Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

PAGE

30

PAGE

34

PAGE

36

JUNE 2, 2016 | VOL. 33

PAGE

40

N0. 4


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | JUNE 2, 2016

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY PRIDE ISSUE 2016

Be loud. Be proud. Be you, and more importantly, #slay. Cover illustration by Andy Simmonds

29 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 16 A&E 22 DINE 45 CINEMA 48 TRUE TV 49 MUSIC 66 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR NIKI CHAN

Niki’s passion for photography began when she borrowed her mother’s point-and-shoot camera as a child. Today, her photos can be seen in BuzzFeed News, Le Monde’s M Magazine, and in City Weekly publications since 2011. Of shooting this week’s Mama Dragons photos (p. 30), she says, “I loved hearing their stories and was inspired by the strength and courage of all the folks I met.”

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at CityWeekly.net/Daily

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

CULTURE

DRINK

Check out new jams from local Time to jump on the Roederer bands Kapix, Cinders and more. Champagne train! Facebook.com/SLCWeekly

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at CityWeeklyStore.com

ENTER TO WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS TO

THE UTAH SCOTTISH FESTIVAL & HIGHLAND GAMES

VISIT CITYWEEKLY.NET/FREESTUFF FOR DETAILS.

New contests posted weekly!


M.E.S.A. MONEY GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF

10”POWERSUBSYSTEM

was 279 BUILT-IN 00 AMPLIFIER& $

SUBWOOFER

99

$50 OFF NOW

300 WATTS RMS TRUE POWER

12”POWERSUBSYSTEM

was $29999

PROGRESSIVE

229

99

$

CREDIT CARD

LEASE / PURCHASE 70% APPROVAL RATE

90

NO

DAY PAYMENT

OPTION

CREDIT NEEDED

soundwarehouse.com/financing

AM/FM/CD/MP3 WMA RECEIVER

300 WATTS RMS TRUE POWER

$4000OFF NOW

259

AM/FM/CD/MP3 WMA RECEIVER

NEW 2016

USB INPUT AUX INPUT

•BLUETOOTH GIVES YOU CRYSTAL CLEAR HANDS FREE CALLING AND AUDIO STREAMING IN YOUR VEHICLE! •THIS RECEIVER IS A DIGITAL PIECE, IT HAS NO CD PLAYER BUT GIVE YOU CONTROL OF A MP3 PLAYER SUCH AS A ANDROID OR APPLE PRODUCT THROUGH THE USB INPUT! •THIS RECEIVER HAS 1 RCA PRE-OUT TO GIVE YOU REAR SPEAKER OR SUBWOOFER AMPLIFIER CONTROL. • DETACHABLE FACE PLATE

69

99

$

NO CD PLAYER

$

94

i99

99

NOW

$

2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

NEW 2016

POWER

MAX POWER

MONO CLASS D

1000W AMPLIFIER

STARTING AT CLEAN DESIGN GREAT SOUND

AM/FM/CD/DVD USB BLUETOOTH 6.2" WVGA TOUCH SCREEN NAVIGATION ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM

I99

$

99

READY

•FRONT, REAR AND SUB X 4 VOLT RCA PRE OUTS •DUAL BACKUP CAMERA INPUT •(50W X 4) 200 WATTS •STEERING REMOTE READY

MSRP $950.00

59999

$

COME INTO 1 0F 3 LOCATIONS FOR ALLMUSTGO,HURRYINTODAY

UP TO 75% off REGULARSOUNDWAREHOUSEPRICING

CLOSE-OUT PRICING ON MARINE DECKS, WOOFERS, REMOTES & MORE!

W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M

| CITY WEEKLY |

•1 CHANNEL

CLOSE OUT

600W AMPLIFIER •5 CHANNEL CLASS D MAX POWER 1600W AMPLIFIER

34999

• 200 WATTS (50W X 4) •1 X 2.5V RCA PRE-OUTS •VARIABLE COLOR •DETACHABLE FACE NEW 2016

•4 CHANNEL CLASS D MAX

CUSTOMIZE YOUR RECEIVER TO MATCH YOUR CARS INSTRUMENT PANEL.

MSRP $400.00

NEW 2016

X SERIES POWER AMPLIFIERS

$

• THIS RECEIVER HAS VARIABLE COLOR ILLUMINATION ALLOWING YOU TO

with navigation

NOW

$

VEHICLE! • YOU CAN HOOK UP STEERING WHEEL CONTROLS TO THIS RECEIVER.

NOW:

i5999

• BLUETOOTH GIVES YOU CRYSTAL CLEAR HANDS FREE CALLING IN YOUR

6.2" AM/FM/CD/DVD/USB AUX/BLUETOOTH WVCA TOUCHSCREEN MONITOR

7" TFT TOUCHSCREEN DISPLAY

•SINGLE DIN FLIPOUT •200 WATTS (50X4) •2 VOLT FRONT, REAR & SUBWOOFER RCA PREOUTS

EACH

2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

AV RECEIVER W/ DVD BUILT-IN BLUETOOTH TECHNOLOGY USB/AV INPUT

99

FOR BETTER SOUND QUALITY AND CONTROL.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

USB INPUT AUX INPUT

• THIS RECEIVER HAS 3 RCA PRE-OUTS TO HOOK UP MULTIPLE AMPLIFIERS

• THIS RECEIVER HAS 200 WATTS OF POWER TO 4 SPEAKERS. • 1 SET OF RCA PRE-OUTS TO HOOK UP A POWER AMPLIFIER FOR BETTER SOUND QUALITY. • THIS RECEIVER HAS A FRONT AUX PORT TO HOOK UP A MP3 PLAYER, IPOD, OR AN IPHONE FOR MORE MUSIC OPTIONS. • DETACHABLE FACE PLATE.

99

$

AM/FM/MP3 WMA RECEIVER NEW 2016

AUX INPUT

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER& SUBWOOFER

HOURS

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 6/8/16

JUNE 2, 2016 | 3

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | JUNE 2, 2016

LETTERS A typical injustice

Colby Frazier’s report on the mishandling of the Elizabeth Smart kidnapping [May 19, City Weekly, “The Smart Files”] would be shocking if the impossibility of justice in America weren’t so typical. In fact, the only discordant note is sounded by Detective Cordon Parks, who remarks, as gratuitously as inaccurately, that “We don’t actually have a lot of cases around here where innocent people are accused of crimes.” How can he know? Does anyone honestly believe that if Elizabeth Smart had not turned up alive in Salt Lake—had David Mitchell killed her—that the deceased Richard Ricci would have remained on the books as her presumed, albeit unprovable killer, and the case left open forever? Ricci’s connection to the Smart family was exactly the same as Mitchell’s: They both worked for Ed Smart. The only meaningful difference was that Ricci had been dismissed, while Mitchell was still working for Smart up until the kidnapping, whereupon he disappeared as abruptly as Elizabeth. Sure, that’s 20/20 hindsight. We all experience it, and may gain insight from it. What most of us will never experience is the purportedly universal conviction of police that their best tool is their intuition, a human power as illusionary and misleading as our power to remotely judge celebrities. Whether it’s Kate Beckett or John Luther, every TV cop trusts their “gut,” and it seems a good guess that their creators get that idea from actual police lore: a source of malpractice on a scale that, contrary to Parks’ testimony, is rumored to send

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. 10,000 innocent suspects to prison every year. Next time you hear an authority sneer that, “Oh, yes, the prisons are full of men, every one of whom is innocent,” consider that he may be simply closer to the truth than he can afford to admit.

GEOFF WICHERT Murray

CW staff dishonors many

I have been turning to City Weekly of late, due to The Salt Lake Tribune’s reduction in content, and I came across your column “Staff Box” [May 19]. I am no tea-bagger and find myself in accord with most of CW’s content, articles and reporters, but I was severely taken aback by the gross insensitivity displayed by staff answers to the question “How will you celebrate Armed Forces Day?” Jeremiah Smith’s answer, that he was going to soak his bones in booze and hot spring water, was the most egregious. Without the incredible sacrifices of our armed forces, he could easily be headed for the Thermalbad for some schnapsen. Bask in the beauty and freedoms of our country, but do not forget from whence they came. Kudos to comments by Scott Renshaw and Mason Rodrickc. The other staff members should be required to attend some type of sensitivity training including a book report on the book The Faith of Our Fathers—I am sure it is available in CliffsNotes.

PAUL KLEIBER Salt Lake City

Pickleball revival

Growing up in Ohio, I worked at a swim club as a high school student where Pickleball was a main attraction, I myself becoming an avid player. I was excited to see articles in City Weekly and The Salt Lake Tribune regarding the growth of Pickleball across Utah. With that said, as the executive director of a youth sports nonprofit, this past winter we renovated a dilapidated warehouse in downtown Salt Lake City into a multipurpose recreation center with the purpose of drawing in more types of nontraditional “play” during the winter (and summer). We received a grant to install two courts provided by Connor Sport Court and have used the space primarily for “Futsal,” a variation of street soccer. However, I think Pickleball would be an excellent addition to our space and I love the health benefits that the sport provides.

TYLER STOCKSTILL Salt Lake City

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Business Department Administrator ALISSA DIMICK Office Administrator CELESTE NELSON Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

Editorial

Managing Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer COLBY FRAZIER Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofreader LANCE GUDMUNDSEN Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns DASH ANDERSON, JORDAN FLOYD, CASEY KOLDEWYN, KATHLEEN STONE

Marketing

Marketing Manager JACKIE BRIGGS Marketing/Events Coordinator NICOLE ENRIGHT Street Team BEN BALDRIDGE, ALISSA DIMICK, BLAKE DIMICK, SIERRA DAGGET, MELISSA METOS, ANDY ROMERO, LAUREN TAGGE, RACHEL TERRAN, MIKAYLA THURBUR, TINA TRUONG

Sales

Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales LINDSAY LARKIN Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives JEFF CHIPIAN, LISA DORELLI, TYESON ROGERS, SIERRA SESSIONS, JEREMIAH SMITH

BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, CAROLYN CAMPBELL, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, MICHELLE LARSON, DOUG LOWE, KATHERINE PIOLI, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER

Production

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Art Director MASON RODRICKC Graphic Artists SUMMER MONTGOMERY, CAIT LEE, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Circulation

Display Advertising

Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

801-413-0936

National Advertising

Business/Office

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866 www.vmgadvertising.com

Accounting Manager CODY WINGET

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

All Contents © 2016

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 5


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | JUNE 2, 2016

PRIVATE EY

All Pride Aside

I met Bert Fontana in grade school at Copperton Elementary, second grade or so, before man stood on the moon, when the Kennedy brothers were still alive, when Dr. Martin Luther King and Malcolm X spoke to inequality, before the Beatles, when Liberace was simply considered flamboyant and Rock Hudson was kissing starlets like there was no tomorrow. Actor Sal Mineo was yet to publicly announce he was gay, so, by that simple math, I met Burt a long, long time ago. We grew up in Bingham Canyon. The Bingham Canyon mine was yet to devour or bury our homes; there were still businesses on Main Street and we heard rumors the old fashioned way—at the barber shops, in the taverns, on the playgrounds and occasionally, during mostly secret telephone calls. They were mostly secret because some homes had party lines, meaning their phone line was shared with that of a neighbor. Lord knows that some things are better left unsaid rather than discussed over a transit that someone else can listen in on. If you asked any former Bingham Canyon resident if there were lesbian women or gay men living among them, most likely the answer would be, “maybe, but I never knew any.” Such an answer is reflective of a bygone time when people not only didn’t ask questions about sexuality, but also reflective of the fact that gay men and women just didn’t live their lives openly. Except for their secrets known to but a select few, they blended in perfectly with everyone else. They were hardcore miners. They were hardy drinkers. They were hardass military men and women. They hardly went to church. They were just like everyone else near as one could tell. Canyon residents never really spoke about knowing “homosexuals.” They merely cited rumors that

so-and-so might very well be one, as often as not in the vernacular of the times, like “she’s a regular tomboy” or “he’s light in his shoes,” or, “you know, one of those.” I knew Bert was “one of those” before we were both 10 years old. He was my buddy, one of my best friends as a kid, as a young adult, and well past middle-age, when he finally up and died. His had not been an easy life, though you’d never know it by his ever-present smile and twinkling eyes. He was a bright light with a wicked sense of humor, yet he bore a tragically dark side as well. Before we were 20, he’d seen and done more things than most people might ever do in a lifetime. His prop as a male dancer was a python. He was not naïve. He could be cunning and charming at the same time. I really never learned what killed him—bad heart, AIDS, loneliness or all of the above. He was loved by all, mainly because he loved so many first. The local hair and wig community took the news hard. He could do hair like no other and I can certify that as I was among those he started on. He always wanted to cut my hair. I spent many hours in the Fontana home growing up— Burt introduced me to the Four Tops and Cream (really? What kid had that range in the 1960s?)—and it seemed like every time “Bernadette” or “White Room” began to play, Burt would grab the scissors and ask if he could cut my hair. I got lots of free haircuts and heard lots of good music back then. I’m not sure what Bert got back. Actually, I do, because he told me so. He got a straight friend back who never once questioned who he was or judged him for being himself, what God created him to be: half Greek, half Italian, full-on gay male. Everyone knew Bert was gay—different—by the time we were in third grade. We just didn’t know the word for it, and we

STAFF BOX

B Y J O H N S A LTA S

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

@johnsaltas

never tried to find one. He was just like all the rest of us—hiking, biking, throwing rocks—plus he had the additional juxtaposition of adoring his mother’s beautiful and rare doll collection. Some of us saw him in a dress. Everyone envied his artwork. He didn’t choose to be Bert, he was simply Bert. He would not, as a third-grader, know that someone out there would want to beat the shit out of him simply for being Bert, for being gay, he learned that later. Because he was gay, people who would otherwise gladly count him as a friend or companion, scorned him. Or hated him. Or worse. There’s worse than hate, and Bert knew that, too. Professionally, he came to know men in our community who were deeply closeted—politicians, businessmen, priests. He told me about some of them, family men I’d seen on the news, and he’d say, “He’s kinky. I have to keep my mouth shut or I’m dead.” Burt died either before or during the Pride celebrations in 2014. I remember seeing him at Pride a couple of years before that, and he looked forlorn. I said, “C’mon, Bert, isn’t this what you’ve waited for?” He said, “Yes, but I’m sad. I’m one of the oldest ones left. All these little faggots are running around and they don’t even care what we went through. They think being gay is easy. It’s not easy. It’s hard. You have to fight. “Do you know how many friends I lost?” he continued. “Do you know how many times I got the shit beat out of me? They think I’m an old hag. They’ll see. You watch. They’ll see. They think gay is a party. They’ll see. They better see.” CW

“THEY THINK BEING GAY IS EASY. IT’S NOT EASY. IT’S HARD. YOU HAVE TO FIGHT. DO YOU KNOW HOW MANY FRIENDS I LOST?”

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

What does Pride mean to you? Jeff Chipian: I see Pride. I see power. I see a badass motha who don’t take no shit from nobody.

Pete Saltas: Civil rights and liberties are essential to a community’s structure. That’s the founding principle of this nation … “all men are created equal.” Although the language defining those freedoms has changed over time (for the better) there should never be exceptions to those freedoms. If one group of people doesn’t have them, nobody else deserves them.

Tyeson Rogers: Pride to me means that all the people who live in Salt Lake who feel the same way I do about life in general are going to come together at the start of every summer to start it off right …. with day drinking, smoking, dancing and all around debauchery of the best kind. It’s not summer till Pride has gone off.

Paula Saltas: Living each day with integrity and without judging and accepting people for who they are. Being true to yourself is the main thing.

Andrea Harvey: A certain Disney quote comes to mind: “Ohana means family. Family means no one gets left behind.”

Lisa Dorelli: Setting aside one day of the year, especially in a state of blatant hopes for repression, to shine brightly in all of the colors of one’s personality and lifestyle. Live free, live happy. Plus, it’s a hell of a party.

Mason Rodrickc: P is for Pride, in all it’s glory. E is for Energetic folks lost in the parade. N is for No one is turned away. I is for Ignorance being stomped out! S is for … um, wait … What was the question?


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 7


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | JUNE 2, 2016

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

In today’s world, you get more news from an Internet story’s comment section than you do from the story itself. The question is how to let the public know what the public knows. Let’s first take the death of Neil Ashdown, former Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr.’s chief of staff. He died of “unknown causes at the age of 46,” according to a May 23 article in The Salt Lake Tribune. That was the last we heard. Then there is the curious case of Deputy District Attorney Chad Platt, whose death after a fall from a parking garage was ruled suicide. Reports from neighbors and various TV outlets noted members of the Internet Crimes Against Children task force battering down the door to Platt’s home and staying up to seven hours. All District Attorney Sim Gill would say is this: “It would be highly inappropriate and disrespectful both to him and to his family to speculate on whatever Chad may or may not have been thinking.” Reporter Robert Mims tried many times in comments to shut down the speculation. Confirmation, attributable sources, unconfirmed allegations. But endless comments beg the question: Why can’t the media find a way to begin to explain the gaps in knowledge? Public deaths and public figures deserve more. “Suicide is never the result of a single incident,” the Poynter Institute says in “Reporting on Suicide.” The media may be squandering an opportunity to discuss whatever led to the suicide. The actual details may be salacious at best and lead to copycats. As for Ashdown, reporter Robert Gehrke conceded a fair point to a commenter who assumed suicide. That assumption still stands until the coroner rules otherwise. Both of these stories deserve ongoing updates to stay ahead of the social media frenzy. To be fair, at least the reporters at the Trib are reading and responding to their readers. Just not “officially.”

Barring Bars

Two meeting houses of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are applying for a permit to serve God to the community. Both were denied by the Utah Department of Religious Control until they receive written approval from the Restaurant Association, which governs the extent to which religion interferes with social mores. Of course, just the opposite has taken place in Utah, where LDS rules. The owners of two establishments, one in St. George and the other in Logan, were denied liquor licenses pending The Word, according to Utah Public Radio. This hearkens back to a request from Salt Lake’s Cinegrill, which had the misfortune of locating next to an LDS facility that is not a church. It was denied a liquor license despite a positive letter from the church. State law, apparently, is only concerned with proximity and anything church-related.

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Details, Please

In the video for Tyler Glenn’s solo debut “Trash,” it’s clear the Neon Trees frontman is out for provocation (think: booze-slingin’, secret-handshaking and altered portraits of Mormon church founders Glenn defaced himself ). He’s also out for answers from his former faith, and more importantly, closure given the church’s stance on LGBTQ members. In a candid chat with City Weekly, the singer talked about the controversial vid, escapism in music and what it means to be proud.

It’s been a few weeks since the release of the video for “Trash,” the calm after the storm. What is your perception of it now?

I’ve heard so many positive remarks about the video and things I didn’t consider, like, that it would help people or make people feel emotional. For me, it was literally an expression of one weekend of losing my faith completely, and then feeling completely high from the idea that maybe I can do something that I want to do and live my life. I was trying to encapsulate this really angry, confused moment in the video, and now I’m seeing that that’s how other people felt and feel, and it’s really, really inspiring to see it resonate in that way.

Did you have anything like that when you were a kid? Anything like the watershed moment this video can represent to youth now?

For me, it was always in music for sure, but I don’t know if it was a watershed moment. I just always felt safe in music, so I guess that would be my response.

How involved were you in the iconography and the look of the video itself?

I was heavily involved. I sat with the director—and he’s not LDS at all—and I was just trying to explain [that] this is something that went on and is still going on, I’m in it, and this is the expression I wanna make and this is what the record’s about. I was very descriptive; I wanted to have it in a disciplinary council, a high council even, and have the real authentic, visceral experience. He took all that detail and turned it into a really cool art piece. I was stoked at what he turned it into.

What does the word Pride mean to you?

Pride is something I’m just now learning about. I’ve always had a problem with … I always thought I was being authentic—and I think I was being authentic at the time—but this is the first time that I feel proud, loud and excited to rally for people that need to be rallied for. So, Pride to me is emotion, it’s joy, it’s passion, it’s anger.

-ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 9


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | JUNE 2, 2016

STRAIGHT DOPE Big Boom Since April 2011, a mysterious deep, echoing, boom has been heard every Tuesday morning, spring through fall, throughout northwest Washington, D.C. It’s always the same noise, between 6:30 and 8 a.m., and seems to originate from the south, likely across the Potomac River. The rumor was that it was earlymorning drills from Arlington Cemetery, but I haven’t been able to confirm this. Conspiracy? Very loud garbage truck? My dog and I are dying to hear your answer booming across cyberspace. —Beth Venit

1200 S State St. 801-531-8182 / beernut.com www.facebook.com/thebeernut

Beer & Wine brewing supplies

Hours: Sun 10-5pm M-Sat 10am-6:30pm

You, your dog and everyone else, my friend. The mysterious-boom phenomenon is widespread enough to warrant an entry in the dictionary—brontide, defined by MerriamWebster as “a low muffled sound like distant thunder” that’s “thought to be caused by feeble earth tremors”—as well as a robust selection of regional appellations worldwide: Off the coast of the Netherlands, they’re called mistpoeffers; in Haiti, it’s the gouffre. Here in the U.S., noises of murky provenance have been reported, in recent memory, as far afield as Charleston, S.C., and Clintonville, Wis. The latter, a series of which Wisconsinites heard in 2012, were ultimately blamed on shallow earthquakes, not strong enough to cause any shaking but variously audible, according to CNN, as “rattling pipes, clanging metal, thunder or firecrackers.” The former? Who knows? It’s not like no one’s had time to work it out, either—these booms have been going off for centuries. On expedition in Montana in 1805, Meriwether Lewis (of “and Clark” fame) reported hearing at irregular intervals a noise he called “the unaccountable artillery of the Rocky Mountains.” James Fenimore Cooper, describing circa 1850 the noises heard over Seneca Lake in upstate New York, arrived at the same metaphor: “a sound resembling the explosion of a heavy piece of artillery, that can be accounted for by none of the known laws of nature. The report is deep, hollow, distant and imposing. The lake seems to be speaking to the surrounding hills, which send back the echoes of its voice in accurate reply.” “Seneca guns” caught on as a term for the phenomenon, yet folks are still fighting about what it actually is; no less than the U.S. Geological Survey concedes that there “does not appear to be any agreement on what causes the Seneca guns.” Let’s look at some of the contenders: n It’s probably not UFOs, not that that hasn’t been (inevitably) suggested. It’s also probably not a hypersonic U.S. spy plane, though some Brits were keen to suggest such when they heard a series of loud booms coming from the sky in late 2014. That said, the military has claimed responsibility in some cases; some coastal Virginians spent weeks trying to figure out the source of one boom in the 1970s before the Navy finally admitted that, yep, one of its planes had gone supersonic off the coast. It’s probably worth keeping in mind that Charleston, where such noises are frequently reported,

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

The Science of Brewing...

is home to a joint Air Force-Navy base, and it’s not like those guys are eager to spill the beans about what they’re getting up to. n The credit for those booming noises in Britain ultimately went to a meteorite, which—it was surmised—flamed out over the British Isles before ditching into the sea. n As mentioned above, seismic activity is always a good guess. According to a 2011 paper from the Seismological Society of America, “it seems that even smaller earthquakes are capable of producing audible sounds with no perceptible shaking,” as was the case in Wisconsin. This includes activity offshore—tsunamis, such as those caused by subsea earthquakes, are known to be capable of producing loud booming sounds—and a phenomenon called cryoseisms, wherein subterranean ice thaws or freezes rapidly, giving off a cracking sound in the process. n Back at Seneca Lake, the prevailing theory points to underground natural gas deposits escaping to the surface. Given your proximity to the U.S. Capitol, Beth, I don’t think gaseous outbursts can be definitively ruled out. While we’re here, we’d be remiss not to mention the mysterious boom’s sonic cousin known as “the Hum”: a low-frequency auditory phenomenon that, by some estimates, between 2 and 10 percent of the world’s population is able to hear. (And perhaps be driven mad by—at least one amateur researcher has tried to link the Hum to the prevalence of U.S. mass shootings.) A 2004 paper in the Journal of Scientific Exploration excluded the possibility that it’s just tinnitus (for what it’s worth, I’d excluded that possibility myself in a 1998 column) and suggested—not conclusively—that radio transmissions might have something to do with it. Further tests are pending. Anyway, which of the above is you? Well, none of them, actually—I’m afraid your initial hunch was the correct one. “Yes, it is coming from here,” emails Jennifer Lynch, a public affairs officer at Arlington National Cemetery. “The Old Guard practices its battery salute every Tuesday before the cemetery opens.” The Old Guard, officially known as the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, conducts military ceremonies at high-profile occasions—presidential inaugurations, state funerals and the like—and thus naturally needs to stay sharp. So much for nature’s timeless mysteries. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago, IL 60654.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 11


Death Sentence

How prepared is Utah to deal with fatal overdoses stemming from a synthetic opiate? BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net stephenpdark

“H

eroin is a death sentence. People are dying from it every day,” says national Drug Enforcement Agency spokesman Rusty Payne. “Fentanyl is 50 times worse.” Three salt-like grains of the synthetic opioid Fentanyl on your skin can prove lethal. “Fent,” as it’s known on the street, has been used for years by doctors through time-release patches to provide pain relief for people with terminal diseases or chronic pain. It’s that synthetic potency which has led drug traffickers to making their own Fentanyl, using chemicals purchased from China, and then mixing it with powdered heroin (called “China White,” once a name for heroin itself) or even putting it in pills. Waves of opioid overdose deaths linked to illicit Fentanyl have been reported in recent months on the East Coast, Chicago and New Orleans. In just two weeks in Sacramento, Calif., in late March, 2016, 52 people overdosed from Fentanyl-spiked, fake hydrocodone pills. Fourteen died. The prognosis is dire, according to testimony given in mid May 2016 by a senior DEA official to a U.S. House judiciary subcommittee. “The yearly market for illegal non-medical prescription pain relievers is over 11 million people, and if Fentanyl is introduced into even a small portion of that overall market, there is a likelihood that overdoses will increase,” he said. Fentanyl offers vast profit margins compared to heroin, which requires significant investment in land, cultivation and refining. A kilo of Fentanyl from China costs just $3,000-$5,000 but—because of its potency—it can generate revenues of $1.5 million stateside, according to the DEA official’s testimony. As of yet, no deaths related to illegally manufactured Fentanyl have been reported in Utah. And that has cops and advocates worried. University of Utah Department of Pediatrics program manager Sam

Plumb first heard about Fentanyl overdoses from a San Francisco counterpart, who described, he recalls, going from receiving calls about lone individuals overdosing, to suddenly seven people all fatally overdosing in a single location. “They got batches they thought were heroin, but they were 100 percent Fentanyl—and they wiped out that group,” he says the advocate told him. State Medical Examiner Todd Grey is unsure as to why Utah has apparently been spared the Fentanyl-driven death toll that other states have seen. “I suspect it has more to do with how heroin is imported and marketed in Utah,” he writes in an email response to questions submitted to his office by a City Weekly reporter. He says at his state agency, “prescription narcotics are still a bigger problem than illicit Fentanyl in terms of the number of deaths we see. I do not doubt this could change very quickly if Fentanyl-laced heroin becomes more commonly sold in Utah.” Plumb, however, says fake Fentanyl is already making itself known on Utah’s streets. “I can tell you this: it is already here, 100 percent certainty,” he says. John Eddington is Agent in Charge of the Salt Lake City office of the DEA. “We’re seeing an increase in the number of investigations of opioid-related issues that involve Fentanyl,” he says, citing fake Oxycodon pills that were found to contain “Fent.” That presence, Plumb says, raises a disturbing issue as Utah currently has no way to effectively monitor the path of destruction illicit Fentanyl is creating across the state. A veteran police officer, who spoke out about his fears regarding illicit Fentanyl on condition of anonymity because he did not have permission to talk to media, believes that if Salt Lake City tested for Acetyl Fentanyl, which is Fentanyl cut with lactose, “you’d see we have a problem here. We should be testing for Acetyl Fentanyl in every O.D. case.” Part of the problem with identifying whether fake Fentanyl is responsible for fatal overdoses, national DEA spokesman Payne notes, is that the drug converts in the system to “look like an opiate. You’ve got to be looking at increased testing to determine whether it’s there. A lot of the time [medical examiners] are checking the heroin box when it’s actually Fentanyl.” Utah tests for pharmaceuticalmanufactured Fentanyl. According to a records request submitted to the Utah Department of Health, 118 people died of pharmaceutically derived Fentanyl overdoses in 2010-2014. While the Utah Forensic Toxicology Lab (UFTL) and the Medical Examiner’s Office test for standard Fentanyl, they do not test

“People are willing to do this knowing they may die.” – Drug Enforcement Agency spokesman Rusty Payne

FILE PHOTO

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | JUNE 2, 2016

NEWS

P U B L I C H E A LT H

Whether fake pills or powdered narcotics, fears are mounting that the presence of Fentanyl in illegal drug products will mean a climbing death toll among Utah’s already vulnerable user population. for illicit versions, known as analogs. UFTL director Matt Slawson says the Fentanyl molecule is the same if manufactured legally or illicitly. “Bathtub chemists” introduce chemical impurities, he says, “which can be tested for, provided we are given clues to what to look for,” citing Acetyl-Fentanyl and Bytryrul-Fentanyl as two examples of essentially impure Fentanyl. At the moment, his lab “is evaluating the value of adding these analytes to our screening process.” Eddington says testing for illicit Fentanyl is currently being discussed among state agencies. “I think it could be beneficial to have that information,” he says. As yet, Slawson is not part of that dialogue, but hopes to be. “To be able to determine ‘illicit’ [Fentanyl] requires communication between law enforcement agencies and the health de-

partment,” he says, something he tries “to do as much as possible.” Utah is fourth in the nation for drug overdose deaths, with the Center for Disease Control reporting 603 fatal O.D.s in the Beehive State in 2014 alone. That tragic statistic makes it a state ripe for traffickers seeking increased profit margins by selling Fentanyl-spiked heroin and fake prescription pills to people who are struggling to get the prescription pills that led to their addiction in the first place. An Oxycodon tablet’s street value is calculated by the milligram—an Oxy 80 milligram tab costs $80. For that, you can buy 8-16 hits of heroin on the street. As pressure has been brought to bear on doctors and pill manufacturers to curb practices of over-prescribing, patients who have become addicted to opioids after injuries or other issues


CONTINUED

COURTESY SAM PLUMB

NEWS

Naloxone advocate Sam Plumb hands out kits to reverse overdoses outside the downtown shelter.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 13

or fatal dose. And it’s the presence of the illicit substance that’s filling up morgues nationwide. “Basically, if you are a heroin user right now, you are going to die,” says the veteran cop. “You are not going to be able to function as you did in the past. At some point, you’re going to get Fentanyl and you’re going to die.” What has the anonymous cop particularly concerned—given Utahns’ prevalence for pill-popping in a state where Mormons frown upon alcohol—is the recent emergence in local drug busts of “pill presses,” where traffickers have been manufacturing fake “oxy” pills containing Fentanyl. Would addicts knowingly use a drug this lethal? Without a doubt, DEA’s Payne says. “People are willing to do this knowing they may die.” But if you’ve gone to jail, says the veteran cop, for burgling cars to sustain your habit, then come out after a break from drugs, and “slam” (inject) heroin—only for it to be Fentanyl—your body wouldn’t stand the shock. The traffickers, he says, “are killing off their money source. I guess there’s just so many that want it, they don’t care.” With approximately 12 people fatally overdosing a week in Utah in 2014, Plumb fears that the epidemic of opioid overdoses the state has been experiencing in recent years will pale once the full force of the illicit Fentanyl wave bears down on local addict populations. He predicts a spike in overdose deaths, where the numbers will climb in groups of half a dozen or more, rather than individuals. “It’s going to get far worse before it gets any better,” he says. Without systems set in place to alert law enforcement, treatment facilities or hospitals about the implications of illicit Fentanyl, he fears for the worst. Utah, he says, “is unprepared for what is coming. And it’s already here.” CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

turn to cheaper alternatives. “You cut-off pills and you created this huge heroin culture by doing that,” says the veteran cop. That’s why, he continues, you see middle-class mothers from Sandy near the shelter buying heroin from the open-air drug market that has festered there for years. With the reduction of drugrelated felonies to misdemeanors by the Utah Legislature in 2015, advocates and law enforcement are still waiting to see where funding will come from to provide the significant increases in treatment being made available that are necessary to begin to address Utah’s opioid-addiction epidemic. “You can’t incarcerate your way out of this,” he says. “Treatment is the key.” But to address Utah’s overdose problem, a more immediate measure lies in making Naloxone (aka Narcan), a medication which typically almost immediately reverses an opioid overdose, widely available. It can be carried and administered by lay persons. Co-founders of Utah Naloxone, Plumb and his sister Dr. Jennifer Plumb have been passionate advocates for the medication, handing out kits to anyone who asks. Cottonwood Heights Police Department became the first Utah law enforcement agency to issue kits to its officers. Fentanyl produces a much shorter high than heroin, and lacks the emotional and physical “warmth” and euphoria associated with the latter. While addicts go into a “nod” on heroin and their breathing slows as they overdose, Fentanyl is much faster— and therefore more deadly. The problem lies, in part, in knowing what your dealer is selling you. “You can hope you have a trusted dealer, but I don’t know there’s such a thing,” Sam Plumb says. The heroin you buy to snort or inject can be cut with anything from rat poison to laxatives or Fentanyl. An unscrupulous or incompetent dealer can make a lethal mix and there’s no way for a user to know prior to he or she self-administering a “hotshot,”


THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

FARMERS MARKET KICK-OFF

Lots of us have been going to the Winter Market at the Rio Grande, but, hey, summer’s finally coming! You can help celebrate 25 Years of the Downtown Farmers Market, which coincides with “Independents Week.” The week recognizes the great Utah businesses that are the backbone of our cities and economy. The Farmers Market is a nexus for many of them, bringing a culinary, cultural and economic experience to Salt Lake City. Who doesn’t like fresh produce in an environment filled with chemicals and frozen fare? Make it an evening at the Market Kick-off Party. Squatters Pub Brewery, 147 W. 300 South, 801328-5055, Thursday, June 2, 5:308:30 p.m., $40 in advance/$50 day of event, SLCFarmersMarket.org

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | JUNE 2, 2016

CITIZEN REVOLT

In a week, you can CHANGE THE WORLD

WORLD REFUGEE DAY

Nine things that would make a terrible butt plug:

1. A continental breakfast 2. Chacos from the D.I. 3. Your parents’ expectations 4. Grandma’s D.N.R. bracelet 5. Hellboy’s right hand of doom 6. Upcycled rebar 7. Proust’s In Search of Lost Time 8. Trump’s inflated sense of self-importance

9. The DABC’s moral superiority complex

Even if you plan to vote for Donald Trump, you can still enjoy a fun day with friends and family—and refugees from around the world. It’s an educational event for everyone—those who know, fear or welcome refugees to Utah. On tap are cultural entertainment, a global market, “Spice Kitchen Food Festival” and refugee youth volleyball and soccer championship games. And don’t miss the 5K “Run for Refugees.” World Refugee Day was established by the United Nations General Assembly on Dec. 4, 2000. Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, 801-618-5096, Saturday, June 4, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free, Jobs.Utah.gov/Refugee

AVIATION FESTIVAL

You can fly, or even find a job. What could be better if you’re an aviation fan? The Skypark Aviation Festival and Expo features an FA A presentation among other forums. You’ll hear about hiring from Skywest Airlines. For $25, you can take an airborne spin courtesy of Bountiful Flight, and, of course, there will be free giveaways, a concert, skydivers, a flyby and food trucks. Skypark Airport, 1887 South 1800 West, Woods Cross, 801-295-3877, Friday, June 3, 1-6 p.m.; Saturday, June 4, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; waffle breakfast 8 a.m.; Lifeflight arriving at 10 a.m., free admission​, SkyParkUtah.com

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

People With Issues Ms. Pixee Fox reported in May that she was recovering nicely from cosmetic rib-removal surgery, performed by one of the few doctors in the world who offers it (Dr. Barry Eppley of Carmel, Ind.). Though she has had more than a dozen “beautifying” procedures, she had trouble finding a surgeon who would agree to take out six “free-floating” ribs (ones not attached to the sternum). Born in Sweden, she gave up a career as a trained electrician to come to the United States and pursue her goal of looking “like a cartoon character”—which she has surely achieved with her now-16-inch waist.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

New World Order German soldiers participating in a four-week NATO exercise in Norway earlier this year apparently had to abort their efforts days earlier than other countries—because Germany’s defense minister, Ursula von der Leyen, had imposed strict rules on overtime pay. Soldiers are to work no more than 41 hours a week, she said, according to revelations by London’s Daily Telegraph.

WEIRD

Leading Economic Indicators Triple Crown winner American Pharoah earned an estimated $8.6 million racing but, now retired, could earn as much as $35 million just by having sex. Stallions reportedly can breed into their 20s, and the horse, now barely age 4, will have 175 conquests by the end of this summer, according to a May report by CNBC. One industry worker said Pharoah has put on weight, spends his spare time peaceably eating grass, and “looks more like a relaxed horse.” A spokesman for the Kentucky farm now housing Pharoah said he “has proven to be very professional in the breeding shed.”

n In Oregon, Shannon Egeland, 41, already convicted in 2014 of running a mortgage-fraud operation during the 2004-2008 real-estate boom, pleaded guilty in May 2016 to the subsequent crime of deliberately having himself shot to gain his judge’s sympathy (and to collect on disability insurance he had purchased the week before). Egeland, scheduled to start a 10-year sentence for the 2014 conviction, told the judge he had been assaulted by gunfire when he stopped in traffic to help a pregnant woman, but in reality he had ordered his teenage son to shoot him in the legs with a 20-gauge shotgun.

n Amateurs: Government agencies trying, legally or not, to hide details from public inquiries under freedom-of-information demands usually resort to indelibly blackening out what they do not want revealed. The Public Health Agency of Canada, however, recently tried a unique method, according to an Associated Press correspondent. The AP had requested files on the 2014 Ebola outbreak, and, revealed reporter Raphael Satter, the documents finally arrived from the PHA with parts carefully “redacted”—using “Scotch tape and paper.” Satter reported that he got everything the AP had asked for by merely peeling the tape back. (A Dallas Morning News reporter, commenting on Satter’s experience, wrote, “Canadians are so nice.”)

Perspective King Cove, Alaska, population 923, lies between two massive volcanic mountains on one of the Aleutian Islands, unconnected to other civilization and 625 miles from any medical facility (in Anchorage), “accessible” only by a weather-challenging “puddle-jumper” airplane to Cold Bay for a connecting flight. About two-thirds of the residents have flying anxieties so severe that King Cove has a makeshift vending machine dispensing Valium. U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski has campaigned to build a road to Cold Bay to eliminate the nerve-wracking flights, but it would disturb a federally protected wilderness, and the U.S. Interior Department has so far declined. (Unconsidered: Channel the late Sam Kinison, who implored starving Ethiopians to just “mo-oo-ove!” since food doesn’t grow in the desert.) Thanks this week to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Bright Ideas The Moscow Times reported in May that bailiffs in Russia’s Perm region, employing originality as yet unseen in America in attempting to collect an overdue debt, arrested the debtor’s cat. The bailiffs listed the feline’s value at the equivalent of $23, and the man came up with that sum the next day and took the cat home. The Federal Bailiffs Service explained that all the other “property” in the apartment was in other people’s names.

Oops! This correction appeared in The New York Times print edition of May 10: “Because of an editing error, an article on Monday (May 9) about a theological battle being fought by Muslim imams and scholars in the West against the Islamic State misstated the Snapchat handle used by Suhaib Webb, one of the Muslim leaders speaking out. It is imamsuhaibwebb, not Pimpin4Paradise786.”

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Latest Religious Messages The Keystone Fellowship Church in North Wales, Pa., has a tradition of congregants reserving pew seats by leaving bibles in place, but worshipper Robert Braxton, 27, was having none of that on April 24 and took a saved seat anyway. Witnesses told Philadelphia’s WCAU-TV that when one church member gently tapped Braxton on the shoulder to inform him of the tradition, Braxton snapped at him and became disruptive. Congregant Mark Storms, 46, flashed a gun and confronted Braxton, who punched Storms, adding, “That’s not a real gun” and “What are you going to do, shoot me?” Storms, contending that he felt threatened, fired two shots, killing Braxton, and was charged with voluntary manslaughter.

n Britain’s venerable Oxford University issued a formal suggestion to law lecturers recently that they give “trigger warnings” (and allow classroom absences) if the class subject matter might be unpleasant to some students. Complained one frustrated lecturer, “We can’t remove sexual offenses from the criminal law syllabus—obviously.”

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 15


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | JUNE 2, 2016

ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 6.2

THURSDAY 6.2

Salt Lake City has been booming with popculture-themed conventions over the past few years, but many of them treated table-top gaming and video games as side attractions—never focal points. Last year, Salt Lake Gaming Con took full advantage of that opening and took off with great success. The event operated out of Sandy rather than downtown to set itself apart, while also utilizing the space given to them to provide every kind of gamer the opportunity to jump in and have fun. This year’s convention (recently having a 50 percent stake purchased by Salt Lake Comic Con) returns a few months early, offering major video-game tournaments for Street Fighter V, Rocket League, League of Legends, Heroes of the Storm, Halo 5, Call of Duty, Mortal Kombat X, Hearthstone (WoW), Super Smash Bros. and Pokkén Tournament. Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft will all be on hand with playable demos of new games on the way, one of their last presentations before they all head to E3 in two weeks. Table-top gaming isn’t left out of the mix either, as X-Wing and War Machine have started signing up tournament players, with more games to be added soon. Cosplay will, of course, play a major role, as they’ll be holding a major gamer-version contest with prizes. And finally, the special guests for the event will include Grand Theft Auto voice actor Steven Ogg, cosplay model Joanie Brosas, comedy hypnotist Vincent Lords, 2014 Super Bowl champion Sealver Siliga and more to be named leading into the event. If you’re gamer in Utah, you seriously need to check this event out. (Gavin Sheehan) Salt Lake Gaming Con @ South Towne Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Sandy, June 2-4, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., $10-70. SaltLakeGamingCon.com

The former director of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts at the University of Utah, David Dee, founded his own gallery in 2014, specializing in art of Utah and the West. David Dee Fine Arts’ current exhibit, National Parks of the West: Celebrating 100 Years in the Parks, offers a collection of artworks, mostly paintings, depicting the wonders of the National Parks in our area. Works in the exhibit date as far back as Thomas Hill’s oil painting “Yellowstone Geysers” from 1883 (detail pictured). The collection also assembles a survey of some of the finest painters in the region during the early 20th century, including Thomas Moran, whose technique on “The Grand Canyon of 1912 Arizona from Hermit Rim Road” (chromolithograph) is an exquisite blend of light and dark, and the sheer scale of the Grand Canyon. Other artists represented include Franz A. Bischoff, Gunnar Widforss, James Everett Stuart and John Fery. The interest in National Parks, and the debates over designating more public lands, such as the proposed Bears Ears National Monument, as well as the anti-federal government protests that have occurred and the stated positions of Gov. Herbert and other state officials, make this topic especially germane and an essential viewing to get a glimpse at notable artists’ visions of the land, and the reverence with which they held it. Sometimes it takes the vehicle of visual art to enable us to see the significance of something in the world—to ponder what it means to us, and contemplate the impact if it were lost. (Brian Staker) National Parks of the West: Celebrating 100 Years in the Parks @ David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through June 10. DavidDeeFineArts.com

Salt Lake Gaming Con

National Parks of the West

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS JUNE 2-8, 2016

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

FRIDAY 6.3

TUESDAY 6.7

Over the course of 10 years—featuring everything from Medieval morality plays to a puppeteered version of the cinematic Alien saga—Meat & Potato Theatre has never taken the obvious path. And the current production of con-temPOE-rar-y showcases a sampler platter of everything that’s weird, wonderful and thoroughly unique about the company. Company co-director Tobin Atkinson has adapted nine Edgar Allan Poe works for his four-actor ensemble of Jeffrey Ingman, Rebecca Marcotte, Josh Thoemke and Raina Thorne, but in no case does that mean an obvious interpretation, even of the most familiar pieces. “The Tell-Tale Heart” is rendered as broad comic pantomime; “The Purloined Letter” is set in the glasnost-era Soviet Union; the poem “The Bells” becomes a four-part variety show of song styles ranging from Sinatra swing to rock opera; and “The Pit and the Pendulum” employs an expressive puppet as its tormented hero. As is almost inevitable in a production like this, the individual segments vary in the successful execution of their concepts. But the cast is required to show off an impressive array of skills to make this show work, including slapstick, singing, dancing and manipulating puppets. Atkinson never fails to be ambitious in his stagecraft, whether that means lighting the action with hand-held lights, employing Foley artist sound effects or finding the ideal costumes to capture the eerie crew of a ghost ship. Meat & Potato takes the work of a singular artist, and shows why it remains a singular voice in local theater. (Scott Renshaw) Meat & Potato Theatre: con-tem-POE-rar-y @ Rose Wagner Studio Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through June 12, FridaySaturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., $20. ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org

Yellowstone was the nation’s first national park, a wild place so stunning that Americans decided it needed to be preserved for future generations. Now, 100 years later, our National Park Service oversees the care and protection of mountains, deserts, seashores, historic monuments and battlefields. Terry Tempest Williams’ new book, The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, features essays that take readers on a tour of 12 of these places—from Grand Teton in Wyoming to Big Bend in Texas, and from Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay to Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. Williams, arguably Utah’s best-known living author, is also one of the state’s most outspoken naturalists and environmental activists: Just last month, she bid on oil-and-gas parcels at a BLM auction in a Tim DeChristopher-style protest of the sale of public lands. The Hour of Land reflects her commitment to land preservation. The stories have elements of historical storytelling, personal essay and travel writing, and all of them take a deep look at the rapid shifts wrought by climate change. After decades of drought, she writes of the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, the river is so shallow “that a person can walk across the river in 10 steps, maybe less.” Join Terry Tempest Williams this week at an event hosted by King’s English bookstore for a reading, discussion and signing of The Hour of Land. Also on the bill, enjoy a performance by The National Parks, voted the 2016 Band of the Year by City Weekly readers. (Katherine Pioli) Terry Tempest Williams: The Hour of Land @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 7, 7 p.m., $12. ArtSaltLake.org

Meat & Potato Theatre: con-tem-POE-rar-y

Terry Tempest Williams: The Hour of Land


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SOLD OUT ALL ACROSS U.S., CANADA & MEXICO As close to a live David Bowie concert as possible! Has performed with the legendary popstar himself! Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime David Bowie experience! Advance Tickets: $60.00 At Door/Day of Show: $65.00 www.celebritydoublestributeconcerts.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 17


Super Bowls

Local skate parks are far from a haven for boardriding hooligans. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

@CityWeekly

10-foot tall chain link fence surrounds the only public skate park in Sandy: Lone Peak Skate Park, across the street from the walled-in White City township (walls must be a thing out here). A “rules and regulations” sign nearby informs me that the park is locked every night, between 9 p.m. and 9 a.m., but it’s midafternoon and the gates are shut tight, this time due to construction. Skate park closures also seem to be a thing out here; another laminated post warns that vandalism or inappropriate actions (“profanity, reckless or boisterous behavior”) will result in “future or progressive closures up to two days.” I’m starting to feel like I’ve found a hold-over from the Wild West. If it weren’t currently a ghost town, I imagine Lone Peak might be a real rough and tumble place set amid the peaceable housing developments. “The Sandy skate park is really popular. It has a lot of small, beginner stuff. Lots of kids ride there,” Sierra, a skater girl I meet at the Jordan Skate Park the following day, informs me. Despite my subtle prompts, trying to uncover the insider truth about the park’s seedy nature, she’s not talking. “Thing are pretty cool there,” she insists. I’m actually relieved to hear that things aren’t as bad as they at first appeared. On a mission to find the best spots to ride this summer, I was worried after my first investigative stop that I’d gotten into more than I’d bargained for. After all, skaters have a bit of a reputation. No one seems to want them grinding their rails or riding their streets. The University of Utah even tried briefly to ban downhill riders from campus last summer. It often seems like the world envisions hooligans and punks when they see a skateboarder, but there’s got to be a good reason why Salt Lake City and a number of surrounding municipalities (see sidebar) have put good money into creating over a dozen free, public skate parks. The day I show up at the Jordan Skate Park—known to insiders as “the 9th & 9th park”—the vibe is pretty mellow. A half dozen early 20-somethings cruise around the bowl—a couple guys in

A rider takes on the bowl at Jordan Skate Park.

KATHERINE PIOLI

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

A

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | JUNE 2, 2016

A&E

GET OUT

skinny jeans and two girls in grunge plaid shirts. They each take turns, one person dipping in for a quick ride around the bowl and then back out, leaving it open for the next rider. Everyone seems to kind of know each other, but there’s not much talking, and it certainly isn’t loud. As for “boisterous or profane” behavior, I happen to overhear one of the girls mutter “fuck me” as she almost loses her balance coming out of a turn. Each of the valley’s skate parks, I learn talking with skaters Sierra and Nollie, reflects the neighborhood it’s in. “There’s lots of cheap rent around here,” laughs Nollie, which I figure explains why I’ve only seen college-age kids at this cement pool. Who’s skating where also reflects the park’s design. Some parks are designed only for skateboards, while others allow inline skates, BMX freestyle bikes and scooters. The easier parks—with fatter rails and smaller bowls—also tend to attract more kids and beginner-level riders. Just as I’m packing up to leave, a little guy with a scooter rides up to the bowl. He hangs around Nollie, just behind her like a shadow, until she looks down at him. “What’s up, buddy?” she asks, and hands him her skateboard. CW

RUNDOWN OF PUBLIC SKATE PARKS Draper (13423 S. 300 East): For all levels of riders, quarterpipes and street section. Lights: no. BMX: yes. Midvale/Copperview (8446 S. Harrison St.): A street skater’s dream, big rails for beginners, ledges and stairs. Lights: no. BMX: no. Park City (1250 N. Sullivan Road): Huge park (20,000 square feet), one of Utah’s best, street and bowl sections, skate summer camp till 11 a.m. Lights: no. BMX: no. Riverton (12600 S. 1600 West): One of the original parks, two bowls, a halfpipe section. Lights: no. BMX: no. Salt Lake City/Fairmont (900 E. 2340 South): Good flow bowl, 5-10 feet deep, limited street area. Lights: yes. BMX: yes. Salt Lake City/Jordan (1000 S. 900 West): One of best bowls for continuous riding. Lights: no. BMX: yes. Sandy (10100 S. 700 East): One of Utah’s biggest and most popular, designed for beginners. Lights: yes. BMX: yes. Other skate parks at: Rose Park, Taylorsville, Herriman, North Salt Lake, Salt Lake/Cottonwood, South Jordan, American Fork, Orem, Provo, Heber, Layton, Ogden, North Ogden. Reviews at SaltyPeaks.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 19


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

20 | JUNE 2, 2016

moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

WEDNESDAY 6.8

Richard Russo: Everybody’s Fool

ALEX BOYE

SATURDAY AUGUST 20, 8:00PM

RACHEL PLATTEN

FRIDAY JUNE 17, 8:00PM

FREE OUTDOOR MOVIE AND CONCERT: “NORM OF THE NORTH” FREE MUSIC BEGINS AT 8PM. JUNE 18, 8PM.

AMERICA’S MUSIC AND DANCE SPECTACULAR: FREE TO THE PUBLIC MONDAY AUGUST 8, 8:00PM

FOR TICKETS/ MORE INFO VISIT:

DRAPERAMPHITHEATER.COM 944 E. VESTRY RD. DRAPER 801-576-6570

In his 1993 novel Nobody’s Fool, Richard Russo introduced readers to Donald “Sully” Sullivan, an aging man in the small upstate New York town of North Bath whose life has been filled with bad decisions. A film adaptation of the book cast Paul Newman as Sully, and Russo went on to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for his 2001 novel Empire Falls. But more than 20 years later, the author has returned to North Bath for the sequel, Everybody’s Fool. Unfortunately, Sully is not facing the best of his days as we step back into his life. A cardiologist has informed him that he may have only a year or two left to live, and it’s news that he’s reluctant to share even with the people closest to him—not that “close” is something Sully does well. Once again, Russo tells a story about the unique ecosystems of small-town life, in his distinctively engaging voice. Enjoy an evening with one of America’s most acclaimed writers. (Scott Renshaw) Richard Russo: Everybody’s Fool @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 8, 7 p.m., free. KingsEnglish.com

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Big River Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Dr., West Valley, 801-984-9000, May 26-July 23, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees 12:30 p.m. & 4 p.m., HCT.org con·temp·POE·rar·y Meat & Potato Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, May 27-June 12, ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 16) Disney’s The Little Mermaid SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, 699 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, June 3-18, Monday-Saturday, 8 p.m., SCERA.org Fourth Annual Legacy Gala CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-2981302, Saturday, June 4, CenterpointTheatre.org The Full Monty The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through June 4, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., The-Grand.org Ivanhoe Knight Fever The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through June 4, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheOBT.org Jane Eyre Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through June 4, HaleTheater.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Draper Amphitheater, 944 East Vestry Road, Draper, June 3-11, Friday, Saturday, & Monday, 8 p.m., DraperArtsCouncil.org Murder on the FrontRunner Express Desert Star Theatres, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through June 4, various showtimes, DesertStar.biz Newsies Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 800-259-5840, June 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; June 10, 8 p.m.; June 11, 2 & 8 p.m.; June 12, 1 & 6:30 p.m., SaltLakeCity.Broadway.com Once Upon a Mattress Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-865-2896, May 27-June 6, Friday, Saturday, & Monday, 7:30 p.m., CedarTheatre.org Rock of Ages Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, June 3-25, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee June 18 & 25, 2 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com

DANCE

Ballet West Academy Student Performances Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-

2787, June 2-3, 7 p.m.; June 4, 2 p.m. & 7 p.m., ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org SNaked: The True Story of the Garden of Eden SB Dance, Rose Wagner Black Box, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 4, 10, 11, 17 & 18, 8 p.m., SBDance.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Tabernacle Organ Recitals Tabernacle, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, year-round, MondaySaturday, 12 p.m., MormonTabernacleChoir.org Utah Wind Symphony Season Finale Jordan High School, 95 Beetdigger Blvd., Sandy, June 7, 7:30 p.m., UtahWindSymphony.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, every Friday, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, every Saturday, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, every Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Chris D’Elia Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 2, 7:30 p.m.; June 3 & 4, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com Russ Nagel Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, June 3-4, 8 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Craig Johnson: The Highwayman Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, 801-484-9100, June 2, 7 p.m., free, KingsEnglish.com Steven Raichlen: Project Smoke The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 4, 2 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Brodi Ashton, Jodi Meadows and Cynthia Hand: My Lady Jane The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 7, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com


moreESSENTIALS Terry Tempest Williams: The Hour of Land Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, June 7, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 16) Richard Russo: Everybody’s Fool The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 8, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 20)

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Salt Lake Gaming Con South Towne Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Sandy, June 2-4, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., $10-70. SaltLakeGamingCon.com (see p. 16) The Utah Pride Festival 2016 Washington Square Salt Lake City & County Building, 450 S. 200 East, Salt Lake City, June 3-5, UtahPrideFestival.org Utah Lake Festival Utah Lake State Park, 4400 West Center St., Provo, 801-854-2904, June 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., UtahLake.gov

FARMERS MARKETS

Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market Historic Main Street, 600 Main Street, Park City, Sundays, 10 a.m.5 p.m., June 5-Sept. 18, ParkSillySundayMarket.com

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net!

CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Abstract Expressions Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, 801-519-2461, through June 11, EvolutionaryHealthcare.com Art at the Main Spring Show Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, through June 25, ArtAttheMain.com Brian Snapp: House of My Brother/House of My Sister Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Claire Taylor: The Inhabitants of the Salt Lake City Cemetery Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through June 24, SLCPL.org Drips, Splashes & Puddles: Paintings by James Haymond Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through June 16, SLCPL.org Jena Schmidt: Believe & See “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through June 4, AGalleryOnline.com Jennet Thomas: The Unspeakable Freedom Device Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20

S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 30, UtahMOCA.org Jennifer Seely: Supporting Elements Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Jim Jacobs: Append Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Joan Zone Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-353-4088, through June 12, ArtAttheMain.com Lewis J. Crawford: Constructs Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Lucy Peterson Watkins: Textures of the Wasatch Red Butte Garden, 300 S. Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through June 19, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., $7-$12, children under 3 free, RedButteGarden.org Maryann Webster: Narrative Works Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Michael Swearngin Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-385-3383, through June 11, ModernWestFineArt.com National Parks of the West: Celebrating 100 Years in the Parks David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through June 10, DavidDeeFineArts.com (see p. 16) Nic Courdy: Metaphornography Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through July 23, UtahMOCA.org Oonju Chun/Heidi Moller Somsen Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8293, through June 10, Phillips-Gallery.com The Painted Veil Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande, through July 8, VisualArts.Utah.gov (see p. 20) Person, Place or Thing Utah Arts Festival Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through June 3, Monday-Friday, UAF.org Roberta Glidden Dibble Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8293, through June 10, PhillipsGallery.com Sarah May: Identity Retablos Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through June 10, Facebook.com/MestizoArts See Me Hear Visual Art Institute, 2901 S. Highland Drive, 801-474-3796, through June 2, Monday-Saturday, VisualArtInstitute.org Snapshots: Mixed Media Works by Larry Cohen Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, June 5-July 7, SLCPL.org Star Wars Exhibition Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through June 5, UtahArts.org

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

VISUAL ART

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 21


italianvillageslc.com

REST IN PEACE

Pride in Profession

DINE

Remembering restaurateur and realtor John Williams BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I Get your Italian on. 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT M ON -T HU 11a - 11p F RI-S AT 11a - 12a / S UN 3p -10p

801.266.4182

THIS BE GOOD

Authentic Greek Specialties Breakfast · Lunch · Dinner · Beer & Wine

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM ● SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH ● 521-6567

hate having to write this damned article. But, upon hearing of the tragic death of John Williams, I just wasn’t in the space to do a “business-as-usual” restaurant review this week. I sure wish I were writing about Williams under happier circumstances, because that’s how I remember him. For anyone who might not know, Williams died in a house fire on May 22. His estranged husband, against whom Williams had filed for divorce earlier in the month, is facing charges of aggravated homicide and aggravated arson. I don’t know if Williams ever marched in a Pride parade. I do know that he took great pride in his businesses, as well as in constantly furthering Salt Lake City culture and cuisine. He was a patron of the arts and a bold pioneer, albeit a quiet one, in helping to advance LGBTQ rights and recognition in our community. That was long before— dating all the way back to the 1970s—it was routine or even safe to be “out” as a gay man in that very community. Having written about the local dining scene for more than 20 years, it’s hard for me to imagine what it has become without acknowledging the influence of John Williams and his company, Gastronomy Inc. The story has been told many times, but it’s worth repeating. From the time that Williams set his eyes upon the decaying New York Hotel from his nearby haunt in the Shubrick Apartments, he wanted to save it. And save it he did. In 1978, Williams opened the New Yorker restaurant, and it’s been one of Utah’s most venerable and enduring dining destinations since. He took special pride in his restaurant, and turned to the local art community for the unique, contemporary décor and ambiance that would characterize all of his ventures. Stained glass windows, painted columns and works from local artists set Williams’ restaurants apart. During a recent visit to the New Yorker, I was touched to see a colorful portrait of his business partner Tom Sieg—who died in 2008—hanging at the bar, in front of the seat he seemingly always occupied, serving as an amiable host to guests old and new. Like Sieg, Williams often proudly patrolled his restaurant, spreading his warmth among customers. It’s sad to think that a portrait of Williams will probably soon accompany Sieg’s, much sooner than it should have.

FILE PHOTO

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 |JUNE 2, 2016

Italian Village

But as sad as this week has been, I and all of my colleagues with whom I’ve spoken remember Williams as a very happy and dynamic man. We’ve all received warm hugs from him—even during times when we might not have been championing his food. In retrospect, there’s a lot to be said of the “comfort” food served up at Gastronomy’s Market Street restaurants, even if they’re not exactly examples of cuttingedge cuisine. With Williams, business partners Tom Guinney and Sieg launched the first Market Street Grill and Oyster Bar downtown. Those successes would be followed by Market Street Broiler, Baci Trattoria, Club Baci, Café Pierpont, China Star and additional Market Street locations. I still mourn the closing of Baci Trattoria, a restaurant that was ahead of its time, serving chic Italian fare in a contemporary setting when the dining public wanted spaghetti and meatballs and checkered tablecloths. In addition to being restaurateurs, Williams and his Gastronomy partners were/are real estate investors, and very good ones. You might recall that under Williams’ direction in the 1990s, they purchased the Firestone Building, the Salt Lake Hardware Building and the Ford Motor Co. Building. Their real estate savvy has probably helped prop up their restaurants in lean times. And, Williams was always especially keen on saving historic Salt Lake City structures from the wrecking ball. He and his business partners were recognized in 1998 by The National Trust for Historic Preservation with its highest award—the National Trust Honor Award. Their commitment to historical preservation helped to shape the way our downtown looks and feels today.

John Williams (1944-2016) I wasn’t here in ’78, but I’m told that just about everyone advising Williams thought he was nuts to open the New Yorker. He was quoted in a Salt Lake Tribune article years ago saying, “People were concerned about our sanity.” Remember, this was way before the city had the plethora of upscale dining spots it does today, and sticker shock at the New Yorker was definitely a factor. Nevertheless, the restaurant has been a hit ever since its doors opened. Just as this restaurant paved way for the other high-end ones that followed, Williams’ Market Street Grill was also a pioneering force in our culinary scene. Prior to its opening, fresh fish and seafood in local restaurants meant pretty much one thing and one thing only: trout. But Williams and his partners struck a deal with Delta Airlines in which they would fly fresh seafood in from the West Coast on a daily basis. One has to wonder if all of the sushi spots that SLC has spawned in the past decade or so would have been feasible without Williams and Gastronomy blazing the trail to bring in fresh ocean fare, thereby helping to train our taste buds. Just as John Williams left his mark on our palates and on the city’s skyline, he also left an army of faithful employees to praise his generosity, professionalism and mentorship. I will miss him. But I take solace knowing that part of his soul is embedded in the very brick-and-mortar of the restaurants and community he loved. CW


WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL PARTICIPATING LOCATIONS AND SPONSORS FOR A SUCCESSFUL

burger week

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Royal Eatery

HIGHLAND

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

PINKY’S

JUNE 2, 2016 | 23

®

| CITY WEEKLY |

sponsors: x-nation I poplar | Garage | Budweiser | Salt & Smoke meats


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 |JUNE 2, 2016

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-86 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

S P E ND $30 & GET $5 OFF

Exp. 6/30/16

Meditrina-Lewandowski Wine Dinner

Evan Lewandowski—owner and winemaker at Utah’s own Ruth Lewandowski Wines—is teaming up with owner/chef Jen Gilroy and her team at Meditrina for a winemaker dinner on Wednesday, June 8, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The six-course dinner includes pairings of four different new Ruth Lewandowski releases, including 2015 Naomi, 2015 Rosé, 2015 Feints and 2014 Boaz. Menu items for the evening include dishes such as ryeberry salad, Jamaican jerk-fried chickpeas, chicken rillettes with pickled pear, brown butter cherry and duck confit risotto and lentil salad with Kalamata olives, mushrooms, sundried tomato pesto and toasted pine nuts. For dessert, there will be housemade chile chocolate truffles and cheese. Evan Lewandowski will also be on hand to discuss his artisan wines. The cost is $40 per-person for food and $30 for the optional wine pairings. Phone 801-485-2055 to reserve your spot.

3370 State St. in Chinatown | (801) 486-8800 | HoMeiBBQ.com

Utah County’s First Brewery

Look for Strap Tank Brewery—Utah County’s first brewery—to open in early June, at 569 S. 1750 West in Springville (StrapTankBrewery.com). The brewery, restaurant and pub is named for the unique 1907 Strap Tank Harley-Davidson Motorcycle, made with a strap-on gas tank. The owner is Rick Salisbury of Salisbury Homes, an avid vintage motorcycle enthusiast. Stay tuned here for more opening info.

Cav’s Pizza Man

Anyone who has been paying attention to the NBA playoffs this year has seen plenty of Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James. (If you have been watching the playoffs, you’ve also seen him during commercials as a spokesperson for KIA Motors.) Still haven’t had enough? Well, he has brought his skills to Utah, opening FastFire’d Blaze Pizza—a company backed by James—on May 26 in Lehi (3370 N. Digital Drive), near Cabela’s and the new Porsche/ Audi dealership (not KIA?). The Chipotlestyle build-your-own artisan pizza casual eatery serves pizza, salads, s’mores pies, blood-orange lemonade and more, including gluten-free dough and vegan cheese options. Other Blaze investors include Maria Shriver and Patrick Schwarzenegger. As of press time, LeBron is busy playing basketball and is unlikely to be seen in Lehi anytime soon. Quote of the week: “Breakfast cereals that come in the same colors as polyester leisure suits make oversleeping a virtue.” —Fran Lebowitz Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

On Racks Now! Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 25


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

26 |JUNE 2, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Portugal: Not Just Port

Exploring Portugal’s other red wines

GRAB A BITE

TONIGHT DINNER & SHOWS

NIGHTLY SATURDAY& SUNDAY

BRUNCH AWARD WINNING

PATIOS TO

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

A

s was the case with wine from Spain over the last couple of decades, table wines from Portugal—especially red ones—are beginning to attract the attention they deserve. Some have become darlings of wine experts and restaurateurs, undoubtedly in part because they tend to be very economical. Since the 1990s, wines from Portugal have dramatically improved, and are some of the best values in European wines. You can enjoy great Portuguese table wines for well under $20, and some priced at half that. Indeed, the most expensive non-Port red wine from Portugal in our state that I’m aware of sells for $39.99, and it’s sensational. But, more about that later. Portuguese red wines are almost always blends of many different varietals—most of which are found only in Portugal. So, unless you’ve really boned up on your Portuguese wine grapes—and there are more than 230 of them—you might not even recognize some of the most familiar, like Periquita, Baga, Bastardo, Jaén, Alfrocheiro Preto and such. To add to the confusion—although the French seem to have adapted quite well to a similar system—Portuguese wines aren’t identified by grape varieties, but rather by the regions from which those grapes come. In terms of consistency and availability here in the United States, I would point you toward the red table wines from the Douro region of Portugal for great flavor and excellent value. The Douro, a geographic region situated in the northeast of Portugal, is most famous for its Port. Forebodingly steep hillsides, hotter-than-hell summers, rocky crevices and other environmental challenges make you wonder why any-

Best

of Utah

2015

DRINK

one ever decided to try to make wine in the Douro, but they did. The result, however, is very hearty old vines—in some cases, ones that had to burrow as much as 60-65 feet deep through broken granite in order to find water. A recent winemaker dinner at Finca restaurant, featuring the wines of Quinta do Romeu and winemaker João Menéres, provided the opportunity for me to sip some excellent reds from the Douro. The first was Quinta do Romeu Rosado 2015 ($11.44), a rosé that is made from organic, hand-picked grapes including Tinta Roriz (aka Tempranillo in Spain), Touriga Nacional and Tinto Cão. It’s a light, refreshing, dry rosado that paired beautifully with chef Elloy Berumen’s delicious three-way heirloom carrots (roasted, pickled and confit). A charcuterie plate was paired with Quinta do Romeu Moinho do Gato 2012 ($10.49), which is fermented in stainless steel, with no oak, filtering or fining. Moinho do Gato is a vibrant, spicy wine with good acidity that is versatile enough to pair with a wide range of foods, especially meats and cheeses. Quinta do Romeu Reserva ($20.40) is the Romeu estate’s top red wine—one with floral aromas, firm structure, soft and silky mouthfeel—that hung right in there with stellar, French-racked wild venison. At slightly more than 20 bucks, I defy you to find a better European red wine bang-for-the-buck. Remember I mentioned the most expensive Portuguese red table wine that I found available here? Well, it’s called 2012 Quinta do Crasto “Old Vines” Reserva Douro and it sells for just under $40. It was given a 94-point rating in Wine Spectator and 93 points by Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate, and I can taste why. It’s powerful yet refined, and has great depth while still being elegant. Made with a field blend of between 20 and 30 different varietals, this Douro is brimming with ripe plum and floral aromas and sweet blueberry flavors. The tannins are quite light, and there’s a strong backbone of acidity here. It’s remarkable, even at such a young age. Get some. CW

VOTED BEST

ASIAN EYE CANDY

Book your private party with us up to 40 people

PIZZA & GOOD TIME R E S! BE

2015

post your free online · classified ads at

326 W TEMPLE

IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

GRACIESSLC.COM

Jobs Rentals ll Buy/Se Trade

Sake tasting • Sushi classes 2335 E. MURRAY HOLLADAY RD 801.278.8682 | ricebasil.com

2991 E. 3300 S. 801.528.0181


VIETNAMESE • CHINESE • VEGETARIAN LUNCH • DINNER • CATERING • TAKE OUT

winner 2015 & 2016 MON-THURS 11A M- 9PM FRI/SAT 11A M-9:30PM | SUN 11A M-8PM 7640 SOUTH STATE ST. MIDVA LE, UT 801-889-4090 | PHO33UTA H.COM

South Jordan • 10500 S. 1086 W. Ste. 111 • 801.302.0777 Provo • 98 W. Center Street • 801.373.7200 www.IndiaPalaceUtah.com

A L L DA

Beer & Wine

WHY WAIT?

M-Th 11-10•F 11-11•S 12-11•Su 12-9

9000 S 109 W, SANDY & 3424 S STATE STREET

801.566.0721•ichibansushiut.com NOW OPEN! 6930 S. STATE STREET • 801.251.0682 23 years on Harvey Milk Blvd at 9th East

Catering available 20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

t

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

AND ASIAN GRILL

Germ

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FF O % 0 5 I H S U S ALL LS Y ! L O R & Y E V E RY DA

T G S I S T A Dan Delicatessen & ReU stauran

| CITY WEEKLY |

We’d like to thank our amazing staff & customers for the past 23 years!

Fresh crossants, Danish and muffins from scratch everyday!

JUNE 2, 2016 | 27

Introducing,


Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-andpop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Our Philosophy has always been to take the finest ingredients and do as little to them as possible. Classic Italian techniques used to make artisan pasta, homemade cheeses and hand tossed Pizza.

Naked Fish 20

As you might guess from the name, Naked Fish specializes in sashimi, sushi, maki, nigiri and such, but this restaurant doesn’t stop there. Other dining options include the glazed Pacific Rim pork ribs, miso-glazed sea bass, lettuce cups, tempura and the mind-blowing Wagyu beef. This is the real thing: all-natural Japanese strip loin imported from the Miyazaki prefecture on Kyushu Island. The place might be called Naked Fish, but the beef is stupendous. 67 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-595-8888, NakedFishBistro.com

16 WINNER

249 East 400 South, SLC • (801) 364-1368 stonegroundslc.com

patio is now

open!

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

New Yorker

JUNE 4TH JUNE 18TH JUNE 25TH

oskar & Julia BOWTB pat & Roy

28 |JUNE 2, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net Sabaku Sushi

This restaurant mixes classic Asian cuisine with Southwestern flavors for meals that fit its Moab surroundings. Sabaku flies its fish in overnight from Hawaii, ensuring that each bite is fresh, and the wasabi is freshly ground. Daily specials mean that returning customers always have something new to try. Brave customers are rewarded with the Chef’s Freestyle roll—you never know what you might get! 90 E. Center St., Moab, 435-259-4455, SabakuSushi.com

Lone Star Taquería

The New Yorker’s express lunches are a hit with the hurried business crowd, especially the delicious lobster sliders. For a more leisurely meal, book an intimate table for the evening and dig into the exquisite jambalaya, roasted rack of lamb or the irresistible pappardelle with Maine lobster and tomato-basil cream sauce. A top-notch wine selection and classic cocktails like the bellini, cable car and Manhattan just add to the fun. 60 W. Market St., Salt Lake City, 801-363-0166, NewYorkerSLC.com

It’s a cool and kitschy place, with cold Mexican cervezas served in glass cowboy boots and a rockin’ house sound system. The only thing missing is a beach. Everything is fresh at this inexpensive restaurant, from the tortillas and salsas to the tamales and tacos. The mahi-mahi fish tacos with cilantro aioli are wildly popular at the Lone Star, and I love the zippy jalapeño-spiked guacamole. The burritos aren’t bad, but at Lone Star Taquería, it’s really all about the tacos. Flip-flops are optional. 2265 E. Fort Union Blvd., Cottonwood Heights, 801-944-2300, LoneStarTaqueria.com

Pig & A Jelly Jar

Melty Way

Pig & A Jelly Jar serves a from-scratch menu for breakfast, lunch and Sunday dinner, with a focus on Southern-tinged comfort food. This cozy and friendly restaurant invites you to linger, with servers who are excellent and knowledgeable. For breakfast, tempt your tastebuds with frittatas, ham hash, chicken and waffles and more. Lunch options include burgers, salads, sandwiches and soups. The “blue plate” special changes daily, with items such as chicken potpie and Italian meatloaf. 401 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 385-202-7366; 227 25th St., Ogden, 801-605-8400, PigAndAJellyJar.com

Resistance to Melty Way’s grilled-cheese-sandwich creations is futile, especially with tasty combinations like three cheese (havarti, pepper jack and aged cheddar), artichoke and tomato (provolone, marinated artichokes, tomatoes and pesto) and more. If you really want to blast your taste buds into the next galaxy, add bacon, fresh jalapeños or a Parmesan crust. Fresh-made soups, ice-cream sandwiches, cookies and other sweets round out your out-of-this-world meal. If you are of the gluten-free persuasion, you can get your sandwich made on Udi’s gluten-free bread for only 99 cents more. Multiple Locations, MeltyWay.com

Mediterranean fast, fine dining at an affordable price. In The Heart Of Sugar House

Better burger... meet better breakfast! s e r ve d 7 : 0 0 - 1 1 : 0 0 a m M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

V

VG

catering • delivery• dine-in 2121 s. McClelland Street (850 east) 801.467.2130 I couscousgrillexpress.com

D I N I N G · B E S T O F U TA H · N I G H T L I F E A C T I V I T I E S · W E L L N E S S · S E R V I C E S H O T E L S & T R AV E L · R E C R E AT I O N · R E TA I L · T I C k E T S W/ L O W O R N O F E E S

1 3 N E I G H B O R H O O D L O C AT I O N S FAC E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U RG E R

cityweeklystore.com

GF


PRIDE ISSUE 2016

A

PAGE

30

PAGE

34

rainbow flag, remember that? Up until then, the sigil— the work of San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker—meant very little to me. It was a mere symbol often seen on shot glasses or cheap dog tags in San Diego’s Hillcrest district where I’d come into my own. But on the evening of June 26, it meant triumph. It meant vindication. It meant unity, as many non-gay friends also changed their profile pic in support. That same jubilation continues to run deep in Utah thanks to some of the subjects featured in this special issue. People like illustrator Andy Simmonds, aka Hey Rooney!, who has amassed a huge social media following thanks to his clothing line that challenges gender norms (p. 38). There’s also the Mama Dragons, a support group made up entirely of LDS women that whole-heartedly supports their LGBTQ kids. They started out as a secret a few years back and are now a fiery and open force to be reckoned with (p. 30). For many, a year lead time is barely enough to plan a

PAGE

36

wedding. Luckily, Amanda and Leisha LaCrone had the better part of a decade to plan theirs and become the first same-sex couple to marry in Sanpete County (p. 36). And what about the often-overlooked bisexual community? Yep, they do exist and they meet up on the regular. Find out what they’re all about on p. 34. Finally, we celebrate with cheers and jeers the ups and downs of the year gone by on p. 40. As far as my own journey goes, when I pray now, it’s usually to give thanks for the family and friends I’ve been blessed with; and about the only change I ask for is a change of heart in those that continue to ostracize, vilify and spread misinformation about those like me. I also give thanks for being different, because let’s face it, anything else would be wearisome. This is my new normal, and I’ve grown to embrace it, unabashedly love it and be 100 percent proud of it.

| CITY WEEKLY |

s a member of the LGBTQ community, it’s been a long road to the current days of #slay and YASSS GAGA. Like many of my cohorts in the Beehive State, being proud of being different wasn’t intrinsically in the cards for me. In fact, I remember my nighttime routine growing up involved getting down on my knees and praying to God to make me normal. To be OK with being different, and on top of that to celebrate it, seemed like lunacy. Still, eventually, celebrate it I did. For me, Pride festivities represented an opportunity for park-drinking, manic dancing and daytime scandal. After a few goes at it, I saw past the beads and the balloon-adorned flatbeds, and came across its true meaning: pride in your community and pride in oneself. That feeling reached its zenith last summer when a landmark Supreme Court decision made marriage for all the law of the land. A lot of people altered their Facebook profile picture to one emblazoned with the colors of the

—Enrique Limón

PAGE

38

JUNE 2, 2016 | 29

The Year in Gay-Z p.40


PRIDE ISSUE 2016

Breathing Fire and Calming Make Hearts way for

the Mama Dragons

By Carolyn Campbell Photos by Niki Chan

| CITY WEEKLY |

M

30 | JUNE 2, 2016

Lisa Glad and her daughter, Patti

ama Dragons began with eight LDS women private messaging each other on Facebook. Co-founder Jill Hazard Rowe recalls that a woman in American Fork sought help for a student in a gay-straight alliance who was having issues. “She brought in a few of us to answer questions.” They supported that student and the feed continued. “It became a nightly thing with us, sharing our sorrows and pain, not only about kids, but also about our church.” It was a place to vent where the women felt truly safe, where their sisters had their backs. The thread of private messages became so long that they created the Mama Dragons Facebook page and added people. They continued to offer support for other LDS people navigating the waters of LGBTQ issues within their families and communities. Initially, the Facebook setting was “secret.” Then they realized how much support is needed and that people are looking for help. Today, there are nearly 900 women worldwide. The group has expanded to include other faiths. “We respect everyone’s spiritual journey,” says Rowe. The name Mama Dragons originated when an Arizona mom decided that the term “mother bear” wasn’t powerful enough. In Mama Dragon Story Project, she explains that, after her 13-year-old son came out as gay, “a whole new level of protection came over me. I now call myself a Mama Dragon. I could literally breathe fire if someone hurt my son.”

Lisa Glad

Four years ago, the bottom of Lisa Glad’s world suddenly dropped away. It was Dec. 22, the night before her big family Christmas party. She and her 20-year-old daughter, Patti, sat alone in a Lowe’s parking lot. Patti suddenly said, “Mom, the thing with this girl tonight ... it’s a date. I’m lesbian.” Glad’s mind rushed helplessly as she thought, “I don’t know what to do with this.” Aloud, she said, “I don’t want to lose you. I love you. We will do whatever we need to do.” She reassured Patti that she would not disown her, adding, “You are mine and you will always be mine.” Glad survived the holidays because she didn’t have time to talk to anyone. Then she contracted a bad case of the flu. “I welcomed it. I could hide in my room,” she recalls. She made an appointment with a family friend who was also her family doctor and her parents’ LDS bishop. “I went in to see him and just fell apart,” she says. He reassured her, saying, “Your daughter was sent to you for a reason. Your job is to comfort her, keep her close and not do anything to push her away.” Glad bore that message in mind years later when her youngest daughter, Kris, expressed that she wasn’t transgender, but didn’t feel female, either. Today, she identifies as asexual and gender-queer. Glad is validated by reaching out as a Mama Dragon. “Our main focus is being allies to each other as mothers. By supporting each other, we can support our gay kids and everybody else’s. Finding out that you have a gay kid can rock you to the core. It’s my opinion that those parents are the ones who the Savior would reach out to the most.” She has two equally strong testimonies—one of LDS Church teachings that she feels “are absolutely right” and the other that advocating and helping parents of LGBTQ children is the absolute right thing for her to do. “I’ve told my stake president about the conviction I have that I am called to this. If I had to choose between my activism and love for my kids versus the church, there is no question that my kids would win. I don’t want it to come to that ultimatum.” She’s currently a nursery leader in her LDS ward. “I know there are certain things in older classes that I cannot teach.” She supports her daughters’ decision to leave the church because “negative things they have heard their whole lives have contributed to their anxiety and depression. Heavenly Father has reassured me that he will keep his arms around my girls. There are times when I want to leave the church, too. Then the spirit tells me I need to be there.” She attended the Mama Dragons second retreat held at a huge home in St. George that once belonged to a polygamist. “There were bedrooms with individual bathrooms all around the perimeter of the house.” After she posted photos on Facebook, her daughter, Patti, asked her to send her a photo of the kitchen. Then she called her mom to say that she had been to that house, too, for a college seminar. “That is the same house where I told someone I was a lesbian for the first time,” she said. That coincidence further brought home to Glad that “this work is what I need to be doing. Mama Dragons helps me reach out to moms to tell them that if they keep breathing and loving their kids that everything will be all right.”

“Your daughter was sent to you for a reason. Your job is to comfort her, keep her close and not do anything to push her away.”


PRIDE ISSUE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 31


Jody England Hansen

MIKE HANSEN

PRIDE ISSUE 2016

Jill Hazard Rowe

32 | JUNE 2, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Jana Moffitt

“My fears about being Mormon and having a gay son were too much for me to handle.” -Jana Moffitt

Scott and Jana Moffitt

Jill Hazard Rowe

On Nov. 6, 2011, Jill Hazard Rowe’s son, Hunter, came out as gay. Hearing his words, she began to cry. She mourned the loss of everything she imagined would happen in his life, including marriage and a mission. Rowe’s own history in the LDS church included serving a mission, temple marriage, teaching seminary, serving as Relief Society president and working with Young Women. “I had many spiritual experiences and we raised our six children in the gospel. But when my son came out to me and my husband, I knew I needed to get rid of everything that I previously thought. I realized I was taught by my leaders, but had never taken it to God.” She learned that while being gay is hard, “being a gay Mormon is impossible. The sooner we as a faith community accept and love these kids, the sooner we will stop the suicide rate.” She says that while “Hunter was happy to be in the family setting, he didn’t connect with church and school. He was very much a loner.” Then he began to dance in his senior year of high school. “He just fell in love with dance as a way to express himself.” Today, Hunter dances and choreographs with a dance company in Denver. “I saw this light in his eyes after he came out to us. Through dance, he became a new person. He started to build confidence and accept that he has worth and meaning.” Because of her strong spiritual experiences, she chooses to stay in the LDS Church at this time. “I walk in those doors every Sunday hoping to make a difference. My religion has boiled down to love more, judge less. I pray for the day when my son can walk into church and be embraced, have a calling and have his fellow Saints support him in that. I pray for the day when he chooses to marry and have a partner and children to raise. I hope they can be in the Mormon Church and be welcome. If this is Christ’s church, he would want all of his children to sit in the pews.” A Mama Dragons board member, her passion is connecting with women and making sure they are not alone. She looks forward to attending the third annual Mama Dragons retreat, where women come from across the country. “We spend a week together, where we hike, talk and connect with each other. As you move along this journey, you become more settled. In the beginning, I cried for a month. I have humor now.”

Jody England Hansen

Hansen says the thing she regrets most about the time when her 17-year-old son came out was that she initially made it all about her. “When he came out, I thought, ‘wait a minute. This can’t be true.’ I wondered why I didn’t know about this. I had no idea, even with friends and loved ones who are gay.” Hansen is a ninth-generation Mormon. Her father was Eugene England, a well-known LDS writer who founded Dialogue, a quarterly printed and online “journal of Mormon thought.” “The church had been the air that I breathe forever,” she says. After her son came out, she had many days of pleading, praying and despairing. “I regretfully and painfully admit that I thought it would be best to try to keep him within what I thought could be a supportive structure of the church community—until I was finally willing to see how often he was hearing the messages of ‘we love you, but … you are inherently wrong, unnatural, unworthy, you will never be accepted by God, you need to change.’” She felt that these messages overwhelmed the gospel message “that God loves all of us, now, as we are, and we are to love one another.” Today, her son is no longer involved in the church. She says, “One blessing of having a child who does not fit within our idea of tradition or culture is that you open up to see that every single path is individual and can lead to God.” For months, she pleaded with God to give her answers. One day, in a contemplative silence, she felt a prompting that said, “Ask a different question.” In her mind, she asked God, “Is he yours?” She says that love flowed around over and through her. As she opened her eyes, she expected to see a tangible manifestation of the love that she felt. “We spend so much time and energy talking about what is going to happen after this life,” she says. “The one sure thing for me is that this life is about loving each other. If we can’t do that, nothing in the next life will make a difference.”

Jana Moffitt

For years, Jana Moffitt kept her worries that her son might be gay “deep down, in quiet, secret places.” My fears about being Mormon and having a gay son were too much for me to handle,” she recalls. From the time he was about three years old, she noticed that Scott was different from his three older brothers, preferring to hang out with his sister rath-

er than following the activities of the older boys. When he was around 13, Scott began spending a lot of time at home, in the basement. His sister came to Moffitt, unnerved by pictures she found on the downstairs computer. “They were male physiques—body builders. You could tell these guys were gay,” Moffitt says. At that moment, her fears of her son being gay became an urgent reality. She questioned Scott, asking, “Is this who you are?” Two days later, he said he had known for a long time. “He was scared to death to be gay,” she says. An LDS bishop suggested therapy. Because Scott was scared to even sit in a waiting room for fear that someone would see him, Moffitt drove him to Provo therapists. “I sneaked him to Provo for years. My other kids didn’t know. I made up stories about going to a piano recital or a workshop for school,” she says of the nearly six years of therapy. “The therapy didn’t accomplish anything dramatic. He said it did help with his self esteem.” Scott went on an LDS mission and returned eight months later. “It wasn’t a good experience for him. But once he came home, he told his siblings he was gay. They love him and were all supportive,” she says. Scott found himself at the University of Utah, where he made friends who were in the arts and music fields that he also enjoyed. He was also involved in student government. Scott started telling a few friends, with whom he felt safe, that he was gay. He decided that he would come out after college. “I could hardly wait for that time, so that I would be able to talk to somebody, to finally say that I have a gay son. I desperately needed someone who could understand my feelings,” Moffitt says. A friend referred her to Mama Dragons. She says that they are still her best friends today. She usually sees another Mama Dragon weekly, or at least twice a month. She is struggling to reconcile her acceptance of her son with the policies of the LDS Church. “I am mourning the loss of a religion I had dedicated my life to. All the things I was taught about the pre-existence and the celestial kingdom have had to change. I can’t believe my son won’t be with me wherever we are.” Today, she says Scott is “the happiest boy” as he prepares to attend graduate school at Duke University to pursue a career as a physician’s assistant. CW


PRIDE ISSUE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

156 E. 200 S. SALT LAKE (801-363-2366

JUNE 2, 2016 | 33


PRIDE ISSUE 2016

Language, Identity & Ginger An evening with the Snaps 1 to 5

| CITY WEEKLY |

Club member Jared Urbina

Club

By Alex Springer Photos by Shauna Brock

Family

34 | JUNE 2, 2016

Club member Rowan Fae

is a term that used to be strictly tied to biology. As our society has evolved, however, this word has had the luxury of evolving right along with it. In fact, it’s one of the few existing words that Salt Lake City’s 1 to 5 Club can use to accurately define itself—the evolution of language has been unkind to those who don’t identify as gay, straight, lesbian or transgender. The 1 to 5 Club is fighting an uphill battle, but this small family is up to something big. Co-founded by Shauna Brock, the 1 to 5 Club holds bimonthly meetings at the Utah Pride Center to support one another and discuss issues surrounding the bisexual community. “The name comes from the historical significance of the Kinsey Scale, which ran on a spectrum of 0 to 6, with 0 being completely heterosexual and 6 being completely homosexual,” Brock says. “Kinsey himself was a bisexual, which also ties back into the name of the club.” Brock was prompted to help create the club because she was surprised to see that the B in LGBTQ didn’t get a lot of representation in the larger community—the first Pride Festival that she attended was still called the Gay Pride Festival. “I felt erased, dismissed and censored,” she says. For those who maintain a cursory knowledge of the LGBTQ community’s fight for equality, it might be hard to believe that a stigma of exclusion could exist within their own ranks. For decades, LGBTQ groups and movements have fought toothand-nail to get where they are today, and the fight is far from over. Based on that evidence, one would think that the bisexual community would have as much of a voice as that of the gay, lesbian and transgender. The reality is that those who identify as bisexual are often met with uncertainty and even derision within the communities that claim to be fighting for unconditional equality regardless of sexual identity. Many bisexuals expect the Pride Festival and the LGBTQ community

to act as places of inclusion in a world that is still struggling to accept the concept of sexual fluidity. As the members of the 1 to 5 Club reported, that is seldom the case. This creates a disconnect that has, according to a study conducted by the San Francisco Human Rights Commission, resulted in elevated levels of depression, anxiety, poverty and domestic violence within the bisexual community. The 1 to 5 Club exists as a refuge for precisely this reason. As we passed a package of gingersnaps back and forth, it was easy to see how such unexpected dissonance created a sense of alienation and frustration among the 17 people in attendance. Our discussion covered everything from the erasure of bisexuality among historical LGBTQ activists to the often-absurd legislation that is currently under scrutiny. Perhaps the most profound discourse that arose during the discussion was the inability that our language has to accurately define sexual fluidity, along with the consequential fallout. Since our legal system is based on that same imperfect system of communication, it makes legislation that impacts the bisexual community very murky and exclusive. “It was hard to hear our supporters argue that sexuality is innate and unchangeable to the Supreme Court,” says club attendee Matt Conway, “According to the court, if there was any clear evidence that a person would change their sexuality or gender identity over the course of their life, then they couldn’t protect that person.” Joni Alexandria, a member of the 1 to 5 Club’s sustainability committee, responded, “Being sexually fluid is innate, but how do you demonstrate that in court? So-called ‘rational thinkers’ require binaries—they need to put walls around things, and that is always problematic.” While legal language will always struggle to find a place for ambiguity, society’s use of language becomes the biggest

impediment to inclusion. A large percentage of bisexual or sexually fluid people struggle with their identities because they aren’t armed with the right language to accurately describe themselves, which forces them to rely on the language that others would choose for them. Attendee Grayson Moore explained how this disconnect “shifts the emotional and mental labor to those who don’t match the cultural default.” When someone identifies as sexually fluid, they are often forced to rationalize their identity to others simply because it doesn’t fit within the culturally accepted defaults of gay, straight, lesbian or transgender. As an example, Brock shared a story about a 1 to 5 Club presentation that she was running for the Pride Center. She used the term “biromantic,” which caused a woman in the audience to approach her. “I never understood why I was in love with my husband, but didn’t want to have sex with him until you used those words,” she said, “I divorced him and I’m happy with my partner now, but if I knew that term then, I would have been a hell of a lot more happy.” “Words are just words, and they’re never going to work exactly the way we want them to,” says attendee Lux Knudsen, “But if we give people the opportunity to learn from us, it gives us all an opportunity to grow.” This is why the 1 to 5 Club is so important to the LGBTQ community. By raising awareness of the fact that a large part of the LGBTQ population is still struggling to accurately define their sexual identity, they are making an impact. The Utah Pride Center is one of the only national Pride Centers that provides support and budget for bisexual programs like the 1 to 5 Club, and their presence at this year’s Pride Festival means that those who may be struggling to define their sexual identity have an inclusive resource that is dedicated to helping them—which is exactly what families are for. CW


FANCY TACOS & FINE TEQUILAS

TH, JUNE 5

ATION DOWNTOWN LOC OPEN AT 9 AM H AMAZING BRUNC T FOR THE FRONT ROW SEA PRIDE PARADE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

TA Q U E R I A 2 7 . C O M

4670 HOLLADAY VILLAGE PLAZA (2300 EAST) 801-676-9706

149 EAST 200 SOUTH 385-259-0940

| CITY WEEKLY |

1615 S. FOOTHILL DRIVE 385-259-0712

PRIDE ISSUE 2016

Patio Pride!

JUNE 2, 2016 | 35


A tale of a marriage 10 years in the making

important to Amanda; for instance, the romantic proposal she never got. She asked him numerous times to propose, but he never did. And, for years she had asked him to fulfill another special dream by taking her to the ocean and beach at Santa Monica Pier. He never did. Eventually, Amanda filed for divorce. And in the process of ending her loveless marriage, she suddenly crossed paths with Leisha again. While stopped at the Sinclair gas station on Utah Route 89 in Mt. Pleasant, Amanda went inside to buy something. And there, behind the counter, as if waiting for her, was her secret high-school crush, Leisha LaCrone. Even though it had been roughly eight years, seeing Leisha again immediately ignited the old flame. Though her heart pounded and the words didn’t want to flow, she managed some small talk while making her purchase. Amanda’s visits to that gas station became more frequent, and the two women opened up to each other. Amanda learned that Leisha had an older sister who was also a single mother, and that she had moved back to Sanpete County because her sister needed help with the children. Soon, the couples’ visits turned into serious dating. And when Leisha learned that Amanda’s soon-to-be-ex was not giving her any financial support with her two kids, Leisha suggested that they move in with her—along with her sister’s

NIKI CHAN

T

hanks to fate or luck after a 10-year delay in their relationship, Leisha and Amanda LaCrone made history on Christmas Eve of 2013 as the first gay couple ever married in super-conservative Sanpete County, Utah. Their unprecedented union happened soon after a federal court ruling, on Dec. 20, 2013, that opened—very briefly—a window of opportunity for same-sex marriages in Utah. Sadly, some two weeks later, on Jan. 6, 2014, that window slammed shut. But, by then, Leisha, Amanda and a few other same-sex couples around the state had successfully jumped through it. The U.S. District Court for Utah issued its decision legalizing same-sex marriage on a Friday. So, gay couples all over the state started anxiously waiting for Monday, when they could apply for their marriage license. Leisha vividly remembers: “On Dec. 23, 2013, we hurried to the Sanpete County Courthouse in Manti for our marriage license.” But there, they were told, “no.” Leisha, while leaving empty handed, announced that she was going to sue Sanpete County for refusing to abide by the widely publicized and reported federal court ruling. “A few hours later,” Leisha recalls, “someone phoned, apologized and said we could be married the next morning. So, on Christmas Eve, we all went down to the courthouse and got married by the Sanpete County clerk.” That marriage had been 10 years in the making. During Amanda’s freshman year, at North Sanpete High in Mt. Pleasant, she first saw Leisha, who was a couple years older. “Instantly I had a crush on her,” Amanda says, “and I said to myself something like, ‘Oh, my goodness, who is this girl?’” She learned that the “who” was Leisha LaCrone. But Amanda never got to know her. Being shy and unaware of her bisexuality, Amanda did not pursue her attraction. And when her then-boyfriend got her pregnant, she married him (but without the romantic proposal Amanda had dreamed of). Leisha, on the other hand, came out in high school. “I didn’t want to pretend anymore to be somebody I wasn’t,” she says. After graduating and turning 18, she and her girlfriend at the time started living together in the area. Within a few months, however, Leisha moved to Salt Lake City, where she stayed for about six years, enjoying the city’s larger and more diverse population. There, her life was good. Meanwhile, back in Sanpete County, Amanda was struggling with her marriage. She recognized that in some ways her husband, the father of her two children, wasn’t a really bad guy. Sadly, she also realized he wasn’t such a good guy, either—at least, not for her, she says. He wouldn’t, or couldn’t, appreciate certain things that were

NIKI CHAN

By Doug Lowe

LEISHA LACRONE

PRIDE ISSUE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

36 | JUNE 2, 2016

THEY DID !

Leisha (right) and Amanda LaCrone with their two kids

three kids who were often there. About that same time, Amanda and her kids left town for a few days on a road trip to visit her parents in Montana. The trip was a turning point in their relationship. Not wanting Amanda to have to drive all the way back by herself, Leisha flew to Montana. Somehow, the return trip— with Leisha helping to drive and manage the two kids— cemented their love. “On that drive, I realized how much I loved Leisha,” Amanda says. She came to clearly understand, “I had finally found somebody who actually cared about my life, who wanted to help make me happy.” And the trip was equally monumental for Leisha: “I saw Amanda being such a strong woman and such a great mother, that I fell in love with her.” After that journey, Amanda and her two children moved in. Come fall 2013, Leisha began secretly planning a trip that she hoped would fulfill two of Amanda’s dearest unrealized dreams. But as far as Amanda knew, it was a trip to Las Vegas. In fact, Leisha had two big surprises for Amanda. “I got a ring and I took her to the Santa Monica Pier at sunset on Oct. 18, and asked her to marry me,” Leisha says. When Amanda responded “yes,” the two started making plans to marry in the summer of 2014. Unexpectedly, a little more than three months later, fateful legal machinations gave the couple a sudden opportunity to speed up their wedding plans. They jumped at that chance, and made a bit of history in the process. “Our marriage was front page news in the local papers, the Sanpete Messenger and The Pyramid,” Leisha says. The two were ecstatic about their marriage, as well as the support of family, despite association with the LDS Church. “We aren’t trying to offend anyone among our Mormon neighbors,” Amanda says. “My grandfather, who is the mayor of Fountain Green and an active member of the church, was happy to conduct the ceremony we held to celebrate our courthouse wedding.” Sanpete County residents like to call their mountain valley “the Heart of Utah.” The double entendre refers the geographic center of the state (very close to where the LaCrones live), as well as the rich history behind the area’s many picturesque pioneerera homes, storefronts and LDS meeting houses (including the temple in Manti). Perhaps it also refers to those old-fashioned Mormon values, including refusal to judge others. Today, that heart might also serve as a tribute to the momentous love story of two Sanpete County women who dared to marry each other—and were finally able to do it on Christmas Eve in 2013. CW


PRIDE ISSUE 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

GOOD FOOD, FAST. opening soon.

Celebrating the in all of us

159 S. Main Street Salt Lake City 8am-9pm Monday - Saturday 9am-3pm - Sunday Lu n c h Dinner C oc k t a i l s

1 8 We s t

M a r ke t S t re e t 8 01 • 5 1 9 • 9 5 9 5

JUNE 2, 2016 | 37

facebook.com/MollieAndOllie instagram.com/mollieandollies www.mollieandollie.com


PRIDE ISSUE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

38 | JUNE 2, 2016

Some samples of Simmonds’ artwork

Rooney Tunes

Local illustrator challenges norms one bubble gum creation at a time

By Kylee Ehmann

P

astel pink, bubbled letters and rainbows are not usually on the list of things that count as subversive imagery. But this overtly traditional feminine design scheme, coupled with phrases such as “Masc4Masc” written in loopy lettering and cutesy images of men in lingerie, is pushing back against traditional gender norms. Andy Simmonds, local illustrator and the creator of Hey Rooney! products, uses his artwork as a way to convey joy through this aesthetic, as well as playing with conventions of femininity and masculinity. “Kind of how I view art, how I enjoy it and how I approach it, is just not that seriously,” Simmonds says. “A lot of people have these really narrow expectations for what is art, and I think that’s the point of art. ... You get to define it yourself and break that view in content or medium or whatever that might be. It’s just not that serious.” Viewing art as something more fun than studious is fed by his past growing up in Bountiful, Utah. Rather than anything specific to the city or his family, he says experiencing the strict interpretations of gender roles in a conservative, Mormondominated culture made him question the seriousness of the gender binary, an attitude that funnels into his creative process. “I think this goes for anyone in similar circumstances. Their gender roles are very enforced and there are limitations on what is acceptable for you to express as a male, or as a female,” he says. “And after having come out, I felt very liberated, obviously, and that just translated into my artwork and design to kind of incorporate and play with masculinity, femininity—kind of poking fun at it, but also making some statements about it.” Simmonds says working and living in Utah provides a lot of inspiration for his artwork because he says he sees the amount of influence the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has on local politics. His work does not come from a place of anger, he says, but more from looking at his environment in a critical way. Clearly his message has resonated as he’s amassed quite the social media following. His Instagram account alone (@heyrooney) has close to 50,000 followers. “I try to make a statement, but to do so in kind of a playful way that’s hopefully not too heavy or serious,” he explains. “I think it makes it more digestible for me. I do feel that it’s important to take certain things seriously, but also to have a playful spin on it makes it feel easier to process and then respond to it.” Simmonds says he is continually responding to the images around him, as evidenced by his recent design, “Make America femme again,” a bubblegum pink-and-white riff on

the Donald Trump presidential campaign slogan. Every few of the ideas that he doodles and draws like this tend to ring true for him, and he runs with it from there, working and reworking an idea until it’s ready to display. “Sometimes it’s really well-received and people kind of get the joke or whatever it might be, and sometimes it does not land and no one really cares,” he says. “But regardless, I really enjoy being inspired by something.” And while the local social and political climate influences his artistic statements, it is the pop art of Keith Haring and Andy Warhol that heavily shape his bright, simple graphic

Andy Simmonds

artwork, and have since he was a kid. “I’m a visual learner and I’m a visual communicator. So I’m drawn to that because it’s the way that I guess I make sense of the world, or my own issues,” Simmonds says. “It’s a visual solution.” But now, he says, the images of Haring and Warhol hold a kind of power beyond aesthetic. While he was formerly unaware that both of these artists were gay, learning about their openness with their sexuality and their positive impact on the LGBTQ community now makes him value their artwork even more. Growing up, the designer says, he was in an “intense denial” about his sexuality. His art functioned as a kind of pressure valve to work through his feelings at the time. “Of course, I didn’t see it then, but I look back and, especially at adolescent art, and there’s such a gay subtext in there,” he says. “Art allowed me to … explore my sexuality in a way that wouldn’t be monitored or questioned and that I think really, although I did not realize it at the time, was really beneficial to me.” Simmonds came out while attending Brigham Young University, where he began to focus on lettering and typography as art. “Being gay at BYU was awful, point blank,” Simmonds says. “You are allowed to be openly gay, beyond that, your experience does not go past that. One would feel very stifled—I did, and left very quickly.” Since leaving BYU, the self-professed “professional tween” has focused on expanding his art base, both in the number of people the art reaches, and in what and how he creates his work. Specifically, he says, he would like to work more with painting and drawing on paper, as most of his work is currently digital-only. By doing so, he hopes to get his work into more physical spaces, such as an installation or a gallery, all while keeping his pastel and bubbly aesthetic. “I love making cute, pink, pastel things, sure, but I would like there to be the depth that I feel and process things with,” he says. “I would hope that is communicated in what I do and that people feel something deeper than just pastels and things that they feel is just speaking whether they relate to it or not.” Simmonds is currently working on a handful of designs that are a bit more serious in nature, but is keeping them under wraps for the moment as he is sending them out to other publications. “I feel I’ve worked so hard and have gone so much to pursue authenticity and if nothing else I hope that’s what someone would take out of my work—that they’d feel inspired to or empowered to pursue their authenticity regardless what that means to them,” he finalizes. CW


BEADS • HATS • MASKS COSTUMES • MAKE-UP

Re-opening June 1st

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SUGARHOUSE

8 01 . 4 8 4 . 7 9 9 6 · M O N - S A T 11 A M - 9 P M / S U N 1- 5 P M

W W W. PIB S E XCH A NGE .CO M

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN:

| CITY WEEKLY |

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190

PRIDE ISSUE 2016

The shack is back!

Told an apartment is “no longer available” based on your gender identity while the “for rent” sign still hangs in the window? Denied employment due to your religion? Not paid full wages for doing your job? IF YOU ANSWERED YES, THE UTAH LABOR COMMISSION ANTIDISCRIMINATION & LABOR DIVISION MAY BE ABLE TO INVESTIGATE AND HELP RESOLVE YOUR CLAIM FREE OF CHARGE. Utah law prohibits discrimination in employment and housing based on race, color, sex, national origin, disability, religion, sexual orientation and gender identity; in employment based on age, and in housing, based upon source of income and familial status.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL 801-530-6801 OR E-MAIL DISCRIMINATION@UTAH.GOV

Sick of Being Single?

Meet Other Singles Today! WWW.CITYWEEKLYLOVELAND.COM

JUNE 2, 2016 | 39

FREE TO JOIN SEARCH BY LOCATION MAKE YOUR OWN VIDEOS


PRIDE ISSUE 2016

The Year in Gay from

A-Z

By En

rique

Limó

n

A look at the people and milestones that helped shape the LGBTQ movement in the last 365 days

A is for allies. The LGBTQ community has won many battles,

40 | JUNE 2, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

thanks to those nongay voices that have lent their heft to the cause—from the Senate floor to the classrooms of St. George’s Snow Canyon High School. We wholeheartedly thank you.

B

is for Jackie Biskupski, elected on Nov. 17, 2015. The jury might still be out on what the legacy of her term might be, but the fact remains that as Salt Lake City’s first openly gay mayor and only the second woman ever to hold that post, she’s broken new ground.

C

is for criminalization. Homosexuality is still criminalized in 79 countries around the globe including Egypt, India, Singapore and Jamaica. Stateside, though anti-sodomy laws were ruled unconstitutional in 2003 by the U.S. Supreme Court, 13 states (including Utah) still have ‘em in the books.

D is for dracarys and those Mama Dragons (see p. 30) J is for Jenner. One year ago this week, Caitlyn Jenner that stand by their children no matter what.

E is for elders. Those

of the non-Mormon kind. Respect them. Acknowledge them. Talk to them. Bow down to them. Without those fearless badasses that paved the way (many of whom succumbed at the height of the AIDS crisis), your reality would be less fabulous.

F is for forty-one. Utah Pride might be middle-aged

now, but trust me, it’s never looked better (in that hot, salt-and-pepper daddy kind of way.)

G is for the gender nonconforming and trans* brothers and sisters. There’s still a long way to go, but you give this vibrant community its diversity and transgressive might. #Masc4Masc be damned.

H is for heels.

Damn them! Now in its 13th year, the Damn These Heels film festival continues to be a beacon for LGBTQ representation. Check it out from July 15-17 at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center.

made her vampy debut on the cover of Vanity Fair. There’s a lot to be said about her political views, but one thing is for sure: The Olympian made transgender a household word, and continues to be a pop culture lightning rod.

K is for Kansas. In March, the Sunflower State became the first one this year to successfully enact a so-called religious freedom legislation that some critics say targets LGBTQ communities at college and university campuses. Step it up, JayHawkers! Kansas is, after all, Dorothy’s home state.

L

is for lips; they’re sealed. We’re glad that this year’s Pride headliner Belinda Carlisle’s weren’t, though, when she schooled Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant in an open letter that called the state’s discriminatory HB-1523 “a weapon against others.”

M is for Milk. Salt Lake City’s

got it in the form of the newly named Harvey Milk Boulevard, aka 900 South. We’ve been officially recruited.

I is for inclusion. As Pride festivities have gotten N is for North Carolina. The state’s move to require larger—from L.A. to our fair city—some grassroots organizations are starting to feel abandoned in the towering shadow of corporate sponsors. Remember who your original marchers were and what their message was.

people use public building and school bathrooms in accordance to the sex stated in their birth certificate instead of their gender identity brought out the worst in people. It also brought out the best.

PROUD TO SUPPORT

7TH ANNUAL


Over 150 Beers, Craft Ciders, Music & More

FAMOUS

PRIDE WEEKEND VISIT UTAHBEERFESTIVAL.COM

A BENEFIT FOR:

4

GINGER & THE BEAST 3PM

JUNE S E C I LY S P RO J E C T C A N YO N S 9 P M

SUN

5

JUNE

| CITY WEEKLY |

TH SA 7 TUR DAY, AUGUST 2

SAT

PRIDE ISSUE 2016

BUY TICKETS NOW!

THE VISION 10PM INAUGURAL STREET PARTY! HOSTED BY PRINCESS KENNEDY

STREET STAGE FEATURING

JUNE 2, 2016 | 41

DJ NICK JAMES | DJ ARTEMIS STARTS MAIN FLOOR STAGE FEATURING @ 10AM DJ LATU


News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games,

PRIDE ISSUE 2016

movies and beyond.

exclusively on cityweekly.net

Chic & Unique

O is for Obama. From repealing Don’t T is for Tyler Glenn. Last month, the Ask Don’t Tell and ending the Defense of Marriage Act early on in his presidency, to his recent affirmation of trans* student rights, the president has gone down in history as the most outspoken one in regards to equal rights.

P is for PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis).

A once-daily medication that has proven to be almost 100 percent effective in preventing the spread of HIV. Get informed and get on it.

Neon Trees frontman released the video for “Trash,” an affront on the LDS Church’s stance on the LGBTQ community. Check out what he has to say on p. 8.

U is for Utah, duh. Not just because I

couldn’t think of anything else with U, but because, even though the Beehive State has a ways to go, steps forged in the last 365 days—including banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in employment and housing—have left a sizable equality footprint.

V is for Vermont. This July, the state’s

decision to introduce same-sex civil unions turns Sweet 16.

42 | JUNE 2, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Q is for queer. What was once a vioHand-crafted wine holder made from recylced wine barrels

329 West Pierpont Avenue #100 801-935-4258 re-findgoods.com

lent pejorative has now been reclaimed and is a thing of beauty. In a bold move last February, the Huffington Post’s “Gay Voices” vertical was renamed “Queer Voices,” saying the term is “the most inclusive and empowering word to speak to and about the community.”

R is for the Red Cross. In December, the

Food and Drug Administration lifted a ban that prohibited gay and bisexual men from donating blood (with a 12-month deferral). As early as 2006, the American Association of Blood Banks, America’s Blood Centers and the American Red Cross issued a joint statement calling the lifetime ban “medically and scientifically unwarranted.”

Marsha P. Johnson

W is for wedding bells. On June 26, the

Supreme Court of the United States ruled that states cannot ban same-sex marriage, finally giving LGBTQ couples the right to legit wedding registry (oh, and those pesky 1,138 federal protections and rights allotted to opposite-sex couples.)

XXX is for porn. In April, Gov. Gary

Herbert deemed porn to be a “public health crisis.” Now that he’s tackled the big issue, perhaps he can move on to homelessness, rampant opioid addiction and nonexistent sexual education for our youth. Now, let’s all take a breath of fresh air. Oh, never mind, that needs work as well.

Y is for youth. Using data from Youth Risk

S is for Stonewall. The genesis of Pride cel-

ebrations across the globe can be traced to what happened at the Greenwich Village’s Stonewall Inn during the early hours of June 28, 1969. Before hitting the bars this weekend, brush up on your history and bow down to the defiant courageousness of people like Stormé DeLarverie, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.

Behavior Surveys gathered between 20012009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that along with heightened bullying, teasing, harassment and physical assault, LGBTQ youth is more than twice as likely to have attempted suicide as their heterosexual peers. Have a LGBTQ kid in your class, church, family? Tell ’em you accept and stand with them. It’ll make a world of difference.

Z is for Zion. Here’s hoping this week-

end’s festivities and the ongoing struggle for equal rights in the year to come represent a “utopian association of the righteous.” Rise up. Continue pushing buttons. Be proud. CW


PRIDE ISSUE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 43


PRIDE ISSUE 2016

HOSTED BY: Pre Sale Tic

$7

at cityweek ly.net/ misscitywe ekly Door ti ckets will b

e $10

T H U R S D AY, J U N E 2 Drewnicorn

At Club Elevate (155 W. 200 S.) Doors at 9, Show at 10

Weekend!

The OFFICIAL Kick off to

Mae Daye

2016 CONTESTANTS:

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | JUNE 2, 2016

kets

Holden

Kay Bye

Janice, Janice, janice

Artemis Chase

PERFORMANCES BY:

2013 Miss City Weekly Angela Saxon

Claudia Newmoon

Gorgeous Jared

BEATS BY DJ CHOICE

2015 Miss City Weekly Harry-it Winston

SPONSORED BY:

cityweekly.net/misscityweekly #misscityweekly #longlivethecrown

Rose Manchester


WEINER

See Anthony Run

CINEMA

Weiner brilliantly captures both a specific and general political pathology. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

Anthony Weiner (center) in Weiner

| CITY WEEKLY |

WEINER

BBBB Documentary Not Rated

TRY THESE Wag the Dog (1997) Dustin Hoffman Robert DeNiro Rated R

Street Fight (2005) Documentary Not Rated

Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story (2008) Documentary Not Rated

JUNE 2, 2016 | 45

The War Room (1993) Documentary Rated PG

however, do a phenomenal job of crafting Weiner into a vital and entertaining film. During a montage showing Weiner marching in a series of parades for cheering throngs, they cut briefly but hilariously to fellow candidate (and eventual winner) Bill de Blasio solemnly plodding along to little crowd enthusiasm. Their editing skills are sharp during a sequence in which Weiner and Abedin make fund-raising calls, and the campaign’s launch is perfectly scored to the pulsing beat of Ace Frehley’s “New York Groove.” If you’re remotely hesitant to watch a documentary about a politician because you’re worried it might be “boring,” banish such thoughts from your mind. As the closing credits roll, we see snippets of TV appearances by Weiner in 2015, doing pundit spots on news shows and even poking fun at himself as a panelist on Real Time with Bill Maher (where his sexts were previously turned into a comedic staged reading). It’s clear he’s not going away quietly, and equally obvious that he’s all but incapable of going away quietly. If Weiner shows us anything, it’s that the answers to “Why have you let me film this?” and “What is wrong with you?” might very well be the same. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

grim meeting, Abedin instructs her on how to face reporters with a smile, because it’s “an optics thing.” By the time we see Weiner rehearsing an apology speech in front of empty chairs, it’s hard to avoid the realization that a political operation judges its successes by how practiced and “on message” it can present itself to the world. But there’s also a fundamental level on which Weiner attempts to answer the blunt question MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell poses to Weiner during an interview: “What is wrong with you?” Weiner himself suggests that the way politicians are wired is connected to his indiscretions—a world of superficial interactions built on trying to get people to like and respect you, and see you as someone deserving of power. Yet Weiner also showcases its subject’s uniquely pugnacious personality—including a confrontation with a heckler at a bakery that went viral—as both a fundamental element of his populist appeal, and the thing that repeatedly brings him down. It’s almost jawdropping to watch Weiner fight back against Abedin’s reluctance to be visible during the last doomed days of his campaign, yet it’s clear that he knows no other way to be than alpha dog. While Weiner’s salacious subject matter makes for understandable voyeuristic appeal, and the behind-the-scenes material is plenty juicy, it would still be easy for a documentary of this kind to fall into a familiar rhythm. Kriegman and Steinberg,

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

t one point during the endlessly fascinating documentary Weiner, codirector Josh Kriegman asks his subject, Anthony Weiner, “Why have you let me film this?” It’s a question that might have had an obvious answer at the outset of the project, as Weiner—the former New York congressman who resigned in 2011 following a highly publicized sexting scandal—tried to revive his political career by running for mayor of New York City in 2013. Kriegman had been a congressional staffer for Weiner, so he had the man’s trust. This movie, you can easily imagine Weiner thinking, would chronicle the restoration of a legacy, a disgraced but principled man fighting his way back into public life. That storybook redemption arc, however, wasn’t remotely in the cards. New and freshly embarrassing photos of Weiner emerged, along with details that he had interacted with several women through a sex website, using the instantly iconic pseudonym “Carlos Danger.” Over the course of three months, Weiner captures the spectacular implosion of a campaign that at one point had been leading in the polls, and wound up with yet another round of Weiner as national punch-line. Like many of the best political documentaries, Weiner exposes in uncomfortable detail the sausage-making unpleasantness of American politics. In particular, this is a portrait of the art of spin, as Weiner and his wife, Huma Abedin—longtime friend and political adviser of Hillary Clinton— attempt to salvage Weiner’s campaign from the wreckage of the latest allegations. Kriegman and co-director Elyse Steinberg capture Weiner’s strategy of trying “to sell this as something that people already know”; as one staffer prepares to leave a


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BELLADONNA OF SADNESS [not reviewed] Restored re-release of the trippy 1973 Japanese animated tale of rape, witchcraft and revenge. Opens June 3 at Tower Theater. (NR)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THE LOBSTER BBB If you’re going to make a movie about a society where the only options are romantic couplehood or losing your humanity, the deadpan absurdist sensibility of Yorgos Lanthimos seems perfect for the task. This story focuses on David (Colin Farrell), who is left by his wife, forcing him per the laws of The City to go to The Hotel, where he has 45 days to find a new romantic partner or face being transformed into the animal of his choosing. Lanthimos and co-writer Efthymis Filippou fill this world with terrific details about the pressure—both physical and psychological—placed on citizens to be paired up, before shifting to The Loners who resist that pressure, including a woman (Rachel Weisz) who is only perfect for David because they’re both nearsighted. It’s often bleakly hilarious as a satire of forced conformity, and even of the different kind of forced conformity within packs of non-conformists. But it’s also far less interested in making any kind of big statement than of maintaining its deliberately flat tone and demented sense of humor. The gag may ultimately wear thin, but it’s a hoot while it lasts. Opens June 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

ME BEFORE YOU [not yet reviewed] Adaptation of Jojo Moyes’ romantic drama about a young woman (Emilia Clarke) who becomes a caregiver for a wealthy paraplegic (Sam Clafin). Opens June 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) POPSTAR: NEVER STOP NEVER STOPPING [not yet reviewed] Andy Samberg and his Lonely Island crew tell the story of a former boy-band member’s fizzling solo career. Opens June 3 at theaters valleywide. (R) TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: OUT OF THE SHADOWS B The original 1980s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were intended as a parody of superhero comics. But this sequel to 2014’s reboot is just one more samey-same sci-fi action blockbuster that apes everything from Ghostbusters and Independence Day

WEINER BBBB See review p. 44. Opens June 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS DOCTOR DOLITTLE At Main Library, June 8, 2 p.m. (G) HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH At Tower Theater, June 3-4, 11 p.m. & June 5, 12 p.m. (R) PELÉ: BIRTH OF A LEGEND At Park City Film Series, June 3-4, 8 p.m. & June 5, 6 p.m. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS .5B Adult Alice (Mia Wasikowska) is back in a sequel to the chaotic, charmless Lewis Carroll theme-restaurant that Tim Burton invented a few years back. This time, Hatter (Johnny Depp) is out of sorts and needs her help, which she will offer because “Hatter is [her] truest friend.” We have no idea what Alice means by that, but this is the sort of movie that believes six impossible things because they’re in the script. Hoary time-travel clichés will be deployed as Alice steals a device from Time (Sacha Baron Cohen) that threatens the fundamental soundness of the universe. It’s all a bit like a rejected script from Doctor Who. It wants to be about a lot of big emotion—family, devotion, friendship—but it does nothing to earn any of it. (PG)—MAJ

THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE B.5 After 15 post-Shrek years, we now have this dispiriting nonsense based on the popular smartphone game, as short-fused Red (Jason Sudeikis) and his pals fight a group of pigs who show up with nefarious motives. Frantic action ultimately ensues, in order to provide touchstones that players of the game would recognize, all built around the “Rudolph” plot of “ostracized outsider finds that his defining trait can help save the day.” And of course it’s seasoned with pop-culture gags—the pigs have a poster from the musical Ham-ilton; pause to allow your knees to recover from the slapping—rather than humor built from character, because that would require effort. Oh, and it ends with a musical production number, just in case you were worried you might miss anything that wasn’t pre-ordained from the start of this century. (PG)—SR

A BIGGER SPLASH BBB Director Luca Guadagnino crafts something tantalizingly close to greatness, even as it weaves and darts its way through multiple ideas and genres. On a picturesque Italian island, rock star Marianne (Tilda Swinton) recovers from throat surgery with her boyfriend (Matthias Schoenaerts)—a vacation interrupted by a visit from Marianne’s ex-lover (Ralph Fiennes) and the young daughter he only recently discovered he had (Dakota Johnson). The four-sided roundelay of sexual tension makes for a great foundation, served well by Fiennes’ amped-up performance and directing choices by Guadagnino that almost always feel invigorating and startling. The character drama gets even more ambitious as the script sets their privileged troubles against background noise regarding doomed immigrant refugees. Only the seemingly deliberate opacity of some of the characters keeps this one from the kind of emotional punch that seems primed to erupt. (R)—SR

LOVE & FRIENDSHIP BBB.5 Whit Stillman—who has, in everything but name, been making contemporary Jane Austen adaptations for 25 years—at last adapts actual Jane Austen (the novella Lady Jane) about a Regency-era widowed noblewoman (Kate Beckinsale) attempting to manipulate fortuitous matches for both herself and her reluctant daughter. There’s more overt deviousness going on here than in more familiar Austen tales, and Beckinsale has a ball as a Lady Jane, yet she still gets the movie stolen out from under her by Tom Bennett’s delightful performance as a simple-minded landowner who is delighted by the concept of peas. The absence of a true conventional “hero” makes it a bit challenging to engage with on an emotional level, but at a tight 92 minutes, Stillman manages something that’s more moment-to-moment hilarious than anything you’re likely to see on screen this year. (PG)—SR

more than just movies at brewvies

| CITY WEEKLY |

46 | JUNE 2, 2016

to The Avengers and The Dark Knight, and cannot hope to distinguish itself in such company. It’s tough to know whom this movie aimed at: It’s too long and confusing for children, yet its plot about an alien who wants to take over Earth for the usual reasons (i.e., no plausible ones) plays like the script was written by an 8-year-old. Indeed, the creepy anthromophorized titular turtles—they’ve got the minds of doofy adolescents, the bodies of adult bodybuilders and the faces of sluggish reptiles, all courtesy of CGI—come across as a child’s idea of what being a grown-up must be like, namely nonstop pizza parties and hanging out in your own cool secret underground lair clubhouse. All of that when you’re not fighting aliens with faux martial arts, of course. It would be an insult to cartoons to call this cartoonish. It’s just loud, chaotic and juvenile. Opens June 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson

FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: JUNE 3RD - JUNE 9TH MONDAY 6TH

CHECK OUT

OUR NEW

FREE!

FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF (1984)

POP STAR

X-MEN APOCALYPSE

MENU

over 40 BEERS

AVAILABLE! 677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


CINEMA

CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THE MEDDLER

BBB

Marketing for writer/director Lorene Scafaria’s movie suggests a story about the contentious relationship between widowed mom Marnie (Susan Sarandon) and her adult daughter (Rose Byrne). But surprisingly little of the story actually revolves around that relationship, focusing instead on Marnie’s complicated road toward finally processing her grief. And while it’s always a shame when Byrne is in a movie yet in not nearly enough of it, Sarandon delivers a rich, heartbreaking performance as a woman searching for a place to put her need to be needed. It’s unfortunate that Scafaria gives in to the tired trope of building a scene around an uptight adult getting stoned, especially when Sarandon is so good while Marnie is repressing her feelings. The Meddler is less about the tension between a mother and a daughter than about the tension between that mother and herself. (R)—SR

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

SING STREET BBB.5 Disclaimer: A musical directed by John Carney (Once), set in Ireland and built on affectionate skewering of 1980s MTV aesthetics might as well be custom-designed to my specifications. In 1985 Dublin, 15-year-old Connor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) responds to life upheavals—including a crush on mysterious older girl Raphina (Lucy Boynton)—by starting a band. Carney and co-songwriter Gary Clark provide an infectious collection of original tunes inspired by early-’80s pop, and Carney has loads of fun playing with the way Connor and his bandmates experiment with their “look.” It’s also built on charming relationships, though, particularly Connor’s connection with his older brother/ musical mentor/life coach Brendan (a wonderful Jack Raynor). The story may meander whenever it’s not focused on the music, but Sing Street is simply lovely at conveying the beautiful foolishness of being young, in love and moved to create. (R)—SR

THEATER DIRECTORY

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

NEIGHBORS 2: SORORITY RISING BB Progess! Dumb movie depicts teen girls behaving badly, but with a positive vibe. Kelly (Rose Byrne) and Mac (Seth Rogen) are about to sell their house, but now a sorority (led by Chloë Grace Moretz) has moved into the former frat house next door, determined to party like sororities typically don’t. (Zac Efron’s frat boy Teddy is back, too.) There are unexpectedly progressive aspects to this sequel, including a distinct female gaze. Otherwise, it’s more of the same from the original movie: a fragmented mess that throws out lots of attempts at humor, way too much of it gross-out. Turns out that gross-out movies don’t work when they’re progressive any more than they do when they’re regressive. Shame is the basis of gross-out comedy, and you cannot shame people who are cool with all the dildos onscreen. (R)—MAJ

X-MEN: APOCALYPSE BB Director Bryan Singer takes a bigger-faster-more fourth swing through the mutant universe, as our heroes—led again by Professor X (James McAvoy)—are pitted against an ancient Egyptian quasigod (Oscar Isaac) who awakens from a centuries-long slumber ready to eradicate pitiful, primitive humanity. Epic hero brawls have already been fairly ubiquitous in 2016, and this one delivers its own slew of three-point-stance hero poses and “who would win a fight between …” moments. But there is almost nothing new to see here, and almost not even the pretense that there’s anything new to see. Its allegory for civil-rights battles by a feared minority has become just a talking point, and remains the only idea these movies are interested in exploring. You’ll flip past it on cable a few years from now, and have no clue which X-Men movie it is. (PG-13)—SR

| CITY WEEKLY |

Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

JUNE 2, 2016 | 47


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | JUNE 2, 2016

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Repossessed

TV

Outcast brings the satanic scares; Feed the Beast arrives undercooked. Outcast Friday, June 3 (Cinemax)

Series Debut: While the fanboys are nerd-raging against each other over the authenticity of AMC’s Preacher, here comes another way-adult, based-on-a-comic-book property: Outcast, from Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman—and it’s so gut-wrenchingly creepy, it’ll only fuel the “Preacher shoulda been on premium cable!” fire. Outcast follows Kyle Barnes (Patrick Fugit), a man surrounded by demonic possessions since childhood, who’s drawn out of seclusion when a child on the other side of his rural West Virginia town goes full-on satanic sock puppet. The pilot suffers from unavoidable but minor instances of first-episode exposition clunk, but the scares and gore F/X could give even atheists insomnia—maybe don’t watch this alone. Banshee almost did it, but Outcast should be the series to finally make Cinemax a player in the originalprogramming game. Did I mention, don’t watch this alone?

You May Now Kill the Bride Saturday, June 4 (Lifetime)

Movie: It’s all in the title when it comes to a Lifetime movie; done right, you don’t even have to watch it. Stolen From the Womb, All the Good Ones Are Married, A Nanny’s Revenge, Cyber Seduction: His Secret Life, Where’s My Baby?, Sexting in Suburbia, Dirty Teacher, Stalked by My Doctor, Wrong Swipe— all real Lifetime movies, and all sufficiently self-explanatory. On the other hand, titles like Ultimate Deception, Like Dandelion Dust and Clara’s Deadly Secret (again, all actual movies) are useless. You May Now Kill the Bride has a catchy name (win!) that doesn’t encapsulate the plot (fail!): “Nicole and Mark get engaged, but his stepsister believes she has a claim on him and is willing to do anything to be his bride.” Please, allow me, Lifetime: Twisted Stepsister. Boom. Done.

Feed the Beast Sunday, June 5 (AMC)

Series Debut: Between previews that practically scream for a “Breaking Bad meets Restaurant: Impossible!” tagline and the mere presence of David Schwimmer, it’s not easy to root for Feed the Beast, an unfocused oddity even by AMC’s usual

Exigent Eminent Extraneous “whatever works besides zombies” standards. Schwimmer and Jim Sturgess star as best buds attempting to open a high-end restaurant in the Bronx—and that’s the least of their problems: Schwimmer’s Tommy is a sad-sack widower with an emotionally traumatized son, while Sturgess’ Dion is an ex-con who owes big money to bad people. Can this sullen wine sommelier and sketchy master chef make their culinary dreams come true? Or at least not get seared and deconstructed by the mob? More pressing, will Feed the Beast survive the move to Tuesdays after tonight’s premiere?

UnReal Monday, June 6 (Lifetime)

Season Premiere: Marti Noxon has contributed to some classic TV series (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Mad Men), and created at least one kinda-winner (Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce), but UnReal is her left-field crowning achievement. When it premiered in 2015 on Lifetime—not a go-to for smart drama; see above—UnReal seemed like a straight forward morality play behind the scenes of a Bachelor-style reality-dating show; Constance Zimmer was the ruthless producer, butting heads with her conscience-burdened second-in-command, Shiri Appleby … but then it got dark, spinning their presumed roles in unpredictable directions. Season 1 broke new “reality TV” ground by killing off a contestant; Season 2 goes even further by casting an—brace yourselves, Trumpsters!— African-American bachelor! UnReal > The Bachelorette.

2nd Annual

Father’s Day Butterfly Release

on Sun, June 19th at 1:00pm

Go all

Outcast (Cinemax)

Casual Tuesday, June 7 (Hulu)

Season Premiere: Director Jason Reitman’s Casual (referencing a dating-app preference level, not fashion sense … well, not entirely) struck another small blow for the Streaming Shows Are Cool, Too! uprising that threatens broadcast and cable’s ever-loosening hold on the originalcontent market when it premiered on Hulu just last October. Stars Michaela Watkins and Tommy Dewey, as a divorcee single mom and her bachelor brother living together and trying to figure out modern dating, turned what could have been a one-joke series about awkward hookups into a surprisingly sweet—and occasionally sad—comedy about not just familial dysfunction, but all of the dysfunctions. Season 2 of Casual expands from dating and sex into even more treacherous territory: making and keeping new friends at a “certain age.” Not quite as scary as Outcast … but close. Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

OUT for

P R I DE 801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC www.theartfloral.com

M-Sat 8-7 • Sun 10-5 • 9275 S 1300 W • 801-562-5496 • glovernursery.com


Warm Tones

MUSIC

JED PEARSON

CANYONS

Folk-rock trio Canyons exude real warmth.

4760 S 900 E, SLC

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

“W

wednesday 6/1

bingo & ultimate KARAOKE

$

thousands of songs to choose from

5

burger & Fries, amfs & long island iced teas

Thursday 6/2

Live Music

reggae at the royal every thursday

the steady 45's funk & gonzo Canyons’ Hillary McDaniel, Kate Anderson and Secily Saunders

Friday 6/3

Live Music come dance to all your

favorite 90's hits saturday 6/4 ®

PRESENTS

ROYAL FEST ALL AGES OUTDOOR SHOW

GATES @ 3PM

CELEBRATING THE RELEASE OF THEIR NEW ALBUM

THE TRUTH

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Candy’s River House THE WAYNE HOSKINS BAND

SHOW @ 10PM

OFFICIAL ROYAL FEST AFTER PARTY

WITH SPECIAL GUEST BERLIN BREAKS

AVAILABLE AT SMITH’S TIX OR THE ROYAL

Tuesday 6/7

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

JUNE 2, 2016 | 49

3 TICKET OPTIONS: ROYAL FEST ONLY: ALL AGES AFTER PARTY ONLY: 21+ | ROYAL FEST & AFTER PARTY:21+

| CITY WEEKLY |

Utah Pride Festival (Pride Stage) 451 S. State Saturday, June 4, 5:30 p.m. $10 (3-day pass $20-50) UtahPrideFestival.org

5

liquid mary janes, amfs & long island iced teas

CANYONS

$

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

“Solitary Trees” burned through the winter gloom. Over acoustic guitars and piano, Anderson clearly and sweetly sings, “I can’t be created/ I can’t be destroyed/ I’m the root of hatred/ I am tears of joy/ I am lightning/ I’m a hole in the sky.” Here, Neu joins in. “Put your neck to my neck/ and we’ll harmonize/ You sing a C/ I’ll sing an F/ and I’ll give you my heart/ if you give me your time.” Suddenly, it felt as though the scene outside had shifted from dull gray to earth tones, blues and flickering ambers—and it was warm. The scanty bio on CanyonsMusic.com says, “Canyons … wants you to feel.” The succession of songs that followed “Trees” each evoked a range of emotions, reactions and sensations: regret (“The Fare”), playful lust (“Don’t Force It”), astonishment at unconditional love (“Pages”) and wistfulness (“Washington Road”). They all, for various reasons, cause eruptions of goose bumps. Anderson says she likes to watch fans react to the first measures of “Washington Road” by quieting down and focusing on the lyrics. “Pages” is another fan favorite—and one the band liked enough to re-record for their brand-new four-track vinyl EP, Sometimes Late at Night. The new songs “January,” “Ohio” (with Saunders singing lead) and “Once” find the band’s harmonies sweeter, their lyrics even more compellingly relatable. Which is fitting. From the beginning, Anderson, McDaniel and Saunders feel real—you sense that any time invested with them or their music is well spent. They want you to feel and, in return, they’re likewise emotionally accessible. At the end of their shows, Canyons performs an a cappella tune (a cover of Sandi Thom’s “I Wish I Was a Punk Rocker”), coming down from the stage to seal their connection with the crowd. If they still need to know why people “give a shit,” well, that’s it. They’ll give you their heart if you give them your time. CW

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

e want to prepare for this interview a little bit, if possible,” Canyons drummer Hillary McDaniel texted the night before we met. “Do you know what your story is going to be about?” That’s one of the most endearing things about the folk-rock trio of McDaniel and guitarist-vocalist-songwriters Secily Saunders and Kate Anderson. First of all, they’re warm people, huggers—and this sincerity infuses their earthy, vivid songs. Also, they’re unassuming, genuinely baffled by the attention they’ve received, including their nomination for Best Folk Artist in City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music 2016 (they finished second, behind their friends Folk Hogan) and becoming an in-demand live act, since forming only a year ago. Behind the Urban Lounge, where the trio plans to see Mexican garage punks Le Butcherettes later on, McDaniel and Saunders, a couple, sit opposite each other at the orange picnic table behind the club’s back patio. Anderson, tall with a long ponytail, sits cross-legged on the tabletop, not minding the bird mess. (She’s tough—her day job is flying choppers for the Utah Army National Guard.) Saunders wears a trucker hat that says, “#indoorsy.” They crack jokes and laugh readily. Any anxiety they may have had about the interview seems to have melted away; even if it hadn’t, they shouldn’t worry, because they’re good on the fly. In fact, that’s how they came together. In May 2015, Anderson, a recent transplant from Reno, Nev., met McDaniel (formerly of Please Be Human and Palodine) and Saunders (The Vision, Elytra, GrapeGrass and, formerly, Talia Keys and Debi Graham). Having booked a tour, Anderson invited her new friends to come along and back her up. A full-time musician, Saunders went, along with guitarist Tim Neu (who left the band in August). McDaniel agreed to join, but had to stay in town for work. Upon their return, they chose a name by looking out their car window, and started to gig. As they played around town, they befriended a crowd of local musicians, including Jordan Young of Candy’s River House. The new connections led to booking more and more shows. Last year, they released an eponymous, five-song EP so they’d have something to “show the clubs.” “We’re surprised that anyone gives a shit,” McDaniel says. “What is it that we have to say—do we have something to say?” interjects Saunders. McDaniel picks it back up. “I mean, I like our music, but I’ve been in a lot of bands where I like my music. And it’s just weird to get attention, basically, without trying too hard to whore myself. … That’s why we were like, ‘What’s this story about?’ Did you hear something about us?’” “Is this about our embezzlement?” cracks Saunders. Just as with their origin story, Canyons’ success boils down to right-place-right-time. They were a Christmas miracle, so to speak. Compiling picks for City Weekly’s “Live” column gets to be difficult at the end of the year and, naturally, the pickins were slim for the Dec. 17, 2015 issue. But a show at the Garage on Beck, with a Crayola-made poster, seemed promising: “A Festivus for the Rest of Us,” featuring a pair of local bands: Canyons, and Six Impossible Things. Soon, via Canyons’ ReverbNation page, the first tones of


NEXT WATCH PARTY: THURS, JUNE 2 NYC VS. RSL

SUE’S STATE LOCATION FREE SHUTTLE TO ALL R S L HOME GAMES NEXT SHUTTLE: SAT., JUNE 18 PORTLAND @ RSL

HIGHLAND live music

FRI SAT

ZOMBIECOCK & FRIENDS SAMEYEAM

IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE FIGHTS

TUE WED SUN & THURS MON & THUR

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | JUNE 2, 2016

MUSIC

CONDIE PAUL

WATCH ALL RSL AWAY GAMES AT A BAR NAMED SUE

GEEKS WHO DRINK

TUESDAY NIGHTS

BEER PONG TOURNEY

CASH PRIZES 9PM SIGN IN | 10PM START

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

STATE live music

FRI SIMPLY B JELLO & DJ RAWKA SAT DJGEEKS WHO IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE FIGHTS

2013

2014

TUE

DRINK

TUESDAY NIGHTS

THU

BEER PONG TOURNEY

SUN &

KARAOKE

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

TUES

WED

CASH PRIZES

8PM SIGN IN | 9PM START FT. DJ BENTLEY ON THE 1S & 2S HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

ULTIMATE FIGHTING 199 STARTS 8PM | SAT. JUNE 4 | BOTH LOCATIONS

ROCKHOLD VS. BISPING

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ★ 11AM-1AM

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET ★ FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE ★ FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

Livin’ the Dream

After 18 years, SLC rockers Royal Bliss go country with new EP, The Truth. BY BRIAN STAKER @getstakerized

F

rom the very beginning, Royal Bliss was serious about making a career in music. Still, singer/guitarist Neal Middleton says, “It’s so much more than I thought it would be.” Their story has been more than just “local band makes it.” It’s also a kind of roadmap—if there can be such a thing—for musical success in the digital age, and a tale of overcoming seemingly overwhelming obstacles. When they played their first shows in 1997, Middleton was barely out of high school, and he says he was lucky to have a friend to “teach him the ropes” about all aspects of being a band, like playing gigs, talking to clubs and assembling a press kit. “Once I got the addiction for being on stage and performing,” he says, “there was no other option.” So the band set about “building a fan base on shameless self-promotion.” Royal Bliss gave away hundreds of their first CDs, and tickets to their shows. Eventually, they started getting local airplay, which spread to Idaho, Wyoming and, later, the Midwest. Investments from friends enabled Royal Bliss to get the attention of several major labels, ultimately signing with Capitol Records in 2007. But it wasn’t all rosy. When Capitol’s parent company, EMI, consolidated a number of labels, cutting numerous artists, the band was able to get Life In-Between (2009) released on Merovingian Records, and it debuted at 151 on the Billboard 200. Even before that, the band had their share of hardships. In April 2004, Middleton fell from a 35-foot tall balcony in Long Beach, Calif., and was paralyzed. He taught himself to walk again in three months in order to play a comeback show in Salt Lake City. “Our only form of income was music, and that was a driving force,” he says. During the same period, drummer Jake Smith rolled his car, and then-guitarist Chris Harding put a ski through his face in an accident. These events birthed the albums After the Chaos and After the Chaos II, the latter yielding the

Royal Bliss

single “Devils and Angels,” which charted and led to their Capitol Records deal. After their experience with Capitol, the band founded their own label, Air Castles, and returned to handling all aspects of their careers, and even opened their own club, The Royal. Now 37, Middleton believes their stylistic journey has echoed their personal ones—from the reggae rock of their partying late teens to the almost heavy metal of the After the Chaos period when “real life happened”—and now country rock seems to fit his “married with children” suburban lifestyle. Royal Bliss’s new five-song EP The Truth is a country-rock search for salvation. “Now I live in the suburbs, with a wife and two kids,” Middleton says. “After all that angst, I realized I’d rather be happy. The music’s turned more toward love and positive vibes.” The band received songwriting assistance on three of the tunes from their friends, Monty Powell and Anna Wilson, who’ve written for Lady Antebellum, Keith Urban and Tim McGraw. The title track finds grace somewhere between the bottle and the Bible. “We’re Livin’ the Dream” might be the group’s theme song, except it’s about the too-short weekend that caps off the 9-to-5 daily grind. The music video recently premiered on country music cable channel CMT, and Middleton says the band will perform on “five different Live Nation country festivals from The Gorge to the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.” They’ll also be on the bill for the Country Fan Fest in Tooele this July. Like the rest of their music, it’s mainstream, but it’s what Royal Bliss has built their success on: being eminently relatable, with a familiar sound. Middleton says fans often tell him “this song changed my life,” and that makes it worthwhile, even if they aren’t getting rich. More than anything, Middleton says Royal Bliss’ story is one of sheer determination and work: “Persistence has been the key.” CW

ROYAL FEST & AFTER-PARTY

w/ Royal Bliss, Candy’s River House, Wayne Hoskins Band, School of Rock. After-party w/ Candlebox, Berlin Breaks. The Royal 4760 S. 900 East, 801-590-9940 Saturday, June 4 3 p.m.; after-party 10 p.m. $15-$30 All ages/after-party 21+ TheRoyalSLC.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 51


COUNTRY DANCE HALL, BAR & GRILL

UTAH’'S BIGGEST & BADDEST

DANCE HALL, BAR, & GRILL 16,000 SQ FT DANCE FLOOR

JUNE 3RD & 4TH

KALEB AUSTIN LIVE

WEDNESDAYS

THURSDAYS

FREE LINE DANCE LESSONS 7PM- NO COVER

FREE COUPLES DANCE LESSONS 7PM- NO COVER

STEIN WEDNESDAY

FRIDAYS

LADIES’NIGHT

NO COVER FOR LADIES FREE LINE DANCING LESSONS 7PM

THIRSTY THURSDAY

SATURDAYS

LIVE MUSIC

ARRIVE EARLY! NO COVER BEFORE 8PM

FREE MECHANICAL BULL RIDES • FREE POOL • FREE KARAOKE • PATIO FIRE PITS

OPEN WED - SAT, 6PM - 2AM 3360 REDWOOD ROAD | 801.972.5447 | WESTERNERSLC.COM

WHERE SOPHISTICATED MEETS CASUAL

Holladay’s Premier Martini & Wine Bar

Heaps of Ruination

Singer-songwriter and “sad bastard” Vincent Draper reveals a new album. BY GAVIN SHEEHAN @thegavinsheehan

V

| CITY WEEKLY |

52 | JUNE 2, 2016

JOHNNY COWAN

Westerner

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MUSIC

The

Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm

DJ’s Friday & Saturday 9pm - Close

Full dining menu available from Cafe Trio

Reservations for special events / private parties

6405 S 3000 E | 888.991.8147 | ELIXIRLOUNGESLC.COM

incent Draper is one of the quintessential storytelling musicians that Utah has the pleasure of calling its own. The self-proclaimed “sad bastard” strums his own brand of folk-influenced softcore, belting out tunes that hit the heart in tender and sometimes whimsical ways. Draper’s previous two albums are already local hits—his first, SAM (VincentDraper. Bandcamp.com, 2013) was made while fronting The Dirty Thirty, and his most recent is a 2014 collaboration with fellow singer/songwriter Charles Ellsworth called Salt Lake City: A Love Story. Since then, Draper has only played a handful of shows over two years while working on new material. But even he didn’t know he was making an album until old and new songs started to come together. “I really started writing for the record before I knew there was going to be one,” Draper says. “‘Angler’ was written years ago while I was with the Small Town Sinners. I liked the song, but it just never felt right. Once ‘Lunatic’ was born, I could see all these little things in many of my songs that, to me, tied them together. And the more I thought about it, the more I realized an album had been written.” Draper booked himself time with Wes Johnson of Archive Recording to mix and

Vincent Draper

engineer the album, but after the initial work was done, his personal life started falling apart, and he hit a musical depression. He forgot about the album for three months until formerly local singer-songwriter Josaleigh Pollet hit him up and asked if he still wanted her to sing on it. The two booked an impromptu session while she visited from Seattle. “Josi sang like a bird, like she was born to do it,” Draper says. “It was inspiring. [She] and Jory, her boyfriend, were very supportive. After that session, I decided that I owed it to myself and the other musicians to finish the project.” Called Ruiner, the new album strays from the darker tone of SAM. It still has sad tunes, but also its fair share of bright spots. “1920’s Eyes” focuses on the gaze of a new woman, while “Tickets” gets the foot tapping to the memories of an ex-lover. But the downer tunes—like “Faded,” “Sleeping Alone” and “Lie To Me”—are wrapped in sweetness with low riffs and comforting string sections, making even the depressing topics feel like they’ve risen above the gloom and into a moment of reflection. It’s a damn fine folk-rock album, but Draper initially “didn’t like it at all.” He says it “reminded me of a lot of pain that I was trying to let go … But I’ve grown a lot, and it means something new to me now. I love it. It reminds me of some of the best friends that I’ve ever had.” CW

VINCENT DRAPER CD RELEASE

w/ Dan Fletcher The State Room 638 S. State Saturday, June 4, 9 p.m. $13 801-596-3560 TheStateRoom.com


S A T U R D A Y , J U N E 4 TH ULTIMATE FIGHTING

CH A M P I O N S H I P ROCKHOLDVSWEIDMAN 16 BEERS ON TAP

Come in for a Beer

1520 W. 9000 S. WEST JORDAN 801.566.2561 | THEBLACKSHEEPBARANDGRILL.COM

Stay for our Food!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BLACK SHEEP Bar & Grill

FULL LIQUOR MENU

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 53


MENU

BEST

GARLIC BURGER

IN THE STATE

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

THURSDAY 6.2

Washed Out, Robert Delong, Fictionist

For the inaugural show of the Ogden Twilight Concert Series, electronic revivalist Washed Out (aka Ernest Greene) brings the acclaimed gauzy synth-pop you heard at every cool party in the early ‘10s—or, at the very least, opening every Portlandia episode (“Feel It All Around”). It’s hard to believe it has already been three years since Washed Out’s beautiful Paracosm (Sub-Pop) came out, but here’s as good of an excuse as any to revisit chillwave’s halcyon days. Also appearing are fellow early-decade beat wizard Robert DeLong, whose main concern continues to be whether he can “make you fucking dance,” and Provo’s own Fictionist. (Kimball Bennion) Ogden Twilight Concert Series, Ogden Amphitheater, 343 E. 25th St., 5 p.m., $5 in advance, $6.50 day of show (plus fees), OgdenTwilight.com

THURSDAY 6.2SUNDAY 6.5

Utah Pride Festival feat. Sister Sledge, Belinda Carlisle and AB Soto

The chart-topping R&B/disco sisterhood Sister Sledge is the perfect pre-Pride kickoff. I mean, if you can’t hear “We Are Family” and not sing along, at least in your head, you’re dead. It’s understandable, though, if you don’t boogie—not everyone can be the greatest dancer, like the dude in that other Sledge song. But you know what? “Family” reverberates with infectious joy, and that, along with its message of unity, is enough to make you

Sister Sledge

54 | JUNE 2, 2016

SHAE DETAR

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

MUSIC PICKS

LIVE

forget yourself—and get into everyone around you. Wait. That sounds wrong. But you know what I mean. (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 9 p.m., $41 in advance, $46 day of show, DepotSLC.com And on Saturday at 8:10 p.m. sharp, check out Los Angeles-based AB Soto, who has gained notoriety with his inimitable penchant for Latin-fusion music, spectacular costumes and stereotype-defying performance art. Taking the stage on Sunday at 5:45 p.m. is Belinda Carlisle, famous for belting out “We Got the Beat” and “Our Lips Are Sealed” with The Go-Go’s, as well as her own “Heaven Is a Place on Earth.” Her post-’80s solo career has become a platform for her vocal support of the LGBTQ community. (Alex Springer) Utah Pride Festival (main stage), 451 S. State, $10-$50, UtahPrideFestival.org

FRIDAY 6.3 The Cure, The Twilight Sad

CAMILLA CAMAGLIA

Although they’ve only been “The Cure” since 1978, Robert Smith and other future Cure members started out in 1976 as the punk band Malice (later called Easy Cure). This year, then, is technically the band’s 40th anniversary—but their trademark gloomy, postpunk/new wave/goth-altwhateveryouwannacallit rock sound officially debuted 37 years ago with Three Imaginary Boys. It’s from those 3.7 decades that The Cure draws

Washed Out for this tour’s sets, which vary nightly, but include most of the classics—but sadly, not the chronically misunderstood fan-favorite “Killing an Arab,” long a burden for Smith. Also, look for one or both of two new tracks: the moody, midtempo number “Step Into the Light” and Disintegration-esque “It Can Never Be the Same.” Openers The Twilight Sad, from Scotland, take inspiration from The Cure on their most recent album Nobody Wants to Be Here and Nobody Wants to Leave (FatCat, 2014), with their brooding bass, mopey vox and ethereal atmospherics. (RH) Maverik Center, 3200 South Decker Lake Drive, 7:30 p.m., $28-$58, MaverikCenter.com

The Cure

BILL EBBESEN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CABARET

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

PINKY’S THIS WEEK’S

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE CITYWEEKLY.NET KIMBALL BENNION, RANDY HARWARD AND ALEX SPRINGER


AMANDA SMITH

LIVE

POST PRIDE PATIO Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Raz Simone

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am-1:00am

Local H

AVAILABLE IN BLACK OR WHITE 6.5” 2 WAY SPEAKERS 150 WATTS RMS

99

99

$

Local H

PAIR

6.5” OR 8” COAXIAL COMPONENT SPEAKERS

6.5” 150 WATTS

24999 $34999

$ AVAILABLE IN BLACK OR WHITE

8” 200 WATTS

PAIR

PAIR

PUNCH SERIES MARINE •8” COAXIAL

NAUTICA SPEAKERS

•6.5” COAXIAL •6.5” DUAL CONE

I7999 pr $ II999 pr $ 6999 pr $

10AM TO 7PM

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 6/8/16

JUNE 2, 2016 | 55

W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

| CITY WEEKLY |

Celebrating the vinyl release of 1996’s album As Good As Dead, Local H is hitting the road to revisit one of the most visceral and honest records to come out of the ‘90s alt-rock scene. Local H is known for playing at least one of their albums in its entirety during their shows, so fans of their sophomore album will definitely want to catch them tonight as they power through the whole of Dead—along with a few other gems from their vast arsenal. As a bonus, Local H—usually a two-piece—is expanding its lineup. Vocalist/guitarist Scott Lucas will be flanked by both current drummer Ryan Harding and original drummer Joe Daniels, who played on As Good As Dead. Local H is shredding its way into the future— no matter how many “high-fivin’ motherfuckers” get in the way. (AS) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

The Ogden Music Festival is not just a spectator sport. The weekend festival will feature professional bluegrass and folk acts including The Brothers Comatose, The Wood Brothers, Joshua James and Aoife O’Donovan. But why just listen when you can play, too? If you’ve got the chops, sign up for the Utah State Instrument Championship, with novice competitions in

Tuesdays at 9 - Karaoke that doesn’t suck! Quality drinks at an affordable price Saturday and Sunday Brunch til 3:00 Great food daily 11am - 12:15am Music Wednesday thru Saturday

WEDNESDAY 6.8

JOHN OAKES

Ogden Music Festival feat. The Brothers Comatose, The Wood Brothers, Joshua James

mandolin, banjo and guitar. If the stage isn’t for you, try the offstage workshops for pointers on the mandolin from the Gibson Brothers, songwriting secrets from The Wood Brothers or biz tips from The Hogslop String Band’s “OldTime Music: Make Hundreds of Dollars a Year.” Kids will also love Todd’s Musical Petting Zoo. (KB) Fort Buenaventura, 2450 A Ave., Ogden, $30 (single day), $63 (three-day pass), see schedule on OFOAM.org

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FRIDAY 6.3SUNDAY 6.5

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Seattle’s favorite white rapper Macklemore took everyone by surprise with 2012’s The Heist, perhaps no one more than himself. At least that’s what it sounds like with This Unruly Mess I’ve Made, his latest collaboration with DJ/producer Ryan Lewis. Macklemore wears his insecurities with fame and privilege on his sleeve this time around, revealing a neurotic—if not any less lyrically gifted—artist behind the “Thrift Shop” swagger. The album bookends with Macklemore’s inner monologue during his upset 2014 Grammy win for Best Rap Album, and the controversial single “White Privilege II,” an honest and uncomfortable look at his success as a white hip-hop artist in the era of Black Lives Matter. It’s not quite an apology, but Macklemore’s telling his critics that he gets it. Fans and haters might want to give these latest offerings a closer listen. (KB) The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, 8 p.m., $46 in advance, $51 day of show, TheSaltair.com


300 Wakara W /redbutte facebook.com

@scheuerman7

PRIDE WEEKEND thursday, june 2,

TALIA KEYS

friday, june 3

DJ LATU

saturday, june 4

Spencer & Lisa Romney, Gina & Rich Varge, Jeremy Abernathy

The Lumineers

7TH ANNUAL PRIDE PARTY W/ THE VISION sunday, june 1 1ST EVER GREEN PIG PRIDE STREET

PARTY HOSTED BY PRINCESS KENNEDY

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

Matt & Dawn Wolfe

tuesday

LOCAL NIGHTS OUT

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Great food

The Lumineers

The crowd waiting for the show to start

$

5.99 lunch special

| CITY WEEKLY |

56 | JUNE 2, 2016

Red Butte Garden The Lumineers ay

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SHOTS OF SUMMER

MONDAY - FRIDAY $

10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM $

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

Mitch, Katie, Lauren, Collin Dunke

Kerry Hankins, Anjee Barber


Ghostland Observatory, Disco Biscuits

Rolling out of Austin, Texas, in a synth-powered Winnebago, Ghostland Observatory has made a name for itself with a fluorescent, electro-funk beat and a frenetic stage presence. The beats come courtesy of Thomas Turner, who often performs decked out in a regal, high-collared cape, and vocalist/guitarist Aaron Behrens channels Iggy Pop as he throws himself into the wilderness of every song. Philly-based jam band Disco Biscuits is another outfit that is fond of pushing the musical envelope. Combining modern techno and trance with a foundation that is onepart roots and two-parts jazz, expect the Disco Biscuits to create consciousness-expanding sonic tableaus that feel less like premeditated grooves and more like an improvisational experiment. (Alex Springer) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $29 in advance, $31 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

DANIEL PERLAKY

THURSDAY 6.2

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 57


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

58 | JUNE 2, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS WEDNESDAY/SUNDAY

Wednesdays 7PM-10PM

$5 Cover

LIVE JAZZ DINNER June 1: The Bob Taylor Quartet

First Sunday of the month June-Sept.

12PM-3PM No Cover

LIVE JAZZ BRUNCH June 5: Young Lions Jazz Band

FOOD & DRINKS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

WEDNESDAY THE CRAFTY CREW CRAFT CLASSES 7PM JUNE 1ST: HAIR UTENSIL HOLDER JUNE 15TH: USA BLOCKS ND JUNE 22 : GRAPE WINE WALL HANGING TO REGISTER GO TO: THECRAFTYCREW.ORG

THURSDAY LIVE BAND KARAOKE W/ THIS IS YOUR BAND

YOU ARE THE SINGER OF THE BAND! NO COVER! 9:00PM - 12:00AM

FRIDAY

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 6.2

FRIDAY 6.3

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Bandemonium 4! (Diabolical Records) The Cold Year + Nathan Payne & the Wild Bores + We Include Pluto + Salem Witch Doctors (Muse Music) Ghostland Observatory + Disco Biscuit + Conquer Monster (The Complex) see p. 57 Give and Take + ForeverAtLast + Allies Always Lie + Advent Horizon + Attack the Sunset (The Loading Dock) Joe McQueen Quartet (The Garage) Katchafire (The Complex) Proper Way (The Hog Wallow) Pure Bathing Culture + Choir Boy + Angel Magic (Urban Lounge) Sister Sledge (The Depot) see p. 54 The Stargazer Lilies + No Sun + Super 78 + Cupidcome (Kilby Court) Therapy Thursdays feat. Bizel Boys + Hunter Siegal (Club Elevate) Washed Out + Robert DeLong + Fictionist (Ogden Amphitheater) see p. 54 Will Baxter Band (Gracie’s Bar)

Acid Betty (The Metro Bar) Britny Fox (Liquid Joe’s) The Cure + The Twilight Sad (Maverik Center) see p. 54 Curtis Salgado + Tony Holiday (The State Room) Dubwise + Hatcha + illoom + Motto + PRFT (Urban Lounge) Gravehill + Deathblow + Blood Purge + Winter Burial (Club X) Insane Clown Posse (The Complex) K-Rose (Club Karamba) Macklemore and Ryan Lewis + Raz Simone (The Great Saltair) see p. 55 Ogden Music Festival feat. The Wild Reeds + Joshua James + The Brothers Comatose + Mountain Heart (Ft. Buenaventura) see p. 55 Ryan Shupe and the RubberBand (Sandy Amphitheater) Sebastian Bach (The Depot) Whiskey Kiss + Utah County Swillers (The Garage) You Topple Over (The Hog Wallow) Vista Kicks (Kilby Court)

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

JUNE 3RD:

BLUES ON FIRST 9PM - 12AM $5 COVER

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

FRIDAY/SATURDAY JUNE 3RD & 4TH

NO

COVER E VER!

LIVE BAND:

OFF THE RECORD MONDAY LADIES BUNCO NIGHT

JUNE 6TH, 7PM FREE TO PLAY CHANCE TO WIN FREE PRIZES!

TUESDAY FREE KARAOKE 8PM

QUALIFY FOR TALENT QUEST CONTEST TACO TUESDAY 2 FOR $2 (W/ BEVERAGE PURCHASE) PRIVATE SPACE FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES & MEETINGS CALL OR STOP BY FOR A TOUR! MUST BE 21+ 150 W. 9065 S. • CLUB90SLC.COM• 801.566.3254

OPEN EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK

275 0 SOU T H 3 0 0 W ES T · (8 01) 4 67- 4 6 0 0 11: 3 0 -1A M M O N - S AT · 11: 3 0 A M -10 P M S U N

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413


TUESDAY 6.7

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Radio Moscow

LOVE STREET

The Midwest isn’t exactly fertile ground for psychedelic stoner rock. With its repetitive, flat landscapes and rolling farmsteads, it’s more often the backdrop for the new American Gothic heavy metal. Still, Iowa’s Radio Moscow has, for over a decade, plied (or plowed!) the furrowed mind of the listener, in the classic-rock mode of Blue Cheer, Jimi Hendrix, et al. So much so, that the cover of their last studio album, Magical Dirt (Alive Naturalsound, 2014) features a landscape whose perspective converges on a giant mushroom (ponder the agricultural and psychoactive significance). The band gets down and dirty with a scorching crop of songs on their upcoming July release, the two-disc set Live! In California. Expect a preview tonight. (Brian Staker) Billboard-Live!, 250 W. 1300 South, 7 p.m., $15, SmithsTix.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LET’S PATIO!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

6.2 PROPER WAY

6.9 WE DREAM DAWN

6.3 YOU TOPPLE OVER

6.10 DEVILS CLUB

| CITY WEEKLY |

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 6.4 LORIN COOK AND THE KITCHEN 6.11 MICHELLE MOONSHINE TRIO

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JUNE 2, 2016 | 59

6.8 KEVYN DERN STARTING 6.20 – MONDAY NIGHT BLUES JAM


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

60 | JUNE 2, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY STORE

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Local Offers Everyday.

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC)

C I T Y W E E K LY S T O R E . C O M

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

TICKETS

Nectar Nights feat. Khensu + Frank Hyperion + Durandal + Sopoke + Vinyl Tapestries (SKY)

FEATURED SHOWS!

SATURDAY 6.4

JUNE 10TH & 11TH BONANZA

LIVE MUSIC

RIVER’S EDGE

Candlebox + Berlin Breaks (Royal Bliss After-Party) see p. 50 Hopeless Jack (The Garage) Kevin Garrett + Joshy Soul + Vinyl Tapestries (Kilby Court)

GA TICKET FOR FRIDAY OR SATURDAY

VALUE:$40.00 PRICE: $30.00

WEEKEND TICKET- FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$75.00 PRICE: $56.25

SATURDAY JUNE 4TH

21+ VIP TICKET - FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$125.00 PRICE: $93.75

JUNE 2ND-5TH

Lorin Cook and the Kitchen (The Hog Wallow) Metalfest (Barbary Coast Saloon) Ogden Music Festival feat. The 3 Muses + Cisco and the Race Cars + The Hogslop String Band + Humming House + Aoife O’Donovan + The Gibson Brothers + The Wood Brothers (Ft. Buenaventura) see p. 55 Perfume Genius + AB Soto + Canyons (Utah Pride Festival) see pp. 49 & 54 Royal Bliss + Candy’s River House + Wayne Hoskins Band (The Royal) see p. 50 Timmy the Teeth + Aaron Joseph Puzey (Velour Live Music Gallery) Vincent Draper + Dan Fletcher (The State Room) see p. 52

®

PRESENTS

ROYAL FEST

MISS CITY WEEKLY PRIDE FESTIVAL PACKAGE

ALL AGES OUTDOOR SHOW

VALUE:$200.00 PRICE: $100.00

GATES @ 3PM CELEBRATING THE RELEASE OF THEIR NEW ALBUM

JUNE 10TH & 11TH

TWO FOR ONE TICKETS!

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

LANDER BREWFEST LANDER, WY

THE TRUTH

DAY

VALUE:$30.00 PRICE: $15.00 WEEKEND TICKET- FRIDAY & SATURDAY

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS Candy’s River House THE WAYNE HOSKINS BAND

VALUE:$50.00 PRICE: $25.00

BIKE & BREW - FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$160.00 PRICE: $80.00

SHOW @ 10PM

JUNE 18TH

OFFICIAL ROYAL FEST AFTER PARTY

2ND ANNUAL “WEE BEER” FESTIVAL GOLDEN SPIKE EVENT CENTER

VALUE:$10.00 PRICE: $7.50

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

BERLIN BREAKS

3 TICKET OPTIONS: ROYAL FEST ONLY: ALL AGES | AFTER PARTY ONLY: 21+ | ROYAL FEST & AFTER PARTY:21+

AVAILABLE AT SMITH’S TIX OR THE ROYAL

BOOK STORE

PIZZA ®

PIZZA THE BEST IN TOWN

THE ROYAL IS LOCATED @ 4760 S 900 E WWW.THEROYALSLC.COM


In an effort to be the best for brunch in SLC, Rye has decided to focus on the AM hours. Going forward Rye will be open: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

JUNE 1:

Monday @ 8pm

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

breaking bingo

JUNE 2:

8PM DOORS

JUNE 3:

9PM DOORS

JUNE 4:

8PM DOORS $3

KAPIX ALBUM RELEASE

DAISY RUMBLE GUMS HOT VODKA

PURE BATHING CULTURE

CHOIR BOY ANGEL MAGIC

DUBWISE HATCHA

ILLOOM MOTTO PRFT

CITY WEEKLY is hiring sales reps that love going to local shows Call Pete 801.413.0936 pete@cityweekly.net

THE VELVET UNDERGROUND + LOU REED TRIBUTE NIGHT: 90S TELEVISION THE CIRCULARS THE FUTURE OF THE GHOST ARTIFICIAL FLOWER COMPANY

wednesdays @ 8pm

TUPAC NIGHT + 90’S HIP HOP PARTY JUNE 7: RED BENNIES 8PM DOORS SCULPTURE CLUB JUNE 6:

geeks who drink

8PM DOORS FREE BEFORE 9 & $3 AFTER

FREE SHOW

8PM DOORS

LOCAL H THE SMITES (SMITHS TRIBUTE BAND) HUMAN LEATHER

JUNE 10:BREAKERS

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

2021 s. windsor st.

JUNE 11:BLACK MOUNTAIN COMING SOON

8PM DOORS

June 12: ill Nino June 17: Form Of Rocket June 18: The New Transit Direction June 19: Blackalicious June 20: Ceelo Green June 21: Big Business

June 22: Metalachi June 23: CloZee June 25: Beach Party July 1: Machinedrum July 5: Femi Kuti July 9: Wye Oak

(west of 900 east)

801.484.6692 I slctaproom.com

BIG REDD PROMOTIONS PRESENTS

SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH

DETHRONE THE SOVEREIGN TORTURED SOUL MOOSEKNUCKLE SUGARBONE LOSS OF EXISTENCE HOOGA

AURA SURREAL DEZECRATION THE BROKEN VICIOUS SOUL ALUMNI

| CITY WEEKLY |

PERFORMING:

METAL FEST ON THE BARBARY

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

live music sunday afternoons &evenings

HOT VODKA THE NUDE PARTY HEAVY DOSE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 8: JUNE 9:

8PM DOORS

MUZZLE TUNG TH’ RATHLETRAP

$10 PRE-SALE $15 DOOR 21+ STARTING AT 12PM

801-265-9889

GREAT

FOOD & DRINK

SPECIALS

JUNE 2, 2016 | 61

4242 S. STATE

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE at


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

62 | JUNE 2, 2016

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. THE CENTURY CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6495044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DO DROP INN 2971 N. Hill Field Road (400 West), Layton, 801-776-9697. Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801943-1696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed.

LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 THE OFFICE 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages THE PENALTY BOX 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET KARAOKE

The Voice of Choice Karaoke Competition (Utah Pride Festival)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Tracy Young (Utah Pride Festival) Summer Bash feat. DJ Marcus Wing and TylerTheSmiler (Infinity Event Center) Ritual + PANTyRAID (Club X)

SUNDAY 6.5 LIVE MUSIC

Belinda Carlisle (Utah Pride Festival) see p. 54 Jaripeo Baile feat. Cuisillos + Graciela Beltran (Utah State Fairpark) Ogden Music Festival feat. Facing West + The Gibson Brothers + Trout Steak Revival + The Wood Brothers + The Hogslop String Band (Ft. Buenaventura) see p. 55 Wednesday 13 + Elete + Shadow Windhawk + The Morticians + Tragic Black (Metro Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Luis Perez (Utah Pride Festival)

MONDAY 6.6 LIVE MUSIC

Dylan Dunlap + Grey Glass + McKail Seely + Emily Bea (Kilby Court) Unleash the Archers + Graveshadow + Common War + Stay Wild (Metro Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

TUESDAY 6.7 LIVE MUSIC

Azizi Gibson + MindBody&Beats (The Complex) Brit Floyd (Maverik Center) Christie Huff + Katelyn Williams + Harold Henry (Kilby Court) Here Comes The Kraken + Feed Her To The Sharks + So This Is Suffering + Lack Of Remorse (The Loading Dock) National Parks (Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center) see p. 16 Radio Moscow + Sacri Monti (Billboard-Live!) see p. 59 Superheaven + Creepoid + The Spirit of the Beehive (Kilby Court) Taake + Wolvhammer (Metro Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke with Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

WEDNESDAY 6.8 LIVE MUSIC

Heavy Dose + Reverberation + UFO TV (Kilby Court) Jesus Piece + Threshold + Villain + Murder/Suicide (The Loading Dock) Kevyn Dern (The Hog Wallow) Local H (Urban Lounge) see p. 55 Walking Corpse Syndrome + A Balance of Power + Sonic Prophecy + MateriaM (Metro Bar) The Wombats (The Complex)

KARAOKE

Areaoke (Area 51) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (Muse Music)


CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

LIVING TRADITIONS FESTIVAL MAY 20-22

CALL FOR A RT I ST S : We’re looking for artists of all types to participate

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Transform a CITY WEEKLY box - into a piece of public art! Your Box will be displayed at the Utah Arts Festival!

UPCOMING EVENTS

MISS CITY WEEKLY PRIDE PAGEANT BUY T

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

CITYWEEKLY.NET/MISSCITYWEEKLY

UTAH PRIDE FESTIVAL & PARADE

AT LIBRARY/WASHINGTON SQUARE

FULL DETAILS & PARADE INFO AT UTAHPRIDEFESTIVAL.ORG

JUNE 2, 2016 | 63

JUNE 3-JUNE 5

| CITY WEEKLY |

AT CLUB ELEVATE

DOORS AT 9PM | SHOW AT 10PM

ICKET NOW! S

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Go to cityweekly.net/outofthebox for full details


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • ADULT |

64 | JUNE 2, 2016

ki c a J

Treat Yourself and We’ll Treat You

Sexy Maid

Service in Salt Lake

ADULT Call to place your ad

801-575-7028

Femme de Ménage MyVIPhostess.com

ESCORTS

(801) 307-8199

Serenity

BodyworkGirls.com All the girls. One place.

Sick of Being Single?

FREE TO JOIN SEARCH BY LOCATION MAKE YOUR OWN VIDEOS CITYWEEKLYLOVELAND.COM

Meet Other Singles Today!


CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

BRR & GRR

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 65

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1. Pasta is loaded with them 2. Isolated 3. Symbol of limpness 4. It may be bounced off someone 5. Blend 6. Suffix with psych- or neur7. Crumbly cheese 8. Sprite alternative 9. ____ Boys' Choir 10. "Why, ____ delighted!" 11. What winds do 12. Some use electric organs 13. Nine-digit ID issuer 21. Bobby who racked up 270 goals and 645 assists

56. Catch wind of 57. Make a comeback? 58. Adidas rival 59. Command in Uno 60. Jerk hard 61. One-billionth of a gig 62. Uncorking noise

SUDOKU

DOWN

22. Khaki 26. "Cool, man!" 27. "Able was I ____ I saw Elba" 28. Sumac with the 1954 album "Mambo!" 29. Harmonize 30. Roof goo 31. Scapegoat for the Fab Four breakup 32. 6 on a telephone 33. Candied Thanksgiving food 36. Locale for cranberries 37. Pres. after JEC 38. Time off, in mil. slang 39. Prefix with kinetic or metric 40. One worshiped in Rome 41. Dribble glass, e.g. 42. Fishing shop purchase 46. Optimistic 47. Fish ____ fowl 48. Her Twitter bio calls her a "world-renowned psychosexual therapist" 49. Kwik-E-Mart clerk 50. "Wild blue" place 53. Sharing a memo with 54. "Now I remember!" 55. A metronome keeps it

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Cornfield call 4. "Bye for now!" 9. Feelings, informally 14. Going ____ 15. Turn aside 16. Sits at a light, say 17. Tattle (on) 18. 1%-ers 19. Virus in 2014 news 20. What the chilly person called the 1987 movie? 23. Common newspaper name 24. Fire 25. What the dog lover called the hit 2000s TV drama? 34. "Be All You Can Be" group 35. Fashion editor Wintour 36. What the chilly person and the dog lover called each other on their wedding day? 43. Takes responsibility for 44. "See ya!" 45. What the dog lover called the 1993 movie? 51. ____ ejemplo 52. Somewhat, in music 55. What the chilly person called the hit 1970s sitcom? 62. Jigsaw puzzle unit 63. Bit of light that's harmful to the skin 64. Letters on some kits 65. Warren Buffett, AKA The Wizard of ____ 66. 1960s-70s All-Star pitcher Luis 67. Chicago-to-Toronto dir. 68. Candidate of 1992 and 1996 69. Actor Ethan 70. Some QB protectors


PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

@mrfreezurass

send leads to

#CWCOMMUNITY

community@cityweekly.net

Flexible Fitness W

INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 66 POETS CORNER PG. 67 INK PG. 68 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 69 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 70 URBAN LIVING PG. 71

FANTASTIC MASSAGE Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

FOLLOW US ON

TWITTER

ith summer rapidly approaching, those looking for a holistic approach to getting fit should check out CorePower Yoga, which has three locations in Salt Lake City. Offering a variety of exercisebased yoga classes accessible to all levels, CorePower can satisfy both the novice and the experienced yoga practitioner. Most classes are one hour long, heated and set to music. The business was founded in 2002 by Trevor Tice, who was introduced to the practice after a cliff-jumping accident left him with a fused ankle and six permanent screws. “No longer able to engage in high-impact activities, [he] was immediately hooked to the physical challenge and, soon after, he discovered the mental and spiritual benefits of yoga,” says Janice Alonso, manager of the Trolley Square location. CorePower Yoga is a national chain with over 150 locations. It’s committed to giving students a high level of instruction whether they pop into a class on SLC’s Highland Drive or Fremont Street in San Francisco. Alonso got involved with CorePower in Orange County, Calif. “After years of dabbling, I finally decided to take on a more committed yoga practice due to chronic back pain and recurring injuries from running and snowboarding,” she says. Following a year as a member, Alonso enrolled in teacher training and has been spreading her love of yoga since 2010. Instructor Katie Gassinger loves sharing yoga with others. “CorePower Yoga has helped me to discover that everyone has some good,” she says. “It’s just a matter of learning how to let that good flow from every nook and cranny of your being.”

CorePower Yoga offers a free week of classes for new students and instructor training for those interested in teaching.

Chanel Stewart, assistant manager of the Foothill location, loves the sense of community her job provides. “It [doesn’t] feel like work,” Stewart says. “I am surrounded by the best people every day. Both students and teachers help lift me up and I get to help them grow.” If you’re interested in trying out CorePower Yoga, check out its class schedule online. The first week is free. Alonso recommends “C1” classes for beginners, which are not as intense but still help students build muscle memory. “Hot Power Fusion is great for beginners,” she says. “It’s our hottest class but the series is more static and slower [with] the same poses every class.” But even if you can’t fit a C1 or Hot Power Fusion into your schedule, Alonso says all classes are accessible because instructors can help students modify the moves. “What I recommend [overall] is a consistent practice to help build good foundation, and knowledge of alignment and safety in poses.” n

CorePower Yoga Multiple locations CorePowerYoga.com

@CITYWEEKLY

66 | JUNE 2, 2016

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

T BEA

CorePower Yoga sells specialty gear and clothing.

Instructor Robin Reno, ready to welcome students to their next yoga class.


Poets Corner

Words Are Just Clothes We Put On Ideas She said, “Do you like my dress?”

Man to Man Massage

MASSAGE BY PAUL You need it I’ve got it. Best damn massage in town.

Call Paul at

801-554-1790 LMT#4736254-4701

Devin Sams

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 2, 2016 | 67

LY

EEK W C L @S

| COMMUNITY |

ON S U W O L L O AM F R G A INST


JAMES OMAN

68 | JUNE 2, 2016

Piercing. Reiki. Card Reading. Massage.

HEART OF GOLD TATTOO

Abyss Body Piercing

245e 300s | 801.810.9247

certificates

available in the

use code: INK40 for an additional 40% off certificates not a coupon. valid only at cityweeklystore.com

Salt lake’S Only all Female artiSt StudiO

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FEATURED

(801) 675-5740 2242 Washington Blvd Ogden, Utah Wed – Sat: 10am – 9pm | Sun-10am To 5pm

infinitetattoousa.com

1526 S. State St. SlC, ut 84115 801-864-6490

ALL piercings $40-$50, titanium jewelry included.

3900s 891e SLC | 801.266.2030


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) The voices in our heads are our constant companions. They fill our inner sanctuary with streams of manic commentary. Often we’re not fully cognizant of the bedlam, since the outer world dominates our focus. But as soon as we close our eyes and turn our attention inward, we’re immersed in the jabbering babble. That’s the bad news, Aries. Now here’s the good news. In the coming weeks you will have far more power than usual to ignore, dodge, or even tamp down the jabbering babble. As a result, you may get a chance to spend unprecedented amounts of quality time with the still, small voice at your core—the wise guide that is often drowned out by all the noise.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “My mother gave birth to me once, yeah, yeah, yeah,” writes author Sara Levine. “But I’ve redone myself a million times.” I’m sure she is not demeaning her mom’s hard work, but rather celebrating her own. When’s the last time you gave birth to a fresh version of yourself? From where I stand, it looks like the next 12 to 15 months will be one of those fertile phases of reinvention. And right now is an excellent time to get a lightningflash glimpse of what the new you might look like.

Local Offers Everyday.

C I T Y W E E K LY S T O R E . C O M

TICKETS FEATURED SHOWS!

JUNE 10TH & 11TH BONANZA

RIVER’S EDGE

GA TICKET FOR FRIDAY OR SATURDAY

VALUE:$40.00 PRICE: $30.00

WEEKEND TICKET- FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$75.00 PRICE: $56.25

21+ VIP TICKET - FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$125.00 PRICE: $93.75

JUNE 2ND-5TH MISS CITY WEEKLY PRIDE FESTIVAL PACKAGE VALUE:$200.00 PRICE: $100.00

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 10TH & 11TH

TWO FOR ONE TICKETS!

LANDER BREWFEST LANDER, WY

DAY

VALUE:$30.00 PRICE: $15.00

| COMMUNITY |

WEEKEND TICKET- FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$50.00 PRICE: $25.00

BIKE & BREW - FRIDAY & SATURDAY

VALUE:$160.00 PRICE: $80.00

JUNE 18TH 2ND ANNUAL “WEE BEER” FESTIVAL GOLDEN SPIKE EVENT CENTER

VALUE:$10.00 PRICE: $7.50

BOOK STORE

PIZZA PIZZA TH E B EST IN TOWN

JUNE 2, 2016 | 69

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Author Rebecca Solnit offers some tough advice that I think you could use. “Pain serves a purpose,” she says. “Without it you TAURUS (April 20-May 20) We are inclined to believe that the best way to see the whole picture are in danger. What you cannot feel you cannot take care of.” or the complete story is from above. The eagle that soars overhead With that in mind, Scorpio, I urge you to take full advantage can survey a vast terrain in one long gaze. The mountaintop perspec- of the suffering you’re experiencing. Treat it as a gift that will tive affords a sweeping look at a vast landscape. But sometimes this motivate you to transform the situation that’s causing you to perspective isn’t perfectly useful. What we most need to see may be hurt. Honor it as a blessing you can use to rise above the medioright next to us, or nearby, and it’s only visible if our vision is narrowly cre or abusive circumstances you have been tolerating. focused. Here’s how poet Charles Bernstein expresses it: “What’s missing from the bird’s eye view is plain to see on the ground.” Use SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Aphorist James Guida contemplates the good results that can this clue in the coming weeks. come from not imposing expectations on the raw reality that’s on its way. “Not to count chickens before they’re hatched,” he GEMINI (May 21-June 20) I foresee fertile chaos in your immediate future, Gemini. I predict muses, “or eggs before they’re laid, chickens who might possibly lucky accidents and smoldering lucidity and disciplined spontaneity. lay eggs, birds who from afar might be confused with chickDo you catch the spirit of what I’m suggesting? Your experiences will ens.” I recommend this strategy for you in the coming weeks, not be describable by tidy theories. Your intentions will not fit into Sagittarius. Experiment with the pleasure of being wide open neat categories. You will be a vivid embodiment of sweet paradoxes to surprises. Cultivate a mood of welcoming one-of-a-kind and crazy wisdom and confusing clarity. Simple souls may try to tone people, things and events. Be so empty you have ample room to you down, but I hope you will evade their pressure as you explore the accommodate an influx of new dispensations. As James Guida elegant contradictions you encounter. Love your life exactly as it is! concludes: “Not to count or think of chickens.” Methodical improvisations will be your specialty. Giving gifts that are both selfish and unselfish will be one of your best tricks. “Healing CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “No gift is ever exactly right for me,” mourns Capricorn poet extremes” will be your code phrase of power. James Richardson. Don’t you dare be like him in the coming days. Do whatever you must to ensure that you receive at least CANCER (June 21-July 22) According to many sources on the Internet, “werifesteria” is an one gift that’s exactly right for you. Two gifts would be betobscure word from Old English. But my research suggests it was ter; three sublime. Here’s another thought from Richardson: in fact dreamed up within the last few years by a playful hoaxster. “Success repeats itself until it is a failure.” Don’t you dare Regardless of its origins, I think it’s an apt prescription to fix what’s illustrate that theory. Either instigate changes in the way you’ve bugging you. Here’s the definition: “to wander longingly through the been achieving success, or else initiate an entirely new way. forest in search of mystery and adventure.” If you are not currently Here’s one more tip from Richardson: “Those who demand seeking out at least a metaphorical version of that state, I think you consideration for their sacrifices were making investments, not should be. Now is an excellent time to reap the catalytic benefits of sacrifices.” Don’t you dare be guilty of that sin. Make sacrifices, not investments. If you do, your sacrifices will ultimately turn being willingly lost in a wild, idyllic, relaxing setting. out to be good investments. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) I’m debating about which of your astrological houses will be your AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) featured hotspot in the coming days. I’m guessing it will come Life will invite you to explore the archetype of the Ethical down to two options: your House of Valid Greed and your House of Interloper in the coming days. The archetype of the Helpful Obligatory Sharing. The House of Valid Greed has a good chance to Transgressor may tempt you as well, and even the Congenial predominate, with its lush feasts and its expansive moods. But the Meddler or the Compassionate Trickster might look appealing. I House of Obligatory Sharing has an austere beauty that makes it a urge you to consider experimenting with all of these. It will probstrong possibility as well. Now here’s the trick ending, Leo: I’d like ably be both fun and productive to break taboos in friendly ways. to see if you can emphasize both houses equally; I hope you’ll try to You could reconnoiter forbidden areas without freaking anyone inhabit them both at the same time. Together they will grant you a out or causing a troublesome ruckus. If you’re sufficiently polite and kind in expressing your subversive intentions, you might power that neither could bestow alone. leave a trail of good deeds in your wake. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Between now and July 25, there’s a chance you will reach the PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) peak of a seemingly unclimbable mountain. You could win a Your theme comes from the title of a poem by Fortesa Latifi: privilege that neither you nor anyone else ever dreamed was “I Am Still Learning How to Do the Easy Things.” During the within your reach. It’s possible you’ll achieve a milestone you’ve next phase of your astrological cycle, I invite you to specialize been secretly preparing for since childhood. Think I’m exagger- in this study. You may imagine that you are already a master ating, Virgo? I’m not. You could break a record for the biggest or of the simple, obvious arts of life, but here’s the news: Few best or fastest, or you might finally sneak past an obstacle that of us are. And the coming weeks will be a favorable time for has cast a shadow over your self-image for years. And even if you to refine your practice. Here’s a good place to start: Eat none of these exact events comes to pass, the odds are excellent when you’re hungry, sleep when you’re tired and give love that you will accomplish another unlikely or monumental feat. when you’re lonely. Congratulations in advance!

CITY WEEKLY STORE


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

70 | JUNE 2, 2016

CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET For more Employment Opportunities, go online to www.utahjobcenter.com

WE ARE

EXPANDING

DRIVERS DRIVERS-CLASS A

HIRING THIS WEEK CITY WEEKLY NOW HIRING INSIDE/OUTSIDE SALES pete@cityweekly.net

NOW Offering PTO! Paid Time OFF for ALL Drivers after 90 DAYS!

Join Salt Lakes most

FUN and EXCITING SALES TEAM Are you:

Punctual Self motivated Driven to Succeed

WE WANT TO HIRE YOU! We offer:

Great downtown location, close to Trax Daily Cash bonuses and Spiffs Paid Training $12.00/hr Uncapped Commission Average Caller makes

We OFFER: Jobs

Rentals ll Buy/Se

Trade

$45,000+ Annually

No experience necessary Call today 801-639-0206 Jobs@iwpmts.com

POST YOUR FREE ONLINE · CLASSIFIED ADS AT

Up to $.45 CPM, Newest Fleet in the Industry Guaranteed Pay Packages Bonuses Tuition Reimbursement Pet on Your Truck Paid Orientation Gold Plan Medical, Dental & Vision & the Respect YOU Deserve! Call Today for more Details

Do you want or need to sell your company? Utah Business Consultants is the premier business brokerage in Utah, where we’ve been operating since 1989. We have sold hundreds of companies, mostly in the $300,000 to $10,000,000 range. Many times our clients are looking to retire, or may be forced to sell for a variety of reasons, or they simply want to cash in on their good efforts. Call George Metos for a free consultation of your specific needs. We can help you understand the value of your company and undertake the steps required to sell it.

801-424-6300 OFFICE I 801-440-3176 CELL www.UBCUtah.com I George@UBCUtah.com

1-800-547-9169 (Dial 1) Or Check us out Online at MayTrucking.com

A VOICE OVER WORKSHOP IS FORMING NOW IN SLC!! Learn to earn voicing commercials & more. www.voscott.com/workshops. html HIRING SERVERS MacCool’s Public House Foothill Location Apply In Person IRONWOOD FINANCIAL Appointment Setters jobs@iwpmts.com FOCUS WORKFORCES Multiple positions, Salt Lake area www.workatfocus.com CONVERGYS Customer Service and Sales Reps careers.convergys.com PUBLIC INTEREST COMMUNICATIONS Sales Representative Utahjobcenter.com NOW HIRING BARISTAS Karma Coffee House 385-214-4323 SAPP BROS. TRAVEL CENTERS Mechanic Utahjobcenter.com STANDARD OPTICAL Optician/Sales Associate utahjobcenter.com LOCAL CARPENTERS HomeAdvisor utahjobcenter.com BRITTON’S Now hiring experienced cooks (801) 572-5148 ANDRUS TRANSPORTATION

Company Solo & Team Drivers www.andrustrans.com CENTRAL TRANSPORTAION DRIVERS/CDL TRAINING CAREER www.centraldrivingjobs.net

NOW HIRING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE jennifer@devourutah.com IRONWOOD FINANCIAL Appointment Setters jobs@iwpmts.com ALPENGLOW SOLAR Journeyman Electrician utahjobcenter.com AMERICAN MANPOWER SERVICES Electrician utahjobcenter.com PRIME INC. Drivers-Reefer www.primeinc.com DIESEL MECHANIC LEVEL 4 Rush Enterprises utahjobcenter.com WORK AT HOME - UP TO $37/HR (SALT LAKE CITY,UT) Responsive Media utahjobcenter.com FRONT END ARCHITECT Saurus Inc utahjobcenter.com CACTUS & TROPICALS NOW HIRING. kathy@cactusandtropicals. com COOK/KITCHEN ATTENDANT Crystal Inn utahjobcenter.com PARALEGAL I Nature’s Sunshine utahjobcenter.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECTUTIVE Canon utahjobcenter.com RESTAURANT GENERAL MANAGER Einstein Bros. Bagels utahjobcenter.com LINE COOK Legends Sports Bar & Grill utahjobcenter.com SALES EXECTUTIVE Franklin Covey utahjobcenter.com


REAL ESTATE

URBAN L I V I N

WE SELL HOMES & LOANS TO ALL SAINTS, SINNERS, SISTERWIVES

G

& UNICORNS!

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, UrbanUtah.com Chair, Downtown Merchants Association

FOLLOW US ON SNAPCHAT @CITYWEEKLY Make Dad Proud and MOVE OUT This Father’s Day!

DOWNTOWN

OLYMPUS COVE

Deluxe 1+ bdrm condo! Two tone paint, central air, stainless steel appliances, extra storage, garage parking! $845

4 bdrm. 2.5 bath single family home loaded! Fireplaces, Balcony w/ city views, radiant floor heating, double wide- extra tall heated garage! $1800

DOWNTOWN Funky 1 bdrm. 2 bath Industrial Loft 1300 sqft. Extra storage, garage parking, balcony, central air! PRICE DROP! $1595

PARTLOW RENTS 801-484-4446

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com Selling homes for 3 years

Loan Officer 801-747-1206 julie@brizzee.net www.brizzee.net

Granting loans for 29 years in Happy Valley- NMLS#243253

Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 32 years in the Land of Zion

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

JUNE 2, 2016 | 71

FOR A FREE LISTING OF ALL OF OUR RENTALS, PLEASE DROP BY OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT 440 S. 700 E. STE #203

Julie A. Brizzée

| COMMUNITY |

MILLCREEK Must Have 1 bdrm. w/ washer dryer included! Walk in closet, private enclosed patio, community pool, covered parking! $745

great man is dead. John Williams, co-founder of Utah’s Gastronomy chain died under horrific circumstances last week (see Dining, p. 22). But this is not the image I want to have left of our friend John. I’m choosing to remember his noble deeds, including those few details so few knew much about. Williams supported many local nonprofits and was the quiet king of charity. He also fought the royal battle to bring business back to an almost abandoned downtown in the mid-1970s. And he established a food empire that rules to this day in the likes of New Yorker, Market Street Grill and Market Street Oyster Bar. I first met him back when we were all wearing polyester suits and platform shoes, smoking Shermans and drinking Long Island iced teas on the patio of the Shubrick apartments (now the Federal Building on West Temple and 400 South). Music from the Bee Gees blared from cheap speakers connected to a turntable. We’d move to the patio of the original Sun Tavern where the Vivint SmartHome Arena now sits and carry on our disco debauchery. We painted this town red … over and over again. Back then, the only seafood found in restaurants in Salt Lake City was of the frozen kind, and served at Bratten’s Seafood Grotto at 644 East 400 South (about where Chili’s is located now). They did not flyin their fish daily, but they did have a vast menu ranging from clams, crab, shrimp and prawns “from both oceans” and fried oyster sandwiches. Around 1977, a New York native came to town and wanted to open up a high-end disco. He chose the basement of New Yorker Building and spent his entire wad digging it out. I have his original business card in a scrapbook. The man threw one party in the dirt for his “Manhattan Bridge Company” before he vanished. John Williams looked at the abandoned excavation and envisioned a restaurant there. The rest is gastronomic history. The finest restaurant in town opened in 1978, followed by the Market Street Grill and the connecting Oyster Bar in ’81. Williams and his business partners brought together a fantastic skill set and a new empire was born. Nobody in the food business here could compete after Bratten’s closed in 1988. Thousands of past and present employees will mourn, as well as thousands of past guests. John, you will be sorely missed for your cheeky sense of humor, your generous gifts and your hard labors in creating an empire we could all enjoy. Goodbye, sweet prince. n

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DOWNTOWN Darling 1 bdrm w/ hardwood floors and vintage details (built ins, alcoved entries etc.) Free laundry! Internet Included! $685

A Local Loss A


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

72 | JUNE 2, 2016

cHeck Us first!

If you have been injured, we can help

WELLSPRING MASSAGE SWEDISH • DEEP TISSUE

801-577-8017

low or no service fees

VOICEOVER WORKSHOP

www.injuryhelputah.com

U r b a n l o U n g e · m U r r ay t h e at e r k i l b y c o U r t · m av e r i c k c e n t e r bar delUxe · the complex · and more!

REFLEXOLOGY

in SLC Learn to earn voicing commercials & more. www.voscott.com/workshops.html

I WANNA CLEAN UP YOUR DOG POOP

cityweeklytix.com

NEW WINDSHIELDS

385-222-3799

OPEN: MON-SAT • SUN BY APPT. 4449 SO. COMMERCE DR, MURRAY (DIRECTLY EAST OF MCD ONALD’S)

Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

www .

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

WORDS

$100 OF YOUR

WELLSPRINGMASSAGEUT . com

Top Dollar paiD

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

For your car, truck or van. running or not, lost title

AWI NDS HI ELDREPLACEMENT. C O M

Certificates available in

THE BACKSTOP For Rates Call: 801.413.0947

i Can help!

801-895-3947

CarSoldForCash.com

SERIOUSLY!!!!! CALL/TEXT 801-673-4372 $10 for 3000 sq ft

CREDIT TROUBLE? NEED A CAR? Mark Miller Loan Center will get you in a car you deserve today. 801-506-1215 mmsloancenter.com

SOLAR POWER commercial-residential FREE ESTIMATES 801-263-2301

CRONE’S HOLLOW IS MOVING! OLD: 2470 S Main through 6/3/16 NEW: 3834 S Main opens 6/10/16

HANDEE SERVICE

Home repair and more 100% guaranteed since 1987 Call Frank 801-854-3900

On-site printer service and toner needs for businesses. 30+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE.

801-809-5058

CALL NOW!!

CityX CUSTOM COUNTERTOPS Granite, Marble, Quartz No Job too big or small, Free Estimates 801-473-0883

DEWEYSBAILBONDS.COM

DIVORCE ONLY $297

801-364-0572

D I N I N G · B E S T O F U TA H · N I G H T L I F E A C T I V I T I E S · W E L L N E S S · S E R V I C E S H O T E L S & T R AV E L · R E C R E AT I O N · R E TA I L · T I C k E T S W/ L O W O R N O F E E S

Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com Free Consult 801-981-4478

MATRIX MASSAGE

Couples Massage, spa packages 7 days a week. 533 S 700 E. 801-799-4999 matrixmassagespa.com DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

cityweeklystore.com

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

CITY WEEKLY STORE Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

Profile for Copperfield Publishing

City Weekly June 2, 2016  

PROUD

City Weekly June 2, 2016  

PROUD