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A magazine A magazine for for Upstate Upstate living living

Winter Winter 20192019

WINTER 2019 A COMMUNITY JOURNALS PUBLICATION

WINTER WINTER REIMAGINED REIMAGINED Celebrating Celebrating traditions traditions in old in old andand new new ways ways

THE THE ELEMENTS ELEMENTS OFOF SOUTHERN SOUTHERN STYLE STYLE

A season A season of of gracious gracious living living


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“The Luxury of Light” Sometimes we take the best things in life for granted. In the 21st Century, at least in the developed western world, the

list of things we simply assume will always be there includes, Light. Of course, we know that it wasn’t always the case that

you simply flipped a switch (or touched an iPad screen) to illuminate your surroundings. We visit replicas of log cabins

from Colonial America or tour old castles in Europe (which have been electrified, of course) and we think ‘how quaint it must

have been.’ No, it was dark. And the darkness was intensified

by the high cost and low energy efficiency of another item we tend to take for granted: windows. But times have changed, and wonderfully at that. Now lighting is a given, and we turn our attention to turning lighting into a luxury.

In the average home renovation the lighting fixtures become

statements of style and not just sources of light. But selecting the right fixtures can be a daunting challenge. Chandeliers, pendant lights, wall sconces, and even ceiling fans are now available in such an incredible cornucopia of options that

homeowners are often overwhelmed by the available styles,

sizes, and finishes. The selection process is helped if the homeowner has a particular style – traditional, mid-century

modern, industrial – in mind; that certainly narrows the

options from the billions to just the millions. One positive

consideration: lighting fixtures are relatively easy to change,

certainly easier and less expensive than changing the granite countertops or the plumbing fixtures.

So consider your

lighting options on the basis of what style and finish you like now, knowing that in a few years you can swap those pendant

lights and sconces for new ones and instantly change the look of your home.

But lighting has evolved in more ways than just style and finish.

Today a designer almost needs a degree in Lighting Technology

in order to assist the homeowner in selecting the right color temperature of light, designing the proper light cone, taking into account reflectivity of surrounding walls, cabinetry, and appliances, and much more. Residential lighting has come a long way since the simple incandescent bulb, with energy

efficient LED and CFL options to consider as well as the “Kelvin Color Temperature.” This latter component describes the type of light given off: warm and calming, cool and inviting, cold

and clinical (not usually a good choice for interior lighting!). Give us a call at AJH Renovations, LLC and let us help you navigate the wondrous world of modern lighting.


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Threshold: atHome's doorstep

Bienvenue!

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY AG AT H E T I S S I E R

Some doorways are meant to frame a 400 year old cupola as if inviting its human residents to step out into the French countryside. Our feature story could not be more welcoming, brought to us by a continental friendship between the Herlongs of Greenville and the Langes of Crespières.

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9 Caledon Court, Suite A | Greenville, SC 29615 | 864.234.2901 | www.sallegalloway.com

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CONTENTS Winter 2019

82 FEATURES

60.

The Joy of Provincial Life A collection of pastoral buildings became a most unusual home to ex-pats working in Paris, in the village of Crespières. The centuries old compound has found its second birth with a family intent on the farm life and hosting friends from near and far.

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82.

Historic Reimagined After three address changes and now a significant restoration, the Fountain Fox Beattie House is once again a residence. The Magg family worked tirelessly to breath new life into one of SC's most historically significant homes.

100.

A Fresh Take Taking the industry out of a Main Street storefront hit just the right note for this reimagined multilevel home, but its rooftop living offers a birdseye view of the central business district.

ON OUR COVER: An antique handrail touched by generations of fingertips down its breadth was captured for our cover by photographer Rebecca Lehde.


Downsize Without Compromise

Maintenance Free Yard • Homesites from the $130s • Walking Trail to Hollingsworth Park Custom Built by Exclusive Preferred Builders • Close to Future Swamp Rabbit Trail Extension

Visit the Sales Office for a Personal Tour 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 • Greenville

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CONTENTS Winter 2019

23 DEPARTMENTS

10. 16.

THRESHOLD NOTES FROM HOME

The Collection: items and ideas to inspire 23. 28. 30. 32. 36. 40.

COMPOSITION  Alice Ballard SAVE THESE DATES  Winter Events ASKED & ANSWERED  Antiques OFF THE SHELF  Southern Cookbooks STYLE SPOTTER  Drink Tables NOOK  Holiday Decor

InnerCella: home and décor, explored 45. IN BLOOM  Rose Ball 50. OPEN TABLE  Traditions 54. DETOURS  Newberry

Modus: methods for home and life

130

45

113. 116. 118. 124. 126. 130. 134. 136. 143.

CRAFTED  Snowflakes LOCAL SPIRITS  Carolina Gin ON THE TABLE  Family Recipes PANTRY  Dried Mushrooms WHAT TO DRINK NOW  Wine + Cheese JUST DESSERT  Mini-Cakes GREEN LIVING  Succulents IN GOOD TASTE  King Cake Party SHOP  Advertisers' Index

“The color of winter is in our imagination.” —Terri Guillenets

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At Home for the Holidays

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Notes From Home

Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. — Albert Einstein

I

magination is a key word when it comes to our three feature homes. Or perhaps “reimagine” fits the description as well. All three of our homes have been reimagined in unique and sublime ways. Homeowners in France had a vision of making a beautiful and very functional home out of what once was a barn owned by a neighboring monastery. The transformation i stunning. The Foun ain Fox Beattie house in Greenville has a long history of being occupied by families and most recently the Greenville Woman’s Club. It now has returned to a treasured family home. The story of its revival is a testament to imagination and perseverance. Downtown lofts a e nothing new to our town, however, the home we have to show you is truly one of a kind. It’s a marvelous cross between exposed brick walls that provide a loft feel and mo e traditional walled room spaces that help to balance the overly industrial feel. Because we are rapidly approaching the holiday season, we have filled this issue with ideas to spark your imagination and to illicit memories of holidays past. We all have experienced the recognition that a taste or a smell can revive. Since memories are essential to the holidays, we are reminiscing about the recipes that have been a tradition in our families. Be sure to check out On the Table for recipes we treasure. And, a poignant essay about Chestnuts in Open Table sums up the feel of “tradition” beautifully. For your hosting during the holidays, don’t miss What to Drink for some great wine and cheese pairings and a tutorial on Carolina Gins in Local Spirits. Just Dessert will show you the latest trend with cake. Plus, you’ll gain some decorating ideas from In Bloom, Craft d, and Nooks. For gift giving great cookbook recommendations from The ee Brothers, Matt and Ted, are in Off The Shel The e’s so much more to discover. May you have a memorable and imaginative holiday season. We’ll look forward to greeting you in March of a brand new year. Enjoy!

Lynn Greenlaw Editor-in-Chief Contact me at lgreenlaw@communityjournals.com or call 864.679.1200 and leave me a message. I always welcome your comments and suggestions.

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Lynn Greenlaw

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Beth Ables | Brendan Blowers | Jonathan Caleb Russ Jennifer Dennis | Jeffrey Dooley | Tasha L. Harrison M. Linda Lee | Ted Lee | Matt Lee | Pete Martin Libby McMillan Henson | John Nolan | Leigh Savage Julia Sibley-Jones | Allison Walsh | Sandra Woodward CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ILLUSTRATORS

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| 864.233.5900 atHOME Magazine is published four times per year. Information in this publication is carefully compiled to insure accuracy. No recommendation regarding the quality of goods or services is expressed or implied. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written consent of the Publisher. Copyright 2019 by Community Journals, LLC, all rights reserved. Designed and printed in the USA. SUBSCRIPTIONS: atHOME Magazine is published Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. The cost of a subscription is $30 annually. For subscription information, please contact us at 864-679-1200.

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Items and ide as t o inspire

The Collection _ Composition: Alice Ballard PG. 28 _ Calendar: Winter Events _ PG. 30 Asked & Answered: Antiques PG. 24

PG. 32

_ Off the Shelf: Cookbooks to Gift PG. 36 _ Style Spotter: Drink Tables PG. 40 _ Nook: Holiday Decor

COMPOSITION

Southern Rebirth

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY L ATOYA J AC K S O N

Winter is a season to reflect on what we collect and the things passed down to us; the care and custody of our belongings. Tradition held dear; time is often well spent by reinventing the old.

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The Collection Composition

A

From the Earth Itself Artist Alice Ballard embraces the sanctity of clay. / by Tasha L. Harrison /photography by Latoya Jackson

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lice Ballard recalls scribbling crayon on the wall. It was one of the first ways she found her purpose, to create art. The second discovery was when her grandmother gave her seeds of corn and beans to plant. These two pivotal moments unlocked a theme, a blend of observations in nature and the careful, steady application of techniques mastered during years of education and teaching that are firmly rooted in these two experiences. “As far back as I can remember, I never considered being anything other than an artist. The only question was which area of the arts I would pursue,” she says. Born into a family of creatives, Ballard’s artistic aims were always supported and encouraged. She pursued her undergrad and masters at the University of Michigan, both in art, however when it came to the focus of her studies, Ballard leaned towards the practical. Clay wasn’t an option at the time and any other type of sculpture would require an expensive studio and the help of others. “I remember thinking I could be more independent if I were a painter.” At the same time, the California Clay Movement was born. The movement was part of a larger transition from designer-craftsman to artist-craftsman. Wayne Highboy, a ceramic artist known for his inventive use of raku earthenware had a MFA show during Ballard’s time at University of Michigan. ‘They were colorful, large and full of life and movement. And so the seed was planted.” From then on, Ballard worked with clay, even painting it. Overtime, clay became her primary medium. Working with low-fire earthenware called terra sigillata—a white refined slip that can be airbrushed or painted— Ballard captures the natural world around her. Growth, transition, renewal or emergence are words that leap to mind when experiencing her sculpture. Each piece seems to be frozen in transformation from seed to sprout. They feel delicate and feminine, and resonant with a responsibility of our place in the world.


Composition The Collection

“WHITE REMINDS THE PAINTER IN ME OF A BLANK SHEET OF PAPER OR A WHITE GESSO CANVAS, FILLED WITH POTENTIAL,” —Alice Ballard

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The Collection Composition

It’s sensors and fecund and invites the touch. This is extremely evident in white pieces from an installation named “A Walk Remembered.” “White reminds the painter in me of a blank sheet of paper or a white gesso canvas, filled with potential,” Ballard says. “White Work” was a series Ballard started in the 1980s and has directed much of her most celebrated work. It was inspired by a bag of tulip bulbs under her studio sink that she forgot to plant in the fall. “To my surprise, they had begun to grow in the darkness of the closed bag! My fascination with these beautiful and sensuous white forms that miraculously produced my mother’s favorite flowers, tulips, were the beginning of my love affair with white forms.” The installation was positioned on grounded pedestals meant to portray the way that Ballard experiences and is inspired by nature. The theme is grounded in the same place all of her work takes root; renewal, the fear and enchantment of the sacristy, calm, and the quietude of snow. Ballard is reluctant to label herself as a painter or a sculptor and simply prefers to call herself an artist. However, even that label seems limiting when considering her work. Rooted in what feels real and tangible, and using materials from the earth itself, it speaks to a connectivity that answers a question many of us can’t find the words to ask in this day and time. Ballard is currently working on smaller sculpture as well as meditation bowls and has recently completed a ten-pod installation for a hospital gallery in Charlotte. She has plans to revisit “A Walk Remembered” as well and expand it with drawings and paintings.

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The Collection Calendar

SAVE THE DATE n ovemb er

Mark your calendar for these not-to-miss winter events.

21

G RE EK PASTRY SALE & H OLI DAY M EAL ST. GEORGE GREEK ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL 406 N. Academy Street The 53rd astry Sale opens its doors at 9:30am (until sold out). Lunch is served beginning at 10:30am. Help fill the coffe s of the Philoptochos Society, which annually supports local and national charities. stgeorgegreenville.org

december

4

RONALD M CD ONALD H OU S E CH ARITI ES OF TH E CAROLI NAS H EARTS & H AN DS GAL A GREENVILLE CONVENTION CENTER The 20th annual gala will celebrate th country of South Africa and feature entertainment from The Migh y Kicks. rmhc-carolinas.org

8-Dec.22

I N D I E CR A F T PA R A DE HO L I DAY P O P U P 2909 OLD BUNCOMBE ROAD

makerscollective.org/holiday

20-Jan.4

O M N I G ROV E PA RK I N N NAT IO NA L G I NG E RBRE A D H O U SE CO M P E T IT IO N OMNI GROVE PARK INN Now in its 27th year, the competition will display ornate and creative gingerbread house entries from an anticipated 200 competitors. omnihotels.com/hotels/asheville-grove-park

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AUGU STA ROAD BU SI N ESS ASSOCIATION HO LI DAY OPEN H OU S E AUGUSTA ROAD Celebrate the beginning of holiday season with holiday-themed treats and activities along with special discounts.

4&6

WI NTRY WREATH S CL ASS SC BOTANICAL GARDEN A class for both children and adults, participants will learn to make a beautiful and fragrant evergreen wreath. clemson.edu/scbg

onlyonaugusta.com/latest-buzz/holidayopen-house-nov-24/

5-7

H OLI DAY FAI R GREENVILLE CONVENTION CENTER The 49th annual vent will feature 350 crafte s and vendors at what is the region’s largest holiday shopping experience. holidayfairgreenville.com

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I M AG E S P R OV I D E D B Y H O S T S O F E V E N T S

Purchase handmade home goods, art, jewelry and children’s toys. The Holida Pop Up will be open Friday through Sunday each week.


Calendar The Collection

14

TD SATU RDAY M ARKET “ PRIS M A H OLI DAY M ARKET ” MAIN STREET For the first time, the beloved Main Street farmers market will return for a special holiday edition. saturdaymarketlive.com

19-24

STRI KI NG ANTLER BASK ETS JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL This eeklong class at The Folk chool focuses on creating an Appalachian Egg Basket that incorporates naturally shed deer antlers with instructor Mark Hendry. All levels welcome. classes.folkschool.org

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W I L SO N GI RL S HO L I DAY P O P U P 59 E. MAIN STREET Featuring original work by local artists, including Jean Wilson Freeman, and a curated collection of handmade, antique and reclaimed pieces. instagram.com/wilsongirlsllc

CH RISTM AS WITH TH E CH OR ALE “CEREM ONY OF CAROLS” MCALISTER AUDITORIUM, FURMAN UNIVERSITY

febru ar y

A Greenville holiday tradition, this year’s performance will feature music composed by Benjamin Britten as well as an audience sing-along of beloved carols. peacecenter.org/events

janu ar y

1

SWEETH EART CH ARIT Y BA L L HYATT REGENCY The 25th annual gala for M als on Wheels will raise funds to support the homebound in Greenville County. Last year’s event fundraising provided over fifty thousand hot m als. Enjoy an evening filled with food, drink, silent and live auctions and live entertainment. mealsonwheels.org/mow-event

8-19

H I STO RI C KI LGO RE - L E W IS HO L I DAY HOUSE 560 N. ACADEMY STREET Each year the members of the Greenville Council of Garden Clubs decorate this historic home for the holidays. Th home will be open for tours Wednesday through Friday. kilgore-lewis.org

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RED CROSS AFFAI R HYATT REGENCY The 28th Annual Cellar Auction will b on the top of the list for upstate oenophiles. The vening will offer wine astings, a seated dinner, and both a silent and live auction that feature exquisite wines and unique travel packages. redcross.org/local/south-carolina

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VALENTI N E ’S DAY COU P L ES COOKI NG CL ASS THE COOK’S STATION Could there be a better Valentine’s date than not cooking in your own kitchen? Grab your sweetie and enjoy creating a multi-course dinner together in the gourmet kitchen at The ook’s Station. thecooksstation.com

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The Collection Asked & Answered

Q. W hat is the difference in an appraiser and a certified appraiser?

A. T  he IRS and the Appraisal Foundation ecognizes three

organizations of personal property appraisers: Appraisers Association of America (AAA), International Society of Appraisers (ISA) and the American Society of Appraisers (ASA). Search the websites for an appraiser that meets your needs and is in your area. Be sure to examine an appraiser’s membership level. Certified members are the highest level of membership, versus “student” or “associate” members of an association.

• A  ppraisers with at least ten years of significant appraisal experience with specialized connoisseurship and marketplace experience who have passed certification exams in their areas of expertise are Certified Members.

Q: H ow does an auction work? How do I bid?

A. P ersonal property auctions are exciting and are a terrific

place to buy great treasures. The auctioneer s arts bidding off at half of the estimate. ou never can predict which items are going to soar and which ones will be great buys. It moves quickly and sometimes you get lucky and can buy things at a great price.

• Try to attend the auction preview which is normally the day before to inspect the items in-person or email the auction house for additional photos. Decide what is your maximum you are willing to pay before the auction (remember the additional buyer’s premium which is normally an additional 25% to the hammer price).

When the need arises to part with a treasured antique and you don’t know its value (and can’t even make a good guess) or you want to attend an auction, but you have no idea how to bid, what to do? Read on because our expert Miller Gaff ey has the answers you seek.

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Q. W hat is the best way to make an offer on something at an estate sale?

A. G  et to estate sales early and don’t hesitate when a piece

speaks to you. Negotiate a price, generally go for 20% less than the sticker price.

Our expert: Miller Gaffney founded Miller Gaffney Art Advisory in 2006, and Childress Gaffney Auctions in 2017 with Karen Childress Clardy, and is an art consultant and certified appraiser. She appeared on the Antiques Roadshow and starred on the PBS series Market Warriors and Ovation’s Art Breakers.

a t Home  |  WINTER 2019

MATT CASON

Sales Representative

I S TO C K ; CO U R T E S Y O F S U B J E C T

Buying, Selling and Valuing Antiques

 he e are many options to bid: if you attend the auction • T in person, you will register and get an auction paddle. Or, you can bid online and watch the auction on the internet on your phone or iPad. Or, you can phone bid and have an auction representative call you when your lot comes up. Or, you can leave an absentee bid on an item with your highest bid price.


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The Collection Off the Shelf

The Gift of Southern Kitchens The Lee Brothers think these cookbooks make a perfect gift.

A

ccording to Forbes, cookbooks are hot. Last year, 17.8 million hardcover cookbooks were sold, a 25% increase over the prior year. And even a cursory glance at the cookbook section of your indie bookstore reveals a sheer number and variety that can seem almost overwhelming. Gigantic reference tomes (designed to be a lower-cost substitute for a cooking-school degree) share shelf space with single-subject volumes meant to inspire mastery in a single fascination (like gelato, or hand-made pasta, or even fifty variations on a Spritz cocktail). Trend books flood the market in lock-step with new diets or an innovation in kitchen gadgetry (Instant-Pot everything). The kind of cookbook we’re most inclined to

buy, however, are the most personal ones, written by talented cooks with compelling stories to tell; about how their life shaped their love of particular flavors and preparations, their inclination toward certain techniques, their repertoire. The best of these books function as a warm invitation into the kitchen to watch and learn, and these are the ones we most often give to others as gifts, because they introduce the recipient to a new friend, with their best recipes thrown in for good measure! We find ourselves turning, again and again, to these five recently published cookbooks and plan to bestow them as gifts during this holiday season. We checked and all of them are available at M. Judson Booksellers.

Matt Lee and Ted Lee are the authors of three award-winning cookbooks and Hotbox: Inside Catering, the Food World’s Riskiest Business. They are also the founders of Cookbook Boot Camp, a two-day workshop that helps chefs aspiring to write their own cookbooks achieve their goals.

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P H OTO G R A P H BY E .V. DAY; B O O K COV E R S P R OV I D E D BY P U B L I S H E R S

/ by Matt Lee and Ted Lee


Off the Shelf The Collection

Coconuts and Collards, by Von Diaz As a child, writer and radio producer Diaz moved from her native Río Piedras, Puerto Rico to Atlanta. She returned to the island during summers to visit her grandmother, from whom she learned to cook. In Coconuts and Collards, Diaz explores the many proximities between southern and Puerto Rican food, and tells stories of how her experiences of both evolved into a highly personal, and flavorful, cuisine. MUST-COOK RECIPE: Brussels Sprouts with Chorizo Soffrito

Secrets of the Southern Table, by Virginia Willis Georgia-born and French-trained, Willis is a chef and author of four books, including the James Beard Award winning Lighten Up Y’all. Her latest, Secrets of the Southern Table, is a travelogue and a stellar collection of recipes representing the kitchen-wisdom and inspiration of diverse cultures and communities she found while traveling throughout the region. MUST-COOK RECIPE: Smashed Fried Okra with Spicy Yogurt Dipping Sauce

SOUL, by Todd Richards Richards is well-known in Atlanta for being founding chef of One Flew South (America’s first restaurant of quality to be found in an airport) and for Southern Fried at Krog Street Market. SOUL, which won the 2019 IACP Award for Best American Cookbook, is his biography-in-recipes, of how being raised in Chicago by southerners and living in Atlanta as a chef trained in fine-dining kitchens, influenced his path to the suave and deeply flavorful repertoire that has become his trademark. MUST-COOK RECIPE: Country Fried Lamb Steak Hot Chicken Style

The Taste of Country Cooking, by Edna Lewis No book does a better job than Lewis’s The Taste of Country Cooking of evoking the rhythms and rituals of seasonal southern cooking (wheat-threshing, hog killing, gathering wild strawberries), and the ways they bind a community together. Her stories of growing up in Freetown, Virginia and the recipes that emerge from them have become a beacon for every cook who aims to prepare simple, honest, and refined southern food today. Not a new book, but a classic, and recently published in a 30th Anniversary Edition with a foreword by Alice Waters. MUST-COOK RECIPE: Pan-Fried Shad with Roe

Turnip Greens and Tortillas, by Eddie Hernandez Hernandez, executive chef-owner of the wildly popular Tacqueria del Sol restaurants in Nashville and Atlanta, was born in Monterrey Mexico, and by the age of 15 he’d opened his own torta shop, serving sandwiches stuffed with pernil he’d learned to make from his grandmother. He dreamed of traveling the world as a rock musician but landed in Georgia and became a self-professed “born-again Southerner.” The recipes in Turnip Greens and Tortillas are a thrilling fusion of Mexican roots and Southern flavors. MUST-COOK RECIPE: Eddie’s Turnip Greens

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t’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas – and nowhere is that more apparent than in your home’s impressive display of holiday décor. From the beautifully trimmed trees to the carefully placed Christmas villages, the holidays are a time to really show out! We’d like to give you some design tips for decorating for the holidays this year with one spot in particular – your fireplace mantel! • Symmetry is key! Try to mirror décor or balancing the weight of décor on either side of the fireplace and mantel. • Overlap artwork and pieces. The key here is layering pieces of varying size. This adds depth to the space. • Fill your fireplace with more than just logs. If you are like most southern families who don’t always use your fireplace in this warm climate, you can add a lovely stack of candles or some other touch of décor for a nice feature! We hope this helps and inspires you while you pull out your holiday décor this year. We wish you a very merry season!

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The Collection Style Spotter

The Renaissance of the Drink Table This season’s style spotter: Terry Gillespie of Hennessee Haven

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ometimes little more than a pedestal, these drink tables or drinking tables or martini tables, as they are sometimes called, can really amp the entertaining spaces in your home. “Many customers are asking for small tables that can be tucked near a sofa and or chair,” says Terry Gillespie, designer and proprietor of Hennessee Haven and someone whose projects have graced the pages of atHome. She says these diminutive tabletops can be decorative accents for all occasions.

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Drink tables can be just a few inches across, enough to hold a cocktail (or a cup of coffee or a single stem of wine) or an be a bit bigger, more like a smaller, taller side table. Th y represent the best of form and function, can lend some sculptural beauty to a tight space or make it feel larger simply from their scale. Th y are versatile to boot but can have a tendency to topple so look for designs that are bottom-heavy. As you can see from Gillespie’s adroit picks, sturdy construction and solid materials keep these drink tables upright. And, their convenient size means they have the ability to move around a room with ease.

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1. THE THREEFER Great between two chairs, this Tri-Dot Drink Table offers three surfaces for sharing. Available in polished stainless steel or brushed brass. MSRP $395 thenaturallight.com

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2. INDUSTRIAL CLASSIC This Ames Drink Table is thick hand-polished art glass in a heavily seeded cloud of white, suspended by an industrial-inspired iron base with tapered legs terminating in a ball foot. MSRP $423 uttermost.com

4. THE SOPHISTICATE Topped with solid marble, this brass finished table is perfect to perch a drink and the slender silhouette is ideal for small spaces. MSRP $129 westelm.com

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5. DECO DELIGHT Who wouldn’t love this white marble top and gilded iron finish drink table? At 20.5” high, it is perfect as a chairside table. Straight lines and sophisticated finish are in keeping with an updated, modern accessory table. MSRP $425 thenaturallight.com

Items available through Hennessee Haven, Interior Design and Gift Boutique

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The Collection Nook

Counting Down Katherine Brooks turned her 1905 Victorian stairway into the ultimate Advent Calendar. / by Hali Wyatt and Stephanie Burnette / photograph by Carter Tippins

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Nook The Collection

Decking the Halls

We asked the Upstate’s hottest Instagram influencers to spill the tea about their holiday décor planning. With 75+K followers between them, their inspired ideas reflect on the old, the unexpected and a passion for the season.

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ime is of the essence when Christmas is concerned. For adults, there never seems to be enough time for all the hustle and bustle between Thanksgiving and Christmas, but for children, waiting for presents can be rapturous torture. When Katherine Brooks’ young daughters started asking “how much longer until Santa comes?” she realized that calendars meant next to nothing to them. She had to brainstorm ideas on how to give them a visual representation; and something on a much bigger scale. Luckily, the staircase in her Victorian home in Central, SC (built in 1905) is comprised of 25 stairs. With a little love and an astonishing amount of creativity, Brooks transformed her staircase into its own advent calendar. Each stair is numbered between intricate woodwork and she cleverly added a house number in a complementary finish to her newel post for #1. Brooks loves a classic lit swag adorning a staircase and a bright red painted ornament is moved down its exterior to help her children mark the days until Santa’s arrival.

 hat vintage item are you crazy W to decorate with this year? We’re currently obsessed with Indian bajot. They function like trays or shallow tables and make a great charcuterie board or plant stand, but they also turn any arrangement you put on them into an instant vignette. We have a lot of vintage Christmas items that we’re jazzed about arranging on these cool boards. Jean Wilson Freeman and Cathleen Seay @wilsongirlsllc I love decorating with vintage style bottlebrush trees and using vintage style garlands for a touch of nostalgia. Wesley Turner @farmshenanigans It has become a tradition to decorate our trees with hand blown bird ornaments that we’ve collected, made in Germany and Poland. It’s truly magical to shop for the glass ornaments across the Christmas markets in Germany. Michael Greene @artifactsgreenville I’m super excited to use these vintage decorative brass French horns that I’ve been collecting. I plan to hang them with ribbon and wire some greenery so they will be like a grouping of brass wreaths.

What room or unexpected place in your home do you like to decorate? I decorate the doors behind my kitchen table every year with wreaths and this 1920s silk velvet ribbon I found a couple of years ago. Kelly Ford @fordstudiodesign My favorite unexpected place to decorate is our master bathroom. It adds an additional touch of holiday excitement while getting ready in the mornings. Wesley Turner @farmshenanigans I make dried orange garland for the windows of my kitchen. Katherine Brooks @design_central_project We’re maximalists in life, but definitely when it comes to Christmas. Bathrooms and over the kitchen sink are probably the little touches we have the most fun with. Jean Wilson Freeman and Cathleen Seay @wilsongirlsllc

Katherine Brooks @design_central_project

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InnerCella Style and decor, explored

Rose Parade 50 years in the making, The Rose Ball celebrated its Silver Jubilee with an avalanche of blooms and inspiration at every turn, room after room. / photography by Brogan Jackson

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InnerCella In Bloom

GOVENOR'S ROOM

Designer Caroline Brackett and Florist Suzie Bunn “I wanted to make it intimate and cozy with colors that were rich and comfortable without being sterile. Coral was the underlayer of the tablecloth, topped with individual runners out of a rose trellis fabric that crossed over each other. Mixing gold with mercury glass is more interesting rather than just using the same finish.” -Caroline Brackett

THE PALMETTO ROOM

Designed by Tara Jackson and Musette Stern “Our inspiration was the Japanese elements found in the wallpaper. We wanted our design to not only be in the room, but to be a part of the room. We used garden bamboo that was cut to size and attached with a silicone glue to glass cylinder vases. For our mats and screen, we cut bamboo to size and used twine to form traditional Japanese obi knots to hold our grid structures together.” -Tara Jackson


InnerCella In Bloom

THE ROSE BALL celebrated its Silver Jubilee, hosting the 25th gala at the Poinsett Club. Guest Designer Emily McCarthy created an overarching concept for the ball and 45+ designers and florists b decked the rooms of the club. Members scalped their own gardens for both heirloom roses and greenery in support of The F esh Market and Walmart donating nearly 10,000 commercial blooms. The plan incorporat d silver elements in honor of the notable anniversary as well as coral for a cohesive color. Rooms were swathed in shades of coral to orange to gold and accented with original art, unique vessels, garland (both draped and hanging) and posh interior design in an abundance of blooms. The Rose all is Greenville’s longest-running charitable event, celebrated biennially, and this year featured 5,000 roses. Since 1971, approximately $3.6 million has been given to charitable causes locally.

LADIES ROOM

Designer Whitney McGregor “Mirrors covered most of the walls, so we wanted to do what I call swags but they are actually referred to as garland. We constructed them the day before with different kinds of greenery, especially branches with berries or little olives or buds, because those interesting forms add so much. Pay attention to the leaf shape when constructing garland. You want things that kind of droop or can hang prettily. All of our flowers were added on-site.” -Whitney McGregor

DRAPED TO PERFECTION Designer Caroline Brackett asked Suzie Bunn of Statice Event Design to help bring her vision for the Governor’s Room to life; one of lush florals in an enti ely draped space. The design for th room was in the works for a year. The walls and ceiling ere tented in gold gossamer fabric, provided by Optrics. Brackett installed two massive paintings by artist Laurie Buck to bookend the room, flank d by two busts posing on lucite pedestals. Each lovely lady was filled with more than 100 stems of fl wers. “Anytime you’re doing an entrance piece it’s really hard to get enough fl wers into it. We really overstuff d them to make them as dramatic as possible,” says Bunn.

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InnerCella In Bloom

Brackett selected mercury glass containers to add the sparkle of silver and large tall taper candles (in fact, each was 36” inches tall) were sourced for antique brass candlesticks of varying heights for the dining tables. GIRL GORGEOUS Busts or containers with open-topped heads have really struck a note of late. Bunn says there are tipsof-the-trade to know before trying this trending arrangement in your home. 1. Line oddly shaped containers first with foil and then with plastic wrap. 2. Soak your oasis until entirely saturated and then drain it for as long as possible (so when lift d it no longer drips). Add fl wers no more than 6 hours before your event. 3. Make sure the overall arrangement doesn’t topple from being front heavy. Think a out which way it will face and have some of the arrangement coming off the ack to distribute the weight. 4. Start with the majority of your greenery, then add line fl wers and place focal fl wers last. 5. Never let the lip of the container show. Build up the foam so fl wers can come down at an angle. Try for something sweeping down over a face and think of your arrangement as an extension of the woman.

PRESIDENT’S BAR

Designer Michele Johnson and Event Planner Farrah Redmon “We wanted to do two really large arrangements creating focal points to draw the eye in. One sat on top of the bar; it reached the ceiling in the room and then fell to the floor. We used at least 7-8 dozen roses in it. Professional Party Rentals special ordered the coral fabric for me. It was draped in the arrangement and also topped the bar tables.”-Farrah Redmon

UPSTAIRS STATESMAN ROOM Designer Sullivan Short "I love that the moss added another touch of magic to the umbrellas. We added coral tape trim to the umbrellas and the tablecloths were hand-painted gingham." -Sullivan Short

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Jean Carter and Company I NT E R I O R DE S IG N F O U N D E D

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InnerCella

Winter’s Aroma An essay about chestnuts and why they matter. / by Stephanie Burnette

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CHESTNUTS ROASTING on an open fire was a real thing for my father. He valued nostalgia. Tradition was created by doing things the long way in our house, year after y ar. He would make chestnut dressing for Christmas dinner, a formal a air where even children were poured a small dram of wine. “The Chestnuts,” as I referred to them, were in-process days before. My dad would call the local grocery stores and assess who was storing them “properly.” In his estimation this meant in the pro duce se ction, cooled but not misted. He would select them by hand, by himself; no one would rush him through this important first step. He’d quote to me his southern motherin-law (a woman whom he regarded a worthy cook), “Ingredients are what make a dish good.” I first remember him roasting the funny brown nuts with tongs o ver a gas flame on the sto ve. Plunk! The y would drop onto a metal pie pan kept covered with foil on the burner next to him. Thi took hours and required a bit of sweet vermouth in a glass or a cup of coffee he nearly always drank after dinner, a habit that seems inexplicable to me today at the same age. L ater, he acquired an antique copper roaster with a hinged lid. A fire would be built in the hearth and we’d make an event of placing the contraption over the embers. There was a knife in our home reserved for cutting an X into the belly of the chestnuts. I realize this borders on obsessive. At the time I thought him merely exacting.

I S TO C K

Open Table


InnerCella Open Table

I admit the smell of roasting chestnuts is intoxicating. Nothing else smells like it, there’s a woodsyness that’s undeniable and I began to identif y the season of winter with the aroma of chestnut husks curling away from its fruit. My father would talk of growing up in New England and buying roasted chestnuts from a street vendor. I found the image romantic in an old movie sort of way, since my reality was about to include peeling the stupid things for hours; I was chided for anything other than an unbroken orb of fragrant fruit. Peeling chestnuts is brutal and to this day I am secretly thrilled buying them by the pound, peeled and vacuum sealed, at Fresh Market. My right thumb twitches as I write this recalling the interior skin of the chestnut being rammed under my nail uninvited. The finishe d chestnuts were folded into a mixture of cubed b re a d , c h o p p e d a p p l e , c e l e r y, browned sage sausage commingled with ground round, a bevy of herbs and spices, apple cider and a whipped egg. It would chill out in the refrigerator overnight, packed into vintage loaf pans. The recipe was always tripled so the prize pony could be selected after baking it off for the dinner table. I would eat a scoop of dressing with a puddle of dark gravy next to it. This was not stuffing and the gravy alongside it was not golden; it was a deep mahogany, rich with drippings and a tinge of red wine. Each year my father would make a

big deal of me trying at least one chestnut, which meant chewing and swallowing the chalky thing. “Stephanie helped ever y step of the way,” he’d say, no matter if there was just a few of us around the table or a whole dining room full. His dressing was built from a childhood which was difficul and full of expectation. I imagine this one dish, made only during the holiday season, was a peace offe ing to his past, an annual tradition honoring better times or at least a memory filled with some pomp if not always grace. As we often do, I grew fond of the velvety things, how they could marry savory elements, especially when gravy ran down its rivulets. My father, who was a tremendous gourmand, once told me the secret of perfectly smooth grav y, “You strain it and it’s smooth.” In light of this, I think he'd forgive my purchased peeled chestnuts or maybe not; I know he’d approve of the cup of coffee I drink in the store while I pick up the package. I have a half-scribbled version of his recipe slipped inside the James Beard Cookbook he gave me when I was pregnant with my first child, a son. The scrawl is nearly illegible, but it’s the prompts I need to keep the recipe on track rather than detailed steps. My daughter picks through the dressing exactly as I once did. She extracts the chestnuts to the side of her dinner plate, mounding

them, building a barricade. She’s happy to inhale all the rest, including copious amounts of turkey or roast. I’ll reach over and snag a chestnut with my fork, toppling her wall, hoping one day she’ll like them too. I wonder what step my father altered in the recipe. He loved a solid improvement and for sure his version was not to the letter what his father made. He had no sons, so it was me, his slight daughter, that got to watch and learn, though I never remember him instructing me how to prepare the dressing other than the chestnut manifesto. I still own the little knife too; I use it to cut foil off the top of wine. It’s a small dark Henkel knife with a curved blade. It sees the light of day a good bit more than in his day. I hope my children debate the virtues of dressing over stuffin at their own tables one day. We’ve stopped using the original loaf pans for fear of lead and half the time I forget to strain the grav y. But the tradition lives on. It takes too many steps over too many days to make my father’s dressing and I love it. The kitchen becomes my sanctuary, and no one interrupts me though all are welcome to jump in and help or snag bites of ingredients along the way. It is a winter activity. One of family and home. Of doing things low and slow. It is a time each year that I openly recall my father, gone now 12 years, and I think about him remembering his family traditions and for that I am grateful. The recipe has become an alter stone.

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InnerCella Detours

Newberry Lives Up to its Name Daytrip to this cheery downtown, full of "friendly folk" and great finds. / by Sandra Woodward / illustration by Tatjana Mai-Wyss

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InnerCella Detours

NEWBERRY ANTIQUE MALL

AN EASY HOUR’S DRIVE from Greenville, Newberry offe s plenty of southern charm. Billing itself as “the city of friendly folks” is neither wishful thinking nor an exaggeration. Hospitality seems to emanate from every storefront and venue. The estoration of the Newberry Opera House about 20 years ago kick-started an infusion of energy in the community, and the Newberry of today has benefited with a city center full of restaurants, shops and attractions. The N wberry Arts Center adds to the downtown mix, with classes and exhibitions by local artists, and the Newberry Museum is undergoing a renovation to expand its offerings You will see the name “Figaro” on several downtown locations, including a smart cocktail bar, a gourmet market shop and an excellent fine-dining restaurant. Another favorite eatery is the Cabana, a “storm cellar” wine and cigar bar. The ells Japanese Garden is a unique feature of the downtown area, the Newberry Community Players is an important part of the community’s mix and there’s always darling Newberry College to stroll. Just south of downtown, Carter & Holmes offe s spectacular orchids and plants so plan to visit their greenhouses. Newberry is fun to visit any day of the year, but there are a number of festivals and special events throughout the year so check out all that Newberry has to offer at ci yofnewberry.com.

Directly across the green from the Newberry Opera House, this small collective of booths offe s books, including some lovely editions of vintage children’s books, along with the expected glassware, accent pieces and furniture.

1014 Main St. 803-271-5704 THE CARPENTER GALLERY New to downtown, this gallery features a small but exquisite collection of fine art, primarily paintings, jewelry and textiles.

1220 Main St. 843-822-7451 carpentergallery.com FIGARO MARKET This sp cialty market and deli offe s an extensive selection of wines as well as meats, cheeses and gourmet food items for sale in addition to an eat-in menu of salads, sandwiches, and beverages and an absolutely adorable corner exterior.

1202 Caldwell St. 803-276-0002 C. T. SUMMER HARDWARE American Pickers featured this store and its owner, Bill Shull (grandson of owner C. T. Summer and son of a Nobel Prize laureate whose award is on display). Step back in time to examine the eclectic contents of an honest-to-goodness small town hardware store, from gaskets to turkey cookers, elaborate chrome or gold-plated fixtures and many other items to surprise.

1207 Boyce St. 803-276-2778

EUROLUX HOME

AS TIME GOES BY This quintessential antique store is filled with an assortment of old and not-so-old items ranging from large paintings and mirrors to glass stoppers for decanters and cruets.

1304 Main St. 803-276-4715 BOOKS ON MAIN Book lovers will appreciate the eclectic mix of old and new books, including some first editions. Antique lovers will find an irresistible collection of “Christmas past” treasures.

1209 Main St. 803-321-1920 thenewberrygallery.com CARTER & HOLMES ORCHIDS The g eenhouses of Carter & Holmes have been producing exquisite orchids and other plants since 1947. In addition to the glorious orchids, these plant masters offer a wide variety of other spectacular plants for home decor. Call in advance to tour the greenhouses.

629 Mendenhall Rd. 803-276-0579 carterandholmes.com PIECES OF TIME EAST This is a efreshingly original shop specializing in vintage furniture painted, decorated and reimagined by the artist/ owner and displayed throughout the huge two-fl or space, along with other home decor items.

You have been warned: this shop is open “by chance or by appointment.” Call in advance to make sure the owners are not traveling Europe purchasing an extensive array of antiques. The shop features a knockout collection of exquisite furniture, but also explore their website, a large part of their business is conducted online.

1409 Main St. 803-276-4001 euroluxhome.com LESLIE, LTD. ANTIQUES A nicely curated collection of case goods, primarily 19th and early 20th-century oak, walnut or mahogany, in pristine condition, thanks in part to the owner’s commitment to quality and expertise in repair and restoration. The shop also features high quality antique glassware.

1002 Coates St. 803-924-1450 THE GALLERY & MATERIAL THINGS This high-end outique offe s something for every taste and interest. From tableware and linens to beautiful home decor and accent pieces, the selection is exceptional. Material Things offe s custom design and fabrication of top-quality drapery, bedding, pillows and other home decor.

1104 Caldwell St. 803-276-7822

1211 Main St. 707-372-5263 piecesoftimeeast.com

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Gifts Tabletop Home Décor

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The Joy of Provincial Life The Langes created a family home in France retaining its 400 year old pastoral roots.

/ by Brendan Blowers / photography by Agathe Tissier

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When I arrived I didn’t speak a word of French. But Spanish being my mother tongue made it easier. —Nereida Lange

The 13-foot tall portal that opens unto the courtyard is an original vestige of this property's first use as the barn of a farm owned by a neighboring monastery. The village of Crespières—despite the presence of many castles, is essentially agricultural.

IN THE OPENING SONG OF “Beauty and the Beast,” Belle complains of the simplicity of French provincial life, yet how many of us watch that scene and think how pleasant it would be to see your butcher and baker every day and to greet them by name when carrying a basket to the market to buy fresh eggs? For Mark and Nereida Lange, decamping to the little town in France called Crespières (pop. 1,600) became a real-life fairytale. It’s a story the couple continues to write daily as they turn ancient stones into their own remodeled “belle maison.” In their new life as expats, Mark worked in nearby Paris as a lawyer for Microsoft while Nereida walked the children to their village school. The app al of the provincial life was instantly felt. Nereida says, “People would open their shutters and say ‘Bonjour.’” It takes daring to move a family with children to a foreign country, but Nereida was up for the adventure. “When I arrived I didn’t speak a word of French. But Spanish being my mother tongue made it easier.” She grew up in Puerto Rico and fell in love with design when her Mother, a factory seamstress, taught her how to make her own clothes.

The anges rented a “typical house with a lovely garden,” thirty minutes from Paris, but Nereida had already been toying with the thought of buying a large old barn to restore. She heard a rumor of a Crespières property being for sale, a town she describes as “magical.” Surrounded by castles from France’s former nobility, the North-central area has retained its pastoral roots since the middle ages. Nereida holds a master’s degree in Architecture from Catholic University and has years of experience as a designer but believes there are elements of historic home renovation that can’t be taught. “Nothing in school prepared me for the challenges of restoring a 16th-century farmhouse.” When Nereida first walked through the 400+year old portal doors to see what hid behind the 14-foot high stone walls, the initial view was not encouraging. “The e was nothing but cars in the courtyard,” she says. The armhouse consisted of several large stone buildings cobbled together around a clearing. “All of the walls are original,” Nereida says. Her trained eye told her there was something precious to

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Three small rooms were turned into one grand entrance. The downstairs benefits from a breezy flow that was not present in the ancient construct.

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Nothing in school prepared me for the challenges of restoring a 16th-century farmhouse. —Nereida Lange

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An 11ft buffet was procured before the dining room was configured into the home's design. The wall was specifically built for the antique cabinet.

purchase seemed extreme. After vi wing pictures of the animal pens and crumbling brick pigeon tower, she thought the Langes had lost their minds. “It was truly a labor of love,” says Herlong. Nereida turned that cow-pen, under the pigeon coop, into a cozy guest cottage that Herlong and her husband have now stayed in. “The origina manger is still in the bathroom,” Herlong says. “The way Ne eida did it has such respect for the integrity of the original farmhouse. It’s very rustic, but don’t let that fool anyone, Nereida does not cut any corners, she’s got an incredible eye and is just really creative.” In much earlier times, monks would have harvested food from the nearby gardens, tilled wheat and sent animals out to pasture in the peaceful fields. What was once a bland palate of tans, greys, and browns, Nereida infused with vibrant and fragrant rose bushes, draping wisteria and verdant green ivy and palms. “It took a long time to get it lush,” she says.

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Two ancient stones were uncovered during the courtyard renovation and repurposed as a central bench for stargazing. “Anything precious we re-used,” Nereida says, “at night, it is lit from all over.” Inspired by the soft, ven light surrounding the property and the possibility of picturesque views from all angles, Nereida used AutoCAD to draw her design for turning the cell-like interior of the structures into an open fl or plan. That m ant tearing down the walls of three small rooms to fashion a grand entrance with a winding staircase to the second fl or. “It is very difficult to h e a fl w of circulation in these old houses,” Nereida says. “Mark and I spent time matching arches of large recuperated wooden beams that would go together. We needed three similar beams to make the entrance threshold for each opening,” she says. It would have been easier, more affordable, and less tim consuming to use new lumber and contemporary thresholds, but that wouldn’t have stayed true to the original dwelling’s style.

Local craftsmen construct d the custom staircase using the same building methods passed down from their fathers and grandfathers. “It is still the norm to have generation afte generation of people doing the same trade,” Nereida says. Before the staircase was installed, Mark and Nereida used a wooden ladder found in one of the barns to access their second-story bedroom. In Lasse Hallström’s film “Chocolat” (also set in a small village in France) a young idealistic priest tells his congregation, “I think we've got to measure goodness by what we embrace, what we create.” That’s hat Nereida has done with this home. She has measured goodness through its restoration. Her passion, after designin the home’s new layout, became hunting the French countryside for authentic handmade items that would make each room an enjoyable discovery. She located the perfect mantle for sale in a manor in the Loire Valley and drove it back, a two-and-a-half-hour trip, strapped to the roof of her car. It now forms an ideal centerpiece to the living room.


The elegant turn of the custom stairs is the handiwork of a local carpenter named Christophe Carrelet who plans to craft a curving oak handrail to match. Bespoke designs that used to be the standard in construction ages ago can still be commissioned here.

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A collection of cleavers hangs beside the exterior kitchen door. They are antiques culled from butchers all over France.

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uncover, something beautiful that could be fashioned from all of this brick, wood and stone. Th y knew this would not be an ordinary real estate purchase, but Nereida was ready to take on the challenge. “I’m very impulsive,” she says knowing in her gut that these old agricultural structures that once held rabbits, cows and pigs could be fit for a modern family, if given a proper facelift Historic renovations have been experiencing a revolution in France in the past decade; however, as Mark and Nereida took note, many old houses (or “des maisons ancienne” as they’re known) have been restored without respect for the history that built them. Nereida saw this purchase as a chance to do it right, but the couple didn’t know if American buyers would be considered in a part of France where little has changed for hundreds of years. As luck would have it, some history was on their side. The home was wned by Jacques Simonet, a photographer and filmmaker who had a fond recollection of Americans. Simonet had published many photos he had taken the day American GI’s had arrived into Crespières in their jeeps and tanks to liberate the village from German occupation during WWII. “He was thrilled to sell his property to an American family and loved my vision of renovation that would retain the warmth and character of the old structure and courtyard,” Nereida says. Th y were soon handed the ancient teninch, three-pound skeleton keys to the property. Nereida began sending photos of their new project to her longtime friend in Greenville, Joan Herlong, who happens to know a thing or two about luxury properties as she is one of the Upstate’s notable realtors, with Sotheby’s International. But even to this real estate professional the


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"The way Nereida did it has such respect for the integrity of the original farmhouse. It’s very rustic" —Joan Herlong

While two new curved steps lead into the master, an old ladder from the original barn remains as a relic of simpler times.

In France, it is customary for kitchens to be hidden. Nereida turned the small hidden kitchen in this home into a mudroom and introduced her neighbors to the style of a big open kitchen designed to be spend quality time in. The l cals refer to it as her “cuisine American.” A classic French table for draping fabric was acquired while antiquing. Nereida had it cut in half and rejoined to form the island of her new open kitchen. It even has shelves underneath for storing dishes. The unique use o rare old furniture has become one of her signatures. The cr wn jewel of the remodeled kitchen is the wave-like brick ceiling held up by thick beams; it’s a turn-of-the-century addition to the room that was discovered during the renovation process. Once Nereida saw it, she painstakingly reclaimed it brick-by-brick. The formal dining r om is distinguished by a buffet abinet measuring over eleven feet long. “I built this wall because I found this buffet and had to ha e it,” Nereida says. Above the cabinet, a gallery of photos hangs depicting visitors caught in midair jumps. The sight of it always make Nereida smile, “the only request we make

of guests is that they jump for joy when they come here,” she says. The ange’s house has played host to many visitors including the aforementioned Herlongs; from curious locals to Mark and Nereida’s friends and family from abroad and once they played host to 80+ artists in the area for a comic book festival. When guests walk into the living room, it’s probably difficult for them believe it used to be a dirt-covered barn with no roof but once Nereida points out the two large stone ramparts coming out of the walls, holding back a mountain of earth, the reality of the amazing transformation comes into focus. Moving all of that dirt allowed for additional outdoor access that leads to a garden where tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries and rhubarb grow in the warm French summers. One of the home’s best traits is its brilliant use of livable outdoor space. An original rabbit pen became Mark’s man cave, complete with a projector for open-air cinema. An area that most likely held pigs is now a luxurious sauna, just perfect for relaxing after a dip in th pool with its infinity edge.

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Any room can become a bedroom-with the addition of some softer elements, and a proper closet.


E P U DA N D E B I TA S S E C U S . M U S M O D I T H A R C I P S U M U T AU T E C T I S Q U I AT I U R ? Q U I A S V E L I U R ?

It’s the beauty of France, the smell of his bread reaches my doorstep at six am

—Nereida Lange

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Mark was happy to repurpose the old animal pens into an outdoor/in recreation space and personal sauna.

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While the courtyard, garden, kitchen, dining and living areas ofte host guests, the second fl or is reserved for family. Attic space was converted into an en-suite bedroom for one of the Lange’s daughters. Nereida’s workroom upstairs, aff ctionately called the “chocolate room,” is accented in rich colors of dark chocolate and burgundy. The master suite t ok five years to pull together. It has tall peaked ceilings, French doors and large windows that work in harmony to create an airy space to form its own retreat. “The challen e was getting a closet into the room,” Nereida says. For that, she relied on the skill of her finish carpenter, Christophe Carrelet, a true French artisan, who is also responsible for the living room woodwork and

much of the home’s custom cabinetry, shelving, and stair-rails. Christophe’s solution was to add a soffit to the cl et’s walls in order to blend the new construction into the sight line of the original exposed beams. When the master door is open, there is a long unbroken view of the whole upstairs. “I can see clear through to my daughter’s purple room,” Nereida says. It was important for Nereida to create a home that was open and warm (and not just from the heat installed under the traditional French limestone tiles). It was also never the Lange’s intention to just renovate a house, they moved here to become part of a community. Since settling in, Mark has introduced the local children to the fun of decorating and dressing up in the American tradition of Halloween. Nereida completed a renovation of the

town hall and held a successful fundraiser (the first of its kind in the area) to install a new public fountain. Th Langes have had a positive influenc on the citizens of Crespières as much as they’ve been positively aff cted and inspired by the rich history and local talent around them. The aker who lives across the street above his shop won top baguette in the region (which includes Paris) this year. “It’s the beauty of France, the smell of his bread reaches my doorstep at six am,” Nereida says. In “A Moveable Feast,” Hemingway's true story of his time spent in France, he writes, “Th y say the seeds of what we will do are in all of us.” If that’s to be believed, then maybe the seed of this provincial life was always buried somewhere inside the hearts of Mark and Neireda Lange. With the restoration of a humble farm into a warm family homestead, the Langes have made their maison joyeuse quite the joyful home. a t Home  |  WINTER 2019  

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HISTORIC REIMAGINED Locals may call it the Beattie House, but the Magg family calls it home. / by Brendan Blowers / photos by Rebecca Lehde

The Fountain Fox Beattie House is not a museum, but it is one of those places that feels important because of its storied past. The third oldest structure in Greenville, it is described in the South Carolina Department of Archives and History as the former “center of social, cultural, and religious life of early Greenville.” Many older locals know the story of Fountain Fox Beattie, a wealthy textile merchant, who built the home as a wedding gift to his bride Emily Edgeworth Hamlin. The house grew along with the prominent Beattie family-- Italianate style wings and a grand columned porch were added in the 1880s giving the home the stately facing it still has today. Despite a past filled with dramatic moves and the threat of demolition, the Beattie House has been awarded a new life with the Magg family; Jori Magg, a realtor for Coldwell Banker, and her dentist husband, Ryan, who, along with their five children (ages seven to fourteen) have decided to make this piece of Greenville history their private residence. 82  

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THEN

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The couple was walking in their North Main neighborhood when they passed an auction sign in front of the two stone columns marking the entrance to the property. The Maggs already owned a historic home on East Park as well as an income property in the Parkins Mill area. “Timing wasn’t great, but we thought, let’s just put a bid in,” says Jori, “we love the stories of old houses.” They didn’t think they would be awarded the home; their offer was the only residential bid and not the highest one. To the Maggs surprise, the City of Greenville liked the idea of making it a home for a family once again. “When we got the call that we got it, we freaked out,” Jori says. After selling their two other homes in less than three months, things were falling nicely into place. When selling public assets it’s a big task to find the perfect owner with good intentions. “When the Magg family came forward with a proposal to renovate the home and gardens we were thrilled. What could honor this beautiful structure better than a lot of children growing up and running around?” says Councilperson Amy Ryberg Doyle. “The neighborhood is mostly single family zoned and the new use fit the neighborhood.”

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WHEN THE MAGG FAMILY CAME FORWARD WITH A PROPOSAL TO RENOVATE THE HOME AND GARDENS WE WERE THRILLED. WHAT COULD HONOR THIS BEAUTIFUL STRUCTURE BETTER THAN A LOT OF CHILDREN GROWING UP AND RUNNING AROUND? — COUNCILPERSON AMY RYBERG DOYLE


The Greenville Woman’s Club had been the last tenant up until 2014. By the time ownership of the property (along with a historic easement) was transferred to the Maggs, the home had been vacant for over two years and some rooms were close to collapsing. Outside posed a similar situation. One of the things that first attracted the Maggs to the Beattie House was its large lot, which held the promise of an enchanting yard for their five kids. However, a front section of the 2.5-acres had become completely overgrown, its leafy shadows littered with broken bottles and abandoned clothes. “When we bought it, we didn’t realize what a big ordeal the outside was going to be,” Jori says. They fenced off the street entrance abutting Church St, planted some trees to buffer the noise and erected an epic treehouse out back. What once used to be a neglected plot is now a place of storybook battles and fairytale flights. While the yard is an on-going improvement project, it was the home's exterior wood siding which presented the biggest

challenge. “We could not pressure wash it because of the lead paint, and the chemical peels that are usually used to remove paint did not work,” Jori says. And so began a ninemonth ordeal where contractors armed with heat guns and hand tools worked on one foot sections at a time, bubbling and peeling through decades upon decades of paint from bottom to top until the entire exterior was complete. That paint project ran $130,000 over budget. Compared to the exterior work, converting the inside of the house from a public meeting place to a residential home felt a bit more rewarding. Jori knew that the wide staircase

The large wooded lot offered a lot of appeal to a large family with kids, however, landscaping came with its own challenges: the Church Street entrance used by the Woman's Club was fenced off and the side parking lot was seeded to return it to a grass yard. a t Home  |  WINTER 2019  

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THE FOUNTAIN FOX BEATTIE HOUSE A Historical Timeline

1830s Fountain Fox Beattie arrives in Greenville from Virginia and purchases a 3-acre lot for $400 on present-day East North Street in an area considered “the suburbs.”

1834 Construction begins across the street from Christ Church. The home’s original design is simple, four rooms split between an upstairs and downstairs, with a separate kitchen.

1880s The home remains in the prosperous Beattie family and takes on an Italianate addition with one-story wings and tall front columns.

CO N T I N U E D O N N E X T PAG E

The staircase hardly resembled its original design when the Maggs first encountered it in its paneled and carpeted state. "We couldn't tell if the stair rail was wood or metal it had been painted so many times," Jori says.


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The process of stripping the stair rail and banister to reveal the original heart pine was tedious but rewarding. Uncovering handcarved details on the chair rail was a pleasant surprise. The natural wood reflects the light from the landing's picture window in a way that carpet never could. The grand stairs have taken their place as the downstairs focal point of the home again. a t Home  |  WINTER 2019  

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Early 1900s

Late 1930s-1940s

Recognized as much for its lush gardens and nicknamed “The Arboretum,” Mrs. John Beattie, wife to one of Beattie's heirs, enjoyed Greenville’s first greenhouse.

As World War II raged on, the remaining Beattie heirs rented the house until the expansion of Church Street required the house to be relocated.

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1946 The City purchases the property and the demolition of the home is announced. Prominent women in the community band together to implore City officials to save the home.


1948 The structure is moved under mule-power to its new street, Beattie Place.

1950 The house opens its doors to the first Greenville Woman's Club meeting. The club rents the home from the city for a dollar each year.

1 9 74 The Beattie House is listed on the National Historic Register.

1983 A real estate development company, U.S. Shelter, brokers a deal with the City to relocate the Beattie House, this time to off Bennett Street. The move takes 12 hours and costs $58,000 dollars. U.S. Shelter pays $75,000 for the brick foundation the house now rests on.

A floor to ceiling built-in fits the home's style so completely, it's hard to believe it's new. Jori enjoys curating each shelf with sentimental objects to personalize what was once a recital hall. Living room furniture is switched or moved frequently to suit family time or entertaining.

2014 The Greenville Woman's Club disbands under mismanagement and ownership of the home reverts back to the City, the home is in disrepair and near ruin.

2015 The City approves a sale of the property to golfer Gary Player’s company Black Knight International for a corporate office, but the deal falls through, leaving the Beattie House vacant.

2017 The property goes to auction as two lots and the Magg family submits the winning bid, beating out higher bids that would have made the home into a restaurant or bed and breakfast.

PRESENT

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The Maggs replaced the mid-19th-century crystal chandeliers that used to hang in many rooms with artistic geometric fixtures that mirror some of the carved lines of the original woodwork. Jori had all the new lighting purchased before they even moved in. One of the historic pictures on the far wall depicts the home as it was on Beattie Street.

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Kitchens are such an important part of modern family home life; this room required some of the most updating. The home's original kitchen was an afterthought-detached from the main house off the back.

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Old nails and carpentry marks from different decades were constantly being uncovered during the renovation. With the addition of a closet and few wall shifts, a daughter's room complete with the sweetest bunk bed was born.

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The home had no downstairs master, so the Maggs created one by enclosing an area that used to be a stage. The design is uncluttered and chic with peaceful accent colors and a simple four-poster bed. a t Home  |  WINTER 2019  

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leading to the second floor from the foyer should be the focal point. Removing wood paneling that had been added sometime in the seventies or eighties revealed a treasure: original hand-carved wainscoting that runs all the way through to the second-floor landing. The railing had been painted over so many times it was impossible to tell whether it was iron or wood, Jori says, “I came every night during the summer and scraped it with a heat gun myself. It took forever, but it was worth it.” What she uncovered was sturdy heart of pine with unique decorative flourishes. A ballroom originally stood to the right of the staircase, the site of many Greenville weddings and piano recitals. Today, it’s been converted to a comfortable living room with beautiful built-in floor to ceiling bookshelves that blend into its period surroundings. The arched doorways and towering ceilings sometimes make it difficult to find furnishings that fit such a scaled home but having an abundance of space also has its advantages, “Last Halloween we moved all the furniture and had a dance party,” Jori says. When the home was used as a social club, it had no master bedroom or bath, so the Maggs put up a wall where a stage had

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LAST HALLOWEEN WE MOVED ALL THE FURNITURE AND HAD A DANCE PARTY — JORI MAGG


been erected and created a large downstairs bedroom (complete with a walk-in closet that used to be the bridal parlor). A lot of work has gone into the kitchen to make it ready to serve a large family. The Maggs installed a massive marble-topped center island, new cabinets and redesigned the pantries which now lie behind a double Subzero fridge to make better use of space. A laundry room and mudroom also flank this side of the home. There’s also an expansive porch along the back of the house, which has been reimagined with screens, tile floors and new lighting replacing ancient rickety fans. The upstairs required the fewest changes. There were already three bedrooms but by hanging some doors and putting up a wall and closet, the Maggs were able to add a fourth. The kids’ rooms are tied together by centuries-old soft cedar plank floors and an 1800s-era enamel trough tub remains in one bath. Oasis Custom Homes completed all of the work under Jori’s watchful eye and planning, but no architect was employed.

That’s not to say there weren’t plenty of others involved with the project. Every decision was mulled over by both state and local historic review boards. The Maggs have binders full of before and after pictures, and every detail, from the color of a chair rail to the size of trim, had to be approved in person by one of the agencies. “I’ve been to more design review boards then I can count,” Jori says. The renovation process was intense, but the finished product is a feast for the eyes, something that serves a family’s needs as well as extending the life of one of Greenville’s most historic places. The Fountain Fox Beattie House began as a home built for a family and thanks to a key decision by the City of Greenville and the ambitious vision of the Magg family, it has returned to its original intent.

A family friend who had never built a treehouse before constructed the impressive play zone for the kids in the backyard. Like the Beattie House, it's filled to the peak with character and charm. a t Home  |  WINTER 2019  

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a fresh take on industrial design in the heart of downtown. / by Allison Walsh 100  

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/ photography by Carter Tippins


A hydroponic living green wall - the crown jewel of the condo - greets visitors at the top of the main staircase. This fully automated botanical masterpiece is nourished by timed LED grow lights and a closed loop feeding system. No green thumb required.

D

ownsizing and fleeing the suburbs after kids fly the coop is not a new tale. Converting former industrial spaces into chic urban homes is also a familiar concept, particularly in cities on the rise like Greenville, but visitors to one such downtown condo should be prepared to check their expectations at the door of this building’s second chapter. It sits on Main Street in downtown Greenville and was once home to Ballew & Scott Clothiers, with retail on the street level and storage and office space upstairs. Just over five years ago the building on the interior was stripped down to its bones to make way for something new. A floor plan was sketched out and an architect friend called in to help with the logistics of converting a long, narrow commercial shell into a comfortable, livable space. Rather than the open loft concept one might expect, the owner wanted rooms and walls and sheetrock and wood doors reversing the trend of making new houses look old by softening the industrial vibe with some of the comforts of more traditional residential construction. The floors on the main level are quarter sawn walnut whereas upstairs reclaimed red oak was installed, milled in Zirconia, NC. Both added immediate warmth to former retail space. The design work was handed over to Karan Marsh of Intentional Design and Mark Barrett of Barrett Merrell Construction took the lead as general contractor. “Mark’s hands-on approach and attention to detail was critical in keeping everyone on track and successful,” Marsh says. The job was a big one. The demolition alone filled nearly 40 dumpsters. An inch thick layer of white stucco and plaster was painstakingly chiseled - and sandblasted and power washed - away to reveal handsome red brick walls. After all the work that was done to expose the brick, Marsh opted to let it take center stage in the

design and left it untouched wherever possible, including the wall of the shower of the guest bath. Here the brick is matched with tile that has the look of white paint over red brick from a series called Grunge by Tesoro, sourced locally at Clayton Tile. “I didn’t want to try to match the brick or get too far away from it or too jolting,” Marsh says. “So, I went with a brick shape that had some of the colors in the brick that would pull through.” The same Grunge tile is used in the kitchen, but this time in the aqua colorway that cleverly complements the metallic hue of the zinc countertops and the grey veining in the Fusion Red granite island top. When Marsh found the striking red granite top at Slabco in Travelers Rest she knew it was the perfect choice, but her client required a bit of convincing. “When I first saw it I said, ‘this is your countertop,’ and he said, ‘it’s pink.” Marsh was right, of course, just as she was when she suggested zinc for the countertops in response to the client’s request for an out of the ordinary material befitting its unique surroundings. “The beauty of zinc is that it will patina with age,” Marsh says. “It’s a living finish. Every time you set a glass on it or put your hand on it or lay a vegetable or anything on it, it’s going to leave some kind of mark and eventually the countertop will get a little bit darker gray and start to look old.” Marsh pegged the local talent of Mike Fastzkie of Twisted Root Woodworking to craft the cabinetry and open shelving. Fastzkie also built the walnut stair treads that lead from the street level entrance up a gas lantern lit staircase to the main living area. The lanterns, along with all the other carefully chosen fixtures in the home, were sourced from Gallery of Lighting. At the top of this staircase is the most delightfully lush surprise, and what Marsh refers to as the crown jewel of the home. Her client is a self-described “plant guy” and didn’t want to sacrifice his love of all things green to live in an urban setting,

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so he started researching interior gardens. He found a company in New Jersey that builds hydroponic living green walls. These botanical masterpieces are fully automated, timed LED grow lights provide 12 hours of full sun and a closed loop feeding system delivers hydration and nutrients twice a day. A second garden wall greets entrants from the back staircase and a third installation keeps things green in the master bath, which also happens to be home to what Marsh says is the biggest rain showerhead on the market. “It can come down like a monsoon,” she says. The master bedroom boasts an unusual wood stove which utilizes an existing chimney from an original coal-burning furnace to vent out. An overhead door

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was installed to create privacy, when desired, but the juxtaposition of the space creates some dimensional whimsy that the owner likes and often leaves it open. A third story was added to the building to create a rooftop man cave of sorts, inspired by the owner’s childhood memories of time spent upstairs at his father’s firehouse in Upstate New York. This space is equipped with every game one might want to play with a cold beverage in hand, from billiards and shuffleboard to Jenga. A back deck is home to a vegetable garden, and the front one overlooks Main Street, with a door that disappears into the wall to open an interior bar area to the great outdoors. Pedestrians take note: that wide open doorway has also been known to facilitate a few serious games of rooftop cornhole.

Accordion windows were installed in the original opening overlooking Main Street for those times when the homeowner wants to hear the hum of downtown. The transoms that once served that purpose on a smaller scale now hang as wall decor, and the copper trim was repurposed on the upstairs bar.


The dimensions of the Fusion Red granite island top required lighting that could hold its own without creating too much interference with the zinc range hood. These beefy glass fixtures from Gallery of Lighting perfectly fit the bill. Walnut treads on the staircase lead the way to a rooftop playground. One original ceiling beam was left in place and used to suspend the ceiling fan; the rest were used as roof beams for the third floor addition.

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After an inch thick layer of white stucco and plaster was painstakingly chiseled and sandblasted away to reveal these handsome brick walls, the homeowner opted to leave them exposed wherever possible. A rollup door was selected for the master bedroom to allow access to a wood stove tied to an existing chimney that once serviced the coal furnace in the basement. Another interior garden keeps things fresh in the master bath, working together with an enormous rain shower head to create the sensation of bathing in a tropical rainforest.

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The third floor was added as a rooftop patio. The space was modeled after the homeowner’s childhood memories of hanging out upstairs in his father’s firehouse in Upstate New York, and is filled with every bar game one can imagine. Accordion doors on either end open to a working deck out back where the gardens are and a party deck overlooking Main Street.

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When the original window on the main level was removed the copper trim was carefully preserved and repurposed here along the granite bar top. The “fun deck,” with its nearly 360° view of Greenville, has become a downtown destination for the lucky friends of this homeowner.

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Snowflakes

Pg. 113

Local Spirits Pg. 116

Family Recipes Pg. 118

Pantry

Pg. 124

Wine & Cheese Pg. 126

Just Desserts Pg. 130

Green Living Pg. 134

In Good Taste Pg. 136

Modus M et h od s for h ome an d l ife

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J E S S I C A B A R L E Y

Storm Front As the thermometer drops, ring in good cheer 'round the table with food, drink and sweets. Darkness comes early and bellies expect to bust with not only nosh but merriment.

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Modus How To

Broadsheet Abilities A flurry of flakes is sating to cut and hang. / by Beth Ables / photography by Jessica Barley

P

aper snowflakes, th y seem universal: the folding, cutting and unfurling of these childhood masterpieces, littering the fl or with papery bits, the final product soon to be Scotch-taped to a window. But, the art of paper snowflakes ha grown up and moved on, today finding a festive place in winter decor. The histo y of folding and cutting paper to resemble snowflakes in all o their infinite variations finds its roots in Kirigami, the ancient Japanese art

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of paper cutting. First used in Japanese temples as offerings to th gods, Kirigami focuses on balance and symmetry. Not to be confused with Origami (the Japanese art of paper folding), Kirigami allows for paper to be both cut and glued or taped together. Mixed up in childhood nostalgia and the resurgence of handmade craft finding time to create a papery winter wonderland makes for an aftern on well spent, and the festive results pay

homage to a season filled gathering and celebrating. You’ll make memories that you can proudly display throughout the winter season. As paper is the key player here, think about texture and color when making your choices. Translucent vellum and rich card stock are both good choices, and a monochromatic scheme of silvers and whites works most anywhere. Use this step-by-step tutorial to fold, cut, and arrange a stunning display.


How To Modus

Supplies: paper scissors tape stapler

Step 4: Starting in the center, join the two corners of the smallest diamond to form a tube and tape. So the tape does not show, choose a satin variety (not glossy) to keep everything uniform. Tip: Scotch Super-hold tape works well for thicker paper like vellum or card stock.

Step 1: Fold the paper square in half along a diagonal, making a triangle. Then, fold that triangle in half once more.

Step 2: Starting on the side of the folded triangle with only two paper folds, and going towards the completely folded end, cut three parallel lines, stopping just before the fold.

Step 3: Open up your paper all the way, revealing a concentric diamond pattern.

Step 5: Flip the paper over, find the next diamond, join and tape those corners together. Flip the paper and repeat until all corners are affixed.

Step 6: Repeat these steps five more times, making a total of six points for your snowflake. Tip: you can do 8 or 10 as well, but be sure to stick to even numbers.

Step 7: Take three completed points and staple the ends together. Repeat with the other three. Join the two clusters together and staple again. Make any adjustments needed with small bits of tape. Don’t worry if it’s not perfect. Remember, no snowflake is alike.

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Modus Local Spirits

Old cocktail, new twist The Carolinas distill some great gin, perfect for a crisp wintertime G&T. / by Pete Martin / photography by Pete Martin and Robert Bradley

N

ow is truly a great time to be a gin lover. If you don't believe me, just look at the shelves at your favorite spirits shop. Next to the usual suspects, you’ll find plenty of fresh options, many born right here in the Carolinas. Unlike other spirits, there’s a lot of latitude when it comes to the ingredients in gin. While most of the requirements for many liquors are clearly defined, gin is diffe ent. Although juniper is a required botanical of gin, distillers each have their own unique recipes and now more than ever are exploring the use of other botanicals to develop fresh, unique styles to help them capitalize on gin’s popularity, which has been on the rise for the last decade. Creative concoctions aside, the traditional gin and tonic, or G&T for

Hwy 9, $30 | Asheville, NC It may only contain nine botanicals, but this is a very flavorful gin. A juniper nose is followed by hints of pepper and citrus on the palate, and the finish is bright yet full. “Big, powerful and good,” said one of the tasting notes. Although this gin brings some unique qualities to the table, it is a superbly made spirit that works exceptionally well in a G&T.

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Bulrush, $35 | Hilton Head Island, SC Bulrush is infused with 13 botanicals and is distilled in a process that aims to create a traditional but approachable gin. Here, bright juniper flavors mingle with hints of lavender and spice, and the finish is deliciously smooth. Tasting notes repeatedly referenced how balanced it was. And, it produced a superb G&T.

Nippitaty, $33 | Charleston, SC This was one of the more unusual gins in the tasting. It’s made from organic spirits infused with 12 botanicals, though juniper isn’t the star here. Rather, hints of orange peel and other citrus fruits abound on the nose. Nippitaty is a very light gin and a good choice for those who prefer a less-dominant juniper profile.


Local Spirits Modus

short, remains a beloved gin cocktail. It’s crisp, refreshing and complements almost anything, from appetizers to a light main course. Although a G&T can be thought of as a summertime drink, there’s no reason not to enjoy this cocktail now. And, with so many regionally distilled gins available, why not give your next gin and tonic a local twist? That’s xactly what we did, invited three friends over to sample six regional gins. After blind asting the spirits straight, I mixed them with tonic and a twist of lime to see how they held up. The erdict: these southern gins deserve your consideration. BUT FIRST, THE TONIC A good G&T requires quality gin, but it also needs good tonic. The e are lots of options, from standard grocery store fare to exotic, small-batch bottlings. Larry Bodkin, president of White Rock Beverages, observed the resurgence in cocktails and launched a line of premium mixers including a smashing tonic for a classic G&T (ideal since White Rock is the oldest mixer company in the US). As with gin, recipes and tastes differ, so xperiment with diffe ent tonics until you find a favorite. Look for glass bottles, which keep the tonic fresh and bubbly. MORE THAN A SECOND ACT Is the resurgence of gin, or the regional brands, just a passing fad? Peter Bouharoun, proprietor of Bouahroun’s Fine Wines & Spirits thinks not. He says the trend has been to pull back from juniper berry, “that heavy pine taste” as he calls it and that distillers have added different botanicals: cucumber, lemon, some distinct to their areas. His prediction? Craft gin is he e to stay.

Conniption Navy Strength, $40 | Durham, NC First, the navy strength part of the name: It has more alcohol. Whereas Conniption American Dry Gin is 44% alcohol, Conniption Navy Strength is 57%. But don’t let that deter you. Perhaps due to its unique production process, this is a super-smooth gin that presents aromas and flavors of juniper, coriander, rosemary and cardamom.

Cardinal, $28 | Kings Mountain, NC This gin features nearly a dozen botanicals, including angelica, juniper, cardamom and frankincense. On the nose, anise dominates, giving Cardinal a decidedly licorice flavor. This carries through to the finish, though hints of sweetness and citrus join the party. If you like licorice, this gin is for you.

Hat Trick, $28 | Charleston, SC This gin is made with crushed juniper berries and fresh lemon and orange peel. It starts with a juniper nose and follows with black pepper and citrus notes. Fairly bright and finishing on a slightly sweet note, Hat Trick is a great option for those seeking a sweeter, more citrusy G&T.

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Modus Family Recipes

A Handwritten Holiday Family recipes find their way from card to table. / by Hali Wyatt

P

ulling out a handwritten recipe each year is simply nostalgic. And, holding something with a loved one’s handwriting on it is an irreplaceable experience, reminding us of who wrote it more than anything. We asked the atHome team to take a trip down memory lane and share their favorite family recipes. Interestingly enough, we found that they were overwhelmingly baked goods, making this story all the more sweet. These ecipes are like family heirlooms and we could not be more delighted to share them, from our table to yours.

Lynn Greenlaw Editor-in-Chief My Aunt Do (short for Dolores) was always a favorite of mine. She made me adorable ragdolls and tons of clothes for all my dolls. She and my Uncle Dick were avid campers who enjoyed traveling the back roads of Indiana, always looking for a camping site in the fall that had persimmon trees. They would collect a few for my aunt’s special persimmon pudding. It was a dessert that made the holiday season extra special and will always remain a treasured memory.

Persimmon Pudding

Editor-in-Chief Lynn Greenlaw 1 1 1 ½ 2 1 1 1 ½ 1

c. persimmon pulp c. sugar c. flour tsp soda tsp baking powder Tbsp butter, softened tsp cinnamon egg c. sour milk c. sweet milk

Method:

Mix all ingredients. Bake in a lightly greased pan (about 8” square) for about one hour, at 350 degree. Serve with following sauce.

Pudding sauce 1 c. brown sugar 3 Tbsp flour 2 c. water 1 tsp butter 1 tsp vanilla Method:

Combine the sugar, flour, and water in a small pan. Cook until thick and smooth, then add butter and vanilla. Tip: Cutting this recipe in half makes enough for the pudding.

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Family Recipes Modus

Almond Toffee Biscotti Writer John Nolan

Apple Sauce Muffins Writer Julia Sibley-Jones

A month after I started graduate school, my grandmother sent me two tiny muffin tins and an index card, now smudged and stained, with this handwritten recipe and the container labeled ‘baking soda’ on masking tape that I still use.

2 1 2 2 2 4 3 1 2 1 1

c. sugar c. oleo eggs c. apple sauce tsp baking soda c. plain flour tsp cinnamon tsp ground cloves tsp allspice c. chopped nuts tsp vanilla

Method:

Cream together sugar and oleo. Add two eggs. Beat well, then add applesauce, to which baking soda has been added. Next add dry ingredients which have been mixed together. Fold in chopped nuts and vanilla. Bake in greased muffin tins at 400 for 10-15 min, or until lightly brown. Batter can be kept in refrigerator for about 2 weeks, using as needed -- or -- baked muffins an be frozen.

I was not a coffee drinker until graduate school when I met my wife, Anne. She challenged herself to create a recipe that would allow us to have freshly baked biscotti with the ingredients we liked.

6 Tbsp butter 1 c. sugar (sometimes I use brown sugar) 1 tsp baking powder ½ tsp baking soda 2 eggs 2 ½ c. flour ½ c. slivered almonds ½ c. toffee chips 2 Tbsp almond flavoring (not extract) Method:

Cream together the butter and sugar. Add eggs. Add the baking powder and baking soda, making sure they’re mixed well in the batter. Add flour 1 cup at a time. Then gradually add ¼ at a time to get the right consistency. Sometimes it only needs another ¼ cup of flour (making it just 2 ¼ total) and sometimes it takes closer to 3 cups. It depends on the quality of butter sometimes and the size of eggs. Then mix in the almonds and then the toffee chips.

The dough should still be sticky but firm to the touch. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a ball and cut in half. Then on a cookie sheet, roll out one half of the dough into a log. Press to make a rectangle about 3-5 inches wide and about ¾ inch thick. Do the same to the other half of the dough. Bake at 375 for 22 minutes. Remove from oven. Let it cool for a bit, if you mess with it too soon, the toffee chips will cause the biscotti to crumble. Then slice at an angle. You should be able to get 18-20 slices altogether. Turn the biscotti on its side and bake 8-9 minutes at 325 degrees. What you’re supposed to do is flip the biscotti and bake on the other side. I’m usually too lazy. I bake it at 325 for about 12-15 minutes on one side and then turn the oven off and keep the biscotti in there for a while. The longer you leave it baking the second time (on lower heat) the crunchier it gets.

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Modus Family Recipes

Cranberry Salad

Writer Libby McMillian Henson

Method:

Banana Bread

Writer Leigh Savage One of my earliest memories is sitting on the floor in my living room, watching the Nancy Welch Show with my mom. This is the banana bread recipe she jotted down during an episode some 40 years ago.

1 stick butter 1 c. granulated sugar 1 egg 4 Tbsp buttermilk 3 bananas - ripened and mashed ½ c. sifted all purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda ⅛ tsp salt ½ c. chopped nuts Method:

Cream butter, sugar, and egg together. Add additional ingredients. Grease and flour loaf pan. Bake at 325-350 degrees for 40 minutes to an hour.

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Pumpkin Chiffon Pie Writer M. Linda Lee

Every Thanksgiving, since my mother passed away in 1976, I have made this pie. Because the filling is a chiffon, lightened with egg whites, the pie is not baked, except the shell. Making the custard is a labor of love, one which evokes fond memories of my mother.

1 envelope unflavored gelatin ¾ c. firmly packed brown sugar ½ tsp salt 1 tsp cinnamon ½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg ½ c. whole milk ¼ c. water 3 eggs, separated 1 ½ c. pumpkin (I use organic, canned pumpkin) ¼ c. granulated sugar (I use unbleached organic cane sugar) 1 pint heavy whipping cream 1 blind-baked 9-inch pie shell

Mix gelatin, brown sugar, salt and cinnamon in the top of a double boiler. Stir in milk and water. Beat in egg yolks with a fork; then beat in pumpkin. Place over simmering water and cook, stirring often— especially around the sides of the pot—until the mixture is heated through (about 10 minutes or so). Remove from the heat and chill (stir occasionally while chilling). When pumpkin mixture is thoroughly chilled, beat egg whites until stiff and gradually beat in cane sugar until very stiff. Gently fold gelatin mixture into the egg whites. When the whites are incorporated, turn the mixture into the cooled pie shell. You can make the pie the day before and keep it in the refrigerator covered with plastic wrap. Just before serving, whip the cream and spread it on top of the pie.

My mom’s cranberry salad is a labor intensive holiday treat. It’s set in gelatin and she always used a ring. After she turned out the ring on a small platter, she’d put black olives in the middle, for service.

4 1 2 1 2 2 1/2

c. cranberries c. sugar pkgs lemon jello tart apple, chopped c. boiling water oranges c. pecans, chopped Heart of celery, chopped

Method:

Put cranberries and peel of 1 orange through chopper, on medium fine setting. Add sugar and let stand 30 minutes. Add 2 cups hot water to jello to dissolve. Put in fridge but watch it. When mixture begins to congeal, add cranberries, sugar, pecans, celery, orange sections and apples. Place in mold or Pyrex and place back in fridge to set up. When ready to turn out, place lettuce leaves on platter. Set mold in warm water for just a bit, then turn over on lettuce leaves or wait 15 minutes and it will drop after you have loosened around the edges.


Family Recipes Modus

Carrot Cake

Photographer Chelsey Ashford

Russian Salad

Writer Sandra Woodward I remember the childhood Christmas Eve when I first tasted it at my maternal grandmother’s house. My mother sent me this card early in my marriage to make sure I could continue the tradition. 2 3 oz. packages lime gelatin 1 1/2 c. boiling water 8 oz. cream cheese, cut into cubes 24 marshmallows, not miniature 2 0 oz. can crushed pineapple, juice included 5 oz. can evaporated milk (or 1/2 . plus 2 tablespoons) 2/3 c. mayonnaise (or Miracle Whip salad dressing if you insist) 2 tsp lemon juice 1 c. chopped pecans Method:

In a large saucepan, combine lime gelatin, boiling water, cream cheese and marshmallows and stir over medium-low heat until smooth. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. Add remaining ingredients except pecans and stir until smooth. Add pecans and pour into a 9 x 13 glass serving dish. Refrigerate and chill until set. Instead of a 9x13 serving dish, a pretty gelatin mold may be used. Refrigerate any leftovers.

My grandmother has always made this recipe for Christmas. I remember driving up to the mountains of Knoxville, Tennessee dreaming about her incredible recipe. The fact that she hand-shaves the carrots to go in the carrot cake has always fascinated me.

2 c. flour 2 c. sugar ½ tsp salt 2 tsp baking soda 1 tsp baking powder 2 c. finely grated peeled carrots 2 tbsp cinnamon 4 eggs 1 c. vegetable oil ¼ c. water Method:

Measure sugar in mixing bowl. Measure flour into sifter. Into flour, measure salt, baking powder, soda and cinnamon. Add vegetable oil to sugar and stir. Add eggs, one at a time, blending after each addition. Start blending in flour and dry ingredients. Add water and then carrots. Pour into greased and floured bundt pan. Place in a preheated oven at

325 degrees for exactly 60 minutes. Let completely cool before icing. Tip: Grate carrots - about 2 ½ large carrots will do. Peeled.

Icing 1 c. chopped pecans 8 oz. package cream cheese 1 stick margarine (softened) 1 box Domino confectioners sugar Pinch of salt 2 tsp pure vanilla extract Method:

Measure chopped pecans and set aside. Place cream cheese and margarine into a mixing bowl, cut into small bits and beat into mixer until well blended. Sift confectioners sugar into this gradually, blending smoothly. Add a pinch of salt, add vanilla flavoring and beat again. Add nuts and spread on cooled cake.

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Modus Pantry

Fungi Tales Dried mushrooms are a worthy winter staple.

/ by Julia Sibley-Jones / photography by Chelsea Lane Photography

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Pantry Modus

H

umans love mushrooms and I think the proof is in how we have lovingly and whimsically named them such as Chicken of the Wood, Fairy Ring, Hedgehog, Hen of the Wood, Lobster and of course the aptly named Oyster mushroom. Moreover, here’s how we describe their fla or: savory, earthy, rich, musky, smoky, woodsy or meaty. Clearly, we think mushrooms lend a bit of magic to any dish. Add mushrooms to soups, casseroles, omelets; eat them raw in salads or let your risotto lounge with them. Mushrooms have the innate ability to deepen a cream sauce or brighten a burger; they are one of the most versatile of foods. Th y are also a good source of fiber and protein, chock full of nutrients and antioxidants. In fact, mushrooms are one of the few plant sources of Vitamin D. And, there are so many varieties, but fresh mushrooms don’t have much of a shelf life and some are hard to find in the States. Enter the dried mushroom. Mushrooms are found all over the world and in almost every season. Th best way to harness all that earthy goodness is to keep dried mushrooms in your pantry. Avoid moisture and heat by sealing them in airtight containers and storing in a cool, dark spot. Even better, frozen dried mushrooms keep for up to a year (but make sure to purchase whole ones). A local source for dried mushrooms is Mushroom Mountain in Easley. Th y also offer tou s and workshops, sell kits for growing your own mushrooms, and are involved in mycroremediation research, or the ability to remove biological and chemical contaminants from water and soil with the use of fungus. So, are you ready to take the plunge? Any recipe calling for mushrooms can use a dried variety if you allow time to rehydrate the ’shrooms. Dried mushrooms tend to have a more intense fla or than fresh, but otherwise, use them as you would mushrooms in any recipe. Start off with an asy mushroom gravy and smother some mashed potatoes for a comfort food night. I plan to tackle a mushroom bourguignon this winter. On these cold nights, you can’t go wrong with a savory mushroom dish.

Savory Mushroom Gravy, adapted from Anna Lapp

How to rehydrate mushrooms 1.  Measure the mushrooms and place in bowl. Cover with water and submerge. For faster rehydrating, use hot water. 2. Soak for 20-30 minutes, depending on thickness and amount of mushrooms. 3. When mushrooms are soft all the way through, remove them from water, squeezing gently. If gritty, rinse mushrooms under running water for a few seconds. 4. Strain mushroom liquid through a coffee filter or paper towel and reserve. Use immediately or refrigerate for 5 days or freeze for up to 3 months.

Method: Rehydrate ½ oz mushrooms. Drain, sieve and save all liquid. Chop mushrooms. Into one cup of liquid, whisk in 3 Tbs cornstarch or arrowroot until smooth and set aside. Heat 2-3 Tbs oil over medium heat. Add ¼ cup chopped shallots and cook until tender. Add 8 oz sliced, fresh mushrooms and cook until soft, about 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer mushrooms to bowl. Add ½ cup dry white wine to pan, stirring occasionally until reduced by half. Return cooked mushrooms to pan and add reserved liquid and chopped rehydrated mushrooms. Bring to a boil. Stir in cornstarch mixture and simmer until thickened, about 5 to 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

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What to Drink Now Modus

Perfectly Paired Mission Grape Co. and Blue Ridge Creamery bring their expertise to our table. / written and photographed by Pete Martin

I

t doesn’t take much to make me happy. Give me a loaf of crusty bread, a chunk of cheese and a bottle or two of wine, and I am set. Unfortunately, while many of us think about pairing wine with food, we don’t always think about what wine goes best with what cheese. Christian Hansen is the founder and cheesemaker at Blue Ridge Creamery in Travelers Rest. He loves cheese, and he also loves wine. When asked to bring several cheeses, Hansen quickly obliged with a cooler full of locally produced goodness. Even the names of these cheeses are locally sourced. “We name a lot of our cheeses after outh Carolina places or water,” he says. The fi e wines we paired with Hansen’s cheeses were selected by Matt Tebbetts, founder of Mission Grape Co., a Greenville-based wine distributor that specializes in unique bottlings. Much of Mission’s offerings a e from Europe, and many have not been available previously in South Carolina. Tebbetts has traveled to France and Italy to meet producers to learn about and select the wines he includes in the Mission Grape portfolio, which he carefully curates for local restaurants and retail shops. Sampling wine and cheese makes for a fun evening during the winter season, and it’s a great way to engage guests. With the holidays approaching, here are five locally driven pairings for your next get-together.

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Modus What to Drink

THE WINE: Dirler-Cadé 2015 Riesling, $25 THE CHEESE: Chattooga Blue

If you’re put off by sweet rieslings, this Alsatian riesling is a good pick. It’s dry, clean, balanced and full-bodied. Tebbetts credits the wine’s sophistication to traditional farming methods and top-quality fruit. “It’s really grand cru fruit without the grand cru price,” he says, referring to the class of wines produced from specialized groups of high-end French vineyards. This wine’s acidity makes it an ideal match for the Chattooga Blue, a raw cow’s milk blue cheese. THE WINE: Prunus Dão Red, $20 THE CHEESE: Buxton

Unlike the other wines, which are all from France, this wine (made primarily from the jaen grape) is from Portugal. This lightly oaked red is elegant and presents a nose of dark berries, plums and anise. On the palate, raspberry and dark cherries abound. This is a really enjoyable wine that comes across silky, elegant and accessible. “It is way undervalued,” Tebbetts says. “Portugal wines are the best values out there.” The rich flavors of the wine paired nicely with the Blue Ridge Creamery Buxton semi-hard cow’s milk cheese.

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THE WINE: Anne Pichon Sauvage 2017 Vermentino, $15

THE WINE: Domaine Roger Belland

THE CHEESE: Fromage Blanc

THE CHEESE: Raven Cliff

This wine offers lots of bright, crisp, citrusy fruit and pairs well with almost any cheese, though it works well with the fromage blanc — a creamy, fresh cheese that Hansen shared. Look for a hint of oak on the palate, too, which makes it an excellent choice to pair with a Thanksgiving turkey or most any fall meal, especially one that includes fall herbs and spices. “People are familiar with vermentino on the Italian side,” Tebbetts says. “This being from the Rhone area, however, provides you with a little more fruit.”

As one of the highest-end producers in Mission’s portfolio, this wine isn’t cheap, but it’s worth every penny. Hailing from one of the top pinot producers in the world, expect flavors of dark cherry, with hints of vanilla. “The best pinot noir in the world is from Burgundy,” Tebbetts says. “This is from one of the better producers of burgundy wines; they are small production but make some of the best pinot.” The Raven Cliff 12-month sheep’s milk cheese paired wonderfully with this wine, it’s texture and taste easily able to stand up to the pinot.

Santenay-Beauregard, $65

THE WINE: Christian Bernard 2016 Grands Fers Fleurie Gamay Noir, $30 THE CHEESE: Eastatoee Camembert

You shouldn’t go into the fall months without enjoying a French Beaujolais. That doesn’t mean you have to opt for a Beaujolais Nouveau, however, which can sometimes be too light for cooler weather. “This is cru gamay from Fleurie,” Tebbetts says. “This is a lighter-bodied, fruit-forward red that will pair well with lots of food, especially traditional holiday fare. Hansen’s cheese pick: the Eastatoee Camembert. “Bloomy rinds like brie and Camembert are challenging to pair with reds, but this wine is delicate enough to express itself without overpowering the cheese,” Hansen says.

Want it/Find it

Wines from Mission Grape Co. are available at local restaurants and retail locations, including Jianna and The Community Tap. Find out more about Blue Ridge Creamery cheeses at blueridgecreamery.net


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Modus On the Table

smaller by design MINI CAKES ARE THE DESSERT OF THE MOMENT.

/ by Jonathan Caleb Russ and Stephanie Burnette / photography by Eli Warren

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On the Table Modus

O

Oh-my-sweetness! Say goodbye to giant layer cakes and hello to these tiny trendsetters because smaller bite size sweets have taken over the dessert scene. Yes, we’ve all had our fair share of cupcakes and cake-pops but the mini cake is a much more sophisticated take on small-scale sweets. Mini layer cakes may be tiny, but they make a big statement especially when compared to just a single dessert. Minis allow for more variety and fla ors to be packed into your menu, giving guests several options to choose from. Pairing them with scaled down cake pedestals will take them over the top. Or, group several together on a larger cake stand for visual impact. Creating these luscious mini layers isn’t as tedious as it may seem. Start by baking your favorite cake in a sheet pan. After c oling, level the cake and use a 4-inch biscuit cutter to cut your rounds out. You can easily stack the cakes 4 layers high. Each 4-inch cake will serve up to 6 guests. Our cakes took their cue from the ballroom fete during what’s referred to as “the party scene” in the opening act of the Nutcracker ballet. The bel ved holiday-time production feels current yet again with its British undertones and sugarplum inspirations. Only now is it possible to consume glitter (the edible type of course) and pipe cable-knit sweaters right onto stacked layers of gingerbread cake. Today’s confections let the imagination run wild and the conclusion of a beautiful dinner party is the most perfect reason to pull out a show-stopper or two or three.

"Sugarplum Princess" Hot Pink Velvet Cake Cream Cheese Filling Vanilla Italian Meringue Buttercream Edible Glitter Disco Cherries

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Modus On the Table

"Sweater Weather" Gingerbread Cake Salted Caramel Drizzle Bourbon Vanilla Italian Meringue Buttercream Pom Poms made by icing Rice Crispy Treat "gumballs"

TAILORED

by DESIGN

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On the Table Modus

"Peppermint Drip" Dark Chocolate Mint Cake Dark Chocolate Ganache Drip Bourbon Vanilla Italian Meringue Buttercream Crushed Peppermint Candies

Mini layer cakes may be tiny, but they make a big statement especially when compared to just a single dessert.

—Jonathan Caleb Russ

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Modus Green Living

Winterize Your Succulents Caring for the geometric beauties can be a seasonal indoor sport. / by Jeffrey Dooley / photograph by Inspiro 8 Studios

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Green Living Modus

SUCCULENTS HAVE become incredibly popular these last few years. With the explosion of social media and designers integrating them into their work, they have now become very common to collect and use as decorative or styling elements. As an interior designer, I myself have become fond of this group of plants and have amassed quite a collection. Before you chuck your end of season plants or allow them to shrivel in severe cold, consider a little TLC keeping them happy and well until warmer temperatures once again prevail. Specifically, I winterize my succulents and prepare them for dormancy. Dormancy is the time during the winter when these plants enter a slow-growing period. The e are a few simple things you can do to ensure your succulents survive inside for winter and thrive. First, clean up any detritus that may be around the plants or attached at the bottom where new growth has taken over. This gi es the plants more direction to focus on their central health allowing them to settle into dormancy. Second, check your plants for any insects that may be hiding in the soil or on the plant itself. Succulents are more prone to infestations when you bring them inside versus when they are outside. It's crucial to take care of any pest problem before bringing them in. You can use an insecticidal soap or even rubbing alcohol applied on a Qtip to rid the plant of bugs. Regardless if the plant has an infestation or not, I always spray all of my plants with an insecticidal soap about a week before I bring them in, then once every other week when they come inside as a preventative measure. The n xt step is light; if you have a smaller collection of succulents, you can easily put them in a sunny window (south facing is the best) and they will do well. In my case, I have

far more plants than I do windows with appropriate light, so I have devised a grow light station. My husband built a small riser out of pressure treated wood in our basement. This helps with draina e and allows the plants to have lots of circulation around their roots helping the soil and roots stay dry in dormancy. I purchased a set of grow lights with what’s called “t5 bulbs.” Thes bulbs are the best at replicating natural sunlight, though there are LED options available too. The lights I pu chased use a simple plug in cord for their power source and have levy pulls so you can adjust the height to your liking. I keep mine about 3 to 4 feet above my plants. The lights a e hung from hooks that are screwed into the fl or joist above. No matter where you decide to winterize your succulents, simply locate a ceiling joist or stud. We put our lights on a timer that is synced with our EST zone recreating the natural cycle of light they have become accustomed to. Don’t forget to add a dehumidifier and also a heater with sensors which activates when too much moisture starts to gather or temperatures drop too low. The e are many options and configurations available, so have fun experimenting and do what works best for you, your home and your plants. You might want to consider shelving units with grow lights built in or even countertop grow lights for small scale collections. Last but not least, your plants will not need near as much water in dormancy. In fact, my succulent collection requires very little at all. I water only about once a month over the winter months, but you can tinker with this depending on the moisture level in the air and soil in your space. Succulents bring me a lot of joy and can last a lifetime if you take care of them properly in all four seasons.

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Modus In Good Taste

BON TEMPS

WHEN KING CAKE SEASON IS THE REASON.

BY J E N N I F E R D E N N I S P H OTO G R A P H Y BY TAY LO R C A S H

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In Good Taste Modus

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My mother and I were the fourth and fifth people in line outside of th warehouse door of Dong Phuong Oriental Bakery an hour before they open, awaiting the opportunity to each purchase three of their coveted cream cheese king cakes. Fortunately, the January weather in New Orleans is relatively mild. We’ve traveled over 600 miles for this purpose. It’s our first mother/ daughter road trip, spurred by my desire for an authentic king cake party and my mother’s desire to see the city of New Orleans again. Th day after e returned to Greenville, I would turn 34. Rewind a month when I casually mention to a friend that I adore the fact that I can have king cake for my birthday each year. The date is jus inside of Carnival season, a time between Epiphany and Ash Wednesday when Louisiana bakeries begin cranking out tens of thousands of the sugar-glazed pastry rings. Typically, I would simply have one shipped to my door, but as the conversation continued a plan evolves into the possibility of a road trip to secure a dozen or more king cakes to share at a self-produced birthday bash. I am an event planner by trade, so hosting others is what I do. My birthday felt like the perfect excuse to embark on this somewhat elaborate escapade. On our last day in Nola, my mother and I make our rounds to the bakeries. First up was the early morning line at Dong Phuong, then on to a pop-up outpost for Haydel’s where praline pecan was selected for variety of fla or. As it was early in Carnival season, the line at Manny Randazzo’s wasn’t too long and I made the spilt second decision to get the “extra-large” king cake (as the only thing more fun than petite cakes are overly large ones). We rounded out the lot with what had been considered the prettiest of all king cakes, the one showered with iridescent edible glitter from Sucre. Six months later, all locations of the famous bakery would close following a scandal within the company.

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With fifteen akes carefully placed in my surprisingly capable hatchback, we drove hundreds of miles back, the air laden with the smell of sugar, so that all the king cakes would be in mint condition for the next aftern on. I had booked an event space at Hampton Station; it was an unfinished bay at the time (but heated thankfully) and it would be flank d with barrels from Birds Fly South Ale Project. This ould provide a wonderful backdrop to the cake table, and it filled the space with the distinct pleasant scent that only comes from barrel-aging. I decided to eschew the Mardi Gras masks and other more flam oyant dÊcor in favor of candlelight, pine green velvet and gold brocade. Inspired by fine-dining meets pastry shop, I set up a milk bar with a display of skim milk, 2% and full fat along with a bounty of stemless flutes of cou se. Lots of chatter occurred comparing the cakes from the various bakeries and guests really took the challenge to heart. From the very young to the much older, significant sugar-laden calories were consumed. I shared my birthday and my carefully-sourced king cakes with friends and family on that winter Sunday aftern on, and it made for an incredibly memorable experience. And now that the memory has been made, I believe next year’s birthday cake will be shipped.


Party Planning Carnival Style

• Carnival season begins on Epiphany (January 6th) and ends on Mardi Gras (which in 2020 is February 25th). If you are aiming to be authentic, your Mardi Gras-themed party should take place during this time. Traditionally this is when king cakes are sold although some are now available throughout the year, so you can decide when to celebrate.

How-to Order a Louisiana King Cake

In Louisiana, every local has their own firmly held opinion in regard to the best king cake. Here are a few of the bakeries (adored by locals) that will ship a cake overnight so you too can have an authentic king cake without a trip to the Crescent City. Haydel’s Bakery | New Orleans, LA The Haydel’s cake arrives covered in a heavy glaze and alternating gold, purple, and green colored sugar. This bakery’s cake features a lighter use of cinnamon and a pop of citrus flavor. haydelsbakery.com Joe Gambino’s Bakery | New Orleans, LA Want to ensure that your cake is perfectly decorated? This cake is lighted sprinkled with a touch of cinnamon and then shipped with a kit that allows you to ice the cake upon arrival and top with a good covering of colored sugar. gambinos.com Manny Randazzo King Cakes | Metairie, LA The Randazzo cake is generously frosted with a white glaze and is lightly topped with gold, purple, and green sprinkles as opposed to granulated sugar. It also packs a heavy cinnamon flavor that is reminiscent of a cinnamon bun. The bakery is opened seasonally as their sole focus is king cakes (a decision they made back in 1995). randazzokingcake.com

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• Learn a bit about New Orleans and Mardi Gras history and talk to someone who has lived there. It will help you to create the best experience for your guests. Find some popular hashtags on Instagram such as #mardigrasnola and #nolaevents and take notes. • Mardi Gras can be an over-thetop theme and you can certainly embrace the beads, glitter and sequins, but also consider a toneddown approach centered around the gold, purple and green color palette representing the Fleur De Lis and authentic food and drink. • Utilize pieces you have at home to decorate and know that you can rent-in some fabulous linens or gold flatware, for example, to round out the décor without having to purchase (or clean) them. Professional Party Rentals is a great resource for events of all sizes. Sometimes just that one linen will tie a whole dinner party together. • Teach your guests about the traditions of Mardi Gras and king cake. This can be done in advance with the invitation or with printed pieces at the party. It is also a great story to share as you bring out the king cake and wait to see who will be the lucky recipient of the baby inside one of those slices. Although there’s some debate about why it is a plastic baby that is placed in the cake, everyone agrees that guest who gets the baby is the one to host the next party.


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Ad Index Modus ADVERTISER ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PAGE# 4 Rooms Home Trends by Roots��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������56 AJH Renovations, LLC����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������8-9 Atlantis Luxury Pools�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 57 Bogari������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������39 Carolina Furniture & Interiors����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������15 Carson Speer��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������21 The Chet & Beth Smith Group ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 52 Clayton Tile�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6-7 Coastal Carolina National Bank��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������141 Cobblestone Homes���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2-3 Coln Construction����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������19 D Pearson Kitchen & Bath���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������143 Designed for Downtown������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������34-35 Dillard-Jones Builder��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Inside Front & 1 Dutchmans�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 22 The Embassy Flowers�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������122 Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������42 Forest Kitchen Design Studio����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������98 Galt Innovations������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������38 Gateway Supply Co. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������4-5 Geiss & Sons Jewelers���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Back Cover Genco Pools & Spas�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 27 GrandSouth Bank�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 144 Greenville Carpet One ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������44 Hennessee Haven������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������20 HGI Cabinetry����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������59 IBI Custom Home Builders�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������129 Ike's Carpet������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������141 Inline Tile�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������123

ADVERTISER ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PAGE# J. Dabney Peeples Design Associates, Inc.�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 37 Jean Carter and Company������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������49 Jeff Lynch��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������31 Johnston Design Group������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������53 Jordan Lumber Company�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������1112 Katherine Hall-Joan Herlong & Associates/Sotheby's���������������������������������������������������������123 Land Art Landscapes, LLC��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������58 Lil Glenn Company������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 97 llyn strong fine art jewelry��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������18 Louver Shop ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������43 Madison & Co.������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������111 Marblelife Stone & Tile Restoration��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������99 Melissa Morrell/Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices��������������������������������������������������������������81 MHK Architecture & Planning���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 78 Old Colony Furniture ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Inside Back Pacific Shore Stones��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������80 Panageries Design Discovered ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 79 Pelham Architects�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������132 ProSource����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������17 ReMax ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������110 Ridgeline Construction Group, Inc.��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������96 Sallé Galloway�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������11 Star Granite Interiors�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������129 Stoneledge Properties������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 37 Studio of Michael P. McDunn������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������141 Tindall Architecture Workshop������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 112 Two Men and a Truck��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������111 Verdae Development����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������13

DESIGN... BUILD... LIVE. D. Pearson Kitchen & Bath is your best local source in Greenville County for quality design & remodeling for your kitchen and bath. Every detail is carefully executed. We can also act as your point person for countertops, tile and other products to complete your project. , Serving Greenville County

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q 864.254.8331

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w dpkitchenbath.com

License #: RBS.59015

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A smarter, better banking experience is here.

Why GrandSouth Bank? We’re truly a local bank, which allows us to make faster and more flexible decisions with each individual customer. We look for a way to make it happen.

381 HALTON ROAD, GREENVILLE, SC 29607 | 864-770-1000 | WWW.GRANDSOUTH.COM

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Exclusive Furniture Source for iHome by Milestone at Hartness Complimentary ASID Design Service (In-store or In-home) Furniture, Accessories, Rugs, Bed Linens, Lighting, & Fabric Serving Greenville for 73 years • Best Brands, Competitive Prices Experience, Knowledge, Reputation • Website w/Live Instagram Feed

oldcolonyfurniture.com | 3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330


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At Home Winter 2019  

At Home Magazine is now published four times a year (Winter, Spring, Summer, & Fall) by Community Journals LLC located in Greenville, SC. Fo...

At Home Winter 2019  

At Home Magazine is now published four times a year (Winter, Spring, Summer, & Fall) by Community Journals LLC located in Greenville, SC. Fo...

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