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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, May 31, 2013 • Vol.15, No.22

INSIDE UBJ:

THE JOY OF FRANCHISING

Healing

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Community set to transform riverside area into Cancer Survivors Park SEE STORY ON PAGE 8

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“God just came to us and told us to get involved, and so we did.” Greer philanthropist Bob Castellani, on his and wife Lisa’s decision to donate $250,000 for a statewide study on how to better protect children from sexual abuse.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

60,709

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“We feel terrifically affirmed.”

Prescription drug overdose deaths in Greenville County in 2011, the highest rate in South Carolina

St. Anthony’s pastor Fr. Patrick Tuttle, on the $6.2 million raised to build and operate a new St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School.

“These organizations are coming together in a healing mood to bring this park to the city.” Kay Roper, Patients First executive director, on rivals Greenville Health System and Bon Secours St. Francis uniting to support the planned Cancer Survivors Park.

“What son of the ’50s would not take the opportunity to be Davy Crockett? He was one of the country’s first superheroes.” Larry Bounds, a Chautauqua performer and Wade Hampton High School teacher, who will portray Crockett in this year’s Chautauqua Festival.

“For every overdose death, there are hundreds of wrecked lives through addiction which are then multiplied by their impact on immediate families and friends, let alone the financial costs to society.”

$20,311.43 Total of 21 grants given to Greenville County teachers by Public Education Partners to fund innovative programs

5

Length in hours of Dennis Johnson’s “November,” to be performed in its entirety by soloist Dennis Johnson at Furman’s nief-norf music festival

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Talking tickets

Local notes

City’s payday. Parking violations pay for enforcement, garages

Greenville City Pa r k i n g by the Numbers

CYNTHIA PARTRIDGE | CONTRIBUTOR

Greg Beckner / Staff

20,492 – number of citations issued so far in 2013 as of April 30 $322,000 – amount of parking fines collected so far in 2013 as of April 30 23,808 – number of citations issued in 2012 $396,000 – amount of fines collected in 2012 5 – number of parking enforcement officers working in Greenville’s downtown

Parking tickets and fines in the downtown Greenville area can be a hassle for anyone who drives. Those who have ever gotten a ticket and wondered where the money goes or why each new ticket is more expensive may appreciate this explanation from Dennis Garrett, general manager of Parking Services for the City of Greenville. The city conceived the concept of incremental fines that increase $10 each offense “two to three years ago to help curtail some of the repeat violations” in the downtown area, Garrett said. “Once you get five or more outstanding or unpaid tickets that aren’t paid, you get a boot. And if they’re unpaid for a year, we do have the option to set off debt by collecting from

their income tax,” he said. The purpose behind the graduated fine system was to open up the street parking spaces in the downtown area, Garrett said. “According to the observation of the parking enforcers, it has had a positive effect on the availability of spaces on the street.” The volume of violations has stayed consistent with little variation since the change about three years ago, he said. There are ways to avoid a fine on the weekends. Parking downtown is free in two locations. Richardson Street Garage is free from 6 a.m.-9 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, with a $3 flat fee after 9 p.m. The garage is also free with no flat-fee rate from 6 a.m. Sunday to 6 a.m. Monday. The West Washington Street deck is free from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Monday through Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday. Once a parking ticket is paid, the money goes into a parking fund that then pays for parking enforcement, operational offices and parking facilities, Garrett said.

The Second Annual Multicultural Festival will be held June 27 at 3 p.m. at McAlister Square in Greenville. The festival highlights the cultural diversity of the Upstate community through food, music, dance, art, storytelling and more. Also, representatives of organizations that help protect and promote these cultures in the area will discuss how others can get involved. If you would like to participate, you may represent your culture free of charge. For more information, call 864-3253592 or visit multiculturalevent. webs.com On May 11, Master Kim’s World Class Tae Kwon Do held their ninth annual charity Break-A-Thon, benefitting Project HOPE Foundation. Students and guests enjoyed carnival games, demonstrations and the breaking of 2013 boards. Nearly $9,000 was raised in support of the autism community. For more information on Project HOPE Foundation, visit projecthopesc.org or call 864-676-0028.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Resident’s death probed by disabilities board 48-year-old discovered on May 21 APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board (GCDSNB) is investigating the death of one of its clients, 48-year-old Janice Gaffney, who was a resident in one of the homes owned by the organization. According to John Cocciolone, GCDSNB executive director, the staff tried to wake Gaffney early in the morning on May 21 to go to work and found her dead. Cocciolone The Greenville County Coroner’s Office is awaiting the results of a toxicology report, which will take several weeks, before ruling on the

cause of death, said Barry Wright of the coroner’s office. Both the Greenville County coroner and the state law enforcement division (SLED) will investigate the death, which is routine for any deaths at GCDSNB facilities, Cocciolone said. Thom Berry, spokesperson for SLED, confirmed that the agency was investigating. Cocciolone said that staff followed policies and procedures after discovering Gaffney and did “a great job.” He added that the agency sometimes has to cope with client deaths because GCDSNB often cares for clients most of their lives. “When something like this occurs, it is difficult on families, consumers and our staff. We are committed to full transparency and to providing a safe and nurturing environment for all those entrusted to our care,” Cocciolone said in a statement. At the recent GCDSNB interim board meeting, Cocciolone said if changes need to be made after the investigation is complete, “they will be made.” He added that staff had discovered several things that could be changed, but they were not major.

Health Events National Cancer Survivors Day Sun., June 2 • 3-4:30 p.m. • TD Convention Center Cancer survivors and their families are invited to celebrate survivorship. Free; registration required. Splash n’ Dash Sat., June 22, July 20 & Aug. 3 • Sites vary This three-event series for kids ages 3-16 includes a pool swim and cross country run. Cost: $15/event. For details, visit ghs.org/splashndash. Meet the Midwives Tues., June 25 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required.

Time for summer camp Online registration is open for Greenville’s Recreational Summer Day Camps running weekly from June 17 until Aug. 9 at 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. in multiple locations: Camp Kaleidoscope is for ages 6-11 at the Pavilion, East Riverside Park, Northside Park and Bell’s Crossing Elementary School; Camp Cougar is for ages 6-11 and meets at Southside Park; and The Wanderers Camp, for ages 12-14, is located at the Pavilion. Programs for ages 6-12 are located at Brutontown Community Center, Mt. Pleasant Community Center, Freetown Community Center and Woodfield Community Center. Mt. Pleasant also offers Teen Camp for ages 13-15. For more information, visit greenvillerec.com, Greenville Rec’s Administrative Office or each community center location, or call 864-288-6470.

Is Arthritis Pain a Handful? Wed., June 26 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center® GHS hand specialists will discuss the causes of hand pain and treatment options. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. You Go Girl Sprint Triathlon Sun., July 7 • 7 a.m. • GHS Life Center This event includes a 250-yard swim, 10-mile bike ride and 2.5-mile run. Cost: $55. To register, visit setupevents.com. Let’s Talk About Mental Illness Fri., July 19 • 12-1 p.m. • Centre Stage Join a panel of GHS experts for a discussion on mental illness. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Become a game-changer this baseball season

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

No more delays South Carolina has too many challenges for legislators to run out the clock every year.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Last week, state senators offered hope that 2013 may finally be the year lawmakers ditch “it’s too hard” as an excuse for the legislative paralysis that created South Carolina’s crumbling transportation system. Senators voted – by a large margin – to amend the Senate budget package to set aside $50 million a year so the state’s Infrastructure Bank can service up to $500 million in loans for road and bridge repairs. It’s still “a raindrop on Lake Murray” compared to the size of South Carolina’s road problems (to quote Sen. Nikki Seltzer from earlier this year). But it’s the only hope for getting any new money for road repairs this legislative session, as senators couldn’t agree on any of the stand-alone road bills in play. And it could still fail if the House – which did get a stand-alone bill passed – refuses to go along. This would be foolish, as the House bill offers less money ($80 million, plus $40 million in the House budget for bridges) and has no chance of passing the Senate by session’s end June 6. When there’s no time for a grand bargain, a small bargain will do. The needs are too great for the House to let this chance for more road money get by. The same is emphatically true for two crucial House bills lingering in the Senate – one to restructure government, the other to reform South Carolina’s ethics law. Both have been debated enough for senators to recite the details by heart – the first in some form or other for decades. The proposed Department of Administration would concentrate more executive functions of state government – information technology, human resources, fleet and property management – where they belong in the governor’s Cabinet. It’s not perfect, but it converts more independent fiefdoms into a more coherent, accountable executive branch than the state has ever had before. Just so with ethics reform; a bill equally imperfect, but the strongest overhaul that has come this close to passage in 20 years. H.3945 eliminates leadership PACs, broadens income disclosure, heightens penalties for violations and gives more authority to the state Ethics Commission to probe complaints. Yes, enforcement could be stronger; yes, the Legislature remains the final arbiter of penalties. Yes, the bill leaves lawmakers with several hidey-holes to stash their secrets. But “the perfect is the enemy of the good,” to quote the proverb. South Carolina legislators are notorious for using the quest for perfect as an excuse to make no change at all. That can’t happen this year. These tests – roads, ethics, restructuring – are only three of a daunting list of challenges this state faces that include education, health care, reforms associated with security breaches at the Department of Revenue; the list goes on. Lawmakers cannot keep running out the clock, managing only one major initiative, if that, every legislative session. To quote the governor, “When can we become a state that can do more than one thing in a year?” You’ve got less than a week left, lawmakers. For the good of the state, make it count.

Several years ago, I heard a story on the radio about disabled children in our community who longed to play sports like baseball and golf but needed access to the games. It was at that moment that I developed the concept of the OnPoint CFO & Controller Services Home Run Challenge. After seeing a billboard for the Mauldin Miracle League, I decided to learn more about the organization and discuss ways to get the community involved. I have played baseball since I was a kid and have coached my children’s teams for over 10 years, so it was hard to imagine a child being denied this opportunity to participate. I remember taking my son to one of the Mauldin Miracle League’s games a few years ago where, to our surprise, they invited him to play. I knew it was a day that would forever be remembered by both of us. I recall developing a deep admiration for the coaches and volunteers who make it possible for children with mental and physical disabilities to take part in this favorite American pastime. Seeing baseball made accessible to these children and learning of the lifelong impact the sport has on their lives encouraged me to make the Mauldin Miracle League a beneficiary of the OnPoint CFO & Controller Services Home Run Challenge. The Home Run Challenge is a seasonlong initiative that turns home runs hit by Greenville Drive players at Fluor Field into donations for three Upstate charities: the Mauldin Miracle League, Safe Harbor and the SC Children’s Theatre. These organizations provide services that make our communities a more desirable place to live – hence our support. Organizations like the Mauldin Miracle League and the SC Children’s Theatre foster community and add vitality. Safe Harbor provides crisis intervention for victims of domestic and sexual violence and helps them rebuild their lives. Many of us cannot imagine a Greenville without these organizations.

IN MY OWN WORDS by BRIAN CLARK

Individual giving can be done in several ways: One can give time, support or monetary donations. However, the truth is that monetary donations are the lifeblood of these organizations. Our community’s collective giving is critical for these charities to accomplish their missions. Take for example the SC Children’s Theatre, which uses donations to fund drama classes in Title I schools and put on uplifting shows for the patients at Marshall Pickens Hospital and special needs children at the Meyer Center. Or Safe Harbor, which provides food, shelter and counseling to women in need and teaches dating violence prevention in schools. For the past three seasons, the Challenge has donated over $10,000 to the charities. Let’s take the challenge to the next level. I want to invite individuals and companies to “join the challenge” by pledging donations of any amount for the 2013 Greenville Drive season at onpointcfo.com/home-run-challenge. You can make a per-home run pledge, a one-time gift or join as a corporate sponsor. We will add more charities to our beneficiary list as we receive additional pledges. Large donations continue to be important and we welcome giving at this level. However, for those who have not given to charity because you feel that your small donation may not make a difference, we ask you to join other donors so that collectively your donations can go further. I invite the Upstate to step up to the plate this season and support the OnPoint CFO & Controller Services Home Run Challenge.

Brian Clark is president and CEO of OnPoint CFO & Controller Services.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013


DHEC adopts new midwifery rules Legislature considers bigger changes SHANDI STEVENSON | CONTRIBUTOR

Two of Joffre and Kimberly Swait’s five children were born at home with Licensed Midwife Elizabeth Randolph in attendance. Swait says home birth is not for everyone, but feels “each family should make their own choice” about the birth experience they want. Views such as Swait’s explain the firestorm of controversy that has surrounded recent attempts to revise South Carolina’s midwifery laws. Uncertainty remains as a new set of regulations takes effect this month and a new bill (H.4024) makes its way through the Legislature, but it seems compromise will succeed the contentious atmosphere of the past two months. The Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has regulated licensed midwives in South Carolina since 1982. Becoming a licensed midwife is a rigorous four- to five-year process, Randolph said. The candidate must complete an approved course of study and an apprenticeship. Once training is complete, candidates must pass a written examination created by NARM, the North American Registry of Midwives, and an oral examination administered by DHEC. Once licensed, midwives must renew their licenses every two years, complete 32 hours of continuing education every two years, and meet other requirements. They must also follow detailed guidelines that require them to work in partnership with a physician and to refer high-risk cases to a physician. Earlier this year, DHEC won legislative approval for Regulation 4210, which aligns DHEC’s licensing requirements with NARM’s requirements for Certified Professional Midwives, and creates a Midwife Advisory Council to advise DHEC. The new regulations will take effect this week, according to DHEC communications director Mark Plowden. The South Carolina Licensed Midwives Association (SCLMA) called the change a step in the right direction, but only a step. SCLMA had advocated expanding South Carolina midwives’ scope of practice to include suturing and administering IV fluids, local anesthetic and Vitamin K injections, which South Carolina now forbids and NARM credentialing allows. The

group did not get its wish. Meanwhile, Reps. Kris Crawford and Robert Ridgeway created a firestorm with the introduction of House Bill 3731, which proposed to transfer the regulation of midwives from DHEC to the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (DLLR). Ridgeway, a former chief of obstetrics and gynecology in Clarendon, argued that DHEC licenses facilities, not people, while DLLR is responsible for licensing doctors, nurses and other medical practitioners. Ridgeway’s bill also moved regulation approval to a committee under the Board of Medical Examiners rather than the full Legislature. Ridgeway said while he has nothing against NARM as a credentialing body, the decision of which standards to adopt should be South Carolina’s to make, not an outside organization. But what created the firestorm were provisions that changed terminology from “licensed midwife” to “lay midwife” – which critics found demeaning – and added a new requirement that licensed midwives be supervised by an obstetrician. Current law requires midwives to work with a physician, but this can be a family doctor and the physician need not be present at the birth. Critics insisted the change would make it impossible for midwives to practice, as few if any obstetricians can or will attend out-of-hospital births. H.3731 “would have eradicated midwifery,” says Elizabeth Randolph. The bill never made it through committee. Instead, Crawford and Ridgeway introduced a new bill, H.4024, which was referred to the Committee on Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs on April 24. Ridgeway says H.3731 was “drafted in haste” and had some unfortunate wording. He believes H.4024 is a much-improved bill, with a better chance of passage. “If you want to figure out which way the horse is going, you have to stay in the saddle,” he said. H 4024 eliminates the obstetrician requirement. While it still calls for midwives to be overseen by the BME Board of Medical Examiners instead of DHEC, the seven-member supervisory committee now includes one licensed physician with at least three years’ experience “comanaging patients with midwives” and one “consumer of midwife care.” R.4210, the new DHEC regulation, takes effect this week, but Ridgeway’s bill is still in committee.

JOURNAL NEWS

What’s Right in Health Care Environment Leadership Award in Asthma Management GHS Children’s Hospital is one of only three asthma management programs nationwide to receive the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2013 National Environment Leadership Award in Asthma Management. Hailed as a national model for asthma care, GHS Children’s Hospital is leading the way in addressing asthma disparities. Its multidisciplinary, multilingual, family-centered program provides medical care, case management, school/day care visits and environmental control home visits to more than 4,000 children and adolescents with asthma each year. Breast Health Program Receives National Accreditation GHS’ Breast Health Program has been granted three-year/full accreditation designation from the National Accreditation for Breast Centers. This is the second time GHS has received this designation. GHS was the first program in the Upstate to receive it in 2009. Fit-Friendly Worksite GHS has been named a Platinum Fit-Friendly Worksite by the American Heart Association. This is the fourth year GHS has received this award and the second year in a row it has achieved platinum status. The FitFriendly program recognizes employers who champion the health of their employees and work to create a culture of physical activity and health in the workplace. GHS Marches for Babies GHS was recognized as the top fundraising team in Greenville County for 2013 at March for Babies. GHS raised more than $95,000 for the March of Dimes, which will be used to help babies get a healthy start.

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MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7


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Tucked off of Cleveland Street, there’s a wooded area where the Reedy River winds through downtown Greenville and past the Greenville Chamber of Commerce. Among the trees, you may have braved the metal “cheese grate” bridge over the river, a structure that many canines fear to tread. Diane Gluck, co-founder of the nonprofit Patients First, calls the spot “a gem waiting to be discovered.”

More Than a Decade of Planning

With the help of the community, the approximately three-acre area, along with the Chamber’s lower parking lot, will be transformed into a Cancer Survivors Park. More than a decade in the making, this space for respite, rejuvenation, education and empowerment has had multiple potential locations, but will now be nestled along the banks of the Reedy, said Gluck. “We’re defining ‘cancer survivors’ very broadly. It’s those people who are kicking cancer right now and also people who have lost someone to cancer and who are surviving and carrying

“Gardens reflect life. They are ever-changing and every-renewing. They oftentimes present tremendous challenges and don’t turn out exactly as planned, but with persistence, the rewards are worth the efforts. There is a rhythm to a garden – a continuity that offers hope and a sense of peace. A stroll through a garden invigorates the spirit and re-anchors us within the cycles of life.” TOM KEITH, Cancer Survivors Park landscape architect, who battled melanoma

on in their memory,” she said. Patients First, a nonprofit organization, is introducing the Cancer Survivors Park with a blessing-of-the-grounds ceremony on June 1 in conjunction with National Cancer Survivors Day on June 2. Groundbreaking on the threephase construction

CANCER SURVIVORS PARK PARTNERS Arbor Engineering City of Greenville Design Strategies Greenville Chamber of Commerce Greenville Parks and Recreation Naturaland Trust NEXT

Patients First ReWa Upstate Forever

is slated for fall 2013 and organizers are hoping to raise $3.3 million of the total $4.5 million cost through private donations. Upon completion, the park will later be turned over to the City of Greenville as part of its parks system. The central feature of the park will be a circular celebration plaza and 40-foot-tall pavilion with a canvas cover that Gluck calls “part sculpture, part structure.” On the lower level of the pavilion, there will be an education concourse. There will also be a water wall with an open space, along with pocket gardens featuring areas designed for groups to gather or for individuals to seek solitude. The gardens will feature plants with traditional healing properties and a children’s play area. There are four planned access points to the park, including at the Chamber and a new Church Street overlook. Throughout the park there will be meditation stations, spots where people can embrace their feelings at the time: everything from faith and reflection to the “darker side” of the cancer journey, said Gluck. Programming will also offer education, awareness, therapeutic programs and classes.

Mapping the Journey

The pavilion’s lower level will feature a labyrinth (a popular tool for calming the mind and body) created with stone

BLESSING OF THE GROUNDS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS PARK June 1, 5-6:30 p.m. 24 Cleveland St., Greenville cancersurvivorspark.org 864-255-5010 info@patientsfirstsc.org


JOURNAL NEWS

THE ‘CHEESE GRATE’ BRIDGE Along the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail, there’s an infamous bridge that cyclists dismount for and dog owners are seen carrying their trembling pooches across. It’s referred to as the “cheese grate” bridge, and the advent of the Cancer Survivors Park will replace it with an elegant suspension bridge. The plan is to fly in the 12-foot wide bridge piece-by-piece to reduce disruption of traffic on the Swamp Rabbit Trail.

like that used throughout Falls Park. There will also be a bell that can be heard throughout the park – allowing anyone to ring it to celebrate a joyful moment, said Gluck, anything from a cancer-free report to a birthday. “When you hear it, you too can share in that joy,” she said.

Remembrance

Local architect Ben Rook has contributed immensely to the project, creating the design for the park, said Gluck. “Tom Keith was the landscape architect, and Tom (who died earlier this year) and I were heavily involved in this concept,” said Rook. “This is going to be an educational venue within a natural environment, so people will be able to learn things from this park in terms of cancer and treatment.” Design of the park relies on symbolism, “using space, sculpture and words to inspire and create an experience as opposed to a place you go to,” Gluck said. A walk through the park may represent a person’s journey or connection with cancer. “We all enter at different points and travel different paths – and though it’s

“There will be areas of repose, and people that are going through the tortures of the whole cancer process will be able to go there and find solace.” Cancer Survivors Park designer BEN ROOK

an uphill climb, we all hope to get to that celebration pavilion,” she said. Patients First has partnered with multiple organizations. Throughout the planning process, everyone from survivors to healthcare providers have been part of focus groups to provide input on what they want to see in the park, Gluck said. To incorporate a key part of life for many of those touched by cancer – spirituality – there is the later possibility of a woodand-glass nondenominational chapel on the other side of Cleveland Street.

A Spirit of Healing

Organizations that are often competitive, like Greenville Health System and Bon Secours St. Francis, are uniting to support the park, said Patients First executive director Kay Roper. “These organizations are coming together in a healing mood to bring this park to the city,” she said. What’s more, two historic rivals, J.L. Mann High School and Greenville High School, recently announced they will combine their fund-raising efforts during this fall’s Spirit Week to mutually benefit the Cancer Survivors Park (though still competing, of course, to see which school raises the most money). Anyone “who has a heart for cancer” may support the park, Gluck said. Residents, survivors and families have affordable contribution opportunities and organizers are discussing everything from engraved bricks to a “faces of cancer” photomosaic collage. The Cancer Survivors Park is for the entire community to come together in a spirit of healing, Gluck said. “We want to change the way you live just by being in this park.”

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MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9


journal news

No surprise: Greenville is growing

SAME DAY SERVICE WITHOUT BODY SHOP PRICING

All municipalities in county SC’s biggest cities 2010 2012 Percent see population growth Location estimate estimated change CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

BEFORE

AFTER

COLORS

est. 1995

700 Woodruff Road, Greenville (Near Beck Academy)

extremecolorsgreenville.com 800.985.1778

Greenville is growing. It should come as no surprise to those who live here, but the latest population estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau show Greenville County is growing – and faster than the state as a whole. According to U.S. Census Bureau estimates, Simpsonville had the largest growth among the six municipalities – at 4.5 percent – from 2010 to July 2012. Greenville, which finds itself landlocked, recorded the smallest increase among the six municipalities – 2.7 percent – but even that was faster than South Carolina’s 2.1 percent population growth. Greenville is the county’s most populous city at an estimated 60,709 residents.

Columbia

129,765 131,686 1.5

Charleston 120,422 125,583 4.3 N. Charleston 97,662

101,989

4.4

Mt. Pleasant 67,866

71,875

5.9

66,520

68,094

2.4

Rock Hill

Greenville 59,140 60,709 2.7 (Source: U.S. Census Bureau)

It is the state’s sixth-largest city. Columbia, Charleston, North Charleston, Mt. Pleasant and Rock Hill all had populations greater than Greenville. Those cities were the only cities in South Carolina with more than 50,000 people. South Carolina’s population grew to 4,723,723 residents, a 2.1 percent increase over the 4,625,364 who lived here in 2010. Mauldin was Greenville County’s secondfastest-growing municipality, growing 4

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JOURNAL NEWS percent to 23,808 people. Mauldin’s pop- growth among all U.S. cities and towns ulation in 2010 was 22,889. Growing nearly with at least 50,000 people. Its populaas fast at 3.9 percent was Greer – with an tion grew 4.9 percent between 2011 and 2012. estimated July 2012 popThe others in the top five were Midulation of 26,645 land, Texas; Cedar Park, – and Travelers Texas; South Jordan, Rest at 3.8 perGreenville County Utah; and Clarkscent at 4,750. ville, Tenn. Greenville 2.6% of total land in SC No state County as a whole Greenville County other than grew 3.6 percent to an 9.9% of total populaTexas had estimated population of tion estimated for more than one city 467,605. July 2012 on the list of the 15 Nationally, eight of the 15 fastest-growing large fastest-growing cities and towns cities. were in Texas. New York continued to be The fastest-growing municipalithe nation’s most populous city ties are spread across Texas, from the high plains of West Texas to the Houswith 8.3 million residents. ton suburbs. San Marcos, along the InOnly 3.7 percent of the country’s terstate 35 corridor between Austin and more than 19,500 incorporated places had San Antonio, had the highest rate of populations of 50,000 or more.

GROWTH IN GREENVILLE COUNTY Location

Fountain Inn

2010 estimate

change

(Source: U.S. Census Bureau)

       

July 2012 estimated

7,648

3.2%

7,898

Greenville

59,140

2.7%

60,709

Greer

25,646

3.9%

26,645

Mauldin

22,889

4.0%

23,808

Simpsonville

18,244

4.5%

19,056

Travelers Rest

4,576

3.8%

4,750

451,219

3.6%

467,605

4,625,364

2.1%

4,723,723

Greenville County South Carolina

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journal news

Graham, Zoellick campaign on immigration reform JENNIFER OLADIPO | STAFF

joladipo@communityjournals.com

W

hen it comes to the health care needs of a special person in your life, just good isn’t good enough. At Rolling Green Village, we go beyond ordinary customer service to provide something more: true hospitality. Our newly renovated Assisted Living Center is now open. Schedule a visit by calling (864) 987-4617.

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U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham and former head of the World Bank and U.S. Trade Representative  Robert Zoellick stressed immigration reform as a linchpin in for the country’s economic progress at a press briefing Wednesday afternoon at the BMW Zentrum. “If we fail, nobody’s going to touch this issue for a decade,” Graham said. One of the self-professed “Gang of Eight” senators pushing an immigration reform bill through Congress, Graham said failure to pass his immigration reform bill would be “cutting our own throats economically.” Graham emphasized legal immigration with a path to citizenship as the best way to prepare the economy for the 80 million Baby Boomers who will soon leave the workforce and begin collecting Social Security payments. He said skeptics need to be convinced that the country can absorb 11 million workers “on our own terms,” but millions more than that will be needed moving into the future. He said that companies such as BMW have a demand for highly skilled workers that the nation currently cannot supply. Graham was confident that the plan – which includes guest worker status, a long path to citizenship, a spot at the back of the line, an English language requirement and fines for those who have entered the country illegally – would pass easily in the Senate. He expressed less confidence in Congress, and said President Obama has been “good to work with” on the issue. Among other threats to the economy and competitiveness, Zoellick listed Affordable Care Act changes to healthcare that will come to fruition in 2014. He said it is so complex that even those who support the idea have trouble getting behind it. Graham said the law would be a “train wreck,” then attributed the comment to an unnamed Democratic senator. He also said failure on the immigration bill would have implications for other legislation, such as the debt ceiling debate that has vexed Congress for nearly two years. “If we fail on immigration, I don’t see anybody engaging in debt in a serious way,” Graham said. Zoellick added that recent signs of economic growth will likely push debt ceiling legislation further down the road. Zoellick said immigration reform is

Former World Bank President Robert Bruce Zoellick, left, and U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham speak at the BMW Zentrum.

an important part of a larger structural adjustment that needs to happen in the country. The term “structural adjustment” has been used in past decades for World Bank economic policies in developing countries, but has recently appeared in discussion of the U.S. economy. As in those other countries, he said, tax reform and reducing government regulation on business are keys to structural adjustment, as is education reform. Zoellick had just returned to a trip from China, and talked about seeing firsthand the economic gains that country is making. Graham added that cyberattacks from the country are the biggest impediment to a productive political relationship, and the problem needed to be remedied soon. It has eclipsed the battle over China’s artificially inflated currency, he said. Zoellick cited his longtime friendship with Graham as his reason for making an appearance to lend his support to Graham’s 2014 reelection. It appears to be an attempt to underscore the economic soundness of Graham’s policies. “Every once in a while I come across somebody who is good not only at talking, but also getting things done,” Zoellick said, indicating that Graham was one of those people and citing Graham’s focus on immigration, tax reform and spending control. Graham had spoken the previous day at the Rotary Club of Spartanburg’s weekly meeting, talking more generally about issues such as last year’s attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya, and the Justice Department’s seizure of journalists’ records.


journal news

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journal news

Shining Brightly

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The recent renovations at Hyatt Regency Greenville shine, but perhaps not as brightly as the coveted AAA Four Diamond Award that the hotel just received!

This achievement ranks the Hyatt as

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14 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013


Journal community

St. Anthony’s pastor says community support affirms school’s impact CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Fr. Patrick Tuttle, pastor of Saint Anthony of Padua Catholic School, gives a high five to one of the students in the hallway of the new school.

Greg Beckner / Staff

New School, New Dreams

The two schools on a large city block of Gower Street stand in stark contrast with one another. The old St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School is an aged onestory building with cinder block walls that are literally dissolving, a leaky roof, plumbing and electrical systems that have been patched together by volunteers. The new school, occupied by students for the first time on May 13, features a full-sized gym that allowed the school to hire a physical education teacher for the first time, a library, a sound-batted classroom dedicated to music, classrooms that are drenched with natural light and a rooftop terrarium with South Carolina native plants. It’s a new school that was years in the making – and became a reality thanks to a community-wide drive to provide the Little Catholic School That Could with facilities that equaled the results teachers have achieved with their students. Most of St. Anthony’s 113 students are Baptist. Many come from impoverished and disadvantaged backgrounds and demographic ST. ANTHONY’S continued on page 16

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journal community ST. ANTHONY’S continued from page 15

groups that typically don’t do well in school. But over the past 16 years, 94 percent of students who attended St. Anthony’s, which runs from pre-kindergarten to sixth grade, went on to graduate from high school. More than half went on to college, said Fr. Patrick Tuttle, a Franciscan friar and St. Anthony’s pastor. The school calls among its former students a federal appeals court judge, business owners, lawyers, teachers and an actor, Orlando Jones, who donated a beautiful wood table for the new school. Tuttle likes to tell the story about a police car pulling

into the school parking lot one day. When he asked the officer if everything was OK, the officer nodded and asked if Miss Carolyn was still in Room 6. He had come to tell his former second-grade teacher that he had made the rank of captain. The fundraising effort involved the entire community. Two St. Anthony’s students raised hundreds of dollars by setting up a hot chocolate stand on cold winter days. A woman who lives in the neighborhood gave 35 cents because that’s all she had in her pocket at the time. Three Baptist churches gave, too. So did Greenville’s oldest public high school and numerous businesses and corporations.

PHOTOS BY Greg Beckner / Staff

Left: The chapel in the new Saint Anthony of Padua Catholic School. Above: The new school uses large windows for natural light and innovative desk design called nodes. Top right: The new Saint Anthony of Padua Catholic School.

16 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013


journal community Altogether, $6.2 million was raised, including money to pay the increased costs of operating the new school for three years. “We feel terrifically affirmed,” Tuttle said. The school plans to open the gym, with a shock-absorbing floor donated by St. Francis Bon Secours, to the public. The gym has a scoreboard, a 5.1 sound system and six basketball hoops. A spiral staircase leads from the first floor to the second. The library, which was expanded from 300 books to more than 3,000 titles, was furnished with donations from the bankrupted Borders Books chain, Tuttle said.

Perfect ion

The school’s chapel is filled with furnishings provided by friars from Providence, R.I., including four 19th-century German stained-glass windows. The chapel also contains a stained-glass window of a dove that is the exact replica of a window in the Vatican. The chapel furnishings were stored in Tuttle’s garage for a year and a half during fundraising and construction of the school. The church has not yet decided what it will do with the old school building, Tuttle said. Possibilities being considered are tearing it down, using it as a free college or turning it into a nursery for single parents, he said.

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MAY 31, 2013 | The Journal 17


journal community

Study sheds light on childhood sexual abuse in SC SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy addresses the crowd gathered for the launch of the Silent Tears project to protect the state's children from sexual abuse.

Sposa Bella Photography

plicated and will need key stakeholders to get together to see what will work for South Carolina,” said Victor Vieth, NCPTC executive director. “A lot, though, can be implemented at the local community level without policy reform.” Wilson said the report lists six areas “we need to focus on as a society. Education, prevention, investigation, prosecution, legislation and coordination are areas that we need to comprehensively look into and stand together as one voice for those that don’t have a voice.” Wilson committed to sharing the report with the National Association of Attorneys General so other states can use it as well.

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Many of the child protection professionals interviewed in the study expressed frustration about the time required to resolve child sexual abuse cases – often two years or more. The study recommends a special commission investigate ways to bring these cases to trial within six months of their original report date. Many of the report’s recommendations focused on training and education. Seminaries, law and medical schools were advised to develop or expand their curriculum to provide at least 10 hours of training on child abuse, while universities and colleges were urged to scrutinize existing curricula and implement

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A new study commissioned for South Carolina recommends child sexual abuse cases be brought to trial no longer than six months after they are first reported. A comprehensive list of recommendations for better protecting South Carolina children from sexual abuse was released in Greenville Tuesday at a press conference attended by U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy, S.C. Rep. Bruce Bannister, state Attorney General Alan Wilson, 13th Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins and others. The study was commissioned by Greer businessman and philanthropist Bob Castellani and his wife Lisa, who gave $250,000 to the National Child Protection Training Center (NCPTC) at Winona State University in Minnesota to conduct the statewide assessment. “God just came to us and told us to get involved, and so we did,” Castellani said. Seven counties were chosen to participate and 166 child protection professionals were interviewed, with another 404 people completing an online survey. “Some (of the recommendations) will be relatively easy to do and others will be more com-

undergraduate and graduate reforms. The report recommended the state develop a child protection training facility to conduct “trench training” for current child protection professionals with facilities for mock trials, crime scene investigations and forensic interviews, as well as an online portal to make workshops available 24/7 for members. Noting that child sexual abuse cases can often be hard to prosecute, the report recommended that investigators take photographs of the crime scene in every case – which rarely occurs now – and set a goal of collecting at least five items of corroborating evidence. Forensic interviews should also be conducted within two hours of the first report to authorities, the study said. One in four women and one in six men have been sexually abused before the age of eighteen, according to the Silent Tears S.C. website (silenttearssc.org). Delinquency and crime, often resulting from substance abuse, is more prevalent in adolescents with a history of child sexual abuse, as is teenage pregnancy, the website said. Sen. Scott told the 100+ people gathered at the press conference Tuesday that he will be an advocate for reform and hopes this study can be a “beacon of light for the rest of the nation.”

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Teeing off for a cause Blade Junior Golf Tournament event to benefit Camp Courage On the heels of the BMW Pro-Am, The Blade Junior Classic golf tournament comes to town this summer. However, it doesn’t feature celebrities and pros, but talented young golfers ages 8 to 18. For nearly 15 years, this tournament has offered a venue where aspiring golfers can showcase their talents. In 2004, pro golfer Jay Haas became involved to add a charitable component to the mix. Now the proceeds from A Night of Courage benefit Greenville Health System’s Camp

Courage, a place that offers a camping experience for children with cancer or blood disorders. Participants may be campers rather than patients at the Pleasant Ridge Camp and Retreat Center in northern Greenville County. In previous years, the tournament raised $100,000 for the camp. Play also supports the S.C. Junior Golf Association and First Tee of Greenville. The festivities kick off on July 14 with A Night of Courage, featuring cocktails and heavy hors d’oeuvres, entertainment and auctions. And the golf tour happens on July 15 with the BK Bryan Junior-Am, named for a local businessman who supported the children’s hospital. Winners will be honored at a dinner at the Thornblade Club.

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journal community

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2 Greenville County students diagnosed with meningitis Students at Woodland, East North Street diagnosed with illness

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Two Greenville County students have been diagnosed with meningitis. The state Department of Health and Environmental Control confirmed Tuesday that a student at East North Street Elementary had a mild case of viral meningitis, while a case involving a Woodland Elementary student is being treated as bacterial. The two cases are not related, district officials say. Bacterial meningitis is rare but is sometimes deadly. Woodland Principal Wanda Mote informed parents over the holiday weekend that an unidentified student at the school was diagnosed with meningitis and the school was advised by the state Department of Health and Environmental Control to treat it as bacterial even though the latter hadn’t been confirmed. The school was disinfected following DHEC guidelines. Cleaning continued after students returned to school. The hallmark symptoms of meningitis are fever, headache and stiff neck. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, confusion, sleepiness or difficulty waking up, sensitivity to light, lack of interest in eating and drinking and a rash. Motes said parents should take their children to the doctor immediately for evaluation if they have any symptoms within the next 10 days. East North Street Elementary was also cleaned and disinfected after a student there contracted viral meningitis. Viral meningitis is fairly common and usually does not cause serious illness. Bacterial meningitis, however, is more rare but can cause brain damage and death. About 15 percent of the people who contact bacterial meningitis die from it. Meningitis is usually spread through close, personal or prolonged contact with respiratory or oral secretions, according to DHEC. Unlike a cold or the flu, the bacteria that cause meningitis cannot be spread by casual contact or by breathing the air where an infected person has been, according to the state health department. According to DHEC, there are three

W h at i s m e n i n g i t i s ?

Meningitis is inflammation of the thin tissue (meninges) that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. There are several types of meningitis, including bacterial, which can be fatal. W h at a r e t h e s y m p t o m s ?

The hallmark symptoms are a sudden high fever, headache and a stiff neck. Other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, confusion, sleepiness or difficulty waking up, sensitivity to light, lack of interest in eating and drinking and skin rash. H o w i s i t t r e at e d ?

Bacterial meningitis is treated with antibiotics. How can I prevent meningitis?

Wash your hands. Don’t share drinks, food, straws, eating utensils, lip balms or toothbrushes. Get enough rest. Exercise regularly. Eat a healthy diet with plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough. Get immunized. F o r m o r e i n f o r m at i o n :

Go to scdhec.gov/health/disease or nlm. nih.gov/medlineplus/meningitis.html.

types of bacteria that usually cause bacterial meningitis: H. Influenzae (Hib), strep pneumonaie and Neisseria meningtisdis. The strep germ is the same one that causes most ear infections and pneumonia. It is a common bacterium and can be found on cultures of the noses in up to 70 percent of all adults, according to DHEC. Children are required to be vaccinated for Hib before attending school. The pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended for all children. To prevent Neisseria meningitides, the Centers for Disease Control and DHEC recommended all 11- to 12-year-olds be vaccinated with the meningococcal conjugate vaccine. A booster dose should be given at 16. The vaccine is not required for students, although it is recommended (some colleges require it) for college freshmen living in dormitories, military recruits, anybody with a damaged or removed spleen or anybody who is traveling or residing in countries in which the disease is common.


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In 2011, Greenville County had 39 deaths from prescription drug overdose, the highest number in the state. The OIG reports law enforcement discovered seven doctors in the county who were serving as “pill mills” where residents APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF could buy drugs easily. Patients also often “doctor shop” to obtain prescriptions from different providers, experts say. amorris@communityjournals.com “For every overdose death, there are hundreds of wrecked South Carolina has to take charge of its prescription drug lives through addiction which are then multiplied by their addiction problem and develop a strategy to more effectively impact on immediate families and friends, let alone the financial costs to society,” wrote Inspectackle this life-destroying affliction, accordtor General Patrick J. Maley. ing to a report from the recently formed In four county profiles, neighborstate Office of the Inspector General (OIG). ing Pickens County was cited as havCalled a national epidemic by the Cening “one of the highest per capita opiters for Disease Control (CDC), prescripoid Medicaid prescription rates in the tion painkiller overdoses were responsible Prescription drug overdose deaths in for more than 15,500 deaths nationwide in Greenville County in 2011, highest in SC state.” A task force to reduce the number of painkiller prescriptions in emer2009. According to the OIG report, there gency rooms resulted in a 50 percent rewere 225 prescription overdose deaths in duction in prescriptions in the county, South Carolina in 2011. wrote Maley. The Office of the Inspector General The problem has gotten better, but is was formed to investigate and detect Prescription drug overdose deaths in still an issue. A subculture that takes ad“fraud, waste, abuse, mismanagement, SC in 2011 vantage of quality assurance measures misconduct, violations of state or federhas emerged, he wrote. These patients al law and wrongdoing in the Executive demand painkillers, knowing that emerBranch,” according to its website. gency room doctors may be afraid of reAbusers often favor prescription pain- People who died from a drug ceiving a negative satisfaction survey. killers, sedatives and stimulants used overdose in the US in 2010, according The state’s Prescription Monitoring to treat a variety of conditions, from to the CDC. Nearly 60 percent Program (PMP), a electronic prescripchronic pain to ADHD. involved prescription drugs.

19

Greenville County had highest prescription overdose deaths in SC

DEATH RATE/100,000 POPULATION*

OIG calls for prescription drug abuse crackdown

*Deaths are those for which poisoning by drugs was the underlying cause.

tion database, is an excellent tool, but Maley adds that only 22 percent of the state’s physicians participate and “much fewer actually use it for prescription decisions.” Maley called on physicians to lead the way and use the database. The OIG report commends agencies that treat addiction and others that strive to stem the tide of prescription drug abuse. However, the state lacks a comprehensive approach and the report outlines steps to help address the issue. Recommendations include training doctors, utilizing the PMP, establishing internal controls to detect the small number of doctors prescribing the majority of prescription painkillers, conducting on-site audits, discipline by the medical board, investment in addiction treatment and review of processes. To read the complete report, visit oig.sc.gov.

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22 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Education group funds innovative teaching ideas CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com First-graders at Rudolph Gordon Elementary will learn about economics, math and community through Gatorville, a sixshop “neighborhood” that includes a cinema, general store, sweet shop, post office, salon and music hall. Through the make-believe community, the students will learn economic concepts from supply and demand, use of money and jobs. Brushy Creek Elementary students will create stop-motion animated videos based on the book “Colonial Voices,” using scripts they write, sets they design and scenes they photograph and video. Meanwhile, students at Beck Academy will go to “med school” to learn about human body systems and diseases. The projects are among 21 awarded $20,311.43 in grants to Greenville County teachers by Public Education Partners to fund innovative teaching initiatives in the coming school year. The grants were awarded to educators who demonstrated a strong desire to improve their craft by learning to employ innovative, evidence-based practices in their

classrooms, said Grier Mullins, executive director of PEP of Greenville County. The grants cover initiatives across all subjects, grade levels and areas of the county. The grants will support research, professional development opportunities and instructional materials. The grants are funded through several major donors, including Michelin North America, TD Bank, the Simpson Foundation, BlueCross BlueShield South Carolina and hundreds of individual donors. Cindy Turner, music teacher at Thomas E. Kerns Elementary, received $1,000 to attend the World Music Drumming Workshop in Charlotte. Jennifer Hauser and Kelly Mangum, fourth-grade teachers at Simpsonville Elementary, received $759 to purchase Zuma rocking chairs for fourth-grade students. Jessica Hutcheson, a 4-K teacher at Brushy Creek Elementary, and Joy Rogers, a Brushy Creek kindergarten teacher, each received $935 to attend visual thinking strategies training. Keli Wright, an English for Speakers of Other Languages teacher at Grove Elementary, received $950 to buy five Kindle Fire tablets to use for student peer tutoring, small-group instruction, modeling and co-

operative learning and writing. Kristie Smith, the first-grade teacher at Rudolph Gordon Elementary, received $1,000 to help start an interdisciplinary unit titled “Shop ’Til You Drop in Gatorville.” A.J. Whittenberg Elementary 4-K teacher Mary Ann Harrison received $1,000 to buy “big books” to be used for shared reading activities. Meghan Ladue, music teacher at Crestview Elementary, received $1,000 for a course in the Orff Schulwerk processes for elementary music instruction. Lake Forest Elementary music teacher Melody Richardson and A.J. Whittenberg music teacher Nancy B. Davis each received $1,000 to purchase Orff musical instruments. Pompey Hammontree, Buena Vista Elementary third-grade teacher, received $994.28 to buy two iPads that will be used by students to access pre-recorded introductory reading lessons. Gateway Elementary instructional coach Sheila Moss received $1,000 to attend a summer intensive education coaching workshop. Beck Academy’s fine arts teacher Mary Michel Baker received $1,000 to attend the National Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling conference.

Greer Middle French teacher Michelle Philipp received $945 to buy seven Flipcams to be used to foster students’ oral French communication skills through student-created films. Beck Academy seventh-grade teacher Shawn Uppole received $993 to buy science equipment such as stethoscopes, models of a lung and a knee and books for a “medical school.” Fine Arts Center teacher Donna Shank Major received $976 to attend the Arrowmong School of the Arts to learn new printmaking techniques to transfer images on clay. Berea High drama teacher Katie Halstensgard received $1,000 to attend training at Stony Brook’s Southampton Arts for a week of instruction titled, “A Unique Approach to Storytelling for Directors.” J.L. Mann science teacher Libba K. Mattison received $1,000 for training by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Eastside High English teacher Matthew Moore received $1,000 for nine cover tables and whiteboards that will foster collaborative learning. Travelers Rest drama teacher Timothy W. Brown received $1,000 to help pay for a National Consortium for the Teaching About Asia study trip to China.

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journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Justin Rainer, program manager with JACO Environmental, pries the back off of an old refrigerator during a demonstration on how the appliance can be recycled at the Duke Energy Wenwood Operations Center in Greenville. The metal from the refrigerator will be sent to a metal recycler and is just a small part of what can be recycled.

Fireflies, an icon of Southern summers, are fewer and harder to find in some communities along the coast lately because of urban development and changes in forestry practices. Is the firefly population in your neighborhood declining? Find out by joining this year’s Firefly Count on June 1 from 5-11 p.m. The census is part of the Clemson University Vanishing Firefly Project. People anywhere can participate in the project by participating in the field day, submitting data via the iTunes Firefly app or submitting data via clemson. edu/public/rec/baruch/firefly_project/firefly_survey.html.

During the refrigerator recycling process, refrigerants are removed and sent to a qualified handler.

On May 23, the winners of the Learn to Fly Contest, sponsored by South Carolina’s Greenville Downtown Airport; Airwolf Aviation; Greenville Jet Center; and the Upstate Business Journal, were revealed. The contest received 18,000 entries, but 15,000 of the entries came from the third-place winner, Wade Shealey. His prize was a Discovery Flight lesson worth $149. Second-place winner, Joshua Eskew, also won a Discovery Flight lesson, which consists of 45 minute sessions of both air and ground instructions. The grandprize winner is Kristina Carandang, who won a Private Pilot Training program with all the materials and exams to receive her private flight pilot’s license (worth $8,000).

From left: capacitors suspected of containing PCBs, a switch containing mercury and used compressor oil. The oil is recycled for use in other industrial equipment. The mercury-containing switches are sent to a qualified handler for recycling and the capacitors are shipped to a hazardous waste incinerator for destruction.

The Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce announced that the next Cash Mob will take place on June 6, 4 p.m., at Papa Murphy’s, a local pizza restaurant, located at 6015 Wade Hampton Blvd. in Taylors. Sponsored by Greer State Bank, The Cash Mob is a part of the Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce’s ongoing campaign to support their shop local campaign entitled “Keep the Green in Greater Greer.” For more information, contact Jodi Fortenberry at 864-877-3131, ext. 105 or visit greerchamber.com.

Duke Energy sliced a refrigerator apart May 21 to promote the utility’s ongoing efforts to persuade consumers to trade their old refrigerators for more energy-efficient models. Workers “fileted” the inefficient fridge by detaching its doors, chipping out foam insulation and revealing the numerous materials removed from a refrigerator during the recycling process. Duke also highlighted the energy-saving and environmental benefits of recycling outdated appliances, revealing how older refrigerators in garages and basements consume three times more energy than newer energy-efficient models. The visual demonstration was intended to graphically exhibit how customers can control their energy costs.

The Korean War Veterans Association, Foothills Chapter of SC #301, will perform the dedication of the new Korean War Veterans Memorial on Saturday, June 1, at 11 a.m. in Conestee Park. The Honors Walkway of engraved memory bricks leads up to the new memorial. Engraved bricks can be purchased at $50 for a single brick and $75 for a double brick. For more information about brick purchases, contact Lew Perry at 864-574-5669. Members of the Foothills Chapter have been raising funds for more than two years with great response from the Greenville community. Donations may be sent by mail to the Foothills Chapter of SC #301, P.O. Box 6903, Greenville, SC 29606.

NOW

Enrollment for the next session of the Evening Music Program of Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music Inc. is open through June 3. The program, open to ages 7 and up, teaches students to perform Appalachian music with acoustic instruments: guitar, mandolin, fiddle and banjo. Fee per six-week session is $60 and instrument rental is $25. Classes are held in Greenville, Easley, Pickens and Clemson. Coordinator contacts include: Susan Ware-Snow, 864-979-9188, susu9196@gmail.com for Easley and Greenville; Steve McGaha, 864-283-4871, blindpunkin54@yahoo.com for Pickens; or Ryan Wilson, 864-360-4763, bipryan@gmail.com for Clemson. For more information on the YAM program, visit YAMupstate.org or call 864-878-4257.

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Clemson University recently received national recognition as a Bicycle Friendly University at the bronze level by the League of American Bicyclists. Clemson is one of 58 schools to earn the designation. The league’s Bicycle Friendly University program recognizes institutions of higher education for promoting and providing a more bicycle-friendly campus for students, staff and visitors. There are four designation levels – bronze, silver, gold and platinum – and the recognition stands for several years. In the future, Clemson will be able to reapply for designation at the bronze level and advancement to the silver level.

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Charleston Cooks and Culinary Summer Camps are offering classes for a range of ages taught at Charleston Cooks! Offerings include knife skills, basic culinary skills, baking and more. For more information and to register, visit charlestoncooks.com or call 864-335-2000.

24 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013

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The cheerleaders at JL Mann High School will be holding their annual Kiddie Cheer Kamp on June 10-13, 8:30 a.m.-noon at the high school.  Any student age 4 to 14 is invited to attend. Registration fee is $55. Participants will receive a special camp T-shirt, a certificate of participation, a group photo and a daily snack/drink. For more information and a copy of the registration form, visit greenville.k12.sc.us/jlmann. 

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments lege Club Extended Day Program, which provides afterschool academic assistance and enrichment activities for students in K5-fourth grade. Legacy was one of eight organizations selected to receive a grant from a total of 85 applications. The Lions College Club Extended Day Program is a critical component in improving poor academic performance and behavior issues for Legacy’s most at-risk students. For more information, visit legacycharterschool.com.

Front row, from left: Kendall Hillson, Graysen Dotson, Brittany Williams, Jennings Bryson, Meg Mckinley and Ross O’Keefe. Back row, from left: leadership teacher Bev Cannon, Mary Ann Pires and leadership teacher Bobby Black. Not pictured: award winner Keylee King.

Langston Charter Middle School students who were chosen as recipients of Dicey Langston Leadership Awards for the 2012-2013 school year were recently honored and met Mary Ann Pires, who received a Young American Medal for Service from President John F. Kennedy in 1962. The Dicey Langston Leadership Award is given to recognize students who exemplify leadership specifically in the areas of character, community and civics. Thanks to grants and donations through the PTA, the speech department at Washington Center has acquired multiple new voice output communication devices. As a result, students who don’t have the ability to speak now have a way to speak messages and communicate with others. Some communication devices are small enough to be worn around the neck Washington Center student so that communication is Frankie Robinson uses a DynaVox Xpress communication device. always accessible. Legacy Charter School recently received a $76,445 grant from Greenville Women Giving in support of its Lions Col-

The National Dance Education Organization (NDEO) has announced that Mireille Fehler, a junior at Eastside High School and The Fine Arts Center, has been selected by the National Honor Society for Dance Arts as a national winner of the 2013 NDEO Artistic Merit, Leadership and Academic Achievement Award. In addition, NDEO recognized Jan Woodward, dance instructor at The Fine Arts Fehler Center, for outstanding teaching, leadership and guidance. See a list of the 2013 winners, finalists and honorable mentions with videos at ndeo.org/ nhsdaaward2013.

Phillip Reed, Furman University music major and son of Stone Academy music specialist Jeanie Reed, performs on the sitar for Stone Academy fourth-graders.

K4 student Jay Watson experienced what it was like for Michelangelo to paint the Sistine Chapel as he painted on paper taped to the underside of a table.

The Art Club at Mitchell Road Christian Academy hosted an Art Fun Day for the preschool students. Under the leadership of their art teacher, Wendy Jackson, they had various “art stations” based on famous artists.

Second-grade student Peter Pundys.

Heather Boling’s second-grade students at Mitchell Road Christian Academy were inspired by the book “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs.” They imagined that they needed to go back to the abandoned town of ChewandSwallow and wrote about what they observed there. To accompany their writings, they created papier-mâché “food samples” of items they brought back from the town.

Greenville Middle seventh-graders participated in Mountain Trail Outdoor School in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina last month. Students explored aquatic, forest and wildlife biology along with Appalachian geology and history. 

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

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MAY 31, 2013 | The Journal 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Frame Warehouse and Gallery will be hosting an event to benefit the cancer patients’ foundation, Locks of Love, on Nov. 7, 2013. Two professional hairdressers from Brushy Creek Barber Shop will be cutting hair to benefit the organization, which makes wigs for children who have lost their hair due to cancer treatment. Donors are asked to begin growing their hair now to be able to donate 10 inches. Frame Warehouse will also donate $200 to the Greenville Health System’s Cancer Center for the first 20 people who donate their hair. During the event, original hat designs by Frame Warehouse artists and other donors will be available for auction. For information about the event, call 864-3221218. For more information about hair donation requirements, visit locksoflove.org/donate. Greer Relief recently held its 2013 Volunteer Recognition Celebration. The largest group of volunteers contributed their time to the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) program by preparing taxes for 240 households and bringing $214,506 back to the community. The ceremony also announced the annual awards of service: The Helping Hands award was presented to Caroline Hendricks. The Spirit of Giving Award was presented to Truman Henderson and Tom Ebetino, owners of Salon 906.  The 2012 Volunteer of the Year Award was presented to Guy Cloer. For more information, visit greerrelief.org or call 864-848-5355.

Stevie Rae Lucas and 2012 Volunteer of the Year Guy Cloer.

Spirit of Giving Award: Truman Henderson, Stevie Rae Lucas, Tom Ebetino.

The KDS/Mow Commercial Properties cycling team raised $9,645 for senior citizens in Greenville during the recent 2013 Wheels for Meals fundraising event. This year, 225 cyclists participated, raising $150,000 for meals to homebound clients in the community. Since the founding of KDS in 2008, they have raised almost $56,000. Piedmont Natural Gas recently announced three ini-

tiatives and $11,000 in donations and grants to help the Salvation Army serve residents in Greenville, Pickens and Oconee counties. Piedmont Natural Gas first provided $5,000 to boost the food supply after learning about a shortage due to a 13 percent increase in people seeking assistance. A $6,000 grant will help launch a new Clean Start program to shelter and help people find permanent housing along with programs to help them complete their GED requirements. Lastly, a team of 12 associates volunteered at the Rutherford Street campus during Earth Week. Meals on Wheels of Greenville recently named Catriona Carlisle as its new executive director. Carlisle served as development director for the organization for the last four years and has more than 12 years of development and nonprofit experience. Meals on Wheels currently serves 10 million meals in America and the local affiliate will celebrate its 45th anniversary in October. For more information, visit mealsonwheelsgreenville.org. The South Carolina Arts Commission for the 2013 fiscal year awarded a $6,357 grant to The Cultural Arts Foundation Fountain Inn (CAFFI). CAFFI is an endowment arm of the Fountain Inn Center for Visual & Performing Arts. The support given by the grant will allow the organization to continue offering quality entertainment and arts education for the Golden Strip and surrounding areas. Those who are supporting the grant project are: Bosch-Rexroth, Caterpillar, Rich’s Foods and W.W. Grainger. Belk recently celebrated its 125th anniversary with 125 days of service by improving Title 1 schools in low-income communities. Belk employees painted classrooms, built bookcases, beautified school grounds, planted gardens, updated playgrounds and installed educational murals. Employees also organized in-store book drives and offered school principals personal makeovers with up to $300 in donated merchandise, clothing and makeup. The Belk store in Spartanburg volunteered at Woodland Heights School. During a community presentation, the Duke Energy Foundation presented the Upstate Air Quality Advisory Committee with a $75,000 grant to support the Clean Air Upstate outreach, education and action strategy in the region. The grant will be split into two components with FEATURED VENDOR

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Representatives of the TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, supports the arts in the Greenville community with gifts to Greenville Symphony ($12,000) and the Metropolitan Arts Council ($15,000). Pictured, from left, are: Alan Ethridge, executive director, Metropolitan Arts Council; David Lominack, market president, TD Bank; Bill Johnson, executive director, Greenville Symphony; and Edvard Tchivzhel, music director and conductor, Greenville Symphony. A $10,000 to Greenville Tech Foundation was also awarded.

a portion used to expand current no-idling programs in the region and the remainder used to develop a public outreach and education initiative. The initiative will provide a regional approach to reduce emission levels before the region is potentially impacted by additional EPA regulations. On May 26, Soby’s and Nose Dive contributed 100 percent of their Sunday brunch sales, an estimated $20,000, to the Red Cross – Oklahoma Tornado Victim’s Relief effort. At least 80 people, including staff and volunteers donated their time (and tips) for the event. The Ninth Annual Upstate Diversity Leadership Awards Dinner held May 23. The Upstate Diversity Leadership Award Recipients were David Esch was the International Award Recipient; Debbie Green, Merrywood Elementary School was the K-12 School Award Recipient; Marie Smith was the Individual Award Recipient; Maxim Williams and Camilla Hertwig, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System were Nonprofit Award Recipients; Alyssa Gillis was the College Award Recipient; Bre Byrd was the High School Award Recipient; and Rob Hoak, TD Bank was the Business Award Recipient.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE Chautauqua Festival to highlight American characters and superheroes

LEGENDS

come to

KNOW WHAT: “American Legends”

WHO: 2013 Chautauqua Festival WHEN: June 14-23

LIFE CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

SO YOU

ADMISSION: Most events are free INFORMATION: greenvillechautauqua.org

clandrum@communityjournals.com

AMERICA HAS NO SHORTAGE OF LEGENDS. “You can start with George Washington and make your list,” said George Frein, Greenville Chautauqua’s artistic director and one of the performers in this year’s Chautauqua Festival. “There’s no shortage of people whose entrance into the American story was very significant.” Many times our legends are ordinary people turned hero. Davy Crockett was a backwoods frontiersman who almost became president. Susan B. Anthony was a disenfranchised spinster who challenged the law of the land. Herman Melville was a whale ship deckhand whose voyages became world classics. Malcolm X was a dope peddler and street hustler who became a human rights activist. Those characters will be featured in this year’s Greenville Chautauqua Festival running June 14 through June 23. In addition to the American legends, the festival will relive the Legends of Camelot and experience what Frein calls the “tree roots of American legends” in Falls Park on June 21. Chautauqua has been described as “history that can’t stay in a book.” “History is more than names and dates,” Frein said. “Talking about the past is different than talking in the past.” Chautauqua makes the people of history come alive – portrayed through a part-actor, part-scholar in costume. After the actor performs a monologue, the floor is opened to audience questions. Because of that, Chautauqua is not just an actor working from a script. Instead, the performers immerse themselves in the FESTIVAL continued on PAGE 28

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JOURNAL CULTURE FESTIVAL continued from PAGE 27

Davy Crockett events in Greenville

Friday, June 14, 7:30 pm, Under the Tent at Greenville Tech Saturday, June 15, 9 am, Discussion at The Phoenix Inn Sunday, June 16, 12:30 pm, Celebrity luncheon at The Phoenix Inn ($30) Wednesday, June 19, 11:30 am, Kroc Center Sunday, June 23, 7:30 pm, Under the Tent at Greenville Tech

Susan B. Anthony events in Greenville

Saturday, June 15, 7:30 pm, Under the Tent at Greenville Tech Sunday, June 16, 12:30 pm, Celebrity Luncheon at The Phoenix Inn ($30) Monday, June 17, 9 am, discussion at The Phoenix Inn Thursday, June 20, 11:30 am, Centre Stage Saturday, June 22, 2 pm, The Handlebar

Herman Melville events in Greenville

Sunday, June 16, 12:30 pm Celebrity Luncheon, The Phoenix Inn ($30) Sunday, June 16, 7:30 pm, Under the Tent at Greenville Tech Tuesday, June 18, 9 am, Discussion at The Phoenix Inn Friday, June 21, 11:30 am, Fountain Inn Arts Center

Malcolm X events in Greenville

Saturday, June 15, 2 pm , The Handlebar Sunday, June 16, Celebrity Luncheon, The Phoenix Inn ($30) Monday, June 17, 11:30 am, The Urban League Tuesday, June 18, 11:30 am, the Kroc Center Friday, June 21, 9 am discussion at The Phoenix Inn Saturday, June 22, 7:30 pm, Under the Tent at Greenville Tech

Legends of Camelot event in Greenville

Friday, June 21, 7:30 pm, Falls Park (Rain site: Tent at Greenville Tech) Saturday, June 22, 9 am, discussion at The Phoenix Inn

28 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013

PHOTO PROVIDED

characters by reading biographies and historic writings. It takes about a year to learn a new character. Larry Bounds, a Wade Hampton High teacher and a veteran performer in Chautauqua Festivals, will portray Davy Crockett in this year’s festivals. He’s also portrayed Winston Churchill, Albert Einstein, Houdini, Samuel Johnson and General Wade Hampton. Bounds said he learned quantum physics when he researched Einstein, smoked a cigar and drank Scotch when he was learning about Churchill and learned to fire a flintlock rifle and made a coon-skin hat while researching Davy Crockett. “Chautauqua performers tend to go allout,” Bounds said. That’s because they don’t want to get stumped by a question from the audience. “If you can’t answer the question, it ruins the illusion,” Frein said. To avoid such a calamity, Frein says he goes through his monologue and comes up with likely questions each line may generate. “Not being able to answer the question is the living fear of a Chautauqua performer,” he said. “I’ve dreamt about that.” When asked if he had ever been stumped by an audience question, Bounds answered, “Never, or not so anybody could tell.” The first Chautauqua started as an adult education program for Sunday school teachers at a campsite on Chautauqua Lake in upstate New York. Tent Chautauquas

a very partisan environment, the teacher said. That eventually led to Crockett’s ouster from Congress. “Chautauqua reminds us of the lessons we should have learned but weren’t paying attention,” Bounds said. Susan B. Anthony was a key figure in the women’s suffrage movement. Malcolm X, son of a Baptist preacher who spent time in prison for being a petty thief, dope peddler and hustler, Ken Johnston portrays King Harold in “Legends of Camelot” in became a voice for human rights. Greenville Chautauqua. Herman Melville, who thought he should be known as toured America, including one that the author of the great American novel, “Moby Dick,” wrote about commoners instead of kings regularly stopped in Greenville. But Chautauqua stopped during the Great and royalty, something that led to his books Depression. It was revived in the 1970s as a being mostly ignored while he was living. But being an American legend may not be way to promote humanities education. Greenville’s Chautauqua began in 1999 all that it’s cracked up to be. Melville never when Frein, who is a founding member of received the recognition he deserved as a the National Chautauqua Tour, moved to writer. Women were given the right to vote in 1920, 14 years after Susan B. Anthony Greenville. Bounds said it was easy for him to decide died. Malcolm X was assassinated. After Davy Crockett lost his bid for a to portray Davy Crockett. “What son of the ’50s would not take the opportunity fourth term in Congress, he said, “You all to be Davy Crockett? He was one of the go to hell. I’ll go to Texas.” He was killed in the Alamo. country’s first superheroes.” Bounds said the politics of Crockett’s time is a whole lot like the politics of the last two elections. Crockett didn’t let political party handcuff him and always fought for the interests of his constituents in


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JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 5 / 3 1 , M A I N S T R E E T F R I D AY S

Groove Planet R&B cover band. 5:30 p.m., admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ MainStFridays.aspx 5 / 3 1 , C H A R T E R A M P I T H E AT R E

Darius Rucker Former Hootie frontman plays country hits. Tickets: $28.50-$55. heritageparkamphitheater.com 5/31, THE HANDLEBAR

Milli Fungus/Four 14 Popular local-band co-bill. Tickets: $5. handlebar-online.com 6 / 7 , M A I N S T R E E T F R I D AY S

The Flashbacks ’50s and ’60s beach music combo. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ MainStFridays.aspx 6/7, PEACE CENTER

Jake Shimabukuro Ukulele virtuoso. Tickets: $25. peacecenter.org 6/13, DOWNTOWN ALIVE

Outshyne Local country-rock rising stars. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ DTAlive.aspx. 6 / 1 4 , C H A R T E R A M P I T H E AT R E

Kings Of The Mic Tour featuring LL Cool J, Public Enemy, Ice Cube & De La Soul Once-in-a-lifetime lineup of rap legends. Tickets: $27.50-$64. heritageparkamphitheater.com 6/20, THE HANDLEBAR

Brock Butler Perpetual Groove front man makes a rare solo appearance. Tickets: $8. handlebar-online.com 6/20, DOWNTOWN ALIVE

30 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013

Kelly Jo Connect Powerhouse vocalist fronts versatile combo. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ DTAlive.aspx


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

On the edge with nief-norf Festival presents avant-garde music at Furman The nief-norf Summer Festival may not be as well known (or as mainstream) as Fall for Greenville, but the festival’s artistic director, Andrew Bliss, is trying to change that. The festival is a two-week celebration of contemporary classical and avant-garde performance, composition and discussion that takes place (for the most part) at Furman University. It is an outgrowth of the niefnorf Project, a percussion-centered WHAT: nief-norf Summer Festival ensemble that specializes in composing and performing avant-garde music. The phrase “niefWHEN: Through June 7 norf ” comes from someone’s description of the ensemble’s WHERE: Furman University music: “That music is weird; it sounds like ‘nief-norf.’” INFO: niefnorf.org The festival, which started on May 28 and runs until June 7, is celebrating its third year, but it really began in 2010, when Bliss and Furman percussion professor Omar Carmenates (this year’s festival host) worked together on the American premiere of a piece by composer John Luther Adams. “I was at Furman in 2010, working with Omar on the Adams piece,” Bliss says, “and I was really taken aback by the beauty of the campus and how retreat-like it is when you’re actually on the campus proper.” At around the same time, an idea started germinating in Bliss’s mind. “I’d been travelling around to a lot of different institutions as a solo artist,” Bliss says, “working with different programs at each university. And at each school, I kept meeting one or two students who had particular interest in this music, and I started thinking, ‘What if I could get all these people together in the same place? We could do some very powerful things.’ “And between that being in the back of my head, and arriving at Furman in 2010, I put the two together. I called Omar one day and dropped an enormous idea on him, and he said yes. So that first year, he was instrumental in making this come to life.” Bliss is quick to point out that the concerts are only a part of the experience of the niefnorf Summer Festival. “Yes, there are six or seven concerts in 10 days, because the premise that nief-norf operates on is that we’re first and foremost a performance ensemble,” he says. “But people who are involved with this ensemble really believe that a lot of powerful things can happen if we don’t just focus on performance of contemporary music, but also on the creation of it, by working with composers, and also on the discussion of it, by connecting that work to scholarship. The festival represents those beliefs, those three tiers. There’s a performance workshop, a composition workshop, and then over the weekend we host a professional conference called the nief-norf Research Summit.” But it’s when he discusses the concerts that Bliss’ passion for his music, which he refers to not as classical or avant-garde but as “contemporary,” truly shines through. “The faculty will be giving a performance of John Luther Adams’ ‘A Strange, Sacred Noise,’” Bliss says. “It’s a 75-minute percussion quartet that is absolutely phenomenal. I think it’s one of the best pieces in his catalog. One of the faculty members, Andy Lee, is giving a five-hour solo performance of Dennis Johnson’s ‘November.’ And then the following week, the compositional fellows will have works that they’ve just written given world premieres. There will be SIX world premieres that night!” The general public might feel a certain amount of intimidation when the term “avantgarde” comes up, but Bliss says the festival is designed to dispel any reluctance or confusion. “One of our main missions is to dispel that intimidation factor,” he says. “It’s important to remember that all music was once new. We encourage all people to come to these concerts, and we try to present them with a deep sense of passion for the art but no highbrow attitude.”

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MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL CULTURE

Hot season ahead for FIRE Seven shows on tap for Fountain Inn theater

2013-14

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clandrum@communityjournals.com

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For the first season that he planned as artistic director for the Fountain Inn Repertory Experience (FIRE), Zac Pelicano fell back on some of his other theater firsts. FIRE is opening its 2013-14 season with “The Wizard of Oz,” the play in which Pelicano started his theater career. He was nine and played a munchkin in the South Carolina Children’s Theatre production of the American classic. “Even at the age of nine, I knew it was a mammoth story on stage,” he said. “It is a staggering challenge, but I thought I’d start with the biggest show first.” The cast will be the largest of any show FIRE has done in its six-year history. The 2013-14 season will include four main stage shows and three FIREside radio shows, said Pelicano, a S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities graduate who was appointed FIRE’s artistic director in October. “I believe in quality over quantity,” he said. “We’ve been a bit overextended the last couple of years and I think it was wearing on our actor base and our volunteer base.” FIRE’s first radio show of the new season will be “Dracula,” arriving appropriately on Halloween. Pelicano said he’s planning a bonus that will “add an eerie, creepy layer” for those who attend the show in person. The radio shows are recorded for broadcast on Fountain Inn’s AM station, WFIS, and are available for download from FIRE’s website. In December, FIRE will present the musical version of “A Christmas Carol.” The show was the first Pelicano performed with FIRE as an actor several years ago. “It’s a high-octane musical to go with the familiar story that everybody loves,” he said. FIRE will perform an original radio show, “Old-Time Radio Christmas Revue,” on Dec. 19, featuring singing, comedy and Christmas stories. “Surprisingly, there’s not that much available when it comes to Christmas radio shows, so we wrote our own,” Pelicano said. In January, FIREside Radio will feature “S. Holmes of Baker Street,” a story Pelicano wrote that features a new take on Sherlock Holmes. The story is set early on in the bombings of London in World War II and features an elderly Sherlock Holmes, he said. “Seussical Jr.” is up next from Feb. 28 to March 8. The final show of the season is “Steel Magnolias,” a show that reminds Pelicano of spring although some of the story takes

“Wizard of Oz” Oct. 4-13

“Dracula” FIREside radio show Oct. 31

A

“A Christmas Carole, the Musical” Dec. 6-15 “Old-Time Christmas Revue” Dec. 19 “S. Holmes of Barker Street” FIREside radio show Jan. 17 “Seussical Jr.” Feb. 28-March 8 “Steel Magnolias” April 18-27

AND ABOUT TICKETS... Main stage shows $18 adults $15 seniors $10 students FIREside Radio shows $12 adults $10 seniors $5 students Season tickets $90 adults $75 seniors $50 students Information: 864-409-1050 place over Christmas. “It’s a story of death and rebirth and there’s a lot of that in the air in the spring,” he said. “Steel Magnolias” will be staged from April 18 through April 27. Tickets for the 2013-14 season go on sale on June 1.


scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

Ballet Spartanburg will hold auditions for the children’s ballet “Carnival of the Animals” on June 1, at the Dance Center Studios at Chapman Cultural Center. Nine- and 10-year-olds should arrive 9-10 a.m.; 11- and 12-year-olds should arrive 10-11 a.m.; and anyone 13 years old or older should arrive 11 a.m.-noon and they should bring their pointe shoes. This dance will be performed Oct. 18 and 19 and rehearsals will begin on Aug. 16. For more information, call 864-583-0339. The Artistry Workshops and Gallery located at 12 Andrews St., Greenville, will host Westwind Tie Dye Classes. The adult classes are $35 per session and participants can bring up to four garments, but not towels or sheets. The classes will be held on June 9 and July 21 from 1-5 p.m. The kid’s classes are $25 per session with a T-shirt and materials provided. They are June 4-5, 11-12, and 18-19, and July 16-17 from 9 a.m.-noon. To sign up, contact Karen Dillingham at 864-414-0722 or kdillie@bellsouth.net.

We are...

• Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology. • Doctors of Audiology. • Angie Gerbasi, Courtney Russo, Susan Valenti & Lisa Ramos.

And WE ARE…

“Esto Perpetua Sunset II” by Bonnie Bardos

Longtime Spartanburg thespian Teresa Stuart Hough has received the community’s most prestigious arts recognition, the David W. Reid Award, for 2012. She received “Reincarnate” by Nathan Galloway the non-object sculpture that represents the Hough The Artists’ Guild of Spartanhighest recognition and burg will host “Perceptions” by commendation for voluntary involvement and artists Bonnie Bardos and Nathan support of the arts in Spartanburg at the annual Galloway during the month of Peggy Gignilliat Society party on May 7. For 41 June at Chapman Cultural Center. years, Spartanburg’s art community has preThe exhibit runs June 1-28 and is sented the David W. Reid Award to outstanding open to the public at no charge volunteers. Recipients must first be nominated Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through a formal process that includes several and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. A reception letters of support. Nominees are then submitwill be held on June 20, during ted to a committee for final selection. Last year, the city’s monthly ArtWalk, in the award was made to Bill and Wendy Maythe Guild Gallery, 5-7 p.m. For rose. The award is named after David W. Reid, more information, visit artistsfounding father of Spartanburg Little Theatre guildofspartanburg.com. and public relations director for Converse College. Also, he was the founding president of The Arts Council of Spartanburg County in 1968 and served as president for 13 years.

journal culture

Professional & Personalized Services

200 Patewood Dr., Bldg B, Suite B-400 • 454-4368

GIF T CA RD

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

Book Your Lunch

with Dorothea Benton Frank at Thornblade Club Wednesday, June 12th, 2013 • 12pm

Tickets are $55 for one person, $80 for two people, include 1 copy of the new book, and must be purchased in advance by calling 675-0540 or online at www.bookyourlunch.com The queen of the SC beach book returns! Visit us behind Haywood Mall at 1175 Woods Crossing Road

MAY 31, 2013 | The Journal 33


journal culture

TM

A r t s Calendar M AY 3 1 - j u n e 6 Main Street Fridays Groove Planet May 31 ~ 232-2273 Greenville Little Theatre Annie Get Your Gun May 31-Jun. 22 ~ 233-6238 Metropolitan Arts Council One-Stop Open Studios Through Jun. 4 ~ 467-3132 Downtown Alive The Sound Committee Jun. 6 ~ 232-2273

The Warehouse Theatre A Little Night Music Through Jun. 8 ~ 235-6948 Greenville County Museum of Art Sarah Lamb Through Jun. 9 ~ 271-7570 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Photography by Tom Ebetino Through Jun. 14 ~ 233-6733 Upstate Shakespeare Festival Hamlet Through Jun. 16 ~ 235-6948 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Julie Hughes Shabkie Through Jun. 30 ~ 250-2850 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Artists of 10 Central Avenue Studios Through Jul. 12 ~ 242-1050 Greenville County Museum of Art William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570

Furman’s Music by the Lake Marches From Around the World Jun. 6 ~ 294-2086

Adapted by Kristin Sergel. Based on the stories by A.A. Milne Produced by special arrangement with THE DRAMATIC PUBLISHING COMPANY of Woodstock, Illinois

June 15-23, 2013 Peace Center Gunter Theatre

Centre Stage The Fox on the Fairway Through Jun. 8 ~ 233-6733

E E FR

si p Pe day h t r Bi y ! t r Pa age k c Pa If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in June, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package!

34 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013

Listen to the Ellis and Bradley Show on 100.5 WSSL or visit www.wsslfm.com for more details!

CCJR

For tickets call 467-3000 or visit scchildrenstheatre.org

June 3 - 8, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm; Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-672-2060 ext.2057


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HOME INFO Price: $699,900 | MLS: #1255400 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4 Square Footage: 4000-4199 Schools: Elementary Middle | High Contact: Charlotte Sarvis | 864.346.9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

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36 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013

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MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


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Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

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38 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013

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5BR/4BA Don’t miss this BASEMENT HOME in Simpsonville! Lots of upgrades! From the stacked stone wall to the Brazilian Cherry hardwoods...you will not be disappointed!

4BR/3.5BA Beaufitul 3500 SF home on culdesac street, Highly rated schools. Near Five Forks shopping. Woodruff Rd to Right on Shippers Lane, Left on Grimes Dr, Right on Honey Crisp Way

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Tracey Cappio (864) 567-8887 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Steve May 346-2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

WOODS @ NORTHCLIFF

BEAVER BROOK

FAIRVIEW POINTE

203 WILD GEESE WAY . $229,500 . MLS#1259766

4 BEAVER BROOK CT . $194,900 . MLS#1258703

231 HEATHERMOOR WAY . $194,900 . MLS#1259171

4BR/2.5BA Gorgeous home. Wonderful kitchen - every’s chef’s delight. Open floor plan. Spacious BRs. Great nhood amenities.Hwy 275, L on Edwards St, L on Old Buncombe, R on Watson, L on Newkirk, L on Wild Geese

3BR/2BA Lvely home on large lot with open floor plan & split BR concept. Nw carpet. Lg deck. Hwy 29 to Greer N on Hwy 290, R on Hwy 101, L on Milford Church, R on Groce Meadow, L on Beaver Brook Ct.

4BR/2.5BA Built by owner with all the conveniences. 3 car garage. Beautiful inside & out. Take I-385 South to Fairview Road, exit 27. Turn Right, go approximately 3 miles and Fairview Pointe is on the Right.

Contact: Scott Holtzclaw 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Andie Martin 982-1446 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kimberly Arnold 616-7310 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

EASLEY AREA

HADLEY PARK

WILDFLOWER MEADOWS

745 ZION CHURCH RD . $170,000 . MLS#1253449

332 MOONSTONE DR . $144,900 . MLS#1256766

4 SANDWORT LANE . $134,900 . MLS#1254791

3BR/1BA Unique Vintage home on 1.75 acres near new Easley High Schoo, Many interior updated featres * new landscaping. Hwy 123 through Easley, Left on Hwy 8 /135 for approx. 2 miles. Right on Zion Church Rd.

3BR/2.5BA Great townhome with garage. 385 South to Butler Rd exit, Right on Butler, Left into subdivision, Left on Auburn, Right on Moonstone, Home on Right

3BR/2BA Great home in wonderful location. Spacious rooms. Kitchen with lots of updates. Move-in ready. St Mark Rd just past Post Office, 3nd Left on Rock Crest, 2nd SD on Right, 1st Left, 1st home on Right

Contact: Mary Lou Barnhardt 293-4814 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Linda Brown 884-0966 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND WESTWOOD

OPEN SUNDAY, JUNE 2 FROM 2–4PM

ON THE MARKET

FOX VALLEY

WEATHERSTONE

501 WILLOW BRANCH DRIVE . $113,900 . MLS#1259498

20 MAPLE DRIVE . $94,900 . MLS#1253108

113 EBENWAY LANE . $64,500 . MLS#1249801

3BR/2BA Charming meticulously maintained home. Rocking chair front porch & great deck for entertaining. Right on Fairview Rd, Right on Grandview, Left on Davenport, Left on Vinewood, Left on Willow Branch

3BR/2BA Immaculate hm, great location. Fenced yard, shed, screened porch, covered front porch. Hwy 81 N (GVL St), Turn on Simpson Rd, L on Old Williamston Rd, R on Woodland, R on Rolling Green, L on Maple Dr

1/3 to 1/2 Acre Lots Weatherstone has released a limited number of builder ready lots - Ranging from 1/3- 1/2 acre & Priced in the mid to upper $60s. www.Weatherstone-Homes.com

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Jesse Childress 367-7018 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kenny Reid (864) 293-9090 Coldwell Banker Caine

SEARCH WEEKEND OPEN HOUSES AND ON THE MARKET LISTINGS. journalHOMES.com

Welcome to the Team! Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS is proud to announce new sales associates have joined the company.

BRENDA KINNE Garlington Road Cell 864-349-6910 bkinne@cdanjoyner.com

40 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013

SHANNON DONAHOO North Pleasantburg Cell 864-329-7345 sdonahoo@cdanjoyner.com

CHUCK MITCHELL North Pleasantburg Cell 864-320-6511 cmitchell@cdanjoyner.com

EDWARD RISAVICH North Pleasantburg Cell 864-608-4655 erisavich@cdanjoyner.com

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


JOURNAL HOMES e tur na g i S

e tur na g i S

e tur na g i S

720 Villaggio Dr. - Montebello

623 N. Main St. #7 - Downtown

25 S. Laurens St. - Downtown

$569,900 • 1254535 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$569,000 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$560,000 • 1259236 • Res. Or Com.

Gourmet Kitchen, stainless steel appliances, hardwoods, granite, loggia w/fireplace. Amenities. Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

e tur na g i S

Luxury townhome – walk to Downtown, ≈3000 SF, gated with 2-car gar. Pvt patio/garden, tons of storage. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Res or Commercial – Block off Main St. ≈ 2300 sf. Potential for 3 flrs living space, wine cellar & 2 car gar. No regime/parking fees. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

. Rd sta u g Au Area

. Rd sta a u g Au Are

3080 Earls Bridge Rd. - Easley

305 Jones Ave. #3 - Alta Vista

225 Meyers Dr. - Rockwood Park

$499,900 • 1237373 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$395,000 • 1257507 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$337,500 • 1255804 • 3 BR/3 BA

Mini Estate, ≈3500 sf w/two MBR suites on 2.20 ac, 3 lvl-4600 sf barn. Great features with many updates. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009

s ou lot rge n ac o G eo m ho

Sought after location, walking distance to dtwn, Great living space, lots of storage, Low maint. yd. Move in ready. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

ed ish nt n i ll F e Fu asem B

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109 Shadowood Dr. - Shadowood

7 Treecrest - Neely Farm

$335,000 • 1258892 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

$277,900 • 1257748 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

All brick on pvt, wooded ac lot! Fresh interior paint & updated lighting. 3rd flr can be kid/teen area w/1BR, 1BA + Bonus. Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

lue Va ndo T S o BE n -C Dtw

On cul-de-sac w/finished basement incls - kitchenette, gas fpl, office, BA and storage. New roof, and interior paint. Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

le ab d sir orhoo e D hb ig Ne

g tin Lis

114 Ashby Park Ln. - Ashby Park $229,900 • 1260113 • 3 BR/2 BA

Patio home w/great flr pln, lrg bkyd, 2 car gar, hdwds, scrn porch and irr. Sys. Updated carpet & arch. Roof ‘12. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

wn dto Mi

1001 S. Church St. Unit 403 - The Brio

204 Rainwood Dr. - Poinsettia

$205,000 • 1258401 • 2 BR/ 2 BA

$189,921 • 1228853 • 5 BR/3 BA

Like new! Open floor plan, lots of light. Offers: balcony, pool, workout rm & private gated parking. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Sought after street, ≈0.42 acres & 1990 SF, hardwoods, 2 fireplaces. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

Remarkable home w/5” wood plank floors, lrg backyard & 1 BR downs, on corner lot in established neighborhood Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

101 Ramblewood Ave. - Wildaire $179,500 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

Cul-de-sac lot, hardwood floors & built-ins, beautiful garden, convenient location. Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

J53

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

Agents on call this weekend

SCOTT CORRIGAN 908-8787 PELHAM RD.

KATHY FLEMING 918-2742 SIMPSONVILLE

ED BENTON 979-1144 WOODRUFF RD.

JOHN BENNETT 879-4239 GREER

JEFFREY MEISTER 979-4633 PLEASANTBURG

PAT GISSINGER 608-5009 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

ANDREANA SYNDER 915-4201 AUGUSTA RD.

cdanjoyner.com.

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S M AY 6 – 10, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE

SELLER

CANDLETON VILLAGE

$26,300,000 $2,257,500 $1,700,000 $1,250,000 $869,900 $783,447 $757,608 $635,000 $609,000 $590,000 $572,000 $540,000 $450,000 $427,000 $420,000 $417,000 $378,111 $376,000 $375,000 $370,000 $368,000 $364,000 $340,000 $337,500 $315,000 $300,000 $296,500 $290,000 $285,000 $285,000 $280,000 $278,000 $277,500 $277,000 $265,000 $260,000 $260,000 $256,553 $255,000 $248,149 $242,000 $240,000 $238,750 $238,500 $234,900 $234,784 $233,650 $232,500 $232,500 $229,232 $227,500 $223,000 $222,000 $220,500 $216,000 $213,000 $211,900 $210,000 $210,000 $209,332 $201,000 $197,500 $197,000 $195,000 $193,000 $182,000

CANDLETON VILLAGE APARTM CANDLETON VILLAGE LLLP 2944 N 44TH ST STE 250 CSMC 2007-C3 BENTON ROAD WFC TRAVELERS REST LLC 11440 SAN VICENTE BLVD STE 200 ABUNDANT LIFE MINISTRIES GREENWICH INVESTORS XXVI 559 SAN YSIDRO RD STE I COUNTRY MANOR HOLDINGS L FAIRVIEW 657 LLC 2110 OLD SPARTANBURG RD LOVELACE BEVERLY MARK III PROPERTIES INC PO BOX 170248 CARPENTER HOPE H (JTWROS REDEMPTION WORLD OUTREAC 635 HAYWOOD RD SYNOVUS BANK CRIMSON MARION STREET LL 4675 MACARTHUR CT STE 1550 GARRETT AMY E NANCE ROBERT LEON (JTWRO 501 SIENA DR JG BUILDERS INC ALFONSO JENNIFER G (JTWR 124 GRIFFITH HILL WAY SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND GREENBAUM MICHAEL P 27 W TALLULAH DR KELLY DOROTHY F MORGAN RECE E (JTWROS) 300 HIGHWAY 101 HOUSER CHARLES LLOYD WELLS FARGO BANK N A 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD JAMES OPLE M DISHNER AMY (JTWROS) 35 QUAIL HILL DR GULLEDGE JAY CLEMENTS MATTHEW (JTWROS 205 DOONBEG CT PINNACLE PROPERTIES OF G FONTAINE DANIELLE 205 SHANNON LAKE CIR HOLDER E PAUL III NEUFFER BLYTHE P (JTWROS 38 MOUNT VISTA AVE BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PEIGHTAL THOMAS DEVON (J 127 FORT DR TAYLOR GINGER G LEE SAM 512 N MAIN ST KOHL DANIEL A ILARDI CHRISTINE (JTWROS 9 SQUIRES MEADOW CT BUCKLEY WILLIAM H JR BELLINGER AMANDA L (JTWR 16 S SILVER VIEW LN ROBERTS MARY B BINKS ANDREW P (JTWROS) 29 SEABROOK CT FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG NASEREE TAJ PO BOX 15311 OLDSTROM ANGELA M COCARD ANNE 106 SCATTERSHOT LN RUDY J KARL KULHAN STORM J (JTWROS) 7 GREEN HILL DR MACMILLAN WALTER W (JTWR VANDYKE CAROLYN C (JTWRO 101 RIVER OAKS RD ROSTIN MICHAEL S & PAIGE ULRICH DEREK S (JTWROS) 9 BELMONT STAKES WAY MCLEAN AUGUSTUS A IV WILLIAMS SUSAN WALTON 232 CURETON ST PATTERSON DANIEL C SHORT MARIANNE D 102 N MAIN ST APT C BROWNING PETER R MARTIN BENJAMIN W 447 LONGVIEW TER CREWS REX B HIX LEON 706 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD BUTLER COVE LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC LLC 7301 RIVERS AVE STE 250 TRAN TRINH T PATRICK RITA B (JTWROS) 237 WOOD RIVER WAY MURRELL DONNA P GOODALL JAMES R (JTWROS) 105 CARILION LN MORROW MICHAEL A MARKEL JOHN ROBERT JR (J 103 EDISTO ST GRANBERG ELLEN M MCGRATH ALEXANDER F (JTW 2800 AUGUSTA ST WILCOXSON DUANE SHEALY LISA SHEA (JTWROS 14 CRUSOE CV FOWLER SARA P HORNEFFER KEITH B (JTWRO 1108 N MAIN ST SK BUILDERS INC KUTZNER-MULLIGAN JENNA M 75 GROCE MEADOW RD MUNIZ TERRANCE WILSON BRADLEY EDWIN 1001 KANGLEY DR CHEGUE SERGIO FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 1001 SEMMES AVE 2ND FL WILLIAMS LITTURA WILLIAMS JESSE V 12 EVERLEIGH CT VOELKER JOSEPH R HOLLAND GARY (JTWROS) 16 FAIYRLANDS LN DWELLING GROUP LLC STARKWEATHER STEPHEN J ( 205 BELLE OAKS DR KYLE COURTNEY THOMPSON EDWARD R 116 W FARIS RD GARRETT ROBIN MOORE BASS ALLISON R 135 WILLIAM ST CASH DANIEL FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 1001 SEMMES AVE 2ND FL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BENNETT ANNA R 318 BRIDGE CROSSING DR HERMAN GREGORY M SANDERS KELLY B 18 PELHAM SPRINGS PL COUCH JAMES KEVIN CUPELLI EMILY L (JTWROS) 4 RIVER WAY DR PRIEST JAMES I SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND 40 MARIETTA ST OBERMIER FAMILY TRUST WILLIAMS E PIERCE JR (JT 209 SHEFFIELD RD MCEWAN BARBARA VAN ALLEN PHYLLIS G 407 HUNTERS CIR APPLEGATE CYNTHIA S (JTW LOEWEN MATHIAS 9 ARBOLADO WAY STARKWEATHER JOAN M LINGER RONALD D (JTWROS) 6 MONTREAT LN KUHN DANIELA RANKIN ANDREW RICHARD 8 SILVERTHORN CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SOILEAU DEVIN V (JTWROS) 370 BRIDGE CROSSING DR NVR INC KILBURN BARRY W 127 CHAPEL HILL LN MOORHEAD STEPHEN S WILSON ANGELA A 319 CHENOWETH DR FORD ROAD PROPERTIES LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 D R HORTON INC CRIST ELMER (JTWROS) 29631 COPPER RUN DR SHAW ANSLEY N ROGOWSKI ALLISON L (JTWR 1001 S CHURCH ST UNIT 503 BLACK JESSE C AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 WILLIS GEORGE G STREET HARRY L (JTWROS) 121 HUMMINGBIRD RDG FULMER DORENDA D ABBOTT DAVID W (JTWROS) 134 HORSEPEN WAY ERICKSON ALFRED L WIEGMANN GRANT T 204 E PARK AVE UNIT 902 RUNION MARGARET L MCCROSKEY CHRISTOPHER DA 20 CHATELAINE DR

COLUMNS @ ROPER MOUNTAIN MONTEBELLO GRIFFITH FARM

PARKINS KNOLL QUAIL HILL ESTATES SYCAMORE RIDGE THE BROWNSTONES KILGORE FARMS STONEHAVEN SILVER RIDGE

SUGAR CREEK ROLLINGWOOD RIVER OAKS GLENS @ LEXINGTON PLACE

FOREST HEIGHTS COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS COUNTRY VIEW CARILION WILLIE H. MARTIN ROBINSON COVE

HOLLINGTON CHARTWELL ESTATES THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE 100 COURT ST CONDO COTTAGE @ HARRISON BRIDGE PARK HILL COLEMAN ESTATES WHISPER WALK BRIDGEWATER PELHAM SPRINGS PELHAM FALLS WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE BELMONT HEIGHTS HUNTERS RIDGE WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE TWIN CREEKS STONEWYCK BRIDGEWATER KELSEY GLEN CARRINGTON GREEN TUXEDO PARK CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON THE BRIO AUTUMN TRACE SWANSGATE BELL’S CREEK THE PARK DOWNTOWN MERRIFIELD PARK

42 THE JOURNAL | MAY 31, 2013

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD. ONEAL VILLAGE LENNOX LAKE REEDY SPRINGS THE HEIGHTS SHOALS CROSSING LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE IVY GROVE RICELAN SPRINGS SHELBURNE FARMS PLANTERS ROW JENKINS ESTATES PLANTERS ROW ALLISON’S MEADOW HERITAGE HILL COPPER CREEK THE GROVE KELSEY GLEN NORTHGATE TRACE SHOALS CROSSING BROOKSIDE SUMMER WOOD SHOALS CROSSING CANEBRAKE COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD SHOALS CROSSING ENCLAVE AT BRIDGES CROSSING IVYBROOKE CANEBRAKE TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD HADLEY PARK LONG CREEK PLANTATION WALKER ESTATES MAJESTIC HILLS STANDING SPRINGS BEAVER BROOK DIXIE HEIGHTS WATERMILL SHERIDAN PLACE CHEROKEE FOREST REID VALLEY GROVE PARK

PRICE

$181,500 $180,600 $169,900 $169,900 $168,477 $168,000 $167,500 $166,000 $165,500 $165,000 $164,143 $164,000 $164,000 $163,000 $160,000 $158,000 $156,500 $156,000 $155,985 $155,000 $155,000 $153,944 $153,000 $152,750 $151,000 $150,500 $150,000 $150,000 $149,900 $149,100 $149,000 $147,000 $146,500 $145,000 $145,000 $144,000 $143,750 $143,000 $142,800 $140,000 $135,700 $134,000 $133,000 WOODLAND HEIGHTS $132,000 TIMBER TRACE $132,000 REEDY FALLS $131,000 AMBER GATE $130,000 CREEKSIDE $129,000 JUNIPER RIDGE $128,000 MAGGIE VALLEY $126,550 MAPLE CREEK $124,000 GARRETT SPRINGS $120,000 $120,000 COUNTRY CHASE $119,900 COLE ACRES $117,000 DUNWOODY OAKS $117,000 WESTWOOD $116,500 STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES $116,000 BROOK GLENN GARDENS $115,500 INGLEWOOD $115,000 GIBSON HEIGHTS II $115,000 DUNWOODY OAKS $114,000 SUGAR CREEK VILLAS $113,500 OGDEN ACRES $112,708 WINDSOR FOREST $110,500 HILL PLACE $108,000

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BAN ALE TIMOTHY 108 LAWNDALE DR CAVANNA RAOUL L HARDESTY RODNEY D (JTWRO 30005 EDINBOROUGH DR QUINN SEAN MICHAEL BUMGARNER JACKIE R 9 MOONLIT DR SAINZ GUSTAVO A GARRAUX JANE M 21 BLUE SLATE CT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION CO MATLOCK EVERETT G 104 BROOKLINE CT MICHAELS STEVEN J HOWELL KENNETH E (SURV) 143 BIRKHALL CIR LAND BANK HOLDING GROUP BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT 1155 HAMMOND DR NE STE E5050 BUTLER HORACE L JR AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 SEARLE PROPERTIES LLC HUYNH TRANG 107 HIGHGATE CIR REEL PROPERTIES GROUP CO KRAFT KENNETH L (JTWROS) 104 TURNPLOW CT SPIER JEREMY F FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 7105 CORPORATE DR PTX-C2-35 HUEMMER CARL J TUPIAK TODD R (JTWROS) 37638 LILAC LN JOHNSON ROSALIE (LIFE ES AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 22917 PACIFIC COAST HWY STE 30 ONEY ROBERT O DURHAM BRADLEY LANE (JTW 4 BEAUFORT ST SK BUILDERS INC HOLDEN DONNA D 5 BROMLEY WAY HOWELL KENNETH E WENNING KATHLEEN M 2 PLANTERS GROVE DR HOFFMAN SETH R WATT CAROLYN 15 CHAPEL HILL LN STUTSMAN FREDERICK C (JT DONAHUE JOHN MICHAEL 900 N MAIN ST UNIT 1 EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION CO LOWE DEMIERELES T 16 MEDFIELD CT GALLUCCI RAYMOND ROSE CYNDY L (SURV) 13 KIMBERLYBROOK CT WILLBORN CAROL B AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL PEAVEY JAMES R 403 NORWELL LN PECK NICHOLAS A REVOC TR COBEN JASON M (JTWROS) 118 TICONDEROGA DR PENLAND NORMA JEAN GRAHAM PAUL K 6 GRANADA DR BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC GEORGE MILER INC 12 BRIDGWATER DRR GOLDSMITH JOHN A LOBERGER JEREMY M (JTWRO 104 WAYLINE CT PEAY LEADAIRE SPENCER STRANGE TERRA E 406 BEAVER TAIL DR MANDAP ROMMEL STROUD CYNTHIA M 696 IVYBROOKE AVE WILHOIT JONATHAN C ATHENS ANDREW W (JTWROS) 122 VALLEY FORGE DR BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC GEORGE MILER INC 12 BRIDGEWATER DR KEAR EMILY R BROWN KIM K 1301 ALEXANDRITE LN REYNOLDS LARK P AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 TOMPKINS JANE M CHAPPELL BENJAMIN F 403 MCCRARY CT RS & MS ENTERPRISES LLC AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 SECRETARY OF VETERANS AF GENT KEVIN 1110 W GEORGIA RD SHEALY STEVEN ADAM STRANGE LACY (JTWROS) 5 BEAVER BROOK CT RENAISSANCE HOME MAINTEN ODONNELL LINDSEY R (JTW 22 DIXIE AVE CORONADO LEONARDO JTRS AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD FAY RAYMOND L III CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOST 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD HENSLEY CHRISTIN L COLBERG JONATHAN 203 ROBERTA DR SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND TAT TRUNG H 3 ECHO VALLEY DR SCOTT BRENDA SHERMAN FOS SCOTT BISHOP 312 GROVE RD STYLES JOEL PERRY HAWKINS VICKIE V 1 SAVONA DR CAMPBELL JASON KERR HARPER GLENN ROBERT (JTW 125 BESSIE AVE GAUDERER BARBARA J MCDONOUGH-SIROIS MARGARE 32 ROCK SIDE CT SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND SULLIVAN STEPHANIA Y 103 RIVERBED DR ARCARO DONNIE L TREES MEGHAN (JTWROS) 103 WATERBURY CT HUNT JOYCE J LEE LAURA (JTWROS) 212 CREEKS FOREST DR EICHEL CARL R PILKENTON ERIC (JTWROS) 337 JUNIPER LEAF WAY AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC LARSON ANDREA (JTWROS) 313 FINNWAY CT SWARTZENTRUBER BONNIE LE MCINNIS MICHAEL R JR 4 ACKLEN DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG CORBIN KELLY 104 HEBER TRL DICHARD JOYCE S GOODNOUGH MARK A 117 ASHMORE BRIDGE RD COBB KENNETH P JACKSON TAMEKA C 901 N MAIN ST APT 6 SC STATE HOUSING FINANCE MORFORD AMY C 104 SUNNYDALE DR SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND VIA TRAVIS 248 OAK VALLEY DR OLSON MARIETTA B KUENY DONALD 110 FAUNAWOOD DR REVELLE JOE L GIUFFRIDA BEVERLY J (JTW 110 W LONG CREEK CT MILLARD BRANDI M LYNCH AMY W (SURV) 205 RAVENSWORTH RD HINES MADELINE O RICHEY NANCY S 141 INGLEWOOD WAY BOUDOUCIES MEGAN N BURDETT ASHLEY C 505 BRIGHTFIELD LN BURNS MICHAEL MCKAMY SARAH ELIZABETH 418 FAIRDALE DR DONOVAN DANIEL E CHAPMAN GRACE B 227 GOLDFINCH CIR MILLER BUDDY A SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND 40 MARIETTA ST BANK OF AMERICA N A MORSS JOSHUA M 113 CANEBRAKE DR GOECKELER MONA AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S Realtors® Report Positive Trends in Commercial Market with Increases in Income, Transactions Realtors® who practice commercial real estate have reported an increase in annual gross income for the third year in a row, signaling the market is on the road to recovery. According to the National Association of Realtors® 2013 Commercial Member Pro�ile, transactions and sales volume have also increased since last year.

The study shows median annual gross income for 2012 was $90,200, an increase from $86,000 in 2011 and is at its highest level since 2008. Brokers and appraisers reported the highest annual gross income while sales agents reported the lowest. The study’s results represent Realtors® who practice commercial real estate; these NAR members conduct all or part of their activity in commercial sales, leasing, brokerage and development for land, of�ice and industrial space, multifamily and retail buildings, as well as property management. “The commercial market is showing signs of improvement, which is re�lected in the positive trends in income, transactions and sales volume reported by our Realtor® commercial members,” said Bill Lawton, 2013 President of the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Broker-in-Charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC. “This is a hopeful sign for the future. Realtors® who practice commercial real estate build communities by facilitating investment and promoting the sale and lease of commercial space. There’s no doubt that commercial market improvements will help spur economic recovery and growth for our nation.” Commercial members completed a median of eight transactions in 2012, up from last year. The median sales volume also increased from last year and was $2,507,700. Brokers typically had higher sales transaction volumes than agents. The median dollar value of sales transactions was $433,600 and the median square footage was 10,400.

Similar to the median sales volume, the median lease transaction volume increased this year by more than $70,000. In 2012 commercial members reported a median lease transaction volume of $476,400. Twenty-one percent of commercial members did not have a leasing transaction in 2012. The median dollar value of lease transactions was $169,100 and the median square footage was 4,200. Commercial members who manage properties typically managed 40,000 square feet, representing 15 total spaces.

They also typically managed 16,000 total of�ice square feet, representing six total of�ices. A majority of commercial members, 63 percent, reported they derive more than half of their annual income from the real estate industry. Thirty percent of respondents did not derive any income from commercial real estate leasing in 2012. Only 32 percent derived at least half to all of their income from leasing property. A large percentage, 85 percent, of commercial members earned at least some personal income from commercial real estate investments. Sixty percent of NAR’s commercial members are brokers. Licensed sales agents were the next largest segment at 25 percent. Most commercial members reported working in a �irm that is local and 58 percent work within an of�ice that has a mix of commercial and residential brokers and agents.

Investment sales proved to be the most popular business specialty among commercial members. Identi�ied by the highest proportion of members as their primary business specialty, investment sales was also the top ranked secondary specialty area. Land sales and retail leasing followed closely behind. The typical commercial member has been in commercial real estate for 15 years and involved in real estate in some capacity for 25 years. The median length of membership in NAR among commercial members was 17 years. With a median age of 59, commercial members are also predominately male. However, women are slowly coming into the business; 33 percent of those with two or fewer years’ experience are female, and sales agents have the largest representation of women with 29 percent.

The NAR 2013 Commercial Member Pro�ile was based on a survey of 1,796 commercial practitioners. Income and transaction data are for 2012, while other data represent member characteristics in 2013. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information.

“Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS Clay Hooper Joins Carol Pyfrom Realty Greenville, SC – A Greenville native, Clay has been listing and selling real estate in the Greater Greenville Area since 1986. He believes in treating his clients with respect and being a good listener. Hooper He does not believe in high-pressure tactics and delivers the personal, professional real estate service-and the results you expect. Prior to becoming a REALTOR, Clay was in Human Resources Management. Clay is a licensed Real Estate Broker and former owner of Upstate Dwellings, LLC. He holds the following designations: *Accredited Buyers Representative (ABR) *Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) *Certified Sales Professional (CSP) *Graduate Realtors Institute (GRI) He is a member of the National Association of Realtors, the South Carolina Association of Realtors, and the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors.

Carol Pyfrom Realty Welcomes Ginny Scarboro Greenville, SC – Ginny Scarboro is a recent addition to the Carol Pyfrom Team. She came to Greenville 25 years ago after working in real estate in south Florida, both in property management and real estate sales, and finally as Broker/Owner of her own agency. Since moving to Greenville, she has worked as an Office Manager for a local real estate firm and has returned to real estate sales. She holds the GRI (Graduate of Real Estate Institute) designation. She is a graduate of Bethany College in West Virginia. Gardening and sailing are her hobbies when she gets “time out” from real estate Call Ginny @ 864-915-4840 or email her @ ginny@carolpyfrom.com

MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43


journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF MOTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE AND MOTION TO INTERVENE, PURSUANT TO RULE 24, SCRCP 2011-DR-23-5086 Tabitha Talbert, Plaintiff, v. Christopher Talbert, Defendant Teresa K. Hoglen, Plaintiff/ Intervenor, v. Tabitha Talbert, Christopher Talbert, and “John Doe,” Defendants. In re: Allen Christopher Hoglen, DOB 3/16/13, a minor under the age of seven (7) years TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Plaintiff/Intervenor, by and through her undersigned attorney, will move before the Greenville County Family Court, Greenville, South Carolina, on 24th day of June, 2013, at 2:45pm, or as soon thereafter as counsel may be heard, for an Order of the Court granting to Plaintiff the right to Intervene in the case of Tabitha Talbert v. Christopher Talbert, Case No. 2011-DR-23-5086, for the reasons set forth in the within Motion. Plaintiff makes this request based, without limitation, upon the following facts: 1. Plaintiff/Intervenor is the stepmother of Tabitha Talbert and therefore, the paternal grandmother of the minor child Allen Christian Hoglen, born March 16, 2013. Tabitha Talbert is the biological mother of said

minor child. Tabitha Talbert and Christopher Talbert are involved in marital litigation in this Court. Upon information and belief, Tabitha Talbert deny that her husband, Christopher Talbert, is the father of this child, and Christopher Talbert will also denies that he is the father. This Court has jurisdiction, both in personam and of the subject matter, of this action, and venue is proper in Greenville County. 2. Plaintiff/Intervenor is seeking custody of the minor child named above. Tabitha Talbert has agreed to Plaintiff/ Intervenor’s having such custody, as evidenced by the document entitled “Custody Agreement,” attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference, as Tabitha Talbert currently has no employment, no transportation, and no permanent place to live. 3. Plaintiff/Intervenor therefore has an interest relating to the outcome of the withinreferenced action. 4. Plaintiff/Intervenor’s claim and the ongoing divorce action will have questions of law and fact in common. 5. The best interest of the minor child would be served by allowing Plaintiff/Intervenor to intervene in the ongoing action rather than to file a separate action, as all issues could be decided at the same time. 6. The interests of judicial economy would be better served by these matters being heard at the same time, rather than their being separately adjudicated. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff/Intervenor

respectfully requests the following relief: 1. That she be allowed to intervene in the litigation between the parties; 2. That the Custody Agreement attached hereto be approved and made the Order of the Court; 3. That any and all further hearings be coordinated, in the best interests of the minor child and in the interest of judicial economy, and 4. Any other and further relief as this Court may deem just, fair, and proper. Respectfully submitted, Dianne S. Riley SC Bar #011226 Attorney for Plaintiff/ Intervenor 105 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 271-9747 telephone (864) 271-9755 facsimile May 17th, 2013 diannrileylaw.com Greenville, South Carolina

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED BIENNIUM OPERATING BUDGET COUNTY OF GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA The County of Greenville, South Carolina hereby gives notice of a public hearing to be held on its proposed biennium operating budget for the first fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013 and ending June 30, 2014. The public hearing shall be held on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge at 6:00 p.m. Budgeted Proposed Percent FY2013 FY2014 Change REVENUES General Fund 131,646,023 140,460,045 6.70% Special Revenue Fund 27,429,119 44,372,415 61.77% Debt Service Fund 17,731,154 18,501,715 4.35% Internal Service Fund 32,978,584 35,408,142 7.37% Enterprise Fund 18,778,407 22,003,332 17.17%

Budgeted FY2014 EXPENDITURES General Fund Expenditures Operating Transfers Out Total General Fund Special Revenue Fund Debt Service Fund Internal Service Fund Enterprise Fund

130,996,023 650,000 131,646,023 27,429,119 17,731,154 32,978,584 18,778,407

Proposed FY2014

4/23/08

1. Unit: A020, Sean Silvestri, 2123 Old Spartanburg Rd. #282, Greer, SC 29650 File cabinets, totes, clothes, boxes, misc. 2. Unit: A036, Sylvia Gallman, 105 Trent Dr, Taylors, SC 29687 Furniture, boxes, misc. 3. Unit: A123, Charles A. Barnes, 6 Glenwillow Ct.,Greer, SC 29650 Bed, grill, boxes, misc. 4. Unit: A157, Heather Mclean, 428 Wheeler Ln.,LaFollette, TN 37766 Furniture, w/d, misc. 5. Unit: B13,Shaniquo D. Holliday, 44 Skyview Ln.,Rembert SC 29128 Furniture, boxes, totes. 6.Unit: B172, Mike Briggs, 6311 W. Boehlke, Milwaukee, WI.53223 Bed frame,speakers, neon signs, misc. 7. Unit: B294, Todd M. Gervais, 129 Shady Tree Dr. Taylors, SC 29687 Furniture, misc. 8. Unit: C021-4, Daisy M. Webb, 8703 Old Spartanburg Rd. Taylors SC 29687 Furniture, boxes, totes, misc.

138,806,832 1,389,077 140,195,909 44,372,415 18,501,715 35,408,142 22,003,332

5.96% 113.70% 6.49% 61.77% 4.35% 7.37% 17.17%

11:23 PM

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS ORDER GRANTING PETITION FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION C.A.NO. 12-CP-23-7685 Walter Thurman, Plaintiff, vs. Tarra Henderson, Defendant, Pursuant to S.C. Code §15-9710, counsel for Plaintiff has filed a Petition for Service by Publication, based on two (2) Affidavits regarding Plaintiffs attempts to serve Defendant Tarra Henderson at her last known address in South Carolina, and, after a skip-trace yielded an out-ofstate address, at her last known address in Homestead, Florida. From the affidavits and Petition, it appears that Defendant Tarra Henderson was a resident of South Carolina at the time of the wreck which forms the basis of this suit. It further appears that Plaintiff has acted with due diligence in attempting to locate the Defendant at her last known South Carolina address as well as at a subsequent address in Florida. For good cause shown, this Court hereby grants Plaintiffs Petition for Service by Publication in this matter. IT IS SO ORDERED. Date April 2, 2013 Presiding Judge 13th Circuit Court of Common Pleas

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED BIENNIUM OPERATING BUDGET COUNTY OF GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA The County of Greenville, South Carolina hereby gives notice of a public hearing to be held on its proposed biennium operating budget for the second fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014 and ending June 30, 2015. The public hearing shall be held on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge at 6:00 p.m. Proposed Proposed Percent FY2014 FY2015 Change REVENUES General Fund 140,460,045 144,823,132 3.11% Special Revenue Fund 44,372,415 44,466,951 0.21% Debt Service Fund 18,501,715 18,233,772 -1.45% Internal Service Fund 35,408,142 35,895,691 1.38% Enterprise Fund 22,003,332 19,332,006 -12.14%

Percent Change

The millage proposed for FY2013-2014 shall be 47.3 mills, representing no change in millage from the previous fiscal year. The estimated property tax revenue from the proposed millage for the General Fund for FY2013-2014 is $78,226,747.

AdSlick_02

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 6/15/13, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by:

Proposed FY2012 EXPENDITURES General Fund Expenditures Operating Transfers Out Total General Fund Special Revenue Fund Debt Service Fund Internal Service Fund Enterprise Fund

138,806,832 1,389,077 140,195,909 44,372,415 18,501,715 35,408,142 22,003,332

Proposed FY2013

Percent Change

143,130,310 3.11% 1,683,841 21.22% 144,814,151 3.29% 44,466,951 0.21% 18,233,772 -1.45% 35,895,691 1.38% 19,332,006 -12.14%

The millage proposed for FY2014-2015 shall be 47.3 mills, representing no change from the previous fiscal year. The estimated property tax revenue from the proposed millage for the General Fund for FY2014-FY2015 is $80,573,549.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING PUBLIC COMMENTS IN REGARDS TO THE GREENVILLE COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM OPERATIONAL BUDGET AND MILLAGE LEVY FOR THE TAX YEAR 20132014; AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE EXPENDITURES OF THE REVENUES RECEIVED BY THE GREENVILLE COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM DURING THE TAX YEAR. THE GREENVILLE COUNTY LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES HAS REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL APPROVE MAINTENANCE OF THE LIBRARY SYSTEM’S MILLAGE RATE OF SIX AND ONE-TENTH (6.1) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND A MILLAGE RATE OF ONE AND THREE-TENTHS (1.3) MILLS ESTABLISHED FOR BUILDING PURPOSES PURSUANT TO COUNTY ORDINANCE NO. 2461, FOR A TOTAL MILLAGE LEVY OF SEVEN AND FOUR-TENTHS (7.4) MILLS. THE REQUEST OF THE GREENVILLE COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM BOARD OF TRUSTEES REPRESENTS NO INCREASE FROM LAST YEAR’S AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE LEVY. Dr. Bob Taylor, Chairman Greenville County Council

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2011-DR-23-5049 Josue Giral Salas, Plaintiff, -vs.Nelvy Elizabeth Valdez Rosales, Date filed: November 15, 2011 Defendant. Time filed: 9:34 AM TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is attached and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon the subscriber, at 304 Pettigru Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the thirty- day period, the Plaintiff (s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment by default will be rendered against you. David J. Rutledge Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 10664 Greenville, SC 29603 (864) - 467-0999

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, June 17, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-22 APPLICANT: Lee and Associates CONTACT INFORMATION: rbentley@lee-associates.com or 704-1040 PROPERTY LOCATION: 20 and 101 Lowery Drive PIN: WG05000200500, WG05000200401, and WG05000200402 EXISTING ZONING: R-MA, Multifamily Residential and S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: I-1, Industrial ACREAGE: 13 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 - Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-23 APPLICANT: Pastor Wyatt A. Brown CONTACT INFORMATION: wyattabrown@gmail.com or 238-9400 PROPERTY LOCATION: Alexander Road and Brushy Creek Road PINS: T035000101200 EXISTING ZONING: PD, Planned Development REQUESTED ZONING: R-15, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 20.5 COUNTY COUNCIL: 18 - Baldwin

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-24 APPLICANT: John L. Atkins CONTACT INFORMATION: johnlatkins@msn.com or 288-0759 PROPERTY LOCATION: Fowler Road and Howard Drive PIN: 0560030103000 EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 22 COUNTY COUNCIL: 27 - Kirven DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-25 APPLICANT: Gary Morris CONTACT INFORMATION: gmorris@hsblawfirm.com or 803-540-7961 PROPERTY LOCATION: 25 Draper Street (Brandon Mill) PIN: 0121001200200, 0121001200300, and 0121002200100 EXISTING ZONING: O-D, Office District and I-1, Industrial REQUESTED ZONING: PD, Planned Development ACREAGE: 9.7 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-26 APPLICANT: QuikTrip Corporation CONTACT INFORMATION: bforshee@quiktrip.com or 704-559-8015 PROPERTY LOCATION: N. Pleasantburg Drive at Montebello Drive PIN: 0183030100400 EXISTING ZONING: PD, Planned Development REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial ACREAGE: 7.3 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-27 APPLICANT: Gregory Heintz CONTACT INFORMATION: greg.heintz.scxn@statefarm. com or 292-3080 PROPERTY LOCATION: 1325 Brushy Creek Road PIN: 0538040101200 EXISTING ZONING: R-15, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: POD, Planned Office District ACREAGE: 1.67 COUNTY COUNCIL: 20 – Cates DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-28 APPLICANT: Erik Horton CONTACT INFORMATION: blueline@charter.net or 884-2158 PROPERTY LOCATION: S. Buncombe Road, Commerce Drive, and Commerce Court PIN: G006000100212, G006000100213, and G006000100214 EXISTING ZONING: C-2, Commercial, and I-1, Industrial REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial ACREAGE: 2.9 COUNTY COUNCIL: 18 – Baldwin All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greektown Grille, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 400 East McBee Avenue, Suite 101 and 102, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than June 9, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that American Roadside Burgers, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 301 East McBee Avenue, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than June 9, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that High Spirits Beverage Company, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 912B S. Main Street, Greenville, SC 20601 To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than June 9, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Page 1

MEMORIAL DAY SALE The Ultimate Cooking Experience • The EGG® offers unmatched flexibility - it’s a grill, a smoker and an oven • Double-wall ceramics make it durable and fuel efficient all year long • Turkey, ribs, chicken, burgers, roasts and vegetables - the EGG® cooks them all effortlessly • Bakes better than a brick oven - pizza, bread, even pumpkin pie

3002 WADE HAMPTON BLVD. • 864-268-3853 • MON.-FRI. 10-6; SAT. 10-5 44 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013

M53A

EGG-cessories GALORE! Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

More than 250 members of the community celebrated the grand opening of the Staunton Bridge Community Center last week.

ALOFT photos by Gerry pate / contributing

A large crowd enjoyed watching the balloons Saturday at the Aloft festival at Simpsonville's Heritage Park.

Building construction technology student Ryan Watts of Greenville Tech helps a fourth-grader at Woodland Elementary School build a birdhouse on May 23. Greenville Tech students will assist all fourthgraders at the school with the project. Materials were donated by Lowe’s. 

Above, from left, Stone Academy students Isabelle Crews, Jonah Holbrooks, Benjamin Bowen, Rylie Coley, Holly Bruccoliere, Ryan Thompson and Micah Smith won 11 awards at the District Science Fair this year.

The Stone Academy PTA recently honored three parent volunteers: Susan McLarty, left, received a Patron of the Arts Award for her work with students in creating classroom art over the past six years; Rhett Brown, center, received the Volunteer of the Year award for chairing the school’s annual spring Arts Alive festival; and Bob Brown, right, received a Patron of the Arts & Science Award for his work on Stone Academy Science Days and coaching the Lego League (Robotics) team.

Anne Frichtl’s kindergarten class from Chandler Creek Elementary School show off the strawberries they picked on a recent field trip to Beechwood Farms.

Participants in the first Take Flight 5K and Kids Run to raise money to add playground equipment to the new community aviation-themed park at the Greenville Downtown Airport head down a runway. People congregate at the Runway Cafe for the first Take Flight 5K and Kids Run.

MAY 31, 2013 | THE Journal 45


journal culture



WEDDINGS

figure. this. out. Hair Majesty

By Mark Bickham

ENGAGEMENTS ANNIVERSARIES 

Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS 1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS 3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@ communityjournals.com 46 THE Journal | MAY 31, 2013

Across 1 Profitable venture 9 Bombay bigwigs 15 Fox role 20 “My pleasure!” 21 Region north of Morocco 22 Finnish architect Alvar __ 23 Punkish accessory 24 Leader of the Wild Bunch gang 26 Plush floor covering 28 Asian region, with “the” 29 Lhasa __ 30 Wilmington’s st. 31 Short 32 “Silent Spring” subj. 33 “Bossypants” writer Fey 35 Loses one’s cool 39 She played Molly in “Ghost” 41 Ready to shoot 44 Contact, nowadays 45 Walton of Walmart 47 Two bells, in the Navy 50 Old pool ball material 51 Oahu’s __ Stadium 53 Greet from a distance 56 Hotel team 57 Apportioned, with “out” 58 Nickname for Margaret 59 Start of something big?

61 Devotee 62 Safari sightings 64 Is aware of 66 Star 69 Notes comprise them 71 It’s over a foot 73 Amazingly enough 76 Mythical giants 78 Newspaper section 80 Hardly a guffaw 82 Graceful male swimmer 85 Aware of 87 Double-check 89 Burns a bit 90 “Our Gang” series creator Hal 93 Dreaded musician? 95 Common newspaper name 96 Bother 97 Video game pioneer 98 Site of heavy traffic, with “the” 100 Wind indicator 101 City on the Tigris 103 Acronym that includes middle sch. 106 Tinactin alternative 108 Evidently are 109 Engine housing 111 Takes too much 113 Xi preceders 114 “Madama Butterfly” wardrobe items 116 Did perfectly 118 Low-altitude delivery agent

122 Fetal metaphor 125 Uncommon thing 127 Playground rejoinder 128 Company promoted by a nine-monthold financial wizard 129 Theft target 130 Beach shoe 131 Pastry-making aid 132 Like some loafers Down 1 Sling ingredient 2 Zoo animales 3 Like some lawns 4 Hopes it never happens 5 Big deal 6 Winter spikes 7 “Peter Pan” pooch 8 Many Caltech grads 9 Outback order 10 Be next to 11 Fast flier 12 Like a parabola 13 Percussion kit item 14 Egg holders 15 Parental nicknames 16 Eponymous 18thcentury adventurer 17 One way to decide 18 Old Fords 19 Toy on a string 25 Envelope abbr. 27 Postgrad degree 32 More than just eat 34 “__ any judge of

character ...” 35 Philatelist’s find 36 Catchers with pots 37 Strikingly strange 38 “Hi and Lois” pooch 40 Scenic Massachusetts route 41 Daughter in Shake-

Easy

speare’s “Cymbeline” 42 Pakistani language 43 Part of CBS: Abbr. 46 Blemish 48 Lumber tree 49 Blind-from-birth pianist Templeton 52 British singer with

the age-related albums “19” and “21” 54 __ cava 55 Berkshire jackets 60 Almost all the time 63 “The X-Files” org. 65 More sneaky 67 Put in power 68 Four Corners nickname 70 Sailor from Basrah 72 It has both Hebrew and English letters on its planes 74 Medicine man 75 Still 77 Stains on a red suit? 79 Perfect place 81 Cambridgeshire neighbor 82 Grump 83 O’Neill’s daughter 84 Rams 86 Pistons’ org. 88 Added highlights to, in a way 91 Strong team quality 92 Stevenson villain 94 TV role for Bamboo Harvester 99 Grants academic security to 102 Latin trio member 104 Good boy of verse 105 Response known to preclude its question 107 Lazy __: trays 109 Golfer Calvin 110 Reasons to clean 112 Sail-extending pole 114 Late notice? 115 Foundation plant 117 Stylish eatery word 118 Give up 119 Anti-art movement 120 Bad doings 121 Altar event 123 Holiday quaff 124 Piece of winery equipment 126 Guitarist Barrett Crossword answers: page 44

Sudoku answers: page 44


JOURNAL CULTURE

WHERE I’VE BEEN WITH BILL KOON

College search is over – now the debt begins We are throwing our hats in the air here at our house – and not just because the Privileged Child is graduating from high school, but also because our college search is over. I have written the check for a tuition deposit, and now we can start shopping for the immense technology that college kids have to bring with them these days. A five-pack of Bic pens is no longer enough. But the search business hasn’t been simple. We wanted the best fit for the Privileged Child – which led us to roam much of North America searching for the right school. We covered South Carolina before hitting Maine and Vermont, New York and Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Montreal, Seattle, Portland (Or.), a variety of remote parts of Ohio and central Iowa. It took only two years to get to all of these places, many of which are not exactly tourist destinations. The travel, though, was the good news. Doing all of the applications was the equivalent of shoving a sharp stick into one or both eyes. Had I known what the application process was like, I would have insisted on home-schooling this child for her university degree. I don’t remember much about applying for college back in my stone-age youth. My parents picked out a little school not far from home and dropped me off there, with my trunk, one Sunday afternoon. I had had no counseling in high school, had taken no AP exams – maybe not even an SAT. My only preparation was that I had read a series of novels by Max Shulman about a naïve boy, Asa Hearthrug, who went off to the University of Minnesota without a clue. Asa, as I recall, spent the first years trying to find his adviser and get registered. Along the way, he got involved in a student government election where the main issue concerned elevator etiquette – if men let women get onto elevators first, how do they go about letting women get off of elevators first? He also joined a fraternity, Alpha Cholera. I don’t have to say that I wasn’t taking things too seriously. But it is serious business now. Kids take the PSAT and the SAT and AP exams and IB finals. They get a lot of counseling, and provided they can read and write, they get swamped with materials from all sorts of institutions. Apparently, some schools try to build their ratings by encouraging everyone to apply. They send T-shirts and sunglasses; one even sent an envelope full of confetti so that we could celebrate an acceptance. The ratings, though, are the issue – IQ U had 35,000 applications and accepted 35 kids. Makes them look pretty selective in the various college guides; makes me wish I had my $75 application fee back. A few years ago, someone of influence realized how redundant applications had become. That’s when the “common application” was conceived. A prospective student can now fill out one application and have it sent to all schools from Timbuktu to Siam. A brilliant idea – except that many schools distinguish themselves by asking for “supplements.” They want the “common application” plus their own application, which is often to be accompanied by one or more essays by the student. The latter can be off -the -wall stuff, just to see if your child is really, really, really creative. I remember the Privileged Child sweating over one topic, “Find X” and another one, “Where’s Waldo, Really?” I was no help. Financial aid works the same way. A common, national form asks for details about your money right down to the pennies in your loafers. And it asks you to throw in a few tax returns. Then the individual schools have their own supplemental financial aid forms. At one point, it looked like they were going to ask for the tax return of our orthodontist. I am thankful that I did not have to write an essay about my bank account. But we are in, and we may be able to afford even more than one year, provided the second mortgage comes through or that my gold fillings have appreciated significantly. We remind ourselves, however, that this is a small price to pay for a child on the way to the White House.

Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

Saturday—June 8, 2013 Come early, stay late, bring the whole family! 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. | FISHING ON THE GREEN FISHING ON THE GREEN ONRegistration THEGREEN GREEN FISHING ON THE Tournament and Kids FISHING Fishing Derby. Derby fee $25.00. Funds benefit Loaves and Fishes. RUNNING ON 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. | RUNNING ONTHE THEGREEN GREEN RUNNING ON THE THEGREEN GREEN 5K and Fun Walk withRUNNING live musical ON performance. Registration fee $25.00. Benefits Alzheimer’s Association. PANCAKE BREAKFAST FISHING 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. | PANCAKE BREAKFAST PANCAKE BREAKFAST PANCAKE BREAKFAST Awards ceremony for fishing and running events.

ON THE GREE

GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS

10 a.m. | GUINNESS RECORDS GUINNESS WORLD WORLD RECORDS RECORDS Let’s set the GUINNESS record for theWORLD largest group to perform a Thera-Band exercise. Open to all ages. RUNNING

ON THE GRE

BARBEQUE LUNCH AND DANCE BARBEQUE LUNCH 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. | BARBEQUE LUNCHAND ANDDANCE DANCE

BARBEQUE LUNCH AND DANCE Optional $5.00 donation to benefit Meals on Wheels. Lunch also features our Resident Family Reunion Bake-off and awards.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST

RSVP GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS RSVP RSVP

RSVP

Call Email Register Online

(864) 987-4612 RuthWood@RollingGreenVillage.com RollingGreenVillage.com

RollingBARBEQUE Green Village 1 Hoke Smith Blvd. Greenville, SC 29615

LUNCH AN

Rolling Green Village is a not-for-profit community.

MAY 31, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47


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May 31, 2013 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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