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GREENVILLEJOURNAL JOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, January 10, 2020 • Vol.23, No. 02

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

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A CELEBRATION of the

HEART

TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE.

Co-chairs of 20th anniversary Upstate Heart Ball know heart disease’s impact all too well PAGE 6 Pictured: Dirk and Katherine Pieper photo by JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY


You profit because we don’t.

GREENVILLE JOURNAL

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10


FIRST LOOK THE BIG PICTURES

Upstate Heart Ball is 6 The celebrating 20 years in 2020

virtual reality experience simulates 11 New climb to top of Table Rock Mountain

Schedule Your Tour Today • (864) 606-3055 teaches students 28 Instructor to dance without limits QUOTED

12

“With no burial plots remaining in the cemetery and people increasingly choosing cremation, the need is significant.”

36

“To write a menu, you have to think of everything, and the guest will remind you about what you forgot.”

-Brandy Mauldin, senior administrative assistant, Greenville Parks and Recreation department

-Adam Hayes, executive vice president and culinary director, Larkin's on the River

WORD OF THE WEEK

Agrihood:

an organized community that integrates agriculture into a residential neighborhood to facilitate food production while providing recreation for community members. Page 4

THE BIG NUMBERS

830 foot

drop at Beech Mountain Resort. Read about the seasonal preparations of regional ski resorts on Page 12.

400

submissions for the Upstate Music Award nominations. Read more about the first Upstate Music Awards and voting process on Page 30.

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

COMMUNITY

‘Living authentically’ at Riverstead, an agrihood community in northern Greenville County

n story by JESSICA MULLEN | photos PROVIDED

Developers at Riverstead hope to offer families a convenient way of living authentically in an agrihood. The community, which is 30 minutes from downtown Greenville and 10 minutes from Travelers Rest, is based around farming and keeping families connected to nature. “I grew up 15 minutes from here,” says developer Lucas Anthony. “Back then, we had a bunch of land. I grew up on 300 acres. My brother and I camped out, played and built tree forts. My dream was to have a place big enough where my family could do that. The only problem was that I couldn’t afford it.” Enter Riverstead, an agrihood that gives families the opportunity to live on a lot of land without having to own it all. “It’s very similar to a golf course community,” Anthony says. “All we did was remove the golf course and put a farm in it. And golf balls don’t taste as good as eggs.” The Riverstead property runs along the Saluda River and features views of Table Rock and Caesar’s Head.

It’s very similar to a golf course community. All we did was remove the golf course and put a farm in it.” -Lucas Anthony, developer, Riverstead 4

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

“It took a year for us to do the agricultural clearing and make both open and agriculture space,” says Anthony, who bought the property in 2016. “We left the hardwood trees and protected the river with a 300-foot buffer. It cost us a lot of money to not put houses on the river, but this way everyone can enjoy it.” However, Anthony’s vision for the community wasn’t limited to pretty views. “When building a community like this, we knew it was more than just a place,” he says. “Riverstead has five governing values: collaboration; appreciation for nature; gratitude; lifelong learning; and thriving.” Anthony didn’t originally anticipate just how involved the community would want to be. “I originally intended to have a caretaker and I reserved a home site for him over by the farm,” he says. “But after talking to the homeowners, they said “we don’t want to pay the profit that the caretaker would charge us over and above what our vegetables would cost. They are the farm. I’m giving them the farm, literally.” Anthony says he plans for the homeowners association to give credits to people who serve in the farm or help pick up the trails. The community events are designed to push people together, he says. “People complain less when they invest a little sweat equity.” Anthony has plans for six more agrihoods in areas closer to Greenville to offer those in low-income neighborhoods the opportunity to experience farm-fresh living. Riverstead’s way of life will help to com-

RIVERSTEAD'S GOVERNING VALUES bat consumerism for its residents, says the developer. “The modern subdivision came about because of real estate values being so high. I think it’s due to a lack of gathering. That’s why shopping has become such a big deal. We’re meant to be hunter-gatherers, and there’s an innate desire to gather. We can fulfill that need here by gathering the food for your family, and then you don’t need as much stuff.”

COLLABORATION APPRECIATION OF NATURE GRATITUDE LIFELONG LEARNING THRIVING


NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

WELLNESS

Dining out advice from ‘The Cooking Doc’

ING LIST -4 AY 2 NEW UND S N OPE

ING LIST NEW

n story by BLAKE SHUSTERMAN, M.D.

30 Sevier St. · Augusta Road $679,605 · Matt Nocks 864.906.1052

ING LIST W E N

As Greenville basks in its growing foodie culture and salivates with each new restaurant opening, this food lover is watching with cautious anticipation. Why? As a kidney doctor at Carolina Nephrology and host of an online healthy cooking show, “The Cooking Doc” (www. thecookingdoc.com), the condition of my patients is always on my mind. As food takes center stage in Greenville, we would be mistaken if we did not recognize how dining out, without healthy options, can be hazardous to the well-being of Greenville and all Upstate residents. The perils of dining out reach all of us, whether we are eating fast-food hamburgers or buttery shrimp and grits at one of our local restaurants. That’s because when we eat out, we tend to consume larger portions and less healthy food than we would at home. And, as a state, we don’t need any extra hazards. South Carolina has a 32% obesity rate, a 38% high blood pressure rate and a 12% rate of adults with Type 2 diabetes, the eighth highest percentage in the nation. Do not be discouraged though. As someone who loves to cook and eat a variety of tasty food, I’m not here to tell you to avoid eating out. I am writing as a call to action. A plea to each of you from a local doctor to order not only to benefit your taste buds, but also to benefit your health. If that means low-sodium meals, ask the restaurant to leave off the sauce. If that means you need smaller portions, ask the server to split the order. If that means you cannot keep your hands off the pre-meal bread, ask the server to keep the bread in the kitchen. There are many ways to eat out while still keeping your health in mind but we, as customers, cannot do it alone. We need the cooperation of the Greenville chefs and restaurateurs. I’d like to ask that we encourage our beloved Greenville chefs in our budding foodie town to not only make their mouthwatering menu staples, but to also create healthy dishes that taste just as de-

licious. I am confident in their incredible ability to do so. Sure, you can get the healthy grilled chicken sprinkled with salt and pepper, or you can get the crispy fried chicken on a brioche bun with homemade sriracha mayo,freshly cut fries sprinkled with Maldon salts and house-made pickles. Given that choice, most of us will order the item the chef has perfected, rather than the grilled chicken we could have made at home. If the same culinary creativity is shown in the healthier dishes as is in the higher calorie ones, would we be more apt to order those? I just think we might. There are top-notch chefs out there to create fresh foods and inspire us to eat them. But, they won’t create healthy food items if we won’t order them. Moreover, many of us will not order them because either they appear boring, too “weird” or we are not looking out for our health when we are eating out. Greenville is elevating into a foodie city. Let’s also elevate it into a healthy eating city, a place where our signature dishes are also the tastiest. There are foods that will surprise our taste buds in new and delicious ways if we are ready to try them and if our chefs are ready to make them. I’m ready. My patients are ready. Are you? The Cooking Doc Blake Shusterman, M.D. TheCookingDoc.com. photo PROVIDED

The Cooking Doc is an online cooking series featuring Dr. Blake Shusterman, practicing nephrologist at Carolina Nephrology, where he combines his knowledge of nephrology with his passion for cooking.

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FEATURED

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FROM THE COVER

A CELEBRATION of the

HEART

Co-chairs of 20th anniversary Upstate Heart Ball know heart disease’s impact all too well n story by GEORGIA GAY

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

D

irk and Katherine Pieper have many personal reasons for becoming cochairs of this year’s Upstate Heart Ball. “For my side, I lost my father to heart disease,” Dirk Pieper said. “So, it is always a challenge when you experience that.” Dirk Pieper also lost two close friends in the past two years — one to a heart attack and the other to an aneurysm. Another friend was significantly debilitated by a stroke—despite being young and healthy—and is currently undergoing rehab. “Heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the state,” Dirk Pieper said. Katherine Pieper’s mother and several relatives have heart disease as well. “It has personal meaning in both of our families,” she said. The 2020 Upstate Heart Ball, which is the centerpiece of a yearlong campaign, will be held March 14 and marks the 20th anniversary of the gala. Planners hope the event will raise $1.2 million to go toward research, education, training and awareness about heart disease and stroke.


FROM THE COVER

|

FEATURED

UPSTATE HEART BALL EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP TEAM Katherine and Dirk Pieper 2020 Heart Ball co-chairs

Dan Adams

Open Your Heart chair

Karen Lopez Jordan Live auction co-chair

Carl Sobocinski

Live auction co-chair The gala features dinner and dancing and live and silent auctions. The event also honors local heart and stroke survivors or those who have lost their lives to cardiovascular diseases. This years honorees are Hank Bradberry and Trip McCrary. “As far as the honorees being selected, it all kind of happens organically each year,” said Megan Ramsey, director of marketing and communications for the American Heart Association in Greenville. “Heart disease and stroke touches so many people, so community members often share stories with us of those that have been affected.”

I lost my father to heart disease. So, it is always a challenge when you experience that. -Dirk Pieper, co-chair, Upstate Heart Ball

Maggie and Rick Bradberry’s oldest child, Mae, was a Heart Ball honoree in 2015. Knowing there was a 3% chance their second child could also be born with a heart condition, the Bradberrys took a chance when they welcomed Hank into the family. Unfortunately Hank fell into that 3%. Both Bradberry children are thriving despite having heart disease. Trip McCrary inherited ultra-high genetic cholesterol and at 46 years old discovered that four arteries in his heart were more than 90% blocked. Being a frequent exerciser and mainly a vegetarian, he felt he was in good shape. McCrary’s story is relatable to so many in the sense that heart disease can affect anyone at anytime, no matter age or health.

“We are also inviting all of our past honorees to be in attendance as we celebrate our 20th anniversary,” Dirk Pieper said. Those attending the gala will be able to hear the testimonials of current and previous honorees who have survived strokes, heart transplants and heart disease. “It is the driving force that gets people involved,” Dirk Pieper said. The Piepers, along with their executive leadership team, have been preparing for the black-tie event that will host over 900 guests representing medical, business and social groups from the area. “We have a great executive leadership team. They are very energetic, enthusiastic and dedicated to help us reach our goal of raising $1.2 million,” Katherine Pieper said. “Getting people personally involved is what the ball is all about,” Dirk Pieper said. “It is what really drives the funding.” While money is raised through donation or sponsorship to the American Heart Association, there will also be silent and live auctions along with an Open Your Heart appeal where individual donations can be made during the gala. “So many others have given ahead of us and have made Greenville as great as it is,” Katherine Pieper said. “We love Greenville and are glad to have raised our family in such a giving community.”

Above: Upstate Heart Ball Executive Leadership Team photo PROVIDED

UPSTATE HEART BALL 2020 WHEN: March 14 WHERE: Greenville Convention Center | 1 Exposition Dr. Featured Honorees Hank Bradberry (LEFT)

Trip McCrary (RIGHT)

photos PROVIDED

Katie Van Gieson Harrison Silent auction chair

Robin and Brad Bylenga Jim Clements Libby and Charles Dalton Angi and Howard Einstein Jane Harrison and Ellis Fisher Rikke and Clark Gillespy Fred Gilmer Chris Harrison Flavia and Lynn Harton Carey and David Hudson Robert Hughes Velda Hughes Harold Jackson Kathy and Kris Kapoor Bill McCrary Lauren and Bradley McCrary Cindy and Max Metcalf Denise and Steve Navarro Emilie and John Pazdan Bill Pelham Rick Pennell Kelly and Lee Powell Susan and Tim Reed Minor and Hal Shaw Anastasia and Tommy Siachos Julie and Andrew Smart Rita and Chuck Stone Tracy Swinney Ann and Todd Taylor Angel and Walt Tollison Kelly and Charles Warren Donyelle and Walt Wilkins JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

COMMUNITY

GALAS GALORE

KRISTINA HERNANDEZ Contributor

Greenville is home to several worthy charities. Many host large galas and events, which benefit everything from the local environment to serving the hungry to raising money to support cancer research and heart health. If you’re looking to dress up for a night out for a worthy cause, here are some of the galas where you can lend support.

28TH ANNUAL CELLAR AUCTION This annual gala benefits the Red Cross and includes dinner and dancing plus a live auction that features refined wines and travel packages. January 18 | Hyatt Regency, 220 N. Main St., Greenville Ticket price: $250

OPENING NIGHT BENEFIT – AN EVENING WITH TEDDY ROOSEVELT The opening of the winter season with Greenville Chautauqua consists of a private performance from Doug Mishler as Teddy Roosevelt and a wine reception. Proceeds benefit Chautauqua’s year round free performances. January 31 | Younts Center for Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn Ticket price: $50

Sweetheart Charity Ball photo provided by MEALS ON WHEELS Crafted Gala | photo provided by CCES

SWEETHEART CHARITY BALL The annual charity ball of Meals on Wheels includes a cocktail hour, dinner and a live auction. February 1 | Hyatt Regency, 220 N. Main St., Greenville Ticket price: $150

Upstate Forever photo provided by UPSTATE FOREVER

BLACK TIE AND SNEAKERS GALA The annual event benefits the Urban League of the Upstate and includes a lively band and dancing plus a cocktail reception and dinner. February 8 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: $60/individual ticket. Sponsorships range from $1,500 up to $20,000.

FOREVER GREEN ANNUAL AWARDS LUNCHEON

Greenville Chautauqua Benefit Show photo provided by GREENVILLE CHAUTAUQUA

and includes valet parking, dinner, dancing and a silent auction. March 14 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: $1,000 per couple

Hosted by Upstate Forever, this annual awards luncheon raises money in protection of and awareness for land and resource conservation. February 24 | Embassy Suites by Hilton Greenville Golf, 670 Verdae Blvd, Greenville Ticket price: $50

HOPE BALL The Cancer Society of Greenville hosts a black tie dinner and dancing gala every year that raises money for cancer research. March 4 | Poinsett Club, 807 E. Washington St., Greenville Ticket price: Starts at $1,000 per couple

PIEDMONT WOMEN’S CENTER NIGHT FOR LIFE First ever Night for Life gala benefiting the Piedmont Women’s Center. March 5 | Founder’s Memorial Auditorium, 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville Ticket price: No cost for tickets but attendees are asked to register.

UPSTATE HEART BALL One of the more popular galas in the Upstate, the black tie Heart Ball benefits the American Heart Association

THE GUILD OF THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY CARNIVALE An annual gala with hors d’oeuvres, dancing, open bar, and raffles. Proceeds benefit the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. March 14 |Studio 220 at the Hyatt Regency, 220 N. Main St., Greenville Ticket price: $150

18TH ANNUAL JDRF GALA: A NIGHT AMONG THE STARS This gala raises funds for research for a cure for type 1 diabetes and includes cocktails, a seated dinner and both silent and live auctions. March 28 | Embassy Suites by Hilton Greenville Golf, 670 Verdae Blvd, Greenville Ticket price: $175

CRAFTED: A CAVALIER EVENING The annual gala is a casual evening with live music and food from Table 301. The proceeds benefit Christ Church Episcopal Church School. April 3 | Old Cigar Warehouse, 912 S S Main St., Greenville, Ticket price: $150

Far Left: Black Tie & Sneakers Gala photo provided by KB MEDIA GROUP Left: JDRF Upstate Gala | photo provided by JDRF GREATER WESTERN CAROLINAS

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

PEARLS & PUMPS The annual gala benefits Pearlie Harris Center for Breast Health and includes time for shopping from vendors plus a fashion show and dinner. October 13 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: Starts at $60 SWITCH Freedom Gala photo provided by SWITCH

WAREHOUSE THEATRE GALA This is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the Warehouse Theatre in the West End and includes live music, performances, an open bar and hors d’ouvres. October | 37 Augusta St., Greenville Ticket price: N/A

Artisphere Gala | photo provided by CREAGH CROSS

EVENING OF HOPE GALA The gala features a cocktail hour, sit-down dinner, an auction and dancing. The fundraiser benefits Project HOPE, which provides a variety of services for the autism community. May 2 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: $150 (single ticket), Table of 10 is $1,250 and a VIP table is $2,000

CARIBBEAN CRUSH The annual tropical-themed night is a popular Greenville event that benefits the South Carolina Children’s Theatre and features a fun live auction, steel drums and great food. May 3 | “L”, 211 East Broad St., Greenville Ticket price: $75

ARTISPHERE OPENING NIGHT GALA The gala for one of the best art festivals in the nation includes cocktails, dishes from local chefs and live music. May 7 | Fluor Field, 945 S Main St., Greenville Ticket price: Tickets to the gala come with purchasing the VIP experience. At the $1500 level, you get two tickets in your package on top of other benefits. At the $2500 level, you get four tickets on top of other benefits.

GCMA’S ANTIQUES SHOW PREVIEW GALA

Red Shoe Society Royale Gala photo provided by HANNAH KERR PHOTOGRAPHY

RED SHOE SOCIETY GREENVILLE ROYALE GALA The annual gala benefits the Ronald McDonald House and includes dinner and a silent auction. When: Mid-September Ticket price: $70

DANCING WITH THE CAROLINA STARS An elegant evening with dinner and dancing that pairs community leaders with professional dancers. The event benefits Senior Action, an organization in Greenville that supports senior citizens. September 26 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Fundraising goal: $150,000 Ticket price: $125

SYNNEX SHARE THE MAGIC GALA HOMES OF HOPE GALA The semi-formal evening benefits Homes of Hope, a Greenville organization that helps men overcome addiction and provide affordable housing throughout the state. Tickets include dinner, dessert and live music. May 21 | Hyatt Regency, 220 N. Main St., Greenville Dollars Raised at 2019 gala: $375,000 Ticket price: $100

Homes of Hope Gala photo provided by HOMES OF HOPE

The Share the Magic gala raises money for local children’s charities and the benefit features a live auction of local gifts, travel packages, art and experiences not found anywhere else. October 3 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: Individual tickets are not sold. Table sponsorships are $2,500 up to $35,000.

The annual black tie preview party offers live music and food as well as the opportunity to purchase art and antiques. The event helps support the Greenville County Museum of Art. October 15 | Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St., Greenville Ticket price: Individual tickets are not sold but instead given as part of the annual Art for Greenville campaign. Giving starts at $750.

Hearts & Hands Gala photo provided by JULIE CLEMENTS IMAGE ARTISTRY

HEARTS & HANDS GALA This gala is the cornerstone black tie event of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas. They choose a particular country to donate towards each year and the premiere event includes dinner, dancing and a live auction. December 4, 2020 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: $150

SWITCH FREEDOM GALA This annual gala for Switch raises money to support the fight against human trafficking and sexual exploitation in the Upstate. November 20 | Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr., Greenville Ticket price: $75

Greenville County Museum of Art Gala photo provided by GCMA

GREENVILLE GALA FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS The annual event hosted by Greenville Rec includes live and silent auctions, heavy hors d’ouvres and dancing. Early December | Hyatt Regency, 220 N. Main St., Greenville Ticket price: ~ $75

For more information visit GreenvilleJournal.com

Warehouse Theatre Gala photo provided by WAREHOUSE THEATRE

SYNNEX Share the Magic Gala photo provided by SYNNEX JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

EVENT

Greenville Convention Center hosts Drive FCA! and Remodeling Expo 2020 n story by GEORGIA GAY | photos PROVIDED

Looking for something to do Jan. 1012? The Greenville Convention Center has got you covered. The Drive FCA! Test-drive experience at the South Carolina International Auto Show will feature 2019 and 2020 model Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram and Fiat vehicles. Test-drive participants automatically are entered in the 2020 FCA U.S. national

sweepstakes for a chance to win $75,000 toward a vehicle from the Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram Truck and Fiat brands. A winner will be drawn in early 2021. A number of vehicles will be available for a test drive, including: • Chrysler Pacifica • Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid • Dodge Durango SRT • Ram 1500 Rebel

SOUTH CAROLINA INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW » JAN. 10-12 | TIMES VARY » GREENVILLE CONVENTION CENTER » 1 EXPOSITION DR., GREENVILLE » $5-$8 SOUTHCAROLINAAUTOSHOW.COM

the people o g n i fG v r e s

The Remodeling Expo 2020 is a comprehensive home show bringing together homeowners with remodeling and building professionals. Exhibits and vendors will showcase numerous home products and services, including: • Cabinetry and countertops. • Flooring. • Sunrooms and additions. • Basement finishing. • Waterproofing. • Smart home automation. • Energy-efficient windows and exterior products.

Over $103,000

le

in emergency savings has been established as part of UM’s matched savings program since 2016.

1970-2020 United Ministries offers programs that serve and empower those in our community who are striving to achieve selfsufficiency. We work to end homelessness and reduce poverty by providing opportunities for individuals to obtain education and employment while ensuring they have the life essentials necessary to move forward on their journey.

606 Pendleton Street Greenville SC 29601

United-Ministries.org 864-232-6463

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

REMODELING EXPO 2020 » JAN. 10-12 | TIMES VARY » GREENVILLE CONVENTION CENTER » 1 EXPOSITION DR., GREENVILLE » $4 | CHILDREN FREE MEETGCC.COM

THE IMPACT IS REAL AND SIGNIFICANT

nvil ree

Prou dly

• Ram 1500 Limited. • Fiat 124 Spider. • Jeep Wrangler • Jeep Gladiator • Jeep Cherokee • Jeep Grand Cherokee • Jeep Compass • Fiat 500X

$14,565,447

in annualized wages has been earned by employment readiness program participants in 2018 alone.

Since 2016,

over 450

homeless individuals have gained

permanent housing.


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

OUTDOORS

New virtual reality experience simulates climb to top of Table Rock Mountain

n story by GEORGIA GAY | photos PROVIDED

Table Rock State Park now offers virtual reality headsets that give visitors a simulated hike up the mountain. The headsets, made possible by grants and donations from BMW Manufacturing and the family of Greenville County native Tom Presnell, provides a 360-degree virtual reality experience of iconic spots along the Table Rock Trail.

This new service helps us provide an exceptional experience for visitors, especially people who cannot climb 3.6 miles to the top of Table Rock.” -Paul McCormack, director,South Carolina State Park Service

“This new service helps us provide an exceptional experience for visitors, especially people who cannot climb 3.6 miles to the top of Table Rock,” said Paul McCormack, director of the South Carolina State Park Service. “You get to see the scenic views, deep forests and natural beauty of a protected mountainside of the Southern Blue Ridge.” The virtual tour features four iconic stops along the trail — the trailhead at Carrick Creek waterfall, the halfway shelter, Governor’s Rock and the top of Table Rock. Like other virtual-reality experiences, the view changes with the movement of the user. Using headsets made by Oculus, the experience is available free of charge at the Table Rock Visitors Center at 158 E. Ellison Lane in Pickens. For more information, visit www. SouthCarolinaParks.com.

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NEWS

Where would you send

your family?

|

NEED TO KNOW

COMMUNITY

Historic Springwood Cemetery to add columbarium

n story by GEORGIA GAY | photos by IRINA RICE

With 10 convenient locations | No referral required In the greater Greenville area, call 864-233-5128

elitetherapycenters.com

new year

glide into a

happy

+ ICE SKATE IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

Above: rendering of Springwood Cemetery Columbarium | rendering provided by the COLUMBARIUM PLANNERS

As an added service to families seeking alternatives to traditional burials, historic Springwood Cemetery, which opened in 1812, will soon offer a columbarium. The Springwood Cemetery Advisory Committee recently announced plans to construct a columbarium with niches for cremated remains and memorial plaques. The move comes as the demand for cremations is rising, according to the city. “With no burial plots remaining in the cemetery and people increasingly choosing cremation, the need is significant,” said Brandy Mauldin, senior administrative assistant for the city of Greenville Parks and Recreation department.

PHASE ONE 240 NICHES 96 MEMORIAL WALL PLAQUES 10 MEMORIAL TREES 6 MEMORIAL BENCHES

PHASE TWO 300 NICHES

Springwood Cemetery is home to more than

10,000 RESTING PLACES

120 MEMORIAL WALL PLAQUES Greenville City Council on Dec. 9 approved the Springwood Cemetery columbarium concept. Construction will begin when approximately 125 niches have been sold. Phase one also includes 96 memorial wall plaques.


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PEOPLE

FUNERAL FACTS & FIGURES Over the last 15 years cremation rates have DOUBLED IN THE SOUTH One driving factor for this shift is cost The average funeral and burial is $7,045 while the average cremation and memorial is $3,250 Source: slate.com

Other reasons for the shift toward cremation include: Family members are more spread out than they used to be making visits to a burial site more difficult Cremation is more environmentally friendly There are practically endless options on what to do with cremated remains Source: slate.com

In addition, 10 memorial trees and six memorial benches are available for purchase, Mauldin said. The estimated cost of phase one is approximately $640,166, according to the city. This will include site preparation and work, the columbarium structure, benches, trees and the relocation of the sexton’s house to another part of the cemetery. The sexton's house is typically for the cemetery's caretaker, which Springwood no longer has.

With no burial plots remaining in the cemetery and people increasingly choosing cremation, the need is significant.”

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-Brandy Mauldin, senior administrative assistant, Greenville Parks and Recreation department “Once all 240 niches in phase one have been sold, the advance sale of niches for phase two will begin,” Mauldin said. “Phase two will consist of 300 niches and 120 memorial wall plaques.” Any funds generated in excess of building and care costs for the columbarium will be used for the maintenance and preservation of the broader cemetery grounds. When Springwood Cemetery began accepting public burials in 1929, it comprised only one acre. Today, the cemetery encompasses 30 acres in the heart of downtown Greenville. The overflow of a spring once passed through the cemetery and is a possible origin for the cemetery’s name. The Springwood Cemetery Advisory Committee works to preserve the history and beauty of the cemetery while raising awareness of the historical significance of the cemetery. It also raises funds for additional capital improvements needed to develop and beautify the cemetery.

SIGN UP ONLINE! ymcagreenville.org 864-412-0288 The YMCA of Greenville, following the example of Christ, builds healthy spirit, mind and body for all.

JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Downhill Ride: Regional ski resorts make improvements heading into busiest months

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It’s time for big air and cool runs. Temperatures are dropping and Alpine adventure awaits as skiers schuss into the heart of the season. More than half a dozen resorts are a short drive from Greenville, making downhill fun readily accessible for day trips and weekend getaways. “We go up to North Carolina at least two to three times a season,” says lifetime skier and snowboarder Derrick Simons. “You’ve got some really small places that were perfect for the kids when they were starting and then you have bigger places like Sugar and Beech Mountain. The vertical drops off their top lifts are as big as Breckenridge (Colorado’s) big lifts.” Multiple outfits have spent the off-season on upgrades to improve the visitor experience, including new chairlifts, lighting and snowmaking equipment. “We try to put more money into snowmaking improvements each season,” says Andrew Schmitt, marketing director at Cataloochee Ski Area. “It’s our passion. Right now, the snowmaking in January and February is amazing.” This year’s improvements at North Carolina’s original ski area include new, big guns and a retention pond that collects snow melt. That water is fed directly back to the guns on days that heavier snowmaking is needed.

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14

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

At Beech Mountain Resort, 17 new light towers have gone up, outfitted with 34 state-of-the-art LED slope lights to improve visibility for night skiers and shredders. Beech, which hosts the highest liftoperated ski terrain in the Eastern U.S., is also wrapping phase one of a two-phase plan that will produce more snow in less time, using less energy. “Snowmaking is the backbone of our business and we’re always focused on ways to increase output,” says resort general manager Ryan Costin. “This project represents a huge expansion of the pumping operation and our ability to maximize snowmaking opportunities.” Construction teams at Beech have renovated the pump house, allowing The Tor-

rent Pump Skid to automatically engage additional pumps, as more guns are needed across the mountain. The system taps into 6,500 feet of new water and air lines, and 8,000 feet of armored electrical cable that will send more juice to fan guns, while supporting new high-tech SMI fan and tower guns. Bottom line: Those who like “freshies” are in luck — skiers will see more snow! Anniversary bells are ringing at Sugar Mountain near Banner Elk, as the resort celebrates 50 years by picking up the pace. A new, Silver Bullet chairlift by Doppelmayr has replaced the old Easy Street lift. The detachable quad has cut ride time from six to 2.5 minutes, with the ability to carry an additional 700 passengers up the mountain each hour. “Replacing the original Easy Street lift is not just an upgrade,” says Sugar Mountain Resort owner Gunther Jochl. “It is an example of the continued commitment to offering our guests an exceptional mountain experience.” Off-slope amenities are just as important as the runs for families with snow bunnies who are more interested in the show than the snow. Cataloochee crews have retrofitted an 8,000-square-foot facility between the lodge and ski school for greater use and comfort. “It used to house our big machine groomer,” Schmitt says. “We moved the groomer up the hill and this space now provides extra seating and keeps lines indoors, so folks won’t have to stand out in the weather. This also makes the lodge more spacious.” To enhance visits, Appalachian Ski Mountain has added road maintenance equipment to clear parking lots faster, a new guest-registration system for tickets sales at the base lodge, as well as phone-charging stations. At Beech, the youngest of mountain minors can now frolic in the newly renovated Snowflakes Childcare Center. As 2020 kicks off, a blanket of white covers Whistling Dixie, Boulderdash and dozens of runs across western North Carolina. Whether skiers and boarders rock the greens or bash the back bowls, it’s time to grab your gloves and hit the slopes.

n story by STEPHANIE TROTTER | photos PROVIDED

APPALACHIAN SKI MOUNTAIN, BLOWING ROCK, NC 365-foot vertical drop/12 slopes/3 terrain parks Drivetime from Greenville: 2 hours 39 minutes AppSkiMtn.com BEECH MOUNTAIN RESORT, BEECH MOUNTAIN, NC 830-foot vertical drop/17 slopes/terrain park Drivetime from Greenville: 2 hours 50 minutes BeechMountainResort.com CATALOOCHEE SKI AREA, MAGGIE VALLEY, NC 740-foot vertical drop/18 slopes/terrain park Drivetime from Greenville: 1 hours 50 minutes Cataloochee.com SAPPHIRE VALLEY SKI AREA, SAPPHIRE VALLEY, NC 200-foot vertical drop/2 slopes Drivetime from Greenville: 1 hours 35 minutes SkiSapphireValley.com SUGAR MOUNTAIN RESORT, SUGAR MOUNTAIN, NC 1,200-foot vertical drop/21 slopes/terrain park Drivetime from Greenville: 2 hours 32 minutes SkiSugar.com WOLF RIDGE SKI RESORT, MARS HILL, NC 700-foot vertical drop/15 slopes Drivetime from Greenville: 1 hours 55 minutes SkiWolfRidgeNC.com SNOWSHOE MOUNTAIN RESORT/SNOWSHOE, WV 800-foot vertical drop/41 trails/terrain park Drivetime from Greenville: 6 hours 48 minutes SnowShoeMtn.com WINTERPLACE SKI RESORT/GHENT, WV 603-foot vertical drop/27 slopes/terrain park Drivetime from Greenville: 4 hours 20 minutes WinterPlace.com


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In fact, be catatreated soften, surgically. and remove In fact, be our catatreated natural soften, surgically. lens and In remove fact, cataour natural soften, lens and remove our natural lens lens thatblindness lasts STEVEN for in a lifetime. this MD new notADAM felt or EASTERLING, also among the first five in the 2. U.S. to implant the PanOptix® of reversible the E.Remarkably, fifteen minutes or lens less,isthe cloudy glasses after cataract surgery. provides medical CIVILETTO, MD S. JACOB MONTG Alcon Data oncomprehensive File.new TDOC-0053542 2. Alcon on File. TDOC-0053542 Alcon Data on File. TDOC-0053542 DONALD GLASER, MD BRIAN2. JOHNSON, MD (MarData 10 2017). United States. As life expectancy seen bywhile the trifocal lens. is removed and most iscorrecting replaced by moderate It’s called “The correcting Next-Generation and surgical eye care, LASIK, the he most common ract surgery ispatient. the also most correcting common ract lens surgery moderate while is levthe also Eye. common   “While other while range-of-vision levalso Eye.   “While moderate range-of-vision levEye.   “While other range-of-visionCataract, (Marother 10 2017). (Mar 10 2017). (Mar 10 2017). Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Glauc Cataract, Medical Medical

JOSEPH PARISI, MD, FACS cornea, H. KEITH RIDDLE JR, MD BALAJI PERUMAL, MD increases in this country, so an artificial intraocular lens that Trifocal” because it is designed to Kamra inlay, pediatrics, has the prevalence of cataracts, lasts for a lifetime. Remarkably, this provide correction at all three dis- oculo-plastics, and aesthetics serCataract, LASIK, Medical Cataract, Medical Oculoplastics STEVEN E. CIVILETTO, MD Cornea, ADAM EASTERLING making it even more important to new lens is not felt or seen by the tances.¹ ² vices. Its American Board-Certified Medical Cataract, Medica manage this condition effectively patient. Clemson Eye, a leading eye care team of Ophthalmologists have and optimize vision for a growing Cataract surgery has a fascinat- practice in the Upstate was also performed more than 100,000 catapopulation. ing history that dates back to over among the first five in the U.S. to ract, LASIK, and microsurgical proToday, the implant the FACS new PanOptix® tri-BALAJI A cataract, which is a clouding of a thousand years ago. cedures. JOSEPH PARISI, MD, H. KEITH RIDDLE JR, MD JUSTIN ROMAN, MD PERUMAL, MD focal lens. MD “The PanOptix is the MONTGOMERY JR, MD the natural crystalline lens due to most advanced and precise form JOHNSON, STERLING, MD S. JACOB DONALD GLASER, MD BRIAN Cataract, LASIK, Medical Cataract, Cornea, Medical Cornea, Cataract, LAS Oculoplastics of cataract surgery involves the use first-of-its’-kind is Medical ct, Medical a change in its protein content, Cataract, Glaucoma, Medical Cataract, Cataract, Medical trifocal implantable usually seen later in life and must of a femtosecond laser to fragment, lens.” states Dr. Donald Glaser, one 1. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions for Use. MD STEVEN E. CIVILETTO, MD ADAM EASTERLING, MD S. JACOB MONTGOMERY JR, MD DONALD GLASER, BRIAN JOHNSON, MD CORNEA G EYE CARE be treated surgically. In fact, cata- soften, and remove our natural lens of the eye surgeons at ClemsonADVANCED 2. Alcon Data on File. TDOC-0053542 Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Glaucoma, Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Medical ract surgery is the most common while also correcting moderate lev- Eye. “While other range-of-vision• (Mar 10 2017). • Diabetic Eye Disease • Keratoconus

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ADVANCED EYE CARE • Diabetic Eye Disease •MD,Macular Degeneration JOSEPH PARISI, MD, FACS PARISI, MD, FACS JOSEPH BALAJIPARISI, PERUMAL, MD FACS H. KEITH BALAJIRIDDLE PERUMAL, JR, MD MD Cataract, LASIK,Medical Medical , LASIK, Medical Cataract, Oculoplastics LASIK, Medical Cataract, Oculoplastics Cornea, • Dry Eye CORNEA GENERAL EYE CARE • Glaucoma • Eye Exams • Keratoconus

CORNEA • Keratoconus • RIDDLE Corneal Collagen H. Crosslinking KEITH RIDDLE JR,MD MD H. KEITH BALAJI JUSTIN PERUMAL, ROMAN, JR,MD MD MD JUSTIN ALISON ROMAN, SMITH, MD Cataract, Cornea, Medical Cataract, Cornea, Oculoplastics Cataract, Medical LASIK Cornea, Pediatrics, Cataract, Medical LASIK • Cornea, Corneal Disease Treatment PEDIATRICS

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SPONSORED

Loyal Donors Take Time Out of Their Own Busy Lives to Make a Difference in Mine n photos THE BLOOD CONNECTION

ful—condition characterized by misshapen hemoglobin that inhibit adequate flow of blood and oxygen throughout the body. “It means so much that loyal donors take time out of their own busy lives to make such a difference in mine.” As of yet, there’s no cure, but regular transfusions of healthy red blood cells—the type that Ticknor donates—allow Vereen to enjoy a more normal life by minimizing the chronic pain, debilitating fatigue and frequent infections that are common to sickle cell disease. Left untreated, the blood disorder can lead to

The Blood Connection must collect more than 500 units of blood per day to meet the 24/7/365 needs of every one of the Upstate’s 23 hospitals as well as more than 45 other facilities throughout the Carolinas. In January 2019, whole blood donations averaged 512 units per day, giving the organization a very narrow margin for sudden upticks in demand—a car accident, shooting or other unexpected tragedy—during a season when unforeseen winter events can disrupt supply. “As a community, let’s start the New Year off right

Craig Ticknor He was a young airman when he first rolled up his sleeve to donate blood, and Craig Ticknor— now age 72—has been doing it ever since. “The first time I gave blood was in 1969, when I was in the Air Force,” recalls Ticknor, a frequent donor for an astonishing five decades. “That’s when I found out ‘Hey, it’s no big deal, giving blood.’ So I continued after I got out of the military … when we would have a blood drive at church, in the community, I gave regularly.” Now a familiar and beloved face around The Blood Connection’s center in Greenwood, Ticknor most often donates “double reds”—a procedure that allows him to contribute two units of red blood cells in a single visit. What’s more, he’s prized as a “universal donor,” with O-negative blood that can be used to save anyone’s life, regardless of their own blood type. Only 7% of the population are type O negative but their donations are vital for emergency situations or when a patient’s blood type is unknown. “I try to give every time I’m (eligible) for it,” Ticknor says, explaining that there are four different types of donations: whole blood, plasma, platelets, and red cell. “Double reds only takes about 35-45 minutes. It’s just an easy thing to do—and there are a lot of people who need this blood.” Indeed there are—and Shontrell Vereen of Piedmont is one of them. “I need eight people to donate (a unit of red blood cells) every three weeks for me to live my life,” says Vereen, who requires treatment every 21 days to combat sickle cell anemia, an inherited—and pain-

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

Shontrell Vereen serious complications such as stroke, organ damage and blindness. “Because of The Blood Connection I’m able to play with my kids outside and be more present in their lives,” says Vereen, the father of two girls, age 6 and 12. “Every time I get my red blood cell exchange, I think about the people who have donated to help me. I’m eternally grateful.” While the need for live-saving blood products never lessens, winter’s drop in temperature creates a corresponding drop in donations due to weather-related traffic disruptions such as ice and snow, seasonal colds and flus, and other winter woes. And that’s not cool. “We rely on loyal donors, especially this time of year,” says Allie Van Dyke, Partnerships & Media Coordinator at The Blood Connection. “A snow or ice storm might shut down collection efforts on a given day—but that’s a day when recipients like Shontrell still count on donations. So we encourage the community to give blood as soon and as often as they can on clear days, to keep us covered.”

by providing life-saving blood products for every patient here at home,” said Delisa English, president and CEO of The Blood Connection. “Local blood recipients are our neighbors, co-workers and loved ones, so it’s worth it to find a way to donate, especially through the winter.”

To learn more about the various types of blood donations and how you can help, visit TheBloodConnection.org or call The Blood Connection at 864-255-5005.

thebloodconnection.org | 864-255-5000


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

COMMUNITY

SC Speaker Jay Lucas on how the state will spend $1.9 billion budget surplus n story and photo by EVAN PETER SMITH

South Carolina is flush right now. Thanks to two consecutive years of stronger than expected economic growth, the state now has about $1.9 billion in surplus funds burning a hole in its budget’s pocket. So what will the state do with that money? South Carolina Speaker of the House Jay Lucas addressed that question before an audience at the Poinsett Club on Jan. 6, during a meeting of the First Monday Republican political forum. “I have to start by saying, it’s important in some way for us to get this money back to the taxpayers,” Lucas said. The process behind hemming down specifics will begin with budget hearings in the South Carolina Legislature shortly after Gov. Henry McMaster submits his budget proposal on Jan. 13. While not delving into too much detail yet, Lucas did focus on three primary ways the money would be spent: getting money back to taxpayers; investing more in education; and saving the money in a reserve fund.

Currently South Carolina has about $614 MILLION in its reserve fund One of Lucas' goals is to have $1 BILLION in the state's reserve fund GIVING IT BACK

Lucas offered support for McMaster’s proposal to lower the state's highest marginal income tax rate from 7% down to 6%, as well as a goal to lower the state's tax brackets by .2% every year. For the average South Carolinian, that means “a bigger rebate check,” according to Lucas.

INVESTING IN EDUCATION

“Education is the single most important issue facing our state today,” Lucas said, noting that each year South Carolina loses about 600 teachers. He outlined a plan to give every teacher a $3,000 salary increase, the goal being to “make teaching a much more lucrative career” with “a livable wage.” “We’ve kind of created a problem for ourselves,” Lucas said, referring to the 70,000 unfilled jobs in the state as of this

Education is the single most important issue facing our state today.” -Jay Lucas, South Carolina Speaker of the House year. “A lot of prospective teachers are going to take those jobs instead of teaching.” In a draft of his budget proposal, McMaster has also earmarked $53 million of those surplus funds to go toward fully state-funded pre-K for underprivileged children across the state. More than half of South Carolina’s 3- and 4-year-old children are not enrolled in a pre-K program. “The point is, nothing is off the table,” Lucas said. “There is nothing we should not consider when trying to get education right.”

SAVING THE MONEY

Lucas said he’d like for about $300 million-$400 million of the surplus funds to be relegated to the state’s reserve fund. Currently the state has about $614 million in its reserve fund.

Another goal for funds is

STATE-FUNDED PRE-K FOR CHILDREN IN NEED

“That’ll take us through one bad year,” Lucas said. “It won’t take us through more than one bad year. So we need to save some of this money.” He said the goal was to get the reserve fund up to about $1 billion. JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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SPONSORED

SPONSORED

5 MYTHS ABOUT YOUR WELLNESS & GYM #1 Myth: A healthy lifestyle means working out once or twice a week. TRUTH: Working out once or twice a week will not result in a sustained lifestyle change. Optimally, most physicians recommend three 50-minute sessions weekly with appropriate nutrition to see a significant change. Just look at the stats and statements of fact provided by Doctor Mike Evans in his popular 23 ½ Hours whiteboard video. When an individual takes part in physical activity or exercise for just 30 minutes a day, not 50 minutes as recommended, three times a week the benefits are still life changing for most individuals. (www.youtube.com/ watch?v=aUalnS6HIGo).

#2 Myth: The advertised price for a gym membership is what you actually pay. TRUTH:

Joining fees, annual fees, upgrade fees, and enrollment fees are often added to these “incredibly low gym rates”. Be sure to ask the right questions concerning the actual cost of your gym membership. • Is there a joining fee or enrollment fee? • Are all the programming and classes I want included in my membership? • Do any of these fees recur annually? • Is the membership a month-to-month or 12-month contract? • What is the cancellation policy?

#3 Myth: Counting calories/macros is the best way to lose weight. TRUTH: Not only is counting calories or mac-

ros tedious, it can also lead to disordered eating patterns. Try fueling for your day by eating every 3-4 hours and listening to your hunger and fullness cues instead. Avoid being overly hungry, or overly full throughout the day - and remember no two days are the

same (especially after a hard workout!). Your body knows how much energy it needs, we just need to learn to listen! – Courtesy of Brittany Jones Nutrition Group #4

Myth: Working out with a friend is discouraged and distracting. TRUTH:

One word, ACCOUNTABILITY. It cannot be emphasized enough how important it is to have a workout buddy to keep you accountable. A group fitness class, personal trainer, or friends are all great tools to use to keep you accountable to your healthy lifestyle. You have made the choice to live longer by exercising. You have put in the work to become healthier. Do not let all that hard work go to waste. Maintain and live the healthy lifestyle you have chosen with the help of friends and colleagues.

#5 Myth: All gyms offer the same programs and services. TRUTH:

All gyms or health clubs are not the same. Some are boutiques offering just one type of service like a spin or yoga studio. Another type such as a low-cost fitness center just offer use of equipment and limited services. While others offer a full array of programs and services including equipment, group fitness classes, tennis, pools, basketball courts, and other useful programing. Just be sure you ask the proper questions before joining the gym so you are completely aware of what you are getting for your money. • Do you offer group fitness classes? • How often do those classes occur? • What is included in my membership level? • Do you offer nutrition programming? • What other programming is available to support my wellness efforts?

Five more myths available online. GreenvilleJournal.com

ALL INCLUDED WITH YOUR MEMBERSHIP

LES MILLS

Mixing the hottest music with cutting-edge exercise science, Sportsclub offers the most LES MILLS™ programming in the upstate!

18

YOGA

Improve your health and relaxation by taking one of our 10 Yoga classes available to all levels and ages.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

SPIN

Spin class instructors lead members in high intensity cycling workouts. You control the speed and the resistance.

AQUATICS

Sportsclub aquatics classes focus on flexibility, strength building, and cardio in our salt water pools.

PILATES

Sportsclub’s Pilates classes emphasize proper postural alignment, core strength, and muscle balance.

RAISED BARRE

Set to upbeat music, this class is a full body lengthening and timing class derived from Ballet and Pilates principles.


SPONSORED

MEMBERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES: FITNESS ONLY MEMBERSHIP

Provides access to all fitness equipment and group fitness classes. Pool and basketball courts are included at the Five Forks and Greenville locations. A Women’s Only Fitness Area is available exclusively at the Simpsonville location.

CLUB MEMBERSHIP

This membership includes all the amenities of a Fitness Only Membership plus racquetball privileges.

FULL CLUB MEMBERSHIP

This all-inclusive membership includes fitness, group fitness, racquetball and tennis facilities.

TENNIS ONLY MEMBERSHIP

This membership provides access to our tennis facilities including socials, tournaments, and leagues.

P.R.E.P. (Physician Referred Exercise Program)

p.r.e.p.® is a 60-day physician referred exercise program that introduces participants to exercise. p.r.e.p.® participants meet with fitness professionals twice per week in small group settings and have full access to all of Sportsclub’s amenities for $60 for 60 days.

GREENVILLE

SIMPSONVILLE

FIVE FORKS

712 Congaree Road

667 SE Main Street

317 Scuffletown Road

864.288.7220

PERSONAL TRAINING

All Sportsclub personal trainers are nationally certified to develop custom workouts for you while considering your goals, fitness level and medical history.

864.228.8282

TENNIS

Sportsclub features 9 lighted clay courts, 3 lighted hard courts, and 2 indoor hard courts with programming that includes lessons, clinics, leagues and socials.

864.675.5808

SPORTSCLUB KIDS

A safe and nurturing environment offering year-round programming that includes summer camps, school break camps, an after-school program, Kids’ Nights Out and birthday parties.

ONLINE

WWW.SPORTSCLUBSC.COM

SWIM LESSONS

Learn-to-swim program for ages 3-13 - go from beginner to competition level! Divided by skill levels into small groups. Private lessons available.

PICKLEBALL

Sportsclub now offers the fastest growing sport in the world, Pickleball, on three courts at our Greenville location.

RACQUETBALL

Sportsclub is home to eight racquetball courts, the most in the upstate, and offers leagues, lessons, and clinics for all levels of players.

JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

19


NEWS

|

NEED TO KNOW

READER'S LENS

December Reader's Lens winners GENERATIONS

Celebrating Exemplary Public Leadership

For the month of December our readers were encouraged to submit photos in the theme of "Generations." Several heart-warming photos displaying familial generations were submitted and the winners are below.

Please join us for the 15th annual

Wilkins Leadership Awards Dinner Hosted by Ambassador David Wilkins, Secretary Dick Riley and Furman President Elizabeth Davis

1ST RUNNER UP

Reflections of Three Generations | Casey Porter

Legislative Leadership Award

The Hon. J. Gary Simrill

Civic Leadership Award

Nella G. Barkley

EDITOR'S PICK Tuesday, January 14, 2020 6 p.m. reception | 7 p.m. dinner Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center

2ND RUNNER UP

Special Bond | Greg Lambert

Five Generations Gathered for Thanksgiving | JoAnn Johnson

furman.edu/WilkinsDinner or 864.235.8330

Major Sponsors: BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina SCETV

3RD RUNNER UP

Downtown Stroll with Three Generations | Casey Porter

THIS MONTH OVERALL BEST PICTURE 2019 20

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

Backyard Bird | Thomas Priddy

JANUARY NEW BEGINNINGS


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

CAPTURED

POLAR PLUNGE 2020 n photos by IRINA RICE

People took a plunge in Lake Placid the afternoon of Jan. 1 at Paris Mountain State Park to raise funds for the park. The event is organized by Friends of Paris Mountain State Park. Event organizers listed the temperature of the water at 48 degrees.

New joint. New you.

Trust the team that performs more joint replacements than any other hospital in South Carolina. As the first to bring robotic arm-assisted technology to Greenville, our hospital performs more joint replacements than anyone else in the state. That means our joint replacement team is here for you from education to recovery so you can get moving again.

Call 864-213-4958 to sign up for a FREE joint replacement seminar on Jan. 22.

bonsecours.com

Open House

The Montessori Experience Sunday, January 12, 2020 • 4-6 pm

4-5 pm • Welcome & Meet our Teachers

VIEW MORE PHOTOS ONLINE

WWW.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

VIDEO AVAILABLE ONLINE

WWW.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

5-6 pm • Life After Montessori: An Alumni Panel Learn first-hand from our student alumni panel about the benefits of a Five Oaks Academy education and how they transitioned to high school and beyond.

Minds Opened Here

Please RSVP at FiveOaksAcademy.com.

1101 JONESVILLE ROAD • SIMPSONVILLE, SC 29681 JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

21


HOME

and REAL ESTATE

HISTORIC PLACES

Simpsonville Baptist Church

Widely known throughout the Upstate for the beautiful stained glass windows, "Our Savior Knocking on the Door" and "The Lost Sheep."

n story by KIMBERLY COLLIER

The Simpsonville Baptist Church, constructed 1913-1914, is a significant piece of the Upstate's history. Luther D. Proffitt, Spartanburg architect, designed the early twentieth century church chiefly in the Romanesque Revival style. The church also contains elements of both Moorish and Gothic Revival architecture. The church is a two-story, five bay brick structure with twin towers in stepped, convex-shaped fashion. There are numerous round-headed stained glass windows, each highlighted by a rubbed brick arch. The most celebrated features of the church are the two large pictorial stained glass windows on the west and south eleva-

tions. The church has been known for many years throughout the upstate as “The Friendly Church with Beautiful Windows.” The subjects depicted in these windows are believed to be taken from the work of Holman Hunt, an English artist known for painting biblical scenes. They are entitled “Our Savior Knocking on the Door” and “The Lost Sheep.” The church is now known as First Baptist Simpsonville and offers multiple locations for ministry opportunities. The "downtown" campus at 3 Hedge Street in Simpsonville was listed in the National Register on October 13, 1992. The original listed address in the National Register for the church is 106 Church Street, Simpsonville.

THE BEGINNINGS OF FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF SIMPSONVILLE The beginnings of the church started with a Sunday School class held in a school building on April 1, 1887 and incorporated as a church in November of 1888 with 24 members. The historic church building was completed in May of 1914 with a total cost, including furnishings, of approximately $19,000. Source: South Carolina Department of Archives and History and fbsimpsonville.org

did you know: • April 1, 1887 First meeting of the eventual church occurred • November 11, 1888 Incorporated as a church • 24 original church members • May 2, 1914 Original structure completed at a cost (including furnishings) of over $19,000 • May 15, 1914 First regular service held in the new sanctuary • First brick church in Simpsonville • March 5, 1922 Official name changed to First Baptist Church of Simpsonville

TWICE THE EXPERIENCE. TWICE THE SERVICE. TWICE THE SATISFACTION! LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS.

The Van Gieson Team

Sam Van Gieson

Jennifer Van Gieson

svangieson@cdanjoyner.com

jvangieson@cdanjoyner.com

864.630.4708

“Curated for Kitchen” 1040 W. Washington St | Suite B, Greenville 864.326.0036 | www.ForestKitchenDesign.com 22

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

864.590.4441


EVERYTH I N G WE TOUCH TURNS TO SOLD Ch e t a n d Be t h Smit h.com

864-458-SOLD ( 765 3 )

OUTDOOR LIVING – GRIFFITH FARM

18 GRIFFITH KNOLL WAY, GREER | 4 BEDS | 4 BATHS | MLS#1406711 | $614,900

Gorgeous custom built 4BR/4.5BA all brick home located in the popular Griffith Farm subdivision. Beautiful oak hardwoods that flow throughout the main level. The gourmet Kitchen has new high-end stainless steel appliances with five burner gas range, double ovens, side-by-side stainless refrigerator, custom cabinetry with granite counters and custom tile backsplash. You’ll not only find what you’re looking for inside, but outside there are other wonderful features you’ve been searching for, such as a side entry 3-car Garage with remote access and screened Porch. A fully fenced backyard offers an inviting Rear Deck and patio that is perfect for outdoor entertaining or enjoying a beautiful Carolina day around the fabulous in-ground custom salt water pool.

NEW

THE RAVINES AT SPRING MILL 132 Grinders Circle, Greer $314,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 3 • MLS#1404633

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CHARLESTON WALK 236 Grandmont Court, Greer $389,900 • Beds: 5 Baths: 4 • MLS#1401665

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155 Riverplace Unit 103, Greenville $299,900 • Beds: 1 Baths: 1 • MLS#1407000

505 Rustic Outland Drive, Simpsonville $539,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1398754

EASLEY

GREENVILLE

STRATHMORE

112 Oaklane Drive, Easley $149,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1407620

117 Nature Trail, Greenville $169,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 • MLS#1407927

100 Strathmore Drive, Greer $849,900 • Beds: 6 Baths: 4 | 1 • MLS#1404745

CHARLESTON WALK

PARKINS MILL

ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES

DOWTOWN GREENVILLE

9 Stonewash Way, Greer $389,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 4 | 1 • MLS#1401660

412 Parkins Mill Road, Greenville $266,400 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1400542

9 Sundew Court, Greenville $359,500 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1402825

11 Briar Street, Greenville $209,900 • Beds: 2 Baths: 1 • MLS#1408798

110 Creekland Way, Taylors $239,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1407398

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(864)458-SOLD (7653)

EVERYTH IN G WE TOUCH TURNS TO SOLD

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200 Saratoga Drive $234,999 3BR/2BR. Beautifully updated home with a full unfinished basement with 4 rooms plus a 2-car garage. The basement rooms have framing, accessible wiring and rough plumbing ready to finish out if you like or use it for storage and play area for kids and workshop for Dad! MLS 1393209

Simpsonville homes for sale 225 KILGORE CIRCLE | $874,900 RIVER WALK: Gorgeous, stately home on 1.09 acres. Circle driveway with stone pathway. 2 story foyer with brazilian cherry hardwoods, wood spiral stair case, room for piano, and open dining room.

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4.5 MLS 1402177

LINDA O'BRIEN | 864.325.0495 Wilson Associates

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3.5 MLS 1403269

MARGARET MARCUM | 864.420.3125

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner REALTORS®

505 RUSTIC OUTLAND DRIVE | $539,900

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RIVER WALK: Craftsman style home with open floorplan - perfect for entertaining. On the main level you will find the kitchen, dining room, great room and master suite.

BRAXTON RIDGE: Brand new custom home. All the custom finishes you would expect in a J. Francis Builder home. Quality craftsmanship and precision to detail are evident throughout.

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6BR/5BA/2HLFBA. Meticulously maintained. One-of-a-kind open floor plan perfect for entertaining. Master suite feels like a retreat. The attention to detail is amazing. This home offers a salt water Pebble Tea pool with LED lighting.You must see this house to believe all the extras it has to offer.

113 PARKSIDE DRIVE | $549,000

2.5 MLS 1398754

CHET SMITH / MICHELLE GRAY | 864.458.7653 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner REALTORS®

WATERTON

FOREST LAKE

107 Waterton Way • $239,500

78 Forest Lake Drive • $272,000

4BR/2.5BA. Come see this lakeside home with welcoming living room, gas fireplace, hardwood floors, classic dining room, master suite with separate shower, dual sinks, walk-in closet for your wardrobe. Enjoy the cook-friendly kitchen with breakfast area and granite countertops. Large deck has water views. MLS 1399684

3BR/2BA. Just what your clients have been waiting for! Near Woodruff road...minutes to anything your buyers need. Open flow floor plan, galley kitchen, plenty of storage space. 9 ft+ ceilings with vaulted ceilings in the great room, dining and master bedroom. Enjoy the 2 car garage and private patio perfect for outdoor entertaining.

104 CARRICK DRIVE | $344,000 HIGHLAND CREEK: Custom home featuring main floor master, office with built-ins, two story great room and kitchen with large center island. Deck overlooks the gorgeous rear grounds.

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MELISSA MORRELL | 864.918.1734

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Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner REALTORS®

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RECENT SALES BY SUSAN AS A REPRESENTED BUYER

ALTA VISTA

106 Lanneau Drive • $439,500

7 Crabapple Court 108 Golden Bear Drive 206 E. Augusta Place

3BR/2.5BA. Welcome Home! Conveniently located...few minutes walk to Cleveland Park, the Swamp Rabbit Trail and downtown! Large wrap around porch. Master suite offers a large walk-in closet and ample bathroom with separate shower and tub. Newer carpet and paint on the second level. Seller will entertain a short term rental.

For all your real estate needs...

200 WILD MEADOW DRIVE | $325,000 CREEKWOOD: This home has it all. Great curb appeal, a functional open floorplan, beautifully landscaped yard, top notch neighborhood amenities, and is in a great school district.

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864-201-8656 • susandodds.com GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

3.5 MLS 1407504

PATRICK TOATES | 864.360.0170

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner REALTORS®

116 SUMMERWALK PLACE | $299,900 SUMMERWALK: Nicely updated with new kitchen, expanded laundry/mud room, screen porch and both formals. Wonderful level lot with utility building. Great schools. A must see.

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2.5 MLS 1407386

2.5 MLS 1403838

SUSAN MCMILLEN | 864.458.7653 Allen Tate


HOME OPEN HOUSES

Area open houses

and REAL ESTATE

313 ROSEBUD LANE • $399,000 CARISBROOKE: Rare one-owner home in great neighborhood. This four or five bedroom home with open floor plan is sure to please. SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, January 12

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GREENVILLE’S AGENT 24/7

3.5 | MLS 1407650

est. 2003

Kathryn Curtis, Wilson Associates 864.238.3879 | kathryn@wilsonassociates.net

207 CHELSEA LANE • $749,900 CHELSEA WOODS: Come see classic southern living at its finest. This 5 bedroom/4.5 bathroom home is located in the Chelsea Woods community. SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, January 12

MELISSA MORRELL

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Happy New Year! R YE B U S! N 0 I IVE 0 0 NT $ 5 IN CE

4.5 | MLS 1405514

Angela Rodriguez, Wilson Associates 864.609.7219 | angela@wilsonassociates.net

CHANCELLORS PARK

1 Knightsbridge | $589,900 | 5 BR/5 BA/1 HLF BA | MLS# 1399807 7 DRAYTON HALL ROAD • $484,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION: This home has it all! Only 3 years old in the sought after Five Forks Plantation community. SPECS:

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2.5 | MLS 1405065

Linda O'Brien, Wilson Associates 864.325.0495 | linda@wilsonassociates.net

CHARLESTON WALK

204 Grandmont Court | $454,900 | 4 BR/4 BA | MLS# 1402918

47 LAYKEN LANE • $409,900 VILLAS AT CARRIAGE HILLS: Rare, truly maintenance-free one-level living with all luxury finishes located close to the best of Greenville and Simpsonville! SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, January 12

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2.5 | MLS 1406081

Ashley Steigerwald, Wilson Associates 864.907.0601 | ashley@wilsonassociates.net

HIGHLAND CREEK

104 Carrick Drive | $344,000 | 4 BR/2 BA/1 HLF BA | MLS# 1407386

UPCOMING ARTICLES AND LISTING INFORMATION ISSUE DATE

AREA/THEME

January 24

Parkins Mill area information and listings

February 7

Mountain properties information and listings

February 14

Love your space, great homes for sale

February 21

Davenport history, condos/townhome listings

February 28

Taylors mill history and Taylors listings

March 6

Choosing home pros and renovated listings

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32 Rolleston Drive | $785,000 | 5 BR/4 BA | MLS# 1395830

864.918.1734 GreenvilleAgent247.com *SOURCE: C. Dan Joyner Internal Records, 1/1/2017-12/31/2017.

JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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SUBDIVISION STONE CROFT BUIST CIRCLE OAK MEADOWS CHANTICLEER CHEROKEE PARK HAMMOND'S POINTE TRAXLER PARK THORNTON HALL RIDGELAND AT THE PARK MCBEE BOOKEND CHARLESTON PLACE SYCAMORE RIDGE BROOKHAVEN HIGHLAND TERRACE CLIFFS AT GLASSY NORTHGATE KNOLLWOOD KNOLLWOOD STILLWATERS ELLINGTON PARK PARKERS LANDING BOTANY WOODS KANATENAH LAKE ROBINSON POINTE STONEHAVEN BEAUMONT SILVER MEADOWS KILGORE FARMS AUGUSTA CIRCLE BROOKHAVEN BRENTWOOD RIDGESTONE COTTAGES

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PROPERTY TRANSFERS FOR DECEMBER 9-13

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$47,300,000 $12,300,000 $3,755,000 $1,425,000 $990,000 $889,500 $850,000 $850,000 $825,000 $825,000 $725,000 $694,000 $693,965 $689,000 $670,000 $655,000 $614,000 $540,500 $519,500 $515,000 $512,646 $500,000 $490,000 $490,000 $485,000 $485,000 $483,000 $469,299 $450,000 $449,705 $446,000 $440,000 $428,000 $422,000 $420,000 $415,000 $413,000 $408,550 $402,900 $399,000

TRAILSIDE OWNER LLC PERIMETER QOZB REALTY LL MNT FAMILY LLC ENAM TRUST THE CUTSHALL BRETT FRALEY BE MEDINA CATERINA (JTWROS) DARWIN JANET (JTWROS) DA ZESTIE LLC POTISEK MELISSA GUFFEY ( MARK III PROPERTIES LLC ENSMINGER RICHARD L (JTW BOTKIN ALAN D (JTWROS) B GLOVER RICHARD M TRUST G DANDENEAU SUZANNE M LIVI KAIZEN INVESTMENTS LLC PATEL VIKASH SEEDHOM RANI NAGI (JTWRO LEBLANE BRENDA T (JTWROS D R HORTON INC BORDERS LEI GH H (JTWROS CUSTOM REALTY LLC MCDANIEL KYLE RUSSELL (J AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R WERNTZ MEGAN K (JTWROS) BEHAL CAROL J (JTWROS) B BRENNAN JOHN PATRICK (JT PAQUIN JEFFREY (JTWROS) FRISCH ERIC S (JTWROS) F BRAMLETT PEGGY L HASSMAN ERIC D MULLINAX MORGAN WILLIAM TRAVIS FERDINAND FAMILY LLC LUERS DANIEL J (JTWROS) VALDEZ BRUCE W (JTWROS) HENCHEL LAWRENCE DELMONT GREENLEE CAROLINE E (JTW HASSMAN ERIC MULLINAX LE MESSER NANCY A (JTWROS) DIEZ MEGAN (JTWROS) OMEL SHEARER MARTHA W (JTWROS

101 PARK AVE 11TH FL 8633 SOUTH BAY DR 7828 S CABALLERO DR 2376 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 107 GROVE RD 240 OAK MEADOW DR 316 CHAPMAN RD 1145 E LAKESHORE DR 123 KEOWEE AVE PO BOX 170248 30 MANDARIN CIR 75 WOODVALE AVE 40 PADDINGTON AVE 164 RIDGELAND DR UNIT 100 PO BOX 973 111 E MCBEE AVE STE 303 3 CHARLESTONPLACE CT 116 LEGENDS WAY 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 34 E MONTCLAIR AVE 208 CHESTNUT OAKS CIR 108 MORNINGDALE DR 120 MEYERS DR 120 MEYERS DR 626 SEDGE ST 27 DAVID ST 314 ELLINGTON CREEK LN 204 LAKEWAY PL 10 BOTANY RD 115 CURETON ST 119 LAKE ROBINSON PT 723 CARRIAGE HILL RD 148 BEAUMONT CREEK LN 124 ENOREE FARM WAY 3806 E SUNNYDALE LN 413 PLACID FOREST CT 2115 BOHICKET WAY 12 BELTERRA DR 603 CARMELO CT 206 FERNBROOK TRL

STONEHAVEN STONEHAVEN HOLLY TREE PLANTATION HOLLY TRACE SUMMIT AT CHEROKEE VALLEY WESTHAVEN RIVERSTONE BOYD LISTER ESTATE TUSCANY FALLS COPPER CREEK SOUTHBROOK ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES SUGAR CREEK SADDLEHORN COPPER CREEK LOST RIVER CYPRESS RUN HOLLY TREE PLANTATION BRIAR OAKS SILVER RIDGE GLENVIEW PARK BROOKRIDGE HILLS SUTTON PARK EASTON RIDGE MORNING MIST FORRESTER HEIGHTS FAIRWAY VIEW KATHERINES GARDEN KENDAL GREEN HOLLY TRACE VERDAE MANOR HILLSIDE ACRES BRENTWOOD

$399,000 $396,000 $393,500 $391,000 $388,000 $386,900 $380,000 $379,664 $375,769 $375,000 $374,816 $365,000 $357,400 $350,000 $350,000 $350,000 $349,900 $347,500 $345,000 $340,000 $336,000 $330,560 $330,000 $330,000 $330,000 $330,000 $329,014 $319,000 $317,900 $316,200 $315,451 $314,000 $313,500 $313,000 $312,000 $310,000 $310,000 $310,000 $307,500 $306,936

WILSON TRACY LANDSVERK COURTNEY (JTWR LEPIN ANDREY N (JTWROS) REID ANDREW P (JTWROS) R MIELKE JAMES M JOLLEY DAVID DEAN (JTWRO MCKEOWN HUNTER O (JTWROS BRADLEY CINDY M (JTWROS) STONEBREAKER JOHN (JTWRO VOYTITSKIY TARAS (JTWROS SIMMONS CAROLYN (JTWROS) BEAN CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL KIRBY AMBER JUNE (JTWROS GREEN HARRY (JTWROS) GRE SCHREIBER MARK JOSEPH (J FOSTER SYBIL M MARTIN KAREN MARIE LAFLECHE CAROLINE M (JTW CALDWELL SHANNON L MCMICAN ROBERT F III BRIDGES KEVIN D (JTWROS) COOKE JULIE (JTWROS) COO BELLISSIMO JESSICA (JTWR GAD EL SAYED WAGIH F (JT BAIRD CHEYENNE R BAIRD D RENEWABLE PROPERTIES LAN PETERSON ERIC (JTWROS) P KIRK DAVID MATTHEW (JTWR DIDRIKSON MARK ROBERT (J STOREITGREENVILLE.COM LL MUYCO DIONISIO G MUYCO M SUTTON JENNIFER M CROSBY JENNA D (JTWROS) DODDS MATTHEW RUSSELL IRONS RAYMOND G (JTWROS) BRANDT LYDIA M (JTWROS) SMITH ELIZA G (JTWROS) S AGNEW CYNTHIA E STARZEC LEON A (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC

19 HICKORY CHIP CT 9 ENGLISH OAK RD 1009 PLANTATION DR 153 CIRCLE SLOPE DR 144 CLUB CART RD 1331 GROCE MEADOW RD 600 HARWINTON LN 103 CHINOOK DR 351 WATERS RD 101 TUSCANY FALLS DR 205 GORDANVALE ST 111 HARTWICK LN 417 MEADOWSWEET LN 229 BRIAR CREEK RD 128 NOKOTA DR 213 GORDANVALE ST 404 CATTAIL HOLLOW WAY 8 AUDREY LN 115 BURNS ST 111 CIRCLE RD 103 HOLLYBERRY CT 216 LIMBERLOCK WAY 108 SILVER RIDGE CT 1610 HIGHWAY 14 144 W MCELHANEY RD 2914 LARKIN ST 104 GLENVIEW PARK PL 721 ROCKCLIFF ST 222 HENNIPEN AVE APT 632 3111 WHITE HORSE RD STE A 210 EASTON MEADOW WAY 103 ONSLOW CT 23 RIVANNA LN 205 GOLF VIEW LN 515 PRESLEY CT 35 KENDAL GREEN DR 228 HOLLY CREST CIR 207 WELLING CIR 101 TROUT LN 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401

ARLINGTON DOWNTOWN GREEN MDTH CIRCUIT LLC MILLROCK INVESTMENT FUND BETTENCOURT KENNETH MANN VIRGINIA T BRUNSON APPLEBY GAYLE W M D LIVI FREELY JOHN J JR (JTWROS HARNESBERGER REVOCABLE T DIXON COLEMAN ELLENBERG NELSON PAUL ALVIN AND NE MIZE REVOCABE TRUST CHRISTMAN KATHY L AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R KESSLER MICHAEL L BRUCE & GAIL WOOD LLC CATANZARO CHANDLER MARSH HANAWAY BART E HARVEY LARRY A (JTWROS) MARK III PROPERTIES INC FRANCIS MARIE ELIZABETH CARLSON MARY M FEBREES BROTHERS LLC JOHNSON PAULINE M AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R CHM GROUP INC WILLIAMS KAYE L (JTWROS) LONG TOMIKO (JTWROS) ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN ELLENBURG JONATHAN TAYLO MCELVEEN KATIE B (JTWROS IRONS RAYMOND G ABBOTT LINN E BBCM ALPHA 1 LP KESTER CHRISTOPHER W (JT MNT FAMILY LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH LEONARD LINDSEY L D R HORTON INC D R HORTON INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC

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MYERS GEOFFREY D LEE GINA BEHAL DANIEL L CURTIS CHRISTOPHER M (JT YOUNG LYNN E (JTWROS) SILVERLINE INC KONDOS MACKENZIE I (JTWR NVR INC DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC WATSON GEORGE D MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L WELCH CHRISTIE C SEKIDO KOJI PASZKIEWICZ GEORGE POTTER TIFFANY W (JTWROS MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH BURST JOSEPH A RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES FAZIO TONY & JULIE TRUST SPIVEY RICHARD A NVR INC ALEXANDER DAVID L MONTOTO SHADID RING MICHAEL SAFEGUARD SIX LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL FIELDS AMY SUZANNE DISTRICT TRAVELERS REST MILLER TERRY MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L NILSSON JACK EVERETT JR DEAN ANGELINA (JTWROS) HART LAURA KATHRYN (JTWR SK BUILDERS INC FULLER ANN P GANO DOUGLAS VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC SK BUILDERS INC BCB AND PRB 2 LLC


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PROPERTY TRANSFERS FOR DECEMBER 9-13 SUBDIVISION MEADOW BREEZE GREYSTONE COTTAGES GLENVIEW PARK WOODLAND HILLS GRAYSON PARK DAVENPORT COLLEGE HEIGHTS ADAMS RUN ORCHARD FARMS ARBOR WALK GROVE PARK LONGLEAF RIVERSTONE COUNTRY PLACE ONEAL VILLAGE MORNING MIST LONGLEAF HARBOR LAKE CUNNINGHAM SUGAR CREEK VILLAGE AT GREEN MEADOWS ASHLEY OAKS VILLAGE AT GREEN MEADOWS CHICORA CREST LENNOX LAKE PARK ROW COTTAGES HARRISON BRIDGE COVENTRY HUDDERS CREEK NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS JONESVILLE LANDING BROOKSIDE VILLAS BROOKWOOD COMMONS CROFTSTONE ACRES COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE QUINCY ACRES SUMMERWALK LOVE ESTATES NORTHCLIFF

and REAL ESTATE

SOLD

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBDIVISION

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

$305,000 $304,900 $304,426 $302,761 $302,000 $299,900 $299,000 $297,000 $289,900 $289,000 $288,000 $285,706 $285,645 $285,000 $285,000 $283,000 $280,000 $279,900 $279,900 $277,500 $274,510 $272,000 $270,451 $270,000 $265,000 $265,000 $262,000 $260,400 $260,000 $258,000 $257,400 $256,860 $254,925 $252,000 $250,000 $245,500 $245,000 $245,000 $245,000 $242,500

BROWN BERNARD J JR BROWN COLEMAN TERRY GARCES CONNIE MARIE (JTW M & T PROPERTIES INC BEAULIEU JENNIFER (JTWRO SANDERS CADIMUS STEPHEN LEARY MICHAEL ROBERT (JT BOND KENDALL LEIGH LANFORD CANDICE (JTWROS) STOUT JOSEPH D (JTWROS) CUPSTID WILLIAM BRANDON CORRICA ARTHUR (JTWROS) LOUNDS LATISHA (JTWROS) LONGENECKER ANJA (JTWROS GEOTIS DEBRA HABYAN SUDDUTH MATTHEW B ETIENNE GENEVA S (JTWROS LAYTON CHRISTINE FOWLER DENNE CHARLES L SR (JTWR WAGONER ROGER EDMUND NICKELL DONALD H III STOKES JENNIFER FOX LORI H LOMAX SHELLY ELIZABETH TAYLOR DAVID CARROLL JR NATTA MARK K VAN HICKSON KENNETH P (JTWRO FOX DAVID FUENTES ALEXANDER M (JTW PYLES LORENZO W ODOM RUSTY R (JTWROS) OD WILK MONICA A NVR INC STUMP TYLER SAVAGE REBECCA B WILLIAMS SCOTT SMITH GARY A (JTWROS) SM FRASER KAREN W SOLER COLLEEN K SALIZZONI JENNIFER

74 RISING MEADOW LN 26 BRADSTOCK DR 317 KELBY ST 3649 CALHOUN MEMORIAL HWY 14 WOODLAND HILLS LN 9 FOXBOURNE WAY 9441 LIVORNO CT 1 ERSKINE ST 5 WARRENTON WAY 28 REDGLOBE CT 113 BROOKWAY DR 410 HILBURN WAY 3 TONKAWA WAY 326 DRIFTWOOD DR 108 STILLCOUNTRY CIR 3443 ONEAL CHURCH RD 3 GORHAM CT 801 TROUTDALE LN 45 LAKE HARBOR CT 127 SUGAR CREEK LN 111 PARKLAND DR 115 LEGRAE LN 216 GREEN RIVER WAY 18 MCHAN ST 18 MANORWOOD CT 231 E PARK AVE UNIT F 314 BELLE OAKS DR 1105 DRAYCOTT RD 502 HUDDERS CREEK WAY 309 NEELY FARM DR 132 JORDAN CREST CT 40 CREEKHAVEN LN 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 140 BROUGHTON DR 5 SCANAWAH CT 117 QUINCY DR 504 SUMMERRIDGE CT 434 GREENBRIAR LN 306 NORTHCLIFF WAY 224 MACO TER

BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION WOODINGTON LINKSIDE GREEN BROOKFIELD WEST COOPERS LAKE ANNANDALE ESTATES TRIPLE CREEK COUNTRY VIEW W.W. DAVIS KATHERINES GARDEN MORNING MIST FARM TANNER'S MILL WOODLAND CREEK PLANTERS ROW DEVENGER PLACE UNIVERSITY PARK THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL THE VILLAGE AT ADAMS MILL CASTLEBROOK HIDDEN LAKE PRESERVE SPARROWS POINT NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK CASTLEBROOK BONNIE VISTA AUTUMN HILLS WATERMILL VICTORIA PARK ANNANDALE ESTATES CASTLEBROOK TINDAL PLACE LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON TWIN CREEKS DELLVISTA HEIGHTS BROOKWOOD COMMONS WESTVIEW

$242,000 $241,500 $240,000 $240,000 $236,250 $235,970 $235,900 $234,900 $234,500 $234,000 $233,000 $233,000 $232,400 $231,000 $229,000 $229,000 $225,000 $221,000 $220,000 $220,000 $219,900 $219,490 $218,678 $218,000 $217,500 $216,895 $216,000 $216,000 $215,000 $214,000 $212,500 $211,975 $211,885 $210,000 $210,000 $210,000 $209,000 $205,000 $204,165 $200,000

THOMPSON DORIS M MAY ERIN R (JTWROS) MAY DAY EDITH IDELLA (L-EST) BALOV ZAHRA HOSSEIN POUR PIERCE CHONG Y (JTWROS) BEASLEY MARC (JTWROS) BE HAGEN EDNA-MAE (JTWROS) DYE JASON L WALTERS BRAD LANDON (JTW TAPP JENNIFER JOINES (JT MULLINS KRISTA L JACKSON GWENDOLYN CHAMBERS DENNIS R (JTWRO DUNSON JULIE ANN (JTWROS HOOKS ANN B FAMILY TRUST BUCHER MICHAEL JOHN MYERS WILLIAM JONATHAN GERLAUGH BONNIE TURNER MAGDALENA (JTWROS MCLEOD ALEXANDER C III ( GILKINSON WILLIAM J CRUZ-MORALES MARLEN (JTW JONES GEORGE B MORENO ERNESTO CLINDARD JACK D SR DOWNS ASHLEY ALEXANDRA HICKS KENNETH J JR STIER DONALD CRAIG WEER KEVIN (JTWROS) WEER TORRES JUAN CARLOS BURNETT COURTNEY A GUNNELLS JODI (JTWROS) G ROSS ALYSON MARTIN (JTWR JONES SHANNON B (JTWROS) DRUMMOND CHARLES (JTWROS AGUILAR VERONICA (JTWROS NICHOLS ANDREW C (JTWROS SMITH JAMES HARRISON JR JENKINS RACHEL TEAGUE JENNIFER ELAINE

10 DOUBLE CREST DR 302 WOODINGTON DR 206 GREENVIEW CIR 46 COBBLESTONE RD 151 DOVE HAVEN DR 101 FAIRMEADOW WAY 230 W MOUNTAIN CREEK CHURCH RD 313 MILLRIDGE RD 14 STONE RIVER WAY 1385 CAMP CREEK RD 506 PRESLEY CT 109 PRONGHORN CT 5 PEPPER HARROW CT 405 RUSSELL AVE 217 MEADOW ROSE DR 325 MARSH CREEK DR 509 HEDGEWOOD TER 110 BROOKSIDE CIR 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 307 422 HUDSON RD 820 APPLEBY DR 201 PORTCHESTER LN 305 BEAVER LODGE WAY 116 INNISBROOK LN 199 MOONLIGHT TRL 203 PORTCHESTER LN 1411 N PARKER RD 116 COXTON MILL CT 15 PERKINS CT 127 RIVERDALE RD 5 DUNBROOK DR 402 EDGEHILL CT 205 PORTCHESTER LN 510 REED RD 100 SALTHOUSE RD 2757 W GEORGIA RD 30 PFEIFFER CT 28 MELANIE LN 410 HUNTINGDALE PL 304 SEAVER CT

SK BUILDERS INC ROSE KATHLEEN B (JTWROS) DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BLAKELY DONALD RUSH TRUS SHELTON MINDA A DAVIS AUSTIN J (JTWROS) BRADFIELD JULIE (JTWROS) SAVAGE ENTERPRISES LLC SALAMONE FRANCESCO BAUR TAMI CAIN CHRISTOPHER NEAL (J D R HORTON INC NVR INC CRAWFORD CHARLES D MENTZER SHEILA (JTWROS) DEVER CHELSEY N (JTWROS) DREWITT KEVIN R (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC FOX JUSTIN DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BATSON JANICE S DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL CARSON BRADLEY V BEAM KRISTIE S KOVARIK MARY C COOPER JUDITH D (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC MCLENON ROBERT B BLAIR IRIS M CALVERLEY JACOB J (JTWRO DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL TCC VENTURE LLC KITCHENS J CLIFTON J TRACEY GERALD R TURNER JASON R HART ROGER M HUGHES ELIZABETH G (JTWR FENDER RANDY GLENN 224 MACO TERRACE LAND TR

LANGLEY J ERIC ELLER LANA E JAMES LINDA C TATE DOUGLAS K JARVIS CAROLINE P NVR INC W MOUNTAIN CREEK CHURCH D R HORTON INC MOSIER CHARITY D (JTWROS BENNETT ROBERT E JR (JTW SK BUILDERS INC SCHULMEISTER ROBERT (JTW WILK MONICA CHAPMAN LANE (JTWROS) ORD CORNELIA JAMES LILA KITTREDGE TROY MARY C FARRY ERIN F PARRINELLO AUGUSTE BOLT MARY PRICE REVOCABL MARKOWITZ STEVEN (JTWROS NVR INC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC LIENAU CHRISTOPHER SOWDER JEANNE M (JTWROS) NVR INC MCDADE JAMES VICTOR DELEON JUAN R SMOAK ALLEN JR GEDIKOGLU YAMAN JOHNSON JOSEPH (JTWROS) NVR INC NVR INC TINDAL HOLDINGS LLC ENESA CARI A MASTER KEY PROPERTIES LL SIMONS JENNIFER (JTWROS) HOLLIDAY MILDRED IRENE NVR INC HIGGINBOTHAM MICHELLE L

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JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

ARTS & CULTURE

Limitless Instructor teaches students to Dance Without Limits n story by ARIEL TURNER | photos PROVIDED

B

eth Bradley is the oldest of 18 children. Only two are her biological siblings, and all of the remaining 15 are considered special needs of varying levels of physical and mental abilities. Bradley’s parents began adopting children in need when she was 10 years old, adding a new sibling each year after. She

learned quickly to change diapers and even how to use a feeding tube by the time she was a teenager. As she grew older, her resentment for the amount of responsibility she was expected to undertake also grew. As an adult, though, she’s grateful. “None of it was my decision. It’s not really my story, but it shaped who I am,” Bradley says. Through those difficult years, dance became a haven for her, and now she’s using it to help others. Bradley, who founded Dance Without Limits dance studio in Greer where her three daughters now dance, has created a teaching environment inclusive of all abilities, something that is a rarity in the often competitive and high-pressure dance world.

They’re just kids like every other kid and they can learn to dance like any other kid.” -Beth Bradley, owner/instructor, Dance Without Limits 28

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

“We’ve been able to create a place for kids that didn’t have a place before,” Bradley says. Each class can accommodate students with developmental and physical delays to a certain degree, with the “limitless friends” class specifically for dancers with more acute needs. The model has been so successful that after three years in the current location at 2105 Old Spartanburg Road, the studio needs to move to a larger space. The new location spanning three storefronts at 115 Pelham Road, Suite 24, is under construction. It has twice the square footage as the old spot and three dance rooms instead of one. “We opened with 30 kids,” Bradley says. “We have 335 students now, and they just keep showing up, which I’m so thankful for.” Bradley began dancing at 4 years old in the same studio she would eventually coown and run in her hometown of Hendersonville, North Carolina, before opening Dance Without Limits in Greenville in 2016. It wasn’t her idea, though, to add classes for students with disabilities.

“I did it because my mom told me to,” she says. Her mom wanted Bradley to offer a dance class for her siblings. She says she had to learn how to teach kids who move differently and how to make instructions tangible for them. “I learned how fully capable they are,” she says. “They’re just kids like every other kid and they can learn to dance like any other kid.” After moving to Greenville in 2014 for her husband’s job, she continued commuting to Hendersonville to teach. She eventually had enough of the driving and decided to open a studio in Greenville, thinking naively ‘this will be easy.’ “If I had known what I know now, I wouldn’t have ever done it,” she says. Word of mouth and a crash course in social media marketing led to significant growth after the first few months. And now she’s taking what she considers another big risk with the new location, but she knows she can do it. “When I find something I’m all about, I’m all about it,” she says.


ALL THE BIG NAMES ARE HERE.

Named one of South Carolina’s “10 Best Attractions,” by 2018 USA TODAY 10Best and as one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth. When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s best institutional collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist, Jasper Johns. The museum’s unrivaled Southern Collection highlights a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian. And admission is always free! Learn more at gcma.org.

Jasper Johns, born 1930 Target with Four Faces, 1968 Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal Big Names JJohns 2018.indd 2

admission free

11/20/18 3:04 PM


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

MUSIC

TRY SOMETHING NEW THIS YEAR

Branford Marsalis brings his Quartet to the Peace Center

n story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo PROVIDED

The Grammy-awardwinning saxophonist, bandleader and composer Branford Marsalis has collaborated with some of the biggest names in music over his nearly 40-year career. And we’re not just talking about jazz artists, either. In addition to jazz masters like Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins and his younger brother Wynton, Marsalis has worked with Sting, Mary-Chapin Carpenter, Stevie Wonder, Bruce Hornsby and the Grateful Dead, among many others. Marsalis has also moved into the classical music realm, working with the New York Philharmonic, Philharmonia Brasileira and the North Carolina Symphony. But despite all of those high-profile collaborations, he always returns to his trusty quartet at some point, an adventurous group of players that has been together in one form or another since the mid-1980s.

P O L A N D’ S P R E M I E R O R C H E S T R A

NFM Wrocław Philharmonic January 19 • $15

ENSEM BLE 4.1 F E B R UA R Y 3

AN EVENING WITH BRANFORD MARSALIS » WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 | 7:30PM » PEACE CENTER » $15-$55 PEACECENTER.ORG The current quartet of Marsalis, pianist Joey Calderazzo, bassist Eric Revis and drummer Justin Faulkner has been in place for more than a decade, and that’s the group he’ll be performing with at the Peace Center Jan. 15.

‘Jack Cohan and Friends’ spotlights young Greenville-born musicians n story by PAUL HYDE | photos PROVIDED

“The explosive Latino Stomp.” – Sud Ouest

FEBRUARY 18

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Pianist Jack Cohan has spotlighted young Greenville-born professional musicians eight times over the past 10 years as a part of the Temple of Israel’s Music on Sunday series. “Jack Cohan and Friends” returns to the Temple at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12. The concert, with classical pieces and Broadway songs on tap, will feature soprano Brittany Hogan Alomar and clarinetist Benjamin Chen. “These are incredibly talented young professionals,” Cohan said. Cohan, the first executive director of the Peace Center, will host the concert and provide piano accompaniment. He’ll also perform two solo pieces by Chopin.

JACK COHAN AND FRIENDS » SUNDAY, JAN. 12 | 3PM » TEMPLE OF ISRAEL » 400 SPRING FOREST ROAD » $20/GENERAL | $5/STUDENTS 864-292-1782 Alomar, a Furman graduate who is now on the faculty of Anderson University, will sing Broadway songs from such musicals as “My Fair Lady,” “Carousel” and “West Side Story.” “It’s a lovely group of songs,” Cohan said. Chen, a graduate of the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities and the Cleveland Institute of Music, will perform works by Bernstein and Prokofiev. He’ll also play the virtuosic “Carmen Fantasy” by Alexander Rosenblatt. “It’s a dazzling piece of music, just a blast to play,” Cohan said.

GROUPS

Far Left: Ben Chen Left: Brittany Hogan Alomar

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10


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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

UPSTATE BEAT

THE BEAT GOES ON VINCENT HARRIS Contributor

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

When I first told you about the Upstate Music Awards in November, I didn’t know what to expect. I knew that I was excited about the idea that Future Chord’s Jeremy Theall and the Radio Room’s Wes Gilliam brought to me, the idea of honoring musicians making original music in our area. And I knew I was honored that they wanted to make me part of it. But I wasn’t sure how much of a response the awards would get. I wasn’t sure if the Upstate music scene was going to be as excited about it as I was. Truth be told, I had my doubts about whether this fantastic idea would even get off of the ground. But our music scene and the Upstate as a whole have given us a resounding response. Between Nov. 27 when the Upstate Music Awards website debuted, and Dec. 27, when the nomination period ended, more than 400 submissions from artists and fans were received. We have nominees from just about every genre, including country, rock, folk, hip-hop and electronic dance music. There are scores of EPs, full-length albums and music videos vying for the Best Of honors, and dozens of artists up for various awards, from Best Solo Act to Best Live Act to the 864 Award, which honors community service and advocacy. There are people up for awards who I’ve been covering for years mixed with artists I’d never spoken with before. There are rappers sitting alongside purecountry singers, and DJs in the same categories as folk singer-songwriters. The field is as wide as the music scene itself, which is about all you can ask for when you try something like this. And local businesses have taken notice. My wonderful colleagues at the Greenville Journal were the first to join as partners, and we were soon able to form additional partnerships with the radio stations Hot 98.1, 107.3 Jamz, X98.5 and 99.5 JACK FM. And we connected with our generous sponsors, Brando Jones Films, The Community Tap, The Artistry, iOnGreenville,

Elberon Amplifiers, Radio Room, Bo Stegall The Salon, Crescent Mortgage Co. and the Chapman Cultural Center. In short, the response has been overwhelming, and I’m very grateful to every artist and fan who visited UpstateMusicAwards.com and submitted. Now you come through for us, and for your favorite musicians, one more time. We’ve opened up the voting on the UMA site, and you’ll be able to vote on your favorites in our 13 categories until Jan. 23. You can vote once a day up until the 23rd, and we want you to tell every local music lover you know that they can make their voices heard about who makes the best original music in the Upstate. We’ll name the top five finalists in each category at the beginning of February, and then announce the winners at an awards ceremony on March 1 at ZenAn Elegant Place For Hire in Greenville. We’ll have more details on that event soon, but for now, you’ve got until the 23rd to log on, vote and put your favorites at the top of their categories. It’s a wonderful thing to see the Upstate take an interest in local, original music; your response has shown us, our partners and sponsors that it’s the right time. So go forth and vote. Let’s do this.

VOTING Visit UpstateMusicAwards.com to vote. You can submit your votes once a day. Voting is open until JAN. 23. Top 5 Finalists for each category will be announced at the beginning of Feb. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony on March 1 at Zen.


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

PAUL'S PICK

Greenville pianist takes on all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas in 2020 PAUL HYDE Contributor

For Greenville pianist Zachary Hughes, performing all the Beethoven piano sonatas from memory is “like climbing Everest.” The 32 solo piano works span 600 pages and 11 hours of music. “It’s a little terrifying,” Hughes said, with a laugh, “but it wouldn’t be worth doing if it wasn’t.” The 27-year-old Juilliard grad will take on the sonatas in 2020 in a project he has dubbed “The Beethoven Odyssey.” Hughes will perform two, three or even four of the works in each of 13 recitals, scheduled January through November. The first concert in the series (featuring sonatas 1 and 3) takes place at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12 at the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. The next in the series (sonatas 2 and 4) follows on Feb. 9. The recitals, admission-free with a suggested donation, are part of the worldwide celebrations of the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth. (In April, the Greenville Symphony offers its contribution with Beethoven’s beloved Ninth Symphony.) Hughes, the former principal keyboardist with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, has set aside other professional commitments to devote himself full time in 2020 to mastering the sonatas. “I’ll be living and breathing Beethoven,” he said.

IT’S PERSONAL

Beethoven’s sonatas are considered the great German composer’s most personal musical expressions. They’re among the most challenging works in the solo piano repertoire. “This project is by far the most ambitious thing I’ve done in my life,” Hughes said. Beethoven composed the works over 27 years, beginning in 1795. The early sonatas certainly are difficult, but the later pieces require nothing less than a virtuoso’s technique. They span a range of emotion, from romantic angst to ethereal serenity. Perhaps the best-known is the Sonata No. 14, the “Moonlight” Sonata. “Beethoven wrote his ‘autobiography,’ and we have it in his sonatas,” Hughes said. “We see Beethoven the man very clearly. At the same time, every person can see themselves in these sonatas. They go through all of human emotional experience.”

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AN ‘UNPLAYABLE’ PIECE

At least one of the works, Sonata No. 29 (subtitled “Hammerklavier”), was considered so difficult as to be unplayable until Franz Liszt picked it up a few years after Beethoven’s death and showed it could be done. “It was the four-minute mile of classical music,” Hughes said of Sonata No. 29. “Everyone thought it was impossible for a human being to run a four-minute mile until Roger Bannister did it, and then many others followed.” Hughes already has played some of the most challenging sonatas, including No. 29. “If I hadn’t played ‘Hammerklavier,’ I don’t know if I would have attempted these concerts,” Hughes said. “You don’t just learn ‘Hammerklavier.’ It takes years to settle in.”

LONGTIME DREAM

Hughes, who was born in the small California town of Los Osos, first fell in love with the Beethoven sonatas when he was a young pianist of 13. At a concert, he heard the Sonata No. 23, the “Appassionata” — and it’s still his favorite. “That was the first live piano concert I went to,” he said. “It just floored me. I didn’t know piano playing like that was possible. I didn’t know there was music out there like that. “Since that time, it has been a dream of mine to play all of the Beethoven sonatas.”

l a u n n A e i l a m Se rance S a e l C Thursday, January 9th – Saturday January 25th JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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DATE NIGHT

artscalendar January 10-16

METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL First Friday Jan. 3 ~ 467-3132

n DINNER story by ARIEL TURNER | photo JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

PEACE CENTER An Evening with Bill Engvall Jan. 10 ~ 467-3000

where we're EATING

n A SHOW story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo PROVIDED

THE WAREHOUSE THEATRE The Heath Jan. 10-26 ~ 235-6948

S’MORES NIGHT AT SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ

METRO. ARTS COUNCIL @ CENTRE STAGE Works by Sherrill Hill Through Jan. 10 ~ 233-6733

205 CEDAR LANE RD, GREENVILLE

GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Changing Seasons Jan. 11 ~ 467-3000 YOUNTS CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS Departure: The Journey Tribute Band Jan. 11 ~ 409-1050 TEMPLE OF ISRAEL Music on Sunday: Jack Cohan & Friends Jan. 12 ~ 292-1782 WITS END POETRY AT COFFEE UNDERGROUND Say What! Poetry Jan. 12 ~ 298-0494 PEACE CENTER National Geographic Live: Ocean Soul with Brian Kerry Jan. 13 ~ 467-3000 METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL Zodiac: Works by Garland Mattox Jan. 13-Feb. 21 ~ 467-3132 GREENVILLE CHAUTAUQUA SOCIETY Teddy Roosevelt Talk Jan. 14 ~ 244-1499 PEACE CENTER Film Screening: Itzhak Jan. 14 ~ 467-3000 PEACE CENTER An Evening with Branford Marsalis Jan. 15 ~ 467-3000 GREENVILLE CENTER FOR CREATIVE ARTS SC Governor’s School Faculty Exhibition Through Jan. 29 ~ 735-3948 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM Trumpets, Weird & Wonderful Through Apr. 12 ~ 520-8807 www.GREENVILLEARTS.com 16 Augusta St. | 864.467.3132

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Dinner&a Show

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

S’mores and pizza could be a standalone event with no show necessary, but the weekly winter s’mores night at Swamp Rabbit Cafe wraps up at 8:30 p.m., just in time to get over to Radio Room. The open fire for marshmallow roasting will be ready to go at 5 p.m. and the Swamp Pizza oven will be ready to bake your preferred pie — gluten free and vegan options available. Wine and beer will also be pouring out at the shipping container pizza setup, so make this a great start to a night featuring local favorites. Most of the pizza offerings are on the menu consistently with a seasonal special here and there.

SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ & GROCERY OFFERS COOKING CLASSES TO HELP PEOPLE COOK WITH SEASONAL INGREDIENTS

Radio Room is a four-minute drive from Swamp Rabbit Café

RECOMMENDED DISHES: Loaded baked potato pizza .....$15 House-made white Parmesan sauce, Ashe County cheddar, local potatoes, bacon, caramelized onion, finished with housemade ranch

Buffalo chicken pizza ...............$17

Local chicken cooked in-house and tossed in hot sauce and paired with Clemson blue cheese, Ashe County cheddar, and housemade ranch dressing

what we're SEEING PHAT LIP

AT THE RADIO ROOM Phat Lip is a perfect-fit combination of singer Kelly Jo Ramirez’s passionate, explosive voice and a modern-day version of the Latin pop she loved as a child. Even the ballads on the band’s debut EP, “Vision,” have an irresistible propulsion, settling into relentless head-nodding grooves that seem to deepen as the songs progress and becoming almost hypnotic on the slow, sensual grind of “Most Beautiful Girl,” one of the hottest unrequited love songs you’re likely to hear this or any other year. Add Ramirez’s endlessly inventive, relentlessly powerful voice, and Phat Lip’s live show is a banquet of incredible musical skills combined with great Latin-pop songs.

PHAT LIP IS CURRENTLY RECORDING NEW MUSIC SET TO RELEASE IN EARLY 2020

PHAT LIP » SATURDAY, JAN. 11 | 9PM » RADIO ROOM » 110 POINSETT HWY, GREENVILLE » $10-$15 RADIOROOMGREENVILLE.COM


PHOTOGRAPHY BY MONICA PARKKONEN PHOTOGRAPHY

FIVE OAKS ACADEMY Who murdered cranky billionaire Uncle Edgar at his 90th birthday

starts with “Empathy.” Students start by asking the questions, “What problems

party? It was a “who did it?” mystery as the Five Oaks Academy Middle School

do you or others face?” and “What problems in the world need solving?” They

students used forensics to solve “the murder.” They were tasked with the

then move to define the problem, come up with ideas to solve the problem,

challenge of determining which family member used Uncle Edgar’s

create a solution, test that solution, evaluate what was learned, what

allergy to crab meat as a deadly weapon during their potluck dinner

went well, and what could be improved. The final step in this process is

party. Students used DNA samples of the food served that evening

“Who did it?”

for them to share their product and process with others. Students grow

and compared them to the DNA of imitation crab meat and real

very comfortable presenting their projects and ideas with their peers and

crab meat to identify the killer. This engaging experience, made

teachers starting in the first grade. FOA student “engineers” move through

possible by the Greenwood Genetic Mobile Lab, is one example of the handson inquiry approach to learning used at Five Oaks Academy (FOA). FOA eighth grader Itizi Arsuaga-Agudo shared, “I feel like this experience

the design process daily, improving their creations or coming up with new ones. At FOA, they believe in cultivating a learning environment that encourages and inspires children to be passionate about knowledge. The

has opened a door for me. I have always had an interest in forensics and I now

S.T.E.A.M. curriculum is grounded in empathy and fosters an environment

see that there is much more to it that I thought. It is amazing how advanced

that encourages students to look at our global world and find opportunities to

the technology is and I enjoyed the process of extracting the DNA the most!”

better humanity. Through innovation and exploration, they help each child to

In each classroom, toddler through middle school, FOA has designed

reach their full individual potential as well as inspire them to make the world

the environment to support learning by using discovery, exploration, and

a better place. What will students at FOA create next?

creativity through the research and inquiry-based Montessori method. This holistic approach to learning is the cornerstone for understanding and retention of academic concepts. Entrenched in the Montessori philosophy and curriculum is a scientific method that corresponds to the modern “Engineering Design Process” touted

1101 Jonesville Rd., Simpsonville

by the S.T.E.A.M. curriculum. The design process that is followed daily in the

fiveoaksacademy.com

Montessori environment differs from the traditional design process in that it

864-228-1881


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

EAT & DRINK

MAINSTAY MENUS

Meet John Warner Help us welcome John Warner as the new director of The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center! John brings years of experience to his new position at the Kroc Center, including executive and administrative roles at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, Selective Micro Technologies, LLC, and many others. John also exemplifies a heart of giving, shown through his faithful service in the nonprofit sector. Previously, he served on the boards of the Greenville Symphony Association, the Children’s Museum of the Upstate, the Greenville Tech Foundation and more. We are excited to welcome John to the Kroc Center, and we know his previous experiences and his heart for serving others will help guide us into the new decade!

KROC

GREENVILLE

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

For 20 years, executive chef Shaun Garcia of Soby’s New South Cuisine has gone to the same (unnamed) local restaurant to order the same (also undisclosed) menu item. “I went there for that dish,” he says. “I didn’t go there to see what the special hot trend, new dish was.” And the realization that his customers likely feel the same way has quelled the instinctual chef 's desire to change up Soby’s offerings too often. “I had to look at it from a customer and consumer point of view,” he said. It’s a difficult balance to strike for chefs, weighing their own creativity, customer satisfaction and maximizing profits. Especially in an industry currently dominated by the daily changing chalkboard menu trend, local, non-chain restaurants resisting the fad takes a special resolve. But it also means earning customer loyalty that will be quickly removed if certain menu items disappear. Larkin’s on the River recently underwent such a change. In December, executive vice president and culinary director Adam Hayes instituted the first whole menu change in 15 years. “As a chef, how do I keep what our loyal guests are accustomed to and add new items?” he asks.

To write a menu, you have to think of everything, and the guest will remind you about what you forgot.” -Adam Hayes, executive vice president and culinary director, Larkin’s on the River The answer involves running reports, assessing kitchen talent, listening to customer feedback and much more. Garcia recalls six years ago altering the spicy pimiento cheese and fried pita to make it healthier with a different cracker, thinking guests would appreciate that. Customer response said otherwise. “Sometimes it doesn’t matter what the chef wants to make,” he says. “It’s what the customers want to buy.” Those signature items are determined by sales numbers: the fried goat cheese balls at The Lazy Goat, the fried green tomatoes at Soby’s or the she crab soup and arugula goat cheese salad at Larkin’s. “It’s one of those things that if I have to hire a new chef, they need to know this much of the menu is not yours to control,” says Rodney Freidank, Table 301 corporate chef.

n story by ARIEL TURNER | photos PROVIDED

Mainstay Menu Favorites SASSAFRAS SOUTHERN BISTRO

THE CAZBAH

103 N Main St #107, Greenville

16 W McBee Ave, Greenville

Blue Crab & Pepperjack Fondue Nachos

Cazbah’s World Famous Lobster Cigars

RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

LARKIN'S ON THE RIVER

648 S Main St, Greenville

318 S Main St, Greenville

Three-Cheese Macaroni The Company Crab Cake

She Crab Soup Arugala Goat Cheese Salad

BRICK STREET CAFE

TRATTORIA GIORGIO

315 Augusta St, Greenville

121 S Main St, Greenville

Chicken Salad Sweet Potato Cake

Pappardelle Bolognese

THE LAZY GOAT

SOBY'S

170 Riverplace, Greenville

207 S Main St, Greenville

Fried Goat Cheese Balls

PORTOFINO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 30 Orchard Park Dr #22, Greenville Garlic rolls

Spicy Pimiento Cheese & Pita

SASKATOON LODGE

RISTORANTE BERGAMO

681 Halton Rd, Greenville Chocolate Moose Pie

100 N Main St, Greenville Cacio Cavallo al Forno


The only thing HOTTER than a clean drain is a man who keeps it that way.

It’s time to make a resolution you can actually keep. Whether you’re entertaining a houseful—or that special someone— it’s important to know how to protect sewer lines from cooking fats, oils and grease. Learn more at CleanReedy.org.


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

FEATURED EVENTS

SEE MORE EVENTS ONLINE

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THE LATEST CAN’T-MISS EVENTS

JAN. 11 4:30-9PM Bon Secours Wellness Arena

650 N. Academy St, Greenville

Furman University Basketball doubleheader Furman Basketball is heading to Bon Secours Wellness Arena for a hoops doubleheader on Saturday, Jan. 11. Come support the ‘Dins as the Women’s team faces Samford at 4:30 p.m. and the men’s team take on UNCG at 7 p.m.

National Geographic Live: Ocean Soul

JAN. 13 6PM Peace Concert Hall

300 S. Main St., Greenville

$

$15 – $20

In this presentation, Brian Skerry takes us from the glacial waters of the North Atlantic, where harp seals face off with commercial hunters, to the balmy central Pacific, where he photographed damaged coral ecosystems rebuilding themselves.

PeaceCenter.org

FurmanPaladins.com

JAN. 25

‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe’

10AM

$

What begins as an innocent exploration of an old home, Peace Center winds up taking siblings 300 S. Main St., Lucy, Edmund, Susan and Peter far beyond their wildest Greenville imaginations, as they step through a huge wardrobe, into a land where an evil witch has $19 – $28 taken control and misery reigns.

SCChildrensTheatre.org

JAN. 23

Songwriters Workshop Series

6-10PM

Over the course of four workshops led by McCain and Sharp, and featuring renowned guest singer-songwriters, participants can develop their songwriting skills in a collaborative small group setting. All four workshops are offered as a package for $350, and payment plans are available.

Genevieve’s Theater Lounge 101 W. Broad St., Greenville

PeaceCenter.org

Closing Weekend September 21, 2019 - January 12, 2020

David Armstrong

BEYOND THE NORM January 17 – March 6, 2020

Opening Reception: Friday, January 17th 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.

JOLLEY FOUNDATION Sponsored By

UPCOUNTRY HISTORY MUSEUM - FURMAN UNIVERSITY 864-467-3100 | UpcountryHistory.org 38

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

Centre Stage 501 River Street | Greenville, SC Hours: Tues – Sat | 2 – 6 p.m.


THINGS TO SEE & DO

JANUARY 10 Treasures from the National Music Museum – The Utley Collection of Brass Instruments. Weird, Wonderful and who knows what. • January 10 • Carolina Music Museum, 516 Buncombe St., Heritage Green, Greenville

The exhibit features selected pieces from one of the world’s finest collections of over 600 historic brass instruments from the Joe and Joella Utley Collection of Spartanburg,

Clemson Photo Club’s 9th Annual Show • January 10: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Cheezem Education Center, 100 Thomas Green Blvd., Clemson

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is hosting the Clemson Photo Club’s 9th Annual Member Show. The show will run for three months, beginning October 21 and ending January 21. The show is located in the aAuditorium and second floor gallery of the Cheezem Education Center. This show is open to the public and free of charge.

English for All Levels

• January 10: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St., Greenville • $85 – $320

JANUARY 11 Wool Applique’ – Winter

• January 11: 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $75 Wool is a lovely fabric to sew and embroider. In this workshop, you will learn some basic embroidery stitches and create hearts, mittens, snowmen and other fun winter shapes. Using colorful threads, beads and buttons, you will embellish your pieces and make them your own. The instructor will provide lots of colored and patterned fabric for you to choose from. This workshop is open to students 14 and older.

Impressionistic Landscape Painting

• January 11: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $185 Explore a direct and immediate approach to landscape painting using a full palette and loaded brush. Learn to simplify the image by dividing it into relatable shapes, values and colors. You can choose from a range of reference images provided or bring your own. Methods covered make for a great preliminary introduction if you wish to work outdoors. This workshop will focus on oil painting techniques, but acrylic painting can be accommodated.

Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Intro to Metal Shaping

• January 10: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St., • $125 Learn the fundamentals of shaping metal while making a copper bowl using basic techniques and with few tools that are easy to come by. With the fundamentals learned in this workshop you will be able to create metal work on your own.

Puzzle Solutions

Paws & Read

• January 11: 10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. • Pelham Road Library, 1508 Pelham Rd, Greenville, SC, 1508 Pelham Rd • Free Come to story time with a certified therapy dog. This event is for children between ages 3-10. For more information, email pelhamroad@greenvillelibrary.org or call 288-6688.

Pet Supermarket Hosts “Pet Social” For Pet Parents & Their Pets • January 11: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. • Pet Supermarket, 1922 Augusta St. STE 118 • Free

Join the Pet Experts of Pet Supermarket as they encourage pet parents to learn about proper animal care at the Pet Parent Social Workshop. Customers are invited to bring their pets to all participating Pet Supermarket stores on Jan. 11 from 2-4 p.m. to ask pet-specific questions, receive advice, and to socialize with other pets. Pet Supermarket’s trained professional staff of Pet Experts will lead two, one-hour learning sessions with pet owners. From 2-3 p.m., the workshop will be geared towards cat and dog owners, focusing on essential pet supplies, food, housebreaking and crate training techniques, and suitable…

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ARTS & CULTURE

JANUARY 12 Jack Cohan and Friends

• January 12: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road • $5 – $20 Soprano Brittany Hogan Alomar and clarinetist Benjamin Chen join Jack for a program of classical and Broadway music including sonatas for clarinet and piano by Bernsteins, Prokofiev and the brilliant Carmen Fantasy. Includes Broadway songs from hit shows old and new including a medley from West Side Story. A complimentary wind and cheese reception follows the concert to meet the artists. Free parking.

JANUARY 13 Spanish Intense Advanced Level II • January 13: 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320

Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Plein Air Prepare (Session I)

Auditions | Annie JR.

• January 11: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Pre-registration for auditions is REQUIRED. Online registration can be accessed at www.signupgenius. com/go. The Mauldin Youth Theatre will hold open auditions for its 2020 spring production, Annie, JR. on January 11, 2020. Please visit the auditions page for information on how to sign up and claim your spot. The Mauldin Youth Theatre holds auditions for all youth in the community who are interested. No prior experience is necessary to audition. Auditions will take place in the voice studio or auditorium. Please be prepared to sing no more than 32 bars of music from the show or of a similar style. – Please prepare a monologue from the show or of a similar style. – Called back auditioners will be asked to read from the script.

• January 13: 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.) • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $229 – $249 This class will specifically deal with watercolor as a plein air medium. Perspective will be explored both mechanically and atmospherically through thumbnail sketches that will become designed compositions for personal watercolor paintings. If weather permits, exploration of plein air on campus may occur.

French Conversational

• January 13: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320 • Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10

Challenge yourself with the weekly puzzles, see page 42

SAVE A NEIGHBOR’S LIFE. GIVE LOCAL WITH THE BLOOD CONNECTION Donate blood at our Greenville Donation Center. 435 Woodruff Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 Proud blood provider for all Upstate hospitals.

Schedule your donation today by visiting thebloodconnection.org

JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Italian Beginner Advanced

• January 14: 12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. • |Recurring Event (See all) • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • Greenville, SC United States + Google Map • $85 – $320

Nature Drawing (Session I) • January 13: 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. • $229 – $249

WE HAVE THE SOLUTION! Foundation & Structural Repair Crawl Space Encapsulation Concrete Lifting Easy Financing Lifetime Warranties LIMITED TIME OFFER

Learn to sketch with pencil, charcoal and ink to gain an understanding of fundamental drawing techniques. In this class, you will learn basic drawing concepts while studying line drawing, perspective and shading, as well as studies of organic shapes found in plant life and trees. The class will also cover contour drawings and quick sketches of familiar subjects to increase hand-eye coordination. You will learn to work from small sketches and observations to create large scale drawings.

German Conversational

• January 13: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320 Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

American Sign Language Begin Adv • January 13: 7:45 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320 * Coupon must be presented at time of inspection. Financing offer subject to credit approval. Interest accrues during the promotional period. All interest is waived if purchase amount is paid before expiration of promotional period. May not be combined with any other offer. Ask inspector for further details. Offer valid through 8/31/19.

CALL TODAY FOR A FREE INSPECTION!

864-334-6330 MUST CALL THIS NUMBER IN ORDER TO RECIEVE DISCOUNT

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

JANUARY 14 Chinese Mandarin Beginner • January 14: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320

Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Teddy Roosevelt, presented by Greenville Chautauqua History Comes Alive • January 14: 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. • Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Place • Greenville, SC

Greenville Chautauqua in partnership with the Greenville County Library System presents a Talk Series about the historic lives to be portrayed during the Chautauqua 2020 Season – Teddy Roosevelt, Ben Franklin, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Hedy Lamarr and Rosa Parks.

Drawing and Painting for Teens

• January 14: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $170 – $190 This class functions as a survey to various drawing and painting techniques. Although technique will be a focus in this course, self-expression and creativity will partner alongside the foundations being implemented. All projects are aimed to give you choices and leave room to incorporate personal content. Media included in this course are: graphite, watercolor, acrylic, oil paint, colored pencil, nu’pastels and charcoal. This class is open to students from 12-18 and is suitable for all skill levels.

Painting In Oil: A Direct Approach (Session I) • January 14: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $229 – $249

An overview of impressionistic and naturalistic techniques of representational painting. You will learn about materials, color palette and forms of direct observation to interpret your subjects. Exercises, including sketching from nature and copying from pictures by past masters, will give you the foundation to practice these techniques and develop painterly ways of seeing and rendering the visual world. The class will culminate in an extended still life painting. Acrylic painting can be accommodated.


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ARTS & CULTURE

painting supplies, surface and art reference images and the instructor will help you improve your painting techniques.

55+ Active Adult Apartment Homes

Figure Drawing (Session I)

Starting at $1,399*

• January 15: 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $265 – $285

Weaving & Dyeing Fun for Kids (Session I) • January 14: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. • $95

In this two-day workshop, you will be taught basic weaving techniques as well as how to dye wool. During this session, you will dye wool yarn using Kool-Aid drink mix colors and learn some basic weaving techniques on a small loom. Bring your weaving to the second class and learn how to finish it and how to display it on the wall. You will also have the opportunity to create another woven piece using your own hand dyed yarn. We will talk about color and texture and many weaving techniques will be covered.

JANUARY 15 Jewelry Basics (Session I)

• January 15: 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. • |Recurring Event (See all) • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • Greenville, SC United States + Google Map • $285 – $305 This class is a work and critique space for students interested in developing wax modeling, metal piecing, cold-connections and designing skills. If you have some experience in jewelry fabrication, you are encouraged to work at your own pace on your own bodies of work. If you have limited experience in jewelry fabrication, you will receive more direction from the instructor. Class demos will be determined by your needs. All supplies are included.

Hebrew Beginner

• January 15: 12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320 Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Dust Off Your Brushes (Session I) • January 15: 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $229 – $249

If you haven't painted in a while, dust off your brushes and join this class for painting sessions in a relaxed atmosphere, where you may work at your own pace on subject matters of your own choosing. Bring your own

Learn to draw the figure in charcoal from observation with emphasis on blocking in form and value to develop comparative measuring and shape-seeing abilities. This traditional academic training method allows you to fine tune foundational skills for higher accuracy. You will be introduced to the conceptual principles of light on form while understanding the pitfalls of purely visual observation. You will walk away with a good grasp of systematic approaches and deeper understanding of drawing the figure.

Experimental Painting (Session I) • January 15: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $229 – $249

This class is an introduction to a serious rethinking the parameters of painting. Various methods and materials will give you a point to begin experimenting with your own painting methods. Class lessons will relay the importance of material and process in relation to conceptual ideas. Processes presented in class will include photo transfer, no brush painting, encaustic, sculptural painting, frottage and painting machines. We will also discuss relevant artists and explore the artist’s process.

You’re Invited Swamp Rabbit Hockey Game! Friday, January 31st Refreshments • 6:30pm | Game Starts • 7:05pm

RSVP Requested by January 27th: 864-332-4839 Pre-Leasing Showroom: 52 Market Point Dr, Suite F, Greenville, SC 29607

*Overture is an equal housing opportunity. Amenities and services vary by location. Prices may vary. See a Greystar representative for details.

JANUARY 16 Principles of Illustration

• January 16: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $170 – $190 Illustration is storytelling art. This class will work through the principles that make for strong, effective artwork that supports a narrative. Lessons will focus on the importance of characters, composition, line, color, sequential applications, and the business of freelance illustration. These lessons are open to people of all skill levels and are targeted to students 12 and older.

NO MORE FOOD RULES: How To Find Your Healthy Weight • January 16: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. • Highlands Center for Women, 105 Halton Village Circle Suite A • $10

With the holidays flying by and 2020 approaching, we know you can get overwhelmed when asked about your “New Years resolutions”. Most of us criticize our bodies every time we eat, especially around the holidays, and too often get sucked into counting calories, cutting carbs, and trying every fad diet out there, that we forget to just enjoy our lives. Eating healthy doesn’t mean eating less. To register, email info@highlandscenterforwomen.com.

SEE MORE EVENTS ONLINE

GreenvilleJournal.com

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READER’S

LENS PHOTO CONTEST

The Greenville Journal invites you to share your best photos of what the Upstate has to offer. Each month one Editor’s Choice winner will win a $50 gift card to an Upstate business. Three honorable mention photos will also receive a $25 gift card to an Upstate business. Winning entries will be published in the Greenville Journal. JANUARY 2020 THEME:

ALL THINGS NEW For details on each month’s contest, or to submit your photo and vote, visit:

GreenvilleJournal.com/ReadersLens

JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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PUZZLES

ACORN-STASHING IN THE SKY ACROSS

1 Exchanges for paper money 7 Takes too much, briefly 10 Gp. concerned with birdies 13 Liquid detergent quantity 19 Opere — (in the work already mentioned) 20 International news agency 22 Relaxed 23 “First Blood” actor Richard 24 Pilot Amelia 25 Like magma 26 Start of a riddle 29 930-mile-long Russian river 30 Politico Trent 31 Raw rock 32 Lakers’ org. 35 Riddle, part 2 43 Styled like 44 Heir, often 45 Be a rambler 46 “I smell —!” 47 Defunct Russ. state 48 Riddle, part 3 55 Airline seat pull-down 57 Dir. from N.M. to Ky. 58 “Play it by ear,” e.g. 59 Orem’s state 61 Google program for targeted promotions 65 Brother of DDE’s follower 66 Big tub 69 Riddle, part 4

74 Facial blinker 75 Caviar base 76 Manors 77 Oklahoma city 78 Livid 80 Actor Stephen 81 Basketball tourney org. 83 Riddle, part 5 90 Turner of song 93 Add to the work force 94 Vientiane is its capital 95 No. on a map 96 Liquor choice 97 End of the riddle 105 Prefix with 17-Down 106 Byrnes who was “Kookie” 107 Wayward GI 108 Family mem. 109 Riddle’s answer 117 Mitchell of NBC News 120 Not yet encrypted 121 Is entirely unacceptable 122 Disclose 123 List the particulars of 124 Coop up 125 Officers-to-be 126 Tutu-wearing Muppet 127 D.C. bigwig 128 “— Fideles” (carol)

DOWN

1 Roman 301 2 Plane wings, e.g. 3 Raw beef dish

4 Disney’s Montana 5 Tall Sicilian volcano 6 Fly high 7 Chocolate cookieflavored Post cereal 8 Shortage 9 Guarantee 10 Bell’s ring 11 Mutt’s noise 12 Concerning 13 SLR, say 14 Makes amends 15 Animal hide 16 Jack Sprat’s no-no 17 Function 18 Writer Deighton 21 Jennifer Lopez’s “J to — L-O!” 27 Dull 28 Homer Simpson’s outburst 32 Cruel Roman emperor 33 Male lover 34 Echidnas eat them 35 Once existed 36 Totally lost 37 Squarish, as a vehicle 38 Four minus one, in Italy 39 Gmail rival 40 Trailing plant 41 — Strauss 42 Wizard of Oz creator 49 Work over 50 Happen next 51 Comes upon 52 “Luther” star Elba 53 Repeated jazz phrase 54 Smoker’s puff 56 Pi-sigma link

59 Sport- — (off-roader) 60 Your, biblically 61 “Billy, Don’t Be —” (1974 hit song) 62 Insect egg 63 Beginning 64 Lauder of makeup 66 Seasoned, oily salad dressings 67 French buddy 68 Turner of TV 70 Big coffee dispensers 71 Vincent van — 72 Incline 73 Coffee alternative 78 Suited to — 79 Christmas 81 Court barriers 82 Flight staffers 83 Punch sound 84 Old LP player 85 Crafts’ partner 86 Not stringent 87 Lead-in to “And how!” 88 Suffix with lobby 89 High-pitched warble 91 Nailed the performance 92 Opposite of 63-Down 98 Nuke, as leftovers 99 Standards 100 NFL six-pointers 101 Legendary Manhattan restaurant 102 Pluck, as brows 103 “Stalag 17” star William 104 With 109-Down, part of a Florida orchard

All Adoptions

Crossword Solution: Page 39 109 See 104-Down 110 Mini-exam 111 A law — itself 112 Slush Puppie alternative 113 CD- —

SUDOKU

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // JANUARY 10

114 Female youth org. 115 Incite 116 Subjective loudness unit 117 Circle bit 118 Org. concerned

with the three R’s 119 Burnable storage device

DIFFICULTY LEVEL: EASY

By Myles Mellor

Sudoku Solution: Page 39


GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165

Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line 864.679.1205

email: aharley@communityjournals.com NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the County Council of Greenville County, South Carolina (the “County”), in Council Chambers, at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, South Carolina at or after 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 4, 2020. The purpose of the public hearing is to receive public input and comment in conjunction with Greenville County Council considering and giving Third Reading to the following ordinance: AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A FEE IN LIEU OF TAX AGREEMENT BY AND BETWEEN GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA AND LEHO BEYOND, LLC WITH RESPECT TO CERTAIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY IN THE COUNTY, WHEREBY SUCH PROPERTY WILL BE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. Any person wishing to speak to the ordinance may attend the meeting and will be heard. Written comments may be submitted for consideration by Greenville County Council. Copies of the ordinance may be obtained from the Greenville County Clerk to Council, County Square, Suite 2400, Greenville, SC 29601. GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA s/Butch Kirven, Chairman, County Council

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the County Council of Greenville County, South Carolina (the “County”), in Council Chambers, at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, South Carolina at or after 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 4, 2020. The purpose of the public hearing is to receive public input and comment in conjunction with Greenville County Council considering and giving Third Reading to the following ordinance: AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A FEE IN LIEU OF TAX AGREEMENT BY AND BETWEEN GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA AND ORBIS CORPORATION WITH RESPECT TO CERTAIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY IN THE COUNTY, WHEREBY SUCH PROPERTY WILL BE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. Any person wishing to speak to the ordinance may attend the meeting and will be heard. Written comments may be submitted for consideration by Greenville County Council. Copies of the ordinance may be obtained from the Greenville County Clerk to Council, County Square, Suite 2400, Greenville, SC 29601. GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA s/Butch Kirven, Chairman, County Council

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2019-CP-23-06913 Orange Cotton LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. A-1 Properties, LLC, “John Doe”, representing a class made up of all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the properties having Tax Map #0177.00-02002.00, (hereafter, the subject property), and “Richard Roe”, representing a class made up of all unknown infants and disabled persons who may have some right, title or interest in the subject properties, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, (which Complaint was filed on November 26, 2019) and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. TO: INFANTS(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO ,(GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN)(COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said

infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. YOU WILL FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that Charles W. Crews, Jr., 125 A Woodruff Place Circle, Simpsonville, SC 29681 (phone #864 – 675 – 9581) has been appointed Guardian ad litem for all unknown parties (including unknown infants and disabled persons) who may have some right, title or interest in the subject property. In the event you are in one of the categories listed above and have a claim to the real property which is the subject of this action, more particularly described in the Lis Pendens, you should contact the appropriate Guardian ad litem listed above or your attorney. All persons under a disability have the right to have a Guardian ad litem of their choice appointed if the request is timely made to the Court. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon quiet title complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding title to property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, on Foster Street known as Lot 20 on plat of property of W. A. Bates recorded in Plat Book C, Page 226 in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County. References made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Tax Map #0177.00-02-002.00 C. Richard Stewart, SC Bar #5346 Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Sabor 15 GV LLC / Sabor Latin Street Grill intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 732 S. Main St. Suite A, Greenville , SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 26, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chicora Alley FH LLC, DBA Chicora Alley Firehouse intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 117 North Poinsett Highway, Travelers Rest, SC 29690. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 26, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Diya USA Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 4545 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 26, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Brown Family Catering and Restaurant LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 101 Pebble Creek Drive, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 12, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 59-01/30/20 EMS Billing Services, January 30, 2020, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200. NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE SALE Please take notice Prime Storage - Greenville located at 1260 E Butler Rd., Greenville, SC 29607 intends to hold a Auction of storage units in default of payment. The sale will occur as an Online Auction via www.storagetreasures. com on 1/20/2020 at 12:00 PM. This sale is pursuant to the assertion of lien for rental at the self-storage facility. Unless listed otherwise below, the contents consist of household goods and furnishings. Stacey Clogston unit #B21; Mary Hunter unit #B64; Deborah Pope units #C94 & #D47; Kendrasia N Boykin unit #D76. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply. NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE SALE Please take notice Prime Storage Simpsonville located at 2711 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville, SC 29681 intends to hold a Auction of storage units in default of payment. The sale will occur as an Online Auction via www.storagetreasures. com on 1/20/2020 at 12:00 PM. This sale is pursuant to the assertion of lien for rental at the self-storage facility. Unless listed otherwise below, the contents consist of household goods and furnishings. Wayne Mcculley unit #C011; Mary Beth Rochester unit #D023. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply. NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE SALE Please take notice Prime Storage - Greenville - East North Street located at 4329 East North St., Greenville, SC 29615 intends to hold a Auction of storage units in default of payment. The sale will occur as an Online Auction via www. storagetreasures.com on 1/20/2020 at 12:00 PM. This sale is pursuant to the assertion of lien for rental at the selfstorage facility. Unless listed otherwise below, the contents consist of household goods and furnishings. Broadus Wilson unit #A020; Christy Crumley unit #A178; Jean Louismeme unit #B031; Mark W Crossland unit #B064; Sebastian S Gomez unit #B075; Dexter Pepper unit #B216; Judy D Penland unit #B266; Doug A Moore unit #D027. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply.

AMENDED SUMMONS AND NOTICE (NON-JURY ACTION TO QUIET TITLE) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2019-CP-23-04064 Phillip Bruce Hamilton, Plaintiff, vs. The Forfeited Land Commission, David R. Bailey, the unknown heirs of Kathy Dianne Bailey, David Matthew Bailey, Christopher Ryan Bailey, The Estate of Kathy Dianne Bailey, New Century Mortgage Corporation, Greenville County Tax Collector, Greenville County Codes Enforcement Office, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE as fictitious names representing a class of unknown persons being incompetents, minors, persons in military service to the United States of America, imprisoned persons, and persons under any other form of legal disability including but not limited to unknown heirs, devisees, distributes, administrators, or personal representatives, also all other persons unknown, claiming any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein, Defendant(s). TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, (which Amended Complaint was filed on November 6, 2019) and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Complaint upon subscriber at her office, 1204-A East Washington Street, Greenville South Carolina, 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiff shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. TO: INFANTS(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. YOU WILL FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Maxwell, 9 Calendon Court, Suite A, Greenville, SC 29615 (phone #864-234-2901) has been appointed Guardian ad Litem for JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as fictitious names representing a class of unknown persons being incompetents, minors, persons in military service to the United States of America, imprisoned persons, and persons under any other form of legal disability including but not limited to unknown

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Urban Wren Winery LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 116 North Markley St. Unit 102, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 19, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

heirs, devisees, distributes, administrators, or personal representatives, also all other persons unknown, claiming any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint and C. Richard Stewart, 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, SC 29601 (phone #864-235-2019) has been appointed Guardian ad Litem for the unknown heirs of Kathy Dianne Bailey and The Estate of Kathy Dianne Bailey. In the event you have a claim to the real property, which is the subject of this action, more particularly described in the Lis Pendens, you should contact the appropriate Guardian ad Litem listed above or your attorney. All persons under a disability have the right to have a Guardian ad Litem of their choice appointed if the request is timely made to the Court. s/Courtney S. Camferdam SC Bar #100912 1204-A East Washington Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 6033250 courtney@ camferdamlaw.com Attorney for Plaintiff

AMENDED LIS PENDENS (NON-JURY ACTION TO QUIET TITLE) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2019-CP-23-04064 Phillip Bruce Hamilton, Plaintiff, vs. The Forfeited Land Commission, David R. Bailey, the unknown heirs of Kathy Dianne Bailey, David Matthew Bailey, Christopher Ryan Bailey, The Estate of Kathy Dianne Bailey, New Century Mortgage Corporation, Greenville County Tax Collector, Greenville County Codes Enforcement Office, and afictitious names representing a class of unknown persons being incompetents, minors, persons in military service to the United States of America, imprisoned persons, and persons under any other form of legal disability including but not limited to unknown heirs, devisees, distributes, administrators, or personal representatives, also all other persons unknown, claiming any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein, Defendant(s). NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced and is now pending in this court upon amended complaint of the above-named Plaintiff against the above-named Defendant(s) to have a title to real property quieted in the name of the Plaintiff. The real property which is the subject of this action is described as follows: All that certain piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in the State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, being shown and designated as Lot 29 and a portion of Lot 28, VictorMonaghan Development No.1, as shown on a plat recorded in Plat Book M at Page 39 in the Register of Deeds for Greenville County, and more recently shown on a plat recorded in Plat Book 45-U at Page 5, in the Register of Deeds for Greenville County. Reference is made to said more recent plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. This being the identical property conveyed to Phillip Bruce Hamilton by deed of the Forfeited Land Commission dated September 18, 2015 and recorded September 18, 2015 in Deed Book 2473 at Page 2850 in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County, South Carolina. TMS# 0134.00-08-001.00 s/Courtney S. Camferdam SC Bar #100912 1204-A East Washington Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 6033250 courtney@ camferdamlaw.com Attorney for Plaintiff

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2019-CP-23-06909 Orange Cotton LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. The South Carolina Department of Probation, Pardon and Parole Services, IHC Security Services, Inc., The City of Greenville, “John Doe”, representing a class made up of all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the properties having Tax Map #0177.00-02036.00, (hereafter, the subject property), and “Richard Roe”, representing a class made up of all unknown infants and disabled persons who may have some right, title or interest in the subject properties, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, (which Complaint was filed on November 26, 2019) and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. TO: INFANTS(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO ,(GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN)(COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. YOU WILL FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that Daniel Lee Crotchett, 109 East North Street, Greenville, SC 29601, phone number 864-593-2292, has been appointed Guardian ad Litem for “John Doe” and “Richard Roe”, representing classes made up of all unknown parties (including unknown infants and disabled persons) who may have some right, title or interest in the subject property. In the event you are in one of the categories listed above and have a claim to the real property which is the subject of this action, more particularly described in the Lis Pendens, you should contact the appropriate Guardian ad litem listed above or your attorney. All persons under a disability have the right to have a Guardian ad litem of their choice appointed if the request is timely made to the Court. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon quiet title complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding title to property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, on Cotton Street just east of Rutherford Road designated as lot 9 on plat of property of Southern Investment Corporation shown in Plat Book I, Page 90 recorded in the ROD Office for Greenville County. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Tax Map #0177.00 – 02 – 036.00 C. Richard Stewart, SC Bar #5346 Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com

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LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING A hearing to enlarge the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located atStallings Rd off Rutherford Rd and to provide public notice thereof. PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on (1/28/2020) at 4:00 p.m. in the Conference room of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District Administration Building located at 1600 West Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, a public hearing will be held for the consideration of enlarging the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located at Stallings Rd off Rutherford Rd and to provide public notice thereof. Anyone wishing to be placed on the Agenda for Public Comment is asked to call Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission at 864-232-6721 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday thru Thursday. Public comments will be limited based on the number of persons addressing the Commission. Public comment can also be posted on the website. www.GGSC.gov

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2019-CP-23-06008 DEFICIENCY REQUESTED STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for Hilldale Trust, PLAINTIFF, vs. Datrice Inabinet; Crescent Creek Homeowners Association, Inc.; Ventures Trust 2013-I-H-R by MCM Capital Partners, LLC DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm LLP P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY:

YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on October 15, 2019. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm LLP, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803-726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm LLP, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

JANUARY 10 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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January 10, 2020 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina.

January 10, 2020 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina.

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