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JUNE 16, 2016 | VOL. 33

N0. 6

State of Brony

A booming fringe community of Utah youth finds acceptance in My Little Pony By Stephen Dark


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Marginalized people and Mormons alike find community and love in My Little Pony fandom

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CONTRIBUTOR CASEY KOLDEWYN

Essentials, p. 21 Accio editorial intern! This Harry Potter nerd and U of U junior loves to “talk language, words and writing, particularly when relevant to gender and/ or religion.” At City Weekly, she is focusing on arts and entertainment writing, and, more recently, copy editing. She is also the A&E editor at the U’s Daily Utah Chronicle.

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LETTERS Another false flag in Florida

Three weeks ago I told my friends I would not be joining them at Gay Pride. Why? Because I predicted a false flag during Pride Month this year. That is when an organization stages a fake, partially real or mostly real event and blames it on another group to start a war or enforce draconian laws on their own people. Hitler destroyed his buildings to start war and to warrant gun control on the Jews so they couldn’t defend themselves against him. The Gulf of Tonkin incident was a flag to justify Vietnam and, of course, 911 was an excuse to invade Iraq and Afghanistan. Why does Amazon sell books authored by Manson, Stalin and Hitler yet they are banning Nobody Died At Sandy Hook? Written by a professor emeritus at Princeton, cowritten by five other PhDs and two school safety experts. It sold 500 copies before being banned and is now a PDF. Why did Sundance employees try to stop people from getting a copy of Sandy Hook: Free Your Mind at this year’s festival? I called around to local Barnes and Nobles and even they are selling Mein Kampf ! Not Sandy Hook, though. Events that had drills the same day, same location: Charleston, Boston, 911, San Bernadino, Sandy Hook, Paris and the list goes on. You can still find the manuals. My brother called me this morning and said I was right. That it looks like a false flag happened at a gay club in Florida to justify more gun control and to pit LGBT and “homophobes” against each other. The police took that kid who shot up the black church to Burger King and bought him

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. lunch before taking him to the station. Why would they do that? And what was Hillary Clinton doing in their town the same day? Clinton is also pictured with Sandy Hook parent Francine Wheeler (her and her husband are actors) long before that event, too. They are all friends with Hillary’s gal pal minster Maureen White. I hope that City Weekly readers take a look at a piece titled “42 Admitted False Flag Attacks” on WashingtonsBlog.com for more info.

ANARCHO-QUEER AND FEMINIST, GLYNIS THURMON Sugar House

“Thank the troops for what?”

Paul Kleiber [“CW staff dishonors many,” Letters, June 2, City Weekly], this isn’t your country. It’s Indian Land and the United States, Inc. is a foreign principle owned by the Queen of England’s Crown corporation. She controls and has amended social security. Go look up IRS document 6209 to see how part of a 1040 was set up as a jubilee tribute to the queen. This corporation and their employees that you claim we should all be sensitive to has done nothing but murder innocent people in 70 sovereign places since its inception as the Virginia Company in 1602. Then, of course, continuing on with its renaming in 1871. Your “founding fathers” were basically an array of male pedophiles, people who thought they owned black people, thought they owned women and thought it was OK to kill 75 million people who were already here. Who would listen to them anyway? I’ll listen to myself and nobody else,

thanks, though. District of Columbia is a foreign state set up by the Columbians; a group of freemasons who own Columbia Broadcasting System and Columbia University. New York was named after their York Rite freemasonry bologna. No “veteran” has fought for anyone but their company for centuries. Where have you been? Perhaps you should watch Larken Rose’s video, “Thank the troops for what?” Anyone who signs a contract with them to go kill people when they don’t have a right to deserves no sympathy, respect or sensitivity. And for all the other City Weekly readers writing in to complain about who should or should not be the CEO of this warmongering company; why do you care? Anybody who runs for office of their corporation is a traitor to the original Republic and more importantly the indigenous people whose land this is. I don’t care whether you are talking about Hillary, Trump, Sanders or Gary Johnson, they all need to get a clue. Nobody has a right to rule anybody else.

SALLY GOLDEN

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PRIVATE EY

Bye Bye Love

The most important people in Salt Lake City—the persons who have basically absconded with The Salt Lake Tribune comment boards (Twitter for adults; a bar conversation without the martini) and made them their own—are in near unanimity that a recent proposal by the Miller family, owners of the Utah Jazz and Vivint Smart Home Arena should not be given a certain tax benefit. They claim, as many good liberals and socialists claim, that billionaires already have it good enough, and by gosh by golly, if the rich get a benefit, then they should, too. In sum, one doesn’t learn much by reading the Tribune comment section and I should know since I often become dumber by doing so. The Millers propose to lay out $110 million up front to fix their arena—not exactly chump change. Over the next 25 years, as taxes are levied and collected on their property, they are asking that about 20 percent of those additional taxes be reimbursed back to them, about $22 million. It’s not like the city is taking $22 million from Peter in order to pay Paul—the funds will not be reimbursed if no tax is collected. One could fairly wonder how much tax money will be collected by the city, how many persons will be employed and how many dollars will be spent in surrounding businesses located near, and depend on the success of the arena. The Miller proposal is fair and a good deal for Utah Jazz fans, circus fans, music fans, city residents and especially employers that are either in proximity to the arena or who bank on big nights during Jazz games. Let Gail Miller have her way and then some. Go Jazz.

nnnnnnn In a column a few weeks ago, Salt Lake Tribune editor Terry Orme was all teary eyed as he explained that if not for the Citizens for 2 Voices and the work of Joan O’Brien that the Tribune would have soon failed, but that, in essence, her good work, and that of C2V led to the Paul Huntsman purchase of the Tribune. Oh, bull. Some of the same commenters who don’t like the Miller deal

were quick to thank their pagan gods that a billionaire family of a different sort—a good billionaire family—had come along to put new sand in their online playpen. The very essence of the Salt Lake Tribune hinges on what can fairly be called an illegal anti-trust agreement between the Tribune and its partner, The Deseret News. It’s not technically illegal thanks to some high level hanky-panky, but it has the same practical outcome: Tens of millions of dollars are derived of it thanks to the unholy pairing into a Joint Operating Agreement that binds Mormon and non-Mormon power Gods at the money belt. That JOA (the current iteration of it is the Utah Media Group, UMG) performs the opposite of what the Miller proposal does. It doesn’t create jobs. It screws the little guy. It screws the small business owner. It screws other print media. It screws broadcast. It screws this community every which way—all of which Orme and too many online commenters seem perfectly comfortable with. Their only concern is how much of the ill-gotten “profits” should end up in Tribune coffers (formerly 30 percent, boo! Now 40 percent, yay!). In order to “save” the Tribune, they never cared how the money was “earned” in the first place. That’s like being a bartender in a whorehouse.

STAFF BOX

B Y J O H N S A LTA S @johnsaltas

problem with gays and alcohol after all. We made calls to GrowTix and UMG trying to find out how their Pride revenues would be split between the UMG owners. Never heard back. If the Tribune got it all, good for them. If not, it’s fair to wonder if persons did or did not unwillingly donate to the coffers of the Deseret News and its owner, the LDS Church, which of late has struck a delicate balance with the local gay community. But enough to profit from? And alcohol, too?

nnnnnnn And now there’s Orlando. When something as horrific as what took place in the Pulse nightclub on Saturday night occurs, we brave survivors become quite predictable, don’t we? Politicians dust off their “thoughts and prayers” sound bites. Political parties pick sides. Candles are lit. Vigils are held. Pundits spew the same old crap. Columnists wax on—today would be my fifth or tenth time waxing, but I’m not going to today. But nothing has changed in America since November 22, 1963, when a gunman killed our president and I cried. Fifty-three years later, the only change is the type of gun, the number of dead, and whichever victims the cowardly boogeyman of the day points his hatred toward. If Trump or Hillary want to make it out to be something else for their own gain—a gun issue, a Muslim issue—a plague upon them. Saturday was a hate crime against gays. We’ve come to accept that there will be more shootings, just with less dead than the potential could have been. And there will be more. Then more. We’ve become the dullest razors on Planet Earth. There’s nothing more to say that really matters. Innocent people are dying and we accept that and that is wrong. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

IF TRUMP OR HILLARY WANT TO MAKE IT OUT TO BE SOMETHING ELSE FOR THEIR OWN GAIN—A GUN ISSUE, A MUSLIM ISSUE—A PLAGUE UPON THEM.

nnnnnnnn A week ago was Pride weekend. It’s estimated well over 35,000 persons bought passes to Pride festivities. Each of those tickets were graced with a “service fee” that was assessed by the ticketing agent provider, GrowTix, which is owned by UMG, which is the partnership between the Tribune and Deseret News. Besides selling tickets for Pride, certain beer and alcohol point-of-sale stands were commissioned by GrowTix, meaning that our friends up the street may not have a

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Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

When was the last time you told someone ‘I love you’? Cody Winget: Every day, I have a rad wife and the best son ever! Nicole Enright: I tell my cats that I love them every morning. And my husband, too. Jackie Briggs: Just a few hours ago. After losing my mother last year I unsurprisingly understand the value in telling, showing and shouting how much loved ones mean to you. It can’t be done enough.

Scott Renshaw: I hope it was this morning, or I’m going to be in big trouble when I get home.

Alissa Dimick: Not sure who was the latest to get my love bomb. I force my ‘I love you’ on people like I have a love goal I must meet daily.

Jeff Chipian: Friday July 5, 2013, Akron, Ohio. Let’s just say it didn’t go as planned. Before that, 2005.

Bryan Bale: I haven’t said that for many years. It’s not a phrase I take lightly.

Josh Scheuerman: This last weekend with the recent tragedy, I was reminded once again what really matters. To love regardless of what happens in our lives and to never stop.

John Saltas: Today. Andrea Harvey: I tell my boyfriend every day, but I need to work harder at making sure my family and friends know. I love you guys! Jeremiah Smith: Right now. I love you all.


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Outing Uniformity

Lest we forget Paul Mero, formerly of Sutherland Institute infamy, he’s alive and kicking the common wisdom on Utah Politico Hub, self-described as a collective effort to examine and yes, gossip about politics. In his latest screed, Mero takes on his beloved LDS Church and its penchant for uniformity. He talks about Mormons trying to out-righteous one another, and being overzealous about stuff like food storage and cola drinks. But then he talks about the way they dress—pretty much the same. You know, the dark suits, white shirts, clean-shaven look. Utah County’s the worst, he says. “Republican candidates … run on ideological platforms, not policy platforms,” like they’re the purest or know the Constitution best. Mero bemoans the loss of individuality. In fact, he once had a beard he was asked to shave. We’ll believe he’s a nonconformist when he grows it back.

Mormons for Trump

And speaking of uniformity, let’s talk about voting in Utah. Just check “R” and you’re done. Done with voting, done with choosing, done with thinking. A recent New York Times op-ed by McKay Coppins, a BYU journalism graduate, talks candidly about why Mormons are worried about Donald Trump. He wonders if Utahns will succumb to the “pull of partisanship” even though Trump’s anti-immigrant stance is reminiscent of Mormon travails. You know—attempts to exterminate the Mormons, and in 1879 to restrict Mormon immigrants from overseas. And there are plenty of other reasons for religious Mormons to dislike Trump—philandering, for instance. Coppins, however, concludes that conservative Mormons will still pull the lever for Trump. That they consider him the lesser of two evils is ponderous. But this is life in Utah.

Park City, Patent Pending

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What’s with the penchant to trademark city names? Vail Resorts is trying to trademark “Park City” ostensibly to protect Park City Mountain Resort. But OMG, petitions opposing the trademark have been flooding the patent office, according to the Park Record. It wasn’t just corporations who were worried. Residents of Park City made it known that they don’t want to be trademarked. Vail is looking at a memorandum of understanding. In other words, they wouldn’t sue businesses using the name Park City. But residents weren’t buying that. Trademark law appears to lean against trademarking geographic areas, but apparently there are plenty of places that claim to be trademarked. It’s just more of the corporatization of America.

JORDAN FLOYD

Tired of endless Google searches just to fix a leaky faucet?

Mika Israelsen is an employee at Utah Natural Products Alliance (UNPA) in Sugar House. In her first few months working there, Israelsen was tasked with working alongside the Historic Signs Committee Council of Sugar House to restore the Steering Stark sign outside of the UNPA office building on 1075 S. Hollywood Ave. Thanks to her, the sign now glows bright above the street just as it did in mid-20th century. In Israelsen’s own words, she “killed it.”

How did you get involved in restoring the Steering Stark sign?

I joined the UNP team in November and this was my first project they put me on. I was a new hire and they said this is your project; this is your baby—go crazy. So I did, and it has been my main focus since then. I was so happy it was tasked out to me. I killed it.

Was the process of getting the sign restored a difficult one?

We actually tried to do it a couple years back, and the guy who [we contracted to do it] took our money and ran. We were heartbroken about that. So we didn’t go back to try and do it for a while because we felt jaded. Then the Sugar House Community Council reached out to us. They said, we are doing a grant program, if you are interested. So what we did is, they gave us a list of contacts, we reached out, and picked the bid that was the cheapest and best.

What’s the history and significance of the sign?

The history of the building is really cool. It has been a couple of things. It was the Stark automotive, and that happened until 1957. For us, we wanted to keep it pure and keep it real—especially, with all the changes that are happening in Sugar House right now. We wanted to keep the history alive and restore the signs, and hopefully inspire others to do the same. Because people who take the signs down or make any kind of changes can’t go back—if they are gone, they are gone.

Do you think the modernization of Sugar House is a big issue for the community? I wouldn’t say it’s an issue. I think it is important to change with the times, but always remember where the roots are, and what this was before, because without it, we wouldn’t exist. We wouldn’t have these beautiful streets and culture and heart of what Sugar House is. For us, it was a no-brainer.

Have you gotten a lot of positive feedback from the community about the sign?

We’ve gotten so much feedback. We’ve been working on it and, while we were out here, we have so many passersby saying it is cool. The younger generation will stop by and wonder what is going on, and then you have some of the people who have been in this neighborhood forever and they will come and tell their stories about what they remember from when the garage was open. We’ve had so much positive feedback, which is great and exactly what we wanted.

—JORDAN FLOYD jfloyd@cityweekly.net


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Your column of September 23, 1988, addresses whether cannibalism is routinely practiced anywhere and concludes it is not. But why not? One argument in favor of cannibalism is simply that it is food. Not every part of every dead human is going to be fit for consumption, but some are—perhaps enough to relieve a food shortage in some starving, drought-stricken region. —Johnny Always nice to hear from a longtime reader. Why not cannibalism? For some cogent reasoning along these lines—from an ethics standpoint, anyway—I point you to a 2004 paper in Public Affairs Quarterly by the philosopher J. Jeremy Wisnewski. If you want a good read, I’d put this one up against Eat, Pray, Love any day of the week. At the end, Wisnewski stresses that he hasn’t made a case for the practice, necessarily, but he feels he’s pretty handily dealt with the various arguments against it. Here are some highlights: n As long as the cannibalized aren’t consumed alive or murdered for the purpose of being eaten, we can hardly claim that harm has been done to them. Indeed, “the decomposition of the body itself would be a harm,” Wisnewski suggests—so basically we can call it a wash. n “Eating the flesh of a human being, the argument runs, would cause undue distress to the family of the cannibalized,” Wisnewski says. “Let us grant that it is wrong to cause undue distress.” So one would want to obtain consent from the cannibalized’s loved ones, presuming they are around to consent—as in all things, it’s best to first ask nicely. n Wisnewski then addresses the “formula of humanity,” part of Kant’s concept of the categorical imperative, which states that humans must always be viewed as ends, never merely as means. And what is cannibalism—at least in the sustenance context you propose—beyond the means to a full belly? But a corpse “is not a human being,” Wisnewski argues. It’s merely “flesh,” and therefore does not have dignity. Dignity, according to Kant, “lies in the capacity of an agent to be autonomous,” something one obviously forfeits upon buying the farm. n OK, forget dignity—what about simple respect? It’s disrespectful to eat someone’s flesh just because they’re no longer around to complain, right? Not inevitably, says Wisnewski. There are plenty of behaviors— “raising one’s middle finger, going without one’s shirt, belching,” and so forth—that telegraph disrespect in some cultures but are uncontroversial in others. Just because we may perceive eating a former acquaintance as a pretty serious F.U. doesn’t mean it’s inherently disrespectful. (Wisnewski here grants that hopefully the deceased will have made her wishes known one way or another regarding becoming a postmortem casserole. “The author of this article has no objections to being cannibalized,” he adds; happy to put you two in touch, Johnny.)

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Cannibalism: Yea or Nay?

Obviously one could similarly muster philosophical arguments against cannibalism, but here let’s just stipulate Professor Wisnewski’s findings: We can eat other human beings, provided we’re not murdering them, provided they’ve granted some kind of premortem consent, etc. Should we? A few things to consider: n Despite ongoing debate among experts about how many societies ever really engaged in cannibalism (which is where we left things back in 1988), it’s still generally believed that the fatal neurological disease kuru was transmitted among the Fore people of Papua New Guinea via their practice up into the 1950s of eating their dead relatives’ remains, brains prominently included. Remember mad-cow disease? From the same pathological family as kuru, it spread due to cattle’s being fed meal containing bits of other cows. n Were humanity to embrace cannibalism, we’d likely end up eating a lot of recently deceased old folks. Culinarily this may not sound promising, and we’d certainly want to develop some prep methods to get around the toughness factor, such as, er, aging the meat. But a 2015 article in Modern Farmer makes a case (granted, with respect to livestock) that we should be eating older animals anyway—properly tenderized, they’re apparently more flavorful than younger specimens. n An article on the website Live Science—ha, ha—argues that compared to four-legged stock, humans really aren’t very meaty, and compared to chicken they’re slow to mature, so you won’t get much bang for your buck with a widespread program of human cannibalism. That’s partly why, through history, the practice has existed largely as a last rite (or a last resort), rather than an ongoing method of subsistence. n Humans are, in the end, red meat, which, here in the developed world, we’re told we should stay away from. Elsewhere on earth, of course, few can afford to be too picky. But this brings us to the real point, re the starvation issue: Human hunger is most decidedly not a question of a lack of resources—it’s a question of distribution. There’s already plenty of food to go around, in other words, without us needing to have granny for dinner. n

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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PROFILE COLBY FRAZIER

Full of Life

A quiet, 25-year art project on I Street is nearing an end. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @colbyfrazierlp

T

here’s Jim, a cutout of his head stuck to a popsicle stick protruding from a vase on the top of a kitchen cabinet. There is medium Jim, chilling on the right side of the couch, leather gloves on his hands, just a few feet away from old Jim, sitting in what appears to be a wheelchair. Guarding the front door is young Jim. Jim, Jim, Jim, everywhere. For 25 years, Jim Williams, a retired architect and an ambitious artist, has quietly turned his home at 265 I St. into an ever-changing piece of artwork, with the home’s primary occupant as the main subject. Williams’ home is a bulging selfportrait of a man and the space he occupies. And, as all efforts must, Williams’ most expansive piece of artwork, comprised of thousands of individual pieces, is entering its final act. After a handful of tours, limited to 10 people and facilitated through the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art conclude this fall, Williams, 76, intends to put his collection in storage and, by spring, sell his home. “The house, with the collection, is the final art piece,” Williams says. For much of Williams’ artistic life, he worked in obscurity. A self-described hermit, his efforts at home didn’t gain public attention until 2011, when local artist Cara Despain wrote a book, The Beginning of Now, about Williams and his home. In an exhibit of the same name, Despain and Williams recreated a portion of Williams’ home in a gallery. For Despain, the conclusion of Williams’ long project has sparked efforts to preserve the collection. She says some interest has been expressed by Utah museums, but in a perfect world, someone would step in, buy the home and keep it open as a museum. This latter scenario is what Mary Toscano, Williams’ studio assistant, hopes to see. “I think that someone should buy the whole thing and keep it as an art piece,” she says. “I want the house to be an artist destination site, like Spiral Jetty.” On the surface, a home filled with photos and art installations of Williams, who has a wispy white beard, red Coke-bottle glasses and stands 5-feet, 1-inch tall, might not sound artistically glorious. But Williams and his home—inseparable

Left to right: Jim Williams stands with two self portraits, his 9-year-old self, which he calls “young Jim”; the floor in Williams’ kitchen. in this context—are just that. The depth of the art, which in some places includes numerous iterations of different pieces (Jim’s figure is cut from a photograph, the cutout itself is a shadow silhouette of Jim, which is glued to a surface and then a photo is taken of the new surface, spawning a deliberate and intricate series of art) can be like jumping down a rabbit hole. While the result might seem narcissistic, Despain says Williams’ fascination with self portraiture is not the fruit of an outsized ego, but blossomed from the fact that for much of the past two decades, Williams lived alone in the house. And many of the pieces, Despain says, incorporate Williams’ family and friends. “He almost imagines himself or that person as part of him and they get absorbed into his portrait,” Despain says. “I think it’s just sort of his entire life that he’s reflecting. That’s what he has to work with, is himself and his life and anything that comes into contact with that.” Williams says he arrived at self portraiture incrementally. In 1981, his line drawings were shown in a gallery in New York City. “They just got no attention at all,” Williams says, remembering that he decided to migrate to a different side of the art spectrum. “I said, ‘OK, I’m going to do large, colorful [pieces] with a theme.” Williams began painting a series of bright portraits, but he ended up in every one of them. These double portraits then set Williams on the path of photography and portraiture that has consumed his artistic endeavors, and his home. There is an element in Williams’ art, he says, that grapples with the loss of innocence. For Williams, he says his loss of innocence, which by his definition involves the time at which children begin to act and speak with motive, occurred around the age of 9. It is Williams’ face from age 9, known as young Jim, which pops up

frequently around the house. “When I think of myself, my internal vision of self, that’s what I see,” Williams says of young Jim. Williams’ small frame has always been a marked personal characteristic, and during his school years, it bred an insecurity that, partly through cathartic moments in his art, has completely eroded. In this arena, Williams says, his work has been a “way of accepting self.” To the trained eye, there are sparks throughout Williams’ home that are reminiscent of popular artistic periods, or individual artists. Because many of Williams’ creations occurred in isolation, Despain says she has been surprised by the period aspects present in the pieces. “You still see bits and pieces of the art world at large,” Despain says. “It fits in even though it stands apart, if that makes sense, and I just think it’s important work.” If Williams does end up packing his collection into boxes and selling the home, some art installations will remain. On the kitchen floor, which Williams remodeled a couple of years ago, is a painting, interspersed with his picture, which he says illustrates his relationship with the potter, Jim Stewart, whose work appears throughout the house. Williams says he and Stewart are camping buddies, and there are flashes of red and yellow across the floor to perhaps symbolize a campfire, while the streams of conversation appear to assemble in the far corner, near a twoperson table, and spread out from there. While some of Williams’ pieces appear simplistic, Despain says that Williams’ process is meticulous to the point of obsession. When he makes changes to an installation, Despain says the change is catalogued and written down. Similar record keeping is done with postcards and letters: A copy is always made.

A fan of T-shirts, Williams says he’s created hundreds over the years, all of which incorporate his self portraits. On a warm Wednesday morning, as he sanded a piece of plywood in his driveway, Williams wore a faded tie-dye shirt, a picture of young Jim ironed onto the left sleeve. Originally from Kansas, Williams says he comes from farmer stock—the origins, he says, of the compulsive, hardworking and project-oriented side of himself. These traits, he says, propelled him through a career in architecture and have kept him on task over the years. By spring, he says he’ll be renting an apartment near his daughter and grandchildren, in Portland, Ore. The walls, he says, will be blank—a contention that Despain says is absolute “bullshit.” In Williams, Despain says she sees a pure artist, one who has constantly created artwork with no effort to show it or to sell it. This trait, she says, “the sheer dedication and depth of it, and the way that he was doing it in spite of being an outlier,” is what makes Williams so special. “He wasn’t showing it, he was just doing it because that’s what he does, that’s what he wanted to do and that’s a true artist,” Despain says. Williams imagines that he’ll miss creating self portraits, and he’ll miss his home; the fully grown fruitless mulberry tree he planted on a sweltering day four decades ago, the 1930s-era garage that he turned into a studio and greenhouse and every other corner of the place that has become as much a reflection of Williams’ psyche as it is a home. What Williams will do with new white walls in Portland is anyone’s guess, but it will most certainly be another chapter in the man’s life, making itself ripe for interpretation. “I need to go onto the next one, and the next one requires me to move on,” he says. CW


COMMUNIT Y ENRIQUE LIMON

NEWS Not Just Statistics

More than 1,000 gather to find solace after Orlando hate crime. BY ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net @EnriqueLimon

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e.

Local residents joined similar vigils around the state, country and the world on Monday to honor those senselessly slain in Orlando.

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Hasan told City Weekly after her speech. “They have rights equal to everybody else; they have a right to exist and they are children of God just like everybody else.” “The Muslims in Utah, we’re your friends, you don’t have to fear us,” Ul-Hasan said, stressing that regardless of the rhetoric that’s flooding the 24-hour news cycle, this is a time to unite. “The main thing is, that if you’re a person of faith, you cannot say that there’s a group of people that you hate, that you don’t want to have around and that you want to have aggression toward,” she said. “That’s not part of anything. That’s not part of any God or creator, because whether you are similar, different—you know, black, white, Hispanic, Muslim, Christian, Jew—it doesn’t matter because we were all created from God, so why would we feel that we have a right over anybody else to eliminate that being? On behalf of who?” Several in the audience carried signs remembering the victims’ names. Many wore top hats in honor of Edward Sotomayor Jr., who was known for donning a chapeau. Lifetime Salt Lake City resident Pete Liacopoulos took a different approach. Propped by a tree, the 52-year-old set up an American flag and a couple of hand-scribbled signs. One of them read “Omar burn in Hell,” referring to the gunman. “You don’t go around doing that. This is a despicable act right here,” Liacopoulos said. “I’m angry, because anybody here, if it happened to their child, they would feel the same way than those people do— madder than hell, lost.” In an evening filled with poignant moments, Cox asked members of the straight community in particular: “How did you feel when you heard that 49 people had been gunned down by a self-proclaimed terrorist? That’s the easy question. Here’s the hard one: Did that feeling change when you found out that the shooting was at a gay bar at 2 a.m. in the morning?” CW

in Jun e l p p a m a on Jim Be

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he knee-jerk thoughts and prayers settled, like Monday’s raindrops, members and allies of the local LGBTQ community trickled onto the the Salt Lake City and County Building’s lawn to gather and find comfort after Sunday’s mass shooting inside an Orlando, Fla., club that left 49 dead and 53 injured. The setting was surreal given that just a week earlier, that same patch of grass was the scene for arguably the most wellattended Utah Pride celebration in history. On Monday, however, trench coats replaced tank tops, umbrellas were favored over glow sticks, and joy made way to sobbing. “Many straight people worry about sharing a bathroom, queer people worry about being murdered for existing,” community activist Leslie Shaw said. “That’s not OK.” Shaw reiterated her support of the Latinx community, denounced the number of anti-LGBTQ pieces of legislation that have been introduced nationwide since samesex marriage became legal, and drew attention to the importance of gay-specific bars and gathering places. “If you cannot wrap your head around a bar or club being a sanctuary, you’ve probably never been afraid to hold someone’s hand in public,” she said. Another speaker, Lt. Governor Spencer J. Cox, started with “an admission and an apology.” The former was that he is a straight, white, middle-aged, Republican “with all of the expectations and privileges that come with those labels.” The apology was to those kids he went to school with in Mount Pleasant, those that were different. “Sometimes I wasn’t kind to them,” Cox said in a cracked voice. “I didn’t know it at the time, but I know now they were gay. I regret not treating them with the kindness, dignity and respect; the love that they deserved.” Cox further said he was sad, angry and confused, and underscored that those dead are “not just statistics. These were individuals, human beings. They each have a story; they each had dreams, goals, talents, friends, family. They are you and they are me.” Interfaith leader Noor Ul-Hasan took the opportunity to preach divine love and acceptance. “I think there’s a lot of love for eachother out there and [today’s group] want to make sure that they are heard as individuals and as a group of people,” Ul-


NUEVE

In a week, you can

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THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

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CHANGE THE WORLD

OLDEST HOMES PRESENTATION

Take a look before they’re all gone. Salt Lake City’s Yalecrest neighborhood is one of the oldest and most historic in the state—and also the most targeted for new construction. The K.E.E.P. Yalecrest nonprofit will take you through the ’hood in a slideshow presentation of the recent Oldest Homes Tour, introducing you to the history of the homes and their residents. Many homes are more than 100 years old. Hear the history of the homes and the residents. Anderson, Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-5820445, Thursday, June 16, 6:30-7:45 p.m., free to public, KeepYalecrest.org

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CITIZEN REVOLT

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It’s legal now—you can collect rainwater in your own backyard. Really, it used to be against the law. Now Salt Lake County, Murray City and Eagle Mountain are partnering with the Utah Rivers Council to offer residents 50-gallon rain barrels as part of what they call the “rainwater harvesting revolution.” Barrels can be daisy-chained with no added cost—all components included, even a 6-foot-long overflow hose. Salt Lake County Sports Complex, 595 S. Guardsman Way (adjacent and to the north of the U of U tailgate parking lot), 801-538-7240, Saturday, June 18, 8 a.m.-noon, see website for pricing, RainBarrelProgram.org/URC

SYMPHONY SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTO CONTEST

9 Headlines we came up with for this week’s issue. But do they listen to us? No, they don’t.

1. The Mane Attraction 2. The Cult of Colt 3. Hoof Are You to Judge? 4. Un-Stable Homes 5. Neigh Sayers 6. Equ-Us! 7. Ring Around the Bronies, We

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Get ready to take tons of photos in anticipation of the Utah Symphony & Opera’s Deer Valley Music Festival. “The Great DVMF Adventure” spotlights the six-week outdoor festival and summer events, which open Saturday, July 2, in Park City. This year, two separate social media contests include more than a dozen interactive photo challenges, encouraging participants to explore the many activities, attractions, experiences and sights of Park City. Participants will submit photographic “evidence” through Instagram, including the hashtag #DVMFadventure, tagging the Utah Symphony (@utahsymphony) and including the challenge number to submit their entry. Check out the grand prizes. Instagram.com, 801869-9027, Friday-Tuesday, July 1-5; Friday-Monday, July 15-18, free, DeerValleyMusicFestival.org

329 West Pierpont Avenue #100 | 801-935-4258 Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

Who’s a Good Boy? Life is good now for British men who “identify” as dogs and puppies, as evidenced by a BBC documentary (Secret Life of the Human Pups) showing men in body outfits (one a Lycrasuited Dalmatian, “Spot”), exhibiting “sexual” expressions (stomach-rubbing, ear-tickling and nuzzling their “handlers”), eating out of bowls, gnawing on chew toys, wearing collars (so as not to be a “stray”), and jumping in the air for “treats.” (However, decency demands that a Pup must only feign urinating against a lamppost.) Said Spot (aka Tom), “It’s about being given license to behave in a way that feels natural, even primal.” Added “Bootbrush,” “[We] are trying to grasp the positive elements of the archetype of the dog.”

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Everyone Deserves a Second Chance Efrain Delgado-Rosales was sentenced to five years in prison in March for smuggling noncitizens into the country. (The Border Patrol had caught him 23 times previously, but had declined to file charges.)

WEIRD

New World Order As an alternative to the more costly in vitro fertilization, researchers at a Dresden, Germany, institute announced (in the recent Nano Letters journal) that they had developed a motorized device tiny enough to fit around a sperm’s tail and which could be commanded to propel it to “swim” faster toward the target egg, increasing the chances of fertilization. A prototype is still in the works. n The internet pornography behemoth PornHub recently added to the glut of physical fitness “apps” with one designed to help users tone up sexual muscles. The BangFit’s routines include the “squat and thrust,” the “missionary press,” and other ways to practice what the company describes as the “one activity people are always motivated to do and (for) which they are never too busy.” (Imagine, for example, wrote Mashable. com, “quantify(ing) your dry humps.”)

Least Competent Criminals James Kinley III, 27, was charged in York County, S.C., in May with dealing marijuana. He apparently had the (unfounded) belief that York County deputies do not monitor Craigslist— because that is where Kinley advertised (“I Sell Weed”), in a notice with his photo, address and price ($200). n Grady Carlson, 58, went to the Carolina Title Loans office in Spartanburg, S.C., on May 25 to apply for a high-interest “payday” loan—and nervously paced while answering questions. The Carolina employee asked if anything was wrong, and Carlson allegedly disclosed that he needed money—fast!—to purchase methamphetamine. A subsequent police search turned up a glass container and drugs.

Recurring Themes (Cow Edition) For years, India has been concerned about the gas-release problem posed by its nearly 300 million cows (and 200 million more gasintensive animals), but researchers in Kerala state revealed a promising breeding answer in May: dwarf cows (about one-fourth the size, producing somewhat less milk but one-seventh the manure and one-10th the methane). (Pound for pound, methane traps 25 times as much heat as carbon dioxide.) (Bonus: The New York Times Style Book apparently now accepts the word “farting” in formal copy—while reporting that “belching” is the far more serious methane problem.) n In the early years of News of the Weird, urban readers learned of the custom of various Western locales’ charity cow-patty “bingo” games in which cows are fed and turned loose on a field of wageredupon squares. (In fact, in 1997 Canada’s Nova Scotia Gaming Control Commission temporarily banned the game while it investigated whether it could be “fixed” by training the cow to favor certain relief spots.) The event lives on, but a charity fundraiser in Great Falls, Mont., in May was halted when the cow jumped over a fence and had to be chased down. Rather than await the now-nervous (or perhaps constipated) cow, the contest winner was selected by random draw.

Thanks this week to Mel Birge, Stan Kaplan, Gerald Sacks, and Don Schullian, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

UTAH BLUES FESTIVAL

SATURDAY, JUNE 18

1PM-11PM AT THE GALLIVAN CENTER

YAPPY HOUR

MONDAY, JUNE 20

6PM-9PM AT JORDAN PARK (1060 S. 900 W.)

JUNE 16, 2016 | 15

News of the Weird Classic (June 2012) All U.S. states have forms of no-fault divorce, but England still requires that couples prove adultery, abandonment or “unreasonable behavior,” which leads to strange claims, according to an April (2012) New York Times dispatch from London. For instance, one divorcing woman’s petition blamed her husband’s insistence that she speak only in Klingon. Other examples of “unreasonable” behavior (gathered by the Times of London): a husband’s objecting to the “malicious” preparation of his hated tuna casserole, another’s 15-year silence (except for writing him Post-It Notes), a husband’s distorting the fit of his wife’s outfits by frequently wearing them, and one’s insistence that a pet tarantula reside in a glass case beside the marital bed.

UPCOMING EVENTS

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n When Triston Chase, 20, missed his court date in April in Harnett County, N.C., on financial fraud charges, it was revealed that his arrest in December had come when he had been found “residing” illegally, as a civilian, in a barracks at Fort Bragg—in a facility housing the Army’s 3rd Special Forces Group. According to a prosecutor, Chase had been posing as an explosive ordnance disposal specialist “for months.” The official investigation of Special Forces’ barracks “security” was still underway at the time of Chase’s court date.

Weird Animals Among the critters for which life is most difficult are male nursery web spiders that (according to May research in Biology Letters journal) instinctively “court” females with food wrapped in silk—offerings that (a) increase the males’ chances of scoring and (b) decrease, by 84 percent, their chances that the female will spontaneously eat the male. The study also found that males sometimes try to mate using nonfood items wrapped in silk (with mixed results) and also that sometimes unscrupulous females accept food gifts but nevertheless immediately devour the male.

Wait, What? Video surfaced in May of students at Winston Churchill High School in San Antonio, Texas, actually playing jump rope with the intestines of cats that had been dissected in biology class. Obviously, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals was not pleased, but school district officials called the exercise a valid demonstration of the “tensile strength of the organ” and only reluctantly agreed to investigate further.

DRAG BRUNCH 6.12

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Bright Ideas Argentina’s TV channels have many of the same taboos as U.S. broadcasting, including restrictions on women’s handson demonstration of how precisely to examine themselves for breast cancer. However, as AdWeek reported in March, the agency David Buenos Aires apparently solved the problem with an explicit TV public service announcement featuring a model (facing the camera, topless) showing exactly how such an exam should go, e.g., where to press down, where to squeeze. The secret? The model was an overweight man with generous-sized “manboobs.”

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The Continuing Crisis As Libya’s central bank struggles to stabilize a halting economy, it could surely use the estimated $184 million in gold and silver coins that Moammar Gadhafi minted but left buried in an underground vault in the coastal city of Beyda, but the treasure is inaccessible because central bank officials don’t know the lock’s combination (as The Wall Street Journal reported in May). The latest plan is to have a locksmith squeeze through a 16-by16-inch hole in the outer vault’s concrete wall and once inside to try his hand. If unsuccessful, the government’s bureaucrats likely cannot get paid, but even if successful, various anti-government factions may go to extremes to snatch the coins.

n Matthew Freeland, 29, was convicted of several homeinvasion offenses in Kingston, Ontario, in May, and the judge, considering a proper sentence, found only two previous probation orders—but then, looking further, found 59 convictions and sentenced Freeland to more than two years in prison.


A booming fringe community of Utah youth finds acceptance through My Little Pony

Kyler Black

By Stephen Dark

ife on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border was boredom or terror, with not too much in between. For combat engineer Kyler Black, serving at the remote Army outpost known as Firebase Asadabad also offered not only endless hours of Call of Duty: Black Ops on the Xbox while offduty, but also the thing he’d been longing for since he’d graduated from high school in a small town outside Richfield, Utah. “I wanted something to be able to tell somebody,” Black says. Whether guarding the perimeter while the occasional mortar was lobbed over his head by the Taliban, or hearing rounds ping off his truck in a midnight firefight, he would certainly have anecdotes to spare. But when Black returned from his tour of duty in 2011, he found his tales of combat did little to compensate for bouts of depression that left him struggling to get out of bed in the morning. After enrolling in classes at Utah Valley University in Orem, he found himself fighting an exhausting battle against thoughts of suicide. “My depression was killing me,” he says. Salvation came from an unlikely source—a children’s cartoon called My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic. Black says he was enchanted by the animation, the show’s emphasis on catchy songs and its stories set in the town of Ponyville, where six ponies learned how to be better friends whilst confronting personal challenges, and the occasional dragon or hydra. He binge-watched the first four seasons and now credits the show “with getting me out of

my really bad depression-funk.” The show premiered in October 2010 and is currently in its sixth season. Its premise was a re-imagining by The Powerpuff Girls creator Lauren Faust of a toy and television franchise created in the early 1980s by Hasbro—and intended for young girls. But Black soon discovered that other young men, typically white and heterosexual, across the United States, shared his fascination. The captivation even came with a name: brony, a portmanteau of “bro” and “pony.” The brony label is embraced by male and female teens and adults who adore the show, some secretly, others proudly and publicly bonding over their televisual passion and, in the process, creating their own communities. An ex-Mormon, Black began attending regular Saturday afternoon meetings of brony students at the LDS Church-owned Brigham Young University in Provo. It took several meetings before his initial apprehensions eased. “The community really impressed me,” he says. “There’s actually a bunch of grown men who watch a little girls’ show—and I’m one of them.” That Black was able to find a thriving community of fellow bronies on the campus of a college that revels in conformism is not as implausible as it might sound. Utah claims a unique position in the fandom. According to a survey known in brony circles as the Herd Census, which was conducted with the help of statisticians at Massachusetts’ Salem State University, the nation’s most Mormon state also has the highest per capita brony population in the country. Utah has 9.03 bronies per 100,000

DAVID HALLIDAY

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State of Brony

residents. Alaska comes in second with 8.16. In total, according to the “State of the Herd report” website, there are between seven and 12.4 million bronies in the U.S. In the early days of the fandom, fans would use the term “love and tolerate,” as a motto reflecting the show’s emphasis on friendship and kindness. But while some bronies have remained true to that motto, others have let it fall to the wayside, in part because of infighting, whether over which episodes are the best or even which is the best pony. “Some of us still have those core beliefs where we try to accept everyone no matter who they are, how they behave or what parts of the fandom they enjoy,” Salt Lake City brony Robby Galaviz says. On June 17 and 18, 2016, local and out-ofstate bronies will gather for the fourth annual Crystal Mountain Pony Convention at the Radisson hotel in downtown Salt Lake City. There, they’ll celebrate all things “pony” in the heart of a state where, Mormon and non-Mormon bronies alike say, “love and tolerance” can be hard to find.


RICK CAVENDDER

BYU Brony club co-founder Kirk Hamilton

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Plushies on display

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JUNE 16, 2016 | 17

In the first season’s opening two-part story-arc, a precocious purple and pink unicorn named Twilight Sparkle learns that friendship can be a life-changer for those reluctant to connect. That resonates profoundly with Galaviz. As IT manager for a local business, he has struggled with illness and depression. When the 2013 Crystal Mountain convention was announced, the until-then “secret brony” convinced himself he needed to get out and be more social. “After the con, I went fully brony,” says Galaviz, who later founded Bronies Drinking Coffee. “Something about the brony community hit me in the heart: how extremely funny it was, this weird thing that we all like, that we’re not afraid to show it even though you’re going to get a lot of shit for it, for liking a cartoon that was designed for little girls.” Galaviz, who is in his early 30s, says he was bullied as a child to the point he had to leave Utah with his grandfather for a period. While proud of his ethnic heritage and family name, he changed his first name to Robby, because that’s “who I identify as, instead of the person who was constantly knocked down and bullied.” When he recently ran into one of his former bullies, he asked him “why?” “It was fun,” he says was the answer. More than a half a dozen bronies interviewed by a City Weekly reporter described similar experiences with bullies and depression. “I think we have all had our past trauma that we’ve overcome with this fandom,” says Aaron Crandall, who was abandoned by his father when he was 10. “I’m still not completely over it. I felt I’d never be loved and accepted in this world, and the bronies have helped me out with that. It’s been amazing, life changing.” Troy Harry wears a rubber band on his wrist with the name of a teenage boy who drew brony attention, sympathy and fundraising efforts nationwide after he was bullied in 2011 and attempted suicide. Troy says he, too, was mercilessly bullied after he took a pillowcase featuring Barney the purple dinosaur to school for show-and-tell. Eventually the bullying died away, but when he moved to junior high, he put on weight and developed breasts. Again, he was the target of abuse, being called “Double D,” and “Booby boy.” Like Harry, Winter Day says she was painfully shy until she started coming to the Salt Lake brony club. The group “has helped me a lot with my social rehabilitation,” she says, although she’s “more of a fan of the fandom than the show.” Winter says she was raped as a child and cannot watch mainstream entertainment for fear images of sexual violence will trigger memories for her. “Mostly it’s child abuse and sexual violence I’m really sensitive to,” she says. “I mostly only consume family-friendly material because it’s safer.” When she came out as trans, she found acceptance at the club, where her brother Ez had been attending. That same welcoming embrace was not so apparent at work or among the neighbors who knew. She draws an analogy between the strange ideas and “prurient fantasies” people can have about members of the

K. HAMILTON

GOING FULL BRONY

Julie Johnson as My Little Pony character Princess Celestia

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For those unfamiliar with the brony community, it can be an emotive topic, in part because of a public discomfort with the idea of grown men who are involved with a show derived from little girls’ toys. “We’ve been called bad names,” says Galaviz, everything from pedophile to practitioners of zoophilia, or, in less scientific terms, one brony recalls, “horse-fucker.” Some of the tensions stem from gender stereotypes and long-standing ideals of masculinity in American culture, says Candi Carter-Olson, assistant professor in Utah State University’s Department of Journalism and Communitcation. The ideal man in American culture “doesn’t express emotion except anger, can’t be weak or afraid of anything and always has to be in control of women or non-hyper masculine men,” she says. “He has to be a protector.” Bronies, she says, break out of that potentially damaging paradigm, “challenging traditional masculinity in many ways.” University of Utah associate professor in gender studies Matt Basso notes that the 2010s are an era where “we are trying to figure out what we think about gender.” The line where bronies cross over into sexuality, however tenuously, is where the true rub emerges for many in society regarding the fandom. “That line between childhood and adulthood, especially when it runs up against sexuality,” he says, “still makes us uncomfortable.” Part of the American tradition of the ideal male is to be disconnected from children and essentially uninterested in childhood, Carter-Olson says. But to people like pundit Kelley Vlahos, who asked in a piece for The American Conservative whether bronies represented “the end of American manhood,” veteran Black has a defiant reply. “You can’t take my man card. I earned it,” he says of his tour of duty in Afghanistan. “I love guns. I like it when things go boom. I can’t think of anything more satisfying than making a whole tank vanish.” BYU Brony club co-founder Kirk Hamilton says he’s an Eagle Scout who chops wood and “is in touch with my inner man.” He continues, “I don’t think it’s necessarily we’ve lost what the traditional man is. The ideal man is a good father, a good countryman, a good neighbor, a man of service.” He argues that young men who are bronies represent “a good direction for us to be going. The show teaches us to be conscientious of other people’s feelings, to take a stand for yourself based on your own beliefs.” But while ideas about masculinity are shifting, bronies as yet have not benefited from the friendship and support they show each other as far as society is concerned. The brony community “is used to being persecuted,” says computer programmer and brony, Joe Broderick. They “feel degraded by the stereotype put on bronies of someone who lives in mom’s basement.” Spend time with bronies at BYU or at Bronies Drinking Coffee, a Salt Lake City-based social group that meets on Saturdays at a South Salt Lake coffeehouse called Kafeneio, and that stereotype does indeed seem illinformed. Rather, a different quality emerges—not one of people who might seek to victimize others, but of those who have been victimized themselves. In these groups, young men and women, several clutching pony toys, reveal histories of trauma, bullying, depression and marginalization. In the show’s positive values, and in their shared fandom, they’ve found an opportunity to heal, and forge an

ad hoc family structure providing warmth, friendship, safety and even empowerment. “In the world of My Little Pony, above all else,” Galaviz says, “friendship really is magic.”

KEITH SURVELL

THE TRUE RUB


FLYING THE FREAK FLAG

Roughly one in five bronies are female—a Facebook page for Utah Pegasisters, an alternative name for female bronies, has 200 members. Julie Johnson, a Layton-based brony and vice president of the Crystal Mountain Pony Con, says female bronies don’t generate the same kind of controversy as male bronies because the show is targeted at young girls. Being less controversial makes them “not as special,” she says, “as you’re a chick.” She argues that female bronies can themselves be marginalized, citing several documentaries on the fandom that did not feature interviews with women bronies. “That’s something that needs to change,” she says. “Being a brony doesn’t mean that you’re male.” Then there are the fan obsessives who are too brony even for other bronies. “There’s always the one guy who ruins the fun for everybody else, the guy who speaks the loudest,” Johnson says. “Let’s call him the ‘purist brony.’ He’s way too into the show, takes everything too seriously, and

BDC running the episode viewing at Crystal Mountain Pony Con 2015

BDC Winter Prom Formal and gift exchange

ROBBY GALAVIZ

18 | JUNE 16, 2016

STEPEH DARK

ROBBY GALAVIZ

takes it too far.” Creating space for everyone, bronies say, means allowing for those with extreme views of bronyism to be part of the community. That, they say, is because being a brony is about far more than watching a TV show. It’s about embracing your creative spirit, drawing on the inspiration from the show to pursue newly discovered talents, perhaps as a writer, penning fanfiction, as an artist drawing your own ponies or as a musician remixing My Little Pony songs or even creating original pony-inspired music. Utah has several high-profile bronies, including Dr. Wolf, who shares his insights into My Little Pony episodes on million-hit YouTube videos, and Nathan Carlin, whose My Little Pony-inspired music has drawn favorable reviews from the show’s creative team. “I know through My Little Pony a lot of artists have gotten the confidence to do more than [draw] ponies,” Johnson says. Kirk Hamilton co-founded the BYU Brony club. Out of frustration with his favorite show’s at-times opaque back stories of its characters, he wrote his own version of a history of the show’s universe. Thus far he has sold 144 copies. “One of the best things the community does is allow you to experiment,” he says. “It encourages you.” Or as Johnson says, “Fly your freak flag, my friend.” Just how freaky bronies are allowed to get, though, is a matter of some debate, especially in Utah, where many bronies are practicing Mormons. There is, as some might suspect, a side to bronyism that many adherents are reticent to discuss, and those who do are likely to reference “Rule 34,” which states that if it exists on the internet, there’s porn of it. In the brony world, hand-drawn pony porn is known as clop art. Masturbating to said porn is known as clopping. “We don’t talk about it in polite company,” Johnson says. At the Crystal Mountain Pony Convention, “We have a rule: If you’re looking to purchase something a little bit bluer, you can talk about it, but you can’t have it out, or we will confiscate it.” As of yet, that hasn’t happened, but the convention’s website was hacked once, though, by someone who posted risque, pony-related images.

trans community and about bronies. “Those of us who are marginalized have a lot in common I guess.” And that, Galaviz says, is a central element that unites many bronies. “The show teaches you that friendship really is something nobody should be afraid of.” He says the show has helped those who gather at his meetings “to find friendship among each other, to help each other out with our own issues, and get past whatever differences we may have had in the past.” At their meetings, fans gather round a TV to watch an episode, while others sit and talk while drawing “O.C.”s (original pony characters) which they have created as a representation of themselves, or an aspect of their personality. They talk about episodes and about their lives, and at times the meetings have the feel of a boistrous and affectionate family gathering. “We don’t discriminate,” Galaviz says. “We don’t say you’re too weird for us, that you need to go away. We give everyone a chance.” Even within the brony community, however, some feel marginalized.

ROBBY GALAVIZ

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Bronys Drinking Coffee (BDC) attend a Utah Furry Fandom Meeting

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BYU Brony Club celebrates Christmas with a MLP episode


BROTHER BRONY

RICK CAVENDDER

BRONIES HAVE THE POWER

David Halliday

Matthew Robinson, one of many Utah brony artists

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Stephen Carter

JUNE 16, 2016 | 19

Stephen Carter, who is Mormon, a nonsocial brony and editor of Sunstone magazine, a progressive Mormon intellectual publication, spies potential changes in Mormonism if LDS bronies rise through the ecclesiastical ranks. Mormonism values conformity to staunch male and female ideals, he says. In the My Little Pony universe, though, “you are valued because of your difference. I think there’s a huge hunger for that in Utah.” That’s because there’s “such a push, such a current to be the right sort of person, to present in the right sort of way. To even briefly inhabit a universe where people can go, ‘Oh my gosh, you’re so weird. Isn’t that great?’ gives us a nourishment we didn’t know we needed.” Carter recalls sitting down to watch the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic pilot with his two little girls and laughing the entire time. “I thought it was the best show ever,” he says. In those early years, he says being a brony was akin to belonging to a secret club, “Kind of like being a Christian after Christ was crucified, you’d make the sign of the fish in the ground. In the same way, you’d very carefully prod to see if this person is showing a brony sign,” whether it was an admission of knowledge of who a particular pony was, or a My Little Pony sticker on a laptop. Carter contrasts My Little Pony with the classic, 1980s cartoon He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, having grown up with the latter. He adored HeMan, which he describes as “a very moral show.” Both shows, he points out, offer moral lessons at the close of each episode. But He-Man had a very patriarchal foundation, he says, with values set heavily in good and evil, the latter represented by Skeletor and his male friends. “No one ever strayed from their assignments of good and evil,” he says. “It was a very earnest show.” My Little Pony, by contrast, hues to a matriarchal foundation, with many of the characters female, the supporting characters male and the plots revolving around conflicts between friends. “The moral basis of My Little Pony boils down to relationships and their interplay, rather than the conflict of good and evil,” he says. The two fundamentally different approaches to storytelling prove

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While bronies offer a variety of reasons for Utah’s place in the brony fandom—it’s the nerdiest state in the nation, the prevalence of both high-tech industry and the passion for science fiction and fantasy that makes Comic Con so successful—Michael DeGraw, the current president of the BYU Brony club, argues that Utah’s dominant Mormon population is the root cause. In a world where mainstream culture features profanity, violence, nudity and sexual imagery, he says, “I believe members are trying to keep their minds pure.” Mainstream entertainment, he adds, “can be awkward to watch when you know it isn’t right. I think a lot of members enjoy the show because they know it’s clean and wholesome and you don’t have to worry about all the nasty stuff that appears in the media sometimes.” Defending that purity, though, can be a challenge. Joe Broderick discovered My Little Pony through his young children. He was “instantly hooked” by the animation and the “relevant” jokes. A computer programmer, he set up a website for role playing, which allows, he says, “budding authors to practice their skills writing fiction,” while also for role players “becoming an outlet for exploring choices in their lives they wouldn’t usually take. For some it’s an escape; for others it’s free psychology.” Despite being centered on a show “built around love, tolerance, friendship and harmony,” Broderick says he got caught up in a turf fight with now-former members of his site who wanted to pursue a more sexually driven approach to the role-playing scenarios. That wasn’t the only problem. “Predators,” he says, “would seek to come into our role-play chat and solicit adult-orientated role-plays from our members.” That behavior, he says, was contrary to the site’s rules. “We’re here to escape reality, not bring too much to it,” he says. “It’s supposed to be a breath of fresh air, not more of the same.” What does appropriate participation look like in his mind? To demonstrate, Broderick invites a member on his website to role play. To start, the other member describes a scene where his pony greets Fluttershy, a painfully shy pony. Taking the role of Fluttershy, Broderick then writes that she “blushes more deeply, letting her mane fall across her face. ‘Oh well ummm hello I’m Fluttershy but … you already know that. Ummm. What’s your name?’” The bronies who frequent his role plays are “secret,” he says, “some afraid of family pressures, some of social pressures, some for fear of seeming less masculine. Honestly a good majority of people I interact with (on his website) would identify themselves as part of the LGBTQ community.” Much like at the social gatherings of brony clubs, his website, he says, provides “a place to call home, free from pressures and tensions of being members of different racial and gender groups. We provide that safe haven for them in a world that doesn’t judge or stereotype.”

With a wife and five children, Broderick says, “I have a very upstanding moral code,” from his membership of his church. Nevertheless, the irony isn’t lost on him that as a Mormon, he administers a site for members of a community his church has increasingly clashed with. Through his site, he’s developed friendships with people that “have helped me change who I am and understand better what it means to be tolerant and respectful of other people’s beliefs.”

DEREK CARLISLE

While there’s a lot of pushback from community members not wanting to even recognize its existence, still others say they have the right to express themselves. “Just like normal porn, you can’t legislate it away,” former BYU Brony president David Halliday says, but “you can put up good safeguards.”


instructive, he says, when you look at the LDS Church. Currently, the church is pursuing the “HeMan approach,” he says, where “evil is out there and we need to defend ourselves against [it].” He cites the November 2015 exclusion policy issued against church members in same-sex marriages and their children. “Whereas before there was a little bit of give, it’s gone now. We’ve thoroughly entered the He-Man world, where Skeletor is same-sex marriage.” And that, he says, comes back around to how the show challenges masculinity. That’s a perspective University of Utah professor Basso also picks up on, namely that Mormon culture idealizes a male in the LDS sensibility, focusing on “being a good son and a good father and having a strong religious grounding.” Bronies, he says, “would in many ways challenge that, at least in my sense that bronies are more challenging of overtly militaristic, macho masculinity.” The Mormon male ideal, Sunstone’s Carter says, is taking care of a family on a single income while maintaining a high calling in the church. That’s a lot to live up to for a Mormon who, post-mission, woos and marries a woman, only for both to be alone in increasingly pressured situations. The man addresses the needs of his ward and ecclesiastical calling and the woman works “to maintain the family and the Mormon image, but their relationship is hardly a thing at all. What brought you together—that sense of intimacy, of working well together—is almost immediately aborted.”

THE PINKY PIE DOCTRINE

My Little Pony, in essence, presents an alternative universe to a Mormon youth raised to think only of his mission. Carter imagines a Mormon youth

MLP fans gather at 2015 Utah Con

JULIE JOHNSON

JULIE JOHNSON

Bronies take a bow at the 2015 Salt Lake City Pony Con

JULIE JOHNSON

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Pegasisters display their wings at the 2014 Salt Lake City Pony Con

watching the show and seeing a world where instead of donning the Mormon male ideal mask, with all it suggests of a future of marital isolation, he can embrace a world where people love each other. That’s evident to a degree in a visit to the BYU Bronies, less a hotbed of subversion than a slumber party for pony fans. The last Saturday before Christmas 2015 on the BYU campus, a group of mostly young men and several married couples, one with a baby, gathered in a windowless room to celebrate Yuletide, My Little Pony style. An episode was screened, and there were pony-shaped cookies, with a variety of different colored frostings to spread over them. Three couples have met through BYU Brony gatherings, former club president Halliday says, including current president Michael DeGraw, who just married fellow BYU student and brony Rachel Bartholomew. There’s a bubbly sense of contentment at the BYU gatherings. “When you accept friendship, which is the central purpose of the show, then people aren’t standoffish. They are there for the same things,” Halliday says. Halliday says that “college is a pretty safe place to be a brony,” although, he adds in an email, he has still had to deal with both disgust and disapproval from other students at BYU. On one occasion, he recalls, “one girl confronted me and said it was wrong for me to like the ponies sexually (mentioning porn and masturbation.) I had to stop her right there and explain I was not sexually attracted to the cartoon—I just really enjoyed watching it.” Halliday discovered My Little Pony following the recommendation of a youth pastor on a podcast called Nobody’s Listening. He thought he’d mock the pastor’s glowing review, but instead fell in love and binge-watched the first season. He had no idea, he says, there was a fandom around it. He found himself questioning, “Am I really watching this?” and “Why do I like this?” and at that point, consulting on the internet, he discovered he wasn’t alone. Being part of the fandom has been educational for him. “Through meeting other people, hearing their perspective, it’s shaped more of my political mind,” he says. “In a lot of cases I’m diametrically opposed to where I was before My Little Pony. It opened the door but it wasn’t the changing factor.” BYU Brony club co-founder Hamilton doesn’t view the show as subversive, but rather as a facilitator. “I think the biggest thing the show does is open channels of communication without

shutting down any types of beliefs. It’s less an insidious plan to turn conservative people more liberal, but rather to get people to communicate, to be willing to listen to other people’s ideas, even if you don’t agree with them.” And it’s that focus on communication, Sunstone’s Carter argues, that may one day help blunt the “He Man” politics that currently pit Mormons against more progressive thinkers, even in their own ranks. Carter predicts that “when bronies start to enter the Mormon hierarchy, things will start to change. Bronies will bring with them a sense of conflict based not on good and evil, but on friendship and tolerance, on embracing those who are different from you, rather than setting them apart. They will see the world more playfully instead of more earnestly. They will be looking at how Pinky Pie could add to the church.” He argues that bronyism brings a subversive tilt to Utah that is similar to the role that Christ played among the Jews, where “Jesus constantly threw monkey wrenches into the Jewish culture. I see My Little Pony fulfilling a similar role.” He continues, “Jesus taught the most important thing you can do is love one another. He was about what is your relationship with God and the people around you. In a lot of ways the story of Jesus resembles a My Little Pony episode,” he says, “Except they don’t crucify anybody at the end.” CW

Pony art by Josh Reed


ESSENTIALS

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The Green Loft is a cooperative organization purposed, as the name implies, around sustainability and energy efficiency—”green living,” as they call it. Their location, on Highland Drive, has also been hosting art exhibits loosely based on green themes, and this month features the works of Bob Kleinschmidt and the loft’s art curator, Kristina Lenzi. Kleinschmidt, a printmaker, came to Salt Lake City in 1969 to teach in the art department at the University of Utah, and in his three decades there made an indelible impression on his students and the local art scene, through various exhibits he participated in, most notably the Springville Museum of Art. As Professor Emeritus, his work still engages with viewers through its use of objects from the world of nature as symbols, highly personal yet immediately accessible. He showed there last year, but this exhibit is a completely different body of work. Lenzi was a former student of Kleinschmidt; it’s fascinating to study the instructor’s impact and influence through the lens of her own work. Her drawings are more psychological, using the vehicle of self-portraiture to probe the dimensions of consciousness (“Consciousness 1: Multitudes of Denial” is pictured). His example can be felt in her teaching methods as an adjunct professor in the art departments of the U of U and Weber State University. Though she has broadened the scope of her work into collage, drawing and performance art, it all focuses on the psyche. (Brian Staker) Bob Kleinschmidt and Kristina Lenzi @ Green Loft Gallery, 2834 S. Highland Drive, through July 1, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MondayFriday; artists’ reception Friday, June 17, 6-10 p.m. GoGreenLoft.com

If you haven’t visited the Utah Foster Care Chalk Art Festival—taking place June 17-19 on nearly every available square of sidewalk running down the middle of The Gateway in downtown SLC—in any of its past 14 incarnations, you have been missing out on not only beautiful artwork created with one of the most impermanent tools in the art world, but also a great cause. The festival is meant to bring awareness to foster care, drawing attention to the needs of kids placed in the foster system to have reliable adults in their lives, as well as the funds to support those adults in their efforts to provide safe families for the foster kids they have stepped up for. Artists participating in the event are separated based on their year in school—with one group filled by youth in grades 6-12 and the other set aside for anyone post-high school—to vie for the similarly separated awards offered in four categories: best in theme; people’s choice; best in show; and a sponsorship competition, given to the artists in each age group who raise the most money for their sponsor. There are different things to enjoy each day of the festival, as artists will work on their masterpieces both June 17 and 18, producing work in various states of completion. On June 19, however, each finished piece will be primed for optimal gallery strolling. (Casey Koldewyn) Utah Foster Chalk Art Festival @ The Gateway, 18 N. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, 877-505-5437, June 17, 4-9 p.m., June 18-19, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., free. ChalkArtFestival.org

Relive childhood summers of Slip’N Slides with the ultimate slide, as a record-breaking 1,000 feet of inflated vinyl returns to Salt Lake City on June 18. Last year, thousands of attendees were able to cool down by cruising down the slide with complimentary inner tubes, and this year should be just as popular. Slide the City stretches down three blocks of the hill on Main Street above North Temple. The slide pumps more than 6,000 gallons of water down its length, and combined with the steepness of Main, the volume of water can allow sliders to hit some pretty serious speeds. The slide offers two lanes—one for individuals, and a wider one for families and friends to slide down together. Event organizers recommend making a day of it; for entertainment before and after slide sessions, local vendors will provide food and merchandise, as well as live music. The event’s website also recommends that participants bring their own water guns or water buckets to keep cool throughout the day. Slide the City organizers say that the slide is thrilling, but still safe: The pump system keeps the water clean for everyone using the slide, and as an additional safety measure, each slider receives a mouth guard. Reserve a time spot by registering on Slide the City’s website, and then pick up your wristband and other swag in advance. Doing so on the day of the slide will only mean more waiting in line, and less playing in the water. (Kathleen Stone) Slide the City @ North Temple and Main Street, Salt Lake City, June 18, 9 a.m., $15-$99. SlideTheCity.com

JUNE 16, 2016 | 21

A city may be full of talented artists, but quite often, talent isn’t enough. Artists need ways to get their work out into the world, and even as democratizing technology has made certain kinds of artistic work easier to distribute, others depend on organizations with a mission to showcase that work. It’s hard to be a playwright if nobody stages your play. Wasatch Theatre Co. has been committed to that kind of mission for most of the past 20 years, and this year takes its dedication to artists in a different direction: new work by artists specifically inspired by a completely different kind of art. For this year’s incarnation of that annual Page to Stage Festival, local photographers were commissioned to provide images—like the one above, by Ann Davis—that would provide the starting point for writers to create their short plays. Playwrights were then assigned a cast of actors for whom to write, and over the past several months, those original works have been coming together for this weekend’s world-premiere performances. Ryan Noufer, Dave Hansen, Mandy Barfuss, Nicholas Dunn and Lindsey Hall are the writers whose short plays debut, covering topics ranging from gender politics to religious radicalism, and tones from drama to absurdism. The company’s own Beth Bruner also premieres her own new play Keep A-Runnin’ in a special staged reading on June 18 at 4 p.m. Join the artists for a reception following the Friday performance, and support new art. (Scott Renshaw) Wasatch Theatre Co. Page to Stage Festival @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 16-17, 8 p.m. & June 18, 1 p.m. & 8 p.m., $20 general admission, ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org

Slide the City

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SATURDAY 6.18

Utah Foster Care Chalk Art Festival

FRIDAY 6.17

Bob Kleinschmidt and Kristina Lenzi

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Motor Mouth From morning radio to podcasts to standup, Jim Norton has plenty of places to talk. BY GAVIN SHEEHAN comments@cityweekly.net @TheGavinSheehan

J PAGE TO STAGE FESTIVAL Rose Wagner June 16th

im Norton has a lot going on these days. Aside from being a co-host on Opie with Jim Norton, the comedian is running his own SiriusXM program, The Jim Norton Advice Show; working on a new original animated series, The Chip Chipperson Show, based on one of his characters; and will be co-hosting a new UFC podcast later this month with former welterweight champion Matt Serra. Earlier this year, he started a new tour called Mouthful Of Shame, bringing his uncensored sensibility to everything from Caitlyn Jenner to Donald Trump.

City Weekly: You’re coming up on two years running with Opie on the morning show. What’s your time been like working with him as a team?

Jim Norton: You know, it’s weird without Anthony. You never get used to it. I know Opie well enough to work with him, but it’s one of those things where I don’t know what the show is sometimes. They call it Opie with Jim Norton or Opie with Jim, but it’s still Opie’s show. When it was Opie and Anthony, that was okay, because that was the way I came in. But now that it’s a different show, I feel like ‘Man, I’m 47 and I’m still just kinda on someone else’s show.’

BEER, BRATS, & BLUEGRASS

Historic Depot Square, WY

June 17th & 18th

How’s The Advice Show been?

I enjoyed that today! I was doing an episode today in my living room on a piece-ofshit outdoorsy canvas chair, so it was kind of fun. I love doing it from home.

It was announced last week you’re joining Matt Serra for a new UFC podcast, which is super cool for me as a fan. What are you guys looking to do with the show?

Don’t know—it’s a great question. We’ve done a few sit-downs, but nothing for broadcast yet. So next week, when we sit down and do some run-throughs, we’ll probably do a recording on the 20th for it to go up [on June 21].

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Do you have any ambition to do live fight commentary down the road?

No, [Joe] Rogan’s the best announcer in sports. We might broadcast live from somewhere, do some live events, but I don’t know the sport well enough. Kenny Florian does a great job, [as well as] Mike Goldberg. Even fighters have a real hard time doing that. It’s a real art form.

The Chip Chipperson Show got 31 percent of its funding on Indiegogo. Are you still looking to produce it, or are things on hold for now?

Oh, yeah! The reason I did flexible funding is because the guy who ran the page asked for a lot more money than I wanted to ask for. No one was being deceptive or scummy, or trying to ‘get over.’ I said originally maybe $100,000 maximum, and he was saying ‘no, you gotta do $200,000,’ because he does campaigns in the millions. People sometimes lose a third [of the funding] in the perks you have to give people. So we wound up with $61,000, Inidegogo took their cut, and now we got a finalized contract. It’s probably going to cost me to send out [perks] … I’m guessing around $15,000. I’m probably going to have $41,000 to play with. So I’m not going to do as many episodes, or raise the animation quality. But I want to do something different because, the feedback we got was that some people loved it and thought it was really funny, I heard some really smart feedback on what was wrong with it. But some people who love Chip, they’re used to Chip operating in the real world, even though it’s always in the studio, people are used to it being this live interaction. And seeing it in a cartoon world was weird. So how do I capture that live feeling—what can I do to make them happy, too?

So aside from all of those projects, what else do you have in the works?

I want to do another special, which I’m supposed to find out about this week. But a third book, I’ve been thinking about for a

Jim Norton

long time. I just keep getting motivated, then unmotivated, then motivated, then unmotivated. … I’ve just kinda been lazy about it.

You’ve played SLC multiple times. Any cool stories of touring or coming through Utah?

I met a couple of girls in Utah, [but] it’s a tough market to get laid in. But I love the crowds up there. First [time] coming through, you never think the crowds will be as good as they are, but they’re actually good comedy crowds. I’m hoping people will come out and see the show and love it because of that reason.

What can people expect on this tour? All new material, or a mix of old and classic?

Oh yeah, Charlie Sheen stuff, Cosby stuff that wasn’t in my last special, of course Jared from Subway, Caitlyn Jenner, Trump, just everything that’s kinda been happening. … But a lot of the stuff … even though it’s topical, I try to tie it all in so it feels like you’re watching something [that will still be] relevant in a year. CW

JIM NORTON

The Depot 400 W. South Temple 801-467-8499 Saturday, June 18 8 p.m., 21+ $36 JimNorton.com TheDepotSLC.com


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Arsenic and Old Lace Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center, 435-797-8022, through Aug. 5, varying days, 7:30 p.m.; July 23, 1 p.m., CCA.USU.edu The Curious Savage CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801298-1302, through July 2, Monday & ThursdaySaturday, 7 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org Dancing in Wonderland Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center St., Provo, 801-852-7007, June 21, 7 p.m., Provo.org Disney’s The Little Mermaid SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, 699 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, through June 18, Monday-Saturday, 8 p.m., SCERA.org Fiddler on the Roof Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry, 435-723-8392, through June 25, Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; June 18, 2 & 7:30 p.m., HeritageTheatreUtah.com High School Musical Jr. Timpanogos Valley Theater, 90 N. 100 West, Heber City, 435-6542125, through June 18, Fridays & Saturdays, TimpValleyTheatre.com The Man of La Mancha LaForge Encore Theatre Co., 328 N. Coleman, Tooele, 435-248-2048, through June 25, 7 p.m., LaForgeEncore.org The Most Lamentable Roman Tragedy of Titus Andronicus Pinnacle Acting Co., Westminster College Dumke Auditorium, 1250 E. 1700 South, 801-810-5793, through June 25, 7:30 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., PinnacleActingCompany.org National Theatre Live: Hangmen Broadway Centre Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-587-8879, June 18, 12 p.m., THC.Utah.edu Page to Stage Festival Wasatch Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801355-2787, June 16-18, 8 p.m., 1 p.m. matinee June 18, ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 21) Perfect Pitch Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 20, varying days/times Monday-Friday, DesertStar.biz Peter Pan Hale Center Theatre Orem, 225 West 400 North, 801-226-8600, June 16-Aug. 6, Monday-Saturday 7:30 P.M., Saturday matinee 3 p.m., HaleTheatre.org

Dave Newman’s “Sitting Bull Series” is on display at Modern West Fine Art (177 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3383, ModernWestFineArt.com) June 17-July 9. Pirates of Penzance The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, June 17-July 23, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheOBT.org Rock of Ages Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through June 25, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m. & special sing-along June 18 & 25, 2 & 7:30 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, June 22-Aug. 28, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org Shrek the Musical Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-3930070, through July 30, Mondays, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., TerracePlayhouse.com Staged Reading by Beth Bruner Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801355-2787, June 18, 4 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org West Side Story CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-2981302, June 20-July 18, various showtimes, CenterPointTheatre.org

DANCE

SNaked: The True Story of the Garden of Eden SB Dance, Rose Wagner Black Box, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 17 & 18, 8 p.m., SBDance.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Murray Concert Band Summer Concert Murray Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, Salt Lake City, June 18, 8 p.m., MurrayConcertBand.org Tabernacle Organ Recitals Tabernacle, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, year-round, MondaySaturday, 12 p.m., MormonTabernacleChoir.org Utah Symphony Taylorsville Regional Park, 5100 S. 2700 West, Taylorsville, 801-533-6683, June 22, 7 p.m., UtahSymphony.org Beethoven, Mozart and More Utah Symphony, Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 801-533-6683, June 20, 8 p.m., UtahSymphony.org


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moreESSENTIALS COMEDY & IMPROV

Arden Myrin Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, June 17-18, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Comedian Doug Wyckoff Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, June 17, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Drew Lynch Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 16 & 19, 7:30 p.m.; Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th Street, Ogden, 801-6225588, June 16-17, 7 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Improv Broadway Dress Rehearsals Brigham Larsons Pianos, 1497 South State Street, Orem, 909-260-2509, every Monday, 8 p.m., free, ImprovBroadway.com Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, every Friday, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Jim Norton The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 801-355-5522, June 18, 8 p.m., DepotSLC.com (see p. 22) Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Christian Mckay Heidicker: Cure for the Common Universe The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 18, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Christopher Husberg: Duskfall Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, June 21, 6:30 p.m., WellerbookWorks.com Lindsey Leavitt &Julie Olsen: Commander & Cheese: The Big Move and Discover America: From Sea to Shining Sea The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 21, 6:30-8 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Stephen King: End of Watch Juan Diego High School, 11800 S. 300 East, 801-484-9100, June 17, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Fort Douglas Day Fort Douglas Military Museum, 32 Potter St., June 18, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., FortDouglas.org Slide the City North Temple and Main Street, Salt Lake City, June 18, 9 a.m., $15-$99, SlideTheCity.com (see p. 21) Utah Blues Festival Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, June 18, 10 a.m., $20-$60, UtahBluesFest.org Utah Foster Chalk Art Festival The Gateway, 18 N. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, 877-5055437, June 17, 4-9 p.m.; June 18-19, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., free, ChalkArtFestival.org (see p. 21)

FARMERS MARKETS

Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market 600 Main Street, Park City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., June 5-Sept. 18, ParkSillySundayMarket.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont, Salt Lake City, June 8-Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, June 11-Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

TALKS & LECTURES

ARTLandish: Land Writers Salt Lake City Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, 801-5248200, June 16, 7 p.m., UMFA.Utah.edu

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Absence. Presence. CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, June 17-July 8, CUArtCenter.org Art at the Main Spring Show Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, through June 25, ArtAttheMain.com Bob Kleinschmidt and Kristina Lenzi Green Loft Gallery, 2834 S. Highland Drive, through July 1, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday; artists’ reception Friday, June 17, 6-10 p.m., GoGreenLoft.com (see p. 21) Claire Taylor: The Inhabitants of the Salt Lake City Cemetery Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through June 24, SLCPL.org Colour Maisch and Gary Vlasic Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, June 17-Aug. 5, SaltLakeArts.org Dave Newman Modern West Fine Art Gallery, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, June 17-July 9, ModernWestFineArt.com (see p. 24) Don Weller: Another Cowboy Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-6498882, June 17-July 24, KimballArtCenter.org Ideologue Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 23, UtahMOCA.org Jennet Thomas: The Unspeakable Freedom Device Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 30, UtahMOCA.org Jennifer Seely: Supporting Elements Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Jim Williams: 265 I...Home As Self-Portrait Utah Musuem of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Lucy Peterson Watkins: Textures of the Wasatch Red Butte Garden, 300 S. Wakara Way, 801-5850556, through June 19, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., $7-$12, children under 3 free, RedButteGarden.org Nic Courdy: Metaphornography Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through July 23, UtahMOCA.org Nouveau Pastiche: Paintings by Wendy Van de Kamp Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through July 9, SLCPL.org The Painted Veil Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande, through July 8, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., VisualArts.Utah.gov Snapshots: Mixed Media Works by Larry Cohen Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through July 7, SLCPL.org Through Her Eyes: Photography by Utah Female Photojournalists Salt Lake City Main Library, Lower Urban Room Gallery, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 24, SLCPL.org Whitney Bushman: The Greatest Joy Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Aug. 6, UtahMOCA.org


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you-can-eat buffet brunch ($34/adults; $17/kids), from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. I don’t know where Sundance finds all of its affable, professional servers, but Charlie Behan is another gem. He walked us through the buffet—from the salad and omelet/carving stations through the massive array of desserts—encouraging us to take our time and enjoy everything. I started Sunday brunch with chilled shrimp and local artisan cheeses before moving on to the yummy poached eggs on steak hash. Curried chicken with basmati rice was delicate and delicious, as I worked my way toward the carving station’s roasted lamb and prime rib. Drinks (coffee, tea, juice, milk and soft drinks are complimentary) were regularly refilled, and used plates efficiently bussed. Other can’t-miss options include the divine French toast, smoked trout, spinach salad, smoked salmon and, of course, notable desserts like killer chocolate cake, banana-chocolate bread pudding, housemade cookies, tarts and more. After all that enjoyable eating and imbibing, we were more than ready to take advantage of Sundance’s summer biking and hiking trails to help burn a few calories. We also hope to return soon to attend one of the special evenings of the Bearclaw Supper Club at the mountaintop Bearclaw Cabin, which take place on June 25, July 30 and August 27. People often ask me where, in culinary terms, they can find Utah. I think the soul of Utah is at Sundance. CW

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The grilled octopus ($16)—tossed with tiny white beans, piquillo peppers, migas (Mexican-style croutons) and chimichurri—was remarkably tender. Just as delicate and lovely was sushi-grade diced hamachi ($17) served alongside a hollowed-out and sliced avocado, with grapefruit, fried rice and fresh basil. As delicious as this dish is, I’d suggest serving the hamachi atop the hollowed avocado rather than underneath it, just for aesthetic appeal. My son, Hank, was willing (barely) to share his starter of grilled asparagus and morels with a poached egg, parmesan cracker and Madera veal, and I’m glad he did. It’s a wonderful appetizer or shared dish, and one that pairs beautifully with Honig-Sundance Napa Sauvignon Blanc—part of the Sundance Artists Wine series. Another superb wine pairing suggested by the Sundance folks is Bucklin Sonoma Zinfandel and tender, juicy elk loin with an array of seasonal mushrooms, red cabbage, Brussels sprouts and tart blackberrypomegranate mostarda ($48). If that sounds like a dish better enjoyed in winter, opt for the summery Moroccan-spiced airline chicken breast ($32) with pearl couscous, colorful heirloom carrots and natural chicken jus. I’ve felt over the decades that Tree Room cuisine has often varied from good to great, depending on who’s been heading up the kitchen. Right now, under the supervision of resort Executive Chef David Mullen, it’s hitting very high notes. He is ably assisted by a talented team that includes Senior Restaurant Manager Jonny Losee, Executive Sous Chef Eric Miller, Resort Pastry Chef Ashleigh Dougherty and Sous Chef Ashley Parkins. Opened in 1996, the Foundry Grill at Sundance is named for the large foundry wall located in the main dining room. On Sundays, they offer a top-notch all-

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ne of the very first restaurant reviews I ever wrote—as a fresh-faced newbie just discovering the Utah dining scene—was some 20-plus years ago, on the Tree Room at Sundance Resort. Don Heidel was the chef back then; he’s now executive chef at the Alta Club. A couple of decades ago, I liked the Tree Room and Sundance a lot. I still do. It’s amazing how timeless Sundance seems. Prices have risen a bit through the years and the cuisine evolves with the times, but it is still one of the state’s most appealing and reliable dining destinations. Time seems to slow down at Sundance. No one appears to be in a rush, and it’s the perfect locale to unwind and catch one’s breath. The resort and its employees manage to combine world-class professionalism with a relaxing, friendly style—a mix that’s not easy to achieve. The dining and drink venues in particular—under the watchful eye of Steve Solomon, director of food and beverage—are not just among Utah’s most revered, but I think some of the best in the West. If you’ve never heard the Tree Room genesis story, Sundance’s fine dining restaurant was thusly named because in 1970, when it was built, founder Robert Redford—who is nothing if not environmentally conscious—chose to build his restaurant around an existing 65-foot pine tree rather than cut it down. The Tree Room—and the tree—are still going strong. First-time visitors should allot some time to wander the restaurant and take in the Native American art and Western memorabilia that is on display from Redford’s personal collection. Then sit back, chill and enjoy one hell of an evening. No one will rush you should you decide to linger over just one more glass of wine or some other after-dinner drink. Although every Tree Room staff member I’ve encountered is first-rate, thank your culinary luck if you should wind up with Skyler Saenz as your head server. This guy could work anywhere. He’s not only knowledgeable down to the last pea tendril in the polenta agnolotti starter, but since he is also working on his second-level sommelier certification, he knows his wine pairings as well. He started us off with a clever bite-size take on strawberry shortcake for an amuse bouche, which we enjoyed with glasses of Gloria Ferrer Sonoma Brut. By the way, the wine list is excellent.

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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

SPEND $30 & GET $5 OFF

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Dad’s Day Duel

Bambara (202 S. Main, 801-363-5454, Bambara-SLC.com) hosts a Father’s Day Duel on Sunday, June 19, which features a beer pairing dinner pitting the tastes of Executive Sous Chef Brian Kenney against Assistant General Manager Jason Nardone. Four courses will be paired with two beers per course. Customers will decide who came up with the best pairings and have a chance to win a free weekend night at the Hotel Monaco.

3370 State St. in Chinatown | (801) 486-8800 | HoMeiBBQ.com

Olympic Food Trucks

Combining the joys of skating and grazing, The Utah Olympic Oval (5662 Cougar Lane, Kearns) has announced its partnership with the Utah Food Truck League. Every Wednesday night during the summer, visitors to the Oval can enjoy great food from an array of local food trucks along with public ice skating. Guests are invited to beat the heat from 7-9 p.m. in the climate-controlled arena; the food trucks will operate from 5-8 p.m. Among them are The Matterhorn (a gourmet French toast truck), Silver Moon Taquería (Utah’s first and only fish taco truck), Cupbop (Korean barbecue in a cup), Shylo’s Mobile Café (artisan sandwiches, soups, fries and pies), Casa De Soul (Southwestern fusion and comfort food) and Tushar Brazilian Express (fast-casual Brazilian fare). Public skating admission is $3.50 for ages 3 to 12; $5 for participants 13 and older. UtahOlympicLegacy.org.

Take Dad Glamping

The Conestoga Ranch luxury-camping destination at Bear Lake is gearing up to celebrate dads on Father’s Day weekend. Festivities kick off on Friday evening, June 17, with a western barbecue at the resort’s Campfire Grill Restaurant. Dinner is complimentary for dads and $24 for other adults; $16 for kids 12 and under. Live entertainment will be provided by Sam DeLeeuw, a poet, humorist and emcee. Saturday, June 18, feature a bean toss, ping pong tournament and pizza-making contest, with prizes from the Conestoga Ranch General Store. The crowned pizza winner will receive a one-night stay in a Conestoga wagon during the 2016 season. Saturday night’s entertainment at Campfire Grill will feature western outlaw music by GT Hurley, a Montana-based singersongwriter. ConestogaRanch.com. Quote of the week: “Where you eat is sacred.” —Mel Brooks Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Virtually Umbria

Tasting the Italian wines of Tuscany’s little sister BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

O

n June 9, I took part in a virtual wine tasting. The wines I tasted were an array of reds and whites from Umbria, a small vineyard region in Italy. Wait, what is a “virtual wine tasting,” you ask? Well, the tasting was real. The virtual aspect was that a handful of wine writers around the world—including yours truly—were connected via Twitter during the tasting, to exchange and compare notes, provide feedback and so forth. The timing was good, insofar as I’d recently become especially interested in Umbrian wines, thanks mostly to having enjoyed those of producers such as Antonelli, Arnaldo-Caprai and others.

The small region of Umbria is bucolic in comparison to its bigger brother, Tuscany. The reds from Umbria I tasted were mostly Montefalco Rosso: light, approachable, everyday wines that are blends of Sangiovese and Sagrantino, plus frequently a splash of Merlot, Montelpulciano or Cabernet Sauvignon. And, while Umbria’s best known white wine is Orvieto, I had fun during the tasting mostly with Grechetto and Montefalco Bianco whites. Not all of them might be available where you live, but they are mostly bargains, and worth tracking down or special ordering. Grechetto is a white grape variety of Greek origins that’s strongly associated with Umbria, although it’s also grown in Tuscany and Lazio. While Grechetto is primarily a blending grape, I tasted a couple wines made solely from Grechetto. Arnaldo-Caprai Grecante Grechetto 2015 ($19) has the peach aromas you expect in Orvieto, along with green apple and pear flavors. There’s a slightly vegetal note mid-palate that makes me think it would be a good partner for salads and asparagus dishes. Terre de la Custodia Grechetto 2014 ($20) is another 100 percent Grechetto wine. As with Arnaldo-Caprai, it undergoes no malolactic, is fermented in steel tanks and sees no oak. Fresh peach scents and citrus flavors characterize this light-bodied, creamy textured vino—one that would pair well with

DRINK poultry and seafood dishes. Next up from Umbria was a fullbodied white called Perticaia Trebbiano Spoletino 2015 ($23). Although Trebbiano is one of the planet’s most widely planted grapes, it tends to produce unremarkable wines. This one is an exception. It’s big and bold, with floral and tropical fruit aromas and some nuttiness on the nose. The finish is off-dry (slightly sweet), and I would recommend it to anyone trying to break the Chardonnay habit. Chardonnay lovers will also dig Tabarrini Adarmando Bianco 2013 ($35), a high-end Trebbiano Spoletino wine that is aged a minimum of 12 months in stainless steel on the lees. Frankly, I thought it was aged in wood, given its richness and depth. It’s very floral, almost like a cross between Viognier and Sauvignon Blanc, but with the heft of Chardonnay. I’d love to take it for a spin with a creamy lobster or crab dish. Scacciadiavoli literally means “cast out the devils”

in Italian, and the Scacciadiavoli winery takes its name from a 19thcentury exorcist who lived in the small village bordering the winery’s vineyard. Scacciadiavoli Montefalco Bianco DOC 2014 ($20) is a full-bodied, complex blend of Grechetto (50 percent), Trebbiano (25 percent) and Chardonnay (25 percent). Prior to blending, the Grechetto and Trebbiano are aged in steel tanks sur lie, while the Chardonnay ferments in wood casks. The result is a fruity nose of apricot and peach with floral hints, and a crisp mouthfeel with a long finish. Of all the wines I was able to taste—too many to list here—my favorite was Còlpetrone Montefalco Rosso 2011 ($16). Made from Sangiovese, Sagrantino and Merlot, this is a powerful, but well-balanced, red that is perfect for roasts and grilled meats. Next time you’re wine shopping—cyber or otherwise— take a trip to Umbria. CW


The shack is back!

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In The Heart Of Sugar House

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Vegetarians beware: The Habit Burger Grill has some of the best in the state, from the Santa Barbara-style burger to the BBQ bacon. Watching your figure? Not a problem—the restaurant also offers sandwiches and salads. Either way, you better be prepared to drive home stuffed to the brim. 2121 S. McClelland St., Salt Lake City, 801-484-6132, HabitBurger.com

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

JUNE 18TH JUNE 25TH JULY 2ND

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-andpop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Habit Burger Grill

patio is now

Lucky 13 Bar and Grill BOWTB Pat & Roy marc why jazz

Come by this burger-oriented sports bar for Sunday brunch and sip a bacon-topped bloody mary while watching the morning game, or order one of Lucky 13’s famous flavorful garlic or bacon burgers. Everything’s made slowly and with care, so there might be a wait for your food to arrive at the table— but it’s definitely worth it. 135 W. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-4418, Lucky13SLC.com

The Other Place

Better burger... meet better breakfast! s e r ve d 7 : 0 0 - 1 1 : 0 0 a m M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

This classic, friendly restaurant specializing in Greek and American comfort food has a bevy of longtime loyal customers who come in for the renowned marinated steak and eggs and the seasoned, knowledgeable service team. Generous portions are standard here, whether you’re in the mood for a savory lamb dish, a platter of mezedakia, soups, pasta, a sandwich, a sweet serving of housemade baklava or rice pudding. There are also tasty gyros and kebabs to be had, and breakfast is served anytime. 469 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-521-6567

Park City Pizza Co.

1 3 N E I G H B O R H O O D L O C AT I O N S FAC E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U RG E R

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-86 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-

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32 | JUNE 16, 2016

GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

Eat Right, Live Right, Fresh & Healthy!

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Located in Kimball Junction, Park City Pizza serves up delicious, old-fashioned pizza—the kind you can’t get from chains. You can eat in, order to-go or have your meal delivered. Popular hand-tossed pies include the Weed Eater (mushrooms, olives, peppers and onion), Mexican (jalapeños), Greek (spinach, artichokes and tomatoes), Santa Fe (chicken, cilantro and tomatoes) and, of course, good old pepperoni. There is also an entire menu of gluten-free options, in addition to salads, sandwiches and calzones. 1612 Ute Blvd., Park City, 435-649-1591, ParkCityPizzaCo.com

Red Iguana

This killer, authentic Mexican restaurant proves Utah can really spice things up. A perennial favorite, Red Iguana has had a lock on City Weekly’s Best of Utah Mexican Restaurant category for what seems like centuries. For authentic fare, turn to dishes like the signature cochinita pibil (slow-roasted pork loins), papadzules (tortillas with eggs and pipian) and puntas de filete a la Norteña (sirloin tips with bacon). It’s one of the most popular restaurants in the city, but everyone agrees it’s worth the wait. 736 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-322-1489, RedIguana.com

The Robin’s Nest

Locally owned and operated, The Robin’s Nest was founded on a passion for an all-American favorite: the sandwich. All of the sauces and dressings are housemade, and everything is prepared fresh daily. The menu offers soups, salads and more than 25 sandwiches that are all unique to the restaurant. There’s no boring sandwich here; try options like the Aloha Oink, with blackforest ham, provolone and pineapple salsa on ciabatta; or the Rooster Call, with chicken salad, red onion, provolone and sweet-honey Dijon. 311 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6378, RobinsNestSLC.com

Rye

You’ll get a full helping of live sound and video if you eat during a neighboring Urban Lounge concert. But don’t think that’s the only time to dine here. Rye features brunch every day, dinner until at least midnight all week (till 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday) and is an operating coffee bar from 7 a.m.-6 p.m. The restaurant caters to all tastes, ranging from hangar steak and pork belly to a flavorful vegan hash. Finish off your evening downtown with a Rye sundae: ice cream topped with bourbon-soaked cherries, whiskey caramel and salted caramel popcorn. 239 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-364-4655, RyeSLC.com


REVIEW BITES

JOHN TAYLOR

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

Delicious Food, Great Atmosphere!

Opening Soon at 110 W. Broadway, SLC, UT 715 East. 12300 South. Draper, UT I 801-996-8155

Rice Basil’s Key Lime Calypso Rice Basil Sushi Bar & Asian Fusion Cuisine

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249 East 400 South, SLC • (801) 364-1368 stonegroundslc.com

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Our Philosophy has always been to take the finest ingredients and do as little to them as possible. Classic Italian techniques used to make artisan pasta, homemade cheeses and hand tossed Pizza.

t

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It’s easy to miss, since it’s tucked away and part of a larger commercial building, but Rice Basil is well worth discovering. While the word “fusion” generally doesn’t hold much culinary appeal for me, fusion dishes account for only a small portion of the menu, which is dominated more by sushi and classic Japanese entrées. The jalapeño hamachi appetizer featured a stunning presentation: served on a square black stone tile, each piece topped with thin-sliced radish, jalapeño and a tiny parsley leaf; alongside was the chef’s special yuzu sauce, six tiny dots of citrus mayo, fresh ginger and wasabi. Another sensational appetizer is the tuna tartare, served on avocado slices atop Pringles potato crisps, garnished with microsprouts. For cooked dishes, the saba shioyaki is hard to top: two whole skin-on grilled mackerel fillets, served on a bed of assorted sauteed vegetables. Even the ramen was a beautiful thing. Swimming in a very respectable pork broth were fish cake slices, generous portions of tender marinated pork belly, a hard-boiled egg, bean sprouts, seaweed and julienned scallions. For all of you lovers of sushi and modern Asian cuisine, there’s an important new player in town. Reviewed March 17. 2335 E. Murray-Holladay Road, Holladay, 801-278-8682, RiceBasil.com

T G S I S T A Dan Delicatessen & ReU stauran

JUNE 16, 2016 | 33

South Jordan • 10500 S. 1086 W. Ste. 111 • 801.302.0777 Provo • 98 W. Center Street • 801.373.7200 www.IndiaPalaceUtah.com

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winner 2015 & 2016


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FINDING DORY

Reef-cyling

CINEMA

Finding Dory misses the spark of originality Pixar is capable of at its best. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

B

efore Finding Dory, as has been traditional with Pixar’s animated features, there’s a short film as a kind of cinematic appetizer. Alan Barillaro’s Piper—the tale of a young sandpiper learning the hard lessons of how to forage for food at the ocean’s edge—is an absolute delight, from the astonishing photorealism of its lighting to the emotionally rich (and fairly literal) interpretation of the old “give a man a fish/teach a man to fish” aphorism. It’s funny, sweet and richly imaginative. And it was the most memorable thing about the experience of watching Finding Dory. There’s an irony to the fact that Pixar’s current direction with regard to its features seems more frustrating because of the possibilities highlighted by their own shorts. While the Pixar braintrust doubles down on its focus on sequels—another Toy Story, a third Cars and a second Incredibles feature are in line behind Finding Dory, with one original story squeezed in there— the shorts show us that the talent at the company can create original work that is both technically and emotionally engaging, and often flat-out hilarious. There’s nothing particularly wrong with Finding Dory. It’s just hard not to realize how much more Pixar is capable of when they’re not playing it safe. Writer/director Andrew Stanton opens with a prologue taking us back to the childhood of the blue tang Dory, showing the origin story of how the forgetful fish was separated from her parents, leading up to the fateful day when Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) met clownfish Marlin (Albert Brooks) for the events of Finding Nemo. One year after those events, Dory is still settled in with Marlin and Nemo, but a flash of memory includes a clue to her parents’ possible whereabouts. Setting out across the ocean with Marlin and Nemo (Hayden Rolence), Dory eventually reaches

a California aquarium for an adventure that might reunite her with her family. And it is an adventure, which Stanton understands well (even in his pilloried live-action John Carter). The set pieces are orchestrated with great energy and sharp comic timing, from a dangerous chase involving a giant squid to a climactic plan to stop a truck as it takes our heroes from the aquarium. There are basics of cinematic storytelling that make it easy to engage with a story like this, and Finding Dory hits those beats with absolute professionalism. What’s missing is, not surprisingly, a sense of discovery. It’s not just that some of those set pieces feel familiar, like the aforementioned squid chase playing like a mix of Nemo’s shark chase and anglerfish chase sequences. Finding Dory simply misses the opportunity to do the only thing that really gives a sequel an advantage: deepening the relationships between the characters we already know. Dory is actually separated from Marlin and Dory for the majority of the film, primarily interacting instead with new characters like a camouflaging amputee “septopus” named Hank (Ed O’Neill) and near-sighted whale shark Destiny (Kaitlin Olson). While the cynical view would be that these characters were created simply to provide new merchandise to sell, the real problem is that they’re just not interesting enough to make up for the lack of connection in this story between the characters we came to see, because we care about them.

Dory and Hank the “septopus” in Finding Dory

It is perhaps enough that DeGeneres still inhabits Dory with such soul and commitment. Her voice performance in the original was magnificent, and she’s nearly as good here, wrestling with the doubt and negative self-talk that so many people confront when living with disabilities. Indeed, the real power of these two movies may be in their ability to normalize those who struggle with physical or psychological limitations, never offering them magical cures but allowing them to come to terms with what they can accomplish. As a lesson for young viewers, that shouldn’t be underestimated. We also shouldn’t underestimate what Pixar’s creative team can do when they’re at their best. As solidly satisfying as Finding Dory is, it also ends more or less where it begins, offering a payoff that seems like a foregone conclusion the moment Dory sets off on her journey. You could do a lot worse than another Dory story. You could also do, with some of the same spark that shows up in Pixar’s short films, a lot better. CW

FINDING DORY

BBB Ellen DeGeneres Ed O’Neill Albert Brooks Rated PG

TRY THESE Finding Nemo (2003) Albert Brooks Ellen DeGeneres Rated G

WALL-E (2008) Ben Burtt Elissa Knight Rated G

John Carter (2012) Taylor Kitsch Lynn Collins Rated PG-13

Pixar Short Films Collection, Vol. 2 (2012) Various Not Rated


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE BBB The “buddy action comedy” seems like such a simple, obvious formula that it’s always shocking to realize how few examples get it right, the way this one does. Kevin Hart plays Calvin Joyner, an accountant who peaked in high school, but finds his bland middleage life shaken up by the appearance of former classmate Bob (Dwayne Johnson), once a picked-on fat kid but now seemingly a super-spy with plenty of secrets. The McGuffin of a plot matters little; the A+ chemistry between Hart and Johnson is everything. Johnson in particular does hilarious work, based on how hard it is for Bob to shake the eager-to-please nerd in his soul even once he’s a badass killing machine. Hart’s character feels a bit more like a missed opportunity, but it’s impressive watching him show the comedic range to play straight man to Johnson when the situation calls for it. Throw in action beats with a bit more creativity than you might expect and a few terrific cameos, and the occasional dud joke seems rare indeed, especially when you’re watching the birth of a great comedy team. Opens June 17 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

GENIUS BB.5 The biography that was this movie’s source material is called Max Perkins: Editor of Genius, about the literary publisher who worked with Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Thomas Wolfe. The movie reduces the title to one word, focuses almost exclusively on Perkins’ work with Wolfe and is indeed more a biopic of Wolfe than of Perkins. Unsurprisingly, it falls short on both fronts, offering no insight into—or even evidence of—the genius of Wolfe (played by Jude Law in a jaunty North Carolina accent), nor of the most famous book editor of the 20th century (played by Colin Firth, also affecting Americanness). Still, shallow though it may be, Genius—adapted by John Logan (Gladiator), and the first film directing credit for acclaimed theater director Michael Grandage—tells a respectably engaging story, buoyed by Firth and Law’s charisma and a clear affection for the American literary giants of the 1920s and ‘30s. Nicole Kidman spices things up as Wolfe’s jilted mistress; Laura Linney, alas, is underused as Perkins’ wife, present just enough to make you wish the film had explored their relationship more. It isn’t bad; it’s just profoundly mediocre. Opens June 17 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider RAIDERS!: THE STORY OF THE GREATEST FAN FILM EVER MADE

BBB

BRIGADOON At Main Library, June 22, 2 p.m. (NR) THE TERMINATOR At Brewvies, June 20, 10 p.m. (R) ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS At Tower Theater, June 17-18, 11 p.m., June 19 @ 12 p.m. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES THE CONJURING 2 BBB The sequel to the scariest movie of 2013 covers similar ground— and to similar pants-wetting effect. Director James Wan delivers more smooth, meat-and-potatoes horror based on the files of real-life paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga). It’s 1977, and a north London family—divorced Peggy (Frances O’Connor) and her children— are bedeviled by a malevolent spirit that possesses 11-year-old Janet (Madison Wolfe). Since we know up front what kind of movie this is, Wan skips “maybe there’s another explanation” formalities and gets right to scaring us with unambiguously supernatural events. And he makes frightening use of familiar haunted-house tropes, even finding room for a few nice family moments. The world may not need more movie franchises, but the thought of the Warrens’ case files bursting with creepy stories for Wan to adapt is appealing. (R)—EDS DHEEPAN BBB Jacques Audiard finds a unique approach to exploring the immigrant refugee experience, yet almost loses it in a narrative that’s both over-stuffed and overly conventional. To escape civil war in Sri Lanka, ex-rebel soldier Sivadhasan (Jesuthasan Anthonyhasan) pretends to be a dead man named Dheepan, and recruits strangers to pose as his wife and daughter so they can emigrate to France as a “family.” Audiard delivers subtly emotional moments in the phony family’s dynamics as they seek some kind of stability in a gang-ridden housing project. Then predictable Green Card-esque complications develop, and Audiard’s great character beats collide with a climax that’s almost baffling in the way that it feels designed for the expectations of an American re-make. I’d rather focus on the complexities of assimilation than wonder what it will look like when Dheepan is played by Liam Neeson. (R)—SR

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Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen take on one of the weirder footnotes in cinema history: A shot-for-shot remake of Raiders of the Lost Ark created by a bunch of Mississippi school kids over the course of seven years in the 1980s, which eventually became an underground sensation when it was discovered years later. The story is framed in the present day as two of the original, now 40-something filmmakers—Eric Zala and Chris Strompolos— attempt to get the final scene that would complete their magnum opus, and there’s a multi-layered poignancy to these middleaged guys returning to an adolescent obsession, foolish though it may seem. It’s also somewhat fitting, given the sprawling scope of the fan-film’s production, that this documentary similarly attempts to cover a whole lot of ground, from the childhood dramas impacting the original production to the cult fame that followed. And while that makes it difficult for Raiders! to lock in on any single thematic through-line, there’s still an almost heroic quality to the tale of these two friends, and the circuitous routes their lives took toward trying to realize a long-deferred dream. Opens June 17 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

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DARK HORSE BBB.5 It’s a true story that unfolds almost exactly like a Weinsteinproduced fictionalized remake would—and it’s still almost absurdly satisfying. Director Louise Osmond tracks the remarkable tale of a group of working-class residents in a Wales coalmining town—led by barmaid/grocery store custodian Jan Vokes—who join financial forces to breed and train a steeplechase race horse they dub Dream Alliance. The unadorned, improbable tale of Dream Alliance’s career alone would make for an excellent bit of journalism, but Osmond does a near-perfect job of putting the elements together—archival footage where available, only the most necessary background information about the key players, dreamy images of the Welsh landscape, and talking-head interviews that bubble over with the charm and personality of the subjects. In some ways, every bend and twist of the narrative might feel manipulative if they were part of a purely fabricated script, right down to the anthropomorphizing of Dream Alliance as an embodiment of his hometown’s feisty spirit. Yet the exuberant emotions of the real-life participants make Dark Horse a rarity among retrospective documentaries: a lump-in-the-throat, tears-in-the-eyes crowd-pleaser. Opens June 17 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG)—SR

FINDING DORY BBB See review p. 34. Opens June 17 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

MONDAY 20TH

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FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: JUNE 17TH - JUNE 23RD

more than just movies at brewvies


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CINEMA

THEATER DIRECTORY CLIPS SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

MAGGIE’S PLAN BB.5 Somewhere in the background of Rebecca Miller’s movie is a more openly acidic portrait of a certain brand of contemporary New Yorker, but it’s repeatedly smacked down by whimsy. Unmarried Maggie (Greta Gerwig), a 30-something academic, decides to have a baby via artificial insemination, which coincides inconveniently with her budding relationship with a married writer (Ethan Hawke). Miller seasons her story with great background details that establish a world of hyper-literate eccentrics, which might have made for great subtext for the ensuing romantic roundelays—including (Julianne Moore as Hawke’s wife). Yet there’s no real attempt to skewer their self-absorption, and considering the sparseness of actual punch lines, aside from Bill Hader’s too-infrequent scenes as Maggie’s best pal, it’s not funny enough to make up for Miller’s seeming desire that we see them as charming, rather than kind of pathetic. (R)—SR NOW YOU SEE ME 2 BB.5 The 2013 original was a stupid movie that somehow convinced many people that it was clever; the follow-up fixes enough things that it graduates from incompetence to mediocrity. The magician protagonists (Mark Ruffalo, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, et al.) are still in hiding and acting as freelance Robin Hoods when they’re forced to steal a valuable microchip by a tech billionaire (Daniel Radcliffe) who has faked his own death. On the most basic level, this story is an improvement because it’s actually about the magicians, giving them actual personalities while focusing on a magical heist caper, rather than a procedural about investigating a magical heist. Unfortunately, grand conspiracies ultimately emerge, and the twisty-turny payoffs once again leap several dozen logical steps to their conclusion. But it’s enough of a trick that this sequel might not actively piss you off. (PG-13)—SR

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: OUT OF THE SHADOWS B The original ‘80s Turtles were intended as a parody of superhero comics. But this sequel to 2014’s reboot is just one more samey-same blockbuster that apes everything from Ghostbusters to The Avengers, and cannot hope to distinguish itself in such company. It’s too long and confusing for children, yet its plot about an alien that wants to take over Earth plays like it was written by an 8-year-old. Indeed, the creepy anthromophorized turtles—with the minds of doofy adolescents, the bodies of adult bodybuilders and the CGI faces of sluggish reptiles—come across as a child’s idea of what adulthood must be like, namely nonstop pizza parties and hanging out in a cool secret underground clubhouse, when you’re not fighting aliens with faux martial arts. It would be an insult to cartoons to call this cartoonish. (PG-13) —MaryAnn Johanson

WARCRAFT BB There’s an audience for this kind of fantasy epic; I haven’t been part of that audience for decades. The video game is transformed into a movie about humanoid orcs fleeing their ravaged world through a portal to a realm populated by humans, dwarves, wizards and, I’m guessing, 20-sided dice. There are characters with names—human warrior Lothar (Travis Fimmel); orc chieftan Durotan (Toby Kebbell); etc.—and even a plot of some sort. But mostly it’s about hacking, slashing and spell-casting, sporadically interrupted by people talking about hacking, slashing and spell-casting, dense with attempts at “world-building” that you might expect in the average middle-schooler’s genre fiction. Spectacular motion-capture performances and director Duncan Jones’ single-minded commitment to mythology and spectacle are almost admirable, but offers little fun unless you still talk about movies using phrases like, “It was so awesome when …” (PG-13)—SR


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Manson Family Values

Aquarius is back on Charles Manson’s trail; American Gothic is more dim than dark. Aquarius Thursday, June 16 (NBC)

Season Premiere: Netflix has put so many “No Spoilers!” review restrictions on Season 4 of Orange Is the New Black, there’s not much left to say besides: There’s a busload of new characters (literally); Piper (Taylor Schilling) has less screen time than ever; Alex (Laura Prepon) has more troubles than ever; there’s darkness; there’s light; there’s more darkness; creator/writer Jenji Kohan is still maintaining an impressive level of dramatic quality (then again, her previous series, Weeds, began to run off the rails around Season 4, so …). Besides, you’ll have binged all 13 episodes by the time you get around to reading this, anyway.

The Jim Gaffigan Show Sunday, June 19 (TV Land)

Season Premiere: TV Land has rebranded, dumping Baby Boomers in favor of Gen-Xers (can’t keep catering to a demo that’s almost extinct—unless you’re a newspaper … uh …). Laugh tracks and cheap sets are being replaced with single-camera film and a scrappier attitude, and The Jim Gaffigan Show is the flagship for the new TV Land. If you’ve seen Gaffigan’s stand-up, you know this sitcom: Tubby white guy, wife and kids, junk food. But, despite a few critical nags about the series being a pale—nope, not going for the easy pasty-Jim joke here—imitation of Louie and Curb Your Enthusiasm, TJGS rose above its anticipated blandness with sharp writing and a sharper supporting. Fun fact (unless you’re an NBC Universal exec): Like Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Lip Sync Battle, The Jim Gaffigan Show was rejected by NBC (which stands for Now Bereft of Comedy).

Murder In the First Sunday, June 19 (TNT)

Season Premiere: Cop-show vet Steven Bochco is still hanging in there with Murder In the First, a reduced redux of his 1995 network series Murder One (a single case investigated over a season—and on cable, that means 10 episodes instead of 22). Season 3 involves the homicide of that most precious of ’Merican celebrities: a pro football player (nooo!), with San Francisco detectives English (Taye Diggs) and Mulligan (Kathleen Robertson) just as gorgeous and

Aquarius (NBC) troubled as ever. And it’s all … whatever. If the new Animal Kingdom doesn’t break the network’s meh streak (and it probably won’t), TNT is serious danger of becoming USA. No one wants that.

American Gothic Wednesday, June 22 (CBS)

Series Debut: Compared to the long-lost 1995 also-CBS American Gothic drama about a supernaturally evil smalltown sheriff menacing the locals—YouTube it; Gary Cole was almost as menacing in it as he is now on Veep—the new American Gothic (posh Boston family has a secret serial killer among them) seems like a snooze. It is—with a recycled title, no less. Not only does this iteration add to the glut of shows with “American” in the title (which all suck, with the lone exception of American Dad), it also wastes actors like Virginia Madsen, Antony Starr (Banshee) and Justin Chatwin (Shameless) on what CBS is now calling “A 13-Part Murder Mystery” (which really means, “We’re sure as hell not getting any more seasons out of this”). Now, American Gothic as a reality-challenge show about goths competing American Ninja-style, there’s a winner!

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

on Sun, June 19th at 1:00pm

JUNE 16, 2016 | 37

M-Sat 8-7 • Sun 10-5 • 9275 S 1300 W • 801-562-5496 • glovernursery.com

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Father’s Day Butterfly Release

2nd Annual

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Orange Is the New Black Friday, June 17 (Netflix)

Heavy Copacetic Bummer

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Season Premiere: When last we (meaning me; I’ve yet to meet anybody who watched Season 1) left Aquarius, it was spring 1968, Detective Hodiak (David Duchovny) and the LAPD were possibly going under Internal Affairs investigation, and milquetoast messiah Charles Manson (Gethin Anthony) was finally starting to show some psycho-spunk (remember, it took Axl Rose a couple of albums to get there, too). In keeping with history, the two-hour Season 2 premiere of Aquarius sees the Manson Family moving in with Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson (Andy Favreau), as Hodiak becomes caught up in another missing-girls case while still making time to snark at hippies, and beat cop Tully (Claire Holt) gets in over her head in a dangerous case again because, you know, even the late ’60s still sucked for women. Aquarius may never achieve its five-season plan, but it has more swagger and grit than most current cop dramas, and features as much sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll as, well, FX’s Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll (seriously, the ’60s music rights and oregano budgets must be staggering).

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TALIA KEYS

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here’s a reason that local singersongwriter Talia Keys earned the City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music Reader’s Choice award—the girl works her ass off. By the time she meets me for our interview, she’s already played a month of shows up and down the West Coast. Next month, Keys heads northeast for a string of shows that will take her to Chicago, New York City, Maine, Vermont and Michigan, before coming back home to SLC via stops in Idaho and Ogden. After some local gigs in early August—including coordinating gear for and performing at the six-day Rock ’n’ Roll Camp for Girls—she’ll spend the last half of the month hitting New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Florida and Tennessee. Keys’ musical motivation took seed early on, when she learned piano at 9, drums at 10 and guitar at 16. But it wasn’t until she played with her first band, Marinade, when she realized that performing passionate, politically charged music was going to be a big part of her future. “With Marinade, we started in my mom’s living room, getting drunk and playing jam band music,” Keys says. Marinade recorded their first album Soak Your Meat in This… in August of 2012 with famed local producer Mike Sasich of Man vs. Music. It’s a tasty mix of bass-heavy funk and grimy, blues-inspired guitar, and it’s the sonic foundation for what would eventually become Keys’ solo career. It was her collaboration with Marinade on the song “Me” that caught the attention of local author and filmmaker Bill Kerig. “For the last two seasons, I’ve been Alta’s resident musician. I was playing at the base of the lift when [Kerig] heard me,” Keys says. Kerig soon discovered the music video for “Me” that was filmed and produced by Keys’ partner Melahn Atkinson. “We shot the video all over Utah—Capitol Hill, Temple Square, the Salt Flats, City Creek—and Kerig loved it,” Keys says. This experience led to Keys and her music occupying a large role in Ski City’s ad campaign. “My mom taught me to ski when I was six, and I’ve worked in the skiing industry for a long time. It was cool to see things come full circle like that,” Keys says. After spending eight years with Marinade, Keys eventually came to the decision to begin a solo career; “Going solo was the only way to tour,” she says. And “solo” means solo: Keys developed Gemini Mind, a one-woman looping project where she plays guitar, synthesizer and a drum machine while also singing and beat-boxing. At home, she also performs with another solo project, Talia Keys & Friends, but for touring purposes, “the main focus is Gemini Mind,” she says, because “touring with a band is not financially responsible.” Going it alone also affords her maximum mobility, which is good for someone so kinetic. Keys started by hitting up venues in towns that are known for their music scenes: New Orleans, Austin, Nashville and Memphis. As you can tell by her summer plans, she continued to hit the road hard. “We don’t have much of an online presence, but we are out there pushing it on the ground,” she says. In 2014, Keys recorded the Gemini Mind EP, once again with Sasich. Unlike her one-woman live show, Keys only plays all of the instruments on “In My Beer” and “Face in the Clouds.” The

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Talia Keys rest of the album features James “Dad” Trevino of Marinade (not her actual father who, sadly, passed away earlier this year), and members of her older band, Lady Legs. Gemini Mind represents a turning point in Keys’ musical career. Not only did it solidify her blues-funk-rock sound, but it established her presence as a fiery advocate for equality and human rights. Last year, Keys released Fool’s Gold under her own name. Although it consists of songs more suited to the band format, the record finds Keys further embracing her abilities as a musical powerhouse. In addition to singing, she plays guitar and drums on every track. Dan Nelson’s horn arrangements throughout the album make each song explode, and provide a perfect complement to Keys’ freight-train vocals. Songs like “No Justice No Peace” and “Help Me” demonstrate that Keys hasn’t forgotten her political activism. “America is beautiful,” Keys says, “but we have so many beautiful people that are being held down unless they’re in that top [income] percentage. That’s what we fight for.” June is a relatively slow month for Keys, but it held one of the season’s highlights for her—one that combined her two passions. As we wrap up our conversation, she reflects fondly on her recent performance at the Utah Pride Festival two weeks ago. “Coming back to Salt Lake [after touring] reminded me why I play music,” she says, “We have this counterculture here—I don’t know how to explain it, but it’s special and I felt it at Pride.” CW

TALIA KEYS & FRIENDS

Logan Summerfest (North Stage) @ Logan Tabernacle 50 N. Main 435-213-3858 Thursday, June 16, 2 p.m. Free LoganSummerfest.com Lighthouse Lounge 130 E. 25th Street (Ogden) 801-392-3901 Friday, June 17, 9 p.m. $5 LighthouseOgden.com


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ast-food cover bands are everywhere, playing other bands’ music, generally copping their whole act and calling it a tribute. Doesn’t that piss you off? I mean, when you’re laying down a portion of the pittance you earn for doing oil changes in a jiffy, or passing out burritos to fat, braying customers, don’t you want more than musical pink slime? The franchising of rock ’n’ roll is imminent. In the early 2000’s Austin, Texas, experimental band Brown Whörnet once said they intended to sell BW franchising rights. Gene Simmons of Kiss—part-marketing genius, 100 percent douchebag—wants to replace all Kiss members via a reality show. Even cover bands are doin’ it: Nerdy ’80s cover band The Spazmatics, who play Liquid Joe’s every weekend, exist around the country in multiple iterations. Living in McMurrica, it’s an inevitability. There’s product placement in songs and videos. Vegetarian Violent Femmes singersongwriter Gordon Gano let Wendy’s use “Blister in the Sun.” Corporations already control music. Now Los Angeles-based Mac Sabbath is juxtaposing the dulcet tritones of heavy metal giants Black Sabbath with iconic characters that once repped a gargantuan grease purveyor—and even changing the lyrics. “I am Iron Man” is now “I have frying pan.” The (totally spiritual) weed jam “Sweet Leaf” is now “Sweet Beef.” We don’t have to take this. City Weekly demanded to talk to the manager—who, it happens, is the only one allowed to do Mac Sabbath interviews. Image is everything, and MacSab employees are required to cultivate an air of mystique—not unlike that of space-hessians GWAR. Hello, “Mike.” Welcome to City Weekly. Would you like to try our snarky editorial today? Order when you’re ready. He laughs at this attempt to give him a taste of Mac Sabbath’s ostensible parent company’s pointless, canned drive-thru greetings. And, before

Mac Sabbath

taking questions, he belches some fine-printspeak about not using the “M-word” or even terms describing the consequences of using said term. “Mc,” however, is somehow acceptable. Likewise, any mention of Black Sabbath. Mike says there are all kinds of gray areas we need to avoid. “Like the meat?” I ask. Once more, he laughs. Anyway, dude. Order when you’re ready. “No,” Mike says. “What can I do for you?” This customer-service judo is a real pain. And here comes the mission statement, which he weirdly attributes to his subordinate. Oh, come on. “Ronald [Osbourne, singer] maintains that he’s traveled here through this timespace continuum from the ’70s, when music and food was still real,” Mike says. “He’s here to deliver this message that we’ve got to get back to the values of the food and music of that time.” It’s not the first time a corporation used traditional values as marketing B.S.—but it might be sincere. The lyrics in “Frying Pan” mention grease and pink slime, like Mac Sabbath’s parent company makes stuff that’s actually bad for you. Could it be that Osbourne, guitarist Slayer MacCheeze, bassist Grimalice and drummer Catburglar are a “message band?” Perhaps we’ve misjudged them. Also, the music is spot-on. Ronald sounds like Ozzy. Slayer riffs like Iommi. As for Grimalice, Mike says they often hear, and say themselves, “I can’t believe it’s not [Geezer] Butler.” The Catburglar seems to be doing his best Bill Ward, but with the Peter Criss makeup and the Ham—er, Sandwichrobber’s, caped black-and-white getup … Is that Eric Singer ... the guy currently portraying Criss in ... Kiss? ’Cause that dude was in Sabbath, too, and tends to take a lot of those scab gigs, subbing for original members of popular bands. More laughter. Mike’s not taking this seriously. There’s nothing worse than when someone in a position of authority makes a mockery of your legitimate complaints. This is clearly going nowhere. Click. Epilogue: If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. Mac Sabbath’s many YouTube clips make the ears and eyes—if not the mouth—water. (“Frying Pan,” Mike pointed out, just achieved the “one million served” milestone.) Just as they drank the Kool-Aid at Jonestown, perhaps it’s time to partake of Mac Sabbath’s sweet gray beef. CW

MAC SABBATH

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Crucialfest 6

Crucialfest—the local festival for lovers of hard, heavy music—is a different take on the festival experience. Instead of a large, open-air field hosting several stages, it’s operated in the showcase format, with nine different showcases at three local venues, featuring three to six bands each night. The Metro Bar lineup on Wednesday is headlined by Salt Lake City’s very own Subrosa, who’ve recently completed their new album, For This We Fought the Battle of the Ages (Profound Lore). Among the offerings at the Art Garden that night are local riff-maestros Yeti Warlord and spoken-word artist, filmmaker and singer of straightedge hardcore band, Trial, Greg Bennick. Thursday, the Art Garden features mostly hardcore bands, including Denver’s Muscle Beach, but also local prog band Your Meteor. If you’re more into the metal/experimental side, that night at the Metro brings a rare show by esteemed local noise band Ether, as well as sludge-doom masters Invdrs and gonzo rock beast, Thunderfist. Friday at the Art Garden opens with local metal trio Making Fuck and punk-rock lunatics Discoid A and Scary Uncle Steve, while The Urban Lounge hosts a rare appearance by Form of Rocket (promoting the vinyl reissue of Se Puede Despedir a Todos). On Saturday, Crucialfest wraps up with a locals-only night at The Urban Lounge, with the New Transit Direction, The Future of the Ghost and Heartless Breakers; a showcase by Wulf Blitzer at the Art Garden; and the festival headliner, Chicago prog-metal power trio Russian Circles, capping things off at the Metro. And that’s just a sampling of the dozens of great bands Crucialfest founder Jarom Bischoff rounded up this year. So

The Monkees’ Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork

JUSTINE MURPHY

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check out the rest online, then clear your weekend. Multiple venues (see site for details). Individual tickets $8-$15, full festival wristbands $50. Crucialfest.com.

THURSDAY 6.16 The Monkees

Who’da thunk that in 2016 The Monkees— who debuted in 1965—would have a Top 10 album? Good Times! (Rhino), at one point this year, topped even Adele and Prince. That could be a testimony to The Monkees’ lasting charms, but with surviving members Mickey Dolenz, Peter Tork and Michael Nesmith (who, alas, isn’t on the tour), receiving songwriting assistance from Fountains of Wayne’s Adam Schlesinger (who also produced), Andy Partridge, Rivers Cuomo, Ben Gibbard, Noel Gallagher and Paul Weller, is their sound being updated for the new millennium? Or is a new(er) crop of songwriters discovering the virtues of this originally ersatz, made-for-TV quartet, showing off the influence of this group in a set

Sarah Pendleton of Subrosa that serves as an homage to the band’s happy-go-lucky style? I suspect that the reason new Monkees music would make such a big splash is the affection for the band’s classic material like “Last Train to Clarksville” and “I’m a Believer,” and for the group itself. The Monkees are of a certain time, but also timeless. Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7:30 p.m., $47-$52, RedButteGarden.org

SATURDAY 6.18 Utah Blues Festival

The Utah Blues Society’s second-annual fundraiser, the Utah Blues Festival, is slated for a daylong event at the Gallivan Center. Headliners include Chicago blues and soul guitarist Ronnie Baker Brooks, American-born/Paris-based fretman Bernard Allison and singer/songwriter/ string-bender Toronzo Cannon. With all

»

Bernard Allison

TRIPP HOPKINS

HENRY DILTZ

42 | JUNE 16, 2016

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three originally from Chicago, the festival has a definite emphasis on the Chicago blues style—electric and fiery, yet also gritty and sensual. That said, the fest also encompasses other blues varietals. Tony Holiday and the Velvetones, the band fronted by the UBS president himself, is a decidedly more Southern affair—likewise Jordan Young (Candy’s River House), who is known to coax smokin’ sounds from a cigar box guitar. And then there are the house-rockin’ sounds of the long-running Sister Wives. With a youth showcase and workshops to beef up your chops on harmonica and slide guitar, the UBF is also a family-friendly event. The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 1 p.m., $25-$219, UtahBluesFest.org

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English post-punk band Eagulls’ second full-length release for Partisan Records, Ullages, gets its title from an anagram of their eponymous 2014 full-length debut. Musically, in instrumental style as well as George Mitchell’s vocals, it seems to echo Robert Smith of The Cure. Baltimore’s Outer Spaces, in the title of their release A Shedding Snake, seems to both argue for indie-rock evolution/transformation and “the more things change, the more they stay the same.” Does indie rock do more than play with the tropes and riffs of regular mainstream rock and render them ironically rendered/remembered?

Eagulls

This remains to be seen, but Cara Beth Satalino’s vocals bear more than a passing resemblance to one Kim Deal, for another ‘80s/’90s fix. Locals The Circulars and Muzzle Tung open. Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $12, KilbyCourt.com

Big Business, Andy the Doorbum

Remember the Tight Bro’s From Way Back When? Because, way back when, the Seattle indie-garage band rocked Kilby Court a time or two. Stoner band Big Business’ members did time in various name bands like the Murder City Devils, the Melvins, Karp and even the Tight Bro’s (misplaced apostrophe and all). Now based in Los Angeles, the two-piece—comprised of vocalist/bassist Jared Warren (the Tight Bro) and drummer Coady Willis—recalls indie heavy-metal duo C Average in their aural assault, if not their actual sound, “bass-ed,” you might say, on a much more low-end sonic spectrum, as opposed to C Average’s comparatively heavy treble. Any two musicians who were once the Melvins’ rhythm section set the bar pretty high. Charlotte, N.C., experimental weirdo Andy the Doorbum, whose latest album is titled, The Fool (Alien/Native Movement), opens. The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $12 in advance, $14 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Big Business

SERA MCGOVERN

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LIVE

In an effort to be the best for brunch in SLC, Rye has decided to focus on the AM hours. Going forward Rye will be open: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com


David Bazan, Laura Gibson

Both with Pedro the Lion and on his own, David Bazan (right) made his bones doing the minimalist singer-songwriter—but he’s always had an affinity for electronic music (see his 2005 side project Headphones). Now, with his third solo album Blanco (Barsuk)—a collection of his monthly singles club releases—Bazan really leans on the electronics, veering into synth-pop territory. If change upsets you, know this: His songs are no less impactful in the new context. They remain confessional and commiserative— and, ultimately, even when he seems in the throes of a major bummer, uplifting. Laura Gibson opens, playing songs from her new one, Empire Builder. (Randy Harward) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $15 in advance, $17 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

AT THE HOG WALLOW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GO HOG WILD

IVAN AGERTON

FRIDAY 6.17

6.16 DYLAN ROE

6.22 ANDY SYDOW

6.17 STONEFED

6.23 THE FABULOUS MILF SHAKES

6.18 STONEFED

6.24 GRITS GREEN

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JUNE 16, 2016 | 45

6.20 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY 6.24 DENNIS GRUENLIN AND ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION THE JEWEL TONES

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46 | JUNE 16, 2016

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. THE CENTURY CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6495044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DO DROP INN 2971 N. Hill Field Road (400 West), Layton, 801-776-9697. Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801943-1696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed.

LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 THE OFFICE 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages THE PENALTY BOX 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 6.16 LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael (Garage on Beck) Blue October + Danny Malone (The Depot) Bodysnatcher + Cries of the Captive + Declared Aversion (The Loading Dock) La Calavera (Liquid Joe’s) Crucialfest feat. INVDRS + Ether + Ape Machine + Mammoth Salmon + Thunderfist + Cactus Pharm (Metro Bar) see p. 42 Crucialfest feat. Turbo Chugg + I Buried the Box With Your Name + CHRCH + Muscle Beach + Your Meteor + Turtleneck Weddingdress (The Art Garden) see p. 42 Dylan Roe (The Hog Wallow) JMSN + Tiffany Gouché (Kilby Court) Marmalade Hill (Gracie’s) The Monkees (Red Butte Garden) see p. 42 Robots Ate My Garden + Cephas + Local Chump (Muse Music) Rylee McDonald (Twist) Shane Smith & the Saints (Billboard-Live!) SLC Sax Summit (Gallivan Center) Soft Limbs + Magic Mint + Mañanero (Urban Lounge) Talia Keys & Friends (Logan Tabernacle) see p. 38 The White Buffalo + Sarah Simmons + Blackkiss (The State Room) Wild Belle + On and On + VanLadyLove (Ogden Amphitheater) Zack Heckendorf (In the Venue)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Open Mic (The Cabin) Therapy Thursdays feat. Timmy Trumpet (Sky) Reggae Thursday (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

FRIDAY 6.17 LIVE MUSIC

Big Blue Ox + Planetaries (The Cabin) Cage9 + Poonhammer + Hooga + Colonel Lingus (The Royal) Chris Collins and Boulder Canyon + Cassanda Denver (Zermatt Resort) Cory Mon (Garage on Beck) Crucialfest feat. Form of Rocket + Elephant Rifle + Cicadas (Urban Lounge) Crucialfest feat. Making Fuck + The Drip + Handicapitalist + Colombian Necktie + Discoid A + Scary Uncle Steve (The Art Garden) see p. 42

The Commodores (Sandy Amphitheater) David Bazan + Laura Gibson (Kilby Court) see p. 45 Dirty Revival (O.P. Rockwell) Jenn Blosil (Velour Live Music Gallery) Metal Gods (Liquid Joe’s) Sacrificial Slaughter + Ontic + Dezecration + MateriaM (Club X) She Loves Meechie (Castle Manor Event Center) Snow Tha Product (The Complex) Stonefed (The Hog Wallow) Summer Beach House 2 feat. 2 Pistols + Prynce Hamilton (Infinity Event Center) Talia Keys & Friends (Lighthouse Lounge) see p. 38 Vitaé + Problem Daughter +Wearing Thin + Bird Watcher (Muse Music)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Chase One2 (Twist)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 6.18 LIVE MUSIC

Batty Blue + Foster Body + Pipes (Muse Music) Candy’s River House + Simply B (The Cabin) Cruicialfest feat. Gaytheist + Theories + Immortal Bird + Throes + Wulf Blitzer + Despite Despair (The Art Garden) see p. 42 Crucialfest feat. Helms Alee + Mos Generator + Fuzz Evil + Oxcross + Die Off + Droopy Tights (Metro Bar) see p. 42 Crucialfest feat. The New Transit Direction + The Future of the Ghost + Heartless Breakers (Urban Lounge) see p. 42 David Archuleta (Sandy Amphitheater) Fangs on Fur + Tragic Black (Club X) Good Old War (acoustic) + Empty Houses (The State Room) Hectic Hobo (Garage on Beck) L’anarchiste + Alyssa Pyper + James Junius (Kilby Court) Old School Throwback Jam feat. SaltN-Pepa + DJ Spinderella + Vanilla Ice + Coolio + Tone Loc + Rob Base + Young MC + Color Me Badd + The Jets + Candyman (Vivint Smart Home Arena) see p. 47 The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (The Hog Wallow) Utah Blues Festival (Gallivan Center) see p. 42 Westward The Tide + The Brocks + Robert Loud (Velour Live Music Gallery)


SATURDAY 6.18

CONCERTS & CLUBS

U92 Old School Throwback Jam: Salt-N-Pepa, Vanilla Ice, Coolio, Tone Loc, Rob Base, Young MC, Color Me Badd, The Jets, Candyman

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Butch Wolfthorn (The Royal) DJ Karma (Sky) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist)

KARAOKE

SUNDAY 6.19 LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

MONDAY 6.20 LIVE MUSIC

Thursday, June 16

JMSN

Kilby Court

Friday, June 17 Salt-N-Pepa

Cub Sport + Taylor Ross Wilson (Kilby Court) Dead Feathers + Red Dog Revival + The Arvos (Kilby Court) Edward Sharpe and The Magnetic Zeros + Preservation Hall Jazz Band + Harriet (Red Butte Garden) Phillip Phillips + Matt Nathanson + Eric Hutchinson (Sandy Amphitheater)

KARAOKE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Afroman (Liquid Joe’s) Andy Black (The Complex) Andy Sydow (The Hog Wallow) Broods + DJ Jarvicious + Brogan Kelby (Gallivan Center) The Growlers + Billy Changer (The Depot) James McMurtry + Max Gomez (The State Room) Lash LaRue (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Metalachi + Folk Hogan + Rumble Guns (Urban Lounge) Scooter Brown Band (The Royal) Silversyde + Theody + Dream Collage + A Dead Desire (The Loading Dock) Tiny Moving Parts + Prawn + Free Throw + Temples + Aspen Grove (Kilby Court)

Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

TUESDAY 6.21 LIVE MUSIC

Big Business + Andy the Doorbum + Eagle Twin (Urban Lounge) see p. 44 Eagulls + Outer Spaces + The Circulars + Muzzle Tung (Kilby Court) see p. 44 Mac Sabbath (The Depot) see p. 40

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

LIVE MUSIC

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David Archuleta

Sandy Amphitheater

An Intimate Evening with Good Old War (Acoustic) The State Room

SunDay, June 19

Blackalicious Urban Lounge

Monday, June 20

Matt Nathanson & Phillip Phillips Sandy Amphitheater

Cub Sport Kilby Court

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Tuesday, June 21

Eagulls

Kilby Court

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DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

WEDNESDAY 6.22

Kilby Court

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

David Bazan

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Blackalicious + Fuze the MC + Dusk + Dumb Luck (Urban Lounge) The Faceless + The Zenith Passage + Dethrone the Sovereign + Alumni (Metro Bar) SEVEN + Michael Calfan (Sky) Tiger Army + The Bellfuries + The Pine Hill (The Complex)

CHECK US FIRST! LOW OR NO FEES!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

DAVID BURKE

Time to brush up on your ‘80s and ‘90s hip-hop vocab. You know: Phat. Phresh. Phtupid. You might even wanna hit up a barber and get yourself a sweet flat-top fade—even taller than Kid’s from Kid ‘n Play. ‘Cause tonight is all about nostalgia for the time when mainstream hip-hop and pop music was fun, even when it was kinda lame (lookin’ at you, Ice). Now it’s just lame (lookin’ at you, Wiz). All of the acts on the bill tonight—even Vanilla Ice, in spite of his reinvention as a Juggalo, will make you see why the new guard is neither phat, fresh nor—well, actually, they are pretty stupid. Anyway, c’mon fatso—bust a move. (You want it, you got it ...) (Randy Harward) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $35.50-$67.50, Smithstix.com


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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

ZITI

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 16, 2016 | 49

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1. "Holy moly!" 2. Brownie mix add-in, often 3. Peter of Peter, Paul and Mary 4. Food item in quarter-pound sticks 5. Venetian blind section 6. Scrabble 10-pointers 7. Urge forward 8. Spree

when becoming House Speaker in 2007 49. "Good as done" 50. What the weary get, in a saying 52. Beat overwhelmingly 55. Hula dancers shake them 56. Home to billions 57. Plenty 58. Fiscal ____ 59. Digital ____ 60. Morning moisture

SUDOKU

DOWN

9. "____ Club" (2003 50 Cent hit) 10. Pushkin Museum home 11. Should the situation call for it 12. Musician's deg. 13. Mind-reading skill, for short 21. New ____ 22. Sgt. or cpl. 26. ____-Lite (band with the 1990 hit "Groove Is in the Heart") 27. Home of "Weekend Update," in brief 29. Decline 30. The Once-____("The Lorax" character) 31. ____-pitch softball 32. "Definitely!" 34. Henhouse menace 36. Utah national park 37. Multicountry union using the same currency 38. Jon Stewart display 39. Some Sharp and Sony products 40. Cheerleader's cheer 41. Baseball positions: Abbr. 45. Some tributes 46. And so on: Abbr. 47. One way to complete an online purchase 48. She said "Today we have broken the marble ceiling"

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Fluctuates wildly 6. Kind of pasta ... or a phonetic hint to 20-, 36- and 54-Across 10. Have a silent role? 14. Firing ____ cylinders 15. Feds who caught Capone 16. Does in 17. "If I ____ betting man ..." 18. Certain tablet 19. Suddenly lose patience 20. "No second chances" policy 23. Previously 24. First Amendment subj. 25. Yale students since 1969 28. "The War of the Worlds" author 31. Edward who went into self-imposed exile in 2013 33. Spell-off 34. Rap's ____ Rida 35. ____ Paese cheese 36. Shade source preferred by cabinetmakers for its stripes 41. Actress Lucy 42. Quash 43. Egg cells 44. Oscar role for Tom 47. Stuck-up sort? 51. Stuck-up sort 52. What may be caught with bare hands? 53. Like some angsty teens 54. The last Whig to be elected U.S. president 59. Fusses 61. "The jig ____!" 62. Director of "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" 63. Fellow 64. Home of Galileo Galilei Airport 65. Caravan stop 66. Lambs' mothers 67. Humorist Mort who wrote jokes for Kennedy 68. Travis who sang "T-R-O-U-B-L-E"


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T BEA send leads to

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Artistic Eats

INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 50 INK PG. 51 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 52 POETS CORNER PG. 53 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 54 URBAN LIVING PG. 55

Any cupcake shop or ice cream parlor can offer you a pre-made dessert. If you want to express yourself with your treats, check out Create Donuts in Sandy. Now in its fifth month of operation, the shop lets customers invent whatever confections their hearts desire by adding different glazes, toppings or fillings to a base dessert. Offering donuts, croissant-donuts, crepes, gelato, cookies, soda floats and homemade drinking chocolate, Create Donuts has something to please every sugar-lover. The delicious desserts are made fresh, exactly how you like them, while you watch. “I don’t know of another place doing that,” LaDonnia Jones, owner and doughnut creator, says. “The range of flavors you can combine is extraordinary, and the quality of the ingredients is excellent.” Jones bakes all her pastries and makes her own gelato in-house, using organic sugar, natural flavors and colors whenever possible, and the finest ingredients, like Key limes from Florida and real Madagascar vanilla. When asked to pick a favorite dessert, Jones says it’s too hard. “If I’m in the mood for something fruity and refreshing, I’d get our soda with grapefruit sorbet and fresh raspberries,” she says. She also enjoys a crepe with gelato, Madagascar vanilla whipped cream and Key lime drizzle or a mocha croissant-donut with chocolate mousse, pecans and a maple glaze. Jones has long wanted to start her own business and founded Create Donuts because it was the type of place she would want to come to. “I love to play with my food,” she says. “I love good dessert that is real and not just sweet and artificial. And I love how social dessert can be.” So far, Jones’ experiment has been a huge success. “The cream filling was incredible,” says Brian Palmer of Sandy, who ordered a dulce de leche-filled bar donut. Jones loves working with customers who

A croissant-donut with maple and coffee glazes.

are eager to create something completely new and unique. “It’s incredibly fun to see kids’—and grown-ups’—faces light up when they see their completed dessert,” Jones says. Her favorite type of customer is definitely kids who have a knack for flavor and experimentation. “They really get into the process,” she says. “It is a blast.” And when a customer is really excited about the process, she says, she and her employees can always tell. “They start bouncing up and down on their toes,” she laughs. “It’s the best.” n

CREATE DONUTS

9305 South Village Shop Drive, Sandy 801-790-2738 Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. CreateDonut.com

50 | JUNE 16, 2016

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

Owner LaDonnia Jones fills a donut and tops it with glaze.

Customers can create their own desserts, choosing from a variety of topnotch fillings and toppings.


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JUNE 16, 2016 | 53


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Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19) The coming months will be a favorable time to boost your skills as a cagey warrior. I don’t mean you should push people around and get into lots of fights. Rather, the goal is for you to harness your aggressiveness constructively and to wield your willpower with maximum grace. In the face of fear, you will not just be brave, but brave and crafty. You’ll refrain from forcing storylines to unfold before they’re ready, and you’ll rely on strategy and good timing instead of brute strength and the decree, “Because I said so.” Now study this counsel from the ancient Chinese statesman Zhuge Liang, also known as Crouching Dragon: “The wise win before they fight, while the ignorant fight to win.”

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Everything you do in the coming days should be imbued with the intention of enhancing the Flow. It’s high time to identify where the energy is stuck, and then get it unstuck. You have a sacred mandate to relieve the congestion … to relax the tweaks … to unravel the snarls if you can, or simply cut through them if necessary. You don’t need to tell anyone about your secret agenda. Just go about your business with zealous diligence and unflagging purpose. If it takes more effort than you wished, so be it. If your progress seems maddeningly gradual, keep the faith. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) My long-term predictions for the next 15 months are a blend of hopeful optimism and a reasonable interpretation of the astrological omens. Here we go: 1. You will have an excellent chance to smooth and soothe the rough spots in your romantic karma. 2. You will outgrow any addiction you might have to frustrating connections. 3. Unrequited love will either be requited, or else you’ll become bored with the futile chase and move on. 4. You’ll be challenged to either refresh and reinvent an existing intimacy, or else get shrewd enough not to repeat past mistakes in a new intimacy. 5. You will have an abundance of good ideas about how to install the theme of smart fun at the heart of your strongest alliances. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Author Courttia Newland quotes the pre-Socratic philosopher Meno: “How will you go about finding the thing the nature of which is totally unknown to you?” In response to this riddle, Newland riffs on what it means to him: “Even more important than the journey itself, is the venture into the unknowable. The ability to find comfort moving forward without quite knowing where you are going.” I nominate these to be your words to live by in the coming days, Cancerian. Have open-hearted fun as you go in search of mysterious and impossible secrets! I’m confident you will track them down— especially if you’re willing to be lost. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your homework is to write a story about the life you’re going to live between now and next April. The length of this predictive tale should be at least three pages, although it’s fine if you produce more. Here are some meditations to lubricate the flow of your imagination. 1. What three questions would you love to have answered during the next 42 weeks? 2. Of the numerous adventures that might be fun to explore, which are the two that would be most consistently energizing? 3. What is the one thing you’d most like to change about your attitude or revamp about your life? 4. What new privilege will you have earned by April 2017? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) According to an old Chinese proverb, if you want to get rich, you must have a nickname. My meditations on your future suggest that this curious formula may have some validity. The next 15 months will be a favorable time to attend to the groundwork that will ultimately increase your wealth. And your luck in doing this work is likely to be oddly good if you add a frisky tweak to your identity—such as a zesty new nickname, for example. I suggest you stay away from clichés like Ace or Vixen or Sharpie, as well as off-putting ironic monikers like Poker Face and Stonewall. Instead, gravitate toward lively choices like Dazzler, FluxLuster, Hoochie-Coochie or FreeBorn.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) During the next 15 months, you will have an unprecedented chance to materialize a fantasy you’ve harbored for years. Essential to your efforts will be a capacity to summon more ambition than you ever have before. I’m not talking about the grubby self-promotion that typically passes for ambition, however. Arrogant self-importance and selfish posturing will not be part of your winning formula. Rather, the kind of ambition I’m referring to is a soaring aspiration that seeks the best and highest not just for yourself but for everyone whose life you touch. I mean the holy hunger that drives you to express impeccable integrity as you seek to master the tasks you came to Earth to accomplish. Get started! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) During the next 15 months, composting should be a primary practice, as well as a main metaphor. If you have been lazy about saving leftover scraps from your kitchen and turning them into fertilizer, now is an excellent time to intensify your efforts. The same is true if you have been lax about transforming your pain into useful lessons that invigorate your lust for life. Be ever-alert for opportunities to capitalize on junk, muck and slop. Find secret joy in creating unexpected treasure out of old failures and wrong turns. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Have you ever made a fool of yourself while trying to fulfill your deepest yearnings? I hope so. If you haven’t, your yearnings probably aren’t deep enough. Most of us, on multiple occasions, have pursued our longings for connection with such unruly intensity that we have made foggy decisions and engaged in questionable behavior. That’s the weird news. The good news is that now and then, the impulse to leave our safety zone in a quest to quench our deepest yearnings can actually make us smarter and more effective. I believe this is one of those times for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) During the next 13 months, what can you do to enhance your ability to be the boss of yourself? What practices can you engage in on a daily basis that will build your potency and authority and clout? How can you gain access to more of the helpers and resources you need to carry out your life’s master plan? These are excellent questions to ask yourself every day between now and July 2017. It’s time to find or create your ultimate power spot. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) The prison population in the U.S. is over two million, more than twice what it was in 1990. In contrast, Canada keeps about 41,000 people in jail, Italy 52,000 and France 66,000. That’s the bad news. The good news, at least for you and your tribe, is that a relatively small percentage of you will be incarcerated during the next 15 months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Aquarians all over the world will specialize in liberation. Not only will you be extra ethical; not only will you be skillful at evading traps; you will also be adept at emancipating yourself from your own delusions and limitations. Congratulations in advance! It’s time to start singing some new freedom songs. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) The English word “catharsis” is derived from the ancient Greek katharsis, which was a technical medical term that meant “purgation” or “purification,” as in flushing out the bowels. Aristotle converted katharsis into a metaphor that described how a drama performed in the theater could “clean out” the emotions of spectators. These days, catharsis may refer to any event that precipitates a psycho-spiritual renewal by building up and then releasing tension. I foresee at least one of these strenuous blessings in your immediate future.


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Summertime is parade time. In Salt Lake City there’s the Pride Parade and the Days of ’47 parade. In other counties and cities, there’s often a Fourth of July parade, a peach or strawberry parade and, of course, the world’s fastest parade at 55 mph (between Bicknell and Torrey). But marching—or even biking or driving—isn’t as straightforward as it may appear. Take, for instance, State Street and 300 West—parts of which are designated as Utah Highway 89. Traffic lights aren’t synchronized there because two different departments—the city and state—run the show, creating several problems. First, there’s the increase in stop-and-go traffic which then, second, increases pollution. Third, there’s doubling of services of maintenance when two different entities maintain our roads. Worst of all, the Utah Department of Transportation has onerous rules for anyone who might cross over a state road— even if it’s within city limits. Here’s an example of Utah road idiocracy at its finest: When the Pride Parade passed from its start point at 200 West over State Street to its 400 East destination, it activated a UDOT waiver requirement. Before the paraders could march across State Street, they had to sign a Waiver and Release of Damages form per Utah Administrative Code R9204 which required: 1. all event participants complete, and 2. that organizers retain all completed forms for 12 months for review if requested by the department. Parents had to sign the form along with childless adults and state that “each of us individually do hereby release, remise, waive and forever discharge the State of Utah, the Utah Department of Transportation, the Utah Transportation Commission, the Utah Highway Patrol and their officers, agents and employees from all liability, claims, demands, actions or causes of action whatsoever arising out of or related to loss, or damages and/or injuries, including death, which may result from my participation in the above named event involving roads within the state of Utah.” Salt Lake City, however, didn’t require any individual participant to sign waivers. Are the thousands of Days of ’47 participants signing this same release? The Pride Center also added on the back of the UDOT waiver a 10-point list of rules banning pets, alcohol and drugs in the parade and holding themselves harmless from the actions of drag queens and their feathers and men and their leathers. So much for fun. n

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City Weekly June 16, 2016  

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City Weekly June 16, 2016  

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