Page 1

ISSUE 1 • SUMMER 2015

Utah GET OUT | GET GOING | JUST GO

WEEKEND WARRIORS

Highway 12’s slot canyons, hikes and food

20

BUCKET LIST

10 summer must-dos

38

MY FIRST TIME

White-knuckling on the White Rim Trail

10


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Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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INSIDE VAMOOSE

12 18

TRAILBLAZER The Mountain Goat Karl Metzer

COVER SHOT

AUSTEN DIAMOND Taken at Mill Creek Trail in Moab

BY BETH LOPEZ

WHY WE CLIMB The joys of a life dedicated to ascension BY DEREK NEWMAN

20 WEEKEND WARRIORS Roadtripping Highway 12 BY COLE LEHMAN

MADE IN UTAH Goal Zero is revolutionizing personal solar chargers

Denis Udink

BY JENNY WILLDEN

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Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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Issue 1 • Summer 2015

Utah

CONTRIBUTORS

GET OUT | GET GOING | JUST GO

STAFF PUBLISHER GENERAL MANAGER EDITORIAL EDITOR COPY EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS

PHOTOGRAPHERS

PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC ARTISTS

BUSINESS/OFFICE ACCOUNTING MANAGER ASSOCIATE BUSINESS MANAGER OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR TECHNICAL DIRECTOR MARKETING MARKETING MANAGER MARKETING COORDINATOR CIRCULATION CIRCULATION MANAGER SALES MAGAZINE ADVERTISING DIRECTOR NEWSPRINT ADVERTISING DIRECTOR DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES RETAIL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES VAMOOSE STORE ASSISTANT MANAGER

JOHN SALTAS ANDY SUTCLIFFE AUSTEN DIAMOND TIFFANY FRANDSEN NICK COMO, TONI ISOM, COLE LEHMAN, BETH LOPEZ, ERRIN JULKENEN-PEDERSEN, MELISSA MCGIBBON, DEREK NEWMAN, JENNY WILDEN SINUE AGUILERA, AUSTEN DIAMOND, ANDY EARL, JOHN HAYMORE, KRIS KUMAR, BRAD LOVEJOY, PETE MANNION, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, VICTORIA SLAGEL, CHASE TAYLOR, BEN VAUGHN, DENIS UDINK, COLE WILSON, HYRUM K. WRIGHT DEREK CARLISLE MASON RODRICKC SUMMER MONTGOMERY, CAIT LEE, JOSH SCHEURMAN CODY WINGET PAULA SALTAS CELESTE NELSON BRYAN MANNOS JACKIE BRIGGS NICOLE ENRIGHT

COLE LEHMAN Cole Lehman is a freelance writer, yoga teacher and an explorer. He writes about the outdoors, yoga and conscious exploration. Deserts are his favorite places.

LARRY CARTER JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF PETE SALTAS ANNA PAPADAKIS DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER, BILL LINES JEFF CHIPIAN, JEREMIAH SMITH ALISSA DIMICK

DISTRIBUTED FREE OF CHARGE THROUGHOUT THE WASATCH FRONT WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. ADDITIONAL COPIES OF VAMOOSE ARE AVAILABLE AT THE VAMOOSE OFFICES: 248 S. MAIN, SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84101, 801-575-7003 EDITORIAL CONTACT: EDITOR@VAMOOSEUTAH.COM COPPERFIELD PUBLISHING, INC • COPYRIGHT 2015. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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BETH LOPEZ Beth Lopez is a runner, climber and slaphappy backcountry skier who lives almost exclusively off burritos. An advertising copywriter by day, she spends her evenings writing freelance tales about the outdoors and commiserating with her favorite “people”: her pets.

MELISSA MCGIBBON Melissa McGibbon is an editor for Outdoor Sports Guide Magazine, a Lolë Ambassador and a member of the Society of American Travel Writers. When not writing, she can be found skiing, biking, climbing, practicing yoga, flying, diving or surfing. She’s always in pursuit of adventure, travel or some daring combination of the two.


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Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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IT’S NOT JUST RECREATION

I

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

NOW OPEN!

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457 As seen on “ Diners,

Drive-ins AnD Dives” Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

-CreeksiDe PAtios-Best BreAkfAst 2008 & 2010-85 YeArs AnD GoinG stronG-DeliCious MiMosAs & BlooDY MArY’s-sAt & sun 11AM-2PM-live MusiC & weekenD BrunCh“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

n the summer, vacations and weekend adventures leave us happily more exhausted than our work weeks. In the winter, we wake up at 3 a.m. to reach snow-covered peaks before coming home and changing into professional-ish clothes for our 9-to-5s. Being without cell service for a week is not an inconvenience—it’s a luxury. Little else is more agonizing than the thought of not reaching a peak after a full day of grueling climbs. And there are many worse things than the smell of our clothing a week into an expedition. For us, it’s not just recreation. This is a lifestyle. To not only value wild places, but to live for the experiences that they afford, is a quality woven into the very fabric of some of us. This rings true especially here in Utah. This state has changed me forever. And for that, Utah, I thank you. When I moved to Utah from Tennessee, it quickly became clear just how much geography can shape a population. The quality of natural spaces in Tennessee is feminine, lush, nourishing—you go out in nature, you learn, you adapt. That’s incredibly important to me still, but the sense of exploration wasn’t as universal there as it is here. By contrast, to me, Utah’s landscape is bold and masculine. We seek to conquer this untamed, unyielding, dry environment. It demands exploration, and there’s no shortage of peaks to climb or natural wonders to simply gawk at. Sometimes it means just a casual afternoon stroll along Bonneville Shoreline or a happy family finding beauty while camping in or near their minivan. Being outdoors, to any degree, is better than the opposite. Believe it or not, these add to the universal sense of exploration we enjoy in Utah. The opportunities are boundless for people of all levels, experience and lifestyle. This is why we’re publishing Vamoose, which is Salt Lake City Weekly’s reimagined Outdoor Rec Guide. We want to help you expedite your outdoor experience. Not to make haste of the adventure, but to go far and try new things. Or, hell, simply crack open a beer and relax, but do so outside of the confines of walls. It’s with great pleasure that we offer the stories of this inaugural issue. We hope they give you a fresh perspective of new ideas of how to enjoy the lifestyle Utahns love so much. We are 9-to-5ers as much as we are ski bums. We love car-camping with a cooler full of beer in the middle of nowhere as much as we love our dawn patrols. So come explore with us. In the Summer ‘15 issue of Vamoose, Cole Lehman takes you to Highway 12 in “Weekend Warriors.” There are accessible slot canyons, enduring hikes, delicious food and red rock for days. Nick Como highlights Utah’s longest continuous trail, the Highland Trail in the high Uintas. But a magazine about adventure isn’t just about going places. It’s about the people and companies who help us get out there. Beth Lopez interviews “The Speedgoat,” Karl Metzer, in this issue’s Trail Blazer feature. And Jenny Wilden gets the lowdown on Goal Zero, a Utah-based company revolutionizing the world of personal solar charging. And there’s so much more. So read on. And then, get out there.

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

4160 Emigration Canyon road

801 582-5807 www.ruthsdinEr.Com

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Austen Diamond, Editor @austendiamond adiamond@vamooseutah.com


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Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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MY FIRST TIME

Mountain Biking

WHITE-KNUCKLING ON THE FAMED 100-MILE WHITE RIM TRAIL

Dreamstime.com

By Toni Isom

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A

s someone who trips over single blades of grass and regularly falls—not only down stairs but up them, I always figured mountain biking was something I should avoid. Sure, I partake in other modes of inherently risky outdoor fun: Road biking, bouldering, skiing, backpacking—each of which involve some combination of jagged rocks, steep grades and high speeds. But mountain biking combines all three. My aversion was based on the odds of increased risk. I must have been in a special mood when I agreed to bike Moab’s famous 100-mile White Rim Trail, which follows the White Rim on the edge of Island in the Sky Mesa in Canyonlands National Park. At the time, my friend Curtis was a junior high school teacher with entire summers free to take up adventuresome hobbies and then guide his friends down the path to a blissful reward. He’d recently embraced long-distance bike touring. I decided to go for three reasons: For one, during the planning stage, Curtis kept referring to the group ride as a “bike pelican” (a twist on bike peloton, the core group of cyclists in a race). This lighthearted mockery of serious cycling culture reduced the intimidation factor and made me feel like I was joining a bike gang of scruffy neighborhood kids. Secondly, the southern Utah desert is a curiosity-sparking, soul-replenishing wonderland. I’d probably have gone if the bike pelican were comprised solely of unicycles. Thirdly, a few people would be doing the ride on touring bikes, so I figured it wouldn’t be overly technical or adrenaline-fueled. I borrowed a friend’s front-suspension 29er and we were off. The worst part of the 100-mile ride was the 7-mile approach to the trail. Riding the heavy bike into a headwind along the skinny highway shoulder, periodically stopping to adjust the seat as my body and bike became geometrically acquainted, I couldn’t help but long for my road bike: nimble, light, familiar. But turning onto the mesa was like awakening in Oz. The labyrinthine redrock landscape unfurled before us, and I dropped into the Shafer switchbacks feeling ridiculously giddy. Within the first 15 miles,

the trail delivered and then some—deep, complex views to the left and Bighorn sheep to the right. We pedaled and pedaled and pedaled. The terrain varied—hard-packed jeep roads disappearing into rosy horizons; vertigoinducing traverses clinging to cliffsides; freeflowing slickrock sections; short, steep, wild descents and climbs. And sand. I developed a Zen-like coolness with the act of pedaling practically in place through long stretches of sand. I found that, for a newb, I was pretty good at bombing down hills. I swallowed my pride and pushed the bike up a few ascents. I learned that red grapes and salty sheets of seaweed are the best snacks when toiling in the desert. And I discovered that after burning a heroic level of calories and sweating like a sow, you can drink 1 metric ton of beer, and then get up at sunrise without a trace of a hangover. I used to edit stories for an outdoor publication, and 80 percent of them concluded with some slight variation of the phrase, “Incredible scenery, incredible skiing and incredible people. It really was an incredible trip.” It became a cliché to me. But it’s tough to fight the impulse to describe my first time mountain biking as anything but incredible. Trying something new, discovering someplace new, and meeting someone new all at once is transcendent and surreal, like having one of those profound dreams that lodges in your psyche, and knowing that someone else dreamed the exact same thing. The shape of the experience remains imprinted in your mind, and in theirs, the same way a formative childhood experience forever binds you to the neighborhood kids with whom you shared it. I rode the White Rim Trail with only one crash, which I executed with the grace of a circus clown. I was probably underprepared, and the ride was undoubtedly difficult at times. But it was a goddamned blast. And, while we’re on the topic of transcendence: If you’re seeking a spirit animal to oversee your first time doing a mountainbike trip or biking in general—or a totem to signify your scruffy gang of explorers—I recommend the bike pelican.

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Why We

Climb

THE JOYS OF A LIFE DEDICATED TO ASCENSION BY DEREK NEWMAN

Louis Grenet

A

t 230 feet up a desert tower, halfway through a classic climb and wedged between a rock and, well, another rock, I start to wonder how most people spend their weekends. I imagine they relax at home, maybe go for a walk through the park with their families or spend time in a city drinking, eating and laughing. They probably use vacation days for actual vacations— like tropical getaways, big cities and the occasional cruise. My knee slips out of the wide crack I wedged it in, bringing me back to my current predicament. If it weren’t for my shoulder jammed in that same crack, and now holding my entire body’s weight, I would have fallen past the last piece of protection I placed 20 feet below me. Nothing to panic over, however: I simply re-wedge my now-bloodied knee back in the crack, wiggle my body up a few feet and clip an old rusted bolt that some dirtbag drilled in the tower’s sandstone years ago. Now safe-ish, I let out a satisfied smile, because this is my vacation, and I continue up my “cruise.” Most people look perplexed when I tell them about the climbing lifestyle—with good reason. What part about waking up before sunrise, hiking miles of steep terrain and bleeding your way up a rock wall sounds like a pleasant time away from work? Let me tell you. In the early 1900s, a mountaineer named Lionel Terray called climbers “Conquistadors of the Useless,” because that’s exactly what we are. We spend the majority of our lives fighting our way to the tops of mountains, just to stand in that lonely place, turn around and go home. Every climber will give you a slightly different answer if you ask them why they climb. Boulderers admire the physical exertion and mental effort involved with projecting short, yet challenging, rock problems. Traditional climbers tend to romanticize

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Continued from p. 12

Chase Taylor

Summer Montgomery

the sublime beauty found in ascending multi-pitches on big walls. Regardless of each climber’s style, I believe every ascender gets a personal sense of accomplishment in escaping their everyday lives and interacting with the outdoors this way. One of Utah’s most famous adventurers, Author Edward Abbey— who, in his own words, had a “lifelong love affair with the rock”—felt this personal sense of accomplishment during his many adventures in Arches National Park. In his book Desert Solitaire, Abbey tells tourists to “crawl, on hands and knees, over the sandstone and through the thornbush and cactus. When traces of blood begin to mark your trail you’ll see something, maybe.” Abbey explains that we have to go through some sort of physical effort, and even make a painful sacrifice, in order to see nature’s true self. I like to assume the “something” Abbey sees is the same sense of accomplishment climbers feel when we’re standing on summits. Our sore muscles and torn-up hands signify the price we pay to see what Abbey saw and felt. There really isn’t a more sublime place than a summit. Tied to bolts, chains, trees or boulders, my climbing partners and I extend our gaze farther than ever. We see the Wasatch Range continue into the unknown, with summits beyond summits begging us to climb them next. We watch birds dance in the air and sometimes swoop down to get a better view of us humans here on the peak in our unnatural habitat. The still silence found on each summit conveys a serene feeling, while winds blow against our skin, reminding us that we’re living instead of dreaming. We see how large nature is and how small cities are. Like the small city below, all of life’s problems seem to dwindle on the summit. This escape is essential to my well-being. Climbing is one of the few things that can diminish my stress in life, by making me focus solely on the task at hand. I’m not the only one. Many climbers dance on rock because it helps with depression, anxiety or the blahs associated with the humdrum of life. So if you’re looking for a healthy and natural way to overcome life’s everyday stresses, look to the nearest rock outcropping and search for a climber: We’re pretty easy to spot. You can usually find us on hiking trails, covered in dirt—or blood—with big backpacks on or mattress-size crash pads strapped to our backs. We’re just about always smiling. We’d be happy to show you what Abbey saw, give you that natural escape and help you find a personal sense of accomplishment unlike any you’ve felt before.

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This Is the Place WALK UTAH’S LONGEST HIKE: THE HIGHLINE TRAIL BY NICK COMO

T

hink of it as Utah’s Appalachian Trail. True, the Highline Trail in the High Uintas Wilderness is accessible to day hikers seeking scenery and wildlife, but it was established with the long-distance thru-hiker in mind—the ones looking to test their soles on a 100-mile (95.7 miles, to be exact) point-to-point trek. The Uinta Mountains—the highest major mountain range in the lower 48 that runs east-to-west—are home to Utah’s highest summit, Kings Peak. From the trail’s start at Hayden Pass trailhead—the highest point on the Mirror Lake Highway (noticing a trend, yet?)—countless alpine lakes, rocky summits and snow banks must be traversed to arrive at the Highline Trail’s eastern terminus

near Flaming Gorge. For most of the 95.7 miles, you’ll be traveling above the 10,000-foot mark. With so much to see along the way, taking your time to traverse the Highline Trail is ideal. There’s a short window between snow season and mosquito season, so plan your trip accordingly. To be prepared for whatever Mother Nature throws at you, be sure to pack a flyfishing rod, a camera, bug spray, an ice axe and loads of perseverance, among your other essentials. This overview is intended to inform and entertain readers, but should not be used in place of a USGS map, a full guidebook and sound judgment of one’s ability level.

Day-Hike the Highline If you’re not ready for 100 miles of continuous hiking or the logistics involved in a car shuttle, you can still take in some of the trail’s scenery on a day hike. Our favorite jaunt starts at Hayden Pass, and then runs east, then north, and through Naturalist Basin. Keep hiking, and you’ll eventually hit the lovely high-elevation Jordan Lake.

Plan B

Ben Vaughn

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Ben Vaughn

Visit a Lake The Uintas are home to roughly 500 lakes, many accessible via a short (1-3 mile) hike. These lakes offer a mellow day trip. Check out Ruth Lake, which is also a popular rockclimbing destination, or Haystack Lake, where you’ll likely spot fly-fishermen casting at dusk.

Noteworthy Points Along the First Half of the Highline Trail As you approach Kings Peak, spend your first night at one of Packard Lake’s scenic campsites—all primitive—and get some great fishing as your first night’s reward. Wilder Lake, at 9,916 feet above sea level, is the lowest point on the trail. Anderson Pass, which you’ll walk over on your third or fourth day, sits at a nosebleed-inducing 12,700 feet above sea level, and will leave you asking, rhetorically, “Got oxygen?”


John Haymore

Hyrum K. Wright

Kings Peak Most hikers looking to tackle the entire length of the Highline won’t miss the opportunity to top out on Kings Peak. A quick day trip off the main trail, this peak will increase your total distance to just over the century mark. Make your camp west of Yellowstone Creek—say, in the meadow about a mile before the switchbacks up the ridgeline—and get an early start to beat the afternoon thunderstorms and the crowds.

More Noteworthy Points The portion of the hike between Porcupine Pass and Tungsten Pass has some of the highest concentrations of lakes in the High Uintas. Naturally, it’s a fly-fisher’s paradise. Working in a shorter day to fish along this section of the trail is advisable— there will be long days on rugged terrain ahead. This Is the End All good things must come to an end, and so does the Highline Trail. End the trip officially at Highway 191 outside Vernal, or Chepeta Lake for a shorter 62-mile version. Most likely, you’ll have to shuttle your car back to Hayden Pass.

Get a Steak and a Beer When was the last time you had a burger and fries—or, hell, a bloody steak? Take your pick between Vernal Brewing Company in Vernal, Pinn Willies in Talmage, and Bear River Lodge near Coalville. Yeah, a beer sounds pretty good about now, too. You’ve earned it.

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“At the time, it was a unique race because it was harder than anything else in the U.S.”

Trailblazer

KARL METZER SPEEDGOAT 50K’S LEGENDARY FOUNDER KEEPS IT NICE AND EXCRUCIATING BY BETH LOPEZ Photos by Cole Wilson

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K

arl Metzer has made a habit of not only winning 100-mile trail races but of obliterating course records while he was at it. But even more noteworthy to the Utah trail-running community is that Metzer founded and directs one of the most challenging mountain races in the country, the Speedgoat 50. Nicknamed The Speedgoat, Metzer is still going strong after 20-plus years of having a “passion for going as far as possible, as fast as possible, while enjoying every minute of it.” The Utah resident has completed 123 ultra-marathons and won 52 of them. He’s also won 36 100-mile races—currently a world record. And if that weren’t enough to fill his dance card, he also has crushed 20 trail marathons and won eight of them. Metzer trotted into Salt Lake City in 1989 to ski bum at Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort, where he worked as a bartender—mainly for the season pass. He fell in love with the Wasatch, and he stuck around. After his first ski season, Metzer spent the summer running in the mountains. He entered some races and won. He emerged as one of the best trail runners locally, and eventually, in the United States. In 1998, Metzer took first in the famed Wasatch 100 trail race by running 100 miles in 20 hours, 8 minutes (beating the previous record time by 21 minutes). The next year, he was a sponsored, full-fledged professional runner, who began ticking off podium finishes in the country’s top trail races. Metzer founded the Speedgoat 50K in 2007. “At the time, it was a unique race because it was harder than anything else in the U.S.” he says. “John Collins [Snowbird’s director of mountain activities] had asked me if I could get 100 runners to toe the line,” Metzer says. “I said it would be easy—and, sure enough, the first year we had 112 runners start.” By 2014, the race had 440 participants. The race is very Karl: Its name comes from his moniker. It is passionately brutal. And the race course winds up and down the very slopes that brought him to Utah. Races around the country have followed in the same footsteps as the Speedgoat 50K by developing ever-more-difficult mountain courses. But the Speedgoat 50K remains one of the hardest. In fact, it’s downright masochistic—runners climb and descend 12,000 feet, scramble around the rocky crags of Baldy and Hidden Peak, get muddied up and post-hole through the occasional snow patch. “The whole idea is to make it hard,” Metzer says. “Having skied at Snowbird for 20 years, I know the mountain, and I use the mountain to create a route that keeps things entertaining.” A phalanx of elite runners shows up for the annual race, which now boasts a tidy $20,000 winner’s purse. Wasatch locals and international runners line up together to test their mettle in fairly fierce competition. But in the end, the sport is approachable and friendly, and he hopes to keep it that way. “Many star athletes in other sports aren’t personable. But ultra-running is a niche community, where we’re all like family. I love that feeling; I love being part of the family,” he says. The Speedgoat 50K ups the ante for hardcore runners, yet Metzer stays busy doing private coaching sessions for up-andcoming runners in Utah, too. His approach is low-key and positive: No distance is too far if you just work your way up, listen to your body and plan on spending the day in the mountains. (He’s also famously unfussy about training routines, eats what he wants to, and washes it down with delicious beer.) The way he puts it, “Just run all day,” or “100 miles isn’t that far,” makes an extra-long race sound less intimidating.

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WEEKEND WARRIORS

ROAD TO NOWHERE

Your weekend guide to Capitol Reef, Boulder, Escalante and Bryce Canyon By Cole Lehman Photos by Austen Diamond & Victoria Slagel

T

he siren call of unknown roads and secret canyons draws adventurers into the landscapes of southern Utah each weekend. Places like Moab and Zion National Park are popular for good reason—but there are other roads to explore. Some of the more promising ones, like Highway 12, wait along the route from Fishlake National Forest to Bryce Canyon. Here, you’ll find uncrowded, epic destinations, farm-to-table restaurants and campsites with unspoiled views of the wildest country in the lower 48. It’s gorgeous country, but it’s born of vast solitude and demands your respect. Follow this template for an unforgettable weekend of camping, hiking, canyoneering, mountain biking and indulging. It’s good to have a plan down there, but don’t let it stop you from exploring unnamed roads that call your name— and they will.

Austen Diamond

662 miles

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Driven

14.7 Miles

Biked

~5

17.5 Miles

2 Hiked

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THURSDAY

Escape from work, hit the road, and spend a night with the Trembling Giant.

Austen Diamond

Camp With Pando

Three hours from the Wasatch Front, the heaviest organism on Earth, an 80,000-year-old aspen grove named Pando, makes a perfect place to camp. The Doctor Creek Recreation Campground has water and bathrooms—but make sure to reserve a site in advance—or find isolated camping down Forest Service roads. Campground: 38.527482, -111.745625 Reservations: 877-444-6777

FRIDAY Drive to Torrey, load up on coffee and beta, hike Capitol Reef, eat pizza, play flutes and set up camp.

Coffee & Beta

In the morning, stop for coffee at Castle Rock Coffee. The espresso starts flowing at 6:30 a.m. for sunrise chasers. Don’t forget to ask about the weather or check on your phone if you have a signal. Stop next door at Capitol Reef Backcountry Outfitters if you want a hiking book or a map—both could come in handy. 875 E. Highway 24, Torrey, 435-4252100, CastleRockCoffee.com

Pie & Beer

Hike Capitol Reef’s Chimney Rock

Capitol Reef is filled with spectacular day hikes. Just inside the park is Chimney Rock, a short 3.5-mile loop that’s worth exploring. Afterward, drive to the must-see roadside petroglyphs or a less-crowded hike up Golden Throne. Trailhead: 38.315697, -111.303976, 3.5-mile loop, 1-2 hours

Victoria Slagel

After a day of exploring, Rim Rock Patio is the best place to eat en route to camp. Serving up tasty pizzas—with satisfying gluten-free crusts to boot—this joint has an awe-inspiring patio to soak up the views of the Reef at sunset with a brew in hand. Toss some horseshoes, and if you’re lucky, you’ll catch some live music during the weekend. 2523 E. Highway 24, Torrey, 435-425-3389, TheRimRock.net

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Austen Diamond

Austen Diamond

Capitol Reef

Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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Austen Diamond

Flute Shop Vibes

Highway 12 Camping

Go Organic

Gear Up

Austen Diamond

Check out and play the large selection of handmade Native American-style flutes at the Flute Shop Trading Post & Motel on your way up Boulder Mountain. This shop is also filled with Navajo-crafted jewelry, dream catchers and fossils. The flutes are easy to play and pleasant to have fireside. 1705 Highway 12, Torrey, 435-4253144, FluteShopMotel.com

SATURDAY Visit Escalante to gear up before exploring bucket-list slot canyons. Then, drive back to Boulder to feast, shower and sleep in a bed.

Located in a beautifully restored building on Main Street, Escalante Mercantile & Natural Grocery has all the natural goodies you need— organic fruits, veggies, meats and snacks. There are no better options in town, plus the owner is superfriendly and her dogs are adorable. 210 W. Main, Escalante, 435-8264114

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Victoria Slagel

Austen Diamond

Escalante Mercantile & Natural Grocery

Mind-bending views and secluded campsites abound along Highway 12 from Torrey to Escalante. Calf Creek Campground offers pit toilets and potable water. To get away from the masses, pull down a dirt road onto BLM land for primitive camping. Settle in anywhere that puts Escalante within easy reach the next morning. Campground: 37.795357, -111.414850

Stop at Escalante Outfitters for more info on your day’s adventure. Pick up a map and grab any gear you forgot, like sunscreen or a bottle of whiskey. Ask to fill up water if you need it—because you probably do. For a delicious lunch in the canyons, wise explorers order the Neon calzone to go. 310 W. Main, Escalante, 435-8264266, EscalanteOutfitters.com


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SATURDAY Spooky & Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyons

Check these magnificent, nontechnical slot canyons off your bucket list individually, or as a loop. Consider that Spooky is too tight for some—both physically and mentally. Travel Hole-in-the-Rock Road with a full tank of gas and lots of water. It’s 26.3 miles on a rough dirt road through flood country to Dry Fork road and the trailhead. Trailhead: 37.476782, -111.220040, 3-mile loop, 3-4 hours

Burr Trail and Singing Canyon

The Burr Trail weaves through pristine desert from Boulder all the way to Lake Powell’s Bullfrog Marina. You don’t have to go far on this scenic road to find natural wonders. Singing Canyon, a roadside slot canyon renowned for unique acoustics, awaits after an easy 11 miles down the road. Trailhead: 37.864826, -111.300527

Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon

Hell’s Backbone Splurge

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Take a break from roughing it to enjoy a lovingly prepared farm-to-table meal at Hell’s Backbone Grill, one of the truly epic destination dining experiences in the United States. Be sure to make reservations. Then spend the night at the welcoming Boulder Mountain Lodge for a comfy bed and a hot shower. The lodge sits by a lake on 11 acres of beautiful country. 20 Highway 12, Boulder, 435-335-7460, Boulder-Utah.com


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plus a gluten free cider area

Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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SUNDAY Sip coffee from a stunning overlook, drive to Bryce Canyon National Park for desert single-track through hoodoos, then pack up and head home.

As Highway 12 spirals up from the red-rock magic, you’ll find Kiva Coffee House. Enjoy coffee from inside this oaky den, or sit on the patio to soak up the stunning views of the Escalante River. The coffee is tasty, and the homemade baked goods and breakfasts always hit the spot. Mile marker 7386, Escalante, 435826-4550, KivaKoffeeHouse.com

Thunder Mountain Hoodoo Ride

Thunder Mountain Trail—an intermediate mountain bike ride—switches through orange and white hoodoos, traverses sandstone fins, and rolls through high-desert forest. With two cars, you can shuttle this as a 7.9-mile mostly downhill jaunt—but the 14.7-mile loop is worth the time. Once you’re done, hightail it back home and to bed—the weekly grind starts tomorrow morning. Ah, that weekend made the long drive worth it, though. Trailhead: 37.743030, -112.329324, 14.7-mile loop, 3-4 hours

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Where memories are made!! June 6th Bear Lake Shake!

July 10th Bear Lake Car Show

July 25th 7th Annual Alaskan Salmon BBQ

Aug 6th – 8th 8th Bear Lake Raspberry Days

1-800-448-2327

www. bearlake.org Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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Made in Utah

Goal Zero MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE SOLAR-CHARGING TECHNOLOGY BRINGS POWER TO THE PEOPLE By Jenny Willden Photos by Andy Earl

Power electronics off the grid with the Goal Zero Yeti, a solar generator that powers laptops, lights and phones (left). Charge a phone or light your way with the Switch, a multifunctional, solar-powered flashlight and recharger (above).

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T

hey call themselves experience enablers. That’s to say that now you can go farther, and stay out longer than ever before because you have battery power that’s both portable and renewable. Are you packin’ portable? Goal Zero, a Utah-based personal solar power company, has made waves in the outdoor industry in the past six years, because it’s creating tough, innovative gear to power expeditions big and small. Sure, many outdoor adventurers look to escape tech-laden lives by heading to the wilderness. But more and more, technology is edging its way into our lives. “Even when we’re headed out to ‘get away,’ we take our phones to use as cameras, or we download information and maps to get around,” says Andy Earl, Goal Zero social media manager and an adventure photographer. “Having power changes what you are capable of doing.” Imagine lighting a backcountry yurt or campsite with solar-powered lanterns, keeping your headlamp charged for weeks without extra batteries, or filming and snapping images for days without running out of juice. Goal Zero’s product line ranges from small chargers designed to give phones a single power-up to larger generators used to power laptops, lights and electronics. By placing a solar panel in the sun with a power pack attached, you’ll, in effect, store the energy in the pack for later use. Stay on the grid longer than ever, even when you’re “off the grid.” Their unique solar panels are built with monocrystalline technology surrounded by rugged, weather-resistant outer materials to protect them for adventures in any climate. All design and development is done by an in-house production team at Goal Zero’s headquarters that sends their designs out of the country for production. When the finished product returns, it’s tested in Utah’s diverse climate by employees and ambassadors before ever being shipped to consumers. Though Goal Zero is quickly becoming a household brand name in Utah, the vision for the company didn’t start too long ago. In 2007, Robert Workman, Goal Zero founder, was doing humanitarian work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where he was leveraging solar technology to provide locals with much-needed access to light. Workman realized that his solar solutions could fill a consumer need in a much larger context, so in 2009, Goal Zero was born. It’s goal simple: to put reliable power in the hands of every human on Earth.

With growth of nearly 17,000-percent in sales in the past three years, Goal Zero was recognized as one of Forbes’ Most Promising Companies of 2014. It has also received numerous awards and accolades from industry thought leaders, such as Outside and the Outdoor Retailer Market, for its techforward products. Through the rapid expansion, however, Goal Zero has remained true to its humanitarian roots by frequently donating solar kits for natural disaster relief with over $600,000 worth of product donated for Hurricane Sandy alone. The company also sends employees to assist in natural-disaster relief and invites others to participate in humanitarian trips to Haiti, the Navajo Nation and other areas in need of solar-power capabilities. Despite Goal Zero’s far-reaching efforts, Utah remains the company’s home. “Utah has so much to offer and has amazing access to everything we, as a company, are passionate about,” Earl says. “You can stand on the summit of a mountain and watch a

sunrise during a backcountry tour or trail run before making it to the office at 9 a.m.” In fact, many Utah-based adventurers— along with an international community of brand ambassadors—help field-test products. The ambassador team is a veritable “who’s who” of the biggest names in climbing, skiing and mountaineering with Utah locals Julian Carr, Mike Libecki, Caroline Gleich and Brody Leven making the roster, just to name a few. When these athletes head out to tackle the world’s most daring peaks and harshest environments, they pack solar technology. Important feedback and beta is brought back to help further innovate Goal Zero’s products. In August 2014, NRG Energy—a Fortune 250 company focused on solar and renewable—acquired Goal Zero, but the company is here to stay, says Lisa Janssen, Goal Zero public relations manager. Janssen adds that a partnership provides more resources, allowing the company to innovate faster than ever.

Norm Krantz, vice-president of innovation and the company’s third employee, says the way Goal Zero innovates sets them apart in the industry. “We always think of the user experience first,” he says. “What will make this easy to use, easy to understand and easy to incorporate into adventures and life?” Why shouldn’t getting power be easy, anyway? The only thing hard about adventure should be coming back home.

Keep your phone powered anywhere with Goal Zero’s Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah | 31 Switch Recharger


Bucket List Family-Friendly Fun

10

MUST-DO RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES THIS SUMMER By Errin Julkunen-Pedersen

F

or both fun-loving outdoorsy families and the wilderness wanderers of the world, Utah has no shortage of aweinspiring outdoor experiences. From the red-rock-induced “Mighty Five” national parks to the cool, high-alpine forests, you can be in paradise—or, rather, many varieties of paradise—within a five-hour drive from the Wasatch Front. You’ve probably already mountain-biked in Moab, hiked through Escalante, jet-skied on Lake Powell, or set sail on the Great Salt Lake (if not, do all of that, too). Here’s a handpicked assortment of bucket-list excursions that you may not have taken and that will expand your views of the Beehive State.

1 Wander the Slopes at the

Wasatch Wildflower Festival

CottonwoodCanyons.org

Beat the valley’s late-July heat by escaping to the canyons. Add in the beauty of Utah’s native plant life, and you’re pretty much set. The Wasatch Wildflower Festival, hosted at each of the four ski areas in the Cottonwood Canyons July 2426, offers free guided tours and other activities for flower fanatics. CottonwoodCanyons.org/Events/ Wasatch-Wildflower-Festival

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Brad Lovejoy

Brad Lovejoy

2 Hook Trout on a Guided Provo River Fishing Trip

Imagine anglers serenely casting flies as the sun sparkles on the Provo River; they’re hooking massive trout right and left. Well, that could be you. Guided fly-fishing on the Provo provides novice fisherfolk with the equipment, expertise and hands-on practice, which might just get them hooked for life. Try Provo River Guides (ProvoRiverGuides.com) or Wasatch Guide Service (WasatchGuideService.com) for starters.

3 Soak at Meadow Hot Springs

In the wee burg of Meadow (four miles south of Fillmore), look for one of the state’s best-kept secrets: Meadow Hot Springs. A destination in and of itself or a quick stop off Interstate 15 on a Southern Utah trip, the thermally heated springs will treat you right. The springs are privately owned but open to the public (no skinny-dipping, though, and pack out your trash). Get there just before sunset; you’ll be glad you did.

4 Drive the Alpine Loop (May to October)

Sinue Aguilera

Pete Mannion

Pack a picnic, and drive through American Fork Canyon on the Alpine Loop Scenic Byway. After buying a Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest day-use pass, you’re on the 20-mile drive, which takes you through alpine canyons with terrific views of Mount Timpanogos and the Wasatch Range. Make a pit stop at Cascade Springs, our recommendation for your picnic, although there are plenty of places along the route to stop and eat, hike or simply enjoy nature. The descent takes you past Sundance Resort, so stop for a nosh and glass of wine at the Owl Bar before you meander back home.

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ParkCityMountain.com

5 Gawk at Nine Mile

Nine Mile Canyon, located just north of Wellington, is loaded with Archaic, Fremont and Ute petroglyphs. For a mellow afternoon, view numerous rockart panels along the road, and take a break at the day-use area at the entrance of the canyon with a picnic. CastleCountry.com/ Nine-Mile-Canyon

Blazing down Park City Mountain Resort’s slopes at extreme speeds is exhilarating, but hitting the runs from the air at 45 mph is a completely different feeling. Both kids and adults love the zipline (must be at least 42 inches tall to ride). With a summer daypass, you can let the crisp mountain air blow through your hair on the Ziprider and Flying Eagle. 435-649-8111, ParkCityMountain.com

CastleCountry.com

34 | Vamoose Utah • Summer 2015

CastleCountry.com

CastleCountry.com

CastleCountry.com

Canyon’s Petroglyphs

6 Zipline at Park City Mountain Resort


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8 01- 9 42- 07 7 7 Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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7 Tube the Weber River

Barefoot Tubing

Hot sun and cool rivers make for an ideal summer respite. Embark on this adventure on your own and then hitchhike back to your car or manage the logistics of shuttling with your friends from Henefer to Taggart. Or make your life easy (that’s what recreation is all about, right?) and hire a local guide service. They’ll hook you up with high-quality tubes and lifejackets, which are necessary, given the Class II & III rapids. Try Barefoot Tubing (801-648-8608, BarefootTubing.com) or Destination Sports (435-649-8092, DestinationSports.com).

outdoor recreation comes in many forms! (5 minutes for the base of big cottonwood canyon)

BEST

PATIO

IN TOWN

8 Cycle Through Liberty Now open at 11:00 am Saturday and Sunday

3200 Big Cottonwood Rd. 801.733.5567 | theHogWallow.com

Pretend you’re in the Tour of Utah race and take your road bike over to Liberty. You can hit major climbs through the North Ogden divide, or avoid that stretch if you’re interested in a less heart-exploding journey. You’ll pedal past Wolf Mountain Resort and lush farmland while seeing massive peaks in the distance. Stop in Huntsville on your way out of town and hit up the Shooting Star—the longest continually running saloon in Utah—for a well-deserved beer.

9 Horseback Ride Through

Provo Canyon

Get out from behind the wheel of your Outback, and get behind some real horsepower. There’s nothing quite like seeing the majestic beauty of Provo Canyon from the back of a beautiful steed. Start down this path and you’ll find yourself cooking chuck-wagon dinners and hanging at the rodeo in no time. Try High Country Adventure (435-654-1655) or Boulder Mountain Ranch (800-783-5819).

10 Cliff Jump at

www.soldierhollow.com 36 | Vamoose Utah • Summer 2015

Pete Mannion

Causey Reservoir

This stop—15 miles northeast of Ogden—is for the risktakers. At the highest jumpoffs, brave souls vault themselves from cliffs more than 50 feet tall—not for the timid of spirit. Check water levels before you make that kind of leap. There are plenty of smaller cliffs to plunge from, and you can always just step in for a swim. No matter how you decide to get in the water, a visit is worth it—but the big jump makes your trip way cooler.


BACK PACK Mine Your Very Own Trilobite FAMILY FUN u-digfossils.com 435-864-3638 Delta, Utah Experience SOUTHERN UTAH ADVENTURE at it’s finest TOURS START AT $79/PERSON

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Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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FISHING By Melissa McGibbon

Little else is as idyllic as a day on the river fly-fishing, one of the great American pastimes. This peaceful sport requires many essential pieces of gear for a complete angling set up, including reels, rods, flies and so on. But, hey, if you master the sport, dinner in the mountains is free—but you’ll cook it yourself.

Columbia Wrangle Mountain Fishing Hat (Women’s)

Don’t go fishing without a proper fishin’ hat. Columbia’s classic straw sun hat keeps you shaded and comfortable. There’s an adjustable chin strap to keep it secured and there is vented crowning, so you won’t have to worry about sweaty-hat syndrome—it’s a thing. $20, Columbia.com

Sage Accel Fishing Rod

The Sage Accel Fishing Rod is light and ultra-responsive with medium-fast action, thanks to Generation 5 technology. It also boasts Fuji ceramic stripper guides, hard-chromed snake guides and a stealth black anodized aluminum up-locking reel seat. Buy it in either the saltwater or fresh-water version. $595-$750, SageFlyFish.com

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Fishpond Chaco Z/2 Footwear

Chaco collaborated with Fishpond to create fly-fishing-specific footwear. These shoes have Fishpond-designed webbing, Chaco footbeds, and Vibram Megagrip outsole. Dial in the fit with adjustable wrap-through straps, and then walk wherever you like, because they excel at keeping a grip on wet, muddy or slippery surfaces. $110 (includes $5 donation to Western Rivers Conservancy), Chacos.com


Patagonia Rio Gallegos Zip-Front Waders (Men’s)

These handsome pants utilize Patagonia’s H2No technology. They’re waterproof and windproof, while still magically remaining breathable and easily packable. They’re built with performance mid-weight fabric throughout, a TiZip front zipper and woollined booties with abrasion-resistant soles—a top choice when it comes to fishing garments. $599, Patagonia.com

Aloe Gator Natural Sunscreen SPF 40

Sun protection is a serious issue. To make that point, Aloe Gator picked a well-mannered, smiling alligator for their label. Ecofriendly and made with all natural ingredients, this sunblock lotion is a smart choice for your gear stash. It’s made with titanium dioxide and zinc oxide for broadspectrum UVA and UVB protection and is water-resistant as well as fragrance-free and paraben-free. $3, AGsBrands.com

UV Buff

If you haven’t Buff-ed, you’re missing out. Fairly ubiquitous with the angling crowd, these little cylinders of fabric are made with breathable Coolmax and are worn in more than a dozen ways, including over your mouth and nose, or around your forehead—handy not only for fishing, but also skiing or simply sitting by a campfire telling tall fishing tales. $25, BuffUSA.com

courtesy Summer 2015Photos • Vamoose Utah | 39of manufacturers


SUP

STAND-UP PADDLEBOARD By Melissa McGibbon

Stohlquist BetSEA PFD (Women’s)

If you think women care about princess seams, a feminine fit, and lined hand-warmer pockets, you’re right. This women’sspecific life jacket is made with a Cordura Nylon outer shell and has ergonomic Wrapture technology for torso shaping that offers a low profile and close, comfortable fit. The cross-chest cinch harness is body-mapped to provide incredibly effective water buoyancy. $129, Stohlquist.com

Kialoa Insanity Paddle

The Kialoa Insanity Paddle is as light—less than 2 pounds—as it is unrealistically strong. Depending on your budget, you can buy it in fiberglass or carbon—the latter being lighter and more expensive. Both versions of the paddle will stand up in all kinds of weather. $179-$359, Kialoa. com

Bic ACE-TEC SUP Board

40 | Vamoose Utah • Summer 2015

The Bic ACE-TEC SUP Board is made with intermediateto advanced-level SUPers in mind, but it’s an excellent option for athletic beginners looking to grow into a board. It’s a solid all-around choice because of its stability and glide in a variety of conditions. Plus, it’s relatively lightweight. $999, BicSUP.com


Grab your bikinis, board shorts and flip-flops—warm weather is here! If you’re not a fan of stand-up paddleboarding (SUP) yet, consider getting on board. It’s one of the fastest-growing recreational sports in the United States, and it’s no wonder. SUPing is easy to pick up, a fun way to enjoy hot summer days, and a killer workout. After the initial gear investment, there are minimal pay-to-play costs. Pick up these choice gear picks to get out and mop up the lake.

O’Neill Stripe Freak Hyperfreak Boardshorts (Men’s)

These top-of-the-line boardshorts are constructed with Hyperstretch TechnoButter material. The Hyperdry durable waterrepellent material makes them comfy and fast-drying. Using anti-rash technology and Hydrofly closure with a locking draw cord, this stylish men’s swimwear is sexy—and you know it. $65, ONeillClothing.com

Nuu Splash Waterproof Portable Speaker

Submersible in up to 3 feet of water, this wireless and waterproof portable speaker can go almost anywhere. The Nuu Splash Waterproof Portable Speaker is good for 10 hours of play time and is rechargeable via standard micro USB. Pair it with your tablet or smartphone using the builtin Bluetooth technology for unlimited musical possibilities. $99, GoNuu.com

Photos courtesy of manufacturers

Summer 2015 • Vamoose Utah |

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Profile for Copperfield Publishing

Vamoose Summer 2015  

Get Out, Get Going, Just Go

Vamoose Summer 2015  

Get Out, Get Going, Just Go