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GreenvilleJournal Friday, July 5, 2013 • Vol.15, No.27 • GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

“Jersey Boys” actors roll with the changes Page 19

Lethal force ruled justified in Brown St. shooting Page 8

GHS, county discuss EMS takeover Page 9

Good to Go takes the farm to the streets Page 11

Happy TRAILS After six years and 2,184 miles, Hayne Hipp will add the Appalachian Trail to his long list of accomplishments

SEE STORY, page 10

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“When you’re on the trail, you push aside all differences and really focus on the positives that each person brings.” Hayne Hipp, on hiking the Appalachian Trail.

125

Number of people who came to the launch of the Good to Go mobile farmers market

“I knew this project would be an obsession until completed. This is the most focused I have seen Hayne in the 50 years we have been married.” Anna Kate Hipp, on her husband’s decision to hike the entire 2,184 miles of the AT. QUOTE OF THE WEEK

TARA EAKER / CONTRIBUTING

“If the world hasn’t fallen apart by 9:45 p.m. on the Fourth of July, there will be fireworks.” Lansden Hill Jr., CEO of Pyro Shows and choreographer of Greenville’s Red, White and Blue fireworks display.

“This is a tragedy. This family lost a loved one. This was a father shot by officers. Nobody wins in this scenario.” 13th Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins, announcing police were justified in using lethal force in the death of a 19-year-old man outside the Brown Street Jazz Club.

“Those extraordinary and unprecedented features were reauthorized as if nothing had changed.” U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, on the 1965 Voting Rights Act criteria that forced nine states to obtain federal pre-clearance on any changes to state election law.

17,800

Number of reported fires related to fireworks in 2011, according to National Fire Protection Agency

$3.9 billion

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Suspect arrested in Howard’s Rock vandalism case

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On June 28, Clemson University police arrested Micah Rogers, an 18-year-old from Pisgah Forest, N.C., in connection with the vandalism of Howard’s Rogers Rock in early June. The white, 1993 Ford F250 – captured in photos released to the public from street cameras outside to the stadium – was registered to the father of Micah Rogers, leading police to his home the morning of June 28. Rogers was charged with one felony of malicious injury to animals or personal property valued at more than $2,000, but less than $10,000; and one misdemeanor for trespassing and unlawful entry into enclosed places. Police reported that Rogers hopped over the fence to enter the stadium. Rogers

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Howard's Rock in its place of honor in Clemson's Death Valley.

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JOURNAL NEWS

amorris@communityjournals.com South Carolinians who have health insurance could see a rebate coming to them over the next few weeks as a result of the Affordable Care Act’s Medical Loss Ratio, or the 80/20 rule. The rule requires insurers of individuals and small groups (50 people or fewer) to spend at least 80 cents of every dollar from premiums on patient care and quality improvement, according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Insurers of large groups (50 or more) are required to spend 85 cents per dollar. The insurance company must issue a rebate if more than 20 cents per dollar is spent on overhead, marketing or administration in a given year. Nationwide, the average rebate is around $100 per family, totaling $500 million, HHS reports. In South Carolina, the insured will receive roughly $6.2 million, or $70 per family on average, according to HHS data. Launched in 2011, the 80/20 rule has also influenced up-front premium costs for consumers, by requiring insurance

Consumer Savings Rise to $3.9 Billion Rebate in 2011

Rebate in 2012

Premium Savings in 2012 $3 ,9 44

$4,500 $4,000

$504

$3,000

$1 ,

$203

$4 0

0

9

3

$192 $980

2011 2012 Individual

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$0

$109

$1 ,1

$1 ,1

$1,000 $500

73

72

$1,500

$1 ,5 99

$2,000

09 3

$2,500

$3 9

Savings (in Millions)

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$970

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2011 2012 Large Group

2011 2012 All Markets

SOURCE: CENTERS FOR MEDICARE AND MEDICAID SERVICES

was released on a personal recognizance bond of $5,470. Clemson University Police Captain Eric Hendricks said in a statement that there is no direct affiliation between Rogers and Clemson University, but police found a Clemson paw on the truck and other Clemson memorabilia in Rogers’ home. The missing portion of Howard’s Rock that was chipped away was not found at the suspect’s home. Investigators will continue to search for the two or three other suspects police believe to be involved with

the vandalism. Police were unable to comment on the $5,000 reward for information because the investigation is still ongoing and reward is only given with conviction. Due to the tradition associated with Howard’s Rock, authorities continue to follow any leads and Hendricks stressed the importance of Clemson fans to not seek personal vengeance. Any information related to the case should be directed to the Clemson University Police Department. For more information, visit clemson.edu.

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JULY 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Restoring equality The Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act makes us equally responsible for the direction our country now takes. Change, even positive change, comes hard, and giving up the security of the federal pre-clearance the Voting Rights Act forced on nine states – South Carolina included – is a tough challenge for those who remember the racial discrimination that spawned it. Discrimination was pervasive at the ballot box when the VRA passed in 1965. South Carolina imposed literacy tests and other obstacles to black voting; only 37.3 percent of eligible blacks were registered to vote, compared to 75.7 percent of eligible whites. The numbers were even fewer elsewhere in the South. Only 7 percent of Mississippi’s black population had access to the ballot; in Alabama, the gap between white and black voters was 49.9 percent. The VRA erased all state-imposed obstacles, and to ensure the worst offenders didn’t re-impose them, Congress took the extraordinary step of requiring six Southern states (eventually nine) to pre-clear any election law changes with the U.S. Justice Department. Extraordinary is the right word, because it said in this regard, these states are no longer sovereign, to be treated equally with all other states, innocent until proven guilty. This was noble legislation, and profoundly necessary. But as the Supreme Court majority observed, once-necessary laws become unconstitutional when the facts that made them essential change so drastically the laws themselves become discriminatory. South Carolina now has 2.9 million registered voters, 80 percent of eligible whites and 79 percent of eligible blacks, according to the S.C. Election Commission. Mississippi has more black voters registered than whites. The gap between black and white voters in Alabama is now 0.9 percent, and Selma has a black mayor. This is an extraordinary reversal. As Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, the VRA “has proved immensely successful at redressing racial discrimination and integrating the voting process.” Yet, he noted, “despite the tradition of equal sovereignty,” Congress has neglected to revise the criteria that separated these states from the rest of the nation. “Those extraordinary and unprecedented features were reauthorized as if nothing had changed,” he wrote. This is why the court nullified the criteria – unless and until Congress devises a new formula based on “current data reflecting current needs.” The court is saying the VRA must recognize the changes of 48 years. The pre-clearance nine have earned the right to equal sovereignty. Note: The VRA is still law. Any state that practices electoral discrimination can be sued. Congress may still force pre-clearance on any state that manipulates election laws to discriminate. But the criteria for such an “extraordinary departure” from equal sovereignty must reflect the present, not the past. Note also: The present is not without problems – some by unintended consequence of the VRA’s noble goals. By requiring states to draw election districts that insured black voters were not drowned out, the VRA allowed politicians, black and white, to gerrymander districts that serve their party and re-election above all else, leading to the polarization that now cripples consensus and paralyzes progress. Too often, hyper-partisans rule to the detriment of the nation. In that, alas, we are all created equal.

Natural gas boosts sustainability It may have passed by quietly, but Piedmont Natural Gas earlier this month issued its second biennial Sustainability Report. If you speak to my 1,800 coworkers, they likely will define Piedmont’s sustainability story in a variety of terms and with different examples. They might mention carpooling on their commute and bringing lunch to work to avoid extra vehicle trips. Or they might talk about the green purchasing program we established in 2012, resulting in a significant increase in our use of recycled, remanufactured and other green office supplies. They may cite our goal to reduce our own carbon emissions by 5 percent by 2017 and the fact that in 2012, we successfully converted 126 vehicles in our fleet to lower-emission natural gas vehicles (NGVs), with plans to have 300 NGVs in use by 2014. They could point out that Piedmont’s approach to sustainability is not just about reducing our impact on the environment. It’s also about the social and economic impact we have, so we are just as focused on developing strong communities through support of educational and local nonprofit organizations in every market we serve. It’s about managing our business to create lasting value for customers, communities, employees and investors. Viewed through this lens, we count among our sustainable business practices the significant investments Piedmont is making in the safety and reliability of our pipeline system and new wellness programs that help employees identify and reduce health risk factors. The dramatic increase of domestic shale natural gas production over the past five years has added a new and exciting dimension to our sustainability story. With natural gas now representing 27 percent of the U.S. energy supply mix and retail rates approximately 30 percent lower than 2008 levels, we have a historic opportunity to extend the benefits of this cleaner, low-cost energy

IN MY OWN WORDS by TOM SKAINS

source to end users across industries and economic sectors. In 2012, we converted nearly 3,800 residential customers to natural gas from less efficient, higher-emission sources of energy. We’re working with corporate fleet owners to incorporate vehicles using low-cost, low-emission compressed natural gas (CNG) into their fleets. To bring CNG to more individual motorists and fleet owners, Piedmont is adding more CNG fueling stations in the Carolinas – including our recently opened Spartanburg station. In late May of this year, we completed construction of a pipeline that will deliver natural gas to a new power-generation plant in Wilmington, replacing coal as its fuel source. This is an event truly worth mentioning because for every kilowatt-hour of electricity generated by natural gas instead of coal, carbon emissions are reduced by about 44 percent. Now more than ever before, we are focused on embracing sustainability and increasing the impact our nation’s abundant supply of affordable natural gas is having on our environment and our economy. We are excited to share these stories because as the provider of natural gas to more than 1 million customers, we hope our communities can see that all our efforts, big or small, work toward one goal – to be responsible stewards of the families, communities and businesses we serve. Tom Skains is chairman, president and CEO of Charlotte-based Piedmont Natural Gas, which serves more than one million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Deadly force 'justified' CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

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A Greenville police officer’s use of lethal force in the shooting death of a 19-year-old man outside a downtown nightclub last November was justified, 13th Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins announced in a press conference Tuesday. Witnesses closest to the scene told State Law Enforcement Division investigators that two city police officers repeatedly ordered Senovio Maldonado to drop the baseball bat he had used to hit another man in the head, Wilkins said. Instead, Maldonado turned and moved toward the officers in an aggressive manner with the baseball bat above his shoulders. Maldonado was no more than six feet away from the officers when one of the officers fired two shots, killing him, Wilkins said. The second officer was bracing to shoot but did not fire because the other officer fired first. Just seconds passed between the orders to drop the bat and the shooting, Wilkins said. He said the shooting was justified because the officers believed their lives and the lives of others were in danger due to Maldonado’s “violent behavior.” “This is a tragedy,” Wilkins said. “This family lost a loved one. This was a father shot by officers. Nobody wins in this scenario.” Greenville Police Chief Teri Wilfong said the officers, whom she would not identify, are relieved with the decision. “They have had a very difficult time,” she said. Both have returned to active duty. David Armstrong, the attorney for Maldonado’s family, said they are disappointed with Wilkins’ ruling on the criminal side. He said the family will most likely file a claim and/or a lawsuit against the city. “We feel that clearly this is a case of excessive force,” he said. Armstrong said the officers had many tools available to them short of lethal force, including tasers and physically restraining the 5-foot, 5-inch man. “It is totally an unnecessary killing,” Armstrong said. According to police reports, Maldonado had been denied entrance to the Brown Street Jazz Club because he didn’t have an ID. After he drove out of a Brown Street parking lot, he brushed his car against two pedestrians. One of the pedestrians made a gesture toward the car and Maldonado exited the car with a dark-colored baseball bat, Wilkins said. Maldonado hit one of the pedestrians in the head with the bat.


JOURNAL NEWS

GHS mulls EMS takeover APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The possibility of Greenville Health System taking over Greenville County’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is being discussed between county officials and GHS representatives, according to County Council Chairman Bob Taylor. Taylor said this week that County Administrator Joe Kernell had been talking with the healthcare provider about the potential of a takeover, but “nothing is certain.” The subject was raised about a year ago, but no official action has been taken, said Taylor. “It makes sense, it’s a medical service,” he said. The county already has a relationship with GHS through the jail at the law enforcement center, he added, and there are efficiencies that could be realized as a result of an expanded partnership. Greenville County EMS has improved on its income and fee collections, he said, and has kept fees in line with Medicare standards. Whether a GHS takeover would involve a change in fees to patients is unclear. The EMS department comprised $15.6 million of the county budget in the 2012-2103 fiscal year and employs about 200 people, said county spokesperson Bob Mihalic. Council member H.G. “Butch” Kirven said that there was talk about a takeover when he served as council chair that grew out of Kernell’s ongoing attempts to improve government efficiency. St. Francis had also been included, he said. The county EMS department is not struggling, he said, but if viewed as a business, it loses about $4 million each year, making it a good target for efficiency efforts. Dr. Angelo Sinopoli, GHS vice president for clinical integration, said the

health system has partnered with Greenville County EMS on several projects to improve patient outcomes and efficiency of care. “Through innovative first-responder protocols, education/training programs and now our community care outreach grant, we have learned that partnering together to care for patients can produce better clinical outcomes,” he said. “We are constantly looking for ways to work together and closer align our healthcare services to better serve the community,” he said. “Should the opportunity come forward to more closely align with Greenville County EMS, we would look favorably upon such a recommendation.” Asked where this leaves Bon Secours St. Francis, the other major healthcare provider in the area, Taylor said patients may already designate which hospital they wish to be transported to, creating an automatic safeguard against a GHS monopoly. Asked if GHS would be the default choice if patients were unaware of the option to designate, Taylor said he didn’t know. Kirven said the county would not enter into an agreement that would leave GHS with a monopoly. Johnna Reed, Bon Secours St. Francis’ vice president for business development, said St. Francis supports Greenville County in evaluating options for cost-effective EMS services and “would expect to be at the table for any discussions that affect the choices for our patients.” When asked if St. Francis would also be interested in taking over EMS, Reed said, “Bon Secours has always been interested in a shared model for medical control and is eager to engage in dialogue regarding solutions and options that address the growing cost of EMS. We welcome the opportunity to participate in any future solutions.”

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Multiple solutions for your hearing needs Police officers who were conducting a traffic stop nearby noticed the altercation and ran toward Maldonado with their weapons drawn, ordering him to stop and drop the bat. When he refused and advanced aggressively, the officer fired. Wilkins said Maldonado’s blood alcohol level was 0.14 and he had “other substances” in his system. Wilkins said SLED determined Maldonado had been drinking prior to going downtown and had gone to a number of establishments while there. SLED interviewed several witnesses – some multiple times – during the investigation, he said.

Wilkins said witnesses closest to the incident – the pedestrians, the officers and two people who were exiting the Brown Street Jazz Club – had the same accounts of the incident. Some witnesses in the smoking area of DT’s Tavern about 50 yards away said Maldonado had put the bat down. Wilkins said because it was dark and the tavern witnesses were furthest away, he gave more weight to the witnesses closest to the shooting. He said there was no video of the shooting, although one witness made a cellphone recording after the shots were fired.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Conquering the AT Hayne Hipp “just couldn’t back out” of hiking the entire Appalachian Trail SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com In this, his seventh decade of life, Hayne Hipp can look back on a wildly successful business career. He was CEO of Greenville’s Liberty Corporation from 1979-2006 and is the founder of the Liberty Fellowship, a philanthropic leadership incubator created in partnership with Wofford College and the Aspen Institute. Other titles that would burnish any resume include former chairman of the Peace Center, Director Emeritus of SCANA Corp., trustee of the Aspen Institute and former chairman of the S.C. Chamber of Commerce. He also holds an MBA from the Wharton Graduate School of Business and completed additional studies at Harvard University. So why does a successful businessman and entrepreneur decide to hike the entire 2,184 miles of the Appalachian Trail? Because he said he would.

First steps of a long hike Hipp says he caught the hiking bug back in the 1970s and ’80s, hitting trails in the Northwest with a small group of friends. Time passed and as life began to change after selling Liberty Corp., he began telling people he was going to hike the Appalachian Trail. Finally, he says, it got to the point where “I had told too many people I was going to do it and just couldn’t back out.” Hipp brings a long view to every challenge. He sees Liberty Fellowship, for example, as his way of ensuring Greenville and South Carolina tap the brightest talents for business leaders of the future. He considers himself lucky to be in a position to give to the community, invest in future leaders and “break down the silos of arrogance so they can have civil discussions.” He brings the same passion to his six-year assault on the AT. Hipp began hiking the trail on a Thursday morning, March 6, 2007, when he was 67 years old. The initial plan, he recalls, was to spend three weeks on the trail, going from Georgia into Tennessee. He and three companions started out at Springer Mountain, Ga., the southern entrance to the AT. On the second night, as they were coming through Neels Gap and down Blood Mountain with a view to spending the night in a hotel, Hipp slipped and severed the quad tendon in his knee, ending his journey as quickly as it had begun.

Boots back on the trail Hipp acknowledges many people would have given up on the trail at that point, but he was more determined than ever. He adjusted his plan to tackle the trail as a section hiker instead, breaking the whole trail into smaller segments. Hipp gave his knee time to heal and picked back up the hike, tackling Georgia and North Carolina sections in fall 2007. In late summer 2008, he set out again to tackle what’s considered the most difficult and rugged portion of the trail: the 100-Mile Wilderness in New Hampshire and Maine. Day one, he and his companions hiked in and made camp. Day two, Hipp slipped and soaked his boots crossing a river. When the group made camp that evening, one of the

10 THE JOURNAL | JULY 5, 2013

PHOTOS PROVIDED

guys propped the boots next to the campfire to dry out. Hipp quickly learned that boots are oil-based and catch fire rapidly. “They looked like two Roman candles going off,” he laughed. Hipp knew he was in trouble. AT hikers travel light and he didn’t have a backup pair. One of his group approached some other hikers farther down the trail and offered “an outrageous sum of money” to buy a pair of boots from them. They said no. Next day, Hipp returned to the trail wearing a borrowed pair of Teva sandals, knowing he couldn’t hike another three days over tree roots and rocks in those. Coming to a house by a lake, the resourceful Hipp commandeered a phone, called in a plane and flew to the nearest town to buy a pair of boots. Then he caught a ride back to the trail. That adventure earned him his trail name

– “Reboot.”

Delight, surprises along the way Over the next several years, Hipp hiked many more portions of the trail, varying from short, three-day jaunts to two-week hikes, but most were “around four-seven days, covering eight to 22 miles, depending on the terrain,” he says. Hipp had no problem inviting himself along anytime he would hear of someone doing an AT portion he hadn’t covered yet and enlisting friends and family to accompany him. Hipp says part of the fun has been the many different people he has hiked with. “When you’re on the trail, you push aside all differences and really focus on the positives that each person brings,” he said. “I’ve hiked with about 20 different people and I can’t think of one that wasn’t an absolute delight to be with.” For all his time on the trail, Hipp says he never really came across anything too unusual – with one exception. In 2011, Hipp was doing a five-day hike by himself in Tennessee. As he rounded a bend, he came across a young woman lying on the trail sunbathing in the nude. Hipp

says he was a gentleman and averted his eyes. He’s seen plenty of turkey, deer and birds, but never ran into a mountain lion or bear. He and his wife, Anna Kate, recently finished the portions of the trail in New Jersey, Connecticut and New York. Both are pilots, which has enabled Hipp to get to and from the trail easier than flying commercial flights and dealing with all of the hassle, baggage restrictions and timing, he says.

22 miles to go On June 20, Hipp and his son, Reid, left to complete the 98 miles still left in Pennsylvania. This leaves only about 22 miles to go in Maryland, and his journey will be complete. Hipp and his wife plan to complete the AT together at Harpers Ferry, W.V., the midpoint of the AT, in mid-July. Looking back, Anna Kate Hipp says she didn’t think he was crazy, but she honestly did wonder if her husband was “really serious about hiking the entire 2,184 miles of the AT.” Now, after hiking about 15 percent of the trail with him “and traveling thousands of miles from Georgia to Maine, I knew  this project would be an obsession until completed,” she said. “This is the most focused I have seen Hayne in the 50 years we have been married. Now I am worried about what he is going to tackle next.” Finishing the trail won’t be the end of the AT, Hipp says. He plans to re-hike favorite sections of the trail. “Hiking becomes addictive,” he said, and he loves planning the hikes. Being on the trail also provides “a time of reflection and deeper thought that you just can’t get anywhere else.” At 73, Hipp won’t be the oldest section-hiker to complete the AT – that honor goes to a gentleman (name unknown) who reportedly completed the hike in 1975 at the age of 86. Even so, “Reboot” will still have another significant accomplishment under his belt. “It’s been an adventure,” he says.


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Good to Go mobile farmers market visits underserved neighborhoods amorris@communityjournals.com

Summer produce is coming into season and the peaches are sweet, the squash savory and the tomatoes tangy. But what if you live in an area where there’s little access to farm-fresh produce? Mill Village Farms, an Upstate organization that oversees several small urban farms, has partnered with Loaves and Fishes food bank to launch a new mobile farmers market that will stop in underserved areas. GOOD TO GO continued on PAGE 12

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Workers pull up to a stop and have the market ready in about 15 minutes, he said. Good to Go is a market that travels to the Because local teens, ages 13-18, work Greater Sullivan and West Greenville ar- at Mill Village Farms and staff the mobile eas to offer everything from blueberries to market, many neighbors have been eager to bread for residents who don’t have access to buy from them. fresh, healthy food. “The neighborhood wants to support the The converted Loaves and Fishes refrig- local youth,” Weidenbenner said. The teens erated truck started service on June 22 and are hired by the farm, work to grow the crops attracted more than and “learn agriculture and entrepreneurial 100 people, said skills along the way,” he said. Dan WeidenIn addition to produce grown at Mill benner, Mill Village Farms, the market offers some Village Farms out-of-season produce, like bananas, director. that is often found in the grocery store, Weidenbenner said. Both neighborhoods requested the mobile market and others are interested, he said. By the next summer season, organizers hope to launch an expanded radius and Good to Go will be stopping next at: full-time schedule for Good to Go to include stops on multiple JULY 6 & 20 – 8:30-11:30 a.m. Greater Sullivan days and more neighborhoods and businesses, he added. Noon-3 p.m. – West Greenville Mill Village Farms currently goodtogogreenville.org partners with the Sullivan Street Farm on Bolt Street and 864-214-6709 Mills Mill Farm off Mills Avenue in Greenville, as well as a rural farm, 52-acre Serenity Farm off Saluda Dam Road. With the addition of the larger Serenity Farm, Good to Go will be able to offer fresh eggs later in the season, Weidenbenner said. Good to Go will also be participating in various special events throughout the GOOD TO GO continued from PAGE 11

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season, including First Fridays along Pendleton Street with other local food trucks, he said.

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Year of Altruism will be ‘powered by humanity’

Mackey isX Community

More than 70 organizations to participate

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APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com In August, the city of Greenville will launch a yearlong mission to inspire what organizers are calling “a movement powered by humanity.” This “Year of Altruism” is precipitated by the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, which is widely considered the beginning of the Holocaust, organizers announced at a press conference last week. Between August and June 2014, more than 70 organizations will host and present events from gospel concerts to lecture series to highlight altruism in the Upstate, said Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness, programming director of the Year of Altruism. Nearly five years ago, the Upstate marked the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht with a communitywide event that anticipated 250 and attracted 800 people. Rabbi Marc Wilson said that event focused on the brutality of humanity demonstrated Nov. 9, 1938, when police stood by while dozens of Jews were killed and more than 7,000 Jewish businesses, homes and synagogues were destroyed. Five years later, the Year of Altruism will revolve around what can be learned from that atrocity and highlight the positive, Wilson said. Trude Heller, who escaped from Nazioccupied Austria 70 years ago and “was hiding” during Kristallnacht, will speak several times during the yearlong commemoration. Heller said she speaks often about her experiences and her main subject is her conviction that “hate brings on hate.” How the Holocaust could happen remains a mystery, even after all these years, Heller said. “We have to find what caused this. Nobody knows what caused this. How the people who were the most intelligent in the world could go with it.” The yearlong events will feature unity and diversity, bringing community members together, said Wilson, who worked on initial planning with Robert St. Claire. Wilson said the community response has been strongly positive, and it wasn’t coincidence, but providence, that brought all the partners together. A highlight of the year will be “An Evening with Elie Wiesel,” Nobel Peace Laureate and author of “Night,” which recounts Wiesel’s personal experience in Hitler’s concentration camps. Tickets for

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the Oct. 1 performance are available now. Another highlight will be a community event on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, which will feature a mass choir, Wilson said. The Greenville Symphony Orchestra will present “Ashes to Rebirth” on the anniversary of Kristallnacht on Nov. 9. Duo Amal, an Israeli and Palestinian piano duo, will perform on Nov. 10. Other events include theatre presentations, exhibits, lectures, performances, essay contests and opportunities for service, said Tollison. Service and self-sacrifice is the point of the entire year, said Greenville City Councilwoman and steering committee member Lillian Brock Flemming. “We desire to move altruism from just a wonderful thought and a wonderful concept, from simply ethical theory to many living activities that regard the good of all people.” Steering committee member Minor Shaw said the Greenville community is already known for its philanthropy, and “this great support (of local organizations) shows that Greenville is an accepting and progressive community embracing kindness, compassion and idealism. The Year of Altruism will only make those values stronger.” Wilson said he is contacted daily by organizations interested in participating, so the Year of Altruism will continue to grow and expand over the coming months. The events kick off on Aug. 19 with an opening convocation featuring Congressman James Clyburn.

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The fireworks display at the City of Greenville’s Red, White and Blue Festival on July 4 is one of the largest in South Carolina. Lasting about 20 minutes, the performance is choreographed by Pyro Shows of La Follotte, Tenn., to music simulcast over radio station WESC 92.5 FM. Prepping for a show this finely orchestrated is no easy task. Lansden Hill Jr., Pyro Shows’ CEO, began his career with fireworks in 1969 and founded Pyro Shows in 1986. He has executed shows with cost varying from $3,000-$300,000, depending on the amount and size of the fireworks. Hill says choosing which fireworks to use greatly depends on the physical location of the show. Typically, 90 percent of the fireworks used by companies like his “are made outside the United States because the ones made here cost 10 times more,” he said “The fireworks made in the United States are usually better quality, but most of these are reserved for closeproximity showcases, such as arenas and concert stages.” Fireworks come in various sizes, but professional fireworks are measured based on the diameter of the mortar (the device the projectile shoots out of) and range anywhere from three to 12 inches. “This diameter multiplied by 100 feet will tell you the altitude the projectiles will reach,” Hill said. “For example, the 10inch will reach 1,000 feet and the 12-inch will reach a quarter mile in the air coming out of the mortar at over 200 miles per hour.” That kind of power can do a lot of dam-

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age in inexperienced hands, Hill said. “Commercial fireworks are beautiful and exciting, but people must remember they can be dangerous if people do not follow proper rules and regulations.” Every year, thousands of people are hurt due to improper uses of fireworks, he said. Commercial-grade fireworks are dangerous and closely regulated. Most regulations deal with transportation and storage, he said, but almost half the states in the U.S. have their own certification requirement to be able to purchase and use professional grade fireworks. Furthermore, most cities have their own regulations for fireworks events, he said. “To plan each event, we have to look at the specific regulations of each city and have multiple meetings with the local fire marshals.” Once the marshals sign off on the plan, the crew begins to set up for the show. Depending on the price, fireworks shows vary from hand-lit firework performances all the way to up to computer-controlled shows. “Computer-controlled shows allow for the fireworks to appear very choreographed and for multiple fireworks to be shot simultaneously,” said Hill. Computerized programs combine lighting, music and other effects with the fireworks to create a truly spectacular show, he said. Greenville’s show is choreographed to music simulcast on a local radio station. “We will perform rain or shine,” Hill said. “We can shoot off fireworks in weather that is worse than what spectators would ever go outside in. If the world hasn’t fallen apart by 9:45 p.m. on the Fourth of July, there will be fireworks.”

In 2011, fireworks caused estimated 17,800-reported fires, including 1,200 total structure fires, 400 vehicle fires, and 16,300 outside and other fires. These fires resulted in an estimated eight reported civilian deaths, 40 civilian injuries and $32 million in direct property damage. In 2011, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 9,600 people for fireworks-related injuries; 61 percent of 2010 emergency room fireworks-related injuries were to the extremities and 34 percent were to the head.

The risk of fireworks injury was highest for children ages 5-19, and adults 25-44. On Independence Day in a typical year, far more U.S. fires are reported than on any other day, and fireworks account for two out of five of those fires, more than any other cause of fires. Source: National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA)


journal community

Summer hunger

Mackey is Compassion X

Food distribution organizations need extra help in warm months

sinc e

1 8 7 2

CYNTHIA PARTRIDGE | CONTRIBUTOR

In the United States, 19 million children rely on free and reduced meals received during the school year. Five out of six children, however, do not get free summer meals, according to the Food Research and Action Center. “While there is often an abundance of donations during the winter holiday season, we see food donations taper off in the summer months, when the need is greatest,” says Paulette Dunn, executive director of Loaves & Fishes, an Upstate nonprofit that distributes donated food to other local agencies. This summer, Loaves & Fishes is spearheading local food drives, picking up collected nonperishable items, and delivering them to its partner social service agencies throughout Greenville County at no cost to the agencies or the people they serve. Loaves & Fishes isn’t the only organization providing assistance this summer. United Ministries offers four programs that address the root causes of poverty, homelessness and unemployment, which can help alleviate hunger. The organization assists hundreds of families each month. United Ministries’ programs include Place of Hope, which focuses on services for couples such as laundry and showers with counseling and case management to meet basic needs, and Emergency Assis-

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If you or your business would like to organize a canned food drive, contact Loaves & Fishes at 864-232-3595 or visit loavesandfishesgreenville.org. For more information on United Ministries, call 864-2326463 or visit united-ministries.org. If you’d like to volunteer or learn more about the homeless in Greenville while doing hands-on service, call Kathy Sharp at 864-233-8020, ext. 200.

tance, which provides rent, utilities and food in high-stress times. An Adult Education program allows students to take control of their future and Employment Readiness assists qualified participants in finding and obtaining a job. Providing spiritual nourishment as well as addressing physical needs, the Triune Mercy Center holds worship on Sundays from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. The service is nondenominational and attracts the diverse population of Greenville to its church. Alongside spiritual guidance, the Triune Mercy Center provides the community with a soup kitchen, clothes closets, food pantry, laundry services, a parish nurse and mental health worker.

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Camp helps kids understand pets photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

A cat looks out from its cage at Animal Care. Animal Care has summer camps for those interested in working with animals. CYNTHIA PARTRIDGE | CONTRIBUTOR

Ever wanted to adopt a pet, but been hesitant because you were worried about your child interacting with a new animal? Greenville Animal Care is now offering a summer camp to help children better understand how to handle household pets. Camp Animal Care is for rising fourththrough sixth-graders and is designed to teach kids the importance of animals, give ideas on how to help animals at the shelter and create future volunteers. A successful summer camp at the

Spartanburg Humane Society was the inspiration for a similar program at Greenville Animal Care. “Our goal is that we introduce younger children to how they as a community member can help homeless animals as well as their own. We want children to get excited about giving back and serve as volunteers in the future,” said Shelly Simmons with Greenville Animal Care. The camp will be held in two sessions, July 2225 and July 29-Aug. 1. The cost for the four-day camp includes include two camp T-shirts, healthy snacks and supplies to make projects. Each day will have a career speaker, service project, craft, music, interaction with animals and tours based on that day’s theme: Pet Care, Pet Health, Living with Your Furry Friend and Second Chance Day. In Pet Care with a dog groomer, campers learn basic tips on grooming and interacting with their animals. The second day features Pet Health and focuses on the importance of proper veterinarian care. Campers also talk with veterinarians and learn what their job entails inside the shelter. Learning how to understand your pet and training demonstrations are the focus of Living with Your Furry Friend. The session also explains pet behavior. And on Second Chance Day, campers learn how animals come into animal shelters and need a second chance. This day specifically focuses on adoption and how to raise funds for Second Chance animals.

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Camp animal care July 22-25 or July 29-Aug. 1 Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-1p.m. For rising fourth- through sixth-graders $125 including snacks and supplies greenvillecounty.org/acs facebook.com/gcanimalcare

STEM support from Clemson The Clemson University Center for Workforce Development has awarded 36 school districts or institutions and nine technical colleges a total of $450,000 for workforce development initiatives. The school districts will share $175,000 and the technical colleges $275,000 to support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs. In March, the Workforce Development Center held a series of workshops where educators with a focus on STEM education learned how to apply for monetary awards to further their programs. The Duke Energy Foundation helped to fund the initiative with a $4.1 million grant. Greenville County Schools and Greenville Technical College were both funded.

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Splash n’ Dash, a multi-sport competition for kids ages 3-16 including a pool swim and cross country run, will take place July 20 at the Caine Halter Family YMCA and Aug. 3 at the GHS Family YMCA. Cost is $15 per person, per event. For details, visit ghs.org/splashndash.

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COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Ten Thousand Villages and Fair Trade Greenville are holding a Fair Trade Beach Party on July 9, 6-7:30 p.m., at Ten Thousand Villages on Augusta Road. The event will kick off the campaign to have Greenville designated a “Fair Trade Town.” Attendees can get a scoop of a giant, 10-foot long banana split, featuring Ben & Jerry’s fair trade ice cream and toppings from Whole Foods. There will also be games, music, discounts, door prizes and frozen drinks. For more information, call 864-239-4120. Greenville Natural Health Center is hosting a Healthy Lifestyle Summer Seminar Series led by Dr. Marina Ponton, Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. Seminars include a 30-minute presentation starting at 6 p.m., followed by a question-andanswer session, and samples giveaways. Seminar topics are July 9: A Guide for Healthy Skin and Hair, and July 23: Power Over PMS. All seminars will be held at Greenville Natural Health Center, 1901 Laurens Road, Greenville. There is no charge to attend, but seating is limited. Reserve a seat by calling 864-370-1140 or emailing info@greenvillenaturalhealth.com. On July 8 from 6:30-8 p.m. the South Carolina Dialogue Foundation will host a pre-Ramadan dinner at 12 Davis Keats Drive in Greenville. For more information contact Christina Bell at 864-991-8089 or cbell@scdialogue.org. Visit Historic Price House near Woodruff on July 6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., for Sweets & Treats in Early America and taste a variety of goodies enjoyed by the Prices, their slaves and other Americans in the early 1800s. Admission is $6 for adults, $4 for ages 5-17, and free for ages 4 and under. Price House is located several miles east of Woodruff at 1200 Oakview Farms Road, Woodruff. For more information, email pricehouse@spartanburghistory.org or call 864-576-6546. Marsha Wallace, founder of Dining for Women, will discuss changing the world one dinner at a time at the July 8 meeting of Democratic Women of Greenville County. Dining for Women empowers women and girls living in extreme poverty in the developing world. The meeting will be held at Runway Café, 21 Airport Road, Greenville, at 5:30 p.m. Reservations are required for dinner and can be made by calling 864-2325531 or emailing headquarters@greenvilledemocrats.com. The cost of the buffet dinner is $15 and guests are welcome to attend. BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina’s South Carolina BLUE store has scheduled free community events in July geared to health, wellness and understanding insurance. Events are held 6-7 p.m. and include Insurance 101 on July 9, Healthy Cooking on July 16, and Weighing Your Options on July 29. Registration is available under events at SCBlueRetailCenters.com. All events are hosted in the seminar room at 1025 Woodruff Road, Suite A105, in Magnolia Park. The Greenville Health System will host an event entitled “Know Your Numbers: Understanding Cholesterol” on July 12 at 12:30 p.m. and July 19 at 8:30 a.m. at the Greenville Health System’s Life Center. The event is free, but registration is required. To register, call 455-5173.

GR EEN V IL L E ’ S mane e v e n t Friday, august 2, 2013 | 6:00-9:00pm Zoo-B-Que: The first-ever barbeque tasting at the Greenville Zoo. With local vendors, live music and of course, all your favorite zoo animals, Zoo-B-Que is sure to become Greenville’s “mane” event! Proceeds will benefit the construction and implementation of the Lion’s Den—something to “roar” about.

The Greenville Health System will host a class entitled “More than Fat” in its Life Center on July 15 at 8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. The class is free, but registration is required. To register, call 455-4010. St. Francis Downtown recently received the American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline Gold Receiving Center Quality Achievement Award. The award recognizes Bon Secours St. Francis’ commitment and success in implementing the highest standard of care for heart attack patients. As a “STEMI Receiving Hospital,” St. Francis Downtown meets high standards of performance in quick and appropriate treatment of STEMI patients to open the blocked artery.

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the good

events that make our community better

Safe Harbor’s Cycle Tour raised $31,000 for victims of domestic violence and their families. The bicycle event had a record number of 309 riders and featured the youngest rider who was 4 years old. Safe Harbor helps victims of domestic violence, providing safe emergency shelter, counseling, legal advocacy and community outreach and education in Greenville, Pickens, Anderson and Oconee counties. Additionally, a capital campaign is underway to raise funds for a shelter in Oconee County for victims. For more information, visit safeharborsc.org. The American Cancer Society presents the Summer Idol fundraiser on July 27 at 5 p.m. at The Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities in Greenville. The competition will feature three separate competitions divided by age: Youth Competition, up to age 17, Adult Competition, age 18 and up, and Group Competition for 3-5 people. Funds raised benefit the American Cancer Society. Due to limited time, space and availability, musical performances are restricted to solos, duets, a cappella, choirs or groups with minor accompaniment. Cost is $15 for youth 17 and younger and $20 for those 18 and older. For more information, call 864-627-1903 or visit summeridol2. eventbrite.com or facebook.com/2ndAnnualSummerIdol. Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative’s annual event, Blue Ridge Fest, raised a total of $183,000 to benefit local nonprofit organizations in Greenville, Anderson, Oconee and Pickens counties. The festival also attracted more than 6,000 attendees, the largest number to date. This year, each beneficiary will receive a total of $13,000 in fundPictured from left are: Jane Daniel, director of donor relations ing. Beneficiaries include for Harvest Hope Food Bank; Charles Dalton, CEO of Blue Harvest Hope Food Bank, Ridge Electric Cooperative Inc. and Blue Ridge Security Hidden Treasure ChrisSystems; and Stephen Frey, government relations and grants tian School, Sabrina House manager for Harvest Hope Food Bank. Children’s Charity, Anderson Free Clinic, Foothills Alliance, Arc of the Tribble Center, Dot’s Kitchen, Rosa Clark Medical Clinic Association, SHARE, Feed a Hungry Child, Mary’s House, Samaritan Health Clinic of Pickens and United Christian Ministries of Greenville. Faces and Voices of Recovery (FAVOR) Greenville recently announced the success of its first Recovery Coach Training, a five-day educational program designed for individuals willing to serve as volunteer FAVOR Greenville Recovery Coaches. The intensive 40-hour training was held in June at the new FAVOR Greenville Center on Woodruff Road. Twenty-four volunteers completed the training, providing the Greenville community with a new support system for those seeking recovery from substance use disorders. Candidates were selected for participation based on their personal recovery experience or family recovery experience, their willingness to volunteer for the FAVOR Greenville Center and their commitment to continuing education and supervision. For more information, visit favorgreenville.org. Bojangles’ recently announced it raised $42,018 during May’s Teacher Appreciation Month in-store fundraiser for South Carolina Future Minds, a statewide nonprofit dedicated to supporting teachers and public education. Bojangles’ also provided all South Carolina teachers a Bojangles’ promotional gift card with a “secret” value of anywhere from $1 to $100.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


Journal culture

Dressing the

PART(s)

PHOTO BY JEREMY DANIEL

(Left to right) Jason Kappus, Nick Cosgrove, Nicolas Dromard, Brandon Andrus and the company of “Jersey Boys.”

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Cast members in “Jersey Boys” are masters of the quick-change. They have to be. The four main characters – playing Frankie Valli, Bob Gaudio, Tommy DeVito

R AC 6 .7

O EL

and Nick Massi – wear 48 different costumes between them. Ten other actors and actresses play 108 different parts. Sometimes they have mere seconds to change between characters or costumes. “Jersey Boys” tells the story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, four blue-collar kids from – you guessed it – New Jersey who became one of the greatest successes in pop music history. The group wrote their own songs, invented their own sound and sold 175 million records worldwide – all before

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they were 30. Their hits include “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Sherry,” “Walk Like a Man,” “Oh, What A Night,” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You.” The production tells a story that spans four decades. Since names can’t be written on costume labels, each actor in the show is assigned a number. Each costume also has a number based on the order in which the actor will wear it. Every outfit is placed in the same location off-stage every night, so the actors and their assistant dressers don’t have to look for a certain tie, shirt or dress for a certain scene.

JERSEY BOYS continued on page 20

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“It’s a matter of organization,” said Sandra Hanlon-Cressler, the show’s wardrobe manager. Cressler has 24 years experience at the job, and keeping “Jersey Boys” looking the same as the clothes designers in New York envisioned is her responsibility. Hanlon-Cressler said she will teach local stagehands the cues signaling when each costume is needed. There’s a person to do shoe repair. A local hire will iron all of the men’s shirts. Tailors and seamstresses will be hired to repair costumes during the

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JULY 5, 2013 | The Journal 19


JOURNAL CULTURE

JERSEY BOYS

JERSEY BOYS continued from PAGE 19

S O Y O U K N O W: WHAT: “Jersey Boys” WHEN: July 10-21 WHERE: Peace Center TICKETS: $55-$85 INFORMATION: 864-467-3000 or peacecenter.org NOTE: “Jersey Boys” contains smoke, gunshots, strobe lights, drug references, sexual situations and authentic “profane Jersey language” and is not recommended for children under the age of 12.

BY THE NUMBERS

1 2.4

gallon of detergent used each week for cleaning costumes

PHOTO BY JEREMY DANIEL

show’s Greenville stay. Wigs and frequent costume changes are the way the show’s three female cast members can play all of the show’s 54 different female characters, who range from a record executive to a waitress to a television producer to old ladies. “The coolest thing is all of them are real people,” said Marlana Dunn, who plays Mary Delgado, Frankie Valli’s first wife. “These are actual real people who were in the lives of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons.” Each of the actresses has a wig master to help ensure they are wearing the hair of the correct character. Dunn’s quickest costume change is nine seconds, when she goes from one of the girl angels in the “Boyfriend’s Back” scene into a quick scene of Mary Delgado with the guys. During “Boyfriend’s Back,” Dunn’s dress is unbuttoned while she is in the car (unbeknownst to the audience) to facilitate the change. “I run off the stage to the wing and change into Mary’s robe, have a second to catch my breath and come back on the

(Left to right) Brandon Andrus, Nick Cosgrove, Jason Kappus and Nicolas Dromard.

stage yelling at the guys,” she said. “The quick nature of the change helps get me into character and the business of the scene.” Some changes are done in quick-change booths, spaces about the size of a closet. “I just stand there with my arms out. One dress comes off and the other goes on,” she said. Costumes are quick-rigged. A shoe hook looks like a buckle. A shirt doesn’t button, it is Velcroed shut. Dunn plays 12 characters. She said she doesn’t have a problem remembering which is which because of the costume changes. “The best thing about it is when you put on the costume, there’s no doubt which character you’re playing,” she said. The deception is so good that many audience members don’t realize there are only three females in the cast until the curtain call, she said. Jason Kappus, who plays Gaudio, said the many costume changes – his quickest takes six seconds and he’s off the stage for 15 seconds – “really helps you move through time. You go through the different seasons in the play as the color schemes of the costumes change. The palette of color helps inform the audience.”

Kappus said he moved to New York in 2010 and was blown away by “Jersey Boys” as an audience member. He decided then he wanted to be in the show and that Gaudio would be the character best for him to portray. “He’s the tallest of the four, he plays the piano and he’s less Italian looking than the other three,” Kappus said, “and all of those three things are me.” The most challenging part of the role for him is the vocal demands. While the Frankie character sings the highest notes, Kappus sings the second part down. “That’s still singing pretty high, and it’s 32 songs a night,” he said. “I had a chance to see Frankie Valli in Atlantic City and he said Bob said they could never do what we do, 32 songs a show, eight shows a week.” Dunn joined “Jersey Boys” in February. She first saw the show three years ago. Her best friend was in it. “It’s the music I grew up with,” she said. “By the finale, I was crying and smiling from ear to ear. I said aloud, ‘I will be in that show.’ And I am. And every single night when I go out for the finale, I still get chills.” “Jersey Boys” runs July 10 through July 21.

miles walked or run by one of the show’s dressers during a day, including pre-show duties, working the show and post-show work

5 9

hours spent per week hand-beading repairs to the show’s “Snowflake” dresses

seconds for Mary Delgado character to get out of the car and change into her robe for “My Eyes Adored You,” the quickest costume change in the show

19

17

most parts played by a single actor

actors

52

87 196

members of the traveling company

number of shoes used in one performance total costumes/ looks in the show

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journal culture

Mumford and Sons’ ticketing deters scalping JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com Scalpers beware: English folk-rock band Mumford and Sons are doing everything possible to keep ticket sales honest in the Upstate. The band, set to take the stage Sept. 11 at the Charter Amphitheatre as part of their Full English American Tour, is requiring fans to register online to receive an invitation to purchase tickets, starting on July 8. Mumford and Sons, best known for their song “I Will Wait,” won the 2013 Album of the Year Grammy Award. While pre-registering to purchase tickets seems new, the BI-LO Center has seen it before. Director of Sales and Marketing Rik Knopp said when they booked Mumford and Sons, staff members recalled “that this type of ticket selling has happened before. I haven’t seen it in the two years that I have been working at the BI-LO Center, but I believe it was Phish who last did ticket sales this way.” Knopp said this approach to ticket sales helps avoid scalping. “There are a variety of ways that bands and management try to avoid having fake tickets on the market, as well as limiting the

Mumford and Sons are scheduled to play the Charter Amphitheatre on Sept. 11.

amount of real tickets each person can purchase,” he said. The band has imposed a cap of four tickets per registration. Tickets are $50 for the pavilion and $35 for the lawn. All tickets are general admission and standing room only, meaning that no chairs or blankets will be allowed to be brought in. Mumford and Sons sold out its three-

night stint at the Greek Theatre in Berkeley, Calif., “within minutes,” said Jim Harrington of Mercury News. “That’s about 26,000 tickets, yet didn’t satisfy public demand.” Fellow English bands Bear’s Den and The Vaccines also will be performing. For more information, visit charteramphitheatre. com or mumfordandsons.com.

Pottery Palooza hits Spartanburg West Main Artists Co-op, located at 578 W. Main St. in Spartanburg, will host its second annual Pottery Palooza, a ceramics show and sale featuring 14 co-op artists from July 18-Aug. 10. This exhibit will feature functional stoneware pottery, along with decorative and sculptural work and miniatures. The opening reception will be on July 18, 5-9 p.m., during Spartanburg’s Art Walk. The public is invited and refreshments will be served. The co-op’s regular hours will be extended for this show to also include July 19-20, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The show may also be seen during regular business hours on Thursdays and Fridays from 3-6 p.m. and on Saturdays from 10 a.m.4 p.m., or by appointment. For more information, call 864-804-650 or visit westmainartists.org.

Photo: Chris Callis

The true story musical phenomenon that takes you behind the music of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons.

July 10-21

THE PEACE CENTER

864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 | peacecenter.org

Original Cast Recording On

www.JerseyBoysTour.com JULY 5, 2013 | The Journal 21


journal culture

A r t s Calendar j u ly 5 - 1 1 Main Street Fridays The Derrick Dorsey Band Jul. 5 ~ 232-2273 Greenville Shakespeare Company Comedy of Errors Jul. 5-22 ~ 770-1372 Peace Center Harry Connick, Jr. Jul. 6 ~ 467-3000 Reedy River Concerts Most Wanted Band Jul. 10 ~ 232-2273 Peace Center Jersey Boys Jul. 10-21 ~ 467-3000 Downtown Alive The Wheresville Project Jul. 11 ~ 232-2273 Furman Music by the Lake The Kings of Swing Jul. 11 ~ 294-2086 Centre Stage Next to Normal Jul. 11-27 ~ 232-6733 Upstate Shakespeare Festival The Comedy of Errors Jul. 11-Aug. 4 ~ 235-6948 Metropolitan Arts Council Flat Out Under Pressure 2013 Exhibit Through Jul. 12 ~ 467-3132 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Artists of 10 Central Avenue Studios Through Jul. 12 ~ 242-1050 The Blood Connection Works by Bruce Schlein & Alan Weinberg Through Aug. 14 ~ 255-5000 Metropolitan Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Garland Mattox Through Aug. 19 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Landscapes from the Southern Collection Through Sep. 8 ~ 271-7570 Wyeth vs. Through Sep. 22 ~ 271-7570

listen up

best bets for local live music 7 / 5 , M a i n S t r e e t F r i d ay s

Derrick Dorsey Band Country/rock/soul party. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ MainStFridays.aspx 7/5, Radio Room

Megan Jean & The KFB Hard-driving, foot-stomping acoustic mayhem. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com/home. 7/6, The Handlebar

Eric Lindell Greasy, Southern-fried Cajun blues. Tickets: $12 in advance; $15 day of show. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 7/6, Peace Center

Harry Connick Jr. The Big Easy’s own jazz superstar. Tickets: $55-$85. peacecenter.org 7/6, The Bohemian Cafe

Spectac & Amiri Indie hip-hop duo. Call 864-235-7922 or visit blog.horizonrecords.net. 7/9, Horizon Records

Glenn Jones Guitar wizard. Call 864-235-7922 or visit blog.horizonrecords.net. 7/11, Downtown Alive

Stereo Reform Electro-rock duo. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ DTAlive.aspx 7/11, Radio Room

Mason Jar Menagerie/ Rachel Kate Gillion/Filthy Still Aggressive re-imagined folk & roots music. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com/home. 7 / 1 2 , C h a r t e r Amp i t h e a t r e

The Black Keys w/ The Flaming Lips Once-in-a-lifetime modern-rock concert. Tickets $39.50, $54.50. Call 864-241-3800 or visit heritageparkamphitheater.com.

22 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Paying homage Charleston educator turned rapper determined to send a positive message Listening to Charleston rapper Spectac (aka Mervin Jenkins) spit rhymes on his new album with DJ/producer Amiri, “Soul Beautiful,” you might be surprised to find out that, underneath the bluster and flow, he’s a former middle school principal who still works in the field of education. A closer listen to his lyrics reveals a man who’s trying to teach with his music, too. Though the majority of “Soul Beautiful” is concerned with fun times and romance, Spectac WHO: Spectac and Amiri manages to work in strong messages about staying posiWHERE: Horizon Records tive, getting educated and rising above your lot in life. You’d be forgiven, though, if you just grooved along with WHEN: Sat. July 6, 3 p.m. what is an insanely catchy album. Drawing from vintage INFORMATION: Call 235-7922 ’60s and ’70s soul and jazz (the album cover features a lovely model covered in classic LP’s by Herbie Hancock, Prince and others), Amiri and Spectac have created a catchy, rock-solid bottom end for melodies that sweep the listener back to an era where every soul song on the radio was a classic. Spectac and Amiri have both been recording individually for the indie underground label HiPKNOTT Records since 2010, but Spectac’s laid-back-but-sharp flow suits Amiri’s dazzling tapestry of classic soul perfectly. I spoke with Spectac on a rainy afternoon about the new album, his dual careers and the state of hip-hop. Tell me a little about the “Soul Beautiful” album. We’re both pretty pumped up about it. We’ve been putting out records for HiPKNOTT since 2010, but we came back united on this particular joint. We dug deep with some nice soul cuts from the ’60s and ’70s with our samples, and we created a beautiful album. It’s really what we love doing. It’s a nice soulful, hip-hop vibe. What changes about your music when you work with Amiri, as opposed to working on your own or with another producer? I really loved a chance to dive in to working with Amiri again. Earlier this year I did a project with (DJ/producer) Shakim, and they’re both outstanding producers, but with the Amiri collaboration, it just made me feel good. The Amiri album is a lot more lively, spirited, feel-good, vibing for the love of the art, whereas the Shakim album (“For the People”) was more about the message. It was about the challenges of our times. You don’t really get that feel off the Amiri album. What kind of music influences you and Amiri? It’s really just old-time grooves that still make and shape who were are today. If you look at the records on that album cover, I don’t care if you were born in the ’60s or the 2000s, those are albums that deeply influence how you were brought up and how you’re living. And that’s really the vibe on “Soul Beautiful.” Was there any hesitation when you made the transition from educator to musician? Well, honestly, I’m still an educator. I work for a nonprofit organization where we do college readiness training for educators who work with students who have that potential to go to college but might be leaning towards going directly from high school into the workforce. That’s what I’ve been doing for the last five years. I just happen to be lucky that I’ve been able to put out some good stuff and spend time promoting it. What do you think the state of hip-hop is right now, both in the mainstream and underground? That’s a question that I would probably give you a different answer to on any given Sunday. But right now, the way I feel with this rain coming down, I really just hope that artists today always remember to pay homage to the ones that came before them. I hope that they always feel like the music is a platform to send a positive message. There are kids watching, and what they one day become could be heavily influenced by what you’re putting out today. VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

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journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world The Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville recently announced that their July Featured Artist is Erin Cronin-Webb. Her “Dog Days of Summer” exhibit will be shown throughout the month at the gallery’s location at 200 N. Main Street, No. 104, Greenville. There will be an opening reception with the artist on July 5 from 6-9 p.m. and animal demonstrations and a fundraiser for Foothills Search and Rescue on July 6 from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg will host “Upcycled in the Upstate” by artist Lou Webster through July 28. The exhibit is open to the public at no charge Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, from 1-5 p.m. An opening reception will be held on July 16 in the Guild Gallery, 6-8 p.m., with an artist talk scheduled for 7 p.m. There will be an

24 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013

encore reception during ArtWalk on July 18, 6-8 p.m. For more information, visit artistsguildofspartanburg.com. The Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville has created a 4-foot by 10-foot paint-by-number canvas of North Main and NOMA Square and community members are invited to come in and paint. The public will be the artists and will sign their names on this canvas. Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville is located at 200 North Main Street, Greenville and is open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Fridays until 9 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. For more information, call 864-239-3882 or visit artistsguildgalleryofgreenville.com. The Pickens County Museum of Art and History is presenting “Legacy: Drawings & Paintings by Melody M. Davis,” “Nam Era: Never Forgotten – a photographic tribute by J. Michael Johnson,” and “American Colors: Patriotism Reflected in Art.” All three exhibitions will continue through Aug. 15. “American Colors” features work by artists from both of the Carolinas and Georgia. The museum is located at 307 Johnson Street in Pickens and is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursdays 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Admission is free but donations are welcomed. For more information, call 864-898-5963. The Greenville Chorale recently announced its 2013-2014 concert season. It will feature: “From Broadway with Love” on Oct. 26 at the Peace Center; “Christmas with the Chorale” on Dec. 13 at Furman University’s McAlister Auditorium; “Bach, Brahms, Shakespeare & More” on Feb. 23, 2014 at Buncombe Street UMC Greenville; and “Music from the Heavens” on May 10-11 at the Peace Center. For more information, visit greenvillechorale.com. Les Beaux Arts Gallery recently welcomed New York artist Sharon Webb to their gallery. For more information, visit lesbeauxartsgallery.com or call 864-269-0555.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL HOMES

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HOME INFO Price: $600s to $800s Square Footage: 2500-3000 Open Floor Plans, Quality Finishes, Elevators, Two Car Garages, Private Patios, Green Spaces Schools: Sara Collins Elementary Hughes Middle | Greenville High Contact: Patrick Franzen | 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes | 864.233.4175 www.highlandhomessc.com

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journal Homes

Pe ople, Award s, Honor s

Ope n T h i s W e e k e n d

O p e n S u n d ay, J uly 7 f r o m 2 – 4 p m

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in May 2013

Miller

Slayter

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A. Marchant

219 Cammer Ave., Augusta Road Area

Wimberly

B. Marchant

Greenville, S.C. – The Marchant Company, the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties, is proud to recognize select realtors for outstanding performance for May 2013. Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: • Valerie Miller for Volume Listing & Sales Volume Agent of the month;

Charming updated Bungalow that is meticulously maintained and move in ready. Owner has put so much love and attention to details in the renovation of this home, a treasure for a new homeowner. A few of the improvements are as follows: Master Bathroom added, new wiring, new roof, thermal windows, removal of exterior vinyl and discovery of original pine siding that is painted a lovely Artesian Spring color plus a beautiful custom front door. The Kitchen: a custom hood over the gas range, a buffet added with custom cabinetry, Cork flooring installed and a niche added for the refrigerator. The Dining Room was extended 4 ft on the SW wall. A Double Carport built and a work shop added. This home has a nice office/ workroom or could be used as a 3rd bedroom. So much space in the attic for storage or possible expansion for added living space. Too many things to list. This is a must see. From downtown Greenville, left on Augusta Rd., right on Cammer, home on left.

Home Info Price: $239,900 | MLS: #1260291 Bedrooms: 2 Baths: 2 Square Footage: 1200-1399 Schools: Blythe Elementary Hughes Middle | Greenville High Contact: Shelby Jordan | 864.329.7811 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

• Kathy Slayter for Unit Listing Agent of the month; • Chuck Werner for Sales Unit Agent of the month; • “March to SOLD” Anne Marchant, Jolene Wimberly & Brian Marchant for Sales Team of the month.

26 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013

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JULY 5, 2013 | The Journal 27


journal Homes

Pe opl e , Awa r d s , H on or s Adducchio Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

the community at Spartanburg Regional Hospital as a trauma RN, CCRN.

Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Palmisa Adducchio has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Garlington Road office. Born in Rome, Adducchio Italy, Adducchio graduated from Belmont High School in Dayton, Ohio. She continued her education at the Central Carolina School of Nursing and earned her degree as a Registered Nurse.

In her free time Ward enjoys cooking, gardening, running races and participating in sprint triathlons.

“We are excited to have Palmisa join us at the Garlington Road office,” said Donna Smith, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.” Adducchio currently lives in Simpsonville where she worked for one and a half years selling real estate. She enjoys gardening, biking, walking, reading and music.

Ward Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greer GREENVILLE, S.C. – June 18, 2013 – Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Danielle Ward as a residential sales agent to its Greer office. New to real estate, Ward is a native of New York state and graduate of Greenville Technical College. She is presently continuing her education at the University of Texas and also serves

Packard currently lives in Taylors with her daughter, Ava, age 4. She enjoys working out, hiking, co-ed softball, golf, and watching sports.

Hawkins Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Ward

“We are thrilled that Danielle has made the decision to join Coldwell Banker Caine,” said Brad Halter, President of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we are excited about the opportunities that await her here.”

Packard Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Natalie Christmas Packard has joined the company and serves as a sales associate with the Toates Team at the Packard Pelham Road office. Packard graduated from Eastside High School and earned her Bachelor of Science in Physical Education at USC Upstate. She previously worked as a Physical Education teacher and coach. “We are excited to have Natalie join us at the Pelham Road office,” said Tim Toates, Broker-inCharge. “We look forward to working with her.”

Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Hope Hawkins has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Garlington Road ofHawkins fice. Hawkins graduated from University of West Georgia and earned her Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. She was previously a Product Specialist at IPS Packaging. “We are excited to have Hope join us at the Garlington Road office,” said Donna Smith, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.” Hawkins currently lives in Mauldin and is engaged to be married in mid July. She enjoys travel, reading, photography and art.

Szmurlo Joins Joyner Commercial Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Patrick Szmurlo has joined the company and

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serves as a sales associate at the Joyner Commercial office. Patrick brings with him a wealth of commercial real estate experience dating back to 1994. His passion for real estate has always Szmurlo been evident, and he brings personal experience to the table when advising and brokering real estate especially projects involving automotive companies, vacant land, and mixed use space in Downtown Greenville. He has lived in the Upstate since 1987. Patrick is happily married, and he and his wife actively support The Salvation Army, love spending time with family, and enjoy attending Clemson football games. Patrick’s knowledge base includes a prior career in the auto industry during which he received many national auto sales awards. He is active in the Upstate community with various organizations including service on the Greenville County Board of Tax Assessment & Appeals.

Solarek Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Pamela Sue Solarek has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the PelSolarek ham Road office. Solarek graduated from Mountain Heritage High School in Burnsville, NC. She was previously General Manager of Best Western Greenville. “We are excited to have Pam join us at the Pelham Road office,” said Tim Toates, Brokerin-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.”

JournalHOMES.com 28 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013

Solarek is a member of the Convention & Visitors Bureau and has held ambassador volunteer roles in Spartanburg and Greenville. She serves on the Accommodations Tax Advisory Board. She and her husband, Don, live in Greenville and enjoy animals, hiking, waterfalls, and international travel.

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Neighborhood Profile

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Ruskin Square at Hollingsworth Park, Greenville, SC Beautiful homes along tree-lined streets welcome you. Ruskin Square offers a fresh approach to city living, featuring custom homes from the $300s in a village-like atmosphere. With great respect for architectural beauty, this close-knit neighborhood showcases distinctive details, charming porches and courtyards, a 20-acre greenspace, multiple pocket parks and maintenance free lawns. Here families and neighbors interact with one another in a variety of settings. The central business district includes the new Verdae YMCA and is a short walk from any home. In its final stage of development, Ruskin Square lot selections are becoming limited. Please call or stop by the Verdae Sales Office, located at 3 Legacy Park Road. For more information, call (864) 329-8383 or visit www.verdae.com.

Neighborhood Info Custom Homes in the $300s Schools: Pelham Road Elementary Beck Academy JL Mann High School

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Amenities: 20 Acre Greenspace Pocket Parks Walking/Biking Paths Maintenance Free Lawns The Preserve Golf Course

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GREENVILLE Barnes & Noble - 735 Haywood Rd. Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd. Community Journals - 148 River St. SPARTANBURG Barnes & Noble - 1489 W. O. Ezell Blvd. The Book Shelf - 90 Pacolet St., Tryon, NC CHARLESTON Indigo Books - 427 Fresh Fields Dr., Johns Island, SC SUBSCRIPTIONS At Home publishes 3 times a year (Spring, Summer, and Fall/Winter). A 1-year subscription is $20, 2-years is $35. Contact us at 864-679-1200. Find us on

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JULY 5, 2013 | The Journal 29


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G r e e n v i l l e T R A N S AC T ION S

R e a l E s tat e N e w s Existing-home sales rise in may with strong price increases

(June 20, 2013) – Existing-home sales improved in May and remain solidly above a year ago, while the median price continued to rise by double-digit rates from a year earlier, according to the National Association of Realtors®. Total existing-home sales1, which are completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, rose 4.2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.18 million in May from 4.97 million in April, and is 12.9 percent above the 4.59 million-unit pace in May 2012. Bill Lawton, 2013 President of the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Broker-in-Charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC, said the recovery is strengthening and to expect limited housing supplies for the balance of the year in much of the country. “The housing numbers are overwhelmingly positive. However, the number of available homes is unlikely to grow, despite a nice gain in May, unless new home construction ramps up quickly by an additional 50 percent,” he said. “The home price growth is too fast, and only additional supply from new homebuilding can moderate future price growth.” Existing-home sales are at the highest level since November 2009 when the market jumped to 5.44 million as buyers took advantage of tax stimulus. Sales have stayed above year-ago levels for 23 months, while the national median price shows 15 consecutive months of year-over-year increases. Total housing inventory at the end of May rose 3.3 percent to 2.22 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 5.1-month supply2 at the current sales pace, down from 5.2 months in April. Listed inventory is 10.1 percent below a year ago, when there was a 6.5-month supply. The national median existing-home price3 for all housing types was $208,000 in May, up 15.4 percent from May 2012. This marks six straight months of double-digit increases and is the strongest price gain since October 2005, which jumped a record 16.6 percent from a year earlier. The last time there were 15 consecutive months of year-over-year price increases was from March 2005 to May 2006. Distressed homes4 – foreclosures and short sales – accounted for 18 percent of May sales, unchanged from April, but matching the lowest share since monthly tracking began in October 2008; they were 25 percent in May 2012. Fewer distressed homes, which generally sell at a discount, account for some of the price gain. Eleven percent of May sales were foreclosures, and 7 percent were short sales. Foreclosures sold for an average discount of 15 percent below market value in May, while short sales were discounted 12 percent. According to Freddie Mac, the national average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixedrate mortgage rose to 3.54 percent in May from 3.45 percent in April; it was 3.80 percent in May 2012. Lawton said market conditions today are vastly different than during the housing boom. “The boom period was marked by easy credit and overbuilding, but today we have tight mortgage credit and widespread shortages of homes for sale,” he said. “The issue now is pent-up demand and strong growth in the number of households, with buyer traffic 29 percent above a year ago, coinciding with several years of inadequate housing construction. These conditions are contributing to sustainable price growth,” Lawton said. The median time on market for all homes was 41 days in May, down from 46 days in April, and is 43 percent faster than the 72 days on market in May 2012. Short sales were on the market for a median of 79 days, while foreclosures typically sold in 43 days and non-distressed homes took 39 days. Forty-five percent of all homes sold in May were on the market for less than a month. The median time on the market is the shortest since monthly tracking began in May 2011; on an annual basis, a separate NAR survey of home buyers and sellers shows the shortest selling time was 4 weeks in both 2004 and 2005. First-time buyers accounted for 28 percent of purchases in May, compared with 29 percent in April and 34 percent in May 2012. All-cash sales were at 33 percent of transactions in May, up from 32 percent in April and 28 percent in May 2012. Individual investors, who account for many cash sales, purchased 18 percent of homes in May; they were 19 percent in April and 17 percent in May 2012. Single-family home sales rose 5.0 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.60 million in May from 4.38 million in April, and are 12.7 percent higher than the 4.08 million-unit pace in May 2012. The median existing single-family home price was $208,700 in May, up 15.8 percent above a year ago, the strongest increase since October 2005 when it jumped 16.9 percent from a year earlier. Existing condominium and co-op sales slipped 1.7 percent to an annualized rate of 580,000 units in May from 590,000 in April, but are 13.7 percent above the 510,000-unit level a year ago. The median existing condo price was $202,100 in May, which is 11.8 percent above May 2012. Regionally, existing-home sales in the Northeast rose 1.6 percent to an annual rate of 650,000 in May and are 8.3 percent above May 2012. The median price in the Northeast was $269,600, up 12.3 percent from a year ago. Existing-home sales in the Midwest jumped 8.0 percent in May to a pace of 1.21 million, and are 16.3 percent higher than a year ago. The median price in the Midwest was $159,800, up 8.2 percent from May 2012. In the South, existing-home sales rose 4.0 percent to an annual level of 2.09 million in May and are 16.1 percent above May 2012. The median price in the South was $183,300, which is 15.0 percent above a year ago. Existing-home sales in the West increased 2.5 percent to a pace of 1.23 million in May and are 7.0 percent above a year ago. With the tightest regional supply, the median price in the West was $276,400, up 19.9 percent from May 2012. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. For additional commentary and consumer information, visit www.houselogic.com and http://retradio.com. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar. com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

30 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013

ju n e 10 - 14, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$891,000 GLEN ABBEY $680,000 RIDGELAND AT THE PARK $646,000 $607,500 $579,900 SUBER RD PROFESS’L PARK $555,000 KINGSBRIDGE $545,000 $540,000 $530,000 TERRACE AT RIVERPLACE $530,000 CHEROKEE PARK $527,500 $522,000 TRAXLER PARK $515,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $508,000 CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $467,250 GLEN MEADOWS $415,000 ABINGTON PARK $400,000 $374,500 $370,000 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $370,000 SHADOWOOD $360,000 COLONIAL ESTATES $350,000 COLONIAL ESTATES $350,000 $350,000 RIVER WALK $345,000 SYLVAN MANOR $344,500 $337,500 GRIFFIN PARK $329,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $322,350 BOTANY WOODS $322,000 RIVER WALK $318,000 SUGAR CREEK $304,500 TUSCANY FALLS $299,594 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $298,000 CHANDLER LAKE $297,570 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $296,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $289,900 COACHMAN PLANTATION $288,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $284,600 WOODLAND CREEK $280,955 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $280,146 CAROLINA OAKS $272,000 CARSON’S POND $260,000 HARRISON PARK $257,900 BELMONT HGHTS $256,500 VERDMONT $256,000 $255,000 OAKS@GILDER CREEK FARM $252,450 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE $250,000 $250,000 HARRISON PARK $250,000 VERDMONT $237,278 PEBBLECREEK $235,000 COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $233,000 GLENS@LEXINGTON PLACE $230,000 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $226,000 CARSON’S POND $226,000 MORNING MIST FARM $224,999 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $221,505 RESERVES@RAVENWOOD $221,400 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $219,000 EDWARDS FOREST $211,500 SHARON PLACE $208,000 SWANSGATE $207,500 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $207,000 ORCHARD FARMS $200,000 MAYS MEADOW $200,000 CLIFFS VALLEY-HIGH VISTA $199,000 CARRINGTON GREEN $199,000 REMINGTON $190,484 COPPER CREEK $190,000 HALF MILE LAKE $189,000 NORTHGATE TRACE $189,000 HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS $186,000 COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $183,580 $183,500 GLENBROOKE TOWNHOUSES $181,250 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $180,000 NORTHCLIFF $179,400 HALF MILE LAKE $179,000 CASTLE ROCK $178,445 WOODLANDS@WALNUT COVE $176,500 BURDETT ESTATES $175,000 POINSETTIA $172,500 MONTCHANNIN $171,500 $171,000 HUNTLEY ACRES $167,700 LANSDOWNE@REMINGTON $166,624 THE HEIGHTS $164,460 REEDY FALLS $162,000 REMINGTON $161,900 HERITAGE LAKES $161,500

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SANCTUARY HOLDINGS LLC UPSTATE INVESTMENT PARTN 177 MARSHALL BRIDGE DR RINNE CAROL A JACOB KATHLEEN ANNE (JTW 225 GLEN ABBEY WAY MELLEY MARJORIE A ARNOLD RICHARD E PO BOX 165 CURRAN WILLIAM D SHELNUTT DAVID LAMAR 722 CLEVELAND ST BRYAN TIFFANY E CRUMPLER MATHEW BENJAMIN 6 LONGVIEW TER TRADE STREET TRADING CO MCTREY PROPERTIES LLC 150 SAGE CREEK WAY KLEIER CHARLES III OWEN BRETT E 406 KINGSGATE CT UPWARD VENTURES LLC MUDDY WATER PROPERTIES 501-A DEANNA LN WALL BEN R JR 1976 IRREV COUCHELL JONATHAN P 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 HIGHTOWER JERRY R HIGHTOWER JERRY R 201 RIVERPLACE UNIT 706 COLLINS CLINTON W (JTWRO GOLDSMITH J ANDREW (JTWR 36 CONESTEE AVE WILKINS DONYELLE WITT SCOTT H (JTWROS) 307 MCDANIEL AVE JOHNSON STEVEN RAY JAMISON JENNIFER G 28 BYRD BLVD PRICE LEON WISE LANI F 608 VILLAGGIO DR INDYMAC VENTURE LLC CASTELLANOS CATHERINE 17 CRESCENT PINYON WAY OWEN BRETT E LUDWIG CHRISTOPHER 601 WHETSTONE CT ABINGTON PARK VENTURES BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 MARTIN ALBERT R 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413 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WILSON ONEAL C (JTWROS) 105 LACEBARK CT MARK III PROPERTIES INC NVR INC 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WILCOX PETER R (JTWROS) 310 STRASBURG DR MANGHAM CHARLES A FORTNER CYNTHIA A (JTWRO 56 SCOTTS BLUFF DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ETHRIDGE JEREMY D 309 STRASBURG DR NVR INC HARRIS DURINDA 9 WOODLAND CREEK WAY BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT KOTSCHATE CRISTINA M (JT 10 PALM SPRINGS WAY BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN BRANCATI NILES M 119 CAROLINA OAKS DR BISHOP CALVIN C HUBER BRETT M 109 POND TERRACE LN DWELLING GROUP LLC TAYLOR BONNIE BALDERSON 2 EDGERIDGE CT COOPER STEVEN L JETER ERIC L 101 ASCOT DR DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC INC HESTER ADAM M 219 CLAIRHILL CT AULT PAMELA A BOWYER MICHELLE F 6 CAROLINE DR KARR AMANDA Y HART MICHAEL G (SURV) 116 RED ROME CT VERDAE DEVELOPMENT MCGEHEE JEFFERSON J (JTW 3 LEGACY PARK RD CROUT J HAROLD 8 EAST STONE AVENUE LLC 708 CENTER RD KRUEGER EILEEN JANE (JTW HOLDER JACK (JTWROS) 104 BELLE OAKS DR DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC LLC WINTERS JORDAN 4 CAITLIN CT GEORGE KATHERINE V HUDAK JASON I 406 ROBERTS RD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT RAGSDALE JENNIFER M (JTW 401 SABIN CT CARTER CHRISTOPHER F LYNCH REBECCA (JTWROS) 204 BELMONT STAKES WAY DWELLING GROUP LLC BROWN GEORGE S 8 BRIARHILL DR GRIGGS CHERYL L STC PROPERTIES LLC 5 HILANDER CT FORD DERICK J KING HOLLY MARIE (JTWROS 3 CARDEROCK CT NVR INC PENNY ALEXANDRA C 204 WATEREE WAY RELIANT SC LLC SONI DIPAL M (SURV) 43 COPPERDALE DR DWELLING GROUP LLC MANGHAM BRENDA J (JTWROS 46 BRIARHILL DR NIX RAY R HILL SHARON A (JTWROS) 104 BRIDGEWOOD AVE JOHNS RICHARD R WORD JACOB W (JTWROS) 205 PIKE CT MCLEAN VIRGINIA M FLINT CORT R 307 MOCKINGBIRD HL KLING BRIAN A HICKS BENJAMIN E (JTWROS 112 WHIFFLETREE DR FORTNER CINDY A AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES REITER ELLEN E 14 CALDERWOOD CT CROWELL DAVID L TIDELANDS BANK PO BOX 1087 DAUGHERTY HARRY P JR BAKER DANNY E JR (SURV) 203 CLEVINGTON WAY D R HORTON INC HEGGIE KYLENE 3913 JAMES HILL 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THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that White Horse Social Club, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 6119 White Horse Road Ste 15, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CPR BURGER, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1025 WOODRUFF ROAD STE D-101, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 800 Fairview Street, Fountain Inn, SC 29644. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 324 S. Line Street, Greer, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF LAURENS IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2013-CPWHITNEY BOOKER, Plaintiff, v. RAISHA COHEN, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE-NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603 LAURENS, South Carolina Dated: Monday, March 25, 2013

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Empire Spirits, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1618 and 1620 Augusta Street, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 6726 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 701 Mauldin Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1904 Gap Creek Rd., Greer, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 715 Howard Street, Landrum , SC 29356. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 400 Sulphur Springs Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 6008 White Horse Road, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that C and T Wines, LLC DBA/ Vino’s Etc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 500 East McBee Avenue, Suite 103 and 104, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 5301 Old Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 100 Middleton Way, Greer, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com JULY 5, 2013 | THE Journal 31


journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE BOUNDARIES OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED IN THE DEL NORTE SUBDIVISION FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORDERLY COLLECTING AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE, GARBAGE AND TRASH WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE: THOSE AREAS IN THE DEL NORTE DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBERS (“TMS#”) 0538010102200 0538090104800 0538090109800 0538090114900 0538100119800 0538010102304 0538090104900 0538090109900 0538090115000 0538100119900 0538010103202 0538090105000 0538090110000 0538090115100 0538100120000 0538010115700 0538090105100 0538090110100 0538090115200 0538100120100 0538020101000 0538090105200 0538090110200 0538090115300 0538100120200 0538040100505 0538090105300 0538090110300 0538090115400 0538100120300 0538090100100 0538090105400 0538090110400 0538090115500 0538100120400 0538090100200 0538090105500 0538090110500 0538090115600 0538100120500 0538090100300 0538090105600 0538090110600 0538090115700 0538100120600 0538090100400 0538090105700 0538090110700 0538090115800 0538100120700 0538090100500 0538090105800 0538090110800 0538090115900 0538100120800 0538090100600 0538090105900 0538090110900 0538090116000 0538100120900 0538090100700 0538090106000 0538090111000 0538090116100 0538100121000 0538090100800 0538090106100 0538090111100 0538090116200 0538100121100 0538090100900 0538090106200 0538090111200 0538090116300 0538100121200 0538090101000 0538090106300 0538090111300 0538090116400 0538100121300

0538090101100 0538090106400 0538090111400 0538090116500 0538100121400 0538090101200 0538090106500 0538090111500 0538090116600 0538100121500 0538090101300 0538090106600 0538090111600 0538090116700 0538100121600 0538090101400 0538090106700 0538090111700 0538090116800 0538100121700 0538090101500 0538090106800 0538090111800 0538090116900 0538100121800 0538090101600 0538090106900 0538090111900 0538090117000 0538100121900 0538090101700 0538090107000 0538090112000 0538090117100 0538100122000 0538090101800 0538090107100 0538090112100 0538090117200 0538100122100 0538090101900 0538090107200 0538090112200 0538090117300 0538100122200 0538090102000 0538090107300 0538090112300 0538090117400 0538100122300 0538090102100 0538090107400 0538090112400 0538090117500 0538100122400 0538090102200 0538090107500 0538090112500 0538090117600 0538100122500 0538090102300 0538090107600 0538090112600 0538090117700 0538100122600 0538090102400 0538090107700 0538090112700 0538090117800 0538100122700 0538090102500 0538090107800 0538090112800 0538090117900 0538100122800 0538090102600 0538090107900 0538090112900 0538090118000 0538100122900 0538090103100 0538090108000 0538090113000 0538090118100 0538100123000 0538090103200 0538090108100 0538090113100 0538090118500 0538100123100 0538090103300 0538090108200 0538090113200 0538100118200 0538100123200 0538090103400 0538090108300 0538090113300 0538100118300 0538100123300 0538090103500 0538090108400 0538090113400 0538100118400 0538100123400 0538090103600 0538090108500 0538090113500 0538100118500 0538100123500 0538090103700 0538090108600 0538090113600

32 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013

0538100118600 0538100123600 0538090103800 0538090108700 0538090113700 0538100118700 0538100123700 0538090103900 0538090108800 0538090113800 0538100118800 0538100123800 0538090104000 0538090108900 0538090113900 0538100118900 0538100123900 0538090104100 0538090109000 0538090114100 0538100119000 0538100124000 0538090104101 0538090109100 0538090114200 0538100119100 0538100124100 0538090104200 0538090109200 0538090114300 0538100119200 0538100124200 0538090104300 0538090109300 0538090114400 0538100119300 0538100124300 0538090104400 0538090109400 0538090114500 0538100119400 0538100124400 0538090104500 0538090109500 0538090114600 0538100119500 0538100124500 0538090104600 0538090109600 0538090114700 0538100119600 0538100124600 0538090104700 0538090109700 0538090114800 0538100119700 0538100124700 0538100124800 0538100130800 0538100137700 0538110101400 0538110106400 0538100124900 0538100130900 0538100137800 0538110101500 0538110106500 0538100125000 0538100132700 0538100137900 0538110101600 0538110106600 0538100125100 0538100132800 0538100138000 0538110101700 0538110106700 0538100125200 0538100132900 0538100138100 0538110101800 0538110106800 0538100125300 0538100133000 0538100138200 0538110101900 0538110106900 0538100125400 0538100133100 0538100138300 0538110102000 0538110107000 0538100125500 0538100133200 0538100138400 0538110102100 0538110107100 0538100125600 0538100133300 0538100138500 0538110102200 0538110107200 0538100125700 0538100133400 0538100138600 0538110102300 0538110107300 0538100125800 0538100133500 0538100138700 0538110102400 0538110107400 0538100125900

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0538110105000 0538130102600 0538100129400 0538100136400 0538110100100 0538110105100 0538130102700 0538100129500 0538100136500 0538110100200 0538110105200 0538130102800 0538100129600 0538100136600 0538110100300 0538110105300 0538130102900 0538100129700 0538100136700 0538110100400 0538110105400 0538130103000 0538100129800 0538100136800 0538110100500 0538110105500 0538130103100 0538100129900 0538100136900 0538110100600 0538110105600 0538130103200 0538100130000 0538100137000 0538110100700 0538110105700 0538130103300 0538100130200 0538100137100 0538110100800 0538110105800 0538130103400 0538100130300 0538100137200 0538110100900 0538110105900 0538130103500 0538100130400 0538100137300 0538110101000 0538110106000 0538130103600 0538100130500 0538100137400 0538110101100 0538110106100 0538130103700 0538100130600 0538100137500 0538110101200 0538110106200 0538130103800 0538100130700 0538100137600 0538110101300 0538110106300 0538130103900 0538130104000 0538130104100 0538130104200 0538130104300 0538130104400 0538130104500 0538130104600 0538130104700 0538130104900 0538130105000 0538130105100 0538130105300 0538130105400 0538130105500 0538130105600 0538130105700 0538130105800 0538130106000 0538130106100 0538130106200 0538130106300 0538130106400 0538130106500 0538130106600 0538130106700 0538130106800 0538130106900 0538130107000 0538130107100 0538130107200 0538130107300 0538130107400 0538130107500 0538130107600 0538130107700 0538130107800 0538130107900 0538130108000 0538130108100 A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGE IN THE COMMISSION OR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

People and dogs attending NOMA’s first “Yappy Hour” at NOMA Square take time to get acquainted.

Dogs attending “Yappy Hour” were treated to pup-tinis. Humans could try specialty drinks and “yappetizers” at Roost at NOMA Square.

Live entertainment was part of “Yappy Hour.”

Two attendees of “Yappy Hour” mingle at NOMA Square.


journal culture

TheThe Upstate’s ShopAlternative Alternative Upstate’sBody Body Shop

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week Brickmaking was a popular project station for over 250 children at Juneteenth. Participants were able to make actual bricks from scratch, experiencing a taste of manual labor in the 1800s. Other activities included making candles, blessing dolls, ice cream and cooking hoe cakes.

The Upstate’s Body Shop Alternative

1 Day Service • Free Estimates Bumper Repair • Scratch &Bumper Chip Repair Day Service • Free ·Estimates 1 Day1 Service · Free Estimates Repair 3M Paint Protection Scratch Repair & Chip Repair · 3M Paint Protection Bumper • Scratch & Chip Repair

Juneteenth participants take a break for lunch at Y Hollingsworth Outdoor Center’s Juneteenth Celebration on June 21. Here, children from Reedy River Baptist Church day camp enjoy a picnic on the grounds with old-time music by John Fowler.

Estimates 1 Day Service • FreeExtremeColorsGreenville.com ExtremeColorsGreenville.com 3M Paint Protection 864-283-0633 864-283-0633 & Chip Repair Bumper Repair • Scratch 700 Woodruff Road, Greenville ExtremeColorsGreenville.com (Near Beck Academy) 864-283-0633 3M Paint Protection WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES

700 Woodruff Rd., Greenville 700 Woodruff Road, Greenville (Near Beck Academy) (Near Beck Academy)

700 Woodruff Road, Greenville (Near Beck Academy)

Kitty Evans returned to the third annual YMCA Juneteenth for her portrayal of Kessie, a field slave, giving life to the historical culture and lifestyle slaves lived pre-Civil War. Kessie told stories, sang and let the younger Juneteenth participants play some of her instruments.

ExtremeColorsGreenville.com 864-283-0633

Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com Crossword puzzle: page 34

Sudoku puzzle: page 34

JULY 5, 2013 | THE Journal 33


journal culture

Jane’s

figure. this. out. Tee Time

By Gail Grabowski

SKINNY ON SKIN Greetings Journal readers! My name is Jane Crawford and I have been in the upstate since 1987. I am so proud to call Greenville my home. I opened the first med-spa in the U.S. right here in Greenville, SC during the late eighties and went on to be the founder and co-owner of Carolina Aesthetics. I have served on the Faculty of the American Society of Cosmetic Plastic surgeons for 15 years and have been very fortunate to have studied with the most forward thinking physicians and Aesthetic practitioners in the world – India, Asia, Europe, New Zealand and the US! While my training, reputation, and experience is global, my passion and purpose are local. I’ve recently opened the Jane Crawford Skin Clinic on The Parkway near Thornblade. I’m proud to have an outstanding team of individuals who are all proficient in the most current technology and science of skin care services and products. We customize our care for each client, and are dedicated to the use of safe healthy products with the latest technology to achieve results. I will be writing about the importance of these in future columns so stay tuned!

jane crawford 405 The Parkway, Suite 200 Greer, SC 29650 www.JaneCrawfordSkinClinic.com

864-469-7720 34 THE Journal | JULY 5, 2013

Across 1 Put one’s hands together, in a way 5 Apple products 9 Concert memorabilia 14 Preserves, in a way 19 Hip dance? 20 “Summertime,” for one 21 They’re forbidden 22 Genre of Vasarely’s “Zebras” 23 Before thou know’st 24 Many a cheerleader 25 Golf green border 26 South-of-the-border residences 27 Really old deck of cards? 29 Feline in the headlines? 31 Catamaran mover 32 WWII torpedo vessel 33 “Uh-uh” 34 Guarantee 37 Like skilled negotiators 39 Perch in a pond 43 __ Robert: nickname for pitcher Bob Feller 44 Watchdog breed 45 Go bad 46 From Athens to Augusta, Ga. 47 When some deadlocks are broken, briefly 48 Thief who begs to be arrested? 52 Word alphabetizers ignore

53 Get stuck for, as a cost 54 Stroked tools 55 Mouth piece? 56 Sunrise service occasion 58 Jazz nickname 60 Wrecker’s fee 63 Hickman who portrayed Dobie Gillis 64 Decade divs. 65 Frogumentary? 68 Where Hillary was a sen. 69 Miss the beginning 72 Macadamia product 73 Quitter’s words 77 Tampico pals 78 Union agreement? 79 Epitome of virility 80 Excessively 81 Christmas cupful 82 Price tag on a toilet for tots? 87 Initial step 88 Ultimate power 89 Certain suit top 90 Deduce 91 1980s attorney general 92 Uncaged 95 Cuddly companion 97 It’s not good to be over one 98 Dawn deity 99 Northern Scandinavians 100 Mark’s successor 101 Humongous harbor wall? 104 Sitcom with spiteful

scripts? 109 Sweetheart 110 Trying to lose, after “on” 111 Share a border with 112 Makeshift swing 113 Saxon leader? 114 Old laundry soap 115 Start over 116 They’re drawn in bars 117 Saunter 118 Conservative IRA asset 119 WWII weapon 120 Traffic sound

Down 1 Turn black 2 Moon goddess 3 Often 4 Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking, e.g. 5 Chatterbox 6 Serif-free font 7 Copies per day, say: Abbr. 8 Virologist Jonas 9 Edible with a crisp pod 10 Cheap-seats spot 11 Like much small print 12 Leg up 13 Three-part figs. 14 Gregarious 15 Ho-hum feeling 16 Wear 17 Server’s aid 18 Rd. atlas listings 28 Place to play bocce,

perhaps 30 Like sweaters 32 “Symphony in Black” artist 34 Taurus neighbor 35 Arabian peninsula capital 36 Flickering bulb?

Hard

37 Items on an auto rack 38 “I Will Follow ___”: 1963 chart-topper 39 Twitter titter, and then some 40 Nitpicking kid minder? 41 Visibly frightened

42 Mower handle? 44 Hood’s missile 45 Force back 48 Baby or nanny follower 49 Norwegian king, 9951000 50 Watch 51 Was about to nod, maybe 54 “Quit worrying about it” 57 Comes out with 59 Mountaineer’s challenge 60 Pete’s wife on “Mad Men” 61 Bismarck et al. 62 Devils Tower st. 66 Santa __ racetrack 67 Carpentry joint 69 Premarital posting 70 Act the wrong way? 71 Anka hit with a Spanish title 74 Capek play about automatons 75 Silly sort 76 Dynamite guy? 79 Surfboard fin 83 Half of sei 84 What one might sneak out on 85 Swing voters: Abbr. 86 Fiscal exec 87 Balloon or blimp 91 Gardener of rhyme 93 What “F” often means 94 Cocktail with scotch 95 Bodega patron 96 Most fitting 97 Symbol of precision 99 Escorted 100 Scriabin composition 101 Jupiter’s wife 102 Trendy warm boots 103 Lawn game missile 104 They’re sometimes seen in jams 105 Partner of aid 106 Big Island port 107 Versatile cookie 108 Wild place, once 109 Avuncular top hat wearer Crossword answers: page 33

Sudoku answers: page 33


JOURNAL CULTURE

PAST AND PRESENT WITH COURTNEY TOLLISON HARTNESS, PH.D. AND JULIA PAFFORD

Designing downtown How a renowned landscape architect helped spark a Renaissance on Main Street Two weeks ago, during the annual meeting of the South Carolina Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, nationally recognized landscape preservationist Charles Birnbaum addressed an eager crowd gathered at the Hyatt. His talk focused on urban design, contextualized efforts to develop Greenville’s Main Street, and offered historical insight into the place of Greenville’s Main Street amongst other notable American downtowns. Greenville’s downtown did not evolve haphazardly over the past several decades. On the contrary, today’s downtown is the result of decades of strategic and thoughtful efforts that began nearly 50 years ago. Just two decades after the end of World War II, downtown Greenville was most unlike the thriving nucleus it had been during the war. Our city had fallen victim to the same disease plaguing downtown areas across the country. The recent proliferation of automobiles had had a profound impact on residential patterns in a very short time, contributing to urban flight. Furthermore, the GI Bill provided benefits that allowed many returning veterans to become firsttime homeowners, thus also contributing to the development of the suburbs. By the late 1960s, the trickle of people and businesses from the city to suburbia had turned into a veritable tsunami, leaving downtown areas full of vacancy signs and empty sidewalks. David Paulson, the city’s downtown development coordinator from 1975-1980, recalled recently in an interview with The Greenville News that downtown was “quite desolate” with a “high vacancy rate, just very dated.” In the face of this decline, Greenville politicians and business leaders dedicated themselves to a revitalization effort, one that would bring businesses, residents and pedestrians back to its city center. The first step of that effort was creating a more appealing Main Street, and for that, they needed a master landscape architect. In October of 1976, Mayor Max Heller, along with some Greenville City Council members, travelled to San Francisco to meet with Lawrence Halprin, an acclaimed and

influential landscape architect who had created such works as Ghirardelli Square and the United Nations Plaza in San Francisco, and who would go on to create the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C. Heller sought out Halprin because of his ability to turn public space into social space. His artful but functional designs encouraged pedestrians to interact with those around them. By the conclusion of their visit, Halprin was fully engaged as a partner in the revitalization effort. To underwrite this reconfiguration and beautification of Main Street, however, the city needed a massive amount of funds, an amount they could not secure independently. In anticipation of the costs needed to meet this need, the city developed publicprivate partnerships with local businesses. Community leaders Tommy Wyche, Buck Mickel and Alester Furman acted as chief arm-twisters, convincing local businesses to invest in this effort. By August of 1977, they had the money to begin implementing Halprin’s plan, which was accepted with one condition: Mayor Heller, remembering the Vienna of his youth, asked that the corner plots at intersections be filled with flowers rather than Halprin’s shrubbery. According to Halprin’s plan, they narrowed Main Street from four lanes to two, and put in diagonal parking spots, and strategically placed benches, unique lighting and signage along the corridor. In 1978, the city also planted trees along Main Street. Halprin’s work was not just beautification; it was meant also to help Greenville become a more engaged community. At the Hyatt two weeks ago, Birnbaum, founder and president of the Cultural Landscape Foundation in Washington, D.C., described Halprin’s work here as a “kaleidoscope of life.” He explained that Halprin intentionally created “pinch points” on Main Street, places where people would be, by virtue of limited space, forced into the same area as other pedestrians. This was meant to encourage Greenvillians to interact with each other more often, to help build a closer community. Birnbaum also emphasized that Halprin’s design also prioritized the pedestrian experience above efficient transportation, narrowing the lanes available to cars and widening the pedestrian space. Before the newly redesigned Main Street could be filled with pedestrians, however, Greenville had to give them a reason to be there. Businesses and restaurants needed to be lured back. Greenville’s big break came

when local attorney Tommy Wyche succeeded in convincing the Hyatt hotel chain to build a Regency-level hotel on North Main. The company had a policy of never building this level of hotel in such a small city, but relented because of Wyche’s pressure and Greenville’s willingness to foot the bill for the hotel’s parking garage, convention center and atrium. The Hyatt Regency opened to much acclaim in 1982. In a 2007 interview, Heller remembered that after the Hyatt project, “the private sector of the community realized something was going to happen.” Soon, developers began restoring downtown buildings to their former historic glory. Ground floors of old buildings were renovated to be attractive storefronts while the second floors of many buildings were converted into apartments. The addition of the Peace Center in 1990 provided yet another anchor to Main Street, this time to the south end. With the Hyatt and Peace Center, plus the addition of fashionable living space and the improvements to Main Street, the idea of living downtown evolved from an absurd notion into a sought-after opportunity in just 20 years, and that trend has only con-

tinued. Greenville is currently in the midst of a Renaissance, thanks to the continued, visionary efforts exercised under the mayoral leadership of Knox White since 1995. Lawrence Halprin died in 2009. His Wikipedia page offers a list of his many impressive accomplishments. Near the bottom of that listing is “Main Street, Greenville, S.C.” Our downtown is notable, for it was conceived by one of the foremost landscape architects of the twentieth century, and became reality because of the dedicated community leadership our city continues to enjoys to this day. Our downtown is a point of pride for Greenvillians; the man who designed it ought to be as well.

Julia Pafford is a Furman Advantage fellow and a research assistant for Dr. Tollison at the Upcountry History Museum. A rising senior history major at Furman, she is from Savannah, Georgia. Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness is an assistant professor of history at Furman and museum historian at the Upcountry History Museum.

JULY 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 35


Saturday, July 20, 2013 Best Hand $2000 Worst Hand $250

Registration 8 A.M. First Bike out 9 A.M. Last Bike out 10 A.M.

Door Prize Drawings

Registration fee $25

Dual Starting Locations: Laurens Electric Cooperative 2254 Hwy. 14, Laurens, SC or Harley-Davidson of Greenville 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

(includes a FREE t-shirt) Benefitting

Cooperative Care Contact: David Hammond at

864-683-1667 PO Box 700, Laurens, SC 29360

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube

July 5, 2013 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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