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LOREN GRAY NICOLÃ’ CAIMI OLIVIA HOLT RYAN LOCHTE TY DOLLA $IGN


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INSIDE

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 eason to Become a R Better Man

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Spread Wings into the Ocean Blue

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 his Season's Shoe T Trends Are Creating a New Generation

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How to Run a Mile Without Stopping

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Evolving at a Home Away from Home

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Summer Love

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Uncovered Purpose Under an Unexpected Spotlight

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Staying True to Her Mission

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It's Where He's Going

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Precious Scars

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Be the One

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Museum

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We Used to Listen

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When Else Life Has

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Part of this Moment in History

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More Than a Feature

Cover shot by Arshum Rouhanian (Loren Gray) and Al David (Nicolò Caimi)

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Pushing the Limits: Bold with a Little Bit of Texture Nicolò Caimi Giorgio Armani Acquaman

The Idea of You

A Star is Born

to Vinyl

in Store


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CIVILIAN

Founder & Publisher Al David

Co-Founder & Chief Marketing Officer Vanessa Ferrelli

Editor-in-Chief Eiko Watanabe

Editorial Assistant Caroline Eddy

Creative Director Tim Morrison

Art Director Tyon Weekes

Media Producer Wanhi Lee

Fashion Editor Lassalle

Contributing Fashion Editor Ty-Ron Mayes

Politics Editor Matt Anthes

Director of Technology JP Martinez

Senior Web Developer Rebecca Koniahgari

Director of Social Media Ana Callahan

VP, Brand Partnerships Martin Moor

Marketing Director, Brand Placement Makaila Kay Ho

Staff Writers Monica Dias, Dylan Worcel, Leonye McCalla, Alain Clerine, Margaret Mallison, Gavy Contreras Mike Varius, and Oliva Walker

Legal Counsel Chris Cardillo, P.C. 9728 3rd Avenue, Suite 308 Brooklyn, NY 11209, T. 646-398-5025

CIVILIAN is owned by myEPK Media, Inc. 257 W 38th St., PH - 17th Fl., New York, NY 10018 info@myepkmedia.com (424) 25-myEPK The entire contents of CIVILIAN are protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written consent of the publisher. CIVILIAN accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and/or photographs, and assume no liability for products or services advertised herein. CIVILIAN reserves the right to edit, rewrite, refuse or reuse material, and is not responsible for errors or omissions and may feature same on CivilianMag.com, as well as other mediums for any and all purposes.


little backstory on our Gabrielle Aplin shoot. I first met Gabby 5 years ago in NYC when she was on her first U.S. tour, which led to a photo shoot in L.A. with her for another publication that I was working for at that time. Besides that, we had fun and shared laughter – she showered me with so much excitement from her 2013 Japan trip (owl cafe, cat cafe, photo sticker booth, restaurant manners, etc.), I drew her a sea otter, I asked her to do a Beatles cover (2014 marked the 50th anniversary of their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show), and she actually did and sent it to me two months later. When she spoke, she was so bright and sparkly.

A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EIKO WATANABE Hi there! I hope everyone is excited that summer is just around the corner. As we conduct photo shoots in so many locations, for this Summer issue, too, we shot amazing talents in Los Angeles, New York City, Fort Lauderdale, London, and Toronto. (To all the wonderful shoot crews we worked with for this issue – thank you so much. This wouldn’t have been possible without you guys.) We don’t strategize on what locations we should do shoots – rather, we simply go to whoever we’d like to shoot. I often get asked how we decide who to shoot – in all honesty, I don’t really know, but if there’s someone who would like to take action in hopes of encouraging the youth to go all out to realize their own dreams, I am all in. That said, there has to be a spark on both parties with a sense of mission. Although each and every shoot is very different, special and dear to me, if this helps for CIVILIAN to be understood a bit better, I wanted to share a

In the summer of 2017, I was home in Japan while I was struggling in every aspect of my life: my family falling apart, so much uncertainty in my career, and my personal life crumbling. When this started taking a toll on my health, I saw a flyer saying Gabby would tour Japan. She was kind enough to invite me and my mother to her Tokyo show, and afterward, we would go say hi to her and she was already waiting for us in the backstage hallway with a beer bottle – so ready to do that non-stop sparkly talk. I did not share any of my personal struggles with her but that whole night encouraged me so much that I felt confident – that I could turn everything around and move forward. Last February, she stopped by NYC during her rescheduled tour, and as I gave her some gifts from my Japan trip that I did a few weeks prior, we promised to work together again. We shot her this past January in London for this issue, but it wasn't until I read the article draft that I realized she was also fighting to overcome her own challenges the whole time. The very action of giving others hope and courage despite facing personal challenges is, although not easy, where our real strength lies, and nothing gives me greater joy and honor than working with such courageous individuals and showcasing their stories.

Thank you, Eiko Watanabe, Editor-in-Chief


Grey polo shirt, MICHAEL KORS. Black jeans, DIESEL. Shoes, RALPH LAUREN (TALENT’S OWN)Wedding band, TALENT’S OWN.


RYAN LOCHTE

Reason

to Become a Better Man Alain Clerine

Sure, Ryan Lochte has garnered 12 Olympic medals, 62 world-championship medals, and multiple world records – yet, according to the 34-year-old swimmer, his life can be summarized in just one word: family. He credits his wife and son (and daughter on the way) for changing his life for the better. Having had a reputation in the media as a nonchalant party boy, Lochte is currently only focused on two things: his family and making his fifth Olympic Games appearance at Tokyo 2020. “Preparing for the Olympics is a four-year process,” he says. “You have to swim every day so that you can improve your time by just one second. Taking one day off can set you back weeks.”

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RYAN LOCHTE

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e got his start as a young swimmer under his mother’s tutelage as she was his first swimming coach. “I just loved being in the water, loved being in the pool,” he recalls. A childhood passion would soon prove more fruitful. At 12 years old, his family moved from Rochester, New York to Florida, and his father transitioned into his coach. From there, he had continued success into high school and then college where he was a two-time NCAA swimmer of the year at the University of Florida – and has gone on to successfully represent the United States in Olympic Games. Lochte is tied for second among American athletes with 12 total Olympic medals, placing behind his friend and teammate Michael Phelps who sets the pace as the most decorated Olympian in history with 28 total medals. “Michael and I are great friends. We root for each other,” Lochte says of their perceived rivalry. “I’m just happy to represent the United States and help us win medals. I know I’m the old guy among the group now, and I want to be able to help the young guys and just have fun with the process.” However, success has not been without drawbacks for Lochte. He was involved in controversy at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro for

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possibly making false claims of an attack during a night out on the town, resulting in a 10-month suspension. He was also suspended 14 months last year when he posted a photo on Instagram of himself receiving an intravenous infusion. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency launched an investigation, and while they did not find that he was injecting himself with any banned substances, the problem was the amount of fluid that he received as the USADA does not allow athletes to receive intravenous infusions of more than 100 ml in a 12hour period unless they have a special exemption. “I don’t want to take any of my mistakes back. Every mistake has helped me grow as a person, and I’ve learned from them,” says Lochte who diligently continues his preparations for what he knows might be his last competitive tournament. While he is uncertain about his career plans after the next Olympics, Lochte wants to give back to the sport he loves. He is a spokesperson for the Mac Crutchfield Foundation whose mission is to prevent drowning through education and to provide swim lessons to residents in communities in need. Photographer & Videographer: Sylvain Denis Stylist: Juelle Alexandra Men’s Grooming: Natasha Katrina (using Dior & Kenra Professional) Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Sonesta Fort Lauderdale Beach @sonestafortlauderdale www.sonesta.com/us/florida/fort-lauderdale/sonesta-fort-lauderdalebeach) & PDQ (@pdqfreshfood -www.eatpdq.com)


Navy blue suit, VERSACE.
 Light blue dress shirt, THE MEN'S STORE AT BLOOMINGDALE’S. Tie, VERSACE. Belt, TALENT’S OWN. Dress shoes, GIORGIO BRUTINI (TALENT’S OWN). Wedding band, TALENT’S OWN.


Green leather bomber jacket, DOLCE & GABBANA. Black jeans, DIESEL. Shoes, RALPH LAUREN (TALENT’S OWN). Wedding band, TALENT’S OWN.


“I don’t want to take any of my mistakes back. Every mistake has helped me grow as a person, and I’ve learned from them.”

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shoe Trends Are Creating a New Generation Olivia Walker

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Photographers: Ron Contarsy (for Highmark Studios) & James T Murray


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he world of fashion presented the new, innovative designs for S/S 2019. The atmosphere sparked with electric runways. Clothing alone did not dominate this season’s conversation. The underlying themes beneath the fabric gave us the shoe buzz. As one reflects on Spring/Summer trends of 2019, common similarities include references to queer icons and inspiration. Depicted was an empowered, fluid, and powerful future. Details ranging from color to cut and stitch had a revolutionary component. A sense of comfort was paired with bolder tones – which generated feelings of passion, power, and thrill. The road to a new generation of acceptance is full of enthusiasm. Moreover, a season full of carefree nights, endless joy, and a whole lot of expression has finally arrived. It is time for everyone to walk with their heads a little higher and their best foot forward. As our fashionable friends have shown us through design – the bolder, the better. So, start from the bottom: footwear. Shoes progressive in design with saturated colors and effortless practicality will elevate your outfit and spirit. Below is a list of our favorite summer footwear so far.


FASHION

Givenchy Paris Strap Sneakers In Leather – Givenchy

The minimalist white sneaker has remained a staple trend in footwear. At Givenchy’s 2019 Spring/Summer show, Clare Waight Keller successfully showcased her “blank canvas” and bright color vision. These strap sneakers have matte white calfskin leather and a wide elastic band with the “Givenchy Paris” signature on the front. On its opposite, a second brand signature is written in gold over a leather inset. As a final observation, Keller’s shoe is practical with a tasteful amount of personality.

Men's Regis Neoprene Low-Top Sneakers W/ Exaggerated Sole, Dark Red – Burberry

Riccardo Tisci has kept people on their toes ever since the debut of his first collection at last year’s London Fashion Week: His vision of revolutionizing the British heritage brand was evident for the S/S 2019 collection. It was nothing short of amazing. Notably reflected in the collection is Tisci’s traditional and futuristic influence. The Regis runway-inspired sneaker is a perfect blend of refined and relaxed. The two-toned suede, neoprene and rubber-soled sneaker has a raised Burberry logo on the grip strap. The sole is a platform along with a 1-inch rubber wedge heel. These sneakers are quintessential comfortable and alternative footgear.

Layered Platform Crochet Espadrilles – Gucci

Gucci S/S 2019 in Paris had a lot going on. All eyes were on the details, and the shoes. Alessandro Michele’s collection was heavily embellished, expressive and intricate. The 3-inch breaded-jute platform sandals have navy and red stripes horizontally lining the side with the signature “GG” logo studded at the toe. They have a rubber outsole and an adjustable strap around the ankle. A versatile platform for spring and summer, Gucci’s espadrilles can be worn at a beach-side brunch or even out on the town.


FASHION

Gucci Signature High-Top Sneaker – Gucci

Michele’s presentation in Paris had a variety of different components. Many would describe it as a mix of Hollywood and Baroque. The alternative and bright high-top sneaker has the signature logo embossed into the solid leather. In addition to the 0.5-inch rubber sole and a lace-up vamp with a rounded toe, contrast leather forms a small crisscross pattern at its heel. These high-tops reflect the electrifying impression of S/S 2019.

B23 High-Top Sneakers in Dior Oblique – Dior Almost everyone has owned a pair of Chuck Taylor All-Stars because they are classic. Similarly, when you think of Christian Dior, here’s what we see: timeless. No wonder the Dior B23 High-Top Sneaker was designed with the same body as the famous Chuck Taylor. The sneaker has a solid canvas with the Dior logo printed. The rubber sole is two-tone white and black. Some things can simply never go out of style. It seems Dior has mastered elevated streetwear with the B23 High-Tops this season.

Leather Pump – Gucci

The Gucci S/S 2019 show was held inside the historic Théâtre Le Palace in Paris. The collection included beaded gowns with jeweled tiaras, and there were many references to the Renaissance. Gucci had many people talking, but possibly the most buzzed-about were the designs below the garment. Pointed-toe shoes add sophistication to an outfit – especially when accompanied by a low heel. And the lowerheel trend is making its comeback. This Gucci leather pump has a Sylvie Web strap and a gold buckle – and a 2-inch, detailed bambooeffect heel. Gucci paid close attention to artistry of the designs. However, the best part of this shoe may be the small heart motif sewn into the leather insole!


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Blazer, SANDRA DACCACHE. Earrings, IRIS TRENDS.


OLIVIA HOLT

Evolving

at a Home Away from Home Leonye McCalla

Making the transition from a child actress to a Hollywood starlet can be tough. Many actors have a hard time navigating adulthood after working in the business during their formative years. But every so often, a child star rises above the fray and creates an indelible mark on Hollywood. Olivia Holt can be proud to say she is one of those actors. The Tennessee native and former gymnast began her career in acting upon joining several local theater productions and then appearing in various TV commercials at the age of 10. She eventually starred in Disney XD’s Kickin’ It before moving on to several other Disney productions. “I worked with the channel my entire teenage life, for six years. I grew and learned so much within those 6 years, as an actor, an artist – and an individual,” she recalls. “It felt like a safe and comfortable place for us to explore and soak up as much knowledge as we could. And for me, personally, it really became [my] home away from home.”

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s Disney provided a foundation for Holt, she used it to venture out onto her own, making music and starring in a TV drama series. Based on a Marvel comic book, for instance, Cloak & Dagger tells the story of Tandy Bowen and Tyrone Johnson, two teens from different backgrounds that find out they have supernatural powers. Tandy, the Dagger, boasts the ability to project light in the form of energy daggers. The Freeform show takes on some pretty heavy topics as this is what the network is known for. However, Holt was happy to push the envelope, especially now when marginalized voices are fighting to be heard. “We don’t shy away from what’s actually happening in the world, in this day and age. Our first season, we focused on police brutality, drug addiction, and sexual assault. It’s our job as actors and creators to tell an authentic story and not glamorize these horrific situations on television,” she says. As for her personal life, too, she is fearless. She partnered with WE for a trip to Kenya in 2017, proving to be life-changing for Holt as WE works to build and improve disadvantaged communities

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around the world. “I gained so much perspective from that trip – on the importance of education, on community, and so much more,” she shares. “I now know the kind of human I want to be. I never really questioned that, but this trip just reconfirmed how important it is to spread love and kindness, and to work hard and be grateful for what I have and not complain about what I don’t have.”

Holt still has a long road ahead of her and so much more to accomplish, but we have seen her blaze her own trail hitting many milestones along the way. With her maturity and positive attitude, the star has big plans for the future. Most importantly, she wants to evolve “not only as an actress or artist, but as a human. Both music and acting. It continues to teach me about not being afraid to let go, to [stay] curious, to travel, to learn about people and cultures.” Photographer: Seung Lee (www.kokumastudio.com) Photographer Manager: Phil Kim Stylist: Katelynn Tilley Hair: Marissa Marino Makeup: Tonya Brewer (for Dew Beauty Agency) Videographers: Mason Kim & Wanhi Lee Editor: Eiko Watanabe

Special thanks to Shakey’s Pizza Parlor (@shakeysusa www.shakeys.com)


Jumper, ATELIER PATTY ANG. Cuff, LOUELLA. Rings, LOUELLA. Shoes, CHARLES BY CHARLES DAVID.


LOREN GRAY

Uncovered

Purpose Under an Unexpected

Spotlight Monica Dias

When Loren Gray posted her first video on musical.ly in 2015, she did not expect to become famous. “It wasn’t really on purpose,” she recalls. “My friends at school were actually using it to make videos for Instagram, and I didn’t know it was a platform at the time, and I got on it to make videos like everyone else.” Just like a bolt of lightning, though, fame struck her hard, fast and seemingly out of the blue. “I started getting followers on my Instagram, and I wondered where they were coming from,” she adds. “And then, I realized that I had 30,000 followers on musical.ly, and I was like ‘Oh! This is a thing!’ And from there, I just kept doing it, and I was consistent.”

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Jacket, WOW COUTURE. Top, CHANEL. Leather pants, PRADA. Shoes, GUCCI. Jewelry, SWAROVSKI.


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lthough her massive following provided Gray with something of a creative avenue where she could connect with other people by showcasing her interests, her newfound social-media fame also fundamentally changed her relationships with herself as well as with those around her. “It’s really hard to tell who your real friends are. You never really know who likes you for you, or who likes you for what you have to offer. I think I’ve gotten a little more guarded and careful about who I surround myself with because I have so much more to lose now,” she elaborates. “At the beginning, it was a little difficult to establish the boundaries between my personal life and what I decide to post. I feel like I owe it to people to share my life with them, and that’s not always the case.” Furthermore, her unexpected rise to stardom made her a target of vicious bullying by her schoolmates and Internet trolls, who harassed her and undermined her confidence. “It’s kind of hard being a teenager who’s growing and making mistakes, and having 15 million [people] looking at me all the time. Confidence is something that took me a long, long time to regain,” opens up Gray. While she is openly appreciative of her fans and her platform, she is vocally anti-bullying, and strives to encourage self-confidence and positivity in her fan base. “Being on the Internet, it’s such an awful place at times – where people can say whatever they want – so I constantly put it out to my fans that it’s important to be nice to people, and it’s important to make sure everyone feels comfortable even if you don’t like them,” she continues. “People can say whatever they want on the Internet. It’s not real life.”

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Now, as far as the power of self-confidence goes, the 17-year-old Pennsylvanian sensation is leading by example that she is cementing her place in her true passion: music. “Music has always been a big part of my life. Starting social media, I was a little bit shy of it because of all of the attention that I was getting. I was afraid to put myself out there, but I kind of had this realization that people are going to say what they want regardless, so I might as well go for it, put myself out there, and do what I love,” affirms Gray who has been single-mindedly following her dream of becoming a successful singer-songwriter. Since she signed a record deal with Virgin Records earlier last year, she has released “My Story,” “Kick You Out,” and “Queen,” and has collaborated with Lost Kings (“AntiEverything”). “Music is my full-time focus,” she says. “I just hope that the people that follow me and the people that listen to my music can relate, and if it can help one person or it can empower one person, then I’m doing what I set out to do.” Photographer: Catherine Asanov (@catherineasanov) Fashion Editor: Lassalle (@stylebylassalle & @stevenlassalle_ - www.stevenlassalle.com) Fashion Editor Assistants: Gala Lee (@galaleestyle) & Gabriella Lovazzano (@gabriellajlovazzano) Hair: Justine Marjan Hair Assistant: Samantha Annatone Makeup: Emma Willis (@emmawillismakeup) Videographer: Trip Digital Radio (@tripdigitalradio) Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Primo’s Donuts (@primosdonutsla www.primosdonuts.com) Photographer (for cover): Arshum Rouhanian Art Director: Al David Stylist: Wilford Lenov Hair: Gabi Lopez Makeup: Dillon Peña (for TheOnly.Agency - using Dior) Special thanks to 103 Studios at Capitol Records (@capitolrecords www.capitolrecords.com)


Dress, ANTHROPOLOGIE. Shoes, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN. Gold thin cuff bracelet with silver jewel, IRIS TRENDS. Earrings, SWAROVSKI.


“At the beginning, it was a little difficult to establish the boundaries between my personal life and what I decide to post. I feel like I owe it to people to share my life with them, and that’s not always the case.”

Dress, SAU LEE. Shoes, BADGLEY MISCHKA. Jewelry, SWAROVSKI.


CODY SIMPSON

Spread Wings into the Ocean Blue Margaret Mallison

The Australian tween idol has blossomed into a man and, more importantly, a role model: His name is Cody Robert Simpson. While many of his peers struggled under the intense pressure of success, Simpson thrived. His transition from the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia to L.A. then to New York (to star in the Broadway musical Anastasia as Dmitry until its final Broadway run on March 31st) has been tough, but his family’s support has allowed him to flourish, and grow. “I’ve had the privilege of doing what I love, from a young age. It’s helped me be more independent, more creative, and if anything, it’s given me more opportunity and freedom,” says the 22-yearold performer who sits in a NYC hotel room after stopping by Elvis Duran and the Morning Show. He is very quiet and soft-spoken, but occasionally makes a flawless joke and grins. Although having a pretty packed schedule, he looks calm and confident. It’s a clear, chilly last day of February.

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Sweater, THEORY. Jeans, AG JEANS.


T-shirt, RAG & BONE. Jeans, G-STAR RAW. Boots, TALENT’S OWN. Necklaces, TALENT’S OWN.

“I think we’re at a very crucial period in terms of people paying attention to environmental issues, especially my generation now.”


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is range and capability in acting, and limitless passion have lent a uniquely elusive perspective to the Anastasia cast, and this has further shaped his career. “It’s definitely taught me new techniques, ways of using my voice that I didn’t do as frequently before,” Simpson says. Following the lead of Nick Jonas, Sara Bareilles, and David Bowie, Simpson has been the latest pop star to make the transition to Broadway: a path that he’s more than happy to follow. “I’m very interested in doing more shows, especially given this experience. I’d love to do more – it’s a passion of mine,” he shares. Moreover, his B-Sides EP widely expanded – and evolved – as he regularly dropped a set of 4 songs (including a tune like “We Had”). “A lot of these songs, I’ve had [them] for a couple of years now, and I wanted to release them as groups of guitar ballads,” he elaborates. Joined by drummer Adrian Cota and bassist Shareef Addo, Cody Simpson & The Tide chronicle the stories of love, unity, and environmentalism (“As a writer, I’ve been writing poetry and stories from a young age. I’ve always been really interested in describing settings, in describing images and seeing them, as opposed to strict storytelling”). That being said, in 2017, to mark World Oceans Day, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) named Simpson (who’s an avid surfer) as its first-ever Ocean Advocate for environmental

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responsibility. “I think we’re at a very crucial period in terms of people paying attention to environmental issues, especially my generation now. I’m involved in getting the right narrative out to young people, and hopefully encouraging them to do the right thing,” describes Simpson, adding that the newest generation has the most power to change the way that we think about the environment by influencing not only one another, but everyone around them – their parents included. The future possibilities for Simpson – just like the ocean – are limitless as his genuine passion always activates his creativity in all directions from pop to theatre. After almost a decade in the spotlight, an artist could be limited in their endeavors. Simpson’s career has already proven that the contrary is possible: “I’m looking forward to releasing all this music that I’ve had locked up for a while – I think it’s time to share.”

Photographer: Ron Contarsy (for Highmark Studios) Photographer Assistant: Sarkis Delimelkon Fashion Editor: Lassalle (@stylebylassalle & @stevenlassalle_ www.stevenlassalle.com) Fashion Editor Assistants: Stephanie Lentz (@j.hilburn.stephanie) & Beatrice Figueroa (@beatricefigueroa) Men’s Grooming: Nicole Elle Videographer: Jesse Ovalles Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to The Gallivant Times Square (@gallivantnyc thegallivantnyc.com) & Masseria Caffé and Bakery (@masseriacaffe - www.masseriacaffenyc.com) & Foto Care (@fotocarenyc - fotocare.com) & Fred Blake (@fredatfotocare)


Suit, ARMANI. Shirt, CALVIN KLEIN. Sneakers, VINCE. Necklaces, TALENT’S OWN.


Shirt, MR TURK. Pants, MR TURK. Shoes, SANDERS. Jacket, LTH JKT. Socks, SOCK IT UP.


CHARLIE WEBER

How to Run

a Mile Without

Stopping Dylan Worcel

A young kid at the tender age of 19 had bigger dreams than what Jefferson City, Missouri could offer him. Charlie Weber knew he wanted to study acting so he hit the ground running and made the big move to New York City. Coming up the escalator at Grand Central Station, he experienced culture shock (“The air smelled different, and the energy was really something�) but also found everything he had been looking for. He stayed at a house in Rahway, New Jersey, and hopped on the train the following morning. While studying at the prestigious Stella Adler Studio of Acting, Weber was doing whatever he could to learn, work on his craft, and get his feet wet there.

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CHARLIE WEBER

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eber found success in the modeling industry before his acting career took off. He appeared in the Christmas 1998 Abercrombie & Fitch catalog when Bruce Weber restored the publication. “I shot with him a lot, and he was always very kind and gracious and was very curious about you. He always wanted to talk about you. Some of the photographs are so beautiful. Such a talent,” he says of the fashion photography veteran. Modeling gave him time to develop as an actor; when he felt ready, he started going on auditions. Things started happening quickly after moving to Los Angeles. Weber cumulated attention playing Ben Wilkinson on Buffy the Vampire Slayer (the show had seeped into pop culture and become quite the phenomenon). He experienced anxiety and fear in the beginning but those two things ultimately became fuel for him. “I oddly enjoy those feelings, and it was intense to jump on doing the fifth season of this massive hit cult American institution of a show. I think I had been in L.A. for about six months when I got Buffy – and it was great,” Weber recalls. In 2014, Weber landed a recurring role as Frank Delfino in Shonda Rhimes’ ABC legal drama How to Get Away with Murder. Getting the

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opportunity to work with the one and only Viola Davis is, he says, still “such a crazy thing” for him to grasp. It was a bucket-list moment for him. “We've been doing this for so long, and it's such a huge part of my life. It's almost just my day-today life now, and don't get me wrong, it means as much to me today as it did back then,” he adds. “I'm not content with where I'm at. It's not about fame or money. I just want to keep doing good work, keep pushing myself, and continue to see myself grow as an actor,” says Weber who believes that one must keep a level head and be able to step away and objectively look at what is going on around them because that will help them find success and lead them on the right path in this industry. “I think what I've experienced, as far as being a part of this business, is finding a way to stay in it. Being proactive and just staying focused [are] important. It takes time,” he asserts. “I mean, the right thing doesn't just come along. Sometimes, it does. It's a crazy industry. It's a crazy world. The one thing you have unique is you.”

Photographer: Sandra Selva Stylist: Andrew Philip Nguyen Men’s Grooming: Phoebe Dawson Videographer: Mason Kim Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Smashbox Venice (@smashboxvenice www.smashbox.com/book-appointment) & =V= Venice Ale House (@venicealehouse - venicealehouse.com)


Turtleneck, MR TURK. Jeans, SLATE DENIM. Shoes, SANDERS. Socks, SOCK IT UP.


Summer Love


Blue dress, COBALT & TAWNY. Pants, VINTAGE. Her tasseled necklace, AMBER THAYER. His bracelets, AMBER THAYER. All other jewelry, TALENT’S OWN.


Floral shirt, MODERN LIBERATION. Pants, VINTAGE. Bracelets, AMBER THAYER.


Dress, RAGA. Headband, AMBER THAYER. Pants, GTHAD.


Outfit, VINTAGE.


Floral shirt, MODERN LIBERATION. All other items, TALENT’S OWN OR VINTAGE.


Pants, VINTAGE. Necklace, NEON ZINN.


Palm shirt, MODERN LIBERATION.


Necklaces, TALENT’S OWN.


Jacket, RAGA.


Romper, RAGA. Necklace, AMBER THAYER. Rings, AMBER THAYER. All other jewelry, TALENT’S OWN. Boots, PSKAUFMAN.


Neckerchief, NOVA GOODS. Shirt, TALENT’S OWN. Long johns, TOTALLY BLOWN. Boots, PSKAUFMAN. Bracelets, AMBER THAYER.


Blazer, JOLLESON. Necklace, AMBER THAYER. Bracelets, AMBER THAYER. Belt, STYLIST’S OWN. Tux-striped jeans, STYLIST’S OWN.


Blazer, JOLLESON. Floral headpiece, JOLLESON. His necklace, AMBER THAYER. Bracelets, AMBER THAYER. Belt, STYLIST’S OWN. Tux-striped jeans, STYLIST’S OWN. Sheer top, I'M BTFL. Her pants, I'M BTFL. Her necklace, AMBER THAYER. Pyramid ring, VINTAGE.


Photographer: Paul Collins Models: Justice Joslin, Jef Joslin, Emily Brimlow, Isaac Constantinides (for Gods and Monsters Management), Nathan Brimlow (for Gods and Monsters Management), Dennis Dahlin (for Gods and Monsters Management), Mac Rambo (for Gods and Monsters Management), Shelby Howell & Lukas Neufeld Art Director: Al David Stylist: Marc Littlejohn (@marcalittlejohn - for Ken Barboza Associates Inc.) Stylist Assistant: Damore’ea Stringfellow Hair: DaRico Jackson Makeup: Kim Bragalone


Romper, RAGA. Necklace, AMBER THAYER. Rings, AMBER THAYER. All other jewelry,TALENT’S OWN. Boots, PSKAUFMAN.


EMILY BRIMLOW

Staying true

to her Mission Gavy Contreras

Emily Brimlow, whose fresh sound can be described as a mix of soul, R&B and pop, is looking to take over the world and spread her message of love and positivity. Growing up with a musical family, she “listened to a lot of Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles and Donny Hathaway,” making music an element that has always been a part of her life. She credits her father (who taught her how to play the guitar and is a songwriter himself) as being a huge influence of her decision to be a musician. “I was so young when live music came into my life. My whole family would jam together. My dad was always the leader of the music group for my family,” she recalls.

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EMILY BRIMLOW

A

s she notes that she has written songs “about injustices and things that are going on in the world” – including the fur trade and human trafficking – one of the

23-year-old’s latest singles “Spiritual War” shares a bold message of humans coming together: “We, as humans, are not meant to fight each other. It’s really a spiritual battle between angels and demons. I think we’re fighting a bigger battle that we can’t see,” says Brimlow. With her intense lyrics and battle-filled music video, she is trying to portray the idea that “we should love each other because we have way bigger fish to fry.” She feels it is important to use this art form as a way to spread messages that you are passionate about. The young singer is also a firm believer in humility and is sold on the idea of making beautiful music while she refuses to sell out and sell herself short as a musician. “It saddens me to see people give their life away to being famous,” she describes. “We, as people, have so much potential, and we shouldn’t compromise – especially with art.” She is constantly thinking of ideas for new music and wants to create songs that are “thought-provoking.” “Normally, I jam out a song, and I start to just hum something or sing anything. Sometimes, the greatest things I’ve found I’ve done with my songs have come out of moments where I’m just joking around. Even

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when it’s freestyling, it’s always got the [thoughtprovoking] undertones,” she adds. While Brimlow is still relatively new to the music scene, she has toured the Australian outback, bringing joy to the small indigenous towns. “I was sitting on top of my roof, I would always go to my roof [when I was] in high school to try to get away from my mom,” she laughs, then continues. “There was this moment that I don’t even know how to explain – that I just knew I had to go to Australia.” She joined the non-profit organization Youth With A Mission (YWAM) and was a part of their Music Art and Dance Discipleship Training School (MAD DTS) in Brisbane where she led a 10-piece band on the road (“One of our goals was to bring entertainment to people who never get live music from the outside”). It was Brimlow’s first taste of touring and performing for different crowds every night, proving to be a life-changing experience. Originally from British Columbia, the Canadian native currently resides in a surf town in California, and is focusing her life on creating art. “In the last year, the reality of [music] being a career and the longevity of it hit me but I just thought, ‘No, I’m going to go after this forever,’” affirms Brimlow. Photographer: Paul Collins Art Director: Al David Stylist: Marc Littlejohn (@marcalittlejohn - for Ken Barboza Associates Inc.) Hair: DaRico Jackson Makeup: Kim Bragalone Editor: Eiko Watanabe


RICKY WHITTLE

It's Where He's Going to Be Monica Dias

“Fans re-quote me now and again,” Ricky Whittle says. “I know where I’m going to be. It’s not where I want to be, it’s where I’m going to be, and this is just a step until I get there. I have no doubt that I’ll ever get there.” This sense of certainty has long been an integral part of the charismatic British actor’s personality. “It’s this kind of strange confidence that I’ve always had in life,” the 37-year-old American Gods star matter-of-factly says, expressing his absolute confidence in himself.

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Sweater, RAG & BONE. Jeans, FRAME. Shoes, PRADA. Watch, TALENT’S OWN. Bracelets, TALENT’S OWN.


RICKY WHITTLE

b orn into an English military family, Whittle spent most of his childhood moving from place to place as his father, who was in the Royal Air Force, was assigned to a new outpost every three years. However, Whittle was not bothered by the constant change in scenery – but instead he flourished. “It made me really outgoing, and I found it very easy, and I still do to this day, to assimilate to different cultures, to different people,” he shares. “I can relate to everyone because I spent my life around so many nationalities and faiths and beliefs. It made me very open to everything, which I feel very blessed for.”

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Button shirt, HUGO BOSS. Jacket, THEORY. Jeans, AG JEANS. Shoes, PRADA. Watch, TALENT’S OWN. Bracelets, TALENT’S OWN.


RICKY WHITTLE

A

n athletic child, Whittle grew up dreaming of being a professional soccer player, but his propensity for injury let him choose to study criminology and law at Southampton Solent University. In order to pay for his books, he became a model for Reebok, and eventually he stumbled into his first acting gig in the British television series, Dream Team, without any acting training or experience, or any interest in pursuing acting as a career. “As a kid, you do school plays and you take drama in school in the U.K., and I was good at it, but it was not something I’d do as a career. I wanted to be a soccer player, and then my attention turned to law. [Acting] was nothing I even thought about at all, and then once I got into it, I couldn’t see myself doing anything different,” he recalls. In the U.K., Whittle gained public fame as a soap actor, particularly for his years-long tenure on Hollyoaks, where he played a police officer, but he soon realized that there was little space to grow professionally in the British entertainment industry. “In the U.K., there’s only so far you can go,” he elaborates. “When it comes to actual craft and developing your skills and wanting to succeed in film, Los Angeles is the hub. I knew that if I ever wanted to make it in film, I had to be in Los Angeles, I had to be in the heart of it so that’s why I took that leap. I think that’s where my childhood came in again, where I was okay leaving my comfort zone.”

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Now, on the other side of the pond, Whittle is once again turning heads and gathering praise for his works: The CW’s post-apocalyptic sci-fi show The 100 (he portrayed the role of Lincoln), and needless to say, the chillingly beautiful STARZ series American Gods where he’s taken the lead as Shadow Moon. (Whittle is quick to credit and thank both his colleagues and his mentors, including actor Terence Maynard, who he credits as the man who kick-started his career.) “At the end of the day, it’s more of a feeling, it’s where I’m content, and I’m almost there. I want to show my versatility. I want to be in movies. I want to shoot fantastic films with great people. As an actor, you want to work on great projects with great people,” he affirms, adding that he is looking to do “some action, some romantic comedies. All of my characters are very stoic and strong and serious, always so serious, and I’m really a goofball. It’s about branching out and finding the right project – it’s about being comfortable in life.

Photographer & Videographer: Sandra Selva Photographer Assistant: Mariano Roson Fashion Editor: Lassalle (@stylebylassalle & @stevenlassalle_ www.stevenlassalle.com) Fashion Editor Assistants: Star Campbell (@starcampbellstylist) & Marcus Butler (@marcusbstyle) & Gala Lee (@galaleestyle) Men’s Grooming: Michelle Harvey (for Opus Beauty - using Oribe & Hourglass Cosmetics) Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Smashbox Venice (@smashboxvenice www.smashbox.com/book-appointment)


Jacket, JOHN VARVATOS. Sweater, ATM ANTHONY THOMAS MELILLO. Jeans, HUGO. Shoes, PRADA. Watch, TALENT’S OWN. Bracelets, TALENT’S OWN.


Dress, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN. Leggings, WOLFORD. Shoes, MELISSA.


GABRIELLE APLIN

Precious

Scars Mike Varius

“I’ve spent the last two years getting comfortable with myself,” shares Gabrielle Aplin as the past few years have been monumental ones for the 26-year-old singer-songwriter, who rose to prominence after videos of her singing covers on YouTube gained a large following and her cover of “The Power of Love” was selected to soundtrack the John Lewis 2012 Christmas advertisement. While working on her new album (due out later this year), she acknowledges that her focus has evolved since her attention to mental health in 2017 and 2018 has fostered growth in the singer that has transcended directly into her music. “l found out that I have ADHD so I’ve been writing a lot about my brain. It’s definitely an exploration of my mind and how it’s wired and how it works and the chemicals that make me who I am,” she opens up. “I’ve spent the last two years really working on trying to be more positive – not for any reason that I have to pretend to be happy. I feel very empowered getting to know my brain and how I react when different things happen to me.” For instance, “My Mistake,” released last November, garnered positive critical reception for its raw and powerful lyrics (which is “the most personal, honest song ever written,” as she puts it), and her recent “Nothing Really Matters” celebrates positivity and self-love.

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Dress, CHRISTOPHER KANE. Slip top, FIORUCCI. Shoes, MELISSA.


GABRIELLE APLIN

I

n addition, despite her constant anxieties while touring, Aplin’s love for travel has allowed her to tap into a reservoir of unbounded inspiration. “When I travel, I’m really anxious. I love playing shows but I hate everything else,” she elaborates. “I hate not sleeping in my bed every night but I also love experiencing a new culture, especially. When I was in Japan, I was at Kyoto’s temples, and went down to Kamakura, but the best thing that made me forget about feeling anxious all the time was playing the shows.” Needless to say, Aplin’s avid travel all over the globe continues to inspire her artistic expression. “I was writing one day, and wrote a song about the Japanese art of Kintsugi. Kintsugi is the art of precious scars, and that’s something I soaked up during my trip,” she recalls. “When I came back from Brazil, I was really inspired but I didn’t try and sit down and write a carnival song but I wrote a song that sounded like a carnival song, so I think I was definitely influenced without realizing.”

Moreover, she has experimented with many genres and unique sounds, taking an increased role in her own music production. “It’s sounds and production that I love to experiment with. I just can’t do one production or genre. I love to dress them up in different ways like going through a phase of wanting to wear black in the winter then covering yourself up in sequins in the summer, but it’s still the same thing you’re covering,” says Aplin who hopes to combine her love of music and art. “One of my dreams is to be a music supervisor on a film or series. I need something else to get stuck into.”

Photographer: Bella Kotak Stylist: Keeley Dawson Stylist Assistant: Conaill O'Dwyer Men’s Grooming: John Christopher Videographer: Indy Sagoo Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to K+K Hotel George Kensington (@kkhotelgeorge - www.kkhotels.com/en/london/hotel- george) & KiCK Global (@kick.global - kick-global.com)

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G O D S A N D M O N S T E R S . C O M

P E R S O N A L

M A N A G E M E N T

A G E N C Y


SAM NELSON HARRIS

Pushing the

Limits: Bold with a Little Bit of Texture Leonye McCalla

If you haven’t yet, it’s about time to say hello to X Ambassadors, whose new album ORION (including their sonically-charged single “BOOM”) will be out on June 14th, as they push the limits of sound with their innovative take on modern music, as well as the limits of the human condition. Their origin is just as unique as its sound, an eclectic mix of rock, pop, neo-soul, and other genres. The band is the brainchild of Sam Nelson Harris with help from his brother Casey – two siblings from Ithaca, New York. “I decided to start a band and started playing music with some friends, and Casey was always playing piano. So, naturally one day we decided that we needed a keyboard player, and he started playing with us and that’s really what brought us together again,” recalls Harris, whose soulful vocals float perfectly over the piercing piano chords. Just after 8 a.m. on a chilly morning in early April, he sits in a NYC hotel room – slightly exhausted but ready for a long day ahead.

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T-shirt, RAG & BONE (TALENT’S OWN). Pants, SANDRO PARIS (TALENT’S OWN). Sneakers, NIKE (TALENT’S OWN). Socks, CALVIN KLEIN (TALENT’S OWN). Jewelry, TALENT’S OWN.


SAM NELSON HARRIS

W

hen Harris moved to New York City to attend college, Casey, who was born blind, also moved there with him to attend a school for blind piano tuners. The boys’ love of music took them to Brooklyn; the transition was tough at first because the group’s sound was different from the music local bands were making at the time. “We were a rock band, and we wanted to make arena rock music. We didn’t really fit into any sort of a scene here (Brooklyn) and had to take shows wherever we could. We had to play shows for free,” says Harris. As their popularity grew, however, the band was able to travel outside of New York and flex their musical chops in different cities. “We ended up getting a song on the radio down in Virginia in this town called Norfolk. We would go there and play a sold-out show for 1,400 people, and come back to New York and play for 150 people. You cut your teeth here, and then you can kind of do anything,” he elaborates. The band is incorporating braille and highcontrast images into their visuals, an ode to Casey and others that suffer from visual impairment.

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“We will be actually incorporating on the clothes, on the vinyl, will all have actual braille on it, which is really cool. For us, it’s really practical. Casey can see high-contrast yellow on black. So, everything that we’re doing is really bold with a little bit of texture to it,” he proudly says of the accomplishment. As self-proclaimed advocates of individuality, the band strives to connect with their audience and encourage them to celebrate everything that makes them unique. “I think that we should treasure individuality as much as possible. I think that our music tends to fall in a category that a lot of people can come to it and enjoy. But I think that specificity is really good. If you find yourself in a position where you feel isolated in some way, you should be celebrating your style, your life, and who you are. F**k trying to make it accessible for everybody. Make something that is yours,” Harris affirms. Photographer: Jaime Pavon Photographer Assistant: Lucho Urrutia Fashion Editor: Lassalle (@stylebylassalle & @stevenlassalle_ www.stevenlassalle.com) Fashion Editor Assistants: Stephanie Lentz (@j.hilburn.stephanie) & Beatrice Figueroa (@beatricefigueroa) Men’s Grooming: Amanda Wilson (for Opus Beauty - using Kate Somerville Skincare) Videographer: Jesse Ovalles Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to YOTEL New York (@yotel - www.yotel.com/en/ hotels/yotel-new-york) & Irving Farm New York (@irvingfarm irvingfarm.com)


Hat, TALENT’S OWN. T-shirt, THEORY. Pants, SANDRO PARIS (TALENT’S OWN). Sneakers, NIKE (TALENT’S OWN). Socks, CALVIN KLEIN (TALENT’S OWN). Jacket, CLUB MONACO. Jewelry, TALENT’S OWN.

T-shirt, THEORY. Pants, SANDRO PARIS (TALENT'S OWN). Sneakers, NIKE (TALENT'S OWN). Socks, CALVIN KLEIN (TALENT'S OWN). Coat, MICHELI (TALENT'S OWN). Jewelry, TALENT’S OWN.

Sweater, VINCE. Pants, SANDRO PARIS (TALENT’S OWN). Socks, CALVIN KLEIN (TALENT’S OWN). Boots, COLE HAAN. Jewelry, TALENT’S OWN


Dress, KENZO. Earrings, JENNY BIRD. Shoes, TALENT’S OWN.


BIANCA ANDREESCU

Born A Star is

Alain Clerine

At only 18 years old, teenage prodigy Bianca Andreescu has had an eventful start to her 2019 as she made history, becoming the first Canadian to win a Premier Mandatory singles title. She earned victories over former Grand Slam winners, Angelique Kerber, Venus Williams, and Caroline Wozniacki, and has jumped over 100 spots in the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) rankings.

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BIANCA ANDREESCU

I

nspired by former world No. 1 Kim Clijsters, Andreescu first picked up a racket at age 7 during one of her parents’ business retreats to their home country of Romania. “I remember it was beside my house by some rusty clay courts, and I was hitting with my dad. I remember I was really enjoying it,” she

recalls. Andreescu’s family alternated between Romania and Canada for two years, spending winters in the latter, which helped her mature at a young age (“Traveling around the world really gives you a good sense of knowledge [and] open-mindedness”). However, since she realized she would not have had the same opportunities to pursue her goals in Romania, at the age of 10, she made the permanent move to her birth nation and soon joined Tennis Canada's U14 National Training Centre in Toronto. After a successful junior tournament in France (she won the prestigious 14-under title at Les Petit As), she opened the door to possibly turning professional. Despite being only 14 at the time, she had gotten a taste of the touring circuit and liked the way she handled herself. “At that tournament, at such a young age, you would be signing autographs and giving interviews, and it was a really good experience,” says Andreescu, who won her first professional title in 2016 at the Gatineau 25K tournament.

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Now, as one of the 25 highest-ranked players in the world, Andreescu’s game has matured, and so has her preparation. “When I’m on [the] court, I just want to focus on what’s happening in the present moment,” she says. “I think that’s the hardest part, but I’ve been working a lot on that mental strength.” Naturally, her success has come with increased media attention, an experience she describes as “overwhelming,” while she has gotten slightly more comfortable with the extra recognition. “I try not to really focus on all of that because I know fame can change people,” she affirms. “I try not to think about it.” She’d rather think about her goals as Andreescu hopes to one day be the number-one-ranked player in the world, while being an inspiration for the younger generation set to come after her: “It gives me another purpose to be good in this sport. I’ve been getting a lot of messages from kids that picked up a racket because they saw me win Indian Wells, and that’s just amazing.” Photographer: Jeff Hui Stylist: Nelly Akbari Hair & Makeup: Aniko Tar Videographer: Jason Fung Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Gare de l'Est Brasserie (@gdlbrasserie www.gdlbrasserie.com)


Bodysuit, CAITLIN POWER. Trouser, JASON WU. Earrings, BIKO. Ring, JENNY BIRD. Shoes, TALENT’S OWN.

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Shirt, REESE COOPER®.
 Coat, SAINTS OF SINS. Pants, H&M.
Rings, PYRRHA. Bracelet, PYRRHA. Socks, THE BLACK TUX. Shoes, NEW REPUBLIC BY MARK MCNAIRY.


CHRISTIAN NAVARRO

One Be the

Alain Clerine

“I have had the privilege of meeting fans all over the world who have told me, ‘This show changed my life,’ ‘This show made me talk to my parents

about what’s happening to me,’ ‘This show made the kids in my class stop bullying me,’” Christian Navarro, 27, shares as teen drama 13 Reasons Why touches on topics such as youth suicide, depression, and substance abuse. “So many young actors don’t really know who they are – that is why they get into these mental health issues. The pressures of Hollywood are a lot, but if you grew up in the South Bronx and you know what it’s like to struggle, then there’s nothing that can break me in this business.”

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Three-piece suit, THE BLACK TUX. Shirt, THE BLACK TUX. Socks, THE BLACK TUX. Ascot, MEN'S WEARHOUSE. Pocket square, MEN'S WEARHOUSE. Shoes, LOUIS VUITTON. Rings, PYRRHA.


CHRISTIAN NAVARRO

raised by two police-officer parents, Navarro spent most of his childhood in catholic school, and partook in martial arts starting at around two years old. Saturdays were spent watching movies with his uncle, and one particular presentation caught Navarro’s attention; Serpico, the 1973 cop thriller starring Al Pacino, changed his life. “Whatever that man was doing on the screen wasn’t acting. It was transcendent,” he recalls, adding that Pacino’s performance along with the relatable plot of an NYPD officer left him “touched” in a different way from other films he had seen – he was so inspired that he performed in school plays and started asking his dad to take him to auditions. “Whatever he (Al Pacino) was doing on screen, I thought I could do that. I don’t know why I believed I could do that, but I thought I could,” he describes. (Now, he has made it his mission to do just that to the younger generation: “Being able to see someone on screen that looks like them and go, ‘Oh, if he did it, I can do it’ – [I want to] give these young blacks and Latinos another way out. Often, their idea of success is to become a rapper or basketball player. There are many options, they just don’t see them,” he adds.)

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Shirt, NECESSITY SENSE. Denim, SAINTS OF SINS. Rings, PYRRHA. Bracelet, PYRRHA. Chain necklace, PYRRHA. Socks, THE BLACK TUX. Shoes, STEVE MADDEN.


CHRISTIAN NAVARRO

H

is parents were supportive, yet apprehensive about the possibility of their son pursuing a career that may not be financially sustaining. Eventually, though, Navarro left his catholic high school and enrolled in a performing-arts school in Manhattan (“It was a snowball effect”). He then moved to England in his junior year and worked at Shakespeare’s Globe, an Elizabethan playhouse, where he was classically trained. It was around this time that he booked his first job, a one-episode guest spot on Law & Order: Criminal Intent. “It went a long way into making my dad a little more comfortable that I could do this for a living,” says Navarro, who decided to hone his craft further in college – instead of trying to catch “lightning in a bottle” – as he attended Rutgers University. “Talent is a given in this field, everybody’s talented, but what matters is how you cultivate that talent,” he explains of his decision to continue his theather education.

creative and personal interaction with Scorsese, Navarro felt reassured that he was going in the right direction, but the drama’s unexpected cancellation after just one season left him in state of uncertainty (“This thing that I had worked for was taken away from me, and I entered a bit of a depression”). Despite a growing portfolio, he kept being told “no,” and he struggled with self-doubt (“That’s a lot of what this business is”). However, while helping an ex-girlfriend prepare to audition for the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, he took an interest in the character of Tony Padilla (who’s a high school student while Navarro was 24 at the time). He “begged” for an opportunity to audition for the role but was consistently denied. When he was finally granted an audition 3 or 4 months later, show-runner Brian Yorkey told him that as soon as he started reading, he immediately knew Navarro would be the one. Photographer & Videographer: Paul Brickman Photographer Assistant: Tom Lucein Stylist: Christina Pacelli (for TheOnly.Agency) Stylist Assistant: Kelsey Triesch Men’s Grooming: Michelle Harvey (for Opus Beauty – using R+Co & Marc Jacobs Beauty) Editors: Mike Varius & Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Shakey’s Pizza Parlor (@shakeysusa www.shakeys.com)

Afterward, he landed a recurring role on Vinyl – created by Martin Scorsese, Mick Jagger, Rich Cohen, and Terence Winter. Through his

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Dress, LIE SANGBONG. Top, CHELSEA AND WALKER. Collar, MARIELLA PILATO JEWELRY. Sneakers, FILA.


mus eum Photographed by

Ron Contarsy (for Highmark Studios)


Dress, LIE SANGBONG. Collar and cuff, TALIS ELEMENTS. Choker, CARLA DAWN BEHRLE NYC. Clutch, EMM KUO. Shoes, CHINESE LAUNDRY.


Dress, EZIE. Skirt, SEVENTY. Belt, MUGLER. Shoes, CALVIN LUO.


Jacket, BURBERRY. Bustier, EZIE. Dress, CHIARA BONI - LA PETITE ROBE. Sneakers, DR. MARTENS.


Dress, CHIARA BONI - LA PETITE ROBE. Corset belt, ALEXANDRA FUKS. Peplum belt, LIE SANGBONG. Hair comb, RICK OWENS.


Dress, YONA NEW YORK. Jacket, LITKOVSKAYA. Hat, WAL HUNG. Boots, UNICARE.


Jacket, HAN. Shirt, HILDUR YEOMAN. Pants, CHELSEA AND WALKER. Scarf, DIOR. Sneakers, DR. MARTENS. Photographer: Ron Contarsy (for Highmark Studios) Model: Montana Cox (for IMG Models Worldwide) Stylist: Jonzu Jones Hair: Cindy Adams (for Art & Style NYC) Makeup: Gabriel Cruz


Nicolò Caimi

GIORGIO ARMANI Acquaman Gavy Contreras


NICOLÒ CAIMI

“I met so many great people. I was young, and I met so many friends from all of these different countries, it was so fun,” recalls Italian wakeboarding champion Nicolò Caimi. From its debut in the 1980s, wakeboarding has been a beloved sport worldwide. The sport, which mixes water skiing, surfing and snowboarding, takes a lot of determination and passion to become successful. One of of these successful athletes is the 23-yearold Caimi who describes himself as “a very competitive person with everything in his life, but especially in wakeboarding.”

C

aimi’s first interaction with the water was when he was just 2 years old. Soon after his dip in the blue, the wondrous sport started to grab his attention. “I was only 6 years old when I started wakeboarding,” he says. “Since then, I’ve only broken my knee twice!” He has internationally competed with the best and made some great friends along the way – two of Caimi’s favorite things to do. Although it’s mostly fun and games for Caimi, he would often get sick before competitions due to the nerves being sensitive. “In the beginning, when I first started doing competitions, I would be on the dock and feel so bad every time. I was so very nervous. One time I almost threw up before the finals,” he describes. Thankfully, though, Caimi has learned to live with the pressure and let his nerves fade away when he competes.

Moreover, Caimi is also transitioning into the modeling industry. He had the opportunity to work with Giorgio Armani and flew out to Los Angeles to film for their THE SCENT OF LIFE series. “It was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. I got to travel for 10 days. I had never been to California, and it’s now one of my favorite places for sure,” he adds. His transition to a career in modeling echoes the same sentiment of his reasons to wakeboard. “I think it’s a great opportunity for adventure and always getting to know other people,” he says. “I like to discover the world.” The dazzling athlete hails from Cantù, a small town in northern Italy where he’s lived all of his life. While he has a dream to leave his life in Italy, he doesn’t really worry too much about his future. “I just want to see what’s going on. I like to live in the moment and see what’s happening in my life right now,” Caimi says. “I always try to have fun doing my work. I love doing my photos – but we’ll see.” Photographer, Stylist & Men’s Grooming: Al David

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Underwear, ARMANI. Sweater, HUGO BOSS.


Mock turtleneck sweater, H&M.


Turtleneck sweater, CLUB MONACO.


Black swim trunk, DEANJEANUS. Jewelry, TALENT’S OWN.


Turtleneck shirt, CALVIN KLEIN. Shorts, ROBERT GRAHAM. Jewelry, TALENT’S OWN.


“I just want to see what’s going on. I like to live in the moment and see what’s happening in my life right now.”


Suit, ARMANI. Shirt, KENNETH COLE. Tie, CALVIN KLEIN.


KIRA KOSARIN

We used to Listen to

Vinyl Margaret Mallison

“I was really scared to pursue putting out music for a long time because it means so much to me. It’s a deeply personal and emotional thing that I’m really invested in,” says Kira Kosarin who has raced forward in pursuit of her dreams, skillfully avoiding the sharp turns and loops life would throw at her. A classically trained ballerina who’s also dabbled in gymnastics, as well as a successful actress and musician, the 21-year-old “Love Me Like You Hate Me” singer has followed her passion for R&B and already devoted to making her mark. The aforementioned tune and “Vinyl” successfully combine her soulful, smoky voice with modern pop beats and R&B harmonies. “Love Me Like You Hate Me,” especially, delves into the power in self-expression and confidence within a relationship while “Vinyl” recalls an old love in an unapologetic exploration of nostalgic memories. “It’s a fully R&B project that I’ve been working on for the last year and a half,” shares Kosarin, who recently released her debut album Off Brand (containing her latest tunes like “47 Hours” and “Take This Outside” too) and is a fast-rising fresh face on the music scene.

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KIRA KOSARIN

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rowing up, Kosarin was exposed to many different types of music, ranging from gospel music to Stevie Wonder (“A lot of my influences right now have come from tropical music or acoustic R&B. I write what I love”). Coming from a family of performers, writers, and musicians, her diverse taste in music is genetic as she says, “I grew up in a family where my dad looked at me and said, ‘In this household, we speak two languages - we speak English and music.’” While most other kids were just starting to explore a diary, she was already creating and playing songs. As a child, she also started dancing, gymnastics, and acting. Although, up until last year, she was mainly known as the lead star on Nickelodeon’s The Thundermans, she’s now pursuing her favorite of all her diverse interests: music. “When the contract ran out, I was like, ‘Alright, time to pursue the thing I love most in the world,’” she recalls. Needless to say, Kosarin’s dedication to music and acting is well documented. Before the show got extended, she was accepted to both Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles, eventually turning them down to

continue focusing on both acting and music. “I make the art that I want to make, that I’m confident about, that I stand behind and that I love,” she elaborates. “I put it out into the world with as much honesty and authenticity as I can [present].” Moreover, she is a vocal advocate in the fight against bullying: a cause that’s so prevalent due to social media. “I try to remind people that everyone on the Internet is a real person with real feelings. We need more people to get loud about the fact that being a nice person is cool,” shares Kosarin whose dedication to ending bullying is one that won’t be easily extinguished – to the same degree that her passion for music fuels her creativity and talent as she’s already on her way to being a multi-talented force.

Photographer: Catherine Asanov (@catherineasanov) Stylist: Katelynn Tilley Hair: Emma Willis (@emmawillismakeup) Makeup: Dillon Peña (for TheOnly.Agency - using Laura Mercier) Videographer: Trip Digital Radio (@tripdigitalradio) Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Primo’s Donuts (@primosdonutsla www.primosdonuts.com)

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Angelo Musco Studio AngeloMusco.com


AISHA DEE

Part of this Moment in

History Dylan Worcel

Aisha Dee knew at a young age she wanted to become an actress. She would constantly tell people that one day she would move to New York. However, people would laugh at her because it seemed so far-fetched – she was nowhere near the bright lights of New York City or Hollywood but was residing in the small town of Gold Coast, Australia.

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“I don't think that I'm anything special or anything like that. I just think that by existing and by making art, that's kind of my form of protest.”

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s a child, Dee and her mom would venture to the local library and rent blaxploitation movies. She adored actress Pam Grier and also found herself watching Sweet Charity starring Shirley MacLaine frequently. “Sammy Davis Jr. has this incredible song in it called ‘Rhythm of Life,’ and I would just watch that scene over and over again because it was just so whimsical,” Dee recalls. She even idolized the kids on Sesame Street – it was the first time she saw kids who looked like her and black business owners on television. “I remember asking my mom, ‘Can you tell me how to get to Sesame Street? How do I get on the show?’ She was like, ‘Well, those kids are actors.’ I then became convinced – that was what I was going to do,” the 25-year-old actress explains. She moved to California when she was 16 years old and began working as an actress. In 2008, Dee landed a role in the series The Saddle Club. She also played roles on Dead Gorgeous, I Hate My Teenage Daughter, Chasing Life and Sweet/ Vicious. Those opened the doors to her latest endeavor on Freeform’s The Bold Type portraying social media director Kat Edison, for who Dee drew inspiration from the 1973 blaxploitation action comedy Cleopatra Jones starring Tamara Dobson: “I figured she was the kind of dog that moved around in the wild like she was ready to fight. She was like, ‘No, I'm not going to back down,’ which is what I'm fighting for, and no one's going to tell me any different,” Dee says. “I think social media really changed the landscape a lot. People are a little vainer, and we all kind of have this idea of our brand. I didn't grow up that way. I didn't have this kind of curated image of who I

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am out in the world, and now everyone does,” she adds, affirming that there are both positives and negatives when it comes to social media usage, but, according to her, it is beautiful to see people gain a sense of self and feel less alone in the world because of it. The next role Dee would love to conquer would be one behind the camera – to tell her own stories. “We're seeing these really diverse actors come in, and I think that's so wonderful, but I think we still need more diversity when it comes to the people behind the camera,” she shares. “There's finally a space for that. I might as well occupy that space one day.” As she genuinely values people of all genders, backgrounds, and ethnicities, she wants “to be someone who's a champion for other people because so many people have helped me in my career. It just feels like now is the time to start paying it forward.” “It's empowering to learn about people who came before you who were kind of the pioneers like Josephine Baker. I hope that I'm part of this moment in history and an example for young girls,” says Dee who also finds a sense of selflove and resilience by going back through black history. “I don't think that I'm anything special or anything like that. I just think that by existing and by making art, that's kind of my form of protest.”

Photographer: Seung Lee (www.kokumastudio.com) Photographer Manager: Phil Kim Stylist: Andrew Philip Nguyen Hair: Marcia Hamilton Makeup: Dana Delaney Videographer: Mason Kim Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Shakey’s Pizza Parlor (@shakeysusa www.shakeys.com)


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TY DOLLA $IGN

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Feature Mike Varius

“Take you where I'm from, take you to the slums/This ain't happen overnight, no, these diamonds real bright,” raps Ty Dolla $ign on Post Malone’s “Psycho.” His verse on the critically successful tune earned him his first Number One record on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and propelled him to a new echelon of stardom. His boastful verse on the hit record speaks to more than his celebrity status – it represents his mounting position in the music industry, and all of the years of hard work that went into getting there, while alluding to the work that is yet to come.

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orn Tyrone William Griffin Jr., named after his father (who is a member of funk collective Lakeside), Griffin’s exposure to music arose at a young age. He quickly began experimenting and learning to play several instruments throughout his childhood. “[My dad] always had instruments around the house, and of course, he’s inspired me,” Griffin recalls. “The first instruments I played were the drums, but my mom wasn’t f**king with it because it was too loud. So, pops bought me an electric drum set. From there, I went on to learn how to make beats, and once I figured out I couldn’t get the beats and sounds I wanted, I picked up the bass guitar, and it became my main instrument.”

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riffin’s unique sound, blending the soulful elements of R&B with the provocative and raw nature of rap music took some time to perfect and cultivate, especially as he faced challenges while coming into early adulthood – right at home. His mother kicked both his brother and him out of the house, and essentially voiced that it was time to find a real job and leave the fantasy of musical acclaim behind, which, however, forced Griffin to tap into a new source of motivation. “I know some people that would probably break, but for me, it made me go hard. When you have nothing, it makes you step up to the plate,” adds Griffin. “It’s all about consistency. If you sit there and do nothing, then that’s what you’ll get. But if you work hard every day, then you’ll get to where you want to go. It’s simple math.” His “simple math” has certainly been adding up: Griffin has been credited as a feature artist and/ or vocalist on over 30 records in 2018 alone, including Drake’s Scorpion, Beyoncé and JAY-Z’s EVERYTHING IS LOVE, Mariah Carey’s Caution, and Kanye West’s ye – to name a few. “Someone either calls or texts me, and they send the song with an open hook or with an open verse, and I send it right back,” Griffin say of his collaborative

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process. “It’s just my favorite thing to do, so I love getting annoyed with working with other people.” “I’ve been focusing on music that’ll change the world. Now, I’m tapping into lyrics. I’m trying to give people something to attach to rather than getting on the mic and freestyling – so much substance,” Griffin elaborates when asked about his new album (at press time, it has yet to have a spring release date). “Mainly, it’s going to be about real life. And I think people will connect with what I have to say this time. It’s probably going to be the best project I drop so far.” While his transcendent ability amongst artists and genres marks Griffin as idiosyncratic and extremely coveted, these days, he’s focusing on adding more authnticity to his own music. “No smoking – none of that sh*t – I’m just trying to make music that really matters lyrically this time. Some life-changing music,” affirms Griffin.

Photographer: Catherine Asanov (@catherineasanov) Photographer Assistant: DeMauriea LeVias Stylist: Andrew Philip Nguyen Men’s Grooming: Sara Tintari (using Baxter of California & skyn ICELAND) & JC Tha Barber & Ty Mosby Videographer: Trip Digital Radio (@tripdigitalradio) Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to Will Gibbs, M.D. (@wgibbsmd www.willgibbsmd.com)


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KATIE STEVENS

The idea of

You Dylan Worcel

It has been ten years since Katie Stevens auditioned for American Idol, and It seems like yesterday for her: getting up in the middle of her math class during her junior year and heading to Boston with her mom. It was a culture shock going from singing at high school talent shows to being thrust into the Idol realm. She remembers feeling overwhelmed, but it was an unbelievable learning experience.

Stevens is of Portuguese descent on her mother’s side. Her uncles and cousins always resided within a mile radius. She was raised speaking both English and Portuguese. She says it’s something to go out into the world and realize that not everyone is bilingual. It has changed her perspective, and she feels grateful raised understanding a different culture. Her childhood was filled with so much love, and she feels fortunate to have such a special bond with her parents and brother. She also always had a home-cooked meal, thanks to her grandmother, who had a garden and even taught Stevens a few tricks on how to cook.

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tevens made the big move to Los Angeles from Middlebury, Connecticut, after wrapping up the summer tour of Idol in 2010. Now, at age 26, she apologizes to her mom profusely because she was so young when she moved to a big city. “I thought I was hot sh*t. I got off American Idol, and I was like, ‘I'm an adult. I could live in L.A.,’” she recalls. Regardless, her parents allowed her to spread her wings and follow her dreams. Music has always been such a huge part of her life, and she gets inspired by the artists who are lyrically vulnerable with their listeners (“The best way to kind of get the best songs is to continually be writing and exercising that muscle”). We will have to wait, however, to hear the music from her because her acting career is in full force nowadays, including her starring role in the upcoming horror/thriller film Haunt. “They're on the rise to being just the most incredible horror filmmakers. They’re also just the sweetest people. Their passion for the project and their collaborative essence were just really incredible to work with,” she says of Scott Beck and Bryan Woods who wrote and directed the movie. More importantly, Stevens has probably been best known as Jane Sloan on Freeform’s The Bold Type: the series that follows the lives of three best friends working at a magazine and supporting one another while navigating through the mess (just like the rest of us). “We don't really say, ‘Here’s the secret key to how to get over your ex, here’s a secret key to learning your sexuality or getting the perfect job,’” Stevens says, adding that the show’s fans often come up to her and say, “I know I’m not your demographic” – because a lot of women watch the show, but a lot of men do, too. “One of the greatest things that The Bold Type

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showcases is that men are also feminists. We are a generation raising feminists, men, and women,” she affirms. It’s particularly important for Stevens to tell Jane’s story because the man she fell in love with in real life went through a similar experience – Paul DiGiovanni lost his mother to breast cancer. “I know I've been so blessed to hear from fans who are going through the same thing, whether it would be that they lost a parent to breast cancer or they found out that they were positive with the BRCA gene,” she candidly shares. “I get to touch people and feel like that's why we tell these stories that will inspire and reach others.” On another note, Stevens and DiGiovanni currently split their time between L.A. and Nashville. Before they met, she would go out with friends and wonder if her future husband was in the same room as her. Little did she know, she was actually in the same room as DiGiovanni when she was 14 years old. He was the lead guitarist for a pop-rock band Boys Like Girls, and she went to their concert as a teenager. She finally met him when she was 21. Even after five years together, she feels very lucky in love. As a matter of fact, before she met DiGiovanni, her father gave her advice after she went through a bad breakup: “I know you're bummed but when you say no to the person who's wrong for you, you open yourself up to who's right for you. You've always dreamed about the idea of that person. That person is somewhere in the world right now dreaming about the idea of you.”

Photographer: Catherine Asanov (@catherineasanov) Fashion Editor: Lassalle (@stylebylassalle & @stevenlassalle_ www.stevenlassalle.com) Fashion Editor Assistant: Gala Lee (@galaleestyle) Hair: Scott King Makeup: Rob Scheppy Videographer: Trip Digital Radio (@tripdigitalradio) Editor: Eiko Watanabe


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GIANLUCA VACCHI

What Else Life Has in Store Mike Varius

“At my age, if I don't have a massage at least every day, it's a problem for the muscles,” Gianluca Vacchi, 51, tells me, speaking over the phone from Italy as he partakes in one of his post-workout massages in his Bologna home. “I exercise every day, depending on where I am. And when I am in Bologna, I train twice a day. I do yoga, a lot of cardio, pilates, then I play tennis. I go running, or I do a routine in my room. Once you are in good shape in the body, your mind is, as well. It’s like a chain reaction.” It's the last day of February but for Vacchi, this means a new month of working out, traveling, and dancing on yachts is on the horizon.

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acchi is best known for his large Instagram presence where he regularly shares glimpses into his highend and lavish lifestyle filled with private jets, finely-tailored suits, epic dance moves, and DJ sets at some of the world’s largest clubs. He first gained Instagram recognition in 2016 after a video of him and a model dancing poolside went viral. Since then, his following has soared (and is now nearing the 13 million mark). Before he could be seen vibrantly dancing on Instagram’s Explore page, however, the businesssavvy Gianluca Vacchi could be spotted regularly at boardroom meetings. Vacchi’s former “life” as an entrepreneur and businessman, as he calls it, started when he took command over his family’s company. “I started when I was about 25 years old because the family company needed some turnaround,” he says. “We had an emerging and very fast-growing company that was producing packaging machinery, and together we decided to sell the real estate business and invest in the packaging company.” A few years later, when he was 29, Vacchi began working in private equity. “I had companies in 12 different sectors, [including] travel industry, plastic, machinery, and plant industry,” he explains, adding that after many years of success in his field, he began to question what else life had in store for him and retired at age 45. “I understood that being a businessman was not moving my curiosity anymore, and I almost sold everything,” he shares. “My curiosity was getting flatter and flatter.”

After speaking with a friend and taking an interest in showcasing his life, Vacchi decided to start an Instagram profile (“If I show the way I live, the way I take care of myself, my way of joking, of being ironic, I can become a global entertainer”). While he still serves as a shareholder, Vacchi's interest now lies elsewhere – specifically in the DJ booth. “Imagine coming out from a business meeting with lawyers and bankers and going into a DJ booth to entertain thousands of young people. It's a dream and a privilege,” he says. That said, in 2017, Vacchi released his first single, “Viento.” “Now my life is totally dedicated to music, which was a passion I started when I was 6 years old, playing the piano,” he continues. “My grandma was a piano teacher so I always had a passion in music which could be seen in my famous dances.” Nowadays, Vacchi is exploring another interest: philanthropy. “Material aspects have never been important. Now, what is growing into me is trying to really help others. In many ways. From classical charity to social media,” he affirms, also referring to those dealing with the current political crisis in Venezuela. “I'm very concentrated on helping all my friends in Venezuela.” He plans to create his very own foundation that will focus on “human rights, and the other is aimed towards giving young people a chance to achieve their dreams. It is a big chapter in my life in the next years for sure.”

Photographer & Videographer: Ray Kay Fashion Editor: Lassalle (@stylebylassalle & @stevenlassalle_ www.stevenlassalle.com) Fashion Editor Assistant: Huberta Marie (@huberta.marie) & Marie Auguste (@marie_lyfestyle) Men’s Grooming: Hanic Arias Editor: Eiko Watanabe Special thanks to PDQ (@pdqfreshfood - www.eatpdq.com)

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Time Flies Spend It Wisely and Privately

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Profile for CIVIILIAN

CIVILIAN - 2019 SUMMER - Loren Gray Cover  

2019 Summer Issue Although each individual has their own unique character, personality, background and circumstance, a person, who gives ot...

CIVILIAN - 2019 SUMMER - Loren Gray Cover  

2019 Summer Issue Although each individual has their own unique character, personality, background and circumstance, a person, who gives ot...