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ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

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FEATURING

SOUTHERN WOMEN WRITERS MERL CODE & DAVID LOMINACK A MODERN ESCAPE PAULA RALLIS HOME HEIRLOOM COLLARDS HUSK SMOKIN’ BARBEQUE

&MORE

FEBRUARY 2021

TOWNCAROLINA.COM


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GREENVILLE

MAGNOLIA HALL

THE RESERVE AT LAKE KEOWEE

455 McKinney Road $10,750,681

130 Hwy 651 $5,250,644

410 Top Ridge $2,225,685

6 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms, 4 Half Bathrooms

5 Bedrooms, 8 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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STONEBROOK FARM

GREYWOOD AT HAMMETT

128 Rollingwood Drive $1,999,672

127 Popular Hill Lane $1,738,615

7 Riley Hill Court $1,289,650

5 Bedrooms,5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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400 N Main St #502 $1,245,601

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4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

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Contents

FEBRUARY 2021

100 TOP DOG

Winner of our Dog Gone Canine Contest, Wookiee is a four-year-old wirehaired pointing griffon. She is owned, and adored, by Greenville residents Reid and Sandy Pannill. by kathryn norungolo

“She considers herself a bigtime hunter, and she thinks the world is going to be taken over by chipmunks.”

(cover) Skillet cornbread with honey-lard butter from Husk Smokin’ Barbeque; (this page) Wookiee, a wirehaired pointing griffon and winner of our Dog Gone Canine Contest, strikes a regal pose for art director Paul Mehaffey. Cover and this photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Base MSRP excludes transportation and handling charges, destination charges, taxes, title, regitration, preparation and documentary fees, tags, labor and installation charges, insurance, and optional equipment, products, packages and accessories. Options, model availability and acutal dealer price may vary. See dealer for details, costs and terms.


With her debut novel, Even As We Breathe, Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle makes history as the first published novelist from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. by scott gould

14 EDITOR’S LETTER 21 THE LIST 29 WEDDINGS 64 MS. BEA WRIGHT 66 MAN ABOUT TOWN 68 WORD COUNT 94 TOWN SCENE 100 SECOND GLANCE

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ROOT & BONE

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Contents

DAILY GREENS The Heirloom Collard Project protects heritage plant varieties, one seed at a time. by lauren stepp

37 4755 51 5955 79 TOWNBUZZ

ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

EAT + DRINK

Art & Light Gallery showcases a variety of artists, near and far; Peggy Baxter serves area seniors with healthy meal deliveries; Merl Code and David Lominack direct our city’s path toward racial equity.

On the outskirts of Asheville, this modern Airbnb offers a sleek, lightfilled stay away with panoramic mountain views.

Hand-carved duck calls by R.H. Jensen are a memorable gift for your favorite hunter; make the most of bird season at River Bend Sportsman’s Resort in Inman.

Amahle Designs crafts fashionable leather wares to accent your winter wardrobe; browse European décor and vintage pieces at Paula Rallis Home’s new location on Augusta Street.

Indulge in meat and bourbon bliss at Husk Smokin’ Barbeque; the Heirloom Collard Project preserves a Southern staple; this cast-iron chicken pot pie is stick-to-your-ribs comfort food.

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Editor’s Letter

Photograph by Kim McMillin

This sense of connection to home, land, and people is a hallmark of being Southern.

CULTURE CLUB

L

iving in the South has its contradictions. No one seems more attached to place, but it is difficult for a Southerner to stay put. We are the definition of social animal. Keeping away goes against the code of our DNA. As we muddle through these difficult times, we must suppress our natural tendency. This sense of connection to home, land, and people is a hallmark of being Southern. Life is never boring here, nor is it lacking in warmth, gentility, and humor—or beauty, compelling art and literature, casseroles, painterly landscapes, loyal dogs, fine barbecue and slowcooked everything, collards as good as gold, elegance, tradition, ingenuity, progress, people who care. It is truly a feeling place—a soul stew packed with flavor. We have a bit of everything in this edition, our seventh Southern Culture Issue. Art & Light Gallery shows a wealth of artists, from here and elsewhere, in a charming bungalow in West Greenville.

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Paula Rallis Home features a modern curation of interior goods and accessories. Southern women writers deliver honesty and history, while enlightening and entertaining us through their work. Husk Smokin’ Barbeque, whose cast-iron cornbread graces our cover, has transformed its West End space into a diner’s fever dream of smoked meat, decadent sides, and lots of bourbon. It’s delivering the food and drink Husk fans have come to know—with a tighter focus on the pit. We also share favorite recipes in this issue, one for braised collards and another for a flaky chicken pot pie. As we tuck into another month at home, consider making these for your family or deliver to the doorstep of a friend. After all, it is the Southern way. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com


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Jasper Johns (born 1930) Flags I, 1973 Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

GCMA-20-19-JJohns Worth The Wait Ad TOWN 2Pg 20X12 Dec8 1pm.indd 1


WORTH THE WAIT. Jasper Johns (born 1930) is the world’s most critically acclaimed living artist. While his reputation is international, Johns has deep roots in South Carolina. He grew up in Allendale, the Columbia area, and Sumter, and he attended the University of South Carolina for three semesters before moving to New York to pursue his career in art. The GCMA collection of works by Jasper Johns began with several gifts from the artist when the Museum opened in 1974. Today, the GCMA collection is one of the ten largest institutional collections of his work in the world. When the GCMA re-opens, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s best institutional collections of works by Jasper Johns, and the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth. The museum’s unrivaled Southern Collection highlights a collection of clay vessels created by enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by African-American artist William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian. The GCMA is grateful for the ongoing support of United Community Bank.

Museum Corporate Partner

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Temporarily closed for construction

12/8/20 4:20 PM


Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

Abby Moore Keith

MANAGING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Laura Linen Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Beth Brown Ables, Scott Gould, Maris Lawyer, Lauren Stepp & Angie Toole Thompson CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS, ILLUSTRATORS & DESIGNERS

IN 2021

Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, Ian Curcio, Jivan Davé & Kim Gibson Andrew Huang

EDITOR AT LARGE

Kathryn Norungolo

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TOWN Magazine (Vol. 11, No. 2) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65 at towncarolina.com/subscribe. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.


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THE LIST

TOBYMAC With seven Grammy Awards, six Gold Records, and an American Music Award to his credit, Toby McKeehan, better known as TobyMac, has risen to fame as a Christian hip-hop recording artist, music producer, and songwriter. On his Hits Deep tour, he shares wisdom from his personal journey in songs from his most recent album, The Elements, including the hit single, “I Just Need U,� which spent 12 weeks at the top of the charts. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed, Feb 24, 7pm. Tickets start at $20. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph by Lee Steffen, courtesy of The Media Collective

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The List VIRTUAL CONCERT SERIES

MITCH ROSSELL

What better way to celebrate what would have been Ludwig von Beethoven’s 250th birthday than by presenting a quarter-millennial tribute to his early piano sonatas? This virtual concert series, presented by the Sigal Music Museum in concert with pianist Zack Hughes, will feature 32 of Beethoven’s early sonatas over 32 weeks (the series started in December). Come Monday mornings, start your week off on a classical note by connecting with the museum via Facebook. Mon, 11am. Feb 1–Apr 5. Free. (864) 520-8807, sigalmusicmuseum.org/eventbrite-event/ beethovens-quarter-millennial-early-sonatas

Up-and-coming country star Mitch Rossell opened for Garth Brooks on his world tour in 2016, and since then, he has penned Garth’s last four singles, including the number-one hit, “Ask Me How I Know.” At Genevieve’s lounge, he’ll have the opportunity to play some of his own well-received new singles, such as “All I Need to See,” “American Dream,” and “Then Again.” Genevieve’s at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Feb 11, 7:30pm. $200 for a table for 4. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

GREENVILLE’S LUXURY URBAN OASIS PRICING FROM THE $400’S

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For a digital brochure, text Markley Place to 59559 MA RK L EYP L A CE. CO M

Photograph by Famzing Studios

Calling all hoops fans—come cheer on the Furman Paladins as they play Southern Conference basketball at The Well. As part of the men’s basketball Weekends at The Well fourgame series, the Paladins will stage a rematch of last season’s exciting showdown with the Wofford Terriers on February 6 and close the four-game series by taking on the Catamounts from Western Carolina University the following Saturday. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, Feb 6, 4pm; Sat, Feb 13, noon. Single ticket, $80 (pod seating available in groups of 1 to 8). (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Photograph by Kevin Anderson

FURMAN BASKETBALL—WEEKENDS AT THE WELL


GREENVILLE VENUE CRAWL

SWEETHEART CHARITY BALL

GREENVILLE HALF MARATHON & 5K

Whether you’re planning a casual corporate event or a formal wedding, the Venue Crawl will introduce you to the best event venues in town. Nosh on small bites and sip beverages while you connect with planners who can help bring your vision to light. Take your own car or hop on the shuttle that will take you to venues in downtown Greenville, the Eastside, Easley, and Travelers Rest.

Put on your dancing shoes and bring your sweetie to the formal annual fundraiser for Meals on Wheels Greenville. Enjoy a three-course meal and the chance to bid on items in the silent and live auctions, not to mention the opportunity to help provide hot meals and hope to local homebound folks in need. Last year, proceeds from the Sweetheart Ball paid for more than 50,000 meals. Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Sat, Feb 27, 6pm. $150/person. (864) 233-6565, mealsonwheelsgreenville.org/mow-event/ sweetheart-charity-ball

Tired of virtual events? Well, get ready to run a real race! Both of these races will be inperson, with runners setting off in small waves in accordance with COVID-19 protocols. The 5K course starts at the Swamp Rabbit Café, while the half-marathon starts in Travelers Rest and traverses 13.1 miles downhill along the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Both courses end at the TD Stage behind the Peace Center in downtown Greenville. Swamp Rabbit Trail, Greenville and Travelers Rest. Sat, Feb 27, 5K at 7:30am; half-marathon, 6–7am. 5K, $35; halfmarathon, $85. swamprabbitrace.com

Various locations around Greenville. Sun, Feb 28, noon– 6pm. $20. (864) 501-0931, greenvillevenuecrawl.com

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SEAMLESS

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com


The List

Quick HITS GENESIS—BMW FROM THE BEGINNING

z Gentlemen—and women—start your engines! The most comprehensive exhibit of early BMWs ever presented in North America is now on display in Greer. GENESIS illustrates five decades of BMW’s history through 24 cars and motorcycles. Ranging from the 1927 R47 sport bike to the 1950s-era BMW Baroque Angel sedans, the ongoing exhibit pays homage to the innovations of the Upstate’s own German carmaker. BMW CCA Foundation Museum, 190 Manatee Ct, Greer. Thru Feb 28. Mon–Fri, 9am–5pm; Sat, 10am–4pm. Adults, $12; youth (ages 6-17), $6; children 5 and under, free. (864) 329-1919, bmwccafoundation.org

MILES DANIEL

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

z Singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Miles Daniel draws on a mix of pop, R&B, and dance rock—both retro and modern—to create his unique sound. Only 25 tables of 4 will be available at his performance at Genevieve’s lounge, so don’t miss the chance to see Daniel in an intimate setting where small bites, wine, beer, and cocktails will be available for purchase. Genevieve’s at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Feb 4, 7:30pm. $200 for a table for 4. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

THURSDAYS ON THE PATIO

z The theater may be dark for now, but you can still support Centre Stage and its future season by purchasing tickets to their fundraising event, Thursdays on the Patio. Your ticket includes a socially distanced seat on the patio, where you can listen to live music and nosh on the evening’s featured food, plus beer and wine. Tickets are limited, so don’t wait to order yours. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs, Feb 18, 7–9pm. $30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org/thursonthepatio

SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE (SEC) WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP z During the first week of March, Greenville will

become the Women’s Basketball Capital of the South when, for the fourth consecutive year, the city hosts the SEC Women’s Basketball finals at The Well. The single-elimination tournament, which includes all 14 teams in the Southeast Conference, will culminate with the championship game on Sunday night. The winner of the 13game competition will go on to the NCAA Tournament. Be sure to snag your tickets before they sell out. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, Mar 3–7, times vary. Ticket prices TBD. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

The Allman Betts Band Cofounders of this seven-piece ensemble, Devon Allman and Duane Betts come by their musical talent naturally as the sons of Gregg Allman and Dickey Betts. The show will feature selections from the band’s two chart-topping albums—their debut project, Down To the River (2019), and their latest, Bless Your Heart—as well as some of your favorites tunes from their fathers’ band, The Allman Brothers. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, Feb 5, 8pm. $50-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Fallen OUT OF LOVE with your current house?

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weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

At the Gassaway Mansion, LAURA MANN & GABRIEL VALK celebrated their love in vintage style. Photograph by Hannah Kerr Photography

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Weddings

LAURA MANN & GABRIEL VALK NOVEMBER 7, 2020

A

s fate would have it, Laura and Gabe found themselves in the same Human Resources Management class during their spring semester at Clemson in 2017. Gabe managed to sit closer to Laura with each class, and after some prodding from his friends, he finally worked up the nerve to ask her on a date. Three-and-a-half years of dating later, Gabe planned a ruse to get Laura back to Clemson. He claimed his fraternity had scheduled an alumni event the same weekend that some of Laura’s college friends were going to be in town for a bridal shower she was attending.

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The bridal shower was real, but everything else was staged for his proposal at The Potter’s Place in Central. After Laura gave Gabe her enthusiastic “yes!” they celebrated with some 50 friends. Their ceremony took place at Gassaway Mansion, where before taking their vows, they shared communion with all of their guests. It was a day filled with love and prayer, exactly as they intended. Based in Greenville, Laura is a media buyer, and Gabe works at Elliott Davis.—Kathryn Norungolo By Hannah Kerr Photography


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Weddings

MADELINE GALL & KALE JEFFORDS NOVEMBER 7, 2020

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Robinson Planning hlfV Town Dec20.indd 1

Madeline and Kale were both living in Charlotte when they connected via a dating app. Just seven months later, they were packing up and moving to Greenville together. On Madeline’s thirtieth birthday, less than a year and a half after they met, Kale concocted a surprise proposal at the Liberty Bridge in Falls Park. After her shocked and excited “yes!” the pair headed to Jianna for dinner, where they were greeted with Champagne and a special handprinted menu. Not even a pandemic could stop these two from celebrating their love at Westfield, where Madeline wore a Lis Simon gown to marry her best friend. Currently, Kale is the assistant director of residence life at Furman University, and Madeline works as a special education teacher at Wade Hampton High School.—KN

11/10/20 3:19 PM


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OLIVIA MILLER & SAKO ZADOIAN OCTOBER 17, 2020 Olivia first saw Sako in downtown Greenville at Tsunami, where she was working as a bartender. It took a few months of flirting before Sako finally worked up the courage to ask Olivia on a date, and they’ve been together ever since. Six years after that first get-together, the pair was on their way to Mara Engai Camp in Kenya, for the vacation of a lifetime with friends. Near the end of the trip, on a sunrise hot-air balloon safari, Sako asked Olivia to marry him. After landing, they celebrated with brunch and Champagne in the middle of the Maasai Mara game reserve. The two were married at the privately owned airport of a close friend, a site that resonated with this couple’s thirst for adventure. In a Martina Liana gown from the White Magnolia, Olivia said “yes” to a lifetime of exploration with Sako. The couple now lives in Greenville.—KN By Carly Jade Photography

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e opy, or’s

Weddings

ARIEL MOSS & NEAL ROBINSON JUNE 29, 2020

Ariel and Neal met in Spartanburg at their first post-graduation job working for American Credit Acceptance. At the time, they were both seeing other people, but they kept up a friendship and often spent time together at work. One night five years later, Neal was downtown and saw on social media that Ariel was there also, and the pair met up. The timing was finally right, and after an evening together catching up, they shared their first kiss. A year-and-a-half of dating later, Neal proposed to Ariel at his favorite spot in the world, his grandparent’s beach house on Pawleys Island. On the creekside dock where they had shared many special moments, Ariel agreed to be Neal’s wife. Her childhood pastor married the couple at Riverain Farm in Travelers Rest, with the bride wearing the wedding band that had belonged to her late grandmother. The pair remains in Greenville.—KN By Lanterns and Feathers Photography

CAYCE FRENCH & DANIEL MCCULLOUGH DECEMBER 12, 2020 Cayce’s friend Courtney pegged Daniel as her perfect match and set them up on a double date. It took a few weeks for the pair to come together on their own, but it turned out Courtney’s instincts were spot-on. Two years later, Daniel scoped out the perfect place for a proposal on his family’s farm on an outcrop of rock in the middle of a field, an oasis that the McCulloughs had dubbed Rock Island. Using Cayce’s late father’s knife, which her mother had given him for Christmas, he carved the couple’s initials in a tree, marking the location where he asked Cayce for her hand. Being married in a church was important to this couple, and since COVID-19 regulations kept their big ceremony at bay, they tied the knot at Christ Church Episcopal, with an intimate celebration of friends and family immediately following at The Rutherford. Cayce works as an events and corporate development manager for Habitat for Humanity, and Daniel is a civil engineer.—KN By Jenny Williams Photography

KAYLA ADAIR & CHASE KINSEY DECEMBER 19, 2020 Kayla and Chase were mere teenagers when they met, but they knew they had something special even then. The pair started dating in high school and continued their relationship long-distance as they attended college, Chase at The Citadel and Kayla at Clemson. Nearly six years later, just before the world shut down, Chase proposed in a South Carolina park. Tragedy struck two months before the wedding when Kayla’s dad suddenly passed away. Despite the loss of her father and the challenges the pandemic presented, this couple persevered. With a small cross and a white rose marking the front row where her dad should have been, Kayla and Chase said “I do” at Bleckley Station in Anderson, where twinkling lights made it seem like one big Christmas celebration—Kayla’s favorite holiday. After spending the evening partying with friends and family, the couple has settled in Anderson.—KN By Mary Catherine Echols

hearing wedding bells? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

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town buzz INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

The artists of ART & LIGHT GALLERY offer fresh perspectives in paint and sculpture.

Photograph of Mar y Lekoshere’s artwork by Paul Mehaffey

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

CREATIVE RAYS GREENVILLE’S ART & LIGHT GALLERY IS HOME TO SOUL - STIRRING ARTISTS by Angie Toole Thompson • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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little white bungalow sits on a corner lot in the Village of West Greenville. It’s flanked by mill houses, across the street from a church, and, if it weren’t for the big orange house numbers painted next to its front door, you might mistake it for another charming residential space in the neighborhood. That little house on the corner is home to Teresa Roche’s long-established Greenville gallery, Art & Light. A walk across the bright front porch and through the door feels like visiting the home of a friend, with its cozy artfilled rooms and the open-armed demeanor of the gallerists. Their combined 25 years of gallery experience make Art & Light a soughtafter partner for artists worldwide, an evolving gallery family that is never lacking in warmth and vision. Gallery director Bracken Sansbury knows how to expertly blend the gallery’s local color with its widespread reach. “Really, an exhibition for a local artist [and] an out-of-town artist are pretty


At Art & Light Gallery in the Village of West Greenville (opposite top), owner Teresa Roche and gallery director Bracken Sansbury curate a thoughtful collection of works from artists across the country, giving special attention to those in the Upstate.

similar,” she shares. In group shows she will often pair a local with a non-local whose works complement one another. “These types of shows allow for a lot of great collaboration.” A recent exhibition called The Light of Hope featured works by Asheville painter Cheyenne Trunnell and LA-based Sali Swalla. The collections seemed built to suit one another, each painter’s work possessing the light and color of an introspective nature walk. Solo shows “are more about the artist [and] what it is they are wanting to explore,” Sansbury shares. Like Greenville mixed-media artist Jennefer Bedenbaugh in her recent exhibition The Soliloquy Project, an allegorical exploration of the human condition and her return to creative work following an immersive residency at the Penland School of Craft. Visiting a gallery may seem like a distant dream for many. Bringing the life-giving solace of art into one’s soul may feel unattainable. But the vision of Art & Light makes space for all art lovers. The exhibitions

mentioned earlier, and so many more, have been uploaded to the gallery’s website. And Sansbury and her fellow gallerists have been hosting livestreams with artists on their social media accounts. What’s more, they’re pushing for all kinds of accessibility. “Our entire inventory is now online!” Sansbury beams. “[This] allows our growing collector base to shop from home. We also have new ways to help collectors visualize works in their space with virtual installations.” As the gallery home to collector favorites like Diane Kilgore Congdon and Glory Day Loflin, Art & Light ebbs with the world's changes to stay relevant and continue to engage with their community and collectors. Near or far, artist or admirer, Art & Light offers a warm welcome to those who love to immerse themselves in thoughtful, stirring works of art. Art & Light Gallery, 16 Aiken St, Greenville. (864) 252-5858, artandlightgallery.com

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TB • PROFILE

After a highly successful career in social work in San Francisco, Peggy Baxter (left) returned to her native Greenville in the early 2000s, where she has worked tirelessly through multiple nonprofits to make our community a better place; (opposite) over the decades, Peggy has amassed a varied collection of pins in support of social causes.

“We’ve got to pay it forward every opportunity we find,” Baxter says. “It’s about a need and a response to the need.”

FOR THE PEOPLE GREENVILLE NATIVE PEGGY BAXTER HAS DEDICATED HER LIFE TO SERVICE by Abby Moore Keith • photography by Kim Gibson

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or many, it’s been a trying twelve months. In a moment, a breath it seems, family members are gone, livelihoods wrecked, careers halted. Those already fighting to make a way have born the brunt, and at times, hope feels hard to come by. But communities can be saved by simple gestures, by people who are willing to orient their hearts and hands to help others. Mrs. Peggy Baxter is one such individual. When the pandemic hit last March, she recognized certain area seniors would lose access to healthy food. So along with a hard-working team of coordinators and volunteers, she created Nutrition With Heart, a service that provides daily meals, all while helping Black-owned restaurants stay in business.

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“I have an advocacy gene,” she says, laughing. “It’s a joke in my family.” While growing up in Greenville’s historic Sterling community, Peggy was inspired by a compassionate relative who was constantly caring for her neighbors. “I said, ‘Whatever she does, I want to do that too.’” Peggy graduated from Sterling High School and attended Hampton University in Virginia, a prominent Historically Black College & University (HBCU). She returned to Greenville in 1959 to pursue a career in social work, but found they wouldn’t even consider her application. “The job I wanted, they said they weren’t hiring coloreds at the time,” Peggy explains. “So I moved West.” She and her husband headed to Denver, where she obtained a master of social work degree and began forging a career advocating for others. Peggy spent several decades in the East Bay area of San Francisco, working with children and families in the health arena and serving the community through various nonprofits. In the early 2000s, she ended an outstanding career as a senior administrator at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland, and made the move back home. Since her return to Greenville, Mrs. Baxter has poured her energies into volunteer and board work with various organizations, like Habitat for Humanity, New Horizon Family Health Services, the American Cancer Society, and Long Branch Baptist Church. So when the pandemic hit, causing increased food insecurity for elderly residents, she was in the perfect position to help. “We’ve got this big problem,” Peggy says. “There are people out there who don’t have transportation or quality, fresh good food. . . . [I asked] What can I do? What do I know? How can I serve? That’s what got me to feeding seniors and keeping restaurants viable and their employees employed.”


A Touch of Kindness Aida M. Gonzalez

Bi-Lingual Funeral Director (Español)

Peggy started making calls, and it didn’t take long for others to recognize her vision. Long Branch Baptist Church and Upstate Circle of Friends, a nonprofit that works with at-risk children and their families, hopped on board, and local Black-owned restaurants, which were in need of business due to pandemic restrictions, agreed to prepare meals. “Everybody I talked to thought it was a great idea,” she says, including local officials, and with funding through the Greenville County CARES Act, Nutrition With Heart was born. Since last September, OJ’s Dinner and Fhinney Buffet #2 have made two fresh meals daily for 125 senior citizens. These “meat-and-twos”—which include baked chicken, green beans, collards, rice, or other soft, non-fried foods— are delivered through a host of volunteers, coordinated by Ruby Coleman and Tonya Craig. But the program doesn’t just meet a physical need for community members. Peggy emphasizes the toll isolation takes on seniors, and relays a story of one of the volunteers, who waits at the end of the driveway after delivering a meal, just to check-in and say hello. Plans are also in the works to have children accompany parents on drop-offs, to provide participants with a spark of hope. “We’ve got to pay it forward every opportunity we find,” she says. “It’s about a need and a response to the need.” Peggy hopes to continue the program through the month of March and beyond, if funding allows. In the meantime, as we continue to endure the trials of this season, let’s all take a page from her book. Because the world sure could use a few more Peggy Baxters. For more information about Nutrition With Heart, or to volunteer, contact Long Branch Baptist Church at (864) 235-6205.

It takes a special person to consistently show kindness, and to help families find beauty during a difficult time. But it’s second nature for Aida Gonzalez, a licensed funeral director, who views her work as not just a job, but a calling. She enjoys “finding the perfect approach for the needs of my families, allowing me to honor their loved one in a special way.” A mom of four, she loves to paint in her spare time, and is also bilingual, which allows her to bring her touch of kindness to even more families. The families Aida assists are invariably touched by her compassion and personal attention to every detail. As one family said of Aida, “You made it easy for me and sincerely joyful.”

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TB • VISIONARIES

DYNAMIC DUO GREENVILLE PILLARS MERL CODE AND DAVID LOMINACK LEAD THE WAY FOR COMMUNITY CHANGE THROUGH REEM by Stephanie Trotter • photography by ian Curcio

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hey come from different generations, backgrounds, and industries, yet Merl Code, a retired attorney from the law office of Ogletree Deakins, and David Lominack, the South Carolina market president at TD Bank, are teaming together to save the soul of Greenville. The two are leading REEM—Greenville County’s Racial Equity and Economic Mobility Commission. The multifaceted group formed after the death of George Floyd and has grown into the largest effort in recent history to transform the way Greenville residents think, act, and operate in regard to race. With a roster that reads like a Who’s Who of local leaders, the commission wants to make improvements and remove systemic barriers in five key areas: Education, Income & Wealth, Criminal Justice, Health & Wellness, and Community Learning. The duo shared a revealing update six months into REEM’s efforts.

How’s the work going so far? Merl code: I don’t think I’ve ever been faced with a personal challenge such as this. In the other leadership roles I’ve served, I’m not sure I’ve made any major impact to the standard of living and condition of the African American

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“I would love for Greenville to become the poster child for other communities on how to open this conversation, heal wounds, and improve the experience in the Black community by removing barriers and inequities.” —David Lominack

At the reins of REEM, the Racial Equity and Economic Mobility Commission of Greenville County, TD Bank executive David Lominack (opposite left) and retired attorney Merl Code (opposite right) are putting their heads together to address systemic racism in our community.

community. Whatever we were doing was trying to address one issue, maybe two. But this is systemic change. We’re looking at what’s in place, what do we need to change, how do we change it, and do we have the will to change it. I’m not sure we’ve had this exercise before, and I’ve been in this community half a century.

DAVID LOMINACK: Intuitively, most of us know there are inequities in our community. I knew a lot of these challenges existed, but the extent is far greater than I thought. One of the positives Merl and I get excited about is the number of people beyond this commission who have raised their hands and said, ‘I want to be engaged; let me know what to do.’

MC: There’s a different climate and tone right now that says, ‘The stronger we are individually, the stronger we are collectively.’ So how can we put policies and procedures in place that help all members of our community reach their potential? If we are successful, we are a stronger community.

Where do we go from here? DL: We initially asked the commission members for six months, but quickly realized we need a lot longer. By December, we hope to have a plan in place to present to the community.

Will Greenville listen? MC: My travels and experiences have led me to believe we are very different. We are special. Greenville has a record of putting people of color in leadership in key areas: our education system, the Chamber of Commerce, the symphony, United Way. But if you’re not impacting the lives of the people you’re trying to help, have you really succeeded? This is the first time where we are trying to get down into the depths of the problem, and we are not alone.

Have conversations been uncomfortable? DL: Yes, there have been some very uncomfortable conversations and people are very passionate, but that’s the space we have to create to move this forward in the community. I believe Greenville has the ability to show that grace and try to measure the true intent of what someone is trying to do and say.

MC: Some folks don’t know what has happened. They just haven’t been exposed. It’s not part of their life experience. George Floyd illustrated what Black folks have been saying for a multitude of years. Now they see it.

What is the biggest challenge to move forward? DL: I think the biggest challenge is where do we start. If there are 500 things we can do, we can’t do all 500 at the same time. How do we pick those initiatives within each committee and boil them down to a manageable level?

MC: We’ve got to start in small chunks. We need to pick things we know we can be successful with. We need to be bold. Let’s not fix the low-hanging fruit that isn’t going to change anything. None of us got involved in this to be window dressing.

You both sound hopeful. DL: I would love for Greenville to become the poster child for other communities on how to open this conversation, heal wounds, and improve the experience in the Black community by removing barriers and inequities.

DL: We’re trying to repair 400 years of history. We’re

MC: I’ve slowed down and I’m retired, but this one gets

not going to do that in six months, or a year. It’s going to take time to change policies, hearts, and minds. But how one person can interact with another person in the community takes no time at all. If everybody can be a bit more open-minded, seek out conversations that are uncomfortable, and be curious to learn from one another, we can build a higher level of mutual respect for each other in this community.

For more on Greenville County’s Racial Equity and Economic Mobility Commission, visit REEMgvl.org.

my blood running, because I can actually see there is interested leadership saying we can have our beloved community, and we can treat each other well. This is what differentiates us from other communities. All of us are stronger, if each of us is stronger. To me, that is what this community is saying.

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TB • SHELF LIFE

From cookbooks (like the latest by Chef Vivian Howard, left) to collections of short stories and poetry, local author Ashley Warlick recommends good reads to hunker down with this month.

THESE SOUTHERN WOMEN AUTHORS ARE MAKING LITERARY WAVES by Ashley Warlick

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teel magnolias Vivian Howard, Ashleigh Bryant Phillips, and Ashley M. Jones are tuned to the frequency of our times as well as the echoes of Southern storytellers who’ve come before them. No matter their forms, they’re charting our past and our progress.

THE COOK’S COOK

Chef Vivian Howard has spent the last decade of her life telling food stories from her small empire of farmto-table restaurants in Eastern North Carolina. Her PBS shows A Chef’s Life and more recently Somewhere South defined the idea of seasonal and cultural influence on the foodways of our region. She’s humble, and thoughtful, and concerned about our newly necessary return to cooking for ourselves. But her latest cookbook, This Will Make It Taste Good, doesn’t dumb it down. Instead, each chapter is organized around one of her secret “flavor hero” recipes—sauces and condiments that can be batched and used in a myriad of ways to take simple,

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THE WILD CHILD

There’s a supercharged undercurrent to the stories in Ashleigh Bryant Phillips’s debut collection. You sense it in the hard lesson or volatile disaster that’s barely avoided, the roadside-attraction Southern landscape we know but maybe have stopped seeing fully. These are stories of long-gone mothers and little brothers, Walmart parking lot epiphanies, the pet python that strikes again. They’re stories informed as much by Flannery O’Connor’s sense of justice and weirdness as Phillips’s own razor-sharp, right-now perspective on the world we walk through every day. Sleepovers by Ashleigh Bryant Phillips, $16

THE PROPHET

Birmingham, Alabama, poet Ashley M. Jones strikes her matches against that city’s rich civil rights history, bringing new light to old shadows in this long conversation this country is having about race. In her collection Magic City Gospel, she offers haikus on the fire hoses faced down by students in The Children’s Crusade and meditations on the real people behind the museum artifacts. The choruses of Sam Cooke and Tina Turner offer solace and warning, ways to see what’s come before in order to see what’s going on now. Look for her new collection Reparations, Now! this fall. Magic City Gospel by Ashley M. Jones, $14 Find these authors at M. Judson Booksellers, 130 S Main St, Ste 200A, Greenville. (864) 603-2412, mjudsonbooks.com

Photographs (Vivian Howard and This Will Make It Taste Good cover) by Baxter Miller

BOOK SMART

straightforward food into the stratosphere. From pickled tomatoes to caramelized onions, sweet to savory, this is a new way to think about cooking. In her introduction, Howard says, “I realized my mission isn’t to protect you from time in your kitchen; it’s to help you make the most of it.” This Will Make It Taste Good by Vivian Howard, $35


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ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

A stone’s throw from Greenville, this modern Airbnb was featured in Architectural Digest.

Rest in sublime scenes of MOUNTAIN MAJESTY in Western North Carolina.

Photograph courtesy of John Barnard

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VIEW FINDER SWA P YOUR DA ILY ROUTINE FOR A PA NDEMIC-FR IENDLY GETAWAY W ITH A STUNNING MOUNTA IN PA NOR A M A by Kathryn Davé

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f you’ve felt a little stir-crazy in the last year—or home has seemed a little less sweet—you might have the itch to trade your four walls for others. Rental data backs this up: bookings for “rural” Airbnb properties have surged since the pandemic, and 62 percent of people say they’re interested in taking a vacation within driving distance.

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Should you be lucky enough to land a reservation at John and Carla Barnard’s modern Airbnb just outside of Asheville, you won’t just get four different walls—you’ll enjoy walls of windows with a mountain view expansive enough to put some mental distance between you and your daily grind. Long before the pandemic turned the travel industry upside down, John and Carla were feeling a little stir-crazy themselves. In 2011, the couple quit their big-time corporate jobs to drive around the United States and Canada in an RV. Two years later, the pendulum of desire swung back, and they decided to build a house on a beautiful plot of land. When John’s parents gave him a hammer that Christmas, it was mostly a joke since they didn’t have any practical construction experience. “We designed the house to be easy to build because we wanted to do a lot of it ourselves,” explains John. “We like simplicity and modernism . . . it also helped that a basic box was easier to build.”

Photographs courtesy of John Barnard

Escape • TOP BUNK


John and Carla Barnard’s popular Airbnb is frequently booked. Watch for weekday availability or book early to get your best choice of dates. Search “The best view in Asheville!” airbnb.com; $426/night

play

The finished house, a long, modern structure with walls of enormous windows, stretches across the property in search of the best view from every room. “The guiding principle in the house is to let the view do the talking,” John says. The couple limited the palette of materials to glass, steel, raw concrete, and local poplar. They kept the furnishings spare, too—clean and modern, with pops of vibrant color. The result was a home so refreshingly peaceful the Barnards occasionally rented it out while they were traveling, thinking other people might enjoy it. In fact, their rental bookings grew so steadily that the Barnards purchased another primary residence and began renting the mountain-view house full-time. “We think our house is pretty special,” their simple Airbnb description reads. After you spend a little time in this quiet, minimal escape with a view that invites you to be still, you might find that “special” is an understatement.

Clean lines and contemporary furnishings ensure that nothing detracts from the serene mountain views visible through the multitude of windows at John and Carla Barnard’s Asheville Airbnb.

The Barnards’ house is a hiker’s dream. Local trails, including Warren Wilson College’s trail system and “hidden gem” Shope Creek trail are within a mile or two from the house, while a fiveminute drive will land you at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s entrance, which offers access to some of the area’s most stunning hikes (or scenic drives, if that’s more your speed).

breathe

Carve out time to renew body and soul with pandemic-friendly wellness therapies. Active types might enjoy a brisk guided yoga and waterfall hike led by locals at Namaste in Nature. Prefer to spend your winter laying low? Treat yourself to a massage from a massage therapist who comes to you—no travel required.

namasteinnature.com; massageonwheels.com, (828) 367-7280

eat

You won’t go hungry with Asheville’s array of restaurants to choose from, but if you’re looking for insider favorites, John and Carla recommend takeaway from Okie Dokies Smokehouse, a Swannanoa BBQ joint beloved by locals. 2375 US 70, Swannanoa. (828) 686-0050, okiedokiesbbq.com

DRINK

If you can tear yourself away from the view, venture out to Appalachian Vintner, a well-curated craft beer and wine market, to pick up a bottle or two to enjoy back at the Airbnb. Natural wine fans rejoice—their selection of pét-nat, orange, and natural wines is one of the largest in the region. 745 Biltmore Ave, #121, Asheville. (828) 505-7500, appalachianvintner.com

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SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

Handcrafted from reclaimed wood, R.H. JENSEN GAME CALLS honor hunting legacies.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Sport • GEAR

• R.H. Jensen crafts heirloom-quality game calls, such as this double pintail mallard duck call, hand-carved from reclaimed wood.

Jenson is often commissioned to craft calls honoring a special hunting dog, carving a pet’s likeness into the wood; one couple brought the ashes of their labrador to Jensen for incorporating into the paint finish.

H

old one of Ralph Jensen’s duck calls and ponder history contained in a single object. Each sought-after call is hewn from storied wood: a thirteenth-century chapel door, the butt of an admiral’s shotgun, a family’s broken piano, or old-growth heart pine from the bottom of the Cape Fear River. Though at first he didn’t understand how a duck call worked, Jensen’s creative know-how in woodwork and his love of the past soon poured in. “I like to put history in my calls; there’s always some story in the wood,” he says. Jensen’s calls are heirlooms; entire collections pass from generation to generation, with devoted collectors: “I even know some folks who’ve got it written in their wills that they want to be buried with their hunting dog and one of my calls.” An R.H. Jensen duck call is an intricate work of art, inlaid with care and precision. Why such elaboration for something inherently simple? “It’s a feeling people are looking for, when the tools they use are special. With a duck call, maybe it’s the feel a person gets when they’re holding it and call the duck in.” Jenson laughs, “And, well—if the duck goes the other way, it still feels good.” R.H. Jensen Game Calls, Wilmington, NC. (910) 231-6865, rhjensengamecalls.com

CALLS OF THE WILD

R.H. JENSEN GAME CALLS ARE EXPERTLY CR AFTED HEIRLOOMS FOR THE HUNT by Beth brown Ables

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photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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SPORT • ADVENTURE

OUTDOOR MAJESTY

HUNTING BLISS AWAITS IN INMAN AT RIVER BEND SPORTSMAN’S RESORT by M. Linda Lee • illustration by timothy banks

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he last bastion of winter in South Carolina, February is also the month when hunters flock to River Bend Sportsman’s Resort in Inman to take advantage of the final weeks of bird season, which ends on March 31. A wing-shooting preserve that rolls across 550 acres bordered by the North Pacolet River, River Bend welcomes both experienced hunters and neophytes to test their skill at bringing down quail, chukar, and pheasant.


“I get a lot of families coming in. They come up here and get out of the house and enjoy something they all like to do together.”

River Bend’s owner and president, Ralph Brendle, hails from Statesville, North Carolina, where he grew up going quail hunting with his father. After graduating from Wofford College in Spartanburg, Brendle took a sales job with Milliken Chemical, where his love of hunting came in handy. “I was taking customers to hunting preserves all over the world for Milliken,” he recalls, “so in 1985 I decided to open my own hunting preserve.”

field with a guide and a dog. While many of the resort’s guides have their own bird dogs, the resort also owns a set of 18 trained dogs, including English pointers, English setters, and German shorthaired pointers. The dogs fill in where humans are lacking, sniffing out birds in the brush and pointing to their quarry, and later retrieving the hunters’ prizes from the dense brush where they fall.

GAME TIME

ROOM & BOARD

River Bend Sportsman’s Resort began with a small lodge set amid acres punctuated by open fields penned in by pine and hardwood trees. In 1998, Brendle built a new pine-log lodge with a restaurant and added 14 rooms to the property (the original lodge is now used as a conference center). Such amenities make hunting here even more appealing. You and your group can experience a half-day hunt, then relax in the evening with dinner prepared by Chef Alex Castro (formerly at Larkins on the River), and perhaps shoot a game of billiards before retiring to your comfortable accommodations for the night. Those include 10 standard double rooms in a building next to the lodge, plus a four-bedroom, fourbath cottage with an open floor plan and fireplace.

GOOD SHOT

Just up the road off I-26, wing-shooting preserve River Bend Sportsman’s Resort offers its guests the joys of the outdoor hunt and comfortable accommodations, too.

Never shot birds before? “You don’t have to know anything about a shotgun at all to come here,” Brendle says. In addition to harboring the renowned Paragon School run by Dan Schindler, the resort employs their own shooting instructors. “They can teach you everything about gun safety so you can start shooting and hitting clay targets.” Shooting clays is where most of his clients—of which 90 percent are corporate customers who fly in from all over the world—begin their hunt. “We call the sporting course ‘golf with a shotgun,’” Brendle explains, “because you have different stations, so you shoot a set of targets at one station, then move to the next one, like you move to different tee boxes in golf.” Once they’re warmed up, most groups take to the

The resort poses no limit on the number of birds you can shoot. “Whatever you want to pay for, we’ll put out there,” says Brendle, who stocks the reserve with birds raised specifically for him. There are eight locations on the property where a maximum of three people can hunt in a guided group at one time. Purchasing a two-person half-day package is your best value. For $825, you get 30 quail, 2 chukar, and 2 pheasant in the field, a dog and guide, and lunch at the lodge. The resort staff will even clean and package the birds you bag. Brendle takes pleasure in watching people enjoying themselves. “Over the holidays, I get a lot of families coming in. They may only get together once a year, but they can come up here and get out of the house and enjoy something they all like to do together.” At River Bend, fun is just one more thing that takes flight alongside the birds. River Bend Sportsman’s Resort, 1000 Wilkie Bridge Rd, Inman, SC. (864) 592-1348, rvrbend.com; reservations required for all activities.

River Bend has a special permit for hunting ducks, which they release on a 40-acre swamp on the property November 1– March 1. Other times of the year, you can track deer and wild turkeys, according to South Carolina hunting laws.

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STYLE • THE FIND

(left) Londa neckpiece, $135; Isondo earrings, $45; (right) Intamo choker, $125; (opposite top right) long sparkly gold feather earrings, $54; (opposite bottom right) bronze flower necklace and bracelet, $98. All from Amahle Designs.

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hile living in Madrid, Lauren Brink liked to take walks. She would spend her days popping in and out of leather shops, and a love of artisanal work began to take hold. When her parents retired to Greenville, she came back to the States as well, with some Spanish leather in her suitcase. Amahle Designs was born from Brink’s hobby of making leather earrings. Since its inception three years ago, she’s added a line of necklaces, totes, and her personal favorite: clutches. A nod to her South African heritage (Brink was born and raised in Johannesburg), amahle is a word from the language of the Zulu tribe, meaning “beautiful.” Brink adores the brand she has built and takes pride in creating custom pieces for her clients. Her leathers come primarily from Italy, but also from Spain and Argentina. “I will say my style is definitely not for the faint-hearted,” Brink says with a laugh. “I always try to create pieces that are somewhat unique.” This small business is built from all over the world, with touches of personality and heart in each original piece. To shop, visit amahledesigns.com or contact Lauren Brink at info@amahledesigns.com.

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STYLE • THE SHOP

THAT’S FAB MODERN DÉCOR MEETS VINTAGE VIBES AT THE NEW LOCATION OF PAULA R ALLIS HOME by Abby Moore Keith • photograph by Rebecca Lehde

P

aula Rallis Home may have moved across town, but the décor destination still rocks chic vibes from its new retail location along Greenville’s prime boutique strip. Designer and influencer, Charleston’s Paula Rallis continues curating her Augusta Street space with modern European curios and vintage pieces. The whitewashed interior is as posh as the vendibles on the shelves, not to mention the vertigo chandelier, which crowns the shop like a sleek Derby hat. This season expect to find mod kitchenware like Sabre dining utensils or mugs from Maison Sarah Lavoine. If you can’t make a trip to the brick-and-mortar, head to paularallishome.com for online options. Paula Rallis Home, 629 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2019, paularallishome.com

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Photographs of items courtesy of Paula Rallis Home

Paula Rallis Home (left) features modern and European-sourced furniture and accents, such as chandeliers, candles, and kitchenware.


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Ms. Bea Wright

’TIL DEATH DO US PART MS. BEA REMINDS OF THE WAYS WE CA N CONSOLE LOVED ONES WHO A RE GR IEV ING

M

y husband and I have a longstanding difference of opinion that will not be resolved in both of our lifetimes. The disagreement relates to how we want to be “funeralized” when we die. Necessarily, the first to go will lose the ability to police his or her own funeral arrangements. Bottom line, my mate thinks that funerals, wakes, and visitations should be completely somber affairs with audible wailing, boxes of tissues, and mournful missing of the deceased. No broad grins allowed, only muted, heartfelt smiles as you speak with the bereaved about the departed. I, on the other hand, embrace the Southern concept of celebrating the dead with food and drink as stories of the deceased are shared through tears mixed with laughter and sorrow. My mother-in-law’s passing was my first experience of losing a family member as an adult. Several years later, I lost my own mother. Mind you, these times were very difficult, but the outpouring of support and sympathy from people far and wide eased the pain. Importantly, the experiences of how my family and I were cared for shaped how I respond when I hear the news that someone is grieving the loss of a family member. So now, I strive to pay forward the expressions of sympathy that helped me deal with my sorrow. Comfort food: Sharing food is a wonderful way to show support, care, and love. Within hours of word getting out about Nana’s death, food was arriving at the door. Homemade casseroles, warm cakes directly from the oven, and store-bought, ready-to-eat favorites were

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dropped off. Friends nourished and nurtured the whole family in our time of need. Tip: If you are coordinating a meal for the bereaved family, first inquire about allergies and dislikes. Also find out the best day and time for delivery and whether they would like help serving food to the family. Sympathy notes: Receiving notes from people who knew and loved my mother-in-law and my mom was very meaningful. Not only did the writings offer comfort, they affirmed that memories of lost loved ones were shared by others, providing a sense of community, even with people I had never met. Also, receiving notes from friends who never knew my mom was immensely touching and supportive. Tip: Write the note, whether or not you knew the person who died. If you have a specific memory of the deceased, share it. Say something: Death and talking about loss make us uncomfortable, but recognizing the death of a loved one is simply kind. I can remember how hard it was getting back to normal after Mom died. Having her death acknowledged was immensely helpful, long after her funeral. Tip: All you have to say is, “I heard about your loss, and I am sorry.” If the bereaved wants to say more, just listen. There are more ways to express sympathy and be present for someone who is grieving, such as memorial gifts, flowers delivered to the bereaved, even minding the house during the funeral service. Death is something we will all experience; choosing to support one another through difficult times is what makes us human. I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.


It’s All About Family. Introducing Ember.

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Man About TOWN

CLEANING HOUSE A CHR ISTM AS PRESENT COMES W ITH MORE RESPONSIBILIT Y THA N THE M A N BA RGA INED FOR by Steven Tingle

L

ast night I was sitting on the couch when Charlie came into the living room. Charlie can be a pain, but he’s always entertaining. It’s fun to watch him scamper around and then dart under the coffee table for a little game of hide-and-seek. When he gets stuck, as he often does, I try to help him, but he always jerks away when I draw near. Eventually Charlie will escape only to bounce off a baseboard or bang into the leg of a barstool. Oh Charlie, you’re a riot. Bored with the living room, he will dash down the hall and out of sight, at which point I will chase after him to make sure he doesn’t get trapped under a bed or tangled up in a lamp cord. Charlie is not a puppy or a toddler, he’s a Roomba—an autonomous robot vacuum cleaner that looks like a miniature UFO. Charlie was a Christmas gift from my wife Jess’s grandparents. Actually, they gave us a personal check equal to the purchase price of a Roomba along with a card that read: Thanks for shopping for us. This is the same couple who recently celebrated their seventy-third wedding anniversary—an achievement that, to me, seems not only mathematically impossible but also questionably desirable.

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A Roomba is supposed to take the burden out of vacuuming. But when it comes to Charlie, Jess and I are helicopter parents. If Charlie is awake and roaming around the house, one of us is always closely monitoring his movements. We learned this lesson the hard way after hearing a crash and then watching Charlie roll out of the den with a small tinsel Christmas tree trailing behind him. One day, after realizing I’d not seen Charlie for a good fifteen minutes, I searched the house frantically only to find him in the bathroom, stuck half on the tile floor and half on a thick circular bath mat, rocking rhythmically in an attempt to break free. If you’ve ever seen two turtles making love, you have a good mental image of the scene. Fortunately, Charlie can only wreak havoc for so long. After an hour or so of bouncing around the house, Charlie eventually tires out. When his battery begins to run low, he makes his way back to his “dock” to power off and recharge. Down for his nap, Jess and I can finally relax and debate who is going to grab the traditional vacuum to take care of all of the rooms where Charlie is no longer allowed.


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INTO THE EARTH M A R IS L AW YER’S DEBUT NOVEL CHRONICLES A MINING FA MILY STRUGGLING A F TER A GR AVE LOSS by Maris Lawyer

This excerpt, “Preface,” is from The Blue Line Down by Maris Lawyer. Copyright © 2021 by Hub City Press. Used by permission of Hub City Press.

PREFACE

J

ude sat on the doorstep while Willis was being born. All he could hear was Ma inside screaming, and the other woman talking to her in a quiet voice. Pa was not home. He was still in the mines. The screaming did not stop for hours. Jude sat on the doorstep during that time, the stillest he had ever been in his life. He watched the littlest children leave the schoolhouse and chase each other home, some starting up games of marbles in flat patches of dust. Most of the older children were in the mines, and hadn’t come out with the other men yet. Pa hadn’t told Jude to come to the mines yet, and he sometimes wondered how many years he had left. Jude never went near the black maw of the mines, gaping like a raw bullet hole in the side of the mountain, where the men shambled in each dawn and shambled back out at dusk, filthy from head to toe. Jude could hear Ma whimpering, followed by more cries of pain and the midwife shushing her. Jude began to wish he had not skipped school. He had never been so still in all his life. The men came out of the mines past dark, and Jude saw Pa with his lantern making his way home. Jude took his chin out of his hands and sat up straighter. Ma was groaning in the house, and Pa heard it. He dropped his things and ran inside.

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Jude rose to his feet and followed. The other woman helping Ma had her hand on Pa’s chest, blocking him from the bedroom, speaking low and fast. Ma started screaming again. The woman turned and ran back in, and Pa followed. They did not close the door, and Jude approached the door slowly to look inside. Ma was laying on her side with her back to him, and she had one leg propped up on the footboard of the bed. Her white nightgown was wet and streaked with red around the bottom. Jude put both hands over his mouth, afraid they would hear his breathing. It got quiet then. Ma’s cries cut off, like when someone presses a hand against a guitar’s strings to stop the sound. Pa’s hand was on Ma’s forehead, and the woman’s hands were inside the nightgown. She pulled out a big, purple baby, and Willis broke the silence with his squalls. Ma wasn’t moving. Her head lay back stiff on the pillow, her eyes watching the ceiling. Jude could not move, could only look at her still, white face from across the room. Pa stroked Ma’s forehead, his black hands leaving streaks of coal dust on Ma’s skin. The midwife was putting Willis in a towel and came up to Pa. “It’s a boy, Hezekiah,” the midwife said. Pa did not reach out to hold the baby. He would not look at it. *** An Irish girl started coming to the house. Her name was Linnet Myers and she was only nineteen years old, and looked even younger, but she was married and had a baby and was already pregnant with another. She nursed Willis and took care of him during the day when Jude was at school and Pa was in the mines. Linnet Myers told Jude he could call her “ma’am,” which made him wrinkle his nose, and she was always scolding him for snatching dried apples from the pantry or digging holes in the front yard looking for worms. Ma had rarely scolded Jude—if he stole a treat from the pantry, she’d utter a harmless fuss and ruffle his hair, shooing him on his way. Jude used to sit on the kitchen stool to watch Ma cook, but now he spent most of his afternoons leaning against the side of the woodpile, watching beetles crawl between the logs. On bad days, days when he didn’t understand why Ma had died,

Photographs (Maris Lawyer and cover) provided by Hub City Press

Word Count


Winner of the 2020 South Carolina Novel Prize, Upstate native Maris Lawyer launches into the publishing realm this June with her mountain mining tale, The Blue Line Down. For more, visit hubcity.org/books/fiction/the-blue-line-down.

he would find stones in the yard and hurl them at the yard crows. But he didn’t mind Linnet Myers too much, because she took care of Willis as tenderly as her own baby. Linnet’s little girl called her mother “ma’am” too— Jude found this ridiculous, until he realized it was the same word for mother. He kept calling Linnet Myers “Mam,” but now he no longer minded. Pa didn’t pay any attention to Willis. Right after Ma died, Willis would raise Cain because he was wet, but Pa wouldn’t do anything about it. But the crying would continue till finally Pa got up, his face red as dynamite, and Jude felt sure he’d hit Willis, or yank him up and fling him out the window. Jude would run forward and scoop Willis up, crying, “I’ll change him! I’ll change him!” When Willis started growing teeth, Pa wouldn’t come near him because of his wailing. At the end of the day, Mam Myers would beat on the locked door, yelling, “Hezekiah Washer, you take your boy in! I’ve got a husband and babe of my own. You take your boy in!”

Pa would stare at the fire, the flames reflected in his black eyes. Jude crossed the room and opened the door as quietly as he could. Tears shone in Mam Myers’ eyes when she saw him. Even with her belly getting big with the second baby, she looked like a kid. She bent down and put Willis, whimpering, into his arms, and pressed her lips on Jude’s forehead. “I’m sorry,” she whispered. “I’ve got a babe of my own.” Jude took Willis inside to his own room, away from Pa. He wet a clean rag in the water basin and gave it to Willis to suck on. Willis was a big, fat baby, with cheeks round as baseballs and bumpy rolls of pudge all up and down his legs and arms. Jude always laughed when he looked at him, because he had never seen anyone so fat. Everyone was all bones and muscle at the mines. Jude pushed his finger into Willis’s cheek, watching the flesh dimple, and he smiled. It was a sign of excess; a sign that somehow, Willis was getting what he needed. Pa still didn’t ask Jude to go to the mines. He knew they could use the money, even the paltry scrip given to the child laborers. Jude would watch the miners— some of them Jude’s own age—climb up the hill in the thin pink morning light, and he’d see them disappear into the mouth of the mine. Jude wondered if Pa kept him in school because he would be able to take care of Willis at the end of the day. Pa didn’t like being beholden to the Myers. Or, maybe he didn’t want Jude in the mines. Sometimes Pa would go into long tirades about the way the miners were treated, with the owners never setting foot below ground.

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Julie Valentine Journey of Hope and Healing: A Virtual Fundraiser JAYCEE DUGARD

GUEST SPEAKER

Jaycee Dugard was kidnapped by two strangers from a bus stop in her hometown of Lake Tahoe in 1991. After surviving 18 years of abuse at the hands of her two assailants, she was finally reunited with her mother and family in 2009. Jaycee is now the author of two New York Times Best Sellers: A Stolen Life: A memoir (2011) and Freedom: My Book of Firsts (2016). Reuniting with her family required an extensive, multi-disciplinary approach to get through a very difficult transition in their lives. They needed protection, expertise, support, and the ability to make choices as they started their healing journey. Jaycee believes that families who survive major life traumas need and deserve the kind of support her family received. Because of this belief, Jaycee and her family formed The JAYC Foundation (Just Ask Yourself to Care). The JAYC Foundation mission is to be of service to families and individuals that have experienced a severe crisis, challenge or conflict through a major life disruption.

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WITH A STORY GROUNDED IN HER

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BECOMES THE FIRST MEMBER OF HER EASTERN

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PUBLISHED NOVELIST WITH HER DEBUT BOOK,

EVEN AS WE BREATHE BY

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SCOTT GOULD

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL MEHAFFEY


by Melissa Reardonon

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SO WHAT IS SOUTHERN (CAPITAL ‘S’)

LITERATURE, ANYWAY? IS IT THE BASTARD LOVE CHILD OF

WILLIAM FAULKNER

AND FLANNERY O’CONNOR, conceived over bourbon and peacock feathers in some undisclosed, rural location a few clicks south of the MasonDixon? Is it defined by some sort of geographic designation? By the distinction of dialect? By the summer-slow motion of the stories the South breeds? Is it even a real thing or just some nebulous category that refuses to wither away? Lord only knows. But perhaps (hopefully) Southern literature is becoming more defined by the voices it has erased and shuttered for too long, voices that are beginning to rise (far too slowly) to the page. One of these voices belongs to Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle, the first published novelist from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Her debut novel, Even As We Breathe, is a richly woven wonder—textured and honest, with a plot that rolls out gently and confidently, not unlike the mountains of Western North Carolina where the story is set.

C

owney Sequoyah, the protagonist of Even As We Breathe, is a nineteen-year-old Cherokee tip-toeing toward the edge of manhood. In an attempt to breach the borders of his Cherokee reservation and earn money to finance a dream of college attendance, he takes a summer job at the luxurious Grove Park Inn in Asheville. The narrative plot-kicker? It’s 1942, and the Grove Park Inn houses not high-rolling tourists, but Axis diplomats and foreign nationals. (In this case, you can translate “houses” as “imprisons.”) In his job as a grounds keeper’s assistant, Cowney navigates a winding and often mysterious path among the military guards, the foreign nationals, teenage infatuation, and the incessant but not unexpected racism that looms over the manicured grounds of the Grove Park Inn during the early days of World War II. For Clapsaddle, the genesis of Even As We Breathe lies in a newspaper feature she ran across about the Grove Park in ’42. “It was an article on Asheville’s role in World War II, mostly about the Biltmore housing works of art. It mentioned the Grove Park housing Axis diplomats and foreign nationals. The story came from there.” And what Clapsaddle did with that rich set-up is utilize a classic storytelling strategy: put a character where he might not necessarily belong. Young Cowney is a stranger in a stranger land, and though he returns time and again to the reservation, he is always drawn back to the Grove Park Inn,

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Through her debut novel, Even As We Breathe, Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle crafts a compelling narrative that unfolds in her native Appalachia. For an excerpt, visit towncarolina.com.

back to the grounds teeming with soldiers and foreigners. In other words, Clapsaddle’s protagonist is caught between the familiar yet stifling reservation and the opulent Grove Park, and his allegiances in both places provide the ingredients for a compelling and authentic read. This high degree of authenticity was a priority for Clapsaddle from the outset of her writing process. She says, “If you look at who has been telling the stories of native existence, it’s not been native people for the most part. You can go back to Hawthorne talking about the dark man in the woods, and those are the first voices, and that defines what native literature is for America. So when you have other people defining what it is, and you hear an authentic voice, it almost sounds inauthentic. When you focus down into Eastern Band Cherokee, we’re very different than other tribes. We’re even different than Cherokee nation in Oklahoma, in terms of our relationship to place. I know in my own experience, people in the publishing world just don’t get that sometimes.”


“If you look at who has been telling the stories of native existence, it’s not been native people for the most part. So when you have other people defining what it is, and you hear an authentic voice, it almost sounds inauthentic.” Clapsaddle’s definition (or perhaps redefinition) of native voice and authenticity permeates each page of Even As We Breathe, no doubt due to the responsibility she feels as the first published novelist from her Cherokee community. “It becomes representative in a way. For a while, when someone asks about literature from the Eastern Band Cherokees, there’s only going to be me. And there’s not just one story from our tribe. I don’t want anyone to assume there is one voice from the Eastern Band because there are so many.”

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nd yet, we see so few books penned by native writers. As Clapsaddle puts it, “There are only small spaces for our sorts of voices.” Fortunately for readers, Clapsaddle’s publisher, the University Press of Kentucky, gave her story the opportunity to see the light of day and carve out a space of its own. Under the editorship of acclaimed novelist Silas House,

Clapsaddle fine-tuned her narrative into a story that Publisher’s Weekly dubbed, “an astonishing addition to WWII and Native American literature.” Reviewer after reviewer has praised its addition to the canon of Appalachian novels. Interestingly, though, Clapsaddle says, “I’ve never been referred to as a Southern writer. I’m curious to see how that plays out.” I am too. Writers like Clapsaddle and books like Even As We Breathe should serve to alter our idea of literary categories because she occupies so many. She’s a woman. A Cherokee. An Appalachian. And a Southerner. Storytellers like Clapsaddle remind us how arbitrary and perhaps unnecessary these literary categories are. They are typically and traditionally created by people (publishers, reviewers, readers, etc.) who don’t actually create the work inside of them. And yet they persist. Which brings me back to the original question: What is Southern literature? Sure, the typical and probably most popular answer (which you’ll hear writers recite time after time) is that Southern authors have an almost obsessive attachment to place. If that’s the case, there’s nothing more Southern than the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. As Clapsaddle says with a laugh, “We’ve been here the longest.” Her laugh is almost symbolic of the good humor and humility Clapsaddle employs as a first-time novelist gaining national attention. “If you had told me five years ago that I would be debuting with a university press during COVID, I would have said ‘forget that.’ But I do think there’s a little bit of a change in the publishing industry. People are looking to smaller presses to see what’s coming through.” AND WHAT’S “COMING THROUGH” ARE VOICES TOO LONG IGNORED, STORIES FINDING FOOTHOLDS THROUGH THE TENACITY OF SMALL PUBLISHERS, MANY OF WHICH ARE HOUSED IN THE SOUTH. So thank goodness for small, independent Southern publishers. Thank goodness for writers who continue to create in silence and solitude until their stories find a crack where the daylight comes in. What is Southern literature? I haven’t got a clue. But I do know this: The South is a wide, sprawling place. There should be plenty of spaces for all the voices that deserve to be heard, like Annette Clapsaddle’s. She is the first published novelist from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. You and I both know the second is out there, waiting.

1942 EVEN AS WE BREATHE was inspired by a newspaper article Clapsaddle discovered about Asheville during WWII. In 1942 the Grove Park Inn was used as an internment camp to house foreign diplomats with Axis ties.

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CONFIDENCE. OPTIMISM. RESILIENCE. ENERGY.

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eat drink FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Husk Smokin’ Barbeque’s Pimento Cheese and Smoked Sausage Plate, with benne crackers and assorted pickles, is a fitting start to the meal or a cocktail accompaniment.

In a reinvented turn, HUSK SMOKIN’ BARBEQUE focuses on pit, flame, and flavor.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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E D • CITY DISH

SMOKE SIGNALS PREMIER DINING DESTINATION HUSK PI VOTS TO FOCUS ON BA R BECUE A ND SMOKED MEATS by M. Linda Lee • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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he past year of quarantine and business shutdowns has led us all to reflect on our lives and livelihoods. In many cases we’ve had to recalibrate and change the way we do things. So, too, restaurants have been forced to take a hard look at their operations. For Husk Greenville, that meant embracing a new concept: barbecue. “The pandemic is 100 percent responsible for the pivot,” admits David Howard, president of The Neighborhood Dining Group that owns Husk. “COVID-19 closed us down and caused us to reflect as a company on all our operations to make sure we remain competitive and viable.” Though Husk had a solid customer base, the style of food didn’t lend itself well to takeout, an adaptation that many restaurants have had to make to stay afloat.


At Husk’s new barbecue concept in Greenville, Chef David Jensen (right) dishes up finger-licking-good dishes such as a fried catfish sandwich (opposite, left) and smoky ribs and brisket with madefrom-scratch sides (below).

HOT PLATES Collard Green Dip

Served with toast “soldiers,” the chef’s play on spinach and artichoke dip incorporates the requisite cream cheese and cheddar, but substitutes chopped collard greens for the spinach and punches it up with pickled serrano peppers and smoked tomatoes.

Fried Catfish Sandwich

Fluffy, golden fingers of cornmeal-fried catfish are crowned with shaved raw onion, dolloped with pickledgarlic tartare sauce, and tucked into a toasted bun, lobster-roll style.

Pulled Pork

Slathered with brown sugar, spices, and apple-cider vinegar, Husk’s luscious pulled pork echoes the vinegarbased barbecue that Chef David enjoyed growing up in the Upstate.

Ultimately, the group decided that a more approachable, familyfriendly restaurant would have a better chance of being successful over the next several years. To oversee this new endeavor, The Neighborhood Dining Group brought in Chef David Jensen, who, for the past seven years, was the sous-chef and butcher at Husk in Charleston. A native of Central, South Carolina, Jensen is stoked to assume the role of executive chef and pitmaster at Husk Barbeque, where he will carry on the Husk philosophy of honoring Southern foodways. “At the end of the day, barbecue is heat, smoke, and some seasonings,” Jensen notes. “It’s how you treat it that determines how it comes out. You have to let the ingredients shine.” To do this, he’s working with two new smokers in the kitchen, using white oak as the backbone and adding accents from hickory and cherry. “Going forward, I want to experiment with fruit woods, like peach wood in summer,” adds the chef, who is a fan of the more subtle flavor that fruit woods impart. An impressive collection of bourbons, peaty Scotch whiskies, and even a smoked Old Fashioned cocktail round out the menu and complement the tender brisket, succulent ribs, and other smoked meats. Some items, like the mac and cheese and the terrific smoked cheddar grits, silky with cream and butter, will stay on the menu, while seasonal sides will rotate in. Signatures including the Husk Burger, shrimp and grits, and cornbread will remain; the fried chicken will now be featured as a special. As is the case with anything in the Husk brand, there’s an overriding expectation of quality. “We’re trying to put our best foot forward in our interpretation of good barbecue,” declares Jensen. “This is our version, what makes us happy. . . . Hopefully, everyone will be able to see that through our food.” Husk Smokin’ Barbeque, 722 S Main St, Greenville; (864) 627-0404, huskbbq.com. Open Tuesday–Sunday for lunch & dinner.

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E D • IN SEASON BRAISED COLLARDS Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:

1 ½ lbs. collard greens, sliced into ribbons 12 oz. applewood-smoked bacon, cut into lardons 2 small sweet onions, chopped 4 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced ¾ tsp. red chile flakes 2 c. chicken broth ¼ c. apple cider vinegar Kosher salt to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Add the bacon to a large Dutch oven or heavybottomed pot, and then turn the heat to medium to let s the fat render out as the bacon crisps. Fry until bacon is crispy and brown, stirring occasionally. Remove bacon from pot with a slotted spoon; set aside. 2. Add chopped onion to hot bacon fat and stir, sautéing for about five minutes. Season with salt. Add sliced garlic and chile flake to onion and continue sautéing for another five minutes, until onions are soft. 3. Pour chicken broth into pot and raise heat until the broth comes to a simmer. Add collard greens in batches, stirring, until they have wilted enough for all to fit. Season again to taste with salt. Reduce heat to very low and cover with a lid. Cook slowly for another 45 minutes to an hour, stirring occasionally. 4. Remove from heat, stir in apple cider vinegar and reserved bacon lardons, and taste to adjust seasoning, if necessary. Serve with the pot-likker. *This recipe originally appeared in TOWN’s Southern Culture Issue, February 2019.

DAILY GREENS THE HEIRLOOM COLL A R D PROJECT PRESERVES A N ICONIC SOUTHER N STA PLE by Lauren Stepp • photograph by paul mehaffey

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n his family’s farm in the piedmont town of Shelby, North Carolina, Chef Jamie Swofford grew up eating collard greens the Southern way—cooked to death with a ham bone and finished with vinegar. When he left Cleveland County at the age of 17 to cook at eateries across the Southeast, he reinvented the collards of his boyhood, but he never gave much thought to the variety of collards he served until 2016. “I love okra, and I met this guy on social media who was growing like 76 varieties in Leicester, North Carolina,” says Swofford. That guy,

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Chris Smith, was shifting his focus from okras to collards. He was specifically interested in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s vast collection of more than 60 heirloom varieties. “When you walk into a grocery store, you see a lot of food but not a lot of diversity,” says Smith. “Varietal diversity means genetic diversity, and that brings about stronger, more resilient food systems.” Along with Ira Wallace, an organic grower and owner of the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange in Virginia, Smith started the Heirloom Collard Project in 2020 to share seeds with growers, officially launching a collard trial involving 20 varieties and eight farm sites across the country. The premise behind the trial has been simple: plant the seeds and see which varieties fare best. Though participants are logging scientific information related to disease resistance, uniformity, and winter hardiness, and will likely continue some form of data collection this year, the project is more about preserving narratives than comparing quantitative figures. As a board member of the Heirloom Collard Project, Chef Swofford grew the 20 collard varieties on a one-acre farm he manages in Gastonia, North Carolina. He found Green Glaze, a plant with dark, shiny leaves, to be the most consistent and best tasting. “It’s my wintertime stand-in when it comes to leafy greens,” he notes. But Swofford developed a particular fondness for the Old Timey Blue variety. Not only does the plant produce striking, purple-ribbed leaves, it also evokes a certain nostalgia. “I’m a country boy,” he says. “That variety reminds me of going to the general store, buying boots and groceries, and getting my oil changed out back.” To learn more about the Heirloom Collard Project, visit heirloomcollards.org.


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E D • KITCHEN AID

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Nourish yourself or someone you love with this savory skillet chicken pot pie—with a dash of Louisiana hot sauce.

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TAKE CARE FL AVOR F UL CHICKEN POT PIE TOPPED W ITH FL A KY PUFF PASTRY CHECKS A LL THE BOXES FOR COMFORT by Kathryn Davé • photograph by Jivan Davé

ave you ever seen a man using Meal Train? Now, I’m not writing men off entirely—I believe that somewhere out there they are coordinating meal efforts for those who need them or signing up for a slot to bring dinner. I just haven’t witnessed it yet. This work—this beautiful, ordinary, often inconvenient work—seems to be shouldered mostly by women. Even if they don’t cook, women are the ones ordering a meal, texting about drop-off times, driving it over after work at rush hour, and oohing appreciatively over the new baby or offering sympathy after the surgery. Taking dinner to someone navigating life’s upheavals is an old art—one that bridges the past to the present, bridges our own insular little worlds to others. Even as the pace of modern life changes, women have kept up with the kind of caring that comes in casserole dishes (disposable, if you know what you’re doing). Meal-coordination websites have just made this thread of connection binding us together visible. According to the website sign-up forms, we are all bringing the same kind of things: White chicken chili. Lasagna. Vegetable beef stew and rolls. Salsa chicken tacos. (There is a lot of chicken.) Chicken pot pie belongs to this particular family of dinners. It transports well and reheats nicely. It includes vegetables, but packages them in a cream sauce and flaky pastry to distract any potential picky eaters. Chiefly— it’s comforting, the kind of dinner your mama would make you (or that you’d make yourself as a child with the help of Marie Callender). See, the comfort of being cared for is ultimately what you bring when you bring a meal. And that’s a train anyone can get on board.

Taking dinner to someone navigating life’s upheavals is an old art—one that bridges the past to the present.

SKILLET CHICKEN POT PIE Serves 4–6

INGREDIENTS: 3 Tbs. unsalted butter 2 small onions, diced 2 stalks celery, thinly sliced 1½ cups carrots, thinly sliced 16 oz. cremini mushrooms, sliced 1 cup frozen green peas 4 cups cooked, shredded chicken ½ tsp. dried thyme 4 garlic cloves, minced 1½ cups chicken stock ½ cup whole milk 1 Tbs. Louisiana hot sauce 1 (10-inch) square puff pastry sheet, thawed 1 egg, beaten Kosher salt Black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. 2. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat and cook onions, carrots, and celery until slightly softened, about 8 minutes. Add 1 more tablespoon of butter, mushrooms, 2 teaspoons kosher salt, ½ teaspoon dried thyme, garlic, and 1 teaspoon black pepper. Cook until mushrooms are tender, stirring when needed, about 8 minutes. Stir in shredded chicken and green peas; remove from heat. 3. Melt 6 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over medium heat and whisk in flour; cook, whisking constantly, about 1 minute. Gradually whisk in chicken broth and cook until thickened, about 6 minutes. Add milk and hot sauce, whisking. Pour cream sauce into chicken mixture, stirring to combine. 4. Drape the thawed puff pastry sheet over filling. Brush lightly with beaten egg wash, and cut 4 slits into the pastry to vent steam. Bake until golden brown and bubbly, 20 to 22 minutes. Let stand 15 minutes before serving. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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p r e s e n t e d

b y

Greenville Journal honors the history and lives of African Americans in our community. Each week, during the month of February, we will highlight the inspirational stories, events, notable people, music, culture and more. Follow along with the series each week in the Greenville Journal and on GreenvilleJournal.com


C O M E F O R T H E B A R B E U E.

Stay for the Bourbon!

Led by Pitmaster & Executive Chef David Jensen. Our pit team utilizes wood-smoking techniques while drawing inspiration from across the barbeque trail map of the culinary South. A comfortable gathering place offering a selection of slow smoked meats, including Ribs, House-Smoked Sausages, Brisket, Pulled Pork and Southern sides along with Husk classics such as the iconic Husk Cheeseburger & Pimento Cheese. The bar offers signature frozen drinks, seasonal cocktails, local beers, and the region’s most extensive bourbon and whiskey list. Husk Barbeque will also offer to-go, catering, and boxed lunches.

huskbbq.com

DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

|

huskbbq

722 S Main Street | Greenville, SC 29601 | 8 6 4 . 6 2 7 . 0 4 0 4


Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program is updated regularly, and now The Anchorage is offering a weekly online market featuring pantry items, take-home dinners, and more. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun &

Mon. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D,

SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864) 412-8677, theburrowgville.com

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tues. 1629 E North St. (864) 6094249, forkandplough.com

Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and pan-seared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass.

$-$$, D. Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites— like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D,

SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

Husk Smokin’ Barbeque After spending a few months off the docket, this West End staple returns with a refreshed menu focused on all things meat. Continuing in their sustainable partnerships and quality craft, pitmaster David Jensen throws out ribs, brisket, pulled pork, and more, plus a host of scrumptious sides. Expect a heavy tribute to bourbon and whiskeys at the bar, and don’t worry, you can still order a side of those famous pork rinds. $-$$. L, D, SBR.

722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 627-0404, huskbbq.com

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily),

SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant bar bites accompany wines by the glass

or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their multicourse tastings, an ode to nature’s bounty. $$-$$$$, D (Wed–

Sat); L, SBR (Fri–Sun). 2510 Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

Reid’s Fine Foods Whether it’s a salmon plate, a bottle of wine, or a delectable pastry, Reid’s has everything a foodie heart could desire. Newly opened in the former Caviar & Bananas space, this Charlotte staple is a one-stop shop for breakfast, lunch, and a last-minute dinner party cheese board. Grab anything on the menu to go, or settle into the likes of a flat-iron steak with squash & Brussels sprouts hash, chimichurri butter, and a truffle cabernet sauce. B, L, D. $-$$. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 283-0940, reids.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées from Chef Scott Kroener range from sashimi-grade tuna and panseared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D,

SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed. 13

S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs. $$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all—whether you’re a vegan or meat lover. $, L. Closed Sun. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

BARS & BREWERIES Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with bar bites. Try the Damn Good Burger featuring double beef patties, American cheese, onion rings, and Mars mayo on house-made brioche, served with a spicy pickle spear. Mixologists Sarah Cochran KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR

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fill your heart with love and kindness

and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$. L, D.

Closed Sun & Mon. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

Carolina Bauernhaus Enjoy the delights of autumn with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Mon & Tues. 556 Perry Ave. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

Since 1948

PACE JEWELERS Located in the Village of West Greenville

1250 Pendleton St., Greenville | 864-232-3436 | PaceJewelers.com #villagewgvl

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

EXILE There’s a new bar in town, with nary a television or wing in sight. If you’re craving an expertly crafted cocktail (or a local beer) in a space with style, this will become your go-to spot. Ideal for a predinner stop, an after-work drink, or for a nightcap. Closed Sun–Tues. 9 Anderson St. exilegvl.com

Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885,

fireforge.beer

Piney Mountain Bike Lounge Part taproom and part full-service cycle shop, Piney Mountain Bike Lounge offers the perfect pit stop after a long day of riding the trails. Local craft brews, wine, and cider complement a regular food truck schedule of popular mobile eateries. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the pump track out back. 20 Piney Mountain Rd, Greenville. (864) 603-2453, pineymtb.com

Elizabeth McDaniel Owner

Artisan chocolates, cocktails, wine, beer, espresso, desserts, and more! Poe West | 556 Perry Avenue Suite B115 | NOW OPEN 12-9 Wed-Sat 864-263-7083 | www.LaRueFineChocolate.com

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Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. Wed–Sat. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

Swordfish Cocktail Club The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St. Wed–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 434-9519, swordfishcocktails.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

Taxi House Wines The bright yellow sliver of a building in the Village’s plaza was once the neighborhood taxi stand, hence this curated shop’s moniker, Taxi House Wines. Now, in collaboration with The Anchorage, the vino destination offers more than 80 unique wine selections, chosen from small, familyowned wineries that focus on sustainability. Closed Sun & Mon. 586 Perry Ave. Tues–Sat, noon–8pm. (864) 207-0685, taxihousewines.com

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Spreadsheets and Deadlines hazy IPA, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you. 1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com

CAFÉS Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underresourced teens and adults. The fresh space presents a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. Getting hangry? A selection of treats is also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sun. 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfastanytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info

Dobrá Tea Tea is the new coffee at this cheery café in the Village of West Greenville, where you can choose among more than 100 different types of tea from around the globe. Pair


your favorite cup with a gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian snack from the list of sweets and savories. $-$$. B, L, D. 1278 Pendleton St. (864) 520-1832, dobrateasc.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com

Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out coldpressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the Taco ’Bout It bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave,

Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207 Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community. $-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

O-CHA Tea Bar A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

Old Europe Located in the West End, Old Europe satisfies your sweet tooth with dozens of decadent pastries and desserts. Éclairs and cookies pair well with an extensive coffee selection, while savory breakfast items are always on hand. Sink into a slice of opera cake, paired with a glass of Champagne. $, B, L, D. 716 S. Main St. Sun–Thurs, 8am– 9pm, Fri–Sat, 8am–11pm. (864) 775-0210, oldeuropedesserts.com

Real Estate the Modern Way

The Spatula Café It can be challenging to find a lunch spot that satisfies both meat-lovers and vegans, but Spatula Café does, and then some. Open for breakfast and lunch, seven days a week, Spatula offers dishes like a tofu scramble wrap alongside a prosciutto bagel, and duck alongside marinated tempeh. Don’t just focus on the meals, though, because their baked goods truly shine. Check out the vegan cinnamon roll, it’s delectable to any type of eater.

$, B, L. 118 Smythe St, Greenville. (864) 2367467, thespatulacafe.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$,

209 STILLWATERS BAY DRIVE, TAYLORS 3 BR/3 BA | $525,000 | MLS# 1434033

B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

Sun Belly Café Week by week, the full plant-based menu at this westside spot changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L.

1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sun. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

James Akers, Jr.

Lee B. Vining

Co-Founder, Broker-in-Charge

Co-Founder, Team Leader

582 Perry Avenue, Greenville, SC 29611

864-236-4111 | info@ModernRECon.com F EB RUA RY 2021 I

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Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC

For special days or the everyday, create memorable meals with a visit to Revival Butchery. Greenville’s local butcher shop specializing in artisan sausages, prime-cuts, gifts, and more. 1296A Pendleton Street, Greenville, S.C. (912) 777-8000 | RevivalButchery.com

Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed

Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

Kairos Greek Kitchen This Charleston-originated spot serves up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the tzatziki sauce. Their choose-your-own approach leads to creative salad combos, and you can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Beautiful? Naturally.

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Mon. 2013

Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sun. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

JEWELRY

111 Henry Street, Greenville

original designs custom repair

864.735.8379

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tanyastieglerdesigns.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on authentic Colombian food, like arepas and patacones, at Sacha’s. Hungry

groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089

TruBroth TruBroth takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a varied mix of Vietnamese staples, health-happy bites, and coffee.

$$, L, D. 36A S Main St, Travelers Rest. Sun– Thurs. (864) 610-0513, trubrothcoffee.com

EUROPEAN Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect complement to a coffee from Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B, L. 147 Welborn St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm. @sc_bakeroom

Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms. $$-$$$, L (Sat– Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170 River Pl. (864)

679-5299, thelazygoat.com

Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine on the corner of River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato. $$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864)

263-7000, limoncellogvl.com


Pasta Addict This Italian haven satisfies at West End outdoor food hall Gather GVL. From gnocchi to tortellini, indulging in cheesy goodness is easy out of their iconic cone containers. Pair your favorite bottle of vino with a bowl of fresh spaghetti alla chitarra, featuring San Marzano D.O.P. tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, toasted breadcrumbs, and Addict oil. $, D, Sun lunch. Closed Mon. 126 Augusta St. (864) 404-0095, pastaddict.com

Ristorante Bergamo Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sun

& Mon. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

Stella’s Southern Brasserie Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, French staples like blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen are served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 6266900, stellasbrasserie.com

PIZZA Coastal Crust Now in the Village of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River Farms. Check out the aptly-named West Village pie, a classic pepperoni pizza punched up with burrata, caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage.

$$, L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. Created with quality ingredients, the shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and even signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk Dr, Greenville.

(864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Sidewall Pizza Company This pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 35 S

Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

Stone Pizza Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, this spot is ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends. Stone and its fire-

inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked in a wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat & Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 6094490, stonepizzacompany.com

Vic’s Pizza The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this family-run walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles).

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JET SKI RENTALS

SPEED BOAT RENTALS

$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone.

YACHT RENTALS

$-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

SAILBOAT

TA C O S

RENTALS

Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails.

KAYAK RENTALS

$-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. $, L, D. 300 River

CANOE RENTALS

FISHING

St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

RENTALS

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

Willy Taco Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta. Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the mother clucker—topped off with a margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Mon. 217

ALL TYPES OF

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Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

TOWN accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.

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GENESIS—BMW FROM THE BEGINNING Gentlemen—and women—start your engines! The most comprehensive exhibit of early BMWs ever presented in North America is now on display in Greer. GENESIS illustrates five decades of BMW’s history through 24 cars and motorcycles. Ranging from the 1927 R47 sport bike to the 1950s-era BMW Baroque Angel sedans, the ongoing exhibit pays homage to the innovations of the Upstate’s own German carmaker.

Miles Daniel | Feb 4

BMW CCA Foundation Museum, 190 Manatee Ct, Greer. Mon–Fri, 9am–5pm; Sat, 10am–4pm. Adults, $12; youth (ages 6-17), $6; children 5 and under, free. (864) 329-1919, bmwccafoundation.org

VIRTUAL CONCERT SERIES What better way to celebrate what would have been Ludwig von Beethoven’s 250th birthday than by presenting a quarter-millennial tribute to his early piano sonatas? This virtual concert series, presented by the Sigal Music Museum in concert with pianist Zack Hughes, will feature 32 of Beethoven’s early sonatas over 32 weeks (the series started in December). Come Monday mornings, start your week off on a classical note by connecting with the museum via Facebook.

Mon, 11am. Free. (864) 520-8807, sigalmusicmuseum.org/eventbrite-event/ beethovens-quarter-millennial-early-sonatas

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MILES DANIEL Singer, songwriter, and multiinstrumentalist Miles Daniel draws on a mix of pop, R&B, and dance rock— both retro and modern—to create his unique sound. Only 25 tables of 4 will be available at his performance at Genevieve’s lounge, so don’t miss the

Now Open at 2204 Augusta Street Our lobby is open for business! For over 20 years, we've been a part of the Upstate community. ww w.gra ndso ut h .com

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Come find out what makes the GrandSouth difference! Greenville • Fountain Inn • Anderson Greer • Columbia • Orangeburg • Charleston

Photograph of courtesy of Furman Athletics

FEBRUARY

1—April 5

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Town Scene


Photograph of courtesy of Furman Athletics

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, Feb 5, 8pm. $50-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

6 & 13

FURMAN BASKETBALL—WEEKENDS AT THE WELL Calling all hoops fans—come cheer

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, Feb 6, 4pm; Sat, Feb 13, noon. Single ticket, $80 (pod seating available in groups of 1 to 8). (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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THE ALLMAN BETTS BAND Cofounders of this seven-piece ensemble, Devon Allman and Duane Betts come by their musical talent naturally as the sons of Greg Allman and Dickey Betts. The show will feature selections from the band’s two chart-topping albums—their debut project, Down to the River (2019) and their latest, Bless Your Heart—as well as some of your favorites tunes from their fathers’ band, The Allman Brothers.

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Genevieve’s at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $200 for a table for 4. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

on the Furman Paladins as they play Southern Conference basketball at The Well. As part of the men’s basketball Weekends at The Well fourgame series, the Paladins will stage a rematch of last season’s exciting showdown with the Wofford Terriers on February 6 and close the four-game series by taking on the Catamounts from Western Carolina University the following Saturday.

CA

chance to see Daniel in an intimate setting where small bites, wine, beer, and cocktails will be available for purchase.

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MITCH ROSSELL Up-and-coming country star Mitch Rossell opened for Garth Brooks on his world tour in 2016, and since then, he has penned Garth’s last four singles, including the numberone hit, “Ask Me How I Know.” At Genevieve’s lounge, he’ll have the opportunity to play some of his own well-received new singles, such as “All I Need to See,” “American

Furman Basketball—Weekends at The Well | Feb 6 & 13

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Town Scene

Switch-A-Roos Children’s Consignment Sale | Feb 19–21

Dream,” and “Then Again.”

Genevieve’s at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $200 for a table for 4. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri, 9am–7pm; Sat, 9am–6pm; Sun, 10am–5pm. meetgcc.com/event/ switch-a-roos-consignment-sale

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THURSDAYS ON THE PATIO The theater may be dark for now, but you can still support Centre Stage and its future season by purchasing tickets to their fundraising event, Thursdays on the Patio. Your ticket includes a socially distanced seat on the patio, where you can listen to live music and

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TOBYMAC With seven Grammy Awards, six Gold Records, and an American Music Award to his credit, Toby McKeehan, better known as TobyMac, has risen to fame as a Christian hip-hop recording artist, music producer, and songwriter. On his Hits Deep tour, he shares wisdom from his personal journey in songs from his most recent album, The Elements, including the hit single, “I Just Need U,” which spent 12 weeks at the top of the charts.

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SC ARMS COLLECTORS ASSOCIATION —GUN & KNIFE SHOW One of five shows a year in Greenville put on by the SCACA, this event provides an opportunity for gun collectors and enthusiasts to buy, sell, and trade guns, knives, and related items. The Association promotes the lawful collection, possession, study, and enjoyment of firearms, both antique and modern, in accordance with all federal, state, and local regulations.

Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Sat, 9am–5pm; Sun, 10am–4pm. Adults, $8; military, $6 (with ID). scgunshows.com/greenville-show

find baby equipment, toys, and even maternity clothing.

nosh on the evening’s featured food, plus beer and wine. Tickets are limited, so don’t wait to order yours.

Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs, 7–9pm. $30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org/thursonthepatio

19–21

SWITCH-A-ROOS CHILDREN’S CONSIGNMENT SALE Looking to replace your child’s outgrown clothes, but short on funds after the holidays? At South Carolina’s largest children’s consignment event you can sell your gently used items and replace them with brand-name and specialty-shop garb at prices that won’t break your piggy bank. In addition to children’s clothing, you’ll

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed, 7pm. Tickets start at $20. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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SWEETHEART CHARITY BALL Put on your dancing shoes and bring your sweetie to the formal annual fundraiser for Meals on Wheels Greenville. Enjoy a three-course meal and the chance to bid on items in the silent and live auctions, not to mention the opportunity to help provide hot

A Child’s Haven • Allen Temple CEDC • Alston Wilkes Society • Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate • Blue Tent • Camp Opportunity • Camp Spearhead • Camperdown Academy • Carolina Family Services • Catholic Charities, Diocese of Charleston • Center for Developmental Services • Children’s Cancer Partners of the Carolinas • City of Greenville Parks and Recreation Department • City of Greenville Police Department • Clarity • Clement’s Kindness Fund for the Children • Conestee Foundation • Diligent Hands Gracious Hearts • FAVOR Faces And Voices Of Recovery • Feed & Seed • Foothills Family Resources • Fostering Great Ideas • Friends of the Reedy River • Furman University Bridges to a Brighter Future • Gateway House • Generation Group Homes of Greenville • Girl Scouts of SC, Mountains to Midlands • Graduate Greenville • Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network • Greenville Center for Creative Arts • Greenville County Schools Food & Nutrition Services • Greenville County Schools Lifelong Learning • Greenville Free Medical Clinic • Greenville Literacy Association • Greenville Theatre • Greenville Rape Crisis & Child Abuse Center • Greenville Zoo FoundationHArvest Hope Food Bank • Greer Community Ministries • Habitat for Humanity • Harvest Hope Food Bank • Homes of Hope • Jasmine Road • Julie Valentine Center • Legacy Charter School • Legacy Early College High School • LiveWell Greenville • Loaves & Fishes • Meals on Wheels of Greenville • Mental Health America, Greenville County • Metropolitan Arts Council • Meyer Center for Special Children • Mill Community Ministries • NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness, Greenville • Naturaland Trust • Pendleton Place • Phillis Wheatley Association • Pleasant Valley Connection • Project HOPE Foundation • Project Host • Public Education Partners Greenville County • Rebuild Upstate • Safe Harbor • Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club • SC First Steps to School Readiness • Senior Action • Soteria at Work • South Carolina Children’s Theatre • Speech, Hearing and Learning Center • St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School • Surgeons for Sight • SWITCH • Taylors Free Medical Clinic • The Family Effect • The Frazee Center • The Generous Garden Project • The Music Club of Greenville for Tanglewood Middle School • The Turning Point of South Carolina • The Warehouse Theatre • TreesGreenville • Triune Mercy Center • United Ministries • Upstate Forever • Urban League of the Upstate • Washington Center • Welvista • YMCA Teen Services Branch • YouthBASE • YWCA

$6.5

million in grants to 82 organizations in 14 years We invite you to join

Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville. To learn more or to join GWG, go to greenvillewomengiving.org

Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

2020-2021 Partners:

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GREENVILLE HALF MARATHON & 5K Tired of virtual events? Well, get ready to run a real race! Both of these races will be in-person, with runners setting off in small waves in accordance with COVID-19 protocols. The 5K course starts at the Swamp Rabbit Café, while the half-marathon starts in Travelers Rest and traverses 13.1 miles downhill along the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Both courses end at the TD Stage behind the Peace Center in downtown Greenville.

Swamp Rabbit Trail, Greenville and Travelers Rest. Sat, 5K at 7:30am; half-marathon, 6–7am. 5K, $35; half-marathon, $85. swamprabbitrace.com

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GREENVILLE VENUE CRAWL Whether you’re planning a casual

ons

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eve n t s attra

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Various locations around Greenville. Sun, noon–6pm. $20. (864) 501-0931, greenvillevenuecrawl.com

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Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Sat, 6pm. $150/person. (864) 233-6565, mealsonwheelsgreenville.org/ mow-event/sweetheart-charity-ball

corporate event or a formal wedding, the Venue Crawl will introduce you to the best event venues in town. Nosh on small bites and sip beverages while you connect with planners who can help bring your vision to light. Take your own car, or hop on the shuttle that will take you to venues in downtown Greenville, the Eastside, and Easley and Travelers Rest.

CA

meals and hope to local homebound folks in need. Last year, proceeds from the Sweetheart Ball paid for more than 50,000 meals.

Mar 3–7

SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE (SEC) WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP During the first week of March, Greenville will become the Women’s Basketball Capital of the South when, for the fourth consecutive year, the city hosts the SEC Women’s Basketball finals at The Well. The single-elimination tournament, which includes all 14 teams in the Southeast Conference, will culminate with the championship game on Sunday night. The winner of the 13-game competition will go on to the NCAA Tournament. Be sure to snag your tickets before they sell out. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, times vary. Ticket prices TBD. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Greenville Half Marathon & 5K | Feb 27

Healthy Heart…Healthier You! DID YOU KNOW?

♥ Heart disease is the leading cause of DEATH in women ♥ Heart attack risk increases dramatically following menopause ♥ Women who begin hormone replacement therapy (HRT) within 5 years of onset of menopause lower their lifelong risk of heart disease and HRT should not routinely be discontinued due to age ♥ Women can lower the risk of heart attack by committing to a healthy lifestyle by eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy weight.

Dr. Denise Broderick

Dr. Kimberly Holloway Dr. Tamela Keller

Dr. Elizabeth Haswell

At Vida Gynecology, our mission is to provide experienced and compassionate care for women at every stage of life. Whether you are planning your first gynecologic visit or are in need of post-menopausal care, the team at Vida is here to provide a comfortable, relaxing place for women of all ages. Call today for more info and appointment 864.720.1299 • vidagyn.com • 274-A Commonwealth Drive F EB RUA RY 2021 I

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UPSTATEBUSINESSJOURNAL.COM

| JANUARY 2021 | VOL. 11 | ISSUE 1

PROGNOSIS

For more than two decades, Community Journals has made a choice to keep all of our content free and available to everyone.

P. 8

We are locally owned and passionate about informing, connecting and inspiring the people of the Upstate.

P. 10

THE HEALTHCARE ISSUE

P. 6

How does architecture affect health? The vaccine is here, but what does the new year hold for a health care system still fighting a pandemic? Companies are stepping up to meet employees’ mental health needs

 



   

ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

  

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Our team is committed to telling great stories and deepening our connection with the community.

WINTER SONG R E C H A R G E Y O U R S P I R I T I N N AT U R E ’ S B E A U T Y

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LIVE LOCAL. SELL LOCAL. GIVE LOCAL.

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This is your chance to experience serenity rediscovered. Become a part of this exclusive, gated community. LeJardin is inspired by the time-honored tradition and style of French and English Estates.

DISCOVER YOUR PERFECT PLACE. WELCOME HOME, TO LEJARDIN.

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Second Glance

TOP DOG W IREHA IRED POINTING GR IFFON WOOK IEE PA NNILL W INS OUR DOG GONE CA NINE CONTEST—A ND OUR HEA RTS

Wookiee is the overall winner of our first annual Dog Gone Canine Contest. For our Reader’s Choice and Editor’s Choice winners, as well as a full gallery of all contestants, visit towncarolina. com/doggone.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

F

or the last fourteen years, Greenville residents Reid and Sandy Pannill have had a strong love for wirehaired pointing griffons. When their late pup, Gracie, was twelve, they brought Wookiee into their home. Their four-year-old companion is named after the beloved Star Wars character Chewbacca, a Wookiee whom they thought she favored. “People always smile when you say her name,” says Reid. “That’s why we were drawn to it.” Reid and Sandy originally sought out the breed when they were living on Fripp Island, as wirehaired pointing griffons are celebrated hunting dogs, adept in the field and in water. While Wookiee hasn’t yet taken advantage of the couple’s new pool, she is a fun-loving pup always in the mood to play ball or with any toy she can find. “She considers herself a big-time hunter, and she thinks the world is going to be taken over by chipmunks. Squirrels are kind of her mortal enemy too,” the Pannills laugh. Not to be confused with a labradoodle, these furry friends were bred in the Netherlands back in the late 1800s and are a mix of a Portuguese water dog and a German longhaired pointer. Wookiee is Reid and Sandy’s only child, and they couldn’t be more proud of her TOWN debut.—Kathryn Norugolo

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Join GCCA in the New Year to Create Your Own Masterpiece! Whether you are looking to improve your skills, explore a new medium, be inspired by an art exhibition, launch your art career, express yourself, or make a new friend in a supportive environment, we have everything you need to light your creative spark. We hope to see you soon at Greenville Center for Creative Arts!

WINTER ART CLASSES

SHAPING IDENTITY EXHIBITION

YOUTH SUMMER ART CAMPS

Virtual & In-Person in a Variety of Mediums

Open First Friday, February 5 through March 24

Enrollment Begins March 5

101 ABNEY ST. GREENVILLE, SC 29611 ARTCENTERGREENVILLE.ORG • 8647353948


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TOWN Feb. 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN Feb. 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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