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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T A P R I L 7, 2 0 1 6 | V O L . 3 2 N 0 . 4 8

THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY Salt Lake City’s gamble to install an iconic art work hits a snag. By Stephen Dark


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2 | APRIL 7, 2016

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

Salt Lake City’s gamble to install an iconic art work hits a snag. Cover photo courtesy of Studio Echelman © Peter Vanderwarker

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CONTRIBUTOR MATT KUNES

This week, we toasted to one of our talented editorial interns as he embarks on a new job. A multimedia journalism major at Weber State University, Matt has made an invaluable contribution to City Weekly during the past few months, and we wish him much success. Thanks, Matt!

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LETTERS The Price of Greed

Most of my fondest memories of the outdoors with my two sons were spent down in the red rocks of southern Utah— taking them on hikes to see the unsurpassed views that you can’t see anywhere else, and letting them hear the incredible silence of the desert. And taking them on rafting trips down the mighty Colorado to see the red-rock canyons like only the river view can deliver. Unfortunately, this jewel— loved by the whole world—will soon be gone if Congressman Rob Bishop, R-Utah, and his greedy pals have their way. The new and improved Public Lands Initiative will condemn the red rocks to ruins in a few short years, but there is much money to be had, so let the fracking begin! Who cares if a few hundred oil wells are scattered around Arches and Canyonlands? Think of all the money our elected leaders will be raking in. When you are hiking through the rocks, ignore the strip-mining scars and coal mine pollution. Remember all the free trips and the perks that our leaders are getting—that will make it all worth it. And when you get to that special quiet spot to listen to the wind, just ignore the bulldozers, dump trucks and giant oil tankers. Bring earplugs. When the air over the entire Moab region is thick with oil and toxic fumes, remember: They said it was good for us to give away paradise. When my grandchildren ask, “Why did they destroy southern Utah?” I will have to tell them the truth: that most of the elected leaders here in Utah are greedy and selfish,

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. and there weren’t enough of us with the guts to stop them.

TONY PIGNANELLI

Cottonwood Heights

Superdelegates Should Reflect Voters’ Mandate

In her role as an unpledged delegate or a “superdelegate” at the Democratic Party’s national convention in Philadelphia in July, state Rep. Patrice Arent, D-Millcreek, has been trying to justify her support of Hillary Clinton. She’s failing at being convincing. The Democratic Party doesn’t trust its members. It designates 17 percent of convention delegates from among elected and appointed party officials who can support whatever candidate they want—and this could include overriding the will of the “pledged” delegates chosen by the voters at about a 10,000-to-1 ratio. Bernie Sanders received 77 percent of the Utah caucus votes, yet will have only 50 percent of Utah’s superdelegates, as Arent and state party Vice Chair Breanne Miller had already committed to Clinton before Utahns had spoken so loudly and clearly. To their credit, the two other superdelegates (which really is a distasteful term)—former party Chair Wayne Holland and current Chair Peter Corroon—waited for the vote and are respecting caucus results. Arent has also never made a compelling argument for Clinton’s superiority either as a candidate or chief executive. Apparently, it’s not important to her that several polls

show Sanders is doing significantly better against all Republican opponents due partly to the broad dislike of Clinton among independent and swing voters. The Republican primary system has its flaws, but at least its superdelegates can’t overturn the will of party members. If they can’t respect the wishes of Utah Democrats and both support Sanders, Arent and Miller should at least flip a coin to see which one of them will support him for a 75 percent representation. Then, their first item of convention business should be to work to reduce the future superdelegate role to nothing more than that of a tie breaker. If superdelegates sway this nomination against the preference of party members, I’ll be changing my party affiliation and won’t be supporting any Democrats with my time and money in November. That may seem petulant, but if my role as a Democrat is to be spoonfed a party line and to fall in behind party-picked candidates, I’ll go elsewhere.

JIM CATANO

Salt Lake City

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Final Words

Since brevity is the soul of wit And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief… —William Shakespeare I hitchhiked around England one summer. I thumbed my way to Stratford-uponAvon, Shakespeare’s hometown, where I toured his house and sought out his grave in Holy Trinity Church. I wanted to make a rubbing of the inscription on his tombstone. The churchmen would not allow access to the grave, but for a few dollars, they would do a rubbing and mail it to me, they said. Ordinarily, I would have taken the offer as a scam but, coming from clerics, I decided to chance it. The black-on-white rubbing showed up in Utah two months later, and I had it framed. It has been hanging on my wall so long that I don’t pay it much attention. This is Shakespeare’s epitaph: Good friend for Jesus sake forebear, To digg the dvst enclosed here. Bleste be ye man yt spares these stones, And cursed be he yt moves my bones. I have to say that I don’t find much wit in the four lines. I wonder what was on his mind when he wrote the epitaph. Epitaph keeps company with obituary. Both are neglected literary forms, I think. Nowadays, obituaries tend to be formulaic, and epitaphs are as rare as a rousing Irish wake. I walked around the Mount Olivet Cemetery on a day so dreary only the resident deer were milling about the graves. In a brief tour, I saw more photographs on gravestones than epitaphs. By the time the Millennial generation is shopping for burial plots, there will probably be gravestones capable of projecting holographic selfies. Obituaries are biographical in detail, laudatory in tone. Epitaphs are little gems—concise and aphoristic. Some are religious. Some are literary. Some, witty. I like the funny ones. Even the hoariest one of all—“I told you I was sick”—always makes me smile. I am

BY JOHN RASMUSON

more a student of obituary than most, and as much as I appreciate the rare, well-crafted obituary, epitaph has more appeal. That it is chiseled into granite gives epitaph an edge, of course. Poetic brevity is another advantage over the well-worn phrases of obituaries published in daily newspapers. In a few, wellchosen words, a years-long personal story is concluded. I like poet Robert Frost’s: And were an epitaph to be my story I’d have a short one ready for my own. I would have written of me on my stone: I had a lover’s quarrel with the world. Epitaphs can also be public and didactic as the inscription on the World War II Kohima Memorial illustrates: When you go home, Tell them of us and say, “For their tomorrow, We gave our today.”

6 | APRIL 7, 2016

be, “He came. He wrote ‘In the Air Tonight.’ He died.” In his poem, “Epitaph,” John Stone provides this one for an auctioneer: Just before the Coffin-Lidder nails the eternal ceiling on, tell the next-to-highest-bidder I am going, going, gone. Who writes epitaphs? Either you compose your own, or someone writes one for you. The latter is risky; the former takes time and reflection. Mortuaries provide fill-in-the-blank obituary worksheets to grieving relatives, but the worksheet makes no mention of epitaph. I doubt most estate planners can spell the word. The “how to write an epitaph” websites are pedestrian. You would think epitaph would be popular especially for those in the Twittersphere. I can imagine a spirited exchange of #myepitaph tweets in the attempt to write the best, 140-character swansong. Some small effort has been made in this regard. More than 25,000 people liked this tweet: “If your grave doesn’t say ‘rest in peace’ on it, you are automatically drafted into the skeleton war.” I found it artless. The best tweets are short, clever and conversational, according to Eric Jarosinski, a self-described Twitter aphorist interviewed by The New Yorker. It is like “writing a cartoon caption for a cartoon that doesn’t exist. … What you really need to do in a cartoon is set someone up for the moment that comes next, after that frame, but is not depicted,” he said. If my life is a succession of cartoon panels (by Gary Larson, if I have a choice), then the penultimate one sets up the epitaph, much as the straight man sets up the riposte in a comedy shtick. What soulful, witty words appear in my final panel? I am thinking of the signature closing of 1950s Looney Tunes cartoons when Porky Pig, voiced by Mel Blanc, stutters, “That’s all, folks!” CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

OBITUARIES TEND TO BE FORMULAIC, AND EPITAPHS ARE AS RARE AS A ROUSING IRISH WAKE.

Rhyming lines make a lasting impression because they are easy to remember. So are the funny ones (even if they never actually make it to a gravestone.) I am thinking of Dorothy Parker’s “Excuse my dust” or W.C. Fields’ “On the whole, I’d rather be in Philadelphia.” While Johnny Carson reigned supreme among late-night talk-show hosts, someone asked what he would like to have as his epitaph. He thought for a moment, then said, “I’ll be right back!” I read an interview with the handsome, blue-eyed actor Paul Newman just before he died. In it, he joked about the famously good looks that Lee Strasberg, the founder of Method Acting, said Newman used as a crutch. “He would have been as great an actor as Marlon Brando if he hadn’t been so handsome,” he said. Newman made light of the criticism with this tongue-in-cheek epitaph: “Here lies Paul Newman, who died a failure because his eyes turned brown.” In the same vein, Phil Collins said his epitaph could well

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If you had a chance to write a few final words on your headstone, what would they be? Jeremiah Smith: I would go with the classic, “Hold my beer, and watch this.”

Mikey Saltas: “Here lies Emperor Saltas, Conqueror of the Known World.” That’s my little prank on the people thousands of years from now who dig up my headstone.

Scott Renshaw: “And they said watching bad movies wouldn’t kill you.”

Jeff Chipian: “I will see you again … but not yet. Not yet.”

Pete Saltas: “I buried the money over there.”

Enrique Limón: “No one loved the poop emoji more. No one.”

Bryan Bale: “Bryan’s not here, man.” Mason Rodrickc: “Judge not what you’d find in your own browser history,” or “He died like he lived. His final words: ‘No, no. It’s a meat salad, spelled h-a-m-b-ro-s-i-a. No, fine, hold the wheel, gimme my phone back, I’ll text her myself!’”

John Saltas: Either piss or dance, but don’t just stand there unless you’re here to water the lilies.

Colby Frazier: “Never Give an Inch.” Andrea Harvey: “It’s pronounced ‘On-drayuh,’ not ‘Ann-dree-uh.’”

Jerre Wroble: “Finally met my deadline.” Paula Saltas: “John did it.”


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FIVE SPOT

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

Saltwater taffy, nutritional supplements, rocket motors … and pipe organs. Yes, add the “King of Instruments” to the list of Made in Utah products. Michael Bigelow, founder of Bigelow & Co., builds those pipe organs for a living. On April 8, Mormon Tabernacle organist Richard Elliott will play an inaugural recital on one of Bigelow’s newly rebuilt organs at First United Methodist Church (203 S. 200 East, Salt Lake City). The 7:30 p.m. event is free to the public. Bigelow describes his craft below.

Rising Rents

When did you start Bigelow & Co.?

Salt Lake City has some soul-searching to do about low-income housing, and you know the city is all about housing these days. High rises are going up everywhere, but affordable housing is relegated to the west side. A story in The Salt Lake Tribune noted that three council members voted against the 80-unit Bodhi Apartment Project because, once again, it’s on the west side. While the reporter pondered low-income housing going up in Federal Heights or Yalecrest, he apparently missed a lot of other potential areas on the east side. After all, there’s a Walmart on Parley’s Way now. The city needs to move aggressively toward affordable rents. A study by the Pew Charitable Trusts showed housing costs for low-income renters up 50 percent since the ’90s, according to Forbes magazine.

Private Education

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It sounds good: $4.5 million in funding for early-education programs. Wow. The Legislature really gets it, you say. Think again. Gov. Gary Herbert is probably trembling at the thought of these legislators working toward another costly override session—this one to ensure that their pork gets paid for. Take the online preschool program and a reality TV cooking show, not to mention a little used K-3 reading program. The Deseret News pointed out that the Democrats see these programs sending tax dollars to private vendors. Yes, the Legislature loves the private aspect of education. In the same edition of the D-News, John Florez editorialized against the state school board, saying it has no vision and the Legislature just tinkers with piecemeal initiatives. It looks like they do that for their friends, instead of Utah students.

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Embarrassing as it is, the U.S. Supreme Court’s stern reprimand of Utah was something of vindication for those weary of the state’s land-grabbing intentions. This was quite the case—Ute Indian Tribe v. Utah. And it’s been going on for 40 years—at some enormous cost. A 2014 story in Native News Online called the whole thing racist. Well, yeah: “Assistant Attorney General Randy Hunter referred to tribal members as ‘these people’ and seeking state jurisdiction on the reservation so Utah law enforcement can arrest ‘drunk tribal members fleeing to the reservation,’” the story said. The high court first denied the state’s claims to the land, but the state kept trying by prosecuting tribal members on the res. Last week, the Supreme Court denied review of the case and reminded Utah that the state had lost. Just wait until they get their hands on our federal lands lawsuit.

Bigelow began business in 1978 in Provo. We moved to American Fork in 1984 to the surplus LDS Second Ward building dating to 1903. We’ve been here ever since.

Tell us about your shop.

We have 10,000 square feet with five full-time and several part-time employees.

Where and from whom did you learn organ building?

When I completed training with Abbott and Sieker in Los Angeles and John Brombaugh in Ohio, I moved to Utah and set up my own organ-building shop. I’ve never done anything else.

How many instruments has Bigelow & Co. built?

We’re currently completing our Opus 38, or in other words, our 38th instrument. The largest is Opus 17-56 ranks at Victory Lutheran Church in Mesa, Ariz. The smallest is Opus 4-3 ranks at BYU-Idaho in Rexburg.

How many pipes in a “rank”?

A rank of pipes numbers 56-61 pipes depending on the number of keys on the keyboard.

Where can people hear organs with the Bigelow nameplate in Salt Lake City?

There are three Bigelow instruments in Salt Lake City: St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral (231 E. 100 South), St. Ambrose Catholic Church (2315 S. Redondo Ave.) and First United Methodist Church (203 S. 200 East).

What is the price range on your projects?

Most expensive was $1.3 million, and least expensive was $25,000.

What’s the most difficult part of building an instrument?

The wind chests and pipes require the most labor, with the action and the casework a closed second. Then there’s the wind system.

How many hours are spent building an organ?

We invested 21,500 hours on the instrument at St. Mark’s Cathedral.

Electronic digital organs are getting more and more realistic. They’re not your grandmother’s Hammond anymore. Will they ever replace real pipes?

Electronic substitutes are already replacing pipe organs in many churches and other venues. However, it’s been my experience that the vast majority of people can tell the difference and prefer the sound of a real pipe organ.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


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What causes the condition known as sanpaku eyes? As a skeptic I place no credence in the notion that those with sanpaku are doomed to die a tragic death while young, but I do wonder about the condition. Is it indicative of any physical or mental health issues? —Bill Ross, Pittsburgh

First off, Bill, “sanpaku” eyes isn’t exactly a medical term. And second, the phenomenon the phrase refers to isn’t exactly a medical condition, but rather a not wildly uncommon physical trait—it’s like you’re wondering about the condition known as dimples. The average reader will now be thinking: What the hell are we even talking about? Well, sanpaku describes eyes in which the sclera—the white part—can be seen above or (usually) below the iris. The word is Japanese, from elements meaning “three” and “white,” the idea being that the is is bounded by sclera on three sides, rather than the usual two. Whatever dent the sanpaku concept has made in the Western consciousness is largely the doing of George Ohsawa, a Japanese thinker who last century helped bring to the wider world the dietary philosophy called macrobiotics, which emphasizes maintaining one’s yin-yang balance via intake of various whole foods. Ohsawa poached the concept of sanpaku from old Asian diagnostic traditions of facial reading, in which different features were thought to reflect aspects of your physical or spiritual health. In his writings, Ohsawa claimed that three-whites was a particularly nasty characteristic, indicative of someone “suspicious, fearful, insecure, quick to misunderstand and passive.” Furthermore, “his heart, sexual organs, liver, kidney and lungs are very sick,” and so forth, and the condition can only be treated with a macrobiotic diet. Ohsawa came armed with examples, too: His list of prominent people with sanpaku included John F. and Robert Kennedy, Hitler, Abraham Lincoln and Marilyn Monroe. And to the extent anyone’s aware of the trait today, it’s because they’ve heard this roster of unfortunates, which has since been expanded to include John Lennon and Elvis. Then there’s Charles Manson, who had the dreaded “upper sanpaku,” in which the white is visible above the iris—thought to indicate a dangerous psychopath. Clearly this group had its share of high-profile troubles, one concedes, but not ones that could have been foretold from the visibility of their sclera. Or could they? Several sources on sanpaku point with satisfaction to an August 1963 interview (by Tom Wolfe, no less) of George Ohsawa in the New York Herald Tribune, in which he’s said to have predicted JFK’s death. Online Herald Tribune archives, though, stop in the year 1962, leading one to wonder: Just how high up does this thing go, anyway? What are they hiding? Obviously you’re not buying this theory, Bill, and I have to say I find it a bit wildeyed myself. Is there anything to sanpaku

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SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Wild-Eyed

eyes medically, though? Not really—as an isolated trait, nobody ever died from showing too much sclera. But they’re sometimes seen as a sort of benign effect of certain other conditions: n Ectropion, or eyelid droop, occurs in aging people as their faces lose muscle tone; as the lower lid droops, you might catch a little more white. Possible medical complication: increased irritation due to greater exposed area of the eyeball. n Retraction of the lower lid, giving the eye a distinctive rounded shape, is a common complication following cosmetic surgery—specifically lower-lid blepharoplasty, which removes lines and tightens the skin. Fear not, though: plastic surgeons have developed a second cosmetic procedure to remedy the effects of procedure número uno, basically by raising the whole cheek below, thus creating enough slack to restore the shape of the eye and cover up that extra sclera. n Exophthalmos, or proptosis, is a bulging of the eyeball; among the underlying causes can be Graves’ disease (an immune disorder that leads to hyperthyroidism), or eye injury or cancer, etc. This might cause a sanpaku look, but here the most striking aspect isn’t really exposed sclera qua exposed sclera; it’s that your eyes are popping out of your head. n Finally, a milky white ring around the cornea—not quite sanpaku, but I guess it could be mistaken for such—indicates the presence of lipid deposits. Called corneal arcus or arcus senilis, this is also a byproduct of aging; it doesn’t affect vision. Anyways, the sanpaku crowd isn’t just swimming against the tide of good science—if we follow one credible theory, they’re up against the whole of evolution. Recall that, among species, humans possess notably visible and well-demarcated sclera. (The sclera of our closest relatives, apes, are either colored or otherwise obscured.) According to what’s called the cooperative eye hypothesis, that’s by design. It’s thought that our eyes evolved to look this way so we’d be better able to communicate—by reading one another’s eyes and tracking each other’s gazes. So more may be better when it comes to the sclera, though I hope this doesn’t mean Charles Manson is the next step in human development. CW Send questions to Cecil via straightdope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


Above the Law

A federal judge stands her ground when a prosecutor seeks special consideration. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

T

JUSTICE

Adolphus Nickleberry’s case remains active even after a federal judge threw out the evidence.

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 11

part of an ongoing national debate, says Daniel Medwed, professor of law at Northeastern University in Boston. While prosecutors are very rarely criticized in court, he says the failings of defense attorneys are routinely highlighted. Judges don’t name prosecutors, he says, out of fear that prosecutors will become timid. “If they are scared of being named for unethical conduct, they might not be so aggressive,” he says, runs the rationalization. “The less noble rationale is that many judges are former prosecutors, and [they] identify more with prosecutors than defense attorneys.” Much as Parrish did, Medwed argues courts should “name” prosecutors. “If they are scared (of being identified for misconduct), they might tread more carefully,” he says. Mark Jones, U.S. District Court clerk for Utah, says six out of Utah’s 14 federal court judges are former prosecutors, which he says is consistent with the national average. Nickleberry, who has multiple felony and misdemeanor convictions, mostly drugs-related, says he faced 77 months on the gun charge. “What I’m dumbfounded by is how big this is for such a small case. I could see if it were murder or kidnapping,” he says. “They’re trying to save [Strain’s] reputation and kill my life.” His troubles aren’t over with the case, despite the prosecutor dismissing it for lack of evidence, after Parrish threw the arrest out. That’s because, in early March, the Unified Police Department, following instructions from the federal prosecutors, screened the same case with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s office. DA Sim Gill says that his office filed it in 3rd District Court to achieve “clarity” on its implications for law enforcement. Medwed says that issues surrounding the Nickleberry case boil down to the fact that no one should be above the law, especially those who enforce it. “If a judge has found reason for concern about an individual prosecutor’s behavior, the public should know about that,” he says. “It should be transparent, not hidden behind the scenes.” CW

ecutors’ off-the-record request that she edit her ruling elicited deep concern. One high-profile prosecutor, Davis County Attorney Troy Rawlings says, “Prosecutors should not be in bed with judges, should not act like they think they are, and should not be perceived as being in bed with the judiciary. How would U of U fans like it if the next time they dare play BYU in football, the referees were all prominent BYU boosters?” Defense attorneys who appear before federal court judges were reluctant to weigh in. One agreed to discuss the case under the condition of anonymity. Backman’s actions, he says, suggest his office “would like to be prosecutor, judge and jury. And there’s a reason we don’t let them be all three.” He argues that the expectation of federal prosecutors that the judge would even entertain the request, “underscores how they have been very accustomed to having more deference than defense attorneys and defendants.” The attorney believes that those judges who have sided with prosecutors have created a climate where prosecutors “believe they are able to hold these kind of meetings with judges and make these kinds of requests.” If, as a prosecutor, you disagree with a judge’s ruling, then, file a motion to address it publicly, Rawlings says. “Don’t say, ‘Hey, Judge, let us off the hook by changing your ruling because we are the good guys who merely make understandable mistakes, wink, wink,” he says. “However, dear Judge, hammer the hell out of defense attorneys like Marcus Mumford, who keep beating us.’” Rawlings is referring to the recent culmination of a five-year effort by the federal government to prosecute St. George businessman Jeremy Johnson. In the trial, which ended in late March with Johnson convicted on eight counts of giving false statements to banks, Judge David Nuffer clashed repeatedly with defense attorney Mumford, whose client in the Johnson saga, Scott Leavitt, walked away from all 86 counts levied against him. Johnson was acquitted of 78 charges filed against him. The events in Parrish’s court are

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to avoid having to report her concerns to the Washington, D.C.-based Office of Professional Responsibility that investigates allegations of misconduct against federal prosecutors, “and particularly avoid any repercussions for Mr. Strain,” Parrish recalled. Backman also asked Parrish in the future to contact his office with concerns about prosecutors rather than put them in a written opinion. She felt that to do so would be “unethical or inappropriate,” to which Backman replied that such communication would not relate to the case. “I responded how attorneys perform on a pending matter could not be divorced from the substance of the case,” she said. In Parrish’s statement to the court, she recalled that Scott Wilson, 1st Assistant of the Federal Public Defender office, said he had “serious concerns with what he perceived as a broader issue, namely that the U.S. Attorneys Office’s had historically received preferential treatment in Utah.” He told Parrish that he found it problematic that judges were calling out public defenders in their written opinions for deficiencies but not prosecutors, for fear of triggering the reporting requirement to the federal government. Responding to questions from City Weekly, Backman wrote in an email that both prosecutors and defense attorneys make mistakes. “It should come as no surprise that we will attempt to support our prosecutors and raise the issue with the judge when they are the subject of criticism in a written opinion,” something that he noted he told Judge Parrish he would support if a defense attorney made the same request. Wilson says the Public Defender’s Office has “never, ever made such a request to my knowledge.” Backman went on to note that an internal review found that Strain’s briefing was erroneous, “and not a deliberate misrepresentation of the law,” he wrote. His office decided that because Parrish’s ruling had not found misconduct, it did not require a referral to the Department of Justice’s watchdog over prosecutorial misconduct. A former federal prosecutor, Utah Supreme Court judge and 30-year legal veteran, Parrish is a relatively new member of the Utah federal court, having been appointed to the bench in May 2015. She concluded in her statement that, “My practice is to call things as I see them and not treat either party differently.” She declined to edit the ruling to the prosecutor’s liking. City Weekly requested a number of prosecutors, defense attorneys and legal experts review Parrish’s ruling and the events detailed by the judge in court. Her handling of the case and Backman’s request earned applause by most, while at the same time, the pros-

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he court record shows that on March 4, 2016, U.S. District Court Judge Jill Parrish met in her chambers with David Backman, deputy chief of the U.S. Attorneys criminal division, and a prosecutor he supervises, Jacob Strain. Backman had asked Scott Wilson, 1st assistant of Utah’s Federal Public Defender office, and federal defender Vanessa Ramos to attend the meeting, which was also at Backman’s request. Strain and Ramos were prosecuting and defending, respectively, 51-yearold Adolphus Nickleberry before Judge Parrish on a charge of possessing a gun while being a restricted person. According to what Parrish read into the court record two weeks later, the meeting wasn’t to plead the case for or against the defendant. Instead federal prosecutors wanted the judge to retract her criticism of Strain. Parrish had raised concerns with Strain’s work on the Nickleberry case in her written ruling granting Ramos’ motion to have the evidence against Nickleberry thrown out. An undercover Unified Police Department officer had illegally impounded Nickleberry’s girlfriend’s car in which Nickleberry was a passenger, Parrish found, prior to his arrest. The judge spent four paragraphs outlining mistakes Strain had made in his briefing. “The court hopes these deficiencies were unintentional,” Parrish wrote. “In the future, counsel for the United States should carefully consider the representations it makes to the court and properly disclose controlling law, even though it may be unfavorable to its position.” In her post-ruling statement, Parrish said that she had not intended to suggest that Strain had been unethical, “but simply to caution counsel to be more careful in the future.” At the private meeting, Backman blindsided Parrish, who had anticipated he wanted to apologize for Strain’s errors. Instead, Backman asked the judge to remove the four paragraphs in her 1-week-old ruling. He told her he wanted

STEPHEN DARK

NEWS

“My practice is to call things as I see them and not treat either party differently.” —Judge Jill Parrish


THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

CHARITY FUNDRAISER

Crossroads Urban Center has been around for 50 years, working to benefit low-income Utahns with its food pantry, thrift store, community organizing and more. For its “golden” anniversary, Crossroads is holding its sixth annual Beer, Blues & Brats Benefit Party. If you don’t recognize Crossroads, you might know some of its spinoffs—Utahns Against Hunger, Wasatch Community Gardens, the Disabled Rights Action Center, not to mention its work on two Salt Lake City homeless centers and Utah’s alternative payroll-deduction giving program. There will also be a silent auction and music from the J.T. Draper Band. Wasatch Presbyterian Church, 1626 S. 1700 East, 801-3647765, April 17, 2-5 p.m., $45; $250 for a table of 6, bit.ly/1oq9aG5 (tickets), CrossroadsUrbanCenter.org

SWORD COMPETITION

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12 | APRIL 7, 2016

CITIZEN REVOLT

Nine people who wish their names were in the Panama Papers:

1. Kanye (per Kim’s request) 2. Rowan Atkinson (Mr. Bean re-

siduals are not what they used to be)

3. Maria Sharapova (drugs are

pricey when you have no sponsors)

4. Chuck Norris (Jackie Chan can’t have all the glory)

5. Martin Shkreli (Wu-Tang

investment turned up more risk than reward)

6. Jay-Z (per Bey’s request) 7. Blockbuster Video founder David Cook

8. Vladimir Putin (again) 9. Gawker’s Nick Denton

You may be no Johnny Depp, but you can still watch presumptive swordsmen swing a sword. Salt Lake City-based United Clans Swordsman Association is hosting its first Sword Competition of the year between its group and students from True Edge Academy of Provo. Both groups are members of the Historical European Martial Arts Alliance, a national nonprofit dedicated to Historical European Swordsmanship. This is a real thing and includes techniques such as long sword, short sword and buckler, dagger, pole hammer and unarmed fighting and defense. East Side Liberty Park by the large stone fireplace, 600 E. 900 South, 801-548-5303 (Travis Emery), April 9, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., free, TheUCSA.com

GALA FUNDRAISER

You can’t get more chichi than La Caille, can you? That’s the venue for the 10th annual Alta Gala, a collaborative fundraiser for Alta Community Enrichment (ACE), Friends of Alta and Alta Historical Society. The gala hopes to raise awareness of the arts, environment and history of Alta. If you’re a skier, there’s also a chance at a drawing for an Alta pass and heliskiing offered by Wasatch Powerbird Guides. There will be hors d’oeuvres stations, dancing, a photo booth and even mobile bidding, if you’re not able to attend. Complimentary shuttles are offered from Alta to the event. Dr. Ken Libre will be the recipient of this year’s Stellar Award in tribute for his important and unique role in sustaining the community. La Caille, 9565 Wasatch Blvd., Sandy, 801-7429719, April 8, 7-11:30 p.m., $130; $85 for Alta employees; $20 for a drawing ticket only, AltaGala2016.AFrogs.org

—KATHARINE BIELE Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

Fun at Work Bill Bailey (a former nine-year employee of the water-irrigation network near Grand Junction, Colo.) was awarded unemployment benefits in December for being wrongfully fired. The company claimed Bailey was insubordinate and that any complaints he had were merely because he is “too sensitive” to workplace “fun” and unable to “forgive and forget” his supervisors’ team-building spirit. According to an administrative law judge, the “fun” included, among other things, detonating unannounced, ear-splitting PVC “potato guns” (using golf balls and other items) on the job and Bailey’s boss placing his own feces in a bag inside Bailey’s lunch pail. (At one point in the hearing, during the boss’ mirthful, carefree descriptions of the “fun,” the judge felt the need to advise him of his Fifth Amendment right.) Following the judge’s decision, Bailey’s two supervisors resigned.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Can’t Possibly Be True “Wall of Sound,” Updated: Police, finally armed with a warrant after months of neighbors’ complaints about loud music, raided Michael Baker’s small one-bedroom apartment in Croydon, England, in March and confiscated 34 loudspeakers that allegedly Baker had been using at high volume at “all hours.” After entering the home with the aid of a locksmith, police left Baker with only a CD player and a pair of earphones.

WEIRD

Questionable Judgments The Agony and Tediousness of “Peeling”: The Canadian supermarket chain Sobeys has recently been selling pre-cut avocado halves, sealed in plastic packages. Said a spokesman, the product “eliminates the guesswork … if you are not familiar with peeling and seeding a fresh avocado.” Also, recently, Whole Foods began selling peeled mandarin oranges, sealed in “recyclable” plastic, at $5.99 per pound (but withdrew the product in March, with an apology and promise to sell the oranges only in their “natural packaging: the peel”).

n The Most “Canada” Story: Ms. Philicity Lafrenier, 25, was charged with several break-and-enter and theft crimes in March in Prince George, British Columbia, after leading police on a halfmile chase as she made her getaway on an ice floe on the Nechako River. When police caught up, she attempted to dispose of items she had stolen (even though still on the ice) by burning them in a small fire, but an officer and a police dog jumped in the water to subdue her.

Bright Ideas North Carolina State University scientists, in a “proof of concept” study published in March, claim they have found a promising alternative for eliminating certain infections—even when no known antibiotic will work. The solution, the researchers write, is to genetically modify maggots (which are well-known to feed naturally off of infected tissue) to gobble up the infections and release, as “waste,” human growth hormone (as they showed in the study could be done with a strain of green bottle fly maggots). n Felicia Burl, 33, who crashed her car (killing her passenger) after running a red light, fled on foot and later tried to foil DNA evidence against her to avoid charges. While in lockup, Burl, with a 29-conviction rap sheet, knew a mouth swab was upcoming and tried to contaminate it by—as police later learned—having two other women spit into her mouth just before the test. She was convicted anyway, and a court in Stamford, Conn., is expected to order a 10-year sentence at Burl’s next hearing.

Thanks this week to Neb Rodgers, Darren Monaghan, Thomas Graham, Thomas Wyman, Larry Neer, and Pete Randall, and to the News of the Weird Board Editorial Advisors.

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n The Most “Georgia” Story: David Presley (of Walton County, about 40 miles from Atlanta), 32, for some reason attempted to blow up his riding lawn mower in March—by placing three pounds of the chemical mixture Tannerite in it and then shooting the mower with a semiautomatic rifle. Although he was standing 30 yards away, shrapnel still hit him, severing his leg just below the knee.

New World Order In March, Foreign Policy magazine noted that someone had created a “hot male migrants” account on the photo-sharing application Instagram: “Someone is going through photos of migrants and refugees, saving ones of men thought of as hot.” (Many of the men, of course, have survived harrowing journeys and even lost friends and family members while fleeing Syria and other war-torn lands. Wrote one Instagram user, of a man who had turned her head, “He’s gorgeous. Am I going to hell for thinking that?”)

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The Continuing Crisis The Most “Florida” Story: State officials have notified retired pro wrestler Mary Thorn of Lakeland that, according to the law, her pet alligator (“Rambo”), age 15, having grown to 6 feet in length, may no longer be kept at home unless she provides at least 2 1/2 acres of roaming space. She made a public plea in March, warning that confiscating Rambo would kill him, as he is super-sensitive to sunlight (having been raised inside her home) and must wear clothes and sunscreen when outside (though Thorn pointed out that he is “potty-trained” and wags his tail when needing to answer nature’s call). At press time, the investigation of Rambo was still ongoing.

n Nicholas Ragin finally got his conviction overturned in March, but it took 10 years before the U.S. Court of Appeals declared that his “right to counsel” had been violated because his lawyer slept during various parts of Ragin’s conspiracy and racketeering trial. (His sentence had 20 more years to run.) One juror later recalled that lawyer Nikita Mackey slept “almost every day, morning and evening” for “30 minutes at least.” Once, according to court documents, after the trial judge called Mackey’s name loudly, only belatedly getting a response, Mackey “jumped up and sort of looked around and was licking his lips … and looked sort of confused and looked around the room.” (The prosecutor said she intends to retry Ragin.)

Mon-Fri 5am-2:30pm I Sat 7am-12 pm

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Salt Lakes Finest! Baked Fresh Daily! 2278 S Redwood Road

APRIL 7, 2016 | 13

801-975-6381


BY STEPHEN DARK • sdark@cityweekly.net •

W

hen the retail, apartment and business monolith that is City Creek Center was under construction in downtown Salt Lake City, Regent Street, a small lane between Main and State, was little more than a row of forgotten offices and entryways to parking garages. Once home to the thundering presses of the Deseret News and The Salt Lake Tribune, after the newspapers relocated, the gothic corridor between 100 South and 200 South seemed little more than a derelict alleyway, connecting Gallivan Plaza with City Creek mall. That 60-foot-wide corridor between two key downtown locations, however, had been on the minds of then-Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and the board of the city’s Redevelopment Agency (RDA) ever since the early stages of developing the Eccles Theater, a 2,500-seat venue on Main that abuts Regent Street.

@Stephenpdark

Becker says he and the RDA board hoped that on the back of the funding of the Eccles Theater, they might also redevelop Regent Street into “a festival street,” akin to a cultural pedestrian space like Maiden Lane in San Francisco. In March 2015, the RDA board approved a $12.8-million project budget for revamping Regent Street, which included $2 million for public art and $700,000 for lighting and projection technology infrastructure. The RDA approached the Salt Lake City Arts Council to find an artist whose work would bring distinction to a street already distinguished by its stubbornly individualistic past. Once known as Commercial Street, it was the hub of Salt Lake City’s red-light district from the 1870s to 1908, after which it was home for immigrant railroad workers and their families.

When the Salt Lake City Arts Council launched a call for entries in May 2015 for an artist to produce a work of public art to crown Regent Street’s redevelopment, they dangled a remarkable carrot in front of local, national and international artists: namely, the $2.7 million budget. But despite so much money earmarked for drumming up interest in a side street, the city and the out-of-state artist with an international client list chosen to execute the project fell dramatically out of step, sending the street’s minders back to the drawing board. Whether it becomes a boon for local artists or a sweet gig for a big-time national artist, the future of Regent Street’s $2.7 million iconic art contract is once more up for grabs. Karen Krieger is executive director of the Salt Lake City Arts Council (SLCAC). Krieger simply defines public art as that which meets the needs of the site where it is placed. “It’s the best expression for the site that the funds will provide. That’s what the artist is tasked with, along with using the right material so it lasts a long time without a great deal of funding needed to maintain it.” Public art is typically tax-dollar funded art that is easily accessible to the public, often placed on a street corner, in a park or a plaza. The $2.7 million budget was Salt Lake City’s largest ever, single art commission. By comparison, since it began operating, the arts council has spent approximately $4.5 million on public art pieces, outside the $3.4 million in sculptures housed at the city and county building, says SLCAC’s head of public art Roni Thomas. With a quarter-billion dollars going into Block 70—as the RDA categorizes the block bounded by Main and State, 100 and 200 South—Regent Street was in line for a major facelift. According to the Request for Qualifications (RFQ) that the arts council put out for the commission, “The redevelopment of Regent Street offers

NIKI CHAN

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GOT AWAY

Salt Lake City’s gamble to install an iconic art work hits a snag.

14 | APRIL 7, 2016

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THE ONE THAT

THE ECCLES THEATER AND REGENT STREET IN FULL-CONSTRUCTION MODE LATE MARCH 2016


JANET ECHELMAN INC.

ONE OF ECHELMAN’S REGENT STREET DESIGNS

STAB IN THE DARK

JANET ECHELMAN INC.

111 Main Street

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For some critics among both the artistic and business community of the Regent Street commission, what it exposed was the problematic process which anointed Echelman in the first place. Local tourism official, Visit Salt Lake’s CEO Scott Beck, says it’s a problem of the arts council being “rooted in the status quo.” He notes the council’s process is not one “that really allows you to create something extremely unique and different than what’s been done.” Nevertheless, Beck believes that public art can still have a significant impact on the city. He senses “a real opportunity for public art, not as furniture, but art that creates experience that really breaks down these perceptions of what people think Salt Lake is.” At the heart of frustration among these local players lies the concern that the selection process did not reflect the creative needs of artists seeking the work nor did it truly offer opportunities for local artists to contribute. Indeed out of 182 artist entries, only 10 were from Utah, a small response that no one can easily explain. Nationally acclaimed artist Ned Kahn was one of the five finalists. In an email, he says the organizers of the competition “did a fine

job.” His criticism relates to the process in general. Competitions, he writes, force artists “to develop their ideas in a vacuum without the back-and-forth dialog with a design team and the clients that can result in a true collaboration and letting an idea evolve and get better.” He describes a competition as akin to “a stab in the dark. Sometimes, you get lucky and hit the nail on the head but, more often, you miss.” Local artist, designer and entrepreneur Jeffrey Berke was the only Utahn who made it to the final five. “I hope a future process will be inclusive of a wide range of art forms and a broad crosssection of community voices,” he says. Some among the local artistic and business community argue Echelman was the right choice for putting Salt Lake City on the public-art map. Downtown Alliance’s executive director Jason Mathis, one of the 14 selection-panel members, expresses disappointment about the breakdown of talks with Echelman, whose work he found exciting. “Hopefully, having more time allows for a more thoughtful selection process so we end up with an even more dynamic art project for Regent Street,” he writes in an email. Salt Lake City Arts Council executive director Krieger says, in retrospect, it was too early to appoint an artist, because Regent Street’s development is highly complex, with many moving pieces in terms of publicly owned and private properties. Echelman, however, argues that she was brought in too late, rather than too early. “In the midst of urban renovation, you want to involve the art early; otherwise, it becomes icing on a cake,” she says. “Instead of something integrated and unique and worthy, it becomes something stuck on like a postage stamp.” While smaller art commissions are easier to implement, she says, “my work is an immersive art experience that involves full integration with the construction site.” NIKI CHAN

to Echelman, terminating negotiations, essentially blaming her for straying beyond the terms of the RFQ in relation to both budget and timeline. The artist robustly denied the claims in detailed responses she sent to Mayor Biskupski in late March 2016. While the RDA wanted the installation completed by the summer 2016—prior to the opening of the Eccles Theater—in the rush to meet the deadline, the city and their chosen artist found themselves pushed farther and farther apart by miscommunication, competing artistic and municipal needs, financial and construction realities.

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an opportunity to merge history with the contemporary to create a welcoming, dynamic urban environment unlike any other found in Salt Lake City.” A local architecture firm, GSBS Architects, developed a Regent Street design to turn it into “a new public experiential gathering place that will engage its visitors as they shop, dine, socialize and stroll.” Part of that design includes art stamped into the sidewalk and walls of “press sheet” imagery celebrating the street’s newspaper past. While Salt Lake City public art projects are funded through a variety of mechanisms—including a 1985 ordinance that 1 percent of the construction cost of new municipal building projects go to art—the Regent Street project was to be funded through a RDA bond. A 14-member selection panel of big-wigs drawn from the municipal, business and arts administration downtown community helped the Salt Lake City Design board—five volunteers appointed by the mayor, of whom no more than two can be artists—whittle down the 182 entrants to five finalists, and then to a winner, in early September 2015: internationally renowned sculpture artist, Boston-based Janet Echelman. Echelman’s “squid-like, jelly-fish organic forms,” as one local artist calls them, have been commissioned by governments, cities, high-profile museums including the Smithsonian and topdraw entities, such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Becker first saw her work in Phoenix. “It was really dynamic art,” he recalls, in a downtown that “desperately needs things to attract people there.” She says her life has been dedicated to “serving the public space, creating works of public art that are free to everyone and that enhance life.” What excited her about Regent Street, indeed what would have made it unique among her portfolio, was the opportunity to effectively shape an entire street. “My goal was to draw people into Regent Street and create a gem in this hidden courtyard that you can only experience if you walk inside,” she says. According to an audio recording of the presentations by the five finalists and panel discussions that City Weekly accessed through a record request, panelists were ecstatic with Echelman’s “soft, billowing netted form,” as a city press release described her winning proposal, and the vision she authoritatively painted of bringing world-class artwork to downtown Salt Lake City. “She was absolutely a winner,” one panelist concluded in the final deliberations, while another crowed, “I think Janet will fulfill whatever need we have.” Yet, several weeks after Mayor Ralph Becker was defeated by current Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Becker’s thenchief of staff, David Everitt, wrote a letter dated Nov. 25, 2015,

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Eccles Theatre

Proposed Hotel Site

THE FUTURE PLAZA EXPECTED TO BENEFIT FROM A PUBLIC-ART INSTALLATION

APRIL 7, 2016 | 15

Walker Garage


16 | APRIL 7, 2016

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COURTESY OF CORDELL TAYLOR

BUY LOCAL DEREK DYER, “THE ILLUMINATOR” ERIK DAENITZ

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COURTESY OF DEREK DYER

CORDELL TAYLOR, “SPACE JUNKE”

Patricia Walsh is public-arts-program manager for national nonprofit America for the Arts. She says that best practices in public arts focus on bringing an artist into a project in its earliest stages. “This provides an opportunity for both the artist and the rest of the project team to work together to deliver creative solutions.” Krieger and her public-art director Thomas say that the selection process was successful, in part because it stopped when it did, rather than plunging into further disarray. They plan to put out another call for entries for Regent Street in Spring 2017, although the RDA’s interim executive director Justin Belliveau feels it should be sooner. Berke advocates for the funds to be broken up. “We could do 30 projects for $100,000 each. This alone would transform the community. Or we could do 60 projects for $50,000 each, and unveil a major new downtown arts experience every month for five years. The community should have this discussion,” he says. The arts council and the RDA agree, at least in term of a public discussion. Prior to the call for entries, they plan to seek public comment this summer on what public art should grace revamped Regent Street. Echelman, meanwhile, feels the result of the original selection process should be honored. In late March 2016, she wrote to Mayor Biskupski urging her to embrace her project. For local artists, excitement over the top-dollar prospect of the Regent Street commission must be tempered, some artists say, with a recognition of limitations. Local sculptor and artist Cordell Taylor says “it comes down to: Do we have the talent here in Utah that could perform on a $3 million contract? That’s the reality right there,” he says. “Would their impact be as significant to the city and the arts as Echelman would be?”

AMY CARON, “HOLOTYPE”

Salt Lake City artists above, shown with their art, discuss access to public-art contracts with some wondering whether Utah artists can handle a multimillion-dollar installation.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints played a key role in Regent Street’s development, intentionally lining up the City Creek entrance on 100 South with Regent Street. The church also owns the 24-story office tower going up adjacent to the theater, the construction of which was announced in September 2013 by the former developers, Hamilton Partners. The LDS Church bought out Hamilton’s ownership of the project in February 2014. Through the new office tower and a boutique hotel development project on the corner of Regent and 200 South, “All of a sudden, we had a new (tax) revenue stream that we were not relying on for the theater, for redeveloping the block,” former Mayor Becker recalls. By leveraging both existing and expected revenues from private developments into a bond, the RDA came up with the money to redevelop the street and finance public art. “I thought we had a very rare opportunity with regard to Regent Street to devote enough money to hire someone to do a great piece of art—indeed, get something that really represented iconic-level art for Salt Lake City,” Becker says. “Art can really help generate interest, visitation and levels of excitement around the city.” When the RDA asked the Salt Lake City Arts Council to organize an up-to-$2.7-million commission for Regent Street in early 2015, the development was in a state of flux. “Regent Street was a big muddy mess,” Krieger says. “The theater was in the very early stages of construction, the facade wasn’t complete and Re-

gent Street itself was torn up. The spaces weren’t really defined.” In May 2015, the Salt Lake City Arts Council issued a call for entries through the CAFE online system—one it hadn’t used before but a system the state had used for some time. It allows artists to submit images and resumes, but some complain it limits their ability to describe projects in the artistic ways they wish to approach them. With only 10 out of 182 submissions coming from Utah artists, both the council’s public-art director Thomas and the mayor’s special adviser Katherine Potter were surprised at the lack of local interest. Local public artist Willi Littig wasn’t. He says CAFE “hurts Utah artists,” who collectively will often not qualify. “Oftentimes, they ask for work done with a budget between $150,000 and $5 million in the last five years—we don’t have those opportunities. We’re all hungry. It’s hard for us.” The sheer size of the commission daunted some artists. “What talent locally would be able to fulfill those specifications of a $3 million project?” local sculptor and artist Frank McEntire muses. “I can only think of one or two artists who have the prowess to pull that off.” Littig says the commission’s price tag overwhelmed him. “Artists here have no problem with $25,000 or $50,000 commission—they’re just sugar plums. You love to have that. Make that $250,000, and we’re uncomfortable. It sounds great, but we get scared by it.” One Utah artist who submitted was the Utah Arts Alliance’s founder and executive director Derek Dyer, whose most well-known work locally is a giant disco ball featured in the city’s New Year’s Eve celebrations. “I knew it would be supercompetitive,” he says, because he had been on the planning board for “the look and feel” of Regent Street. “I knew they wanted a national or international artist.” While there had been some discussions about how to approach the sizable funding, “I think that they eventually went with a lump sum to draw someone with name recognition.” Dyer pitched an interactive projection art proposal with programmable LED lights that would run up and down buildings. “It was heavy on the tech, lots of interactive components. It would have been awesome,” he adds. “That $2 million—me and a lot of artists could have created a piece just as spectacular and inspiring, and it would have received as much attention as the famous artist.”

SHOWTIME

On Sept. 1, 2015, close to 20 people gathered in the Salt Lake City Arts Council boardroom for presentations by the five finalists. Up first was Turkish born, California-based Refik Anadol, who captivated some with his passionate description of three static robots along Regent Street interacting with pedestrians, that interaction reflected in color and light displays on a facade attached to the Walker Center garage. The second finalist—New York and Coloradobased Jen Lewin—couldn’t make the presentation, much to the voiced irritation of panel members. Her team struggled with technical issues and presented a proposal involving an interactive chandelier and three smaller suspended sculptures. Next up was Northern Californian artist Ned Kahn, famous for work that brings visibility to forces of nature, particularly the wind. His presentation of a kinetic facade was rejected because of construction concerns involving the garage


COURTESY OF JEFFERY BERKE COURTESY OF REFIK ANADOL COURTESY OF JEN LEWIN

JEN LEWIN, “THE POOL”

NED KAHN, “TURBULENT LINE,” KINETIC FACADE The four runners-up for the Regent Street public-art competition with well-known pieces

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In a Nov. 17, 2015, email, Thomas wrote to

REFIK ANADOL, “INFINITY ROOM”

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MONEY NEEDS

JEFFREY BERKE, “LIGHT TOWERS”

Sculptor Cordell Taylor was thrilled at Echelman’s victory. “I actually think it’s the best thing the city’s done to enhance their public art,” he says. “Them selecting her is a huge benefit to the city. People who love her work travel to see it. It also shows that we’re not so single-minded as the rumors have been for the last 150 years.” Salt Lake City artist Amy Caron says choosing Echelman is about playing it safe. Awarding the commission “to someone who’s already making all the money, already got all the gigs, I think it’s a safe bet, instead of a risky bet.” And where, some ask, is the uniqueness, in hiring an artist who has similar-size pieces in nearby cities, such as Phoenix? “It doesn’t make me feel that there’s a unique sense of place,” Caron says. “It’s almost like one of the rules would have to be it can’t look like anything else within proximity.” Ironically, Echelman’s piece in Phoenix almost didn’t happen after city government balked at the $2.5 million price tag and withdrew the funding following her selection. Public outcry ultimately saw the piece called “Her Secret Is Patience” become a central focus of the city’s downtown renovation in 2009. According to emails between Thomas and Studio Echelman, the public-art director initially pursued the artist to try to nail down a contract, even as city leaders grappled with the news that Echelman’s second and third ideas would cost the entire proposed budget, as opposed to the $2 million for her simplest installation. When the artist says she learned from the RDA that the bond money expired in September 2017, she pushed for her project to debut then, rather than the August 2016 date the RDA wanted for completion and installation of her sculpture, which would have it ready for the theater’s first visiting Broadway production in November. The city pushed back. “August 30 is the schedule we must agree on for this project and is the date that will be reflected in the contract,” Thomas emailed Echelman. She hoped Echelman understood, she added, “the commitment the public-art program made to the RDA to meet their deadline.” An additional complication was that some of the assumptions early on about the street’s redevelopment, such as the four walls relating to the two garages that bracket it, would be available for art installation needs proved wrong. Which walls will be available remain the focus of “ongoing conversations with the private property owners,” says special adviser to the mayor Potter. Then there were the needs of the theater, loading and unloading trucks at the Regent Street entrance and the impact of pedestrian movement on the art installation. “There was what Janet (Echelman) knew, and what we knew, and a space of gray in between,” Krieger says.

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Even though further discussions were planned the following morning after the five presentations, it was clear a consensus had emerged by late afternoon. Although panelists admired elements of all the finalists, there were concerns over issues including capabilities, maintenance cost and design that left Echelman the clear frontrunner. Connecticut-based architecture firm Pelli Clarke Pelli designed the Eccles Theater. The firm’s principal, Mitch Hirsch, a selection-committee panelist, was impressed by Echelman’s ideas. He recalls the panel was, “very excited by the possibility of having her piece over the plaza area and joining it to the Regent Street structures in a way only she can do.” Echelman’s proposal included only one budget for just under $2 million, which included the optional $700,000 projection piece of the request. Unbeknownst to Echelman, her project manager, whose father had tragically drowned just before the presentation, had not included budgets for the more intricate second and third proposals. Meanwhile, the selection panel thought that her budget for each of her three proposals was under $2 million, which also added to her cachet in their eyes. “I’d almost be inclined to see what she could do if the entire $2.7 million were allocated to her for this type of opportunity,” said one panel member after her presentation, although he didn’t know if that were possible. “If that concept involved a request increase of budget, I think we would support that.” Becker says his only concern about the choice of Echelman was that her work for Regent Street would be “a cookie-cutter version of other plac-

GRAY SPACE

COURTESY OF NED KAHN

FALL BETWEEN THE CRACKS

es.” The people involved in the selection process, he continues, were satisfied it would not, and he signed off on the Boston artist. A week after the presentation, Echelman was notified she had won. Her design “was very unique,” Krieger says. “It was designed specifically for the space, it flowed through that whole area. It used specific colors that related to Utah’s landscape. It’s what she does. All of her work looks very different, it’s similar (to her other pieces), but it’s also very different.”

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wall it was to be hung from. (A recording “glitch,” says the council’s Thomas, meant that Kahn’s hour is missing from the audio recording). After the panel returned from lunch, Echelman kicked off the afternoon session. She talked about how through charcoal sketching, and then working with watercolors, she developed an idea involving “walking through a sense of dappled beauty surrounding me,” exploring the idea of salt crystals perhaps leading to an “iconic crystal” in the new plaza. She proposed first a continuous “journey” through Regent Street, a crystalline path as her second idea, or a combination of the two, “a salt crystal necklace,” as her third. Finally Berke, a 20-year veteran of the Salt Lake City arts and event scene and Montrealbased digital-art-projection specialists Moment Factory pitched their idea “for a world-leading art installation,” Berke said. They proposed mounting a digital-art screen on the Walker Center garage wall, where in the evening, content could be displayed (even though the RFQ had requested visibility day and night). Berke had gathered letters of interest and support from key local players, including the University of Utah’s dean of the College of Fine Arts, the dean of Salt Lake Community College’s school of arts, SpyHop and Sundance—all of whom expressed a keen desire to contribute content to the digital-art display. RDA’s interim executive director Belliveau says that the RDA and city leaders had discussed similar ideas to the Berke/Moment proposal sometime before the call for entries. Having local nonprofits provide content for video projection “falls very much in line with the long-term vision,” Belliveau says.


COURTESY OF STUDIO ECHELMAN © PETER VANDERWARKER

COURTESY OF STUDIO ECHELMAN © PETER VANDERWARKER

JANET ECHELMAN, “1.26”

COURTESY OF STUDIO ECHELMAN © PETER VANDERWARKER

“SKIES PAINTED WITH UNNUMBERED SPARKS,” IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 2014

JANET ECHELMAN WITH HER ART, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 2014

TODD ERICKSON

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“1.26” AT THE BIENNIAL OF THE AMERICAS DENVER, COLORADO, 2010

Echelman that Jackie Biskupski had defeated Becker. As Becker’s mayoral term came to an end, the prospects for the art project also appeared bleak. “I believe there are several items, including this project, that are still under discussion,” Thomas emailed. Shortly after the election, Becker met with Krieger, Belliveau and his then-chief of staff, David Everitt to discuss the still-to-be signed contract. “We were struggling to pull all of these pieces together,” Krieger recalls. The conversation became, she says, “Should we wait until we have the final site to look at, should we wait until we have the experience of the theater and the hotel? Maybe we need to step back from this to make the best possible decision. It wasn’t coming together; maybe that should tell us something about where we were at.” Belliveau and Potter insist the shifting fortunes of politics did not impact the negotiations. That said, while they wanted the new administration to be involved in the decisionmaking process, they didn’t want Biskupski to feel pushed into it, particularly if the city were to proceed with a new call for entries. Becker doesn’t recall that meeting, but he says some of the issues Krieger referenced were brought to him as part of a larger question as to whether he would sign off on restarting the selection process. “It seemed pretty clear to me based on what people were telling me that we needed to spend more time on it,” he says. In a letter to Echelman dated Nov. 25, 2015, Everitt wrote that the city was ceasing negotiations. He noted that during negotiations of the contract, “the scope of the original Request for Qualifications (RFQ) has changed significantly, and the city cannot execute a contract with a scope of work that materially deviates from the original RFQ.” Potter says that the city’s concern was “that a decision of this magnitude, involving high level of public funds, was made with transparency and fairness to process. We didn’t want to do something that could be contested because it had deviated from the RFQ or do something that was not in line with what the RDA and city council had agreed upon with the budget,” she says. The remainder of Everitt’s letter pinned responsibility for failure to complete contract negotiations on the artist. While Echelman’s original proposal had cleaved to the requested completion deadline of August 2016, “the City understands now that to obtain the expected quality and size of

work presented to the Art Design Board, the deadline would need to extend to 2017 or even 2018.” Echelman wanted more money, Everitt wrote, with her bid climbing from $2 million to $2.7 million “for a substantially similar installation.” No mention was made of the snafu over different budgets, or the three ideas Echelman had initially presented. Part of the problem from the city’s perspective was, “There were questions of who was responsible for the installation that came to light, and we felt she was pushing more of that burden onto the city,” Belliveau says. In a document titled “Corrections & Clarifications” Echelman sent to Mayor Biskupski in late March 2016, she addressed Everitt’s criticism. With regard to pushing the completion date beyond June 2016, she wrote that she recommended the city “adjust its delivery date to maximize value to the city for this fixed-price contract by utilizing all the time available, rather than wasting funds on overtime and rush fees to fabricators.” In terms of her budget increase, she wrote that the original RFQ potential total budget was up to $2.7 million, $700,000 of which was for interactive lighting. Her final budget was still $2.7 million, so was within budget parameters. “Janet didn’t exceed the budget that was offered,” Krieger says. “She was within that range. She was just utilizing the entire budget, because there was more work, more research, more engineering, which consequently affects the budget.” As to seeking that the city shoulder the cost of installation, while Echelman had initially sought to exclude that cost from her budget, in a Nov. 4 email, she wrote she would accept the money coming out of her art budget. Echelman and the city continued to negotiate, but on Dec. 11, 2015, Potter emailed Echelman that the city was walking away from negotiations, adding they would pay $5,500 for the time she and her team had already put in. “We reached a conclusion that enough changes were going to be necessary that affected the schedule, the budget and the scope of the project,” Belliveau says, that the city had no other choice.

TIME ENOUGH TO LAST

In late March 2016, Echelman took her case to Mayor Biskupski, informing her in a letter that the original goals of the Regent Street art commission were still achievable before the bond money

expires in September 2017. “I am the city’s duly selected artist,” she wrote and proposed a contract be put in place before the end of April, so she would have “16 months for engineering, design, permitting and fabrication.” She concluded, “I believe the only way to deliver a successful work before the funds expire is to follow through the original Selection Committee’s results without delay.” City Weekly sought clarification from the city as to when the bond money would expire. Potter consulted with the RDA’s bond attorney and learned that it would be in May 2018. “The RDA must have spent a majority of the bond funding on project improvements, which includes public art, within three years from issuance of the bond,” she wrote in an email. Mayor Biskupski’s administration, however, rejects Echelman’s request that the original selection be upheld. Community and Economic Development Director Mike Reberg, referencing Everitt’s letter, wrote in an email that “the arts council and RDA determined that the project didn’t conform to the original proposal.” He continued that with two years to spend the $2.7 million on public art for Regent Street, “there is time to convene an appropriate group and launch a new process.” While the arts council and the RDA have yet to agree on a timeline for a new call for entries, Belliveau notes the RDA, the arts council and the city now have time to explore what the street, the new plaza and walkway provide in terms of displaying art. “It’s so great that this opportunity is not just limited to that one commission,” he says. He hopes to see public-art investment, whether public or private, continue on Regent Street under the RDA’s watch for years to come. Krieger says the next step is public outreach on the future of Regent Street public art this summer into fall. Echelman says having reached out to Biskupski to “offer to get this back on track,” she has a backlog of clients awaiting her work and will not contest the city’s decision to go back to the drawing board. Austin, Texas, which selected her for a $2 million sculpture, was in line “for fabrication after [Salt Lake City], so now Austin will be able to receive their sculpture sooner,” she says. Whoever gets to put his, her or their signature on Regent Street’s public art, Echelman urges the city to remember that great art, particularly the kind of iconic art the city originally sought, takes time. “You want world class, it doesn’t happen in a minute,” she says. CW


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THURSDAY 4.7

An original musical with all-new compositions is a rarity hereabouts—a bold endeavor for a small local theater company. So if you’re going to do it, you might as well dive in with both feet and make it a musical about a transgender Mormon housewife. Such a description grossly oversimplifies Kingdom of Heaven, by playwright/lyricist Jennifer Nii and composer/lyricist David Evanoff, in addition to suggesting a goofy tone that isn’t remotely the case. The main character is indeed Mormon housewife Mary Jane Brown (Jeanette Puhich), whose dabbling in performing songs as an opening act for drag performers forces her to confront her own genuine identity. And it’s also the story of Mary Jane’s husband, Joe (David Hanson), and her best friend/neighbor Brenda (Susanna Florence), both of whom also will have to question the assumptions built into their faith. The production runs a tight 75 minutes and, at times, it feels as though the story needs more room to breathe, so that Mary Jane’s growing awareness doesn’t feel quite so abrupt. But a musical proves to be an ideal format for this kind of story, all about people full of emotions that shake the foundations of the only world they understand, anchored by a trio of strong, sincere performances. When those emotions take the form of something like “The Prayer”—with all three characters reaching for guidance as they journey down unfamiliar roads—Kingdom of Heaven hits at the heart of people who wrestle with the demands of faith on messy, imperfect human lives. (Scott Renshaw) Plan-B Theatre Co.: Kingdom of Heaven @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through April 10, $20, PlanBTheatre.org

Spring: the time of reawakening and new beginnings. And, in the spirit of the season, our own Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. has assembled a concert of works that includes two dance world premieres, two original sound scores and one performance-art collaboration, each as fresh as the new grass on our lawns. What does the subjective nature of beauty mean for dance and movement? Choreographer Joanna Kotze confronts the question with Star Mark, one of the evening’s premiere pieces, set to an original sound score by composer Ryan Seaton from the band Callers, challenging the perception of beauty from the perspective of both the dancer and viewer. A little closer to home, Ann Carlson’s 3-50 Years—created in the year of Utah’s centennial (1996)—explores through movement and sound Utah’s struggle to gain statehood (our statehood bid lasted the longest of any state in the union). Rounding out the evening is Enter, Part II by Ririe-Woodbury artistic director Daniel Charon, a continuation from Part I, which was premiered by the company last season. Charon’s work, which will ultimately culminate as a trilogy, continues to examine humanity’s new evolution of self, how technology and our online life impacts our offline interactions. It was hard to miss Charon’s darkly pessimistic interpretation of technology’s influence on our lives in Part I; perhaps Part II will be more hopeful. For those 21 and over, Ririe-Woodbury invites each Spring Season ticket holder to attend a private pre-performance reception with cocktails provided by Beehive Distilling. (KP) Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Spring Season @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-297-4241, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m., $15$40. RirieWoodbury.com

Continuing the group’s broad outreach of performances during its 75th anniversary, the Utah Symphony is partnering with Clark Planetarium for a performance of Gustav Holst’s The Planets. The work was composed by Holst and performed in London during the late 1910s and early 1920s, with the intent of having each moment convey the emotional effect of heavenly bodies on the human psyche. For years, the full composition was broken into pieces for smaller performances and rearranged to end on movements that were uplifting. Much of the music from this performance has been used over the last century for film and television scores, most prominently, “Mars: Bringer of War” has been used in Sherlock and Doctor Who. Listeners will hear everything from chest-pounding war beats to delightful whimsy to a gallant orchestral coda. To accompany the music, the planetarium has created a montage of 2015 NASA imagery, that includes still-frame shots and full HD videos of the planets as its probes continue through the solar system. Imagery of Pluto will accompany the symphony’s performance of György Ligeti’s Atmosphères, an eerie fullorchestral piece that was featured in the classic Stanley Kubrick film 2001: A Space Odyssey. The concert also includes Alexander Scriabin’s The Poem of Ecstasy, a 20-minute piece accompanied by a poem (although it is never read aloud). (Gavin Sheehan) Utah Symphony: Holst’s The Planets @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801355-2787, April 8-9, 7:30 p.m., $10-84. UtahSymphony.org

Utah Symphony: Holst’s The Planets

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FRIDAY 4.8

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Spring Season

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THURSDAY 4.7

Plan-B Theatre Co.: Kingdom of Heaven

THURSDAY 4.7

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Every Samba Fogo performance feels like you’re stepping into a Carnival celebration: the feather headdresses, the flash of seguías and footwork, the heartbeat of the drums. But Samba Fogo—a local arts nonprofit—is more than a dance performance. It is a festive celebration of Brazilian culture by a community of artists, Brazilian dancers, fire dancers, singers, percussionists, musicians, choreographers, composers and teachers. Conexão—Portugese for “connection”—is the title of this year’s Samba Fogo spring concert. It’s a name that references the amazing collaboration between the many skilled artists, (more than 40) in this talented troupe and their connection with the audience for whom they create these works. As with past performances, Conexão will be filled with original choreography by artistic director Lorin Hansen and original music by musical director Mason Aeschbacher. The two Samba Fogo directors recently participated in a cultural exchange with Cuba and brought back new rhythms and dances. Drawing from the troupe’s new connection with Cuba, this performance is enhanced with Caribbean spice. And for those, like myself, who enjoy music with a good horns section, one of the best parts of this new Cuban connection will be the additions to the band. Along with the traditional Brazilian instruments that often accompany the Samba Fogo dancers, this performance will come alive with the brass sounds of Cuba—trumpet and trombone—with a little saxophone and sevenstring guitar. (Katherine Pioli) Samba Fogo: Conexão @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m., $20, $18 students. ArtSaltLake.org

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A&E

POETRY

COURTESY OF PROVO POETRY

Poem in a Ball Provo Poetry connects the Utah Valley community to verse, one quarter at a time. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

@

CityWeekly

t Enliten Bakery & Cafe in Provo, you can put a quarter in a gumball machine, and it will give you something to chew on—but intellectually, rather than physically. The unique concept of the “Poemball” machine—launched March 24—is the brainchild of Trish Hopkinson and Marianne Hales Harding, co-founders of Provo Poetry. Theirs is a quest, a couple of years in the making, to bring the art of verse into the Utah Valley community in a more visible way. For Harding—who teaches at Western Governors and Brigham Young universities—those efforts began in 2014, with the launch of the Speak for Yourself poetry open mic event at Enliten after she relocated to Utah County. “I had an experience with an open mic in St. George,” Harding says, “and I knew they can be up and down in terms of attendance. So I was expecting to have a long, hard battle to get things up and going. … But when we had our first open mic, we were packed. There was just this swell of writers who wanted this kind of community, and just didn’t have a lightning rod to bring them together.” That kind of community is crucial for writers, Harding says, because of the tendency of writers to be “alone in your head” so much of the time: “It’s invaluable to have other writers to interact with. Your creativity is really sparked by, ‘OK, let’s all write about this.’” Meanwhile, Hopkinson—a poet who works by day for a software company in Lehi—was launching Rock Canyon Poets in early 2015 with a friend. The group addressed poetry in a more academic way. She had met Harding at a Speak for Yourself open mic, and eventually they began to consider how their two groups could work together. “We were seeing that we really needed a promotional arm,” Hopkinson says, “something with which we could engage the rest of the community. There were some folks from [Utah County] who weren’t necessarily writers themselves but wanted to engage. We had a lot of, ‘We had no idea this was here!’ “Salt Lake County has a lot of really strong literary arts groups, and Utah County is really devoid of that,” she says. Provo Poetry was launched in January of this year to fill that void—to connect not just poets with other poets, but poets with all of Utah Valley. For now, that takes the playful and creative form of the Poemball

machine: a standard old-school gumball machine which dispenses plastic balls containing original works from Utah poets including Rob Carney, Meg Day and Laura Hamblin. According to Hopkinson, the concept came from a much more pragmatic place than a burst of poetic inspiration: “Part of it was that Marianne actually had a gumball machine,” she says with a laugh. Plenty of pragmatism was required for the logistics of the project as well. For example, the writers faced a word limit for their contributions, in order for the poems—a total of 150 for the first batch—to fit on the tiny pieces of paper that would be folded up inside the 1-inch plastic spheres. “It kind of helps in the end to have that kind of focus,” Harding says. “There’s only so much you’re going to read standing in line to get your food.” In part because of the public venue, Harding and Hopkinson requested in their call for submissions that the content for the Poemball poems be “PG or PG-13,” but they’re quick to challenge the idea that poetry in Utah County can easily be pigeonholed because of the area’s heavily LDS demographics. “I think there’s probably a preconception … that there’s not a diverse group [of poets],” Harding says. “One of the reasons that there hasn’t been a consistent open mic in Utah County is that they’re generally uncensored. And I feel strongly

Trish Hopkinson, left, and Marianne Hales Harding, with the Poemball machine

about the uncensored thing, even though I myself am a fairly conservative writer. … You want to be aware of your audience, and it can be very alienating for a certain segment of your audience; we want to be inclusive. But we don’t want to put artificial borders on creativity.” “As the evening wears on, though,” Hopkinson adds, “we cut loose a little bit more.” Harding and Hopkinson have other concepts percolating for Provo Poetry—from a presence at Chalk the Block chalk art event in September, to putting poems on bags for Which Wich sandwiches—even as Poemball is just getting started. “There can sometimes be a perception of elitism [in poetry], Harding says, “that ‘I’m not a literary person, so I don’t want to get involved in that.’ Poetry is for everybody. … Anyone can find enjoyment with these kinds of things.” It’s an idea worth chewing over for a while. CW

POEMBALL

Enliten Bakery & Cafe 43 E. Center St., Provo 801-919-3838 ProvoPoetry.org


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MONDAY 4.11

Colm Tóibín/Brooklyn The Academy Award-nominated film Brooklyn won over critics and audiences with its moving tale of a first-generation Irish immigrant coming to 1950s New York. This week, Utah audiences will get an opportunity to learn more about the story from the man who created it. Best-selling author Colm Tóibín—whose 2009 novel was the source for the film—visits Weber State University for a series of public events sponsored by the Hibernian Society of Utah, and connected to his career as a chronicler of his native Ireland. At noon on April 11, Tóibín will introduce a free screening of Brooklyn. At 7 p.m., he’ll present a public lecture connected to the centennial of the 1916 “Easter Rising,” which led to the formation of the Irish Republic, and which Tóibín’s own grandfather participated in. March may be over, but you can still get your Irish on. (Scott Renshaw) Colm Tóibín @ Weber State University, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, April 11. Brooklyn free screening @ Shepherd Union Wildcat Theater, noon; public lecture @ Hurst Center Dumke Legacy Hall, 7 p.m.; all events free to the public. IrishinUtah.org; Weber.edu

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Chicago Midvale Main Street Theatre, 7711 Main, Midvale, 801-566-0595, April 7-16, 7:30 p.m., MidvaleTheatre.com Cowgirls Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through April 9, Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday & Saturday, 8:00 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2:00 p.m., PioneerTheatre.org Disney’s The Little Mermaid The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855944-2787, through April 23, 7:30 p.m., ZigArts.com Greece is the Word The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through April 16, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., TheOBT.org Gypsy Westminster College Jewett Center for Performing Arts, 1700 S. 1300 East, 801832-2457, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; April 9, 2 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through April 9, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 3 p.m., HaleTheater.org Kingdom of Heaven Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-2974200, through April 10, Thursday & Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., PlanBTheatre.org (see p. 20)

Murder on the Frontrunner Express Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through June 4, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 11:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6 p.m. & 8 p.m., DesertStar.biz Seussical The Musical Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, through April 23, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; April 9 matinee, 2 p.m., EmpressTheatre.com Stupid F---ing Bird Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through May 1, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org

DANCE

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, April 9, 7:30 p.m., EcclesCenter.org Samba Fogo: Conexão Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 20) Spring Season Ririe Woodbury Dance Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.com (see p. 20)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Kenshin Taiko SLC Madeleine Festival of the Arts & Humanities, Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, April 10, 8 p.m., UtCOTM.org Pipe Organ Inaugural Recital First United Methodist Church, 203 S. 200 East, Salt Lake


moreESSENTIALS City, 801-328-8726, April 8, 7:30 p.m., free, FirstMethodistSLC.org (see p. 8) Mary Anne Huntsman: A Very Special Piano Recital Alpine Church, 254 W. 2675 North, Layton, 801-546-8575, April 8, 7:30 p.m., DavisArts.org Utah Symphony: Holst’s The Planets Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801355-2787, April 8-9, 7:30 p.m., $10-84, UtahSymphony.org (see p. 20)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Jason Lyle Black Alleged, 201 Historic 25th St., Ogden, April 9, 7 p.m., JasonLyleBlack.com Marcus Wiseguys Downtown, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 8-9, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com (see p. 20) Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, April 8-9, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Cotopaxi Questival Sandy City Promenade, 10000 Centennial Parkway, Sandy, April 8, 4 p.m.-11:30 p.m., Cotopaxi.com Presbyterian Choir Festival, First Presbyterian Church, 12 C St., 801-363-3889, April 10, 4-5:30 p.m., FPSLC.org/music Sustaining Our Culture Powwow U of U InterTribal Student Association, Union Ballroom, 200 Central Campus Drive, 801-581-7391, Grand Entry: April 8, 7 p.m.; April 9, noon & 6 p.m., Utah.edu/powwow Utah Scottish Association Tartan Ball Sons of Pioneers Bldg., 3301 E. 2920 South, Millcreek, 801-541-0939, April 9, 6 p.m., UtahScots.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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2016 César Chávez Visual & Language Arts Contest Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through April 8, MestizoArts.org A Public Spectacle Essay: Letterpress works by Emily Dyer Barker Sweet Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8951, through April 16, SLCPL.org A Real Rockwell?: Cover Art from the Saturday Evening Post Main Library Special Collections, Level 4, 210 E. 400 South, 801-5248200, April 11-May 31, SLCPL.org Abstract Expressions Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, 801-519-2461, through June 11, EvolutionaryHealthcare.com Christopher McKellar: If the Rock is the Word, Color is the Music Anderson-Foothill Branch Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through April 21, SLCPL.lib.ut.us David Maestas: Peaceful Chaos Utah Artist Hands Gallery, 163 E. 300 South, 801-355-0206, through May 18, UtaHands.com Digital Photography by Martin Novak Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through April 18, SaltLakeArts.org Hadley Rampton, Maung Maung Tinn, Nyan Soe: On the Border: Thailand and Myanmar Paintings Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West,

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Aaron Blaylock: The Land of Look Back Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, April 9, 6 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Cinda Williams Chima: Flamecaster The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 8, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com John Turner: The Mormon Jesus The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 7, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Kwame Alexander: Booked Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, 801-484-9100, March 8, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Linda Barney, Bill Coles, J.M. Hofer & C.R. Langille The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 12, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Ridley Pearson: Legacy of Secrets The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 12, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Lisa McMann: Island of Dragons The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 13, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

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24 | APRIL 7, 2016

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moreESSENTIALS

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801-328-0703, through April 8, AccessArt.org History of Photography: Recent Work by Laurel Caryn Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-245-7272, through May 6, Heritage.Utah.gov I’m a Barbie Girl in a Barbie World: Dolls from the Collection of Betsy Contreras DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through April 30, SLCPL.org Kevin Kehoe Modern West Fine Art, 177 W. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through April 9, ModernWestFineArt.com Laura Hope Mason: Extinct Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through April 8, AccessArt.org Marci Erspamer: Tangled in Light “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through April 16, AGalleryOnline.com Nina Tichava: It is All Just a Love Contest Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, 435-649-3001, through April 8, GalleryMAR.com Parlay: Paintings by Trent Call Marmalade Branch Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, through April 22, SLCPL.org Photographic Moose: Linden Waguespack Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801594-8632, through May 6, SLCPL.org Una Pett: Little by Little Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through April 18, SaltLakeArts.org Utah Ties CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-2156768, through April 8, CUArtCenter.org Wild in the West Utah Arts Festival Gallery, 230 S. 500 West Ste. 120, 801-322-2428, through April 8, UAF.org

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 25


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I

’m not quite sure how this happened, but over the span of many years and thousands of dining articles, I somehow never got around to writing a review of Oasis Cafe. Maybe the venerable spot on 500 East just got lost among the glitz and glamour of newer, shinier establishments. And that’s a shame, because the aptly named Oasis Cafe really is an urban escape for anyone looking for good food, service to match and a peaceful, comforting ambiance. Oasis Cafe has been a centerpiece of the downtown (or adjacent to downtown) Salt Lake City dining scene for nearly 21 years, since it was opened by Steve Paul and Jackie Pratt in July of 1995. In January 2002, current owners Joel and Jill LaSalle took over stewardship of the cafe and Golden Braid Books, saving them from being turned into an office building. Along with the LaSalles, longtime employees like general manager Will Keesen, executive chef and operations manager Jared Young and chef Efren Benitez keep Oasis Cafe customers happily attended to and well-fed. Drop in to the Oasis Cafe for lunch—even on a Monday or Tuesday—and chances are that most tables will be filled. I can’t think of another restaurant in town that caters to such a loyal crowd of repeat customers. Some are gathered for tea and a salad or sandwich with friends or colleagues; others are hunkered down solo making use of the free Wi-Fi or paging through a book just purchased at Golden Braid. No one seems unhappy or hurried. In that regard, Oasis feels as much like a sanctuary as a place to eat. But, eat you must. Because the food at Oasis Cafe is excellent under the current kitchen regime, and the prices almost seem like those of yesteryear: The food and drink here is one of the better bang-for-yourbucks in the city. Take the lunch menu, for example. A grilled-cheese sandwich and soup will set you back $9, but the item’s a bit of a misnomer—what you really get is two sandwiches: four crustless (unless you ask to leave the crusts on) half-sandwiches made with white bread, cross-hatched with grill marks and filled with gooey white Vermont and orange cheddar cheeses. Alongside is a heavenly, fresh-tasting roasted tomato and fennel soup—the fennel giving the soup both fragrance and a most subtle anise flavor. It’s a terrific, wholesome,

TED SCHEFFLER

Sake tasting • Sushi classes 2335 E. MURRAY HOLLADAY RD 801.278.8682 | ricebasil.com

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An Urban Oasis

DINE

Oasis Cafe is Salt Lake City’s “happy place” for dining.

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26 | APRIL 7, 2016

OASIS CAFE

housemade lunch for about what you’d expect to pay for a fast-food Subway sandwich, chips and a soda. Another excellent option—either for lunch or dinner—is the tender, flaky grilled salmon filet ($13 for lunch, $20 for dinner), which comes with a luscious honey-lavender polenta cake, fresh arugula and grilled tomato, drizzled with saba, extra virgin olive oil and merlot vinegar. The kitchen’s restrained use of lavender in the polenta makes it a gorgeous accompaniment, and that same lavender infusing the Oasis’ panna cotta dessert ($7)— with fresh seasonal berries, honey-ricotta cheese and a pistachio crumble—makes it one of my favorite desserts. It’s light and lovely, but packs a flavor punch. Having recently spent a couple of weeks in France, dining at times in Michelin 2and 3-star restaurants, I’ve found myself craving simpler, less convoluted cuisine. And that’s what, in my opinion, Oasis Cafe excels at. There might not be the wow factor of a restaurant like Alain Ducasse, but the flavors of Oasis dishes are pure and honest. Sometimes, less is more. Take for instance the paprika-crusted chicken ($18). I’d take this dish over many of the ones I ate in France. It’s so simple I found myself wondering, “Why didn’t I think of this?” Two large boneless chicken breasts were pounded thin and then coated with paprika and seared, the result being similar to Louisiana-style “blackened” chicken, but with better, subtler flavor and balance. Along with the generous portion of chicken—half of which I took home as leftovers—was delicious risotto with sweet corn and avocado salad. I can’t recall a more satisfying meal in the past few months than this one, particularly when accompanied by a wine such as Norton Torrontes ($35/ bottle) from Oasis Cafe’s well-conceived wine list. An array of local beers, liquor and cocktails are available as well. Unlike at many other restaurants,

Oasis’ panna cotta dessert vegans and vegetarians are well-tended to here, where those culinary choices “aren’t an afterthought or an obligation,” according to chef Young, and where each dish is truly inspired and full of flavor. That’s certainly true of dishes like wild mushroom strozzapreti ($16), udon peanut stir-fry ($15) or eggplant Parmesan risotto with roasted vegetable pomodoro ($15)—all of which hold as much appeal to a carnivore like me as they do to a vegetarian. Mostly organic and locally sourced foods are used in the kitchen, and that naturalism also dictates décor choices, with motifs of birds and ferns and the use of all-natural materials (often recycled ones) throughout the restaurant and into the beautiful, flower-laden, courtyard patio in warmer weather. The beams high overhead in the restaurant, for example, came from the old Great Salt Lake Railroad tressle, and the walls are made from Rastra—a recycled polystyrene. Keep in mind also that Oasis Cafe serves breakfast/brunch until 2:30 p.m. So, if you’ve a craving for the bodacious breakfast burrito ($10), a German buttermilk pancake ($9), or an “Oasis Scramble” ($9) and such for lunch, that’s a doable option. As someone who dines out for a living, I’m thrilled to have rediscovered Oasis Cafe, and to have been reminded what a special gem it is in our city. Owner Joel LaSalle sums it up best when he says: “Our goal is to help people every day to have a little bit better life and simply be happier.” Done and done. CW

OASIS CAFE

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s e r ve d 7 : 0 0 - 1 1 : 0 0 a m M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

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28 | APRIL 7, 2016

VIETNAMESE • CHINESE • VEGETARIAN LUNCH • DINNER • CATERING • TAKE OUT

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

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@critic1

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Fresco Finito

After 30 years of providing Utahns with some of the best Italian-inspired cuisine in the state, as well as one of the most inviting settings in which to enjoy it, Fresco Italian Cafe (1513 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City) has closed its doors. According to Fresco co-owner Mikel Trapp, there wasn’t any drama involved. He and his longtime business partner, Mark Stammler, just decided “it was time.” Lately, Trapp has been focused on his other businesses like Trio downtown, Trio Cottonwood and Luna Blanca, as well as additional enterprises and a partnership with the (Joel) LaSalle Restaurant Group which includes Current Fish & Oyster, Under Current and the soon-to-open Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar, in the space that previously was home to Faustina. In related news, Phelix Gardner, former executive chef for Pago and Finca, has taken over the kitchen at Stanza. Stay tuned here for news on Stanza’s imminent opening. Meanwhile, I’m hoping that someone will purchase Fresco and continue to run it with the loving care that Mikel Trapp, for 14 years—and David Harries for 16 years before that—operated the one-ofa-kind restaurant.

New Eating Establishment Owners

Park City’s venerable The Eating Establishment (317 Main, Park City, 435649-8284, TheEatingEstablishment.net), which dates back to 1972 and is a longtime dining destination for locals, has been acquired by the Edison Alley Group. The Edison Alley partners own Salt Lake City’s Bar X and Beer Bar and, according to actor and business partner Ty Burrell, “We’re excited to build on the success of Bar X and Beer Bar by adding The Eating Establishment to our family business. This is a local institution, which will remain under local ownership. We hope to maintain the name and spirit of the original.” Bar X co-owner Jeff Barnard added, “Park City has been dear to my heart since I rode my bike in the Fourth of July parade when I was a kid. This will be my fifth business on Main Street, going back to the late 1980s, and I’m thrilled to be a part of The Eating Establishment tradition.” Quote of the week: If anything is good for pounding humility into you permanently, it’s the restaurant business. —Anthony Bourdain Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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CHECK OUT OUR BOTTLE SHOP

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to momand-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

open 11am-11pm Monday-Saturday

Dolcetti Gelato

With Elizabeth and Mark England’s Dolcetti Gelato, a cream dream has been realized in Salt Lake City. The Englands learned how to make their frozen concoctions from Italian artisans, and the quality is obvious upon your first bite. Check out the exquisite flavors, such as pistachio, pomegranate, chocolate mole and crocantino al rum, to name just a few. This ain’t your grammy’s ice cream. Dolcetti makes its gelato and sorbetto by hand using fresh, locally grown fruits and berries and milk from family-run dairies. Go ahead, take a lick; it’ll be the best 5 pounds you ever gained. 902 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801485-3254, DolcettiGelato.com

Greek Souvlaki

Grinders 13

For more than 40 years, Grinders 13 has been supplying Salt Lake’s residents with East Coast-style grinders, heros and hoagies. It’s rightly known for its great cheesesteak and killer Italian sub, but a favorite Grinders sandwich is the hot meatball sandwich ($6.55 for a 6-inch; $8.04 for a 10-inch) with meatballs made from scratch (you can actually distinguish the various meats in each ball) and housemade marinara sauce, to boot. 1618 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-467-3676; 2125 S. 3200 West, 801-973-6489, Grinders13.com

Guadalahonky’s

People who know great Mexican food will tell you Guadalahonky’s is the place to go. The salsa is justifiably famous—one bite and you’ll see why. Guadalahonky’s offers a wide variety of “Amexicana” and Tex-Mex favorites, from chimichangas to enchiladas, and fajitas to stir fry. They also offer a vegetarian menu and an American menu for those who have a timid tongue. For those who like spice, take a look at the Boca de Fuego (fire mouth) menu. The festive, colorful ambiance just adds to the fun. 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801571-3838, Guadalahonkys.com

properbrewingco.com 857 S Main Street, Salt Lake City | (801) 953-1707 | @properbrewingco

TRY OUR FAMOUS CHICKEN AND WAFFLES SERVED WITH OUR HOUSE-MADE CHICKEN SAUSAGE AND THYME-INFUSED ORGANIC MAPLE SYRUP HALF OR FULL ORDERS AVAILABLE

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As the name implies, souvlaki (pork or chicken) is a mainstay at Greek Souvlaki. But the extensive menu of Greek and American offerings also includes favorites such as classic gyros, beefteki, a veggie gyro, dolmathes, pastitsio, spanakopita, Greek spaghetti, soups, salads and more. The eatery was founded in 1972 by Lee and Mary Paulos—the first to bring Greek gyros to Utah. Their sons—Frank, Leo and Chris—now operate the business with the same great recipes. Multiple locations, GreekSouvlaki.com

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 29

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30 | APRIL 7, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Chalk, Rocks and Roederer Getting to know the soil and sizzle of Roederer Champagne BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

L

ouis Roederer has long been among my very favorite Champagne houses. So, when presented with an opportunity to enjoy a personal tasting and tour of Roederer’s Champagnes and caves during a recent visit to France, I jumped at the chance. Tour any Champagne house in France and you’re going to learn a lot about chalk. Nothing is more important to producing great Champagne than chalk. That might seem surprising, since chalky wine doesn’t seem to fit Champagne’s elegant image. But it’s actually chalk that is largely responsible for producing such elegance. The Champagne region is a challenging

one for wine growers. Given its austere conditions, no one in their right mind would attempt to grow wine grape in Champagne today, had it not already been done for hundreds of years. The soil is lime-rich chalk, and the Champagne region is a cold, northern climate—not exactly Napa. However, that cold, wet climate and chalky soil means that grape vines have to work extra hard to survive and grow deep to reach the water that seeps into the white, chalky soil. That soil retains water quite well, and the whiteness of the chalk absorbs and reflects sunlight, which helps the vines. During periods of too much rain, the chalk allows for good drainage. So, against all odds, the three varietals used in Champagne—Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier—manage to thrive in Champagne’s hostile environment. Louis Roederer Champagne is a unique house insofar as it is one of the few that are still family operated. Dating back to 1833 when the original Louis Roederer was at the helm, Roederer is now managed by Frédéric Rouzaud, who represents the seventh generation of the Roederer family lineage. Roederer is also distinctive in that it owns 240 hectares of vineyards, which satisfies about 70 percent of its grape needs. By contrast, most Champagne houses own little land of their own, and purchase grapes from various growers. In addition,

DRINK more than 30 percent of Roederer’s vineyards are now managed biodynamically, a rarity in Champagne to say the least. With the exception of its Brut Premier NV and Carte Blanche, all Roederer Champagnes are single vintages. This, too, is somewhat rare. When wine writers and Champagne enthusiasts talk about a Champagne house’s “style,” they are speaking about non-vintage Champagnes. This is because whether you’re drinking Möet & Chandon Imperial Brut, Louis Roederer Brut Premier, Veuve Clicquot Brut or any other nonvintage Champagne, it is these non-vintage wines that define the house style. Since non-vintage Champagne is produced on a yearly basis (as opposed to vintage years, which are sporadic), it’s important that the style—flavor, texture, aromas, color, etc.—be consistent from one year to the next. Vintage Champagnes can vary tremendously from one vintage to the next, but non-vintage Champagnes must represent

a distinguishable house style, year in and year out. Roederer Brut Premier ($59) is beautifully balanced and seductive, a rich and complex non-vintage wine that serves well as an apéritif and would also pair with light fish or poultry dishes. Roederer Blanc De Blancs 2008 ($90) is made solely from Chardonnay from grand cru vineyards. It’s slightly sweet, but with distinct chalky minerality of the Côte des Blancs region. Hazelnuts, almonds and white peach notes lend to this wonderful wine’s finesse. I’ve probably drank more Roederer Vintage Rosé Champagne ($80) than any other. I simply love it. Vinified on oak, the wine is a wild ride of red berries, floral aromas, cocoa, brioche and underlying minerality from the 35 percent Chardonnay grapes used. And, what can I say about Roederer’s gastronomic prestige cuvee, Cristal 2006 ($230), except that I doubt I’ll get to enjoy it again until my next visit to Louis Roederer! CW


DEREK CARLISLE

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

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Owner Chris Tsoutsounakis, who grew up working in his family’s Astro Burger restaurants, has developed a smart concept that’s like Chipotle, but with Mediterranean flavors. Customers work their way down a food-filled assembly line, deciding whether they want a traditional gyro, a plate (protein, grains, two sides and pita), salad, wrap or tacos. Then it’s time to pick a protein (classic lamb/beef gyro meat, spit-fired pork, housemade falafel, spit-fired chicken or chicken souvlaki); the pork in particular, which reminds me in flavor and texture of Mexican carnitas, is fantastic. The next step is to find a sauce, like yogurt and cucumber tzatziki, spicy red pepper and feta kafteri or hummus. The toppings and sides are where GR Kitchen really excels. Side dish options include delicious kale salad, quinoa, lemony rice, tomatoes with cucumber, roasted veggies, couscous and Greek salad. For toppings there are crumbled feta cheese, crunchy lettuce, jalapeños, olives and red onion. By the time you’ve piled on toppings and sides, you’ve got a lot of food for under $10. Oh, and GR Kitchen serves locally brewed craft beers, too. Reviewed March 3. 7702 S. Union Park Ave., Sandy, 801-352-7406, EatGRKitchen.com


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32 | APRIL 7, 2016

DEMOLITION

Nope-in’ Letter

CINEMA

Demolition overflows with moments that never feel authentic. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

here comes a moment in some movies—a moment that any real movielover hopes never to have—that I will refer to henceforth as The Moment of Nope. It can be large or small, early or late, part of a performance or part of the plot, but it’s hard to miss when it happens. In short, it’s a moment when a story simply loses you, irretrievably, so that you’re never able to reconnect with what’s happening on that screen. Authenticity vanishes, and all you’re left with as a viewer is a big, “Nope. Nope nope nope nope nope. NOPE.” Any one of a dozen individual culprits could be tabbed as Demolition’s Moment of Nope; it’s a script so steeped in writerly contrivance that its cumulative emotional honesty could be contained in a tweet. But the most obvious point would be the one that sets the major portion of the plot in motion. It occurs when Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal)—a New York investment banker whose wife has just died in a car accident—responds to his bag of M&Ms getting stuck in a hospital vending machine by writing several letters of complaint to the vending-machine company, and including in those letters the story of his marriage. Nope. Just a large, economy-size package of nope. Such moments are, of course, quintessential “your mileage may vary” situations. Demolition is, at its core, a tale of unprocessed grief, one that sends Davis on an increasingly erratic course that causes his father-in-law/boss (Chris Cooper) great agitation. Some people out there— screenwriter Bryan Sipe apparently among them—would find it plausible that someone as emotionally stunted as Davis might take to an anonymous missive like this as a way to communicate to someone that he isn’t

feeling what a person is supposed to feel when their wife dies. But the larger problem is that the letters serve mostly as a plot device to connect Davis with Karen Moreno (Naomi Watts), the customer-service representative at the vending machine company. She is touched, Sleepless in Seattle style, by the awareness that this wounded guy is out there, and she secretly begins stalking him. This easily could serve as another Moment of Nope, especially since Demolition offers next to no information about Karen’s life to explain this behavior—nor her frequent marijuana usage, nor her subsequent insistence that her friendship with Davis must remain chaste—except that she’s raising a troubled teen (Judah Lewis) as a single mother. Hey, sometimes a girl just has to pull on a knit cap and follow a stranger through the streets of Manhattan. The bottom line is that pretty much nothing that any of the characters in Demolition does represents actual human behavior in a way that might make the story resonate. Gyllenhaal’s performance feels lost in all the increasingly ridiculous things Davis does as he wanders through his not-exactlygrieving: He impulsively asks the workers at a construction site to let him help demolish a house they’re working on; he bounces conspicuously around the city to the beat of the music on his headphones; he takes Karen’s son out into the woods and lets the kid shoot at him while he wears a Kevlar vest. “Everything has become a metaphor,”

Jake Gyllenhaal in Demolition

Davis writes at one point, but it winds up feeling like a screenwriter’s desperate attempt to justify a story that is nothing but metaphor, without a single genuine-seeming emotion amid all the “nope.” The insufferability meter leaps into the red as Demolition heads towards its climax, including director Jean-Marc Vallée’s (Dallas Buyers Club) operatic staging of a crisis event that feels exploitative and unearned. It’s certainly an artistic challenge to try to convey someone not feeling something, but Demolition responds to that challenge simply by having its characters do stuff, any stuff— like plowing a backhoe through a living room wall—even if it’s only tenuously connected to the way you’ve ever seen any person you’ve ever known react to anything. The roles are showy, so actors love to play them. The audience, meanwhile, is stuck waiting around for the inevitable epiphanies, or whatever will happen that might get Davis finally to feel. Nearly two hours is a long time to wait for some hope, especially after a narrative so full of nope. CW

DEMOLITION

B.5 Jake Gyllenhaal Naomi Watts Chris Cooper Rated R

TRY THESE Sleepless in Seattle (1993) Tom Hanks Meg Ryan Rated PG-13

Love Liza (2002) Philip Seymour Hoffman Kathy Bates Rated R

Moonlight Mile (2002) Jake Gyllenhaal Dustin Hoffman Rated PG-13

Dallas Buyers Club (2013) Matthew McConaughey Jared Leto Rated R


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE BOSS [not yet reviewed] A business mogul convicted for insider trading (Melissa McCarthy) tries to rehabilitate her image. Opens April 8 at theaters valleywide. (R) DEMOLITION B.5 See review p. 32. Opens April 8 at theaters valleywide. (R) HARDCORE HENRY [not yet reviewed] Action story filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter videogame, because sure, why not. Opens April 8 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BROOKLYN See p. 22. At Weber State University Wildcat Theater, April 11, 12 p.m. (R) SHERPA At Main Library, April 12, 7 p.m. (NR)

I SAW THE LIGHT BB Writer/director Marc Abraham bypasses a cradle-to-grave structure for the story of country music legend Hank Williams (Tom Hiddleston), opening in 1953 with his marriage to first wife Audrey (Elizabeth Olsen), and following his brief career from honky-tonk bar gigs to Grand Ole Opry star. Predictable musicbio conflicts ensue (substance abuse, marital woes), sprinkled

THE BOSS

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GOD’S NOT DEAD 2 B.5 At one point, a character says, “You’re passionate, but it blinds you to the reality of procedure”— an early candidate for the year’s least self-aware line. Like the 2014 original, this follow-up— focused on a high-school history teacher (Melissa Joan Hart) being prosecuted for talking about Jesus in her classroom—is almost proudly unconcerned with making logical sense, as long as it stays on message. It’s a melodrama where our Christian hero selflessly takes care of her grandfather, but the villainous ACLU attorney (Ray Wise) openly hates Christianity while loving the cleanliness of his shoes. And it’s constructed almost entirely of straw men, never once bothering to explain the actual rules/ laws that Hart’s teacher is charged with violating. Credit Wise for sinking his teeth into his part; he gets that this thing is about nothing but rousing the rabble. (PG)—SR

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BATMAN V. SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE B.5 Did director Zack Snyder just tell his screenwriters, “Watch Iron Man 2; I want that, only more lugubrious”? There’s plentiful heavy-handed setup in this first screen meeting between Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill), all swirling around the fallout from the cataclysmic battle at the end of Man of Steel. But whatever issues Snyder might have explored regarding the heavy burden of superhero-hood are buried in the sludge of the overstuffed narrative: good guys duking it out, introducing new characters for the upcoming hero-team, twitchy tech magnate as villain, etc. At least IM2 could fall back on Downey’s charm, where Cavill and Affleck both mostly seem constipated. Snyder crafts some evocative visual tableaux, but by the time we get to the obligatory everything-goes-kaboom finale, it’s just another cog in a franchise machine, and one that’s no damned fun, to boot. (PG-13)—SR

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MARGUERITE BBB.5 Very loosely inspired by the American amateur opera singer Florence Foster Jenkins—subject of an upcoming Stephen Frears biopic starring Meryl Streep—Marguerite is a marvel, a bravura dramedy that beautifully balances tragedy and comedy to the point

MIDNIGHT SPECIAL BBB Jeff Nichols—writer-director of down-to-earth dramas like Shotgun Stories and Mud—branches out into science fiction. Not the flashy, expensive kind, mind you, but the Jeff Nichols kind: thoughtful, meticulously composed, set on a personal scale and starring Michael Shannon. Shannon plays Roy Tomlin, a Texan fundamentalist cult member whose light-sensitive 8-year-old son, Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), has certain awe- and reverenceinspiring powers of a Spielbergian nature. The sect (pastored by Sam Shepard) treats the boy’s spouts of gibberish as scripture, and the NSA (represented by Adam Driver as a dogged, curious agent) wants to know how this gibberish contains government secrets. Roy, his faithful friend Lucas (Joel Edgerton), and the boy’s mother (Kirsten Dunst) want nothing but Alton’s safety as the date of a foretold spiritual event approaches. Once it’s all laid out, the story is simple, almost to a fault; don’t expect to be surprised by much. But Nichols reveals details skillfully, weaving an intriguing narrative out of an ordinary one. This deft storytelling and sincere, plainspoken performances—all beautifully captured by cinematographer Adam Stone—let Nichols harvest much wonderment from his ordinary, extraordinary tale. Opens April 8 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT At Park City Film Series, April 8-9 @ 8 p.m., April 10 @ 6 p.m. (NR)

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KRISHA BBBB Writer/director Trey Edward Shults introduces his title character (Krisha Fairchild) with her skirt trailing from the closed door as she drives her pickup truck. For the next 80 minutes, he continues that kind of attention to detail—with magnificent filmmaking skill—in his intricate character study. The simple story takes place at a Thanksgiving family gathering, where black-sheep Krisha—a 60-something recovering alcoholic—is trying to prove that she’s gotten her act together, including to the estranged son (played by Shults) she barely knows. It could have felt gimmicky that Shults uses his own family—including Fairchild, his real-life aunt—but Krisha never feels like some surrogate airing of dirty laundry. From the extended opening tracking shot through the freewheeling chronology that follows, and especially through a stunning use of sound design, Shults repeatedly puts us inside the head of a woman who can’t completely cope with the environment she finds herself in, and for whom self-medicating simply allows the world finally to slow down. Fairchild’s wrenching performance anchors one of the great film portraits of an addict, and of a well-intentioned family with no clue how to help her. Opens April 8 at Tower Theatre. (R)—Scott Renshaw

where you can’t be sure which is which. In Paris, 1920, socialite and passionate music lover Marguerite Dumont (Catherine Frot) has been deceived by all around her in an emperor’s-new-clothes way about the stupendously off-key awfulness of her singing. As French filmmaker Xavier Giannoli delves past the amused ridicule and into the joy Marguerite gets from singing, we begin to wonder if her self-delusion isn’t actually healthy. The ’20s are just beginning to roar here, and as Marguerite finds herself enjoying, for the first time, a taste of bohemia, she nevertheless remains unaware of the burgeoning of irony in the culture around her (as embodied by an initially sarcastic music critic who is won over and becomes her friend). But the philosophical question is clear to us: Is it better to be wise, jaded and cynical about art, or blissfully undiscriminating about it? Opens April 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) —MaryAnn Johanson


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CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

with performances of classic songs like “Hey Good Lookin’” and “Your Cheatin’ Heart.” What’s missing is an actual point, beyond running through the bullet points of Williams’ professional and personal life, and allowing Hiddleston to show off a quite serviceable physical and vocal transformation. A late sequence involving a journalist interviewing Williams hints at the issues underlying his facility with heartbreaking lyrics, but a story about a great, doomed artist needs to have more to say than, “He was great; too bad that he was doomed.” (R)—SR

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MEET THE BLACKS B.5 Trust me; there’s more stimulation in contemplating what an odd mess Meet the Blacks is than there is in watching it. A careless mixture of slapstick, insults, racial humor, toothless satire and semi-horror, it’s about a newly rich black criminal named Carl (Mike Epps) who moves his family to an especially racist section of Beverly Hills just in time for the Purge, where all crime is legal for 12 hours. Disappointingly, the film borrows (rather than spoofs) the basic structure of The Purge, half-heartedly soaking it in stale gags, clunky writing and amateurish performances. Epps scores a few chuckles being a cranky dad, but screenwriters Nicole DeMasi and Deon Taylor (who also directed) seem to have come up with the pitch line, “The Purge, but for black people,” and then gotten stuck for what to do beyond that. (R)—EDS


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Are You Experienced?

TV

Make It Rain Make It Wait Make It Go Away

The Girlfriend Experience takes sex seriously; Dice rolls snake eyes. The Girlfriend Experience Sunday, April 10 (Starz)

Fear the Walking Dead Sunday, April 10 (AMC)

The Girlfriend Experience (Starz)

Series Debut: George Lopez’s new semi-real-days-in-thelife-of-a-comedian series Lopez was a pleasant surprise that no one thought to ask for, but it turned out to be a worthy addition to the Curb Your Enthusiasm/Louie/Maron family of doc-coms. Andrew “Dice” Clay’s new Dice comes to similarly low, why-is-this-a-thing? expectations … and you’re right! So, so right. Sure, Clay recently redeemed himself somewhat in the role of an insufferable blowhard on HBO’s Vinyl, but that ended with (spoiler alert!) his skull being bashed in; unless Dice’s six episodes culminate in the same fate for the real-life insufferable blowhard, pass. Like the Las Vegas suburbs where the show is set, Dice is sad, dry and wasting space on prime real estate—why not hand one of these shows to a comic from this century?

Hunters Monday, April 11 (Syfy)

Series Debut: The best current aliens-among-us sci-fi series isn’t even on Syfy—it’s Colony, on cable cousin USA. Hunters is a passable consolation prize with considerable cred: It’s based on Whitley Strieber’s Alien Hunter novels, and the series is produced by Gale Anne Hurd (The Walking Dead) and written by Natalie Chaidez (Syfy’s 12 Monkeys). When his wife disappears mysteriously, FBI agent Flynn Carroll (Nathan Phillips) joins a covert government organization, the Exo-Terrorism Unit, that tracks and fights alien terrorists (why yes, there is a strained allegory to earthly ter-

rorism afoot—thanks for asking). Apart from one truly inspired bit of product placement—the aliens communicate via secret messages through Spotify!—there’s not much to distinguish Hunters from other Spacemen Who Look Like Us generica of years past. And, for the record, I prefer Slacker Radio.

The Detour Monday, April 11 (TBS)

Series Debut: TBS has been previewing The Detour so hard that it feels like the season’s already happened—it hasn’t, right? Experiencing some Angie Tribeca déjà vu here. Anyway: The Detour stars Jason Jones (The Daily Show, The Night Before) and Natalie Zea (Justified, The Following) as harried parents on a family road-trip where everything that could possibly (and impossibly) go wrong for them and the kids does, spectacularly. Sound like National Lampoon’s Vacation? It is, just doled out in weekly half-hours, all of which are far funnier than last year’s limp Vacation reboot. In particular, Zea is a minor comic revelation now that she’s not playing her usual role as an endangered ex-wife— more of an endangered current wife, but hilariously. Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv.

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Season Premiere: Good news/bad news if you’re among the non-whiners who are onboard with The Walking Dead’s sorta-prequel, Fear the Walking Dead: Season 2 will feature more than twice as many episodes as the first, but it will also be “split” (ugh), with the first half running through May, and the second airing “later in 2016” (presumably August, leading up to TWD proper in October). When last we left the Los Angeles living among the still-fresh dead of the early Z-pocalypse, they were prepping to escape “the infected” (West Coast for “walker”) by yachting into the Pacific Ocean, setting up a perfect confluence of Yacht Rock, horror and Styx’s “Come Sail Away,” if the producers would just listen to me. Season 2 promises to still pile on the family drama (a sticking point with the whiners), if not give a glimpse of what’s going on in the rest of the world and/or the swimming prowess of zombies.

Dice Sunday, April 10 (Showtime)

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Series Debut: No Starz series has ever arrived with as much critic-melting Prestige Television pageantry as The Girlfriend Experience: The 13-episode series is produced by Steven Soderbergh (and based on his 2009 movie of the same name), written and directed by a pair of indie filmmakers, stars the granddaughter of Elvis Presley (Riley Keough, Mad Max: Fury Road) and premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. Following the movie’s lead, Keough plays a law-firm intern who moonlights as a highpriced escort with occasional bouts of self-awareness and humanity. The Girlfriend Experience looks like Soderbergh’s film—natural lighting, always a giveaway—but packs more story (and sex) into its taut, 30-minute episodes. Just don’t expect much cutesy comedy à la Secret Diary of a Call Girl— this Experience is serious business.


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Maybe Memories

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THE USED

Utah’s post-hardcore prodigal sons The Used contemplate 15 years together. BY ZAC SMITH comments@cityweekly.net

O

ver the past 15 years, The Used— presently including original members Bert McCracken (vocalist) and Jeph Howard (bass), along with newcomers Dan Whitesides (drums) and Justin Shekoski (guitar)—have gone through change. They’ve had three RIA A-certified gold and one platinum record, sold three million albums worldwide, dabbled in veganism and vegetarianism, battled addiction and homelessness, married and became fathers, and transcended the “emo” label. Change, in this case, is not meant as the slur often used by early-adopter fans and disgruntled concertgoers. For The Used, formed in Orem in 2001, change is and always has been a matter of growth—personal and musical. “If you are not changing, you are lying to yourself. We’ve tried to [evolve] as naturally as possible,” Howard says. The Used’s newest project revolves around the question of meaningfully bridging their past and their growth. This year, being the band’s 15th anniversary, they decided to stage a special tour. “We missed the 10th anniversary, then we were gonna [celebrate the] 11th, but that just sounded stupid. So we waited [until] the 15th came around,” Howard says. The idea was that the 15th anniversary would be bigger and better in every way, a celebration of their achievements and the fans that made it all possible. At each stop, The Used will play for two nights, performing their self-titled 2002 debut album on the first, and then 2004’s In Love and Death (both on the Reprise label), with, according to Howard, “one extra song each night as an encore. Maybe two, if we are feeling frisky.” Talking about those first two albums, it is with no slight hint of nostalgia that Howard recounts the life of The Used in those early days. “We rented this house and we would write in the living room, mostly because we couldn’t play shows at that time,” he says. “Every time we’d play a show, we’d get kicked out [because] we were too loud or somebody would get hurt. I remember some kid broke his legs and it was our fault, for some reason.” The band also had trouble getting to those infamous early gigs, especially the ones here in Salt Lake City. “We didn’t really have any gas money to drive places, or a car that could fit all our gear, so we weren’t really able to make it to Salt Lake [that often],” Howard says. The Used was forced to get creative with their transportation. “I [worked as] a baker and there were one or two shows where I borrowed a company van and loaded up our gear in the middle of the night.” Luckily, The Used got away clean on that one. “I don’t think they really noticed I borrowed it.” Eventually, their song “A Box Full of Sharp Objects” found its way to Goldfinger frontman, John Feldmann, and he flew the band to California to record that first album. It wasn’t the rock & roll fantasy it sounds like. “I remember the hotel we stayed at; it was called the Jolly Roger. It’s still there in Marina del Rey,” Howard says. “Our hotel room had blood everywhere. All over the sheets, there were bloody handprints. And blood all over the bathroom. It was really ghetto.”

The Used With persistence, the aid of Feldmann, and few odd experiences along the way—including McCracken dating Kelly Osbourne—The Used muscled into the national spotlight with those first two albums. They’ve since released four more studio albums: Lies for the Liars (2007) and Artwork (2009) on Reprise, Vulnerable (2012) as a joint venture between Hopeless Records and the band’s own Anger Music Group, and Imaginary Enemy (2014) on the band’s new label, GAS Union. That’s in addition to two live albums, several EPs and the 2003 compilation of demos and unreleased tracks, Maybe Memories. For Howard, “The songs [from the first two albums], I don’t get sick of playing at all. Because they mean so much to the fans, [they] take on a completely different meaning. These songs are way past us and above us, and that is more important.” With this in mind, Howard says he greatly looks forward to his upcoming time in Utah and the reaction from The Used’s hometown crowd. “This tour is very special. If you see a Used tour, this is the one to come see.” And furthermore, “I would go to both nights.” April 1 marked the release of The Used’s newest CD/DVD set, Live & Acoustic at The Palace, a concert recording of 12 stripped-down numbers incorporating a choir and some orchestration, and subsequently “[Something] we’ve been wanting to do for years, to put on a show that is but isn’t The Used.” Fans can also look forward to an upcoming studio album, with recording slated for early next year. “[We have] about 10 to 20 musical ideas right now, and we are looking to write more on this tour.” So, yes, The Used has changed, but for all the right reasons and in all the right ways—as naturally as possible. CW

THE USED

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Hey, Joe

Multi-tasking musician Joseph Ballent can’t seem to slow down. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

J

oseph Ballent has a bright future in music, if he chooses to stick with it, because he really knows how to hustle. “A typical week is filled with work, music, volunteering at the VA, gearing up for physician’s assistant school applications, some kind of outdoor adventure and some acting on the side,” he says. Ballent first contacted City Weekly last October. “I’m a local musician,” he wrote in an email. “I build custom electric guitars out of old skis (ski-tars) and have performed up at Sundance. I just finished a full album, recorded with Camden Chamberlain of Suicycles and Zodiac Empire. I’m continuing to slog away at the underground with hopes for exposure.” “Slogging” conjures images of serfs pulling wagons of manure uphill toward the king’s castle. That’s not the word for what Ballent does. He has the energy and enthusiasm of someone half his age, and he’s only 27. He needs to be that tireless because, as I learned in a series of interviews—some via text—that his typical week is much fuller. “Work,” for example, is a full-time job at a treatment center for teens suffering from addiction and abuse. In addition to his main duties, Ballent founded a music program at the center. They have a full PA and stockpile of instruments that they use in weekly jams and monthly performances. Ballent also gives each student a spirit rocker based on their taste, and has them sign their name on the center’s kick drum head. The program is a success; Ballent often hears students say it’s a highlight of their week. “It’s one for me, for sure.” Interestingly, Ballent didn’t play seriously until five years ago. His prior experience consisted of guitar lessons that didn’t take. “I’m now convinced that part of my brain just hadn’t yet wired itself.” That changed when a coworker, also a musician, encouraged Ballent to go for it. Ballent spent his tax return on the cheapest electric guitar and amp he could find and

Joseph Ballent

“it finally clicked,” says the self-described “unabashed alt-rocker and Seattle-sound junkie.” Those sonic predilections are evident on Burn Atlas’s eponymous first album, which is full of guitar riffs, loops, beats and vocal cadences straight from the altrock playbook. On “Trigger Finger,” Ballent talk-sings playful lyrics, evoking Soul Coughing. Sing-songy and beat-driven, “Lemonade” smacks of the Butthole Surfers’ 1996 hit, “Pepper.” The acoustic “Fury in Follywood” sounds like the Meat Puppets (post-MTV Unplugged) with vocals that are a surprisingly palatable blend of Third Eye Blind’s Stephan Jenkins and Dinosaur Jr.’s J. Mascis—with Ballent aping Eddie Vedder in the background. Of course, Ballent plays every instrument on every song. Burn Atlas, he says, was intended as a solo project, with a second band on the side. He’s since reconsidered the second project, inviting bassist Matthew Lemieux and drummer Leo Schlosnagle into Burn Atlas. “It became clear,” Ballent says, “that I could only realistically pour myself into one musical project to a satisfactory outcome.” The band has since played more Sundance gigs and an acoustic set for X96’s “Live and Local.” They’re also about to record the first Burn Atlas song to feature the full band. You know, in between all the other stuff. How does Ballent find the energy for this level of activity? He quotes Heath Ledger, portraying The Joker: “I Just. Do. Things.” More seriously, though, his scorched-earth policy is simple: “I thrive on the hustle and the pursuit.” But once again, there’s more to it than that. “One day at work, a student came up and showed me they had downloaded my album from iTunes,” Ballent says. The teen told him it had pulled him out of a horrific depression. “In that moment,” Ballent says, “I knew beyond a doubt I had done something worthwhile.” CW

BURN ATLAS

w/ Holy Revolver, Dealin’ in Dirt, Comfort Cage The Urban Lounge 241 S. 500 East Monday, April 11, 8 p.m. 801-746-0557 Free TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com


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APRIL 7, 2016 | 39

Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm


BRIAN STAKER & RANDY HARWARD

Joshy Soul and The Cool

At only 26, Joshy Soul (born Joshua David Strauther) sounds like he’s been playing music since the heyday of Motown, Sun and Stax/Volt. Fittingly, he describes his debut release Vintage Dreamin’ (JoshySoul.Bandcamp.com) as “an album for old souls who miss the old ways of music and lifestyle.” He says every song draws from his personal experience, but also from the good ol’ days of the ‘50s, “with rhythm and blues, to Lindy hop, to straight Motown shuffle that makes you want to rock back and forth.” The fattoned guitar, plucky piano, bright brass and Soul’s exuberant voice can turn even the most determined frown upside-down, accomplishing Strauther’s main goal, which is to make you “want to smile, put your nicest clothes on, and show somebody some love!” (Randy Harward) The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., free, ExcellenceConcerts.org

FRIDAY 4.8 Father John Misty

Joshua Michael Tillman, also known as Father John Misty, has been a part of the new indie folk rock movement since the early 2000s, working solo as J. Tillman; with the bands Fleet Foxes, Saxon Shore and Har Mar Superstar (the nom-detune of his brother, Sean Tillman); and since 2012 with the religious moniker. As “Father,” he seems to be able to access

Father John Misty

EMMA ELIZABETH TILLMAN

a more essential level of performing and songwriting, balancing nearromantic profundity with bleak cynicism. His earlier work showed fluency in a variety of indie rock subgenres, but his more recent stuff demonstrates a poeticism that the best of the new folkies are bringing to their craft. Last year’s I Love You, Honeybear (Sub Pop), his second as FJM, shows that the persona isn’t a gimmick—he has something genuine and worthwhile to say. (Brian Staker) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $28 in advance, $30 day of show (plus $2 for fans under 21), DepotSLC.com

Gary Clark Jr.

Austin, Texas, guitar whiz Gary Clark Jr. came up in the late ‘90s, and almost immediately began to attract attention for his self-assured, blues-influenced playing style. As opposed to his musical forerunners like Stevie Ray Vaughan, rather than a clean, ringing tone, Clark favored a more distorted guitar sound. Once he conquered the Texas blues scene, he started to receive national attention, playing numerous festivals, earning Spin’s Golden Corndog in 2012 for performing in more festivals than any other musician, and, for a while, watching his song “Bright Lights” become almost ubiquitous in TV (Suits), film (Stand Up Guys) and even in a video game (Max Payne 3). If his music seems to have damn-near universal appeal, it’s because he shows how the blues is integral to almost all other genres of American music. (BS) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $30 in advance, $35 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

Joshy Soul

TUESDAY 4.12

An Evening with Elvis Costello

In 2005, at Antone’s in Austin, I was watching blues legend Hubert Sumlin tear it up—while standing next to Robert Plant, whose super-cool bodyguard had promised me a post-set photo. Suddenly, a figure in a porkpie hat and trademark spectacles zipped onstage and grabbed a mic. Elvis Fucking Costello. He looked like a giddy kid up there. When the song ended, Costello and Sumlin hugged. Then, Costello ran offstage. So, was I a Zeppelin guy, or a Costello guy? My feet knew

Gary Clark Jr.

FRANK MADDOCKS

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before my brain did—I was already giving chase. I caught up and asked for a photo. Costello grabbed my camera, put his arm around me, clicked the shutter, shook my hand and ran on. Well, the LCD display on my camera showed only a flesh-colored rectangle. Noooo—I’d been at full zoom! I caught Costello near the exit. Still smiling, he performed a full do-over, then split for his own show across town. Now my screen showed two music fans stoked on encountering our heroes. Sadly, I lost the shot in a hard-drive crash. But tonight, 11 years and one month later, and for the first time—because I was obligated to cover something else that night—I’ll get to see Elvis Costello perform a nice, long set comprised of whip-smart pub rock songs that shake my soul. Larkin Poe opens. (RH) Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 7:30 p.m., $30-$60, KingsburyHall.Utah.edu

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Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers

Parov Stelar

Parov Stelar’s 2013 double album The Art of Sampling (Etage Noir) is a comprehensive sojourn through the technique of sampling in a variety of settings. The Austrian DJ/producer’s eclectic style—fusing breakbeat, electro, house, jazz and swing music, earned him a reputation as a real innovator, and one of the founders of the electro-swing genre. Stelar’s somewhat formal attire and use of small jazz-combo instrumentation recreates the excitement of old-school jazz music in modern electronic context. (BS) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $30 in advance, $35 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

WEDNESDAY 4.13

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers In music journalism, comparisons are like Monopoly money: Some of us make it rain with the cheap “a = b” references. But when the Asbury Park Press calls you the “Springsteen of the Southwest,” that means something. That’s the Boss’s hometown paper, so the analogy is weighty— and accurate. Just like Bruce is jacked into the souls of the common folk in Jersey, Clyne is plugged into the worker-slashdreamers of the American Southwest. We first heard Clyne’s twangy rock on The Refreshments’ 1996 album Fizzy Fuzzy Big & Buzzy (Universal), and the Peacemakers are touring in celebration of the platter’s 20th anniversary, plus its recent release on vinyl. Expect to hear Fizzy in its entirety and Peacemakers songs that demonstrate why a Clyne’s getting tribute album with contributions from Alice Cooper, Lydia Loveless, The Smithereens and Cracker. (RH) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $15 in advance, $20 day of show, LiquidJoes.net


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In the Venue

219 S 600 W 19 (801) 359-32 /inthevenue facebook.com

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 43

Jourdan Elyse, Jimmy Hunter


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BIG REDD PROMOTIONS PRESENTS

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THURSDAY 4.7

The Used + The New Regime (In the Venue) see p. 36

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee)

LIVE MUSIC

Astronauts, etc. + Harriet Brown + The Sleep Talk (Kilby Court) DJ Courtney (Area 51) Dumb Luck Album Release (The Urban Lounge) Haystak + Casper Takett (Club X) Hot Noise & Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jackdevil (Metro Bar) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Joshy Soul & The Cool (The Gallivan Center) see p. 40 Lost Boy (The Urban Lounge) Michelle Moonshine (Butcher’s) Therapy Thursdays: Headhunterz (Sky)

FRIDAY 4.8 OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s)

LIVE MUSIC

Barbaloot Suitz (Park City Mountain) DJ Jarvicious (Sandy Station) DJ Reverend 23 & Stryker (Area 51) Father John Misty (The Depot) see p. 40 Gary Clark Jr. (The Complex) see p. 40 The Maw Band (The Cabin) The Night Spin Collective (Area 51) Pete Yorn (The Urban Lounge) The Shivas + Max Pain & The Groovies + Soft Limbs (Kilby Court) Sneaky Pete and the Secret Weapons (O.P. Rockwell) Son of Ian (The Hog Wallow Pub) The Sugarhood Shindig feat. DJ Nix Beat (Comic Wolf Vintage) Telluride Meltdown (Rock & Rieley’s)

Museum + Music: Karaoke Kitsch (Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art)

SATURDAY 4.9 OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s)

LIVE MUSIC

Divisions CD Release (The Loading Dock) Fast Eddy Band (The Fifth) Holst’s The Planets (Abravanel Hall) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Loudon Wainwright III (Egyptian Theatre) The Maw Band (Park City Mountain) Nathan Fox + The Arvos + City of Salt (Kilby Court) see p. 45 Peter Murphy (Urban Lounge) Robyn Cage (Riverhorse) Slaine (of La Coka Nostra) (Club X) Tribal Seeds (Park City Live) Tribal Theory (The Complex) The Wild Feathers + The Shelters (The State Room) The Used + The New Regime (In the Venue) see p. 36

KARAOKE

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DMA’s (The Urban Lounge) Irish Session Folks (Sugar House Coffee) Laura Stevenson + Crying + Chris Farren (Kilby Court)

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Karaoke Bingo (The Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State)

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SATURDAY 4.9

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Nathan Fox

Singer-songwriter and Berklee grad Nathan Fox plays music too expansive to be pinned to any one genre. While Americana is his main sound, Fox reaches deeper into areas of rock, jazz, soul and folk than traditional Americana artists do. A San Diego native, he stands out for his full, heavy-noted acoustic songs, nuanced by jazz-tone electric guitar, piano, saxophone and his silky vocals. The emotional breadth of his material led to Fox’s songs popping up on TV (Daredevil, Jessica Jones) and in films (Deliver Us from Evil). Local bands The Arvos and City of Salt open. (Westin Porter) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

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OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Duel School (The Tavernacle)

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4.07 MICHELLE MOONSHINE

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3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

APRIL 7, 2016 | 45

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY

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KARAOKE

An Evening with Elvis Costello + Larkin Poe (Kingsbury Hall) see p. 40 Dark Star Orchestra (The Depot) Folk Hogan + King Columbia + Jack Wilkinson (Kilby Court) Matthew Logan Vasquez (The Urban Lounge) Panic! At The Emo (The Fallout) Parov Stelar (The Complex) see p. 42

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Burn Atlas + Holy Revolver + Dealin’ in Dirt + Comfort Cage (The Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Hot House West (Club 90) Unwritten Law w/ Fenix TX (In the Venue)

Conn and Rob Live Jazz Music (Maxwell’s) Ellie Goulding + Broods + Bebe Rexha (Maverik Center) see p. 46 Jam Night feat. Dead Lake Trio (The Woodshed) Jazz at the 90 (Club 90) Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 42 The Smith Street Band + Hard Girls + Lee Corey Oswald (Kilby Court)

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MONDAY 4.11


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WEDNESDAY 4.13 Ellie Goulding

What can you say about someone like Ellie Goulding, who rocketed to fame so quickly while still in her 20s? Her kind of overwhelmingly successful pop music is largely the product of producers, who create a synthetic (literally, synthesized) environment in which lyrical fantasies swim. Of course, without singing chops, the music is nothing, and Goulding has vox for days. Her breathy, airy vocal delivery creates a sense of the organic, the human amidst the artificial background. Her third album, Delirium (Polydor, 2015) manages to avoid repeating the same moves of her previous two. Broods and Bebe Rexha open. (Brian Staker) Maverik Center, 3200 South Decker Lake Drive, 7 p.m., $29.50$59.50, MaverikCenter.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

In an effort to be the best in Salt Lake’s brunch game, RYE has decided to focus our aim on the a.m. hours. Effective February 29th, RYE will be open Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 47

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CITY WEEKLY

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 49


Š 2016

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1.Times spent in prison or in office 2.Milo of "The Verdict" 3.Designer McCartney

47.Boy 50.Wiped the slate clean 51.Driver's ID: Abbr. 53.Matey's yes 54.Become lenient (on) 59.Topic in a world religions course 60.Old theaters once owned by Howard Hughes 63.GWB's successor 64.New pedometer reading 65.Mo. for campaign surprises

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

4.Car company once owned by G.M. 5.Musical opposite of dimin. 6."Sick!" 7."I'm ____ loss" 8.Customizable character in a computer game 9.Old Testament prophet 10.Letters on a B-52 11.Palooka 12.Unlike a child 13.Bellow and Steinberg 21."But with every deed you are sowing ____ / Though the harvest you may not see": Ella Wheeler Wilcox 23.Wool source 26.More verdant 27.Heart test letters 28.Establishes a new foothold 31.Food preservative, briefly 34.Some four-year degs. 36.Losing line in tic-tac-toe 37.____ Arbor, Michigan 38.Reason to hit the brakes 39.Like many holiday weekends 40.It can be a major turnoff 42.Grabbed some Z's 43.Fragile fabric made from a plant fiber 44.Blushed

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1.Chuck 5.Best Picture of 2005 10.Brand founded in 1979 by Brian Smith when he began importing sheepskin boots to the U.S. from Australia 14.It is, in Ibiza 15.Batting average, e.g. 16.Singer Bareilles 17."Cheers" actress Perlman 18.Red-wrapped imports 19.Name of three Giants outfielders in 1963 20.Soprano Nellie and others 22.Hooter named for its small size 24."Blueberries for ____" (classic children's book) 25.Relating to the cover of the eyeball 29.Carry-____ (airplane totes) 30.Actor Vigoda with a 2016 obit that read he "outlived by about 34 years an erroneous report of his death that made him a cult figure" 32.Just get (by) 33.Co. led by Baryshnikov in the 1980s 35.Sheriff's badges, often 38.Substituting for, in poetry 41.One way to wish 45.It may elicit a "ur welcome" 46.____ canvas (art exhibit designation) 48.World Cup cry 49.Bay window 52."Dig in!" 53."Ha! That's ____ one!" 55.Julius who developed a container in the 1870s to culture bacteria 56.Hwys. 57.On a farm team? 58.Glacial formations 60.Many a flea market transaction 61.Lupino and Tarbell 62.iPad reading 66.____ empty stomach 67.With 69-Across, something an athlete is said to put on before competing (see the grid's circles) 68.Prefix with -holic 69.See 67-Across 70."Brooklyn Nine-Nine" org. 71.Sweetie pie 72.Played a prank on using bathroom tissue, informally

SUDOKU

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 51

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have a long history with Salt Lake and Utah readers that we’ll continue as long as they buy books from us.” Long-time staffer Bruce Christensen loves working where his passion for reading is both fostered and an asset for customers. “I enjoy discussing books with fellow employees and customers,” Christensen says. “There are so many books and so little time to read them, working in a bookstore helps me focus on what to choose and what to save for later with the hope that I will get to them eventually.” Weller Book Works carries new, used and rare books, including first editions worth thousands of dollars. On a microbudget? The bookstore frequently offers $1 books for sale in bargain carts at the front of the store. n

COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 51 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 53 POETS CORNER PG. 53 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 54 URBAN LIVING PG. 55

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ook lovers all over the valley should check out Weller Book Works in April. On April 21, Weller Book Works will be the scene of a Pulitzer Prize Birthday Party, and April 30 is Independent Bookstore Day. Not free on those dates? The bookstore also hosts a Collector’s Book Salon on the last Friday night of every month—a chance to mingle, munch and hear from a featured speaker. Weller Book Works (previously Sam Weller Books) moved into Trolley Square in 2012. Lane Richins has worked for Weller Book Works for 11 years and loves being part of the history of books. “Sooner than later, we’re going to have a generation of children who never have to pick up a physical book,” Richins says. “Bookstores are in danger of becoming more museums than bookstores. Weller Book Works fights that daily and aggressively. We dare people to keep reading, get the book in the hand and open the mind. I like being part of that fight.” After 80-plus years of serving Salt Lake City’s reading community, the store prides itself on a knowledgeable, capable and friendly staff. Weller Book Works has what you want to read—and a lot of things you didn’t know you wanted to read. The staff is committed to keeping books alive. “Nothing can beat the feel of a book between your fingers,” Richins says. “I love having access and exposure to all kinds of information, including the treasures of the Rare Book room,” staffer Melanie Jonasson says. “I also dig the unique personalities that I work with and have met since I have been employed here, and the fact that every day holds a new learning adventure!” Co-owner Catherine Weller is proud of the community they’ve created. “We love that we host events for authors from the self-published to the marquee, play and poetry readings, panels and slams from the community at large,” Weller says. “We

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) French artist Henri Matisse (1869-1954) is regarded as one of the greats, in the same league as Picasso and Kandinsky. Even in his 80s, he was still creating marvels that one critic said seemed “to come from the springtime of the world.” As unique as his work was, he was happy to acknowledge the fact that he thrived on the influence of other artists. And yet he also treasured the primal power of his innocence. He trusted his childlike wonder. “You study, you learn, but you guard the original naiveté,” he said. “It has to be within you, as desire for drink is within the drunkard or love is within the lover.” These are good, sweet thoughts for you to keep in mind right now, Aries. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Taurus-born Kurt Gödel (1906-1978) was among history’s greatest logicians. His mastery of rational thought enabled him to exert a major influence on scientific thinking in the 20th century. Yet he also had an irrational fear of being poisoned, which made him avoid food unless his wife cooked it. One of the morals of his story is that reason and delusion may get all mixed up in the same location. Sound analysis and crazy superstition can get so tangled they’re hard to unravel. The coming week will be an excellent time to meditate on how this phenomenon might be at work in you. You now have an extraordinary power to figure out which is which, and then take steps to banish the crazy, superstitious, fearful stuff.

coming weeks. It’ll be a favorable time for your imagination to run wild and free. How exuberantly can you fantasize? Find out! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) In his book Strange Medicine, Nathan Belofsky tells us about unusual healing practices of the past. In ancient Egypt, for example, the solution for a toothache was to have a dead mouse shoved down one’s throat. If someone had cataracts, the physician might dribble hot broken glass into their eyes. I think these strategies qualify as being antidotes that were worse than the conditions they were supposed to treat. I caution you against getting sucked into “cures” like those in the coming days. The near future will be a favorable time for you to seek healing, but you must be very discerning as you evaluate the healing agents. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In his poem “The Snowmass Cycle,” Stephen Dunn declares that everyone “should experience the double fire, of what he wants and shouldn’t have.” I foresee a rich opportunity coming up for you to do just that, Scorpio. And yes, I do regard it as rich, even marvelous, despite the fact that it may initially evoke some intense poignance. Be glad for this crisp revelation about a strong longing whose fulfillment would be no damned good for you!

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Poets Corner

Rainy February where do hide her? The city is alive with wondering. The ink not yet dry with words of longing. The skies bleed to know that tomorrow might find her Walking through my dreams on solitary eves. Dousing all hope, for i’ll soon be forgotten, As warm tepid March will take her by the hand, to sow new flowers in her flitting butterfly’s heart. Vyolet Estrada

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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APRIL 7, 2016 | 53

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “When I look at my life, I realize that the mistakes I have made, the things I really regret, were not errors of judgment but failures of feeling.” Writer Jeanette Winterson said that, and GEMINI (May 21-June 20) For a time, pioneer physicist Albert Einstein served as a profes- I’m passing it on to you at the exact moment you need to hear it. sor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. On Right now, you are brave enough and strong enough to deal with one occasion, a student complained to him, “The questions on the possibility that maybe you’re not doing all you can to cultithis year’s exam are the same as last year’s.” Einstein agreed vate maximum emotional intelligence. You are primed to take that they were, then added, “but this year all the answers are action and make big changes if you discover that you’re not feeldifferent.” I’m seeing a similar situation in your life, Gemini. ing as much as you can about the important things in your life. For you, too, the questions on this year’s final exam are virtually identical to last year’s final exam—and yet every one of the CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Psychotherapist Jennifer Welwood says that sadness is often answers has changed. Enjoy the riddle. at the root of anger. Feelings of loss and disappointment and heartache are the more primary emotions, and rage is a reflexive CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your personal oracle for the coming weeks is a fable from response to them. But sadness often makes us feel vulnerable, 2,600 years ago. It was originally written by the Greek story- while rage gives us at least the illusion of being strong, and so teller Aesop, and later translated by Joseph Jacobs. As the tale most of us prefer the latter. But Welwood suggests that tunbegins, a dog has discovered a hunk of raw meat lying on the ing in to the sadness almost always leads to a more expansive ground. He’s clenching his treasure in his mouth as he scurries understanding of your predicament; and it often provides the home to enjoy it in peace. On the way, he trots along a wooden opportunity for a more profound self-transformation. I invite plank that crosses a rapidly flowing stream. Gazing down, he you to apply these meditations to your own life, Capricorn. The sees his reflection in the water below. What? He imagines it’s time is right. another dog with another slab of meat. He tries to snatch away this bonus treat, but in doing so, drops his own meat. It falls AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) into the stream and is whisked away. The moral of the fable: “The causes of human actions are usually immeasurably more “Beware lest you lose the substance by grasping at the shadow.” complex and varied than our subsequent explanations of them.” Fyodor Dostoyevsky said that in his novel The Idiot, and now I’m passing it on to you just in the nick of time. In the coming weeks, LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “I never get lost because I don’t know where I am going,” said it’s especially important for you to not oversimplify your assessthe Japanese poet known as Ikky. I stop short of endorsing this ments of what motivates people—both those you respect and perspective for full-time, long-term use, but I think it suits you those you don’t fully trust. For your own sake, you can’t afford fine for right now. According to my astrological projections, to naively assume either the best or the worst about anyone. If you can gather the exact lessons you need simply by wandering you hope to further your own agendas, your nuanced empathy around playfully, driven by cheerful curiosity about the sparkly must be turned up all the way. sights—and not too concerned with what they mean. P.S. Don’t worry if the map you’re consulting doesn’t seem to match the PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “Believing love is work is certainly better than believing it’s effortterritory you’re exploring. less, ceaseless bliss,” says author Eric LeMay. That’s advice I hope you’ll keep close at hand in the coming weeks, Pisces. The time will VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “If literally every action a human can perform was an Olympic be right for you to exert tremendous effort in behalf of everything sport,” Reddit.com asked its users, “which events would you you love dearly—to sweat and struggle and strain as you create win medals in?” A man named Hajimotto said his champi- higher, deeper versions of your most essential relationships. Please on-level skill was daydreaming. “I can zone out and fantasize remember this, though: The hard labor you engage in should be for hours at a time,” he testified. “This is helpful when I am fueled by your ingenuity and your creative imagination. Play and waiting in line.” You Virgos are not typically Olympic-class experiment and enjoy yourself as you sweat and struggle and strain! daydreamers, but I encourage you to increase your skills in the

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hen I went to college (U of U and Westminster) I lived in the dorms and ate at the cafeteria three times a day. When I went back for another degree I was in an apartment and living on ramen and cereal, going to school full time and working several jobs. I was grateful to have a grandparent that helped in emergencies and had access to grants and loans to pay the costs. The U of U Wellness Center recently put together a questionnaire that discovered students and some staff needed a food pantry on campus. Many groups took a look at the data collected and jumped to action. Kim Hall from the Women’s Resource Center says, “I think most people who are not intimately involved with a specific population of students on campus simply can’t imagine a food scarcity issue or have difficulty imagining other people’s day-to-day existence.” Within months of the study, the university apparently became one of the last state-funded higher-ed schools in Utah to establish a food bank for staff and students. This one is being run by volunteers out of the main bookstore on campus. Folks in need show up with their U of U ID badge, and the bookstore will donate a bag to allow those in need to 1. fill up the bag and 2. walk out as if they had been shopping so as to not be stigmatized. Here’s another eye opener: Many are homeless students living in their cars going to the university. Examples include: 1. first generation students who have little experience managing financial realities and responsibilities; 2. LGBT students who come out to their parents and are kicked out of their homes while attending school and lose a place to stay and parental financial support; 3. international students who have a hard time accessing funds from across the sea and can’t work more than 20 hours per week to earn money (it’s the law); 4. single parents whose partners don’t regularly pay alimony/child support to them and working parents with special-needs kids with massive medical bills and 5. students who themselves have mental-health issues that lead them to bad housing and/or financial choices. Luckily, Hall is heading up a taskforce to address these concerns. This isn’t just a U of U thing anymore. Popup pantries are appearing at high schools around the state. This is the new norm—the distance between the haves and the havenots is getting greater. If you can help, there’s a school or food bank that needs your kind donations every single day around our great state. n


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City Weekly April 7, 2016  

The One That Got Away

City Weekly April 7, 2016  

The One That Got Away