about. “A lot of kitchens are hidden away, and you’re in a hot, steamy space and it’s thankless,” the chef explains. “[At CAMP,] the kitchen is in the dining room, so there’s that instant gratification. I’m most excited about having this platform where I can interact with and feed people and make them feel special and nurtured.” So unwind, explore, and let your taste buds roam. It’s all part of the culinary journey at CAMP.


Photograph of interior (above) by Savannah Bockus

Chef Drew Erickson (left) helms the kitchen at CAMP, turning out a tantalizing selection of small plates like ceviche, dumplings, and tuna tartare. (The cocktails also shine here.) Arguably the best seats in the house, the chef’s counter (above, left) allows diners to interact with Chef Drew as he cooks.

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E D • SWEET SPOT

INSIDE SCOOP CA ITLIN CL A RE DELI VERS FROZEN F UN AT HER NEW CREA MERY IN OVER BROOK by Ruta Fox • photograph by Paul mehaffey

COLD, HARD FACTS Homemade waffle cones are the vehicle of choice for Clare’s scoops (flavors include non-dairy coconut), which you can garnish with any of the 16 toppings and mix-ins. Designing your own shakes and sundaes is another way to get your ice cream fix. In the freezer case, check out the ice cream sandwiches made with cookies and brownies from local Buttercream Bakehouse.

oly cow! A huge 18-wheeler truck pulls up to the front of a tiny storefront in the Overbrook neighborhood to deliver 250 gallons of fresh milk direct from a Wisconsin dairy. A few days later, delighted neighbors will line up for frozen treats in bright and airy Clare’s Creamery, making Caitlin Clare’s girlhood dream come true. Obsessed with ice cream since the age of 15, Caitlin and her sister, Molly, both worked at the same ice cream shop in their hometown in Ohio, continuing throughout college. When Caitlin’s parents urged her to put down the scoop and get “a real job,” she took a ten-year hiatus to dip into digital marketing. Through it all, she never gave up on her sweet dream, and after attending Penn State University’s Ice Cream 101, she dove into ice cream full-time. Caitlin and Molly started selling their smallbatch frozen confection from a cart downtown last May, and it was a stone-cold hit. Now, they dish out handcrafted, super-premium ice cream—which takes two days to make and contains 14 percent butterfat—in 16 core flavors, plus several seasonal specialties. Clare’s Creamery is the perfect place for everyone— destined to be part of this summer’s fun. Clare’s Creamery, 1635 E North St, Greenville. clarescreamery.com. Open Mon–Fri, 2–9pm; Sat & Sun, noon– 9pm.

Honey Lavender

From simple scoops to decadent brownie sundaes and banana splits, Caitlin Clare’s frozen treats are a creamy delight.

Mint Chocolate Chip

Raspberry Chocolate Chip

Honey Vanilla

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SC.EDU

I AM MADE OF WELCOMING SPIRIT. I AM SOUTH CAROLINA. The University of South Carolina is dedicated to creating a welcoming, inclusive environment. Students from every county in South Carolina — including Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson — come together with others from all 50 states and more than 100 countries to form lifelong bonds as members of the Carolina family.


E D • KITCHEN AID

Forget the pickled relish and pecan chicken salad of bygone baby showers, and enjoy a refreshed version of this Southern classic featuring lemon zest and heaps of dill.

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L SUMMER SANDO TR A NSFOR M CL ASSIC SOUTHER N CHICKEN SA L A D W ITH BR IGHT INGREDIENTS by Kathryn Davé • photograph by Jivan Davé

et me give you the worst-case scenario first: somebody’s baby shower, a distant cousin perhaps. Skewers of watery fruit, crystal bowls of mixed nuts, small squishy triangles of chicken-salad sandwiches. The chicken salad is probably a traditional Southern recipe, studded with grapes and nuts or, worse, chopped hardboiled eggs and pickle relish. For years, these sweet, gloppy chicken salads, starring ingredients that should never be bathed in mayonnaise, turned me off to the dish entirely. There’s a good chance I’ve just offended someone. Chicken salad is personal that way, and the ingredients that horrify me may be the ones you adore. Luckily, I was introduced to a different kind of chicken salad in what I consider to be ideal circumstances for the Southern classic: a beach house kitchen in July, counter sticky with citrus from SOLO cup cocktails. Damp bathing suit, a chill from the AC prickling my legs. Thick slices of seedy bread in the toaster getting golden and crispy. A layer of fresh Bibb lettuce and a scoop of chicken salad—hurriedly stirred together that morning, bright and tangy and fresh thanks to yogurt, lemon, celery, and heaps of dill. At last, the proper team of ingredients had been assembled, bringing the brightness and balance I always believed chicken salad was missing. This recipe has become my chicken salad now, the staple of beach sammies and summer lake picnics at my house. When I make it, I am as generous with dill as our mothers and grandmothers were with the pecans and grapes. Someday—God help me—I may find myself preparing this same dillforward chicken salad in dainty servings for a daughter-in-law’s baby shower. Who knows what she’ll think? What I know: traditions that can’t evolve are traps, not treasures.

There’s a good chance I’ve just offended someone. Chicken salad is personal that way, and the ingredients that horrify me may be the ones you adore.

DILL CHICKEN SALAD Serves 6

INGREDIENTS: 4 chicken breasts 1–2 tsp. dried dill (to taste) Olive oil ½ cup plain whole-milk yogurt ½ cup mayonnaise 4 stalks and leaves of celery, finely chopped 1 bunch scallions, finely chopped (approx. ¾ cup) ½ cup fresh dill, chopped Zest and juice of 1 lemon Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 400ºF. 2. Place chicken breasts on a sheet pan lined with foil. Drizzle olive oil over both sides of the chicken breasts, rubbing to coat evenly. Season generously with salt, pepper, and dried dill. Roast chicken until a meat thermometer reads 165ºF, about 20–25 minutes. Let chicken rest for 10 minutes. 3. Transfer cooked chicken to the bowl of a KitchenAid mixer and carefully pour in any accumulated juices from the sheet pan. Quickly shred the chicken using the mixer’s paddle attachment, or alternatively, shred by hand in a large bowl, using two forks. 4. In a large serving bowl, combine yogurt, mayonnaise, celery, scallions, lemon zest and juice, and fresh dill. Stir until mixed; taste and season with salt and pepper. Add in the shredded chicken and stir until well combined. Refrigerate chicken salad until ready to eat; serve on sandwiches or with lettuce and crackers. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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MENAGE - A - FREAK: A CELEBRATION OF HOPS FRIDAY, JULY 31st SATURDAY, AUGUST 1st 2020

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Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program is updated regularly, and now The Anchorage is offering a weekly online market featuring pantry items, take-home dinners, and more. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L,

Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and pan-seared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass.

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun &

Mon. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D, SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864) 412-8677, theburrowgville.com N E W CAMP Tucked into one of the “jewel box” spaces on Camperdown Plaza, CAMP is the newest venture from the Table 301 group. The menu, designed by executive chef Drew Erickson, sparkles with regional American small plates—Wagyu beef corndog, Yucatán-style pork tostadas, stuffed calamari—reimagined with twists inspired by the four years Erickson spent working with über-chef Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in California.

$$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 E Broad St, Greenville. (864) 514-2267, campgvl.com

D, SBR.1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com

$-$$, D. Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites— like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com NEW

Husk Smokin’ Barbeque After spending a few months off the docket, this West End staple returns with a refreshed menu focused on all things meat. Continuing in their sustainable partnerships and quality craft, pitmaster David Jensen throws out ribs, brisket, pulled pork, and more, plus a host of scrumptious sides. Expect a heavy tribute to bourbon and whiskeys at the bar, and don’t worry, you can still order a side of those famous pork rinds. $-$$. L, D, SBR.

722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskbbq.com

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-

crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily),

SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant bar bites accompany wines by the glass or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their multicourse tastings. $$-$$$$, D (Wed–Sat); L, SBR (Fri–Sun). 2510 Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

N E W Reid’s Fine Foods Whether it’s a salmon plate, a bottle of wine, or a delectable pastry, Reid’s has everything a foodie heart could desire. Newly opened in the former Caviar & Bananas space, this Charlotte staple is a one-stop shop for breakfast, lunch, and a last-minute dinner party cheese board. Grab anything on the menu to go, or settle into the likes of a flat-iron steak with squash & Brussels sprouts hash, chimichurri butter, and a truffle cabernet sauce. B, L, D.

$-$$. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 283-0940, reids.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D, FSBR. Closed Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées from Chef Scott Kroener range from sashimi-grade tuna and pan-

seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed.

13 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs. $$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all—whether you’re a vegan or meat lover. $, L. Closed Sun. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR

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Remember the moments.

BARS & BREWERIES TM

Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with elevated bar food. Co-owners Sarah Cochran and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$.

L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

Carolina Bauernhaus Enjoy the delights of autumn with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Mon & Tues. 556 Perry Ave. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

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N E W EXILE There’s a new bar in town, with nary a television or wing in sight. If you’re craving an expertly crafted cocktail (or a local beer) in a space with style, this will become your go-to spot. Ideal for a predinner stop, an after-work drink, or for a nightcap. Closed Sun–Tues. 9 Anderson

St. exilegvl.com

Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. Wed–Sat. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

N E W Servus Biergarten Housed in a former feed and seed in downtown Simpsonville, Servus Biergarten adds an international accent to the new Warehouse at Vaughns, a smorgasbord of family-friendly eateries with plenty of indoor and outdoor seating. From doppelbock to dunkel, German beers flow freely here, so stake out a seat at the bar to discover your new favorite. Of course, you’ll want to pair it with menu items such as bretzels, wurst platters, and more authentic Saxon fare. $. L, D. Closed Mon.

109 W Trade St, Simpsonville. (864) 7571660, servusgreenville.com

Swordfish Cocktail Club The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St. Wed–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 434-9519, swordfishcocktails.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885,

N E W Taxi House Wines The bright yellow sliver of a building in the Village’s plaza was once the neighborhood taxi stand, hence this curated shop’s moniker, Taxi House Wines. Now, in collaboration with The Anchorage, the vino destination offers more than 80 unique wine selections, chosen from small, familyowned wineries that focus on sustainability.

N E W Juniper Hop on the outdoor elevator at Camperdown Plaza to reach Juniper, the rooftop lounge atop the new AC Hotel. Expansive views abound, whether you’re sipping cocktails on the “lawn” at the Secret Garden, sharing modern American dishes in the plant-bedecked Greenhouse, or noshing on stone-fired pizza at Fire Box. True to its name, Juniper rolls out a bar program highlighting gin-based libations— complete with a gin trolley for tableside pours. $$-$$$. D. Closed Sun. 315 S Main

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Spreadsheets and Deadlines hazy IPA, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you.

fireforge.beer

St. junipergvl.com

Closed Sun & Mon. 586 Perry Ave. Tues–Sat, noon–8pm. (864) 207-0685, taxihousewines.com

1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com


Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underresourced teens and adults. The fresh space presents a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. Getting hangry? A selection of treats is also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sun. 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info

Cohesive Coffee Take a seat and sip on a drinkable work of art at Cohesive Coffee at The Junction. Choose from a varied mix of coffee and tea creations to enjoy while working and studying—or book the shop as a unique venue for your next event. From a new coffee drinker to a coffee connoisseur, there’s a little something for everyone. $, B,

L, D. Closed Sunday. 301 Airport Road Unit. (864) 202-6538, cohesivecoffee.com NEW

Dobrá Tea Tea is the new coffee at this cheery café in the Village of West Greenville, where you can choose among more than 100 different types of tea from around the globe. Pair your favorite cup with a gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian snack from the list of sweets and savories. $-$$. B, L, D. 1278 Pendleton St. (864) 520-1832, dobrateasc.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. The coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com

Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted beer. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

CELEBRATING INDEPENDENCE DAY IN THE...

Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community. $-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

O-CHA Tea Bar A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

Old Europe Located in the West End, Old Europe satisfies your sweet tooth with dozens of decadent pastries and desserts. Éclairs and cookies pair well with an extensive coffee selection, while savory breakfast items are always on hand. Sink into a slice of opera cake, paired with a glass of Champagne. $, B, L, D. 716 S. Main St. Sun–Thurs, 8am– 9pm, Fri–Sat, 8am–11pm. (864) 775-0210, oldeuropedesserts.com N E W The Spatula Café It can be challenging to find a lunch spot that satisfies both meat-lovers and vegans, but Spatula Café does, and then some. Open for breakfast and lunch, seven days a week, Spatula offers dishes like a tofu scramble wrap alongside a prosciutto bagel, and duck alongside marinated tempeh. Don’t just focus on the meals, though, because their baked goods truly shine. Check out the vegan cinnamon roll, it’s delectable to any type of eater.

$, B, L. 118 Smythe St, Greenville. (864) 2367467, thespatulacafe.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

Sun Belly Café Week by week, the full plant-based menu at this westside spot changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re

"We’ve worked with Karen Turpin for over ten years and there’s no one else we would trust more to have by our side when choosing the perfect home for our family! Real estate is about relationships and it’s clear the Marchant Real Estate family understands that. Karen has not only been a trusted advisor to us professionally, she’s also become a great friend we feel honored to keep working with." - KATIE AND BLAKE HOWARD

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Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out coldpressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into a made-to-order bowl. Paninis, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B,

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207

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on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L.

1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

220 Riverplace St Unit 501 | Greenville

3 Bedrooms | 3 Full + 1 Half Baths | MLS# 1443322

$1,950,000

Virginia Hayes | 864.313.2986 | 220RiverplaceStreetUnit501.com Coldwell Banker Caine

Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sun. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC 387 Beechwood Drive | Greer

6 Bedrooms | 6 Full + 1 Half Baths | MLS# 1434136

$1,750,000

Nicole Seppala | 864.423.7634 Laura Simmons & Associates

Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed

Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

3836 Pennington Road | Greer

4 Bedrooms | 3 Full Baths | MLS# 1434016 Tim Keagy | 864.905.304 | CTKTeam.com Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner Realtors®

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Kairos Greek Kitchen This Charleston-originated spot serves up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even

before you dip them into the tzatziki sauce. Their choose-your-own approach leads to creative salad combos, and you can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864)

520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Mon. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sun. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on authentic Colombian food, like arepas and patacones, at Sacha’s. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089 N E W TruBroth TruBroth takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a varied mix of Vietnamese staples, healthhappy bites, and coffee. $$, L, D. 36A S Main

St, Travelers Rest. Sun–Thurs. (864) 610-0513, trubrothcoffee.com

EUROPEAN Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect complement to a coffee from Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B, L. 147 Welborn St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm. @sc_bakeroom

Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made


pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli. $$-$$$, L (Sat–

Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine on the corner of River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list. Cap off your meal with the housemade limoncello gelato.

Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

$$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170

Luna Rosa The streets of Italy intersect the streets of Greenville at Luna Rosa’s fresh spot on South Main, bringing more than just tasty gelato to the table.The Luna Rosa family celebrates the concept that community starts in the kitchen, and they welcome

River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

host your next event with us. NOW BOOKING!

3’s Greenville Golf & Grill is a completely renovated par 3 golf course with 12 unique and challenging holes designed by some of the world's leading golf course architects. You're invited to come hang with us around our cozy fire pits and enjoy our new course design and grasses as well as delicious food, wine and cocktails served with authentic Southern hospitality in a casual, laid-back 3’s Greenville Golfatmosphere & Grill is a completely renovated par 3 golf course unlike anything in town. 3’s Greenville Golf &else Grill is a complete

with 12 unique and challenging holes designed by some of the world's leading

Photograph by Andrew Huang

with 12invited unique and challenging holes b For timesisor information call 864.233.6336 or uscourse online at 3s.golf golf course architects. You're to come hang with us around ourdesigned cozy fire pits 3’s Greenville Golf &teeGrill amore completely renovated par 3visit golf and enjoy our course newby course design andYou're grassesinvited asleading well asto delicious golf architects. come food, hangwine wi with 12 unique and challenging holes designed some of the world's EIGHTH STATE BREWING and cocktails served with authentic Southern hospitality in a casual, laid-back Celebrating the happiest first anniversary of andus enjoy our new course and grasses a golf course architects. You're invited to come hang with around our cozy firedesign pits atmosphere unlike anything else in town. If a flight of naturally blue, green, and orange beers sounds intriguing, you’d best make a 3’s Greenville. We love Greenville, and want and cocktails served with authentic Southern ho beeline for Eighth State Brewing. Call them untraditional, but Cameron Owen Adamour new course design and grasses as well as delicious food, wine and and enjoy Cribbs let their brewing skills go wild in the former Claussen Bakery space, in taps filled atmosphere to thank allorofmore you who have enjoyed For tee times information calla864.233.6336 or us. visit us online at 3s.golf andand cocktails served with authentic Southern hospitality in casual, laid-back with off-beat libations such as Blue Skies (sour ale fruited with blueberries passionfruit) and Abiogenesis (Imperial stout with Tahitian vanilla and banana). Also on the menu atmosphere unlike anything else in town. are smoothie-style hard seltzers infused with creative combinations of exotic ingredients For tee times or more information call 864.233.63 (Morello cherry, raspberry, and lemon, anyone?). Savory accompaniments run the gamut from seasonal salads to stecca sammies. $-$$, L, D. Closed Mon–Wed. 400 Augusta St, Ste 140. (864) 609-4590, eighthstatebrewing.com

For tee times or more information call 864.233.6336 or visit us online at 3s.golf

3’s Greenville Golf & Grill is a completely renovated par 3 golf course with 12 unique and challenging holes designed by some of the world's leading golf course architects. You're invited to come hang with us around our cozy fire pits and enjoy our new course design and grasses as well as delicious food, wine and cocktails served with authentic Southern hospitality in a casual, laid-back atmosphere unlike anything else in town. For tee times or more information call 864.233.6336 or visit us online at 3s.golf

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you into theirs for a meal. From cool gelato options—think exotic mango or piña colada—or a warm Monte Cristo. There’s plenty of flavor to fulfill your cravings.

MAULDIN THEATRE COMPANY

$-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 123 S Main St. (864) 241-4040, lunarosagelato.com

Pasta Addict This Italian haven satisfies at West End outdoor food hall Gather GVL. From gnocchi to tortellini, indulging in cheesy goodness is easy out of their iconic cone containers. Pair your favorite bottle of vino with a bowl of fresh spaghetti alla chitarra, featuring San Marzano D.O.P. tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, toasted breadcrumbs, and Addict oil. $, D, Sun lunch. Closed Mon. 126 Augusta St. (864) 404-0095, pastaddict.com

N E W Paloma This restaurant on the ground floor of the chic AC Hotel is a new hotspot in downtown Greenville. The wraparound bar takes center stage in the stunning space, where glass walls open onto a small covered patio. Charcuterie and cheese boards and Spanish-inspired small plates by Chef Fernando Coppola complement house cocktails such as the Wild Flower, a vibrant coral-colored quaff made with peach vodka, Aperol, and lemon, garnished with edible flowers. $$-$$$. D. 315 S Main St.

(864) 720-2950, palomagvl.com

Ristorante Bergamo Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sun

Unparalleled Experience UnrivaledExperience Service Unparalleled Unrivaled Satisfaction Service Unmatched

& Mon. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

Stella’s Southern Brasserie Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, French staples like blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen are served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky

Unmatched Satisfaction

Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 6266900, stellasbrasserie.com

PIZZA

Honored as the #1 Small Team Honored as company wide!

Coastal Crust Now in the Village of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River Farms. Check out the aptly-named West Village pie, a classic pepperoni pizza punched up with burrata, caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage.

the #1 Small Team company wide!

Let us put our years of experience in the Upstate market to work for you!

Jennifer Van Gieson 864.590.4441 jvangieson@cdanjoyner.com

Sam Van Gieson 864.630.4708 svangieson@cdanjoyner.com

Summer Hocker in the Kaleigh Trammell Whims Let us put our yearsStyles of experience Upstate market to work 864.421.4286

Jennifer Van Gieson shocker@cdanjoyner.com 864.590.4441 100 J U LY 20 2 1 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m jvangieson@cdanjoyner.com Summer Styles Hocker

guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk

Dr, Greenville. (864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Sidewall Pizza Company This pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 35 S

Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

Stone Pizza Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, this spot is ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends. Stone and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with housemade mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked in a wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat & Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave.

(864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

TA C O S Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails. $-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. $, L, D. 300 River

St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

$$, L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is for you! simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. The shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where

864.380.1117 Sam Van Gieson kwhims@cdanjoyner.com

864.630.4708 svangieson@cdanjoyner.com Kaleigh Trammell Whims 864.380.1117

TOWN accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.


FRAMES • WORKS OF ART • GOLD LEAFING • SINCE 1987 BROKEN FRAME

RESTORED

IN PROGRESS

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ART CLEANING PROCESS

Cleaned

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HELP US HELP VETERANS

Visit TheGreenlawFoundation.org JU LY 2021 I

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Thru July 3

A AU KARATE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS With over 100 years of history and 700,000 members nationwide, the Amateur Athletic Union is as popular as it is exciting. Come witness the best of the best karate champs as they model their greatest moves. The AAU has donated more than 170,000 Feeding Children Everywhere meals, 10,000 clothing items, and 3,000 bottles of water to survivors of natural disasters, so you can feel good for giving them your support. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, times vary. Free. (407) 934-7200, aaukarate.org

Thru Sept 4

SALLEY MAVOR: SOCIAL FABRIC The Upcountry History Museum has partnered with award-winning fiber artist Salley Mavor on a second exhibition project: Social Fabric. Salley’s rich miniature worlds are bursting with hand-stitched characters, props, and scenery, all crafted with her distinctive blend of materials and personal style. The exhibition offers a three-dimensional look at cultural diversity, migration, and the beauty of humanity— making it a perfect artistic experience for all ages. Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10; children (4-18), $8. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

Thru Sept 5

GREENVILLE DRIVE After being benched last season owing to COVID, the Greenville Drive is back at the bat and raring to hit one out of the park. Come on out to the ballgame to watch

Family Owned, Family Focused. Our commitment to the families we serve is reflected in everything we do. Let us help you create a meaningful experience that best fits your needs. Downtown Chapel (864) 232-6733

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Northwest Chapel & Cremation Center (864) 294-6415

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Southeast Chapel (864) 688-1600

thomasmcafee.com

Photograph courtesy of JL Fulks

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Greenville Drive | Thru Sept 5

Photograph courtesy of Greenville Drive

Town Scene


Photograph courtesy of JL Fulks

TD SATURDAY MARKET If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Set your alarm on Saturday mornings and get downtown early to shop for a variety of summer produce, including seasonal delights such as blueberries, peaches, squash, and tomatoes. Being healthy never tasted so good! Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Sat, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

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COOKING CLASSES: BALLPARK HOME RUNS AND LOWCOUNTRY LEGENDS

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Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Dates & times vary. General admission, $10. (864) 240-4500, greenvilledrive.com

Sharpen your cooking game this summer by signing up for these two hands-on classes at Greenville Tech’s new commercial kitchen in Poe West. On Thursday, it’s all about the ball game, as you learn to make kicked-up corndogs and funnel cakes from scratch. South Carolina classics Frogmore stew (aka Lowcountry Boil) and banana pudding are on the menu for Friday, along with foolproof techniques for frying green tomatoes.

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the Drive play at their home field and appreciate all those things you missed last summer about baseball in Greenville: hotdogs, beer, the scale model of Fenway Park’s Green Monster, and, of course, Reedy Rip’It.

Truist Hospitality and Innovation Center, 556 Perry Ave, Ste B114, Greenville. Ballpark Home Runs: Thurs, 5:30–9pm. $79. Lowcountry Legends: Fri, 5:30–9pm. $99. (864) 250-8835, poewest.com/events-stories

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SOUNDS OF SUMMER MUSIC SERIES FOUNTAIN INN Fresh air, live music, good company—what better way to spend a summer Friday evening? Grab the family, load up your lawn chairs, and head for Commerce Park to hear some of your favorite bands. The July lineup starts out hot with singer/ songwriter JL Fulks, who was named 2020 Country Artist of the Year. The

Sounds of Summer Music Series Fountain Inn | July 2–30 including JL Fulks, July 9

FREEWHEELING EXHIBITION The Allure of the Automobile in Contemporary Art May 11 - August 21, 2021 TM

Learn more by visiting TheBascom.org | 323 Franklin Road, Highlands, NC 28741 | 828.526.4949 JU LY 2021 I

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Town Scene fun continues every Friday through September 10.

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TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Weds, 6–9pm. $10 each, sold in groups of 4. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc.gov/1814/ Greenville-Heritage-Sound-Check

7–28

SIMPSONVILLE SUMMER MUSIC SERIES & FOOD TRUCK RODEO Summer sizzles in Simpsonville with music and food trucks in Heritage Park. In July, the talent includes

July 9

TAPAS & TINIS It’s never too early to rev up for Euphoria, and you can get the party started at the festival’s signature summer event. Chef Tony Schmidt of Performance Food Service

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center.

Photograph courtesy of James Radford Band

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CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Wed, 6–9pm. Free. (864) 838-8051, svillesummerseries.com

Photograph courtesy of Euphoria.

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Simpsonville Summer Music Series & Food Truck Rodeo | July 7–28 including James Radford Band, July 21

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GREENVILLE HERITAGE SOUND CHECK Put your hands together for live concerts! This series of outdoor concerts will light up the TD Stage behind the Peace Center on Wednesday evenings through September. The July lineup runs from the flashy guitar stylings of The Jacob Johnson Group to the soulful sounds of Mac Arnold & Plate Full O’ Blues. Seating is available in T-Mobile Safe Space Pods of four people each or general admission (free) on the lawn.

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Commerce Park, 110 Depot St, Fountain Inn. Fri, 7–9:30pm. Free. (864) 724-8044, fountaininn.org/201/Special-Events

‘80s cover band, Retro Vertigo, the rockabilly group Honey & the Hot Rods, country rock by the James Radford Band, the electric violinist duo Synergy Twins, and a blast from the past with the tribute band Chicago Rewired. So bring your blankets, stake out a socially distanced circle on the lawn, and rock on.


will provide the tapas, while the ‘tinis come complements of Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Larceny Bourbon. With a mix of music from jazz to rock and Motown to hip-hop, Java Entertainment will keep your feet moving on the dance floor.

Zen, 924 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7–10pm. $60. (864) 617-0231, euphoriagreenville.com

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center.

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SIERRA HULL & JUSTIN MOSES Singer/songwriter and virtuoso mandolinist Sierra Hull made a name for herself early in life, playing the Grand Ole Opry at age 10 and performing at Carnegie Hall two years later. For Justin Moses, his musical journey began at age six when he started playing the mandolin. Now the awardwinning multi-instrumentalist is hailed as one of the most versatile musicians in acoustic music. Count on a memorable evening when this husband-and-wife duo get together on stage.

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

10 & 17

GREENVILLE TRIUMPH If you’re searching for the perfect summer evening, look no further. Our advice? Ditch midweek worries and head to the Greenville Triumph stadium (family and friends optional). Once you’re there, take it easy: grab a beer, kick back, and admire the fancy footwork of Greenville’s favorite soccer superstars. Greenville Triumph, 22 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7pm. $10-$25. (864) 203-0565, greenvilletriumph.com

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GREENVILLE VIRTUAL CHAUTAQUA: ANN LOWE As told in this virtual talk, the story of fashion designer Ann Lowe will inspire anyone with big dreams. Born in Clayton, Alabama, and descended from enslaved people, Lowe learned her dressmaking skills from her mother and grandmother. She rose to fame after designing the ivory silk taffeta wedding dress that Jacqueline Bouvier wore when she married John F. Kennedy in 1953.

Tues, 7–8:30pm. Free. (864) 244-1499, historycomesalive.org/event/ann-lowe

Sierra Hull & Justin Moses | July 10

Experienced and Compassionate Care for Women at Every Stage of Life.

Thousands of women successfully treated since 2012. The MonaLisa Touch treats: Vaginal Atrophy, Vaginal Dryness, Vaginal itching/Burning Sensations, Painful & Frequent Urination, & Painful Intercourse. Treatment takes less than 5 minutes in office. No anesthesia. Minimal side effects & no downtime. Relief of symptoms after a single treatment. Three treatments over an 18-week period.

Dr. Denise Broderick

Dr. Kimberly Holloway

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Call today for more info and appointment 864.720.1299 • vidagyn.com • 274-A Commonwealth Drive • Menopause and Hormone Management • Adolescent Care • Abnormal Bleeding Treatment • In-House Ultrasound And Procedures

Dr. Elizabeth Haswell

Patients wishing to have a treatment must have a current Pap smear, no current infections, no vaginal mesh, & any person with a history of herpes must be on antiviral medication.

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Town Scene

15–Aug 8

M Y WAY AT CENTRE STAGE At long last, Centre Stage is thrilled to be reopening its theater with a musical tribute to Frank Sinatra. This intimate, jazz-club-style revue, conceived by David Grapes and Todd Olson, features a live jazz band and the smooth stylings of a small cast of virtuoso performers singing some of the tunes that made “Ol’ Blue Eyes” a legend.

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ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES Southern minister Paul Janeway traded the pulpit for a concert stage in 2012, when he left the ministry to form his Birmingham, Alabama-based band, St. Paul and the Broken Bones. Released in 2014, their debut album,

Fresh Fridays at Hartness | July 16

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Hartness, 2000 Society St, Greenville. Fri, 5:30–8:30pm. (864) 920-0375, hartnessliving.com

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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Photograph courtesy of the Chocolate Artworks.

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JULY

FRESH FRIDAYS AT HARTNESS Head over to the Hartness community on Greenville’s eastside to check out the farmers market on the Grand Lawn. Held on the third Friday of each month this summer, Fresh Fridays will feature produce from the community’s on-site garden plot, plus food vendors such as Chocolate Artworks and Blue Ridge Creamery. You can even shop for hand-crafted items including soap, candles, and reuseable market bags.

Beer stein by @OldeSoul, Zach Landrum, courtesy of Hollowed Earth

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Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $32-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org


Half the City, followed by Sea of Noise two years later, catapulted the eight-member soul band to national fame. Janeway’s powerful voice and personal magnetism will fire up the TD Stage in a summer concert you won’t want to miss. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. Lawn, $50; Genevieve’s, $70. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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POTTERY WORKSHOP WITH HOLLOWED EARTH How about a stein with that beer? The artisans from Hollowed Earth Pottery are teaming up with 13 Stripes to show you how to handbuild your own beer stein. After watching a demonstration, each participant will design their own dishwasher-safe stein, which will be fired at Hollowed Earth’s studio (you can pick it up two weeks later). Cost of the class includes all materials— except the beer.

13 Stripes Brewery, 250 Mill St, Ste PW3010, Taylors. Wed, 7pm. $40. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com/event-details/steinworkshop-with-hollowed-earth-pottery-2

29–Aug 15

THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB Five Southern women, whose lifelong friendships were forged on their college swim team, take a break from their husbands, kids, and jobs every summer at the same cottage on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Spanning a period of 30 years, this witty and touching comedy dives into the dynamics of friendship, as the women ride the waves of ups and downs in their lives. Greenville Theatre, 44 College St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri & Sat, 8pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvilletheatre.org

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THE FRONTMEN OF COUNTRY With more than 50 Top-40 hits between them, when Larry Stewart (Restless Heart), Richie McDonald (Lonestar), and Tim Rushlow (Little Texas) pool their outstanding talents, the result is a country music supergroup. For one night, the Peace Center Concert Hall will ring out with fan faves from their former bands, such as “The Bluest Eyes in Texas,” “Amazed,” and “God Blessed Texas.”

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

The Frontmen of Country | July 31

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Second Glance

GREENVILLE’S GRAND DAME NEA RLY 100 YEA RS A F TER IT OPENED, THE STATELY POINSETT HOTEL PRESIDES OVER M A IN STREET AS ONE OF THE CIT Y’S FIRST SKYSCR A PERS

The steel-frame construction of the Poinsett Hotel has withstood the test of time. After an extensive renovation that restored the building to its former glory, the hotel reopened as the Westin Poinsett in June 2000, on the 75th anniversary of its original launch in 1925.

Photograph courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society

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he Twenties were roaring and the exuberant international Art Deco style of architecture was just coming into vogue in early June 1924, as the steam shovels of Cleveland, Ohio, contractor Hunkin-Conkey rumbled onto the site on South Main Street where the Mansion House had welcomed guests for the past hundred years. Their task: to begin construction of a more modern lodging, The Poinsett Hotel. Under the supervision of the J.E. Sirrine Company, it took $1.5 million and a crew of some 250 masons, carpenters, mechanics, and others 12 months to complete the L-shaped “12-story pile of steel and stone,” designed by noted New York architect William Lee Stoddart. At the time, Stoddart declared The Poinsett, with its luxurious marble and ornate plaster finishes, to be the finest hostelry in the South. As the Greenville News crowed on June 21, 1925, “The Poinsett Hotel is the embodiment, in brick and steel, of the spirit that has made Greenville and that will make a greater Greenville”—words that still ring true today. —M. Linda Lee

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“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 23 West North St. | Downtown Greenville 864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale Sale starts Thursday, July 8, 2021


1.00 ct Generic Emerald Cut

1.00 ct L’Amour Crisscut ® Classic Up to 50% larger

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TOWN Magazine - July 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN Magazine - July 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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