Page 1

Civitas Capitol Connection

APRIL 2014 VOL. 6, NO. 4

Inside CLC

— p. 6-7 —

Election At a Glance — p. 9-11 —

CROSS-CHECKED Elections Board Reveals Vote Problems

100 S. Harrington St. Raleigh, NC 27603 Vol. 6, No. 4

Civitas Institute

NON-PROFIT ORG. US POSTAGE PAID Permit #231 Winston-Salem, NC

BY susan myrick A stunning report by state elections officials has revealed evident voter fraud in the 2012 election – possibly in tens of thousands of instances. The North Carolina State Board of Elections (SBOE) reported this month to the Joint Legislative Elections Oversight Committee on the effects of the state’s new voter reforms. The most disturbing statistics came from comparing voter registration statistics in North Carolina with those of selected states. The results were brought to light as a result of North Carolina’s joining the Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck Program, a consortium of 28 states. The SBOE had been directed by the new elections reform legislation (VIVA, Voter Information Verification Act) to join an interstate crosschecking program and to improve the accuracy of voter registration lists. The SBOE joined the program, and as a result it was determined that more

than 35,000 North Carolina voters who voted in the 2012 general election were identified as matching, by name and date of birth (DOB), a voter in another state who voted in the same election. This revelation deserves to be underlined: Tens of thousands of voters appeared to have voted twice (in North Carolina and another state) in the 2012 general election. Legislators on both sides of the aisle expressed alarm during the meeting. Rep. Bert Jones (R-Rockingham) said, “I believe these are staggering numbers.” Rep. Tim Moore (R-Cleveland) suggested that the number of voters voting in two states in the same election was probably much higher, because the cross-checking didn’t access voter rolls in every state. He told Kim Strach, SBOE director, that this was probably just the “tip of the iceberg.” Rep. Annie Mobley (D-Hertford) said, “These numbers are appalling to me.” The preliminary findings indicate that: • 765 voters with an exact match of first and last name, DOB and last four digits of Social Security number (SSN) were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in N.C. and the other state in the 2012 general election. • 35,750* voters with the same first and last name and DOB were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in both states in the 2012 general election. • 155,692 voters with the same first and last name, DOB and last four digits CONTINUED on page 4

What Vote Fraud

?

The recent report by the State Elections Board revealed that tens of thousands of voters may have voted in North Carolina and also in another state in 2012. Legislators called the figures “staggering” and “appalling,” and noted that the report raises the specter of widespread voter fraud.

Board Investigating Thousands of Cases

Investigators are following up on possible vote fraud and other problems recently uncovered by the North Carolina State Board of Elections (SBOE). The SBOE reported in April to the Joint Legislative Elections Oversight Committee on findings from the Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck Program. (See story at left.) At the committee meeting, member Rep. Tim Moore (R-Cleveland) summed the situation up by telling board officials, “You have documented what appears to be voter fraud … We have over 35,000 people who it appears – are documented – who actually voted in this state illegally, and committed a felony.” The SBOE is a law enforcement agency, and its staff is now investigating the findings. A top priority is probing the cross-check discovery of 765 voters with an exact match of first and last name, date of birth (DOB) and last four digits of their Social Security numbers (SSN) who voted in N.C. and another state in the 2012 general election. “We are working to ensure that these are indeed exact matches,” said SBOE spokesman Josh Lawson. If exact matches are confirmed, the findings will be forwarded to county district attorneys. It is up to them to decide about possible prosecution. The board is also investigating a much larger number of troublesome cross-check cases: the 35,750 voters with the same first and last name and date of birth who were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in both states in the 2012 general election. “We are taking that number very seriously,” Lawson said. Lawson noted the board’s action is not only backward-looking, it is also forward-looking, in cleaning up outdated voter rolls. This includes the cross-check finding of 155,692 voters with the same first and last name, DOB and last four digits of SSN who were registered here and another state – and the latest date of registration or voter activity took place outside North Carolina. He noted that “we are working with multiple state agencies” to check that information. For instance, if someone on the voter rolls here has gotten a driver license in Florida, that raises the clear possibility that he or she is now a Florida resident, thus should be off the NC voter lists.

nccivitas.org


April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

Speakers Outline What “Freedom Is … ”

BY JIM TYNEN “Freedom Is … ” our endangered personality liberty – and the beauty of the ordered liberty that emerges from the lives of free people. Those were just two of the ideas highlighted by our Conservative Leadership Conference. (More on p. 6-7.) Looking at them provides two quick looks at the challenges we face, and the opportunities we have. Noted economist Walter Williams put the choices before CLC attendees in stark terms. He reviewed what has happened to liberty in America, and reminded the Friday dinner audience of the observation that the real danger to liberty is that it will be nibbled away, bit by bit. And in many ways it has been. “Private property and free enterprise [today] are mere skeletons of their past,” he said, surveying the web of laws and regulations that surround us. “We own less and less of our most valuable property — namely ourselves and the fruits of our labor.” Sadly, too many people now believe they can win when government confiscates the property of some to give it to others. “Most Americans believe … in the forcible use of one person to serve the use of another. Indeed, that’s the same as slavery.”

To look at it another way, he said, all consider it a crime if we take a gun and rob someone of $200. But what if we rob someone … with the good intention of giving $200 to a homeless woman? In a welfare state, “the first is illegal theft; the second is legal theft,” he said. Too many Americans are OK with the second kind of robbery, if

it is government taking the money under the cloak of good intentions. Conservatives are mistaken in thinking the only hurdle they face is electing different politicians. “People like big government,” he said. That

servative ideas can be conveyed powerfully and entertainingly in today’s world. Moreover, Papola had a thought-provoking response to the cliché that conservatives don’t care about community. Drawing on a strain of conservative thought going back to Edmund Burke, Papola said that “individualism leads to real community.” “Freedom is about togetherness,” he added. “It is about building real community.”

NAME

ADDRESS

MANAGING EDITOR Jim Tynen jim.tynen@nccivitas.org

CI T Y STATE ZIP

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tiffany Taylor Editorial & Advertising 100 S. Harrington St. Raleigh, NC 27603 phone: 919.834.2099 | fax: 919.834.2350

The Civitas Institute is a 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to advancing conservative and free-market principles in the state of North Carolina. All non-advertising content published in Civitas Capitol Connection may be republished as long as appropriate credit is given and it is published in its entirety. © 2014 by John W. Pope Civitas Institute

Freedom depends on civil society, but “government sandblasts that away. Government destroys civil society.” He showed the CLC crowd a video in which the concept and appeal of ordered liberty is conveyed by flocks of

Check the address label. If the word “subscriber” is not included on the address label of this issue, you must subscribe to ensure you continue to receive Civitas Capitol Connection each month.

PUBLISHER Francis X. De Luca francis.deluca@nccivitas.org

Civitas Capitol Connection is a publication of the Civitas Institute

showed attendees one of his “Keynes vs. Hayek rap videos” that have gone viral on the Internet. In it the two titans of modern economics punch away at each other – literally and intellectually. The high-energy visuals and music show that con-

starlings whirling and diving about the sky. “There is no leader here,” he says in the video’s narration. “It looks like chaos. It looks like anarchy. It’s scary.” One human reaction is to try to impose order on this kind of motion when we think we see it in real life – when people and communities run their own lives. Tragically, Papola said, such an attempt at imposing order “produces chaos. It creates collisions and disorder.” But the flocks of birds are really creating elegant patterns in the sky. “They don’t collide,” Papola said. “They don’t coerce each other, and so the harmony emerges.” Out of the diving, swooping birds a complex, enthralling pattern emerges; the individual birds together create a kind of art. “What you see when you look at this is the beauty of emergent order,” he said in the video. “They are dancing, but there’s no one to lead the dance, no choreographer.” That, he suggested, is the task for people who understand ordered liberty. “We have to come to grips with the beauty of emergent order.” Other CLC speakers provided a range of thoughtful and challenging answers to the question of what “Freedom Is.” Now it’s up to all of us to answer it for ourselves. 

Subscribe today...it’s FREE!

Civitas Capitol Connection

nccivitas.org

means “our task is not to change politicians … It’s to somehow convince our fellow Americans of the moral superiority of liberty and its concomitant limited government.” But how do we do that? One way was suggested by John Papola, a video and television producer who has named his company Emergent Order, after the philosophy behind it. Let’s face it, economics is often dry. Papola, however,

At CLC, John Papola used the example of flying starlings to suggest how an ordered freedom can arise from apparent chaos.

Subscribe

From the Editor

2

PH ONE

*Keep me up to date! Sign me up to receive: Civitas Weekly Review Newsletter Press Releases

Poll Results

Events & Training

* EM AI L (required for items listed above)

Mail to: 100 S. Harrington St. Raleigh, NC 27603 | web: nccivitas.org/signup | phone: 919.747.8052


April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

Expert Highlights Common Core Flaws Civitas Senior Policy Analyst Bob Luebke spoke before the Legislative Research Commission’s Common Core Study Committee on March 20. His comments on the national education standards are as follows: Good morning to mem- mon Core to improve student bers of the General Assembly achievement and our economand guests. My name is Bob ic competiveness. Implicit in Luebke. I am a senior policy such thinking is an assumed analyst with Civitas Institute linkage between standards and and our organization hosts student achievement and stana website titled StopCom- dards and economic growth. monCoreNC. I appreciate A review of the research fails the Committee’s invitation to to find credible evidence for come and share a few thoughts such linkages. Those are the about Common Core. To- findings of two respected proday I’m speaking for the Civi- fessors: Tom Loveless of Hartas Institute as well as for the vard and Christopher Tienken many parents, teachers, and of Seton Hall University. In a concerned citizens who oppose 2012 report, Loveless attempts Common Core Standards. to predict the impact of ComOn June 2, 2010, the North mon Core on student achieveCarolina State Board of Edu- ment. He concluded standards cation adopted Common don’t really matter much. He Core Standards. The standards found that from 2003 to 2009 emerged out of a national dis- states with terrific standards cussion over the decline in the raised their [National Associavalue of a high school diploma tion of Educational Progress] and growing concern over scores by the same amount as America’s poor performance states with bad standards. In on international tests. Sim- a 2011 article [Tienken] cited ply stated, the standards were multiple studies that found no put forth as a way to boost evidence for a link between naacademic achievement, equip tional standards, performance students with different skill on international tests and how sets and to aid businesses that an economy performs. needed metrics to make valid It’s not just faulty arguments comparisons across states. We that give us pause. Common believe Common Core repre- Core Standards also violate a sents a flawed idea and there fundamental principle of our are strong reasons to oppose Constitution: federalism. In the standards. a recent publication, Robert Common Core’s one-size- Scott, the former Commisfits-all controlled approach to sioner of Education in Texas, education makes no sense for a commented on how Common country as vast and diverse as Core changes the fundamental the United States. One of the relationship between the states strengths of American educa- and the federal government. tion is its diversity. Common Scott said: Core’s template will work to By signing on to national eliminate that diversity and standards and the assesshomogenize learning across ments that will accompany schools and grades. them, participating states We believe Common Core have ceded their autonomy will also work to further poto design and oversee the liticize education. Because implementation of their the standards transfer power own standards and tests. from the states to Washington, The implications of ceding D.C., Common Core centralthis autonomy are varied. izes control of education poliNot only do some states risk cymaking. In so doing Comsacrificing high quality stanmon Core will subordinate dards for national standards educational interests to politithat may be less rigorous, cal interests and will also upset but all states are sacrificing the healthy system of checks their ability to inform what and balances between the state students learn. and federal government. In closing, let me say we supBut let’s walk away from port high academic standards. the politics and examine the We believe, however, that arguments for Common North Carolina should develop Core. Those who support the and administer those standards. standards say we need Com- Common Core standards gen-

erate negatives that far outweigh any perceived benefits. The standards are untested; lack validity; stand in opposition to Constitutional principles; work to limit parental influence; and come with too many important – yet unanswered – questions. These include: • Why have Common Core Standards not been pilot-tested? • How will Common Core Standards affect students, teachers and schools?

• How much will Common Core cost to implement in North Carolina and who will pay the costs? • In the absence of evidence for a link between standards and economic competitiveness, what reasons argue for maintaining Common Core? We know members of the Committee are here to help answer those questions. The uncertainty argues for pause and is yet more evidence why

3

we cannot support Common Core. We can support, however, a transparent process that corrects the current problems through a full review of all academic standards and a process that is committed to ensuring that state standards are North Carolina-centric and the highest possible. Considering all the evidence, we believe this is the best option to move forward and we urge lawmakers to give it every consideration. 

Monthly Petition

NC Voter Petition to Fight Common Core Standards Common Core education standards are harmful to children, erode parental rights and local control and in many cases do not represent an improvement in existing academic standards. I ask the NC legislature to withdraw the state of North Carolina from participation in the program.

Name (First, M.I., Last)

Street Address

City

State, Zip

Phone

Email

Signature

County

Date

Name (First, M.I., Last)

Street Address

City

State, Zip

Phone

Email

Signature

County

Date

Cut out and mail to: Civitas Institute, 100 S. Harrington St. Raleigh, NC 27603 Please make copies of this form for others to sign

nccivitas.org


4

April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

Why We Should Support Open Records BY francis de luca The following article was adapted from an oped published March 24 in the News & Observer.

about their activities and whether they are following the law. Last year we requested records from the UNC School

back and cite the specific legal reason for the refusal. The first thing our request showed was that the UNC law

Newspapers, activists and all who care about open government recently celebrated “Sunshine Week.” Now it’s time for North Carolina conservatives to make 2014 “Sunshine Year.” People across the spectrum profess the importance of open records, transparent government and the people’s right to know what their government is up to. But this year means something extra to us at the Civitas Institute as we have been caught up in our own highly publicized public records battle with government and its allies. Civitas for years has used the North Carolina public records law to request (and sometimes even get) records out of our state and local governments. As a conservative organization, we often look for data on spending and salaries, among other hard information. But we also look to see how public agencies go

of Law for Gene Nichol, a law professor and head of the UNC Poverty Center. Our request was the subject of news stories and editorials questioning our motives. A group of professors protested and demanded that the governor tell us to stop. (Note to academics: We don’t work for government.) Few of our critics seem to understand that the law does not require that people say why they want the records; they can just ask. That is a real beauty of the law and one that needs to be more widely known. Anyone, and I mean anyone, can ask for public records, from your local town’s checkbook to emails from the governor’s office. If the records are not personnel-related and don’t fall under a few other exceptions, the agency must turn them over. If it doesn’t, it is supposed to tell you what it held

school violated university policy by holding a closed forum. It just so happened that all of those invited were liberal activists and that almost all were of one political party. Nichol and others went out of their way to conceal the meeting and to keep people from attending. They did this

ment to charge for costs. What costs are allowable, however, has always been a contentious point. We have worked with good people who went out of their way to comply quickly and efficiently, and we have worked with not-so-good actors who delayed and tried to hold us up for money. Gov. Pat McCrory’s administration has attempted to charge for records requests made by numerous groups. I do not know the full details or the volume of the requests, though I have been told it is considerable. To me, the volume is irrelevant; the important thing is to be open and transparent. Do whatever it takes to be open and transparent! If anyone in the administration had asked me, I would have advised that it comply and track costs. If we are to have open government, there will be costs, and we should work those costs into budgets. The legislature needs to know how much to allocate so state agencies comply with the law, but soon legislators should

“Anyone, and I mean anyone, can ask for public records, from your local town’s checkbook to emails from the governor’s office.” using taxpayer money – your money! As for the protesting professors, surprise! Their leader was involved in the forum. There are costs involved in producing public records, such as worker time or copying. The law allows govern-

start cutting that money out of the budget. Why? Because doing so would force government agencies on all levels to make the process easier and less costly for themselves by putting more complete information online where anyone can access

it without going through government gatekeepers. That is the only way we will have true transparency and sunshine. This method should also be implemented at all levels of government (yes, including you, UNC system) so what government is doing is not mysterious or hidden. If you work for government and don’t want citizens to know what you are doing, get out of government and work somewhere else. The people pay your salary and provide the tax money you spend and they have an unabridged right to know what you do with your day and how you spend their money. They are your boss! Those of us on the right should make this a top priority this year and every year. Because we as a whole distrust government, we believe it is imperative to keep an eye on it. People in government will no doubt complain that what I propose will make their work more difficult. To that I say yea! If government finds it inconvenient to do more things, then maybe public employees will concentrate on doing those things government should be doing correctly. If government does less but does it better that is not just a victory for conservatives, it is a victory for everyone. While some (especially liberals and progressives) may think North Carolina conservatives now have control over state and many local governments, to quote President Reagan, “Trust but verify.” That is a good policy today and especially in the future, when elections produce different results, as they most assuredly will. 

Elections Board Reveals Vote Problems CONTINUED from page 1

of SSN were registered in N.C. and another state – and the latest date of registration or voter activity did not take place within N.C. As Moore pointed out, given that only 28 states participate in the interstate cross-check, it is reasonable to believe that the numbers for potential voter fraud would be much higher if all 50 states participated in the

nccivitas.org

program. The four most populous states – Florida, Texas, California and New York – are among the 22 states that did not participate in the 2014 cross-check. Moreover, Strach reported that, during an audit of death records from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Board discovered: • 50,000 new death records that had not previously been provided to the SBOE.

• 13,416 deceased voters on the voter rolls in October 2013. • 81 deceased voters that had voter activity after they died. There is no cost to participate in the cross-check program. States must only sign a memorandum of understanding and assign two staff members to “participate in an annual conference call and email, pull and transmit

the data in January of every year, receive and process cross-check results and work with local elections officials to respond for requests of addresses, signatures, etc.” The findings raise the question of why North Carolina didn’t join this program much earlier. In addition to voter fraud, these figures show massive irregularities with voter registration. Panel member Rep.

Harry Warren (R-Rowan) commented on criticism of the VIVA legislation that “this was a solution looking for a problem.” The report, Warren said, “does clearly – clearly – indicate there is a problem, and that VIVA addresses the problem.” *The Kansas Secretary of State’s Office told Civitas this number includes voter data from states that do not include the Social Security numbers. 


April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

5

Unemployment Update

NC Jobless Tally Falls Below U.S. Rate BY SUSAN MYRICK In February, the state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.4 percent, down 0.3 percentage points from January’s revised rate of 6.7 percent. For the first time since March 2006, the state’s unemployment rate was less than the national rate, which in February rose to 6.7 percent from January’s 6.6 percent rate. North Carolina’s February 2014 unemployment rate was 2.2 percentage points lower than a year ago. The number of people employed here increased over the month by 7,399 to 4,363,010, and increased 48,459 over the year. The number of people unemployed fell by 14,748 in

February to 296,226, and declined 112,126 over the year. The state’s not seasonally adjusted statewide rate was 6.6 percent in February, and the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates decreased in 95 of North Carolina’s counties, increased in four and remained the same in one. Orange County had the lowest unemployment rate at 4.4 percent, and Graham County had the highest at 13.8 percent. The State’s 14 metro areas experienced rate decreases. The Rocky Mount metro area experienced the highest rate at 9.6 percent; the DurhamChapel Hill area had the lowest at 5 percent. 

North Carolina  Unemployment    (2013  -­‐  2014)   10.0%  

9.5%

Unemployment Reform Implemented in NC

9.0%

8.5%

8.0%

7.5%

7.0%

6.5%

6.0%

Jan-­‐13

Feb-­‐13

Mar-­‐13

Apr-­‐13

May-­‐13

Jun-­‐13

Jul-­‐13

United States  

Aug-­‐13

Sep-­‐13

Oct-­‐13

Nov-­‐13

Dec-­‐13

Jan-­‐14

Feb-­‐14

North Carolina    

Pasquotank Gates Northampton 9.5 Vance Currituck Stokes Rockingham Caswell Person 6.7 8.4 Hertford 9.3 Warren 7.7 6 8.2 6.9 7.3 Granville 7.8 Halifax Watauga 8.9 Wilkes Perquimans Camden 6.8 10.2 6.2 7.5 7.2 Yadkin 8 Forsyth Bertie Orange Chowan MitchellAvery Franklin 5.5 Guilford 6.1 9.6 4.4 8 8.4 8.9 6 6.8 Durham Caldwell Nash Alamance Alexander Davie Madison Yancey 5.1 7.1 Tyrrell 8.6 Edgecombe 6.4 7.8 6.2 Washington 6.2 Martin 11.6 5.5 9.4 Iredell Wake 8.2 7.6 Davidson Chatham 6.5 McDowell Burke Randolph 5 Wilson Dare 6.8 Catawba 7 4.5 Buncombe 7.5 Rowan 6.5 9 13.5 Haywood 7.2 Pitt 4.9 6.7 6.3 6.3 Swain Johnston Lincoln Greene Beaufort Lee Hyde Graham 11.4 Rutherford 5.7 6.5 Cabarrus Wayne 7.1 Montgomery 7.8 8.3 12.9 Henderson 13.8 Harnett 9.4 Jackson 5.9 6.6 7.3 Polk Stanly Gaston 5.1 7.6 Moore Craven Cleveland Macon 6.5 Mecklenburg Lenoir Transylvania 4.6 6.1 Cherokee 6.6 6.5 7.5 7.2 8 6.5 Pamlico 7.3 7.3 Clay 8.8 9.2 6.7 Hoke Cumberland Jones Union NC Counties 6.7 Sampson 7.8 Anson Richmond 7.6 Duplin 5.6 8.9 6.5 7.5 7.3 February 2014 Unemployment Scotland Carteret 12.4 6.8 4.4 - 5.7 Onslow 6.6 Bladen Robeson 5.9 - 7.0 Pender 10 9.6 7.6 Ashe 9.1

Alleghany 8.3

Surry 7.1

7.1 - 8.4

Columbus 9

8.6 - 10.2 11.4 - 13.8

New Hanover 6.6 Brunswick 8

2008-2014 Unemployment Rate Comparison County

10-08 1-13 2-14

County

10-08 1-13 2-14

County

10-08 1-13 2-14

County

10-08 1-13 2-14

Alamance

7.1

10

6.4

Cumberland

6.8

11

7.6

Johnston

6.1

8.9

5.7

Randolph

6.7

11.1

6.5

Alexander

7.9

10.2

6.2

Currituck

3.6

10.5

7.7

Jones

6.8

10.7

7.8

Richmond

9.5

13.6

8.9

Alleghany

6.6

12.6

8.3

Dare

4.2

20.1

13.5

Lee

8.2

12.7

8.3

Robeson

8.1

13.9

9.6

Anson

9.5

12.8

7.5

Davidson

7.4

10.7

6.8

Lenoir

7.8

10.8

7.3

Rockingham

7.9

11.7

8.2

Ashe

6.3

13.8

9.1

Davie

6.9

9.3

6.2

Lincoln

7.2

10.8

6.5

Rowan

7.2

10.3

6.7

Avery

5.6

13.7

8

Duplin

5.9

10.6

7.3

Macon

5.3

13.3

8

Rutherford

8.7

14.7

9.4

Beaufort

7.3

11.8

7.8

Durham

5.4

7.9

5.1

Madison

5.7

10.1

5.5

Sampson

5.4

9

6.5

Bertie

7.5

13.5

9.6

Edgecombe

11.4

16.6

11.6

Martin

6.9

12

7.6

Scotland

11.7

17.8

12.4

Bladen

8.1

13.6

10

Forsyth

6.3

9.4

6.1

Brunswick

6.9

12.2

8

Franklin

6.7

9.6

6

Buncombe

5.1

8.1

4.9

Gaston

7.7

11.1

6.6

Mcdowell

8.1

11.9

7.5

Stanly

7

10.1

6.1

Mecklenburg

6.6

9.7

6.5

Stokes

6.1

9

6

Mitchell

7.7

15.5

8.9

Surry

8.3

11.1

7.1

Burke

8.6

11.6

7

Gates

5.2

8.3

6.7

Montgomery

8.3

11.1

7.3

Swain

5.5

19

11.4

Cabarrus

6.4

9.4

5.9

Graham

8.2

20.4

13.8

Moore

6.4

10.1

6.5

Transylvania

5

11.5

7.3

Caldwell

8.3

12

7.1

Granville

7

10.3

6.8

Nash

8.6

12.7

8.6

Tyrrell

6

13

9.4

Camden

5.4

9.4

7.2

Greene

7

9.8

7.1

New Hanover

5.4

10.4

6.6

Union

6

8.6

5.6

Carteret

5

10.6

6.8

Guilford

6.7

10.3

6.8

Northampton

7.7

12.1

8.4

Vance

9.8

13.8

9.3

Caswell

8.2

10.4

6.9

Halifax

9.7

14.7

10.2

Onslow

5.8

9.6

6.6

Wake

5

7.8

5

Catawba

7.9

11.6

7.2

Harnett

7.1

11.5

7.6

Orange

4.2

6.6

4.4

Warren

9.7

12.9

8.9

Chatham

5.5

7.5

4.5

Haywood

5.7

10.2

6.3

Pamlico

5.7

11.2

9.2

Washington

7.2

13.5

8.2

Cherokee

8.7

14.1

8.8

Henderson

5.1

7.9

5.1

Pasquotank

6.4

12.4

9.5

Watauga

4.1

9.5

6.2

Chowan

8.5

11.3

8.4

Hertford

6.6

11.5

7.8

Pender

6.4

11.5

7.6

Wayne

6.3

9.8

6.6

6

10.6

6.7

Hoke

6.3

9.7

6.7

Perquimans

6.7

11.1

8

Wilkes

8.2

11.7

7.5

Cleveland

8.5

11.3

7.2

Hyde

4.6

15.7

12.9

Person

7.3

11.1

7.3

Wilson

7.9

13

9

Columbus

8.1

13.8

9

Iredell

6.5

10.4

6.5

Pitt

7

9.9

6.3

Yadkin

6.1

10.1

5.5

Craven

6.2

10.8

7.5

Jackson

4.3

11.3

6.5

Polk

5

8.2

4.6

Yancey

7.2

13.8

7.8

Clay

nccivitas.org

*Data is from the North Carolina Department of Commerce Labor and Economic Analysis Division


6

April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

CLC ENERGIZES CON Snapshots from CLC

Our Conservative Leadership Conference on March 28-29 hosted 40 speakers and presenters who spoke at five meals and 22 breakout sessions. Exploring the theme “Freedom Is …,” 440 attendees were encouraged to be active and educated about a wide range of contemporary topics. Among the things you could have heard at CLC: “If you’re on welfare, you can’t be free. If you get food stamps, you can’t be free. … If you rely on Uncle Sam for the next job or check, you can’t be free.” Lt. Gov. Dan Forest, assailing dependence on government.

“Can’t we make North Carolina the 10th state that has no income tax?”

Stephen Moore of the Heritage Foundation. He heralded North Carolina’s tax reforms and how the unemployment rate had plunged in the months since then, but he also noted that the nine states without an income tax continued to be national leaders in economic growth.

“The most important thing you know about Obamacare is wrong. … You think we lost? We didn’t lose, we won. We already won this thing, and the president is trying to steal that victory away from us.”

Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute, arguing that when the administration changes the Affordable Care Act it is in effect admitting defeat in the health care debate.

“What would Hayek think of Twitter? What if Sam Adams had a Facebook page? What if Lech Walesa could have livestreamed his speeches from the shipyards in Gdansk?” Matt Kibbe of FreedomWorks, on how the decentralized power of people in communities is frightening political establishments.

“It’s time for the Republican Party to stop talking about Ronald Reagan and start acting like him.” Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah.

Lt. Gov. Dan Forest (at left, shaking hands w attendees) called for “a better America.

Gov. Pat McCrory (above, foreground) spoke to Civi Bob Luddy (at left). Asked about his hopes for the s McCrory responded, to applause, “I want it to b

U.S. Sen. Mike Lee (at right) called for a new conserv that would attack cronyism and “unlock the limitless h that exists when government stays out of the nccivitas.org


April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

7

NCERNED CITIZENS

“When I walked into the F.W. Woolworth, I didn’t know if I would come out in the prone position or still standing. But that didn’t matter. There are some things worth dying for.” –Clarence Henderson, above, who took part in the iconic sit-in in Greensboro in 1960

“Planning is the forcible superseding of someone else’s plan.” Economist Walter Williams, at left.

with .”

itas Chairman short session, be short.”

vative agenda human potential e way.” nccivitas.org


8

April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

Crossover Bills Eyed BY angela hight On May 14, the North Carolina General Assembly will reconvene at noon for what is called the “short session.” One thing that people may not realize about the short session is there are crossover bills that will be eligible to be considered. According to the General Assembly Website crossover bills are: a. Senate bills and resolutions introduced in 2013 that passed third reading in the Senate and were received by the House in 2013, or b. House bills and resolutions introduced in 2013 that passed third reading in the House by May 16, 2013 and were received in the Senate by May 20, 2013 c. However, any bill otherwise meeting these deadlines is not eligible for consideration if it: i. Violates the rules of the receiving chamber; and ii. Is disposed of in the other house by tabling, unfavorable committee report, indefinite postponement, or failure to pass any reading A few of the bills to look out for are:

Teacher Pay heads GA ‘To Do’ List BY brian balfour

H8 Eminent Domain This measure would amend the state constitution to provide badly needed protection for property rights. Under the law, local and state governments can use the power of eminent domain to seize private property for public uses. Historically, eminent domain has been used to build roads, schools, and other public projects. However, recent case law (Kelo v. City of New London) has extended the interpretation of “public use” to include economic development projects. Governments have increasingly started seizing private property for things like parking lots and casinos – projects that have no direct public utility. House Bill 8 would clearly define all acceptable interpretations of public use in order to prevent eminent domain abuse.

H31 and H40 Amend Habitual DWI The bills proposed that “a person convicted of two or more offenses of impaired driving and violating this section shall be punished as a Class F felon and shall be sentenced to a minimum active term of not less than 12 months of imprisonment, which shall not be suspended. Sentences imposed under this subsection shall run consecutively with and shall commence at the expiration of any sentence being served.”

H872 Protect NC Right to Work This bill would void and make unenforceable any contract requiring a contractor or subcontractor to use union labor on the job.

H109 Motorcycle Helmet Law This bill would provide a study to determine whether North Carolina should allow motorcyclists to ride without a helmet.

H824 EpiPens in Schools EpiPens are often used in allergic reactions. This bill would require schools to have a supply of these auto-injectors on school grounds during school events and after school activities on school property. The school would have someone who is trained to administer the drug.

H156 Honest Lottery Act Marketing and advertising for the NC Lottery is something most of us see in our everyday life. This act will provide stricter guidelines to what the NC Lottery can and cannot do in their marketing and advertising.

H465 No Possession of Firearms/Undocumented Aliens This act would amend an act that is already a law. The new act would not allow people without proper documentation and who are not lawfully present in the United States to possess a firearm. If accused of being in possession of a firearm, they will be charged with a Class I Felony. While this is a short list of some of the bills eligible for the short session, feel free to go to www. ncleg.net and look for “The Memorandum on Bills Eligible for Consideration by the General Assembly during the 2014 Regular Session of the 2013 General Assembly” to see a complete list. 

Pass the torch Donate If you like Civitas Capitol Connection, please consider making a donation to help fund the newspaper. Every dollar you contribute will help us send our conservative message out via Capitol Connection to readers across North Carolina. All contributions are tax deductible. Mail to: 100 S. Harrington St. Raleigh, NC 27603 web: nccivitas.org/donate | phone: 919.834.2099

nccivitas.org

State Legislative Building

This year’s legislative “short session” in Raleigh is likely to live up to its name. With so many substantial reforms passed in 2013 and mid-term elections looming this fall, there’s little doubt state lawmakers will prefer a light workload. In addition to revising the second year of the state’s twoyear budget passed last year, there are only a few issues that appear to be on the agenda for 2014. First is teacher pay. Gov. McCrory has publicly stated his desire to restructure the state’s teacher salary schedule in order to ensure starting teachers earn at least $35,000 annually. Legislative leaders have likewise publicly voiced their support for this measure, which would probably be rolled into the budget revisions this summer. Secondly there is the issue of Medicaid reform. The McCrory administration is also taking the lead on this issue. Last year’s budget included a provision allowing for the

state’s executive branch to develop a reform plan for the state’s Medicaid program, and the governor’s office has recently announced its intention to implement “accountable care organizations” (ACO) to generate savings. Medicaid costs in North Carolina have been skyrocketing for years, and have run over projections by hundreds of millions of dollars the last few years. ACOs are networks of doctors and hospitals that agree to work together to reduce costs while meeting established standards of quality care. The networks, in turn, would get to keep a significant portion of any savings they generated. Lastly, Common Core education standards have emerged as a hot-button issue in North Carolina. State lawmakers have created a study commission to re-examine Common Core’s implementation here, and their recommendations may result in legislation this year aimed at slowing or rejecting the standards. 

Yes, I’d like to support Civitas Capitol Connection! My check made payable to the Civitas Institute is enclosed Please charge my:

American Express

Master Card

Discover

Visa

Name _________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________ State _________ Zip ________________ Phone ____________________________ Email _______________________________ Card No. ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Amount: $____________ Expiration: ___ ___ / ___ ___ CVV: __________ Signature: ______________________________________________________


April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

2014 NC Elections at a Glance BY susan myrick The chart on this and following pages is your guide for figuring out what’s happening in North Carolina’s primary races at a glance. First, the lines shaded red are now held by a Republican; those shaded blue have a Democratic lawmaker. The first column shows the Senate (SD) or House (HD) number. (To find out which districts you live in, go to the State Board of Elections website, http://www.ncsbe.gov/ncsbe/).

The second column, 2012 CPI, gives the results of our Civitas Partisan Index (CPI). It compares votes cast in each N.C. legislative district to votes cast in the state as a whole. The end result is a letter (D or R) followed by a number, indicating the extent to which each district leans one way or the other. For example, a district whose voters allotted 5 more percentage points to the Democratic candidates compared

with the state average receives an index score of D+5. The columns “2012 Winner,” “2012 Party” and “2012 Vote” show the winner of that election (or of the lawmaker who has succeeded that candidate in office), which party he or she belonged to, and the percentage of votes received. “2014 Election” shows whether candidates have filed for a primary, which parties are involved (D for Democratic, R

for Republican) and whether there will be two candidates squaring off in November. For instance, Senate District 1’s voting tilts Republican by 3 percentage points compared with the state average. Republican Bill Cook won in 2012, by the narrowest of margins. There’s a primary election on the Democratic side, with the winner facing Cook in the general election. In House District 15, which has an R+12 CPI

9

score, Republican Phillip Shepard was unopposed in 2012. He’ll face a challenger in the GOP primary. The winner of that election will face no opposition on the fall ballot. Senate District 14, on the other hand, has a CPI of D+27. Democrat Dan Blue was unopposed in 2012. No one has filed to challenge him in the primary or the general election, making him the “winner” already. 

SD

2012 CPI

2012 Winner*

2012 Party

2012 Vote %

2014 Election

1

R+3

Bill Cook

R

50.0%

Primary (D) and General Election

2

R+12

Norman Sanderson

R

63.1%

Primary (D) and General Election

3

D+18

Clark Jenkins

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins

4

D+20

Angela Bryant (replaced Ed Jones)

D

72.3%

General Election

5

D+15

Don Davis

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins

6

R+10

Harry Brown

R

100.0%

WINNER

7

R+10

Louis Pate

R

100.0%

General Election

8

R+6

Bill Rabon

R

60.0%

Primary (D) and General Election

9

R+4

Thom Goolsby

R

54.2%

Primary (R) Wins

10

R+6

Brent Jackson

R

100.0%

General Election

11

R+6

Buck Newton

R

60.8%

WINNER

12

R+6

Ronald Rabin

R

51.0%

Primary (D) and General Election

13

D+14

Michael Walters

D

72.6%

Primary (D) and General Election

14

D+27

Dan Blue

D

100.0%

WINNER

15

R+2

Neal Hunt

R

55.8%

Primary (R) and General Election - Open Seat

16

D+12

Josh Stein

D

100.0%

General Election

17

R+3

Tamara Barringer

R

53.7%

General Election

18

R+1

Chad Barefoot

R

55.9%

General Election

19

D+3

Wesley Meredith

R

53.9%

General Election

20

D+26

Floyd B McKissick Jr

D

100.0%

WINNER

21

D+20

Robert B Clark III

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins

22

D+14

Mike Woodard

D

65.4%

Primary (R) and General Election

23

D+15

Valerie Foushee (replaced Ellie Kinnaird)

D

67.0%

General Election

24

R+9

Rick Gunn

R

79.0%

WINNER

25

R+3

Gene McLaurin

D

53.0%

General Election

26

R+9

Philip E (Phil) Berger

R

61.1%

General Election

27

R+5

Trudy Wade

R

57.6%

WINNER

28

D+32

Gladys A Robinson

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins

29

R+18

Jerry W Tillman

R

100.0%

General Election

30

R+17

Shirley Randleman (replaced Don East)

R

64.3%

General Election

31

R+13

Joyce Krawiec (replaced Pete Brunstetter)

R

69.0%

Primary (R) and General Election

32

D+19

Earline W Parmon

D

73.0%

WINNER

33

R+17

Stan Bingham

R

100.0%

Primary (R) Wins

34

R+14

Andrew C Brock

R

100.0%

General Election

35

R+15

Tommy Tucker

R

100.0%

WINNER

36

R+11

Fletcher L Hartsell Jr

R

100.0%

Primary (R) Wins

37

D+13

Daniel (Dan) Clodfelter

D

67.0%

WINNER

38

D+26

Joel Ford

D

80.2%

General Election

39

R+11

Robert (Bob) Rucho

R

61.6%

General Election

40

D+30

Malcolm Graham

D

84.1%

Primary (D) Wins

41

R+8

Jeff Tarte

R

100.0%

General Election

42

R+16

Austin Allran

R

64.5%

WINNER - Open Seat**

43

R+12

Kathy Harrington

R

100.0%

WINNER

44

R+15

David Curtis

R

65.9%

WINNER

45

R+12

Dan Soucek

R

60.7%

General Election

46

R+8

Warren Daniel

R

56.0%

General Election

47

R+10

Ralph Hise

R

56.5%

Primary (R) Wins

48

R+10

Tom Apodaca

R

100.0%

General Election

49

D+9

Martin L Nesbitt

D

62.0%

Primary (R) and General Election

50

R+8

Jim Davis

R

57.1%

Primary (D) and General Election *Replacements in office are noted **Winner - Andy Wells (R)

nccivitas.org


10

April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

2014 NC Elections at a Glance HD

2012 CPI

2012 Winner

2012 Party

2012 Vote %

2014 Election

1

R+6

Bob Steinburg

R

56.3%

General Election

2

D+0

W A (Winkie) Wilkins

D

56.7%

General Election - Open Seat

3

R+8

Michael Speciale

R

59.2%

General Election

4

R+11

Jimmy Dixon

R

65.0%

WINNER

5

D+21

Annie Ward Mobley

D

100.0%

Primary (D) and General Election

6

R+4

Paul Tine

D

50.6%

Primary (R) and General Election

7

D+15

Bobbie Richardson (replaced Angela R Bryant)

D

100.0%

WINNER

8

R+1

Susan Martin

R

57.2%

General Election

9

R+4

Brian Brown

R

51.5%

Primary (R) and General Election

10

R+12

John Bell

R

66.6%

WINNER

11

D+12

Duane Hall

D

100.0%

General Election

12

D+10

George Graham

D

65.8%

WINNER

13

R+16

Patricia (Pat) McElraft

R

88.3%

General Election

14

R+8

George G Cleveland

R

100.0%

Primary (R) Wins

15

R+12

Phillip Shepard

R

100.0%

Primary (R) Wins

16

R+11

Chris Millis

R

100.0%

General Election

17

R+12

Frank Iler

R

66.2%

Primary (R) and General Election

18

D+12

Susi Hamilton

D

66.5%

WINNER

19

R+9

Ted Davis Jr

R

60.3%

WINNER

20

R+10

Rick Catlin

R

64.1%

General Election

21

D+18

Larry M Bell

D

100.0%

WINNER

22

R+1

William Brisson

D

100.0%

General Election

23

D+18

Joe Tolson

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins - Open Seat

24

D+26

Jean Farmer Butterfield

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins

25

R+7

Jeffrey L (Jeff) Collins

R

63.3%

General Election

26

R+8

Leo Daughtry

R

59.7%

Primary (R) Wins

27

D+20

Michael H Wray

D

90.9%

Primary (D) Wins

28

R+12

James H (JH) Langdon Jr

R

100.0%

WINNER

29

D+34

Larry D Hall

D

100.0%

WINNER

30

D+21

Paul Luebke

D

100.0%

WINNER

31

D+32

H M (Mickey) Michaux Jr

D

100.0%

General Election

32

D+19

Nathan Baskerville

D

70.8%

WINNER

33

D+30

Rosa U Gill

D

100.0%

General Election

34

D+14

Grier Martin (replaced Deborah K Ross)

D

97.4%

WINNER

35

R+4

Chris Malone

R

50.8%

General Election

36

R+4

Nelson Dollar

R

55.0%

General Election

37

R+6

Paul Stam

R

57.0%

WINNER

38

D+28

Yvonne Lewis Holley

D

87.7%

General Election

39

D+9

Darren Jackson

D

100.0%

WINNER

40

R+3

Marilyn Avila

R

53.9%

General Election

41

R+0

Tom Murry

R

51.8%

General Election

42

D+23

Marvin W Lucas

D

77.5%

WINNER

43

D+19

Elmer Floyd

D

69.6%

WINNER

44

D+5

Rick Glazier

D

56.3%

General Election

45

R+3

John Szoka

R

56.4%

WINNER

46

D+4

Ken Waddell

D

54.1%

General Election

47

D+19

Charles Graham

D

100.0%

WINNER

48

D+22

Garland E Pierce

D

100.0%

WINNER

49

R+1

Jim Fulghum

R

54.0%

Primary (D) and General Election - Open Seat

50

D+8

Graig R. Meyer (replaced Valerie Foushee)

D

55.0%

Primary (R) and General Election - Open Seat

51

R+5

Michael (Mike) Stone

R

52.0%

General Election

52

R+12

James L (Jamie) Boles Jr

R

100.0%

WINNER

53

R+5

David Lewis

R

56.5%

Primary (D) and General Election

54

D+5

Deb McManus

D

56.1%

Primary (D) and General Election - Open Seat

55

R+7

Mark Brody

R

56.6%

General Election

56

D+26

Verla C Insko

D

77.4%

General Election

57

D+23

Mary Price (Pricey) Harrison

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins

58

D+27

Alma Adams

D

79.9%

Primary (D) Wins - Open Seat

59

R+9

Jon Hardister

R

100.0%

General Election

60

D+28

Marcus Brandon

D

100.0%

Primary (D) Wins - Open Seat

61

R+8

John Faircloth

R

63.8%

General Election

62

R+8

John M Blust

R

76.3%

General Election

63

R+5

Stephen M Ross

R

56.7%

General Election

64

R+7

Dennis Riddell

R

59.0%

WINNER

65

R+7

Bert Jones

R

59.5%

General Election

nccivitas.org


April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

11

66

D+7

Ken Goodman

D

100.0%

WINNER

67

R+14

Justin P Burr

R

62.6%

Primary (R) and General Election

68

R+15

Craig Horn

R

65.2%

WINNER

69

R+13

Dean Arp

R

100.0%

WINNER

70

R+22

Pat B Hurley

R

100.0%

General Election

71

D+22

Evelyn Terry

D

77.9%

General Election

72

D+21

Edward (Ed) Hanes Jr

D

74.4%

WINNER

73

R+21

Mark W Hollo

R

71.4%

Primary (R) Wins - Open Seat

74

R+10

Debra Conrad

R

64.4%

General Election

75

R+8

Donny C Lambeth

R

100.0%

General Election

76

R+15

Carl Ford

R

100.0%

WINNER

77

R+11

Harry Warren

R

61.8%

Primary (R) Wins

78

R+23

Allen Ray McNeill

R

75.0%

WINNER

79

R+16

Julia Craven Howard

R

70.1%

General Election

80

R+22

Roger Younts (replaced Jerry C Dockham)

R

68.6%

Primary (R) Wins - Open Seat

81

R+15

Rayne Brown

R

100.0%

WINNER

82

R+8

Larry G Pittman

R

100.0%

Primary (R) and General Election

83

R+8

Linda P Johnson

R

63.2%

WINNER

84

R+13

Rena W Turner

R

65.3%

Primary (R) and General Election

85

R+18

Josh Dobson (replaced Mitch Gillespie)

R

68.5%

General Election - Open Seat

86

R+9

Hugh Blackwell

R

60.8%

Primary (R) and General Election

87

R+16

Edgar V Starnes

R

100.0%

WINNER

88

R+6

Rob Bryan

R

54.9%

General Election

89

R+16

Mitchell Smith Setzer

R

100.0%

WINNER

90

R+15

Sarah Stevens

R

100.0%

General Election

91

R+11

Bryan Holloway

R

61.0%

WINNER

92

D+1

Charles Jeter

R

51.4%

General Election

93

R+5

Jonathan C Jordan

R

51.5%

General Election

94

R+17

Jeffrey Elmore

R

100.0%

Primary (R) Wins

95

R+16

C Robert Brawley

R

94.8%

Primary (R) Wins

96

R+13

Andy Wells

R

62.5%

Primary (R) and General Election - Open Seat

97

R+18

Jason R Saine

R

100.0%

General Election

98

R+9

Thom Tillis

R

100.0%

Primary (R) and General Election - Open Seat

99

D+30

Rodney W Moore

D

100.0%

WINNER

100

D+22

Tricia Cotham

D

100.0%

WINNER

101

D+24

Beverly Miller Earle

D

100.0%

WINNER

102

D+32

Becky Carney

D

100.0%

WINNER

103

R+7

Bill Brawley

R

100.0%

WINNER

104

R+8

Ruth Samuelson

R

100.0%

General Election - Open Seat

105

R+10

Jacqueline Schaffer

R

100.0%

WINNER

106

D+34

Carla Cunningham

D

100.0%

General Election

107

D+29

Kelly Alexander

D

100.0%

WINNER

108

R+11

John A Torbett

R

100.0%

WINNER

109

R+8

Dana Bumgardner

R

59.2%

Primary (R) Wins

110

R+11

Kelly E Hastings

R

63.8%

WINNER

111

R+9

Tim Moore

R

100.0%

General Election

112

R+11

Mike Hager

R

61.9%

General Election

113

R+11

Chris Whitmire

R

63.0%

General Election

114

D+24

Susan C Fisher

D

100.0%

WINNER

115

R+1

Nathan Ramsey

R

54.3%

General Election

116

R+5

Tim Moffitt

R

56.3%

General Election

117

R+13

Chuck McGrady

R

100.0%

Primary (R) and General Election

118

R+5

Michele D Presnell

R

51.3%

General Election

119

D+1

Joe Sam Queen

D

51.7%

Primary (R) General Election

120

R+14

Roger West

R

100.0%

WINNER

Early voting starts April 24 Election Day is May 6 For information on voting, go to the State Board of Elections website at ncsbe.gov/ncsbe nccivitas.org


12

April 2014 Civitas Capitol Connection

Scandal BY bob luebke Almost two years removed from a scandal that led to the departures of its Executive Director and a staff member and embarrassed the party as it played host to the 2012 Democrat National Convention in Charlotte, missteps, questions and internal divisions continue to dog the North Carolina Democratic Party (NCDP). In early February – less than a year after being hired to lead the party back to victory – NCDP Chairman Randy Voller fired Executive Director Robert Dempsey. Voller is not new to controversy. In recent months the former Piittsboro mayor’s tenure as chair of NCDP has become marred by questions about business debt, fundraising trips and taking actions that didn’t have the support of the full party leadership. Still, the Dempsey firing caught many Democrats off guard. A day after removing Dempsey, Voller said he would nominate North Carolina native, civil rights icon, and former Nation of Islam leader Ben Chavis to the post. Voller’s move stunned Democrats and had them asking a lot of questions about Chavis’ background. No doubt many Democrats admire Chavis’ experience in the civil rights movement, but Chavis also cames with a long list of problems. He spent time in prison in the 1970s as part of the Wilmington Ten. In 1993 Chavis was named Executive Director of the NAACP. Seventeen months

Missteps and Distractions Continue to Dog Tar Heel Democrats

North Carolina Democratic Party Headquarters

later he was let go after it was learned he paid an employee more than $330,000 to settle a sexual harassment claim. In 1997, Chavis converted to Islam and was second in command to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. Unfortunately, there’s more. In 2006, a woman connected with the Nation of Islam filed a sexual harassment claim against Chavis. The woman was paid $135,000 by the Church to end the claim. In 2007 Chavis was sued for financial mismanagement of a restaurant chain in Florida. Evidently the Chavis nomination was too much for many Tar Heel Democrats. A couple of days later, Voller put the whole plan on ice and said he intended to make Chavis the interim director. While Chavis may have had civil rights experience, his associations with the Na-

tion of Islam and questions surrounding his character reminded too many of the cloud of recent scandals NCDP has been trying to escape. What am I talking about? Who wants to remember how in 2012 NCDP Executive Director Jay Parmley was forced out after he was accused of sexual harassment by a staffer? Fallout from the scandal also cost former State Chairman David Parker his job. Then last year former State Finance Director Ellen Stankiewicz accused Voller and allies of physically intimidating and bullying her. Stankiewicz filed an EEOC complaint after Voller and Mann refused to make reasonable accomodations for a chronic health problem. Which brings us back to the NCDP Executive Director position. A day after Voller withdrew the Chavis

My check made payable to Civitas Action is enclosed Please charge my:

American Express

Master Card

Discover

Visa

Name __________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________ City ____________________________ State _______ Zip _____________ Phone _________________________ Email __________________________ Card No. Amount: $____________ Expiration: ___ ___ / ___ ___ CVV: __________ Signature: ______________________________________________________ If you prefer to make your contribution over the phone, please call (919) 834-2099 Contributions are not tax deductible

nccivitas.org

nomination, he named Casey Mann interim Executive Director of NCDP. The choice roiled many of the party faithful. State Auditor Beth Wood, a Democrat, raised concerns about the NCDP’s ability to raise money and Mann’s ties to Voller. In a letter sent to the NCDP Executive Council, Wood wrote, “We will NEVER be able to raise money as long as there is no confidence in the handling of contributors’ moneys.” Wood also asked Voller for an immediate refund of her $500 contribution. She wrote that “it is apparent to me that there is no intent to put checks and balances in place that are necessary for financial accountability and fiscal

re s p o n s i b i l ity. As a CPA and the NC State Auditor, I know what fiscal accountability looks like and what it doesn’t.” Despite the protestations, a month later Voller removed the interim tag from Mann’s title. A day after being named the NCDP Executive Director, Mann talked to the press about the party’s financial troubles and admitted that while its historic headquarters on Hillsborough Street in Raleigh requires a lot of upkeep, Democrats aren’t yet ready to sell the building. Since Dempsey was fired in February, Chief Communications Director Micah Brooks Beasley and Tiffany Reynolds Richardson, a fundraiser, resigned. Individuals within the party say Voller forced them out. The missteps, ethical issues and internal divisions reflect a party in disarray and lacking leadership. Worst of all, most of it is self-inflicted. Let’s hope two years from now we’re not talking about the same sad story. 

Scandal is a regular column in Civitas Capitol Connection that will explore public corruption in NC Government. Have a local corruption story? Email corruption@nccivitas.org or call 919.834.2099.

Civitas Capitol Connection April 2014  

This issue of Capitol Connection highlights a State Board of Elections finding that suggests widespread voter fraud, and portrays highlights...