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F E B R U A RY 2 5 , 2 0 1 6

VOL. 32 N0. 42

Guest workers at resort hotels learn quickly the American dream is not all it seems.

BY JAKE NICHOLS


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2 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SNOW JOB

Guest workers at resort hotels learn quickly the American dream is not all it seems. Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

13 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 7 NEWS 17 A&E 21 DINE 28 CINEMA 30 TRUE TV 31 MUSIC 44 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR JAKE NICHOLS

Cover story, p. 13 Jake Nichols is a reporter for Planet Jackson Hole. In a previous life in New York City, he was a publicist for several comic celebrities including Jerry Seinfeld and Jay Leno. He has been a cameraman for HBO and MTV, a computer programmer and a cowboy. By night, he DJs weddings.

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LETTERS Edicts Not Appreciated

The good old boys down at Temple Square are at it again. First was the slap at innocent children and babies of samesex marriages. Then, the holy ones attacked the bill on medical marijuana. Then, fearing that they would lose their pass to the Celestial Kingdom, two Mormon legislators withdrew their support of the legislation. The Apostles then came out against the safety inspection of water at church-owned campsites. What will follow the attacks against babies, sick people and clean water? Surely, motherhood and apple pie will be spared from these hurtful edicts? If only Mormon leaders could be as good as the lay people of this faith. If there ever was a time to allow LDS women into top leadership, it is now. Few, if any, Mormon women would make the hurtful decisions that these “exalted” men are making.

TED OTTINGER Taylorsville

Singing About Clean Air

Dear Mr. Herbert, Governor, Sir, With all due respect I believe there is some disconnect Between your family values And the air that we breathe

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. Dear Mr. Herbert, Governor, Sir, You took an oath to protect Our constitution and our citizenry And to execute your duties with fidelity. Dear Mr. Herbert, Governor, Sir, I wonder what your God would say About you protecting refineries in every way While they stain our skies brown and gray, Rather than working for a brighter day. Dear Mr. Herbert, Governor, Sir, A wise man once said, “Love one another, Just as I have loved you.” And so I would really like to know When will clean air become a family value? Dear Mr. Herbert, Governor, Sir

CHRISTIAN COLEMAN

at the Salt Lake City & County Building (451 S. State). UAPB has recently launched a campaign to get the Salt Lake City Council to replace the Police Civilian Review Board with a community-controlled police review board. This new board should have the power to investigate and subpoena Salt Lake City Police Department officers as well as to create, review and amend guidelines the SLCPD should abide by. The board’s membership would consist of democratically elected civilians. After the rally, UAPB plans to host a Leap-Day Call-In on Feb. 29 to convince the City Council to support a community-controlled police review board. More information can be found at Facebook.com/UtahAgainstPoliceBrutality.

STEPHEN MICHAEL CHRISTIAN

Salt Lake City Correction: Granite High School enrolled 255 students when it closed in 2009. The article “School’s Out,” [Feb. 18, City Weekly] misstated the number of students. Also, Cherie Wood’s correct title is mayor of South Salt Lake.

Salt Lake City Editor’s note: Local musician Christian Coleman wrote and performed the above song for a video submitted in the NPR Tiny Desk Concert Contest. It can be viewed at YouTube.com

Give the Community Control of Police

On Feb. 27 at 4 p.m., local activist group Utah Against Police Brutality will host a Community Control Now! rally

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PRIVATE EY

Kava Peace

It’s always fun when a news story dominates a news cycle or when an unlikely story takes everyone by surprise. Luckily for Utahns, we’ve had several this past week. The LDS Church and the Utah Legislature are re-thinking prior positions regarding same-sex marriage. OK, not a big surprise when you think about it, but surprising in that most everyone believed the issue was settled—just goes to show you politics is, as always, more willow than oak. Here’s another: Former Utah governor and a man regarded as way too sensible to ever become president of the United States, Jon Huntsman Jr., says he could see himself getting behind the candidacy of Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump. That makes no sense—not that Trump can’t win, but that a man like Huntsman Jr. can support him. In every way—from presentation, to resume, to prose, to accomplishment, to political position—they are not the same. The word “statesman” might as well be stricken from the dictionary. What else? Oh, some members of the Utah House of Representatives, notably House Speaker Greg Hughes (a big “R” fish from Draper) and a little “R” fish from Riverton, Rep. Dan McCay, are calling for an audit of University of Utah athletics because they’re pissed that Utah head basketball coach, Larry Krystkowiak, cancelled next year’s basketball game against Brigham Young University, incurring a penalty of $80,000 due to BYU as was written into that contract’s escape clause. Such penalties are like late fees on parking tickets or library books. Same thing, only with more zeroes. Ute fans owe Krystkowiak a round of applause at this point. As the issue becomes less emotional, more and more Ute fans are reaching the obvious conclusion: There is no upside for any University of Utah athletics program to play BYU other than to appease ancient egos and to drive more knucklehead, anti-Mormon and anti-nonMormon drivel to the sports page comment boards. Utah is now a force in the PAC-12

(not even counting the ski team), is a bona fide research academy, doesn’t mind playing on Sundays and is doing fine. BYU is whatever. Time to divorce amicably. Never mind that Krystkowiak is paying out of his own pocket, this threatened audit—which is customary in any case when public funds are involved (except when millions are spent on Utah Republican insider special interests)—has now been plastered all over America. This is simply a petty payback to the University of Utah, of which I’m a proud graduate. As such—and this is for you, Sen. Gene Davis, a Salt Lake County Democrat who sometimes puts “Vote for Davis” signs in my yard, a Ute fan and member of the audit subcommittee—don’t let those weasels across the aisle out of the box on this. Embarrass the hell out of them. Remind them that while they are looking for some piss-poor reason for Utah to play some private school, those legislators are wasting my time, my money and my sense of what a government should be. Why is this an issue when people are driving to Colorado for medical-marijuana pain and illness relief? Or when gay youth take their lives at alarming rates because living normally is not so easy for an LGBT person in Utah? Our air is filthy, there are potholes on my street and discrimination is rampant. Yeah, right, play ball. And, of discrimination, what of that other big story where a bartender at Willie’s Lounge reportedly told two potential customers that she could not serve them because she wasn’t allowed to serve Polynesians? To some credit, the bar’s owner quickly took it on the chin and admitted that he and his place screwed up. In 30 years of publishing, I’ve never seen a guy clearly admit a mistake in the manner he did. Did Shurtleff or Swallow ever do that? Your local fake religious leader? Your neighborhood scam

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B Y J O H N S A LTA S

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

artist? Nope. You can be your own judge and decide to go to Willie’s or not. I’ve been mistaken for Polynesian more than once, and I’m willing to go there—but I’m pretty sure there are more places than Willie’s with a similar “policy.” Willie’s is not the problem by a long shot. I’ve been lucky to spend lots of time with Polynesian kids. My son’s football friends like James Aiono (a relative of my old buddy, Maua Aiono—some of you old-timers may remember him as the doorman at Oscar’s, One More Time Club, etc.), Kaleki Katoa, Josh Fitisemanu, Kasey Lords, Tavita Fifita and the great-natured Jared Tupai, are welcome at my house anytime. Yeah, they’re bigger than trees—and they emptied my fridge more than once—but they’re the nicest kids I ever met. They introduced me to their culture, which I’m grateful for. I remember an article I wrote many years ago about how on Memorial Day, Polynesian families show such deep respect for their lost loved ones, all but covering entire cemeteries in flowers. It’s a sight. So, here’s what I’m hoping. I hope that all parties sit down to a nice batch of kava and get to some serious relaxing. No need for a Haka. Bring some leis, maybe, and some candy-bar necklaces, a beer from Willie’s and nothing else. Just everyone sit down, take some kava sips and enjoy the numbness. I’ve done it. I’d do it again. We can mix up a batch in the City Weekly offices, make peace, make new friends, and figure out a way to expunge our real enemy: Ignorance. If Reps. Hughes and McCay want to join in, that’s fine, too. And they should. So should Tom Holmoe, BYU’s athletic director, because, well, I’d just love to see him smile for once, and he’s not going to get one by beating the U. CW Send comments to john@cityweekly.net

Was there a time you felt you were discriminated against?

@johnsaltas

I’M PRETTY SURE THERE ARE MORE PLACES THAN WILLIE’S WITH A SIMILAR “POLICY.”

Scott Renshaw: Since I’m a straight white guy, I’mma just shut up here and listen to people who have real problems.

Enrique Limón: How much space you got? Mason Rodrickc: I am mixed race, which makes my skin hue a bit amoeba-ish. I’ve been mistaken for Greek, Egyptian and Spanish. But the only time I really felt discriminated was when I started growing out my beard. My mom said I looked like a terrorist. I didn’t. I looked like Aladdin’s cool older brother. Jeez, Mom.

Nicole Enright: Oh, lawdy! You ever been to the South with curly hair?

Paula Saltas: All my years growing up in Holladay, kids wouldn’t play with me because I was not of the Utah faith. How do you like me now?

Jeremiah Smith: As a Goth Kid in the late ’90s, I was nearly always discriminated against. That, of course, was mostly self-inflicted. Things are much different today. I’m sure my appearance then wouldn’t catch a second glance now.

Jerre Wroble: Back in the day, I was a little too honest in a job interview and said I was a single mom. The would-be employer ended the meeting on that note, saying they wanted someone who was “more stable.” Even though the job would have sucked, her statement stunned me for a minute.

Andrea Harvey: In middle school, I borrowed my brother’s shirt that said “Welcome to the Gun Show” with arrows pointing to my “guns,” which was funny because I obviously had none. But my teacher deemed it inappropriate for a girl to wear and sent me to the principal’s office. Long story short, she got in trouble, not me.


Undignified Deaths A 47-year-old man in Saint-Marcel, Italy, fell to his death in January as he leaned over a balcony railing to shake crumbs off his tablecloth after breakfast. The tablecloth reportedly slipped from his hands, leading him to (unsuccessfully) reach for it.

S NEofW the

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

strip-search employees for “contraband” and to describe the searches in real time to the caller. (A suspect was arrested, and the calls stopped.) Managerial judgment was also on display at a Morro Bay, Calif., Burger King in January when a prank caller somehow convinced BK employees to begin shattering the store’s windows because of a purported “gas leak.” Several windows were smashed in, and an investigation of the call is ongoing.

WEIRD

n A 58-year-old driver dressed except for pants was killed in January in Detroit when he was thrown from his car by a crash. A Michigan State Police spokesman reported that the man had been viewing pornography as he drove.

Recurring Themes Yet another woman gave birth to her own granddaughter in January. Tracey Thompson, 54, offered to be the surrogate mother for her fertility-challenged daughter, Kelley, and delivered a 6-pound, 11-ounce girl at The Medical Center in Plano, Texas. n After notable successes in the United States, Latin America claimed in December its first transgender pregnancy after Ecuadorean Fernando Machado announced he was expecting a child with his partner Diane Rodriguez. Fernando used to be “Maria”; Diane used to be “Luis”; and though both undergo hormone therapy, they have retained their birth organs.

Perspective Reports of the prominence of animal urine in various cultures’ health regimens have surfaced periodically in News of the Weird, and in December, in Al Qunfudhah, Saudi Arabia, a shop selling camel urine (with a long history of alleged medicinal qualities) was closed by authorities after they found 70 camel-urine bottles actually filled with shopkeeper-urine.

n Also in January, David Boulet, in Tacoma, Wash., became the most recent to haplessly try to steal a police car. As officers chased him on an earlier charge, Boulet spotted a parked, marked squad car (with lights flashing), but apparently thought, in the night’s darkness, that the car was momentarily unoccupied. He climbed in—and landed on the lap of a Tacoma police sergeant in the front seat.

Age-Old Prank Fails Will Lombardi, 19, was charged with arson in Northampton, Mass., in January after he acknowledged that “probably” he was the one who left a flaming box of excrement on the front porch of the family with whose daughter he was feuding. The fire was supposed to alarm the victim, who would try to stomp it out, thus spreading the feces and soiling the stomper’s shoes. In this case, however, the fire had spread a bit. (Bonus: Lombardi’s box selection was a used mailer with Lombardi’s name and address still legible.) Thanks This Week to Stan Kaplan, Mel Birge, Chuck Hamilton, Sam Scrutchins, Jenny Adams Powers, Bill Lawrence, Robin Daley, and Kelly Fitzpatrick, and to the News of the Weird Board Editorial Advisors.

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n About a decade ago, several fast-food restaurants (especially during evening shifts staffed by sometimes inadequately trained managers) were plagued by a prank phone-caller, posing as law enforcement requesting investigative help, asking managers to

Least Competent Criminals In January, a 27-year-old man in North Pole, Alaska, became the most recent forced to flee a crime scene on foot because he had locked his keys inside the getaway car. He was identified by surveillance video outside the two businesses he burglarized, but he was still at large.

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Some things just require a complete do-over. That’s the case with West Ridge Academy, formerly the Utah Boys Ranch. That was the former West Jordan Republican, Sen. Chris Buttars’, baby, a school steeped in abuse in the name of rehabilitation. Now renamed, the private treatment center is seeking charter-school status—you know, for the money. Hey, it would be a clean start, right? New name: Eagle Summit Academy. But there are still ongoing investigations and a pending Salt Lake Tribune request for records from the West Jordan Police Department. And while the school promises a “new, empathetic approach to discipline,” it could be cosmetic surgery rather than a new paradigm. Most troubling, perhaps, is Charter Board Chairman Howard Headlee’s comment that all will be well, and it’s not their job to dictate who can be employed by a school. If we’re looking for better oversight, let’s not depend on charter-school status.

Eat, Pray, Build Skills

There’s something wrong with Utah’s approach to people living in poverty, and we’re not talking about panhandling. Some legislative bills this session seem to be seeking to punish the poor or at least teach them a lesson or two. Sen. Lincoln Filmore, R-South Jordan, thinks it’s a grand idea to force prospective welfare recipients to go through self-reliance training. In other words, these are slackers who want a handout and have no intention of bettering themselves. This has drawn disdain from Utahns Against Hunger and the Catholic Diocese of Utah. The fear is that it puts another barrier to receiving real aid while there are already hurdles to climb. Filmore says the principle is not to provide food or housing, but rather to build skills. That’s all fine, but people in poverty often need food and housing before they can start building any skill.

Education First

Senate Bill 101 (High Quality School Readiness Program Expansion) builds on some pilot projects for high-quality pre-kindergarten classes and focuses on intergenerational poverty. If kids don’t get to school ready to learn, then they are doomed to start behind and stay there. Sounds like a no-brainer, and is, in fact, something that United Way has long championed. Sorry to say that, in Utah, there are some who think it’s a bad idea because it takes the decisions for children out of the hands of parents. Yes, that comes from the Eagle Forum and the Sutherland Institute. The most important place to be is at home with Mom, they say. Maybe they’re right in saying kids need more time outside playing, but children in poverty aren’t likely to have that opportunity. The bill is on its way to approval.

Courtesy of Atheists of Utah

School Rehab

Living openly as an atheist in a state known largely for its religious inclination ain’t easy. Think of that South Park song, “The Lonely Jew on Christmas.” Just ask Felicia Entwistle (above, right), president of Atheists of Utah. Far from meeting in darkened rooms wearing cloaks and chanting, the nonprofit she heads is an active member of the community, staging weekly socials and supporting causes like Adopt-a-Highway and the Utah Food Bank. On Saturday, Feb. 27, the group hosts its annual gala at the Salt Lake Hardware Building (105 N. 400 West). Make sure to bid, bid, bid in the silent auction (more information at AtheistsOfUtah.org).

What is the reality of being an atheist in Salt Lake City?

There are some people that give you weird looks. I’ll tell people that I’m an atheist for whatever reason, and they’ll say, “What does that mean?” I respond that I don’t believe in any gods, and they’ll ask, “Not Jesus?” I just smile and go, “Yeah, not any of it.” More than anything, you get people who are either sad for you or angry with you. When we’re at events, I don’t really get a lot of hate, but you do get people, like the missionaries, who think that you’re an atheist because you’ve never heard the good word.

Sounds a lot like telling a lesbian she just hasn’t found ‘the right man.’

Yeah, it’s the exact same kind of thing! Many atheists, not all, consider themselves skeptics. Meaning they demand proof of something though the scientific method before they can believe anything, really. The amount of evidence required is directly proportional to the claim being made, so they generally have investigated the God claims—the big ones— and there’s just nothing there to support belief.

What is it that you hope to accomplish with the upcoming gala?

The gala is a fundraising event for our nonprofit, which is dedicated to the separation of church and state, the education of the public in nonbelief and providing a community for nonbelievers—especially in this state, where a lot of people lose everything when they lose their belief. We have a lot of people whose families don’t speak to them anymore, kids who have been kicked out of their homes and people who lose their jobs.

You plan on donating the proceeds from the silent auction to Planned Parenthood on behalf of Gov. Herbert. What was the genesis of that idea?

That Gary Herbert has consistently used his religion and his personal beliefs on morality to block people’s rights. He’s trying to take away women’s access to health care—and everyone’s access to sexual health care—because Planned Parenthood serves everyone. It’s very tongue-in-cheek. The genesis of the idea was that he gets to keep making decisions like this for all Utahns; I think we could make a little decision in his honor.

Is there a special atheist dress code for the gala?

Naked is preferred! [Laughs] This is formal event, so we are recommending formal attire.

—ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net


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owner, captivity. The stallion, Aristotle surmised, ended it all after realizing he’d inadvertently shtupped his mother—your basic equine Oedipus scenario. It’s not just sexually confused horses, though. Fifty dogs have jumped off Scotland’s Overtoun Bridge in as many years. Pods of whales heave themselves onto beaches; captive dolphins drown themselves. The traditional argument against granting animals too much agency here is that they’re thought to possess senses neither of self nor imagination, both facets of higher-order cognitive functioning required for suicide: you must envision the end of life and understand its implications. So, such thinking goes, when an animal offs itself there’s always some biological or mechanistic reason: Navigation error, in the case of those beached whales. Underneath that Scottish bridge investigators found a colony of mink, whose anal scent glands apparently drive dogs wild—the pups were just lunging after a good smell. But this proposition has been called into question by cognitively complex creatures like dolphins, who can recognize themselves in a mirror, suggesting that crucial sense of self. One prominent biopsychologist turned animal advocate, Lori Marino, has argued that dolphins very much do possess the cognitive capabilities needed to understand the implications of doing themselves in. Monkeys and parrots—other social, higher-order thinkers—can engage in self-destructive behaviors, sometimes unto death, under conditions of confinement or emotional distress, but do we call that suicide? Rather than trying to puzzle out whether animals conform to human notions of suicide, though, Ramsden and Wilson suggest we invert the question: What if we conceived of human suicide—a behavior that’s long perplexed scientists—less as an a willful act of imagination and more as a mechanistic response to conditions? Take, for instance, Toxoplasma gondii, known to cause rodents (to their mortal detriment) to lose their fear of cats, in whose stomachs the protozoan prefers to breed. In humans it’s been linked, a bit more tenuously, to schizophrenia and, yes, suicide. A 2012 study of 45,000-some Danish mothers reported a “predictive association” between T. gondii infection and “self-directed violence.” Far from causation, yes, but as T. gondii continues to spread, it might be helpful to get a clearer picture. CW

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et’s begin our investigation with a little Google search, shall we? The popular line on the lemming-suicide myth, found easily on debunking sites like Snopes, plays as follows: 1. White Wilderness, a 1958 Disney documentary about arctic wildlife filmed in Alberta, Canada, contains a scene showing lemmings taking the plunge you describe, to florid narration: “Carried along by an unreasoning hysteria, each falls into step for a march that will take them to a strange destiny,” etc. 2. However, the whole thing turns out to have been faked. Filmmakers ran the little guys around on a lazy Susan and tossed them manually into a river shot to look like the ocean. Lemmings didn’t even live in that part of Alberta; they had to be imported from Manitoba. 3. “Thus,” Snopes concludes, “did Disney perpetuate for generations to come the legend of periodic, inexplicable mass suicides by lemmings who die by hurling themselves off of cliffs?” Perpetuate, sure. But such accounts give Disney undue credit for a misconception that already existed. The lemming mass-suicide story, and all the metaphorical possibilities that attend to it, had been in circulation for a while, as Edmund Ramsden and Duncan Wilson report in a 2010 paper in the British historical journal Past & Present. Scandinavians in the late 1800s recorded observations of the lemmings’ grim march to the sea, struck by the animals’ ardent devotion to their task—as well as their violent disinclination to be impeded, which inspired the common Norwegian phrase “angry as a lemming.” Ramsden and Wilson go on to describe how observers of the various dramas of the 20th century—Nazism, communism, consumerism—alluded to the suicidal lemming, making it a “recurring motif for modernity”: “The lemming became the totemic animal in an age of cultural pessimism, a symbol of an unconscious and mindless urge toward mass self-destruction, and references to its suicide are legion.” Lemmings, by the way, do sometimes end up underwater, but far less melodramatically than suggested. Their populations operate on a regular boom-and-bust cycle. At the end of a boom, which puts pressure on nearby resources, they disperse in search of food. Some wind up at the ocean and attempt to cross it—lemmings can swim—but drown in the process. You’ll notice the Norwegians don’t say “smart as a lemming.” So, with respect to a weighty word like “suicide,” lemmings don’t really qualify. Do other nonhuman animals? The issue has captivated thinkers as far back as Aristotle, who described a tormented stallion throwing himself into an abyss. Certainly animals take actions that lead to their deaths, and are assigned posthumous reasons for such by human observers: loss of a mate, loss of an

SLUG SIGNORINO

Why are lemmings famous for running off cliffs? I’m assuming this is an urban myth. But where does the idea of suicidal lemmings come from? —Owain Evans


THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@ 42bearcat

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

WRITING WORKSHOPS

Everyone’s got an opinion on commas—or, God forbid, the semicolon. If you have grammar or writing questions, or just want to voice your opinion on grammatical pet peeves, then join Grammarphobia: Easy Tips for Better Writing Workshop at the SLCC Community Writing Center. If you’re feeling more creative, or if you participated in NaNoWriMo last year, you can explore the next steps to finishing that smoldering novel of yours. It’s time to revise and publish with NaNoWriMo 2: Novel Writing Next Steps. Grammarphobia, 210 E. 400 South (Library Square Plaza), 801-957-2192, March 1, 6-8 p.m, $10; Saturdays, March 5, 12, 19 & 26, 1-3 p.m., $40, SLCC.edu/CWC

ACTIVIST/ARTIST TALK

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10 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

CITIZEN REVOLT

Nine people Republicans worry Obama will appoint as the new SCOTUS member:

9. Snap 8. Crackle and/or Pop 7. RuPaul 6. The judge from Night Court 5. The Dancing Itos 4. Judge Reinhold 3. Judge Dredd 2. Siri (British voice) 1. Two kids in a trench coat pretending to be an adult

Maybe you cried, or maybe you just wondered how this could happen in a country of immigrants. Join Yoshua Okón On Oracle as he speaks about his multichannel video installations that reflect a small Arizona town’s struggle with immigration. There, Okón witnessed and chronicled one of the largest protests in the country against the migration of unaccompanied minors. His exhibition, giving voice to dissenting positions on the migration, is at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (20 S. West Temple), but he will be speaking at the University of Utah, in conjunction with U of U associate professor Elena Shtromberg. Department of Art and Art History, Art 158, University of Utah, 375 S. 1530 East, 801-328-4201, March 2, 4:40-5:30 p.m., free ($5 donation suggested), UtahMOCA.org

VIRTUAL SONGFEST

How cool would it be to join the Mormon Tabernacle Choir just once to belt out the “Hallelujah” chorus from George Frideric Handel’s Messiah? For the first time ever, the Mo-Tab is asking singers, choirs and fans to participate in an Epic Easter Digital Collaboration. Record and upload your videos for a YouTube recording to be released on Sunday, March 13. Participants can access the sheet music, a sing-along video for each part, and conducting by music director Mack Wilberg. Once their video is recorded, singers can upload it to YouTube and copy the URL into a simple submission form. Entries accepted through March 1, free, VirtualChoir.Mormon.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


NEWS

“I just think, why not pay the fee and pay your share?” —Utah Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab PUBLIC LANDS

Bidding & Blasting

Environmentalists, gun-toting militia, the Utah Legislature and a deceased Supreme Court justice converge to make the BLM’s day. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

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legislative colleagues had about the prospects of the lawsuit. On paper, Noel says the odds are good that the present court would be ideologically locked 4-4 on Utah’s claim that federal lands should be managed by the state. An appointment by President Barack Obama, Noel says, might well make that 5-4 in favor of preserving federal management of the lands. Whatever takes place with the lawsuit, it will have to occur amid the growing wave of noise coming from the right-wing militias supporting Bundy and conservationists who say the public lands should be just that: Public. That an author like Tempest Williams could make headlines in tandem with a guntoting rancher like Bundy speaks to the BLM’s shape-shifting job description. As set forth in the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) of 1976, the agency is to manage the nation’s public lands for “multiple use, sustained yield and environmental protection.” Dan McCool, a University of Utah political science professor who is also the director of the school’s environmental and sustainability studies program, says the BLM’s task is “extremely difficult,” and that the multiple uses the BLM manages are often at odds. “You can’t possibly make everybody happy all the time with that,” McCool says. While Tempest Williams and Bundy are both protesting the BLM, McCool says the two couldn’t be further apart in their goals and the steps they have taken to achieve them. Bundy and his sons, McCool says, use guns, threats of violence and fear to impose their view that public land should be returned to ranchers, locals and development interests. On the other hand, Tempest Williams, McCool says, is attempting to “prevent the land from being allocated to a very small group of people and keep it open to the public.” “What Terry and Brooke did was comply with the law. What they did at the Malheur Wildlife Preserve was to violate the law,” McCool says. “I’m guessing that [Terry and Brooke] did not show up with a retinue of people carrying automatic weapons and side arms and threatening to kill people. That’s another big difference. And that’s an important difference.” CW

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of Cliven Bundy, who has been at odds with the BLM for more than two decades over his refusal to pay for grazing rights on public land near his Nevada ranch. Bundy joined his sons, Ryan and Ammon, in an Oregon jail where all three have been charged with an array of crimes. Bundy’s sons’ offenses stem from the armed occupation of the Malheur Federal Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon. Although the goals of the Bundy family and their supporters would seem to be at odds with the likes of Tempest Williams and other environmental groups, both appear to share a common foe: the BLM. While Bundy and his supporters lament the cost of grazing cattle on federal lands (the costs in 2015 for a cow and a calf to graze on public land was $1.63 per month), Tempest Williams and other conservationists wonder how pristine land on the outskirts of national parks could end up on the chopping block for $2 an acre. Utah Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, who worked for the BLM for 22 years and is a vocal critic of the agency, says that he has concerns with the Williamses’ lease. If they don’t develop the minerals tucked away beneath the dirt, it will prevent cash from flowing into the state in the form of royalties. But Noel also has issues with the way the Bundy family has advanced its protests of the BLM. Importantly, Noel, himself a cattle rancher, says he doesn’t agree with the contention that there should be no fees to graze cattle on public land. Grazing on private land, he says, costs him up to six times more per animal than grazing on public land. “I just think, why not pay the fee and pay your share?” he says. For the past 13 years, Noel has brought his message to the Legislature, where he is presently running a bill that outlines a plan to manage the more than 30 million acres of public land that Utah is seeking to wrest from the federal government. Gov. Gary Herbert and Attorney General Sean Reyes are soon expected to announce whether the state will spend an estimated $14 million to sue the feds for this land. While Noel says Herbert supports moving forward with the suit, he says the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia—a reliable conservative voice on the court—has thrown into question some of the certainty he and his

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hen 45,700 acres of public land in Utah is auctioned off and the asking price is $2 per acre, energy companies tend to show up. So, on the morning of Tuesday, Feb. 16, that’s exactly what occurred, with representatives from Geoscout Land & Title Co., Turner Petroleum Land Services Inc., Liberty Petroleum Corp., Crescent Point Energy, USCorp and a dozen or so others filling a room at the Salt Palace Convention Center and dropping $314,150 on 22,771 acres. But one on the 22-strong bidders list didn’t have an LLC, Corp. or Inc. in its name. That would be Bidder No. 19— Terry Tempest Williams—whose name was tucked in between Robert Bayless Product LLC and Quinex Energy Corp. Tempest Williams, an author known for her tales rooted in the American West and who lives part-time in Grand County, never did raise her bidding paddle. But a spacious, 800-acre patch of land that no one wanted was up for grabs after the sale. The land, about 14 miles northeast of Arches National Park, was picked up by Tempest Williams and her husband, Brooke, for around $1,200, or about $1.50 per acre. A spokesperson for the Bureau of Land Management, which manages roughly 63 percent of the land in Utah and conducted the auction, says the agency is still unsure whether she’ll secure her lease. Tempest Williams has already taken steps to ensure that she and her new company, Tempest Exploration, comply with the Federal Onshore Oil & Gas Leasing Reform Act, which requires energy development to take place on leased federal land. The act provides a decade-long window for development to occur. When this development does take place, it is certain to be void of drilling rigs, waste-water containment ponds and the mud-splattered rigs that snake up and down Highway 40, delivering

crude oil and gas from the Uinta Basin to refineries in North Salt Lake. Speaking on Feb. 18 on the radio program Democracy Now!, Tempest Williams rattled off a list of wildlife that call the property home, including hawks, pronghorn and white-tailed prairie dogs. “So we’re excited to explore and see what kind of energy development, including the development of the movement, can create,” Tempest Williams told the show’s host, Amy Goodman. “We intend on complying with the law, and we have this lease for 10 years.” The movement Tempest Williams referenced is Keep It in the Ground, which advocates for leaving oil, gas and other climate-changing fossil fuels unexploited. Tempest Williams has also retained the services of attorney Patrick Shea, a former national BLM director, to guide her efforts to ensure she is in compliance with federal leasing laws. If Tempest Williams’ effort to secure some public land through the bidding process sounds a lot like the story of Tim DeChristopher, who was jailed for nearly two years after bidding on $1.8 million of parcels in 2008, you’re right. Shea admits there are obvious similarities. For instance, both are supporters of environmental movements that advocate for less oil and gas drilling, and both have made statements about the leasing process after being assigned a bidding paddle. But the big difference, Shea says, is that the Williamses have the money and intend to pay for their lease, while DeChristopher told BLM officials that he did not have sufficient funds to pay. “She is going to be in compliance with the law, where Tim had no intention of being in compliance with the law,” the attorney says. Shea is confident that Tempest Williams will comply with the law, and that her new energy company will live up to its responsibility to develop energy on the parcel. “She’ll have to show that she’s developed it consistent with the regulations of the oil and gas leasing act,” he says, noting that, while this might not be the first time in history someone has attempted to lease land in this way, it is “the first time they’ve had the former director of the BLM helping them understand what they need to do.” Tempest Williams’ foray into energy development has occurred along a parallel line with the arrest on Feb. 10


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12 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

NEWS CIVIL RIGHTS

Pub Flub

Dive bar hopes to make peace with Polynesian community.

I

t’s always a boost of hometown pride when you realize Salt Lake City is trending. Oh, never mind, it was because, on Feb. 16, Frank Maea and his cousin Stephen Wily—who are of Polynesian descent—were denied service, they say, due to their ethnicity, at Willie’s Lounge, the state’s self-proclaimed “finest dive.” Maea had never visited the Main Street bar but heard “they have either karaoke or there was something there that happened on Tuesdays that went down,” he tells City Weekly inside the downtown electronics-accessory store he manages, surrounded by fancy iPhone covers, “volume-limiting” tiara-topped headphones for kids and other tech whoozits. “[The bartender] looked us in the eyes and said ‘I can’t serve Polynesians,’” he says. “I was taken aback; I was ready to just order a drink.” Maea, who says his poison of choice is a Washington Apple, reacted by posting a video shot inside the bar on his Facebook profile. As of publication, the video tagged #PureIgnorance had more than 5,400 shares. “I wanted to just, kind of, raise awareness,” Maea says of his motive. “Racial discrimination is against the law.” In a response posted on the bar’s now-deleted Facebook page, bar owner Geremy Cloyd wrote in part, “Due to certain issues we’ve had with certain groups of people, we reserve the right to refuse service to anyone.” Maea remembers responding “Are

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

BY ENRIQUE LIMON elimon@cityweekly.net @EnriqueLimon

Members of the Polynesian community gather outside Willie’s Lounge on Saturday to protest discrimination claims. you serious?” and adds that he holds no ill will toward the server, who explained she could lose her job if she didn’t follow the policy. In an interview with KUTV Channel 2, Cloyd said barkeeps are instructed to refuse service to “unknown, intimidating-looking males,” among them men who seem like they just got out of jail or those with neck tattoos or that “look like they’re on drugs. … It just so happens, that our big problem has been with Polynesians.” “It’s been crazy, man,” Maea says about the reaction his video has gotten. “It’s been more of a positive experience, just with the response from everyone— the Polynesian community here, and just everyone in general. It reached overseas; family members from New Zealand and Australia also. It’s all around … it’s been a good experience.” For Cloyd, the ordeal has been the opposite. Standing in his dimly lit office, he says the whole situation has been “very, very misunderstood,” and that he’s received death threats. He’s standing in front of an American flag that proudly hangs on a wall, and says he hasn’t slept since the incident garnered viral attention. “Before you get to judge me, come and get to know me,” Cloyd, a decorated Marine vet says. “I know the response is going to be, ‘Well, why didn’t you get to

know them?’” he continues. “We fucked up on that. Period.” Cloyd says his words were taken “out of context” by local media outlets, adding that he operates “probably the most diverse bar ever. I didn’t get that way by being what everybody is accusing me of right now. Like, we support all the gays that come in here—we have gay nights. I’m so, so not the way I’m being portrayed right now.” Visibly shaken by some of the comments he’s faced in the last days, Cloyd is quick to point out that the red patch on his jacket is the “diver down” flag, a military ensign used on water to caution other vessels a diver is swimming below. It’s “because we’re a dive bar!” he says, explaining it’s not an interpretation of the Confederate flag, as some have accused. As far as the apology Cloyd posted on the bar’s website on Friday, Maea says he accepts it, but “that doesn’t excuse the fact that we were pretty much profiled racially and discriminated upon.” Cloyd, who says the infamous video wasn’t shot when the refusal happened, but rather an hour later when the men came back, insists the message is sincere and that it is one of many apologies he’s attempted to extend to Maea. “I tried to reach out to him that night. I’ve tried to reach out to him since,” he says. On Saturday, Feb. 20, members of the

Utah Pacific Islander Civic Engagement Coalition along with other community leaders gathered at Watchtower Café and led a peaceful march to Willie’s Lounge, carrying signs that read “Polynesian rights,” and “End discrimination in Utah.” The protest, led by Watchtower owner Mike Tuiasoa, did not include a performance of the Haka—the ancestral Māori war cry—as was originally planned, but it did end with bar owner Geremy Cloyd. Cloyd says “of course” the group would be welcomed in his establishment. Just don’t expect a slow-mo, highfiving, let-the-credits-roll reunion. “No, I would not go back in there,” Maea says about a possible do-over. “That’s not gonna validate how I felt that night.” Asked if he’d buy Maea a drink, one of those sour Washington Apples perhaps, Cloyd says, “I can’t legally, in the state of Utah, buy a drink [here]. We could go to another place, but, then, it’s gonna make it look like I don’t want him in here.” He pauses, “But I would gladly buy him dinner.” The symbolic handshake only lasted so long. The following Monday, on Feb. 22, Maea and Wily filed a federal lawsuit against the drinking establishment, claiming civil-rights violations. CW


SNOW JOB Guest workers at resort hotels learn quickly the American dream is not all it seems. By Jake Nichols • comments@cityweekly.net

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hen Oksana (not her real name) arrived in Jackson Hole, Wyo. in 2014, the very first thing she remembers was the mountains. She was awestruck by their rugged beauty. Awe turned to shock when she was shown her home for the next four months. It was a dump, she says. “I am from Serbia. I am not afraid of nasty places,” Oksana says. She shared a bed—not a bedroom, a bed—with three other girls. Once a day, they were trucked from their rented house in Alpine, Wyo., 40 minutes southwest through the

mountains, to their job at a local hotel. The van driver was “many times drunk,” Oksana says. She was promised a comfortable room with Wi-Fi. She got a trailer with no running water. Oksana’s story is not uncommon in Jackson Hole, where temporary foreign workers are the labor lifeblood of the service industry. They are here from all around the world—cooking and cleaning for the valley’s other chief import: tourists. Thousands are here on temporary work visas like the J-1 and H-2B to perform seasonal work local employers say no one else will touch.

THEY’RE COMING TO AMERICA

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When it works, the guest-worker program profits all. Employers get a temp who doesn’t need benefits. Foreign nationals bank U.S. dollars and party like rock stars. Still, the system, at its best, raises questions of whether it drives down wages, contributes to unemployment and fosters an overarching socioeconomic imbalance. At its worst, people like Oksana get steamrolled. “The guest-worker program is great in principle. It’s wonderful for everyone,” Rosie Read says. The attorney has focused heavily on immigration law in Jackson for the past seven years at Trefonas Law. “We have a shortage of people who are willing to perform harder work, more uncomfortable manual labor in the United States, and that gap is often filled by immigrant labor. There is clearly a need—as well as a will on the other side from the employees to come take those jobs.” Problems arise for a variety of reasons, including less-thanscrupulous middle agents—government-sanctioned companies acting as recruiters—that sometimes misrepresent or mistreat foreigners. Federal bureaucracy, red tape and political tugs-of-war have also created a system rife with abuse and exploitation. When workers dare complain, they can be threatened with deportation. They are often too scared to seek help. They don’t know their rights. Neither, it seems, does anyone else.

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Since 2009, lawsuits involving H-2B visa regulations have turned the program into a political football. Crafted for employers by big-money lobbying groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, ImmigrationWorks USA and the National Restaurant Association, H-2Bs were once a cheap and easy way for hoteliers to hire summer housekeepers. Then, a lawsuit. Then, an injunction. Another lawsuit. And a resulting enjoining. Immigration policy becomes campaign fodder while the feds have trouble getting out of their own way. The result of constant litigation and congressional appropriation riders has left agencies like the departments of Labor and Homeland Security wondering which one has the authority to do what, and with what money. “You are up against a big messy bureaucracy,” Read says. “The H-2B regulations, in particular, are a mess. Employers aren’t happy overall with how the program is run. And from the employees’ perspective, I think some protections need to be implemented. Because when things don’t go well for them here, they are trapped. It needs reform from both ends.” Reform is reportedly on the way, but word is always slow to reach Wyoming. When Read took a case pro-bono last summer to represent six workers from Jamaica unhappy with their gig at Snake River Lodge, she ran headfirst into the machine. It took days just to find the right phone number. After a runaround in an automated phone system at the Wyoming State Capitol, Read finally found the right person, only to be told there was nothing he could do. “We were trying to find this one guy. There is one guy in the state of Wyoming who is responsible for taking these complaints, and when we finally found him, he told me he didn’t think he had the authority to investigate visa cases because ‘the program was on hold,’” Read says. “I felt quite helpless. It’s sort of a grim picture as far as what recourse an unhappy temporary worker has in the U.S. during the time they are here. I told the Jamaicans they should just go home and start over with a new employer.” Read eventually convinced someone in Cheyenne to take her complaint. It was filed. She hasn’t heard a thing since. The Jamaicans are long gone. As Read found, protections for foreign workers are few, while finding justice for them is seemingly impossible. According to nationally recognized journalist-turnedresearcher Jerry Kammer, “The State Department has done a horrible job of protecting these people. They are supposed to look after the interests of these people, but [the workers] are often ripped off and abused.”


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14 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Jake Nichols

Jackson Hole’s Cache Creek Lodge is now used to house immigrant workers. Daniel Costa is director of Immigration Law and Policy Research at the Economic Policy Institute (EPI). He says loopholes in immigration law continue to allow employers to exploit migrant workers. It’s an indentured servant program, he says, that borders on serfdom. “Employers don’t need guest workers to fill labor shortages, but they hire them because guest workers become instantly deportable when fired and aren’t protected from retaliation or allowed to switch jobs if they have an abusive employer,” Costa says. Time is not on the side of foreign workers, either. Most are in the states for less than six months. Even if a case were looked into, the investigation would take longer than the visa term. Monetary judgment, if any, would include back pay that probably wouldn’t cover airfare back home, Read says. “Sometimes the only recourse these people have, the only justice they are going to receive, is when newspapers like yours make it a story,” says Mike Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) based in Washington, D.C. “Employers can do pretty much anything they want to [foreign workers] because there are no parents here to complain—whereas, if they are stacking American kids 14 to a room, they wouldn’t be able to get away with it. It all comes down to the same thing: Employers import people they can control and pay less.”

Kenneth Goehring worked as a subcontractor for Vaz-Smith in 2014, the season Oksana and others had their trouble. He remembers that summer as a “nightmare.” Furthermore, Goehring claims Vaz-Smith was unethical and unreliable and still owes him money. Keith Gingery with the Teton County Attorney’s Office says he’s been looking for Vaz-Smith since October 2015. When the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services found that Goehring was owed $1,122 in unpaid wages, Gingery was able to track her down through American Connection in Chicago. “At first, she tried to claim Ken didn’t technically work for her,” Gingery recalls. “Then, she said she was putting a check in the mail. You know how that goes. I haven’t heard anything since.” By August 2014, the hotel contracting with Vaz-Smith for guest workers allegedly had it. According to local attorney Traci Mears, the hotel’s HR director severed ties with the agency after 11 of their workers retained a lawyer. Mears took the case on behalf of the foreign contingent. “They were not being paid what they were promised. The hours far exceeded what is allowed under U.S. law and Wyoming state law,” Mears says. “When I did the calculations, they were making less than $4 an hour. Plus they were being charged $150 a week for housing and $80 a month for transportation. They had no money and no time off.” Goehring agreed, saying, “These kids were treated like crap.” Middle agencies effectively create a layer of protection for employers. When jobs, hours or housing aren’t what was Back to Oksana. She and her fellow countrymen were promised, both parties blame the other. brought to the United States by a recruiting agency called Mears says her issue was with the hotels. “I am really frusAmerican Connection, run by Lynda Vaz-Smith. When trated with the powers-that-be there. They signed the emworkers lodged complaints about the number of hours they ployment contract along with the agency. But all I got was were assigned to work, their subpar housing situations, un—MIKE KRIKORIAN, CENTER FOR finger pointing.” reliable transportation and a workplace environment filled Oksana ended up quitting and going to work somewhere IMMIGRATION STUDIES with systematic abuse, the employer blamed Vaz-Smith. else. She says she liked Jackson Hole and met some really good She, in turn, claimed the hotel was at fault. friends. “It was bad situation. But I know that is not what AmerThere are an estimated 18 licensed recruiting agencies ica is like,” she says. “I still remember beautiful mountains.” like the one Vaz-Smith owns in the United States. They’re Vaz-Smith keeps residences in Wisconsin, Maryland, Maine and Connecticut. Attempts to authorized by the federal government to match employers with employees. They receive fees reach her have been unsuccessful. from the employee, often in addition to recouping airfare and other expenditures they make on

A LOT OF FINGER-POINTING

“CONGRESS HAS ALLOWED THESE PROGRAMS TO MUSHROOM TO SUCH A DEGREE, THERE IS NO BUREAUCRATIC STRUCTURE TO KEEP TRACK OF THEM. IT’S BASICALLY ON THE HONOR SYSTEM.”

behalf of visa seekers. Their role is as a sponsor but, according to some, it comes dangerously close to worker exploitation. “The government is not really all that strict in who they allow to do this kind of work,” Krikorian says. “The standards are pretty low in the approval process required to be a recruiter or middleman, and there is almost no follow-up unless you really screw up and the story gets in the news. Congress has allowed these programs to mushroom to such a degree; there is no bureaucratic structure to keep track of them. It’s basically on the honor system.” Read says she’s familiar with numerous problems with recruiting agencies. “[For instance], the employee is not supposed to have to pay basically anything in order to come here with an H-2B visa. But you’ll see the recruitment agencies charging them some prohibitive fees,” she says. “I’ve certainly heard of recruitment agencies doing this.”

VOODOO ECONOMICS

The guest-worker program is tailor-made for places like Jackson Hole. The average income of residents is nearly $300,000 a year, making Teton County one of the richest counties in the United States. It’s a place of the “haves” and the “will nots.” Those with the means to have their every whim catered to share space with a middle class feeling too entitled to take unskilled work. That leaves bottom-feeder peons to hang sheetrock, fold sheets and mow lawns. That labor pool is stretched thin with 70-hour workweeks pieced together with multiple jobs requiring laborers to hustle between bedroom communities in Teton and Star valleys. Enter Mexico, Venezuela, Argentina and Russia—to the rescue. But are foreign workers actually taking jobs from locals? And do they keep wages artificially


Courtesy photo

low? Sara Saulcy, a staff economist with the Wyoming DeJackson’s resort hotels justifying their use of temporary partment of Employment Research & Planning says, “The work visas because of the town’s seasonal ebb and flow of argument that foreign workers are employed in jobs dotourists is questionable. U.S. Citizenship & Immigration mestic workers do not want may have credence, given that Services found an example of a local hotel that successfulmost foreign workers are employed in low-paying jobs.” ly petitioned the Department of Labor for 118 workers on But immigrant-advocate Krikorian counters. “If the supH-2B visas from December 2007 to April 2008. That spring, ply of foreign workers were to dry up, employers would rethe same hotel asked for another 118 workers from May to spond to this new, tighter labor market in two ways: One, the end of October, effectively providing the resort with they would offer higher wages, increased benefits and year-round “seasonal” coverage. improved working conditions. At the same time, employers would look for ways to eliminate some of the jobs they are now having trouble filling. The result would be a new Newport Hotel Group owns some of the most exclusive equilibrium, with blue-collar workers making somewhat lodging facilities in the country, including the Snake River better money, but each one of those workers being more Lodge & Spa. But one holding you’ll never see them adverproductive,” he says. It’s a valid tise is the Cache Creek Lodge in argument in the real world. But north Jackson. The motel was this is Teton County. ranked dead last in TripAdvisor’s “I’ve got ads in the paper right 41 lodging listings in Jackson now. I don’t care what you pay. before it was sold to Newport No one is walking through the last year. It’s now used solely to door,” says Stephen Price, general house Snake River Lodge’s immimanager of Spring Creek Ranch. grant workers. “We are not taking any jobs from Attorney Read defended a people, and these are good paygroup of Jamaican workers ing jobs.” hired to work at the Snake River Every Jackson Hole-area emLodge. The workers told Read ployer contacted by this reporter their rent was deducted directly says it paid guest workers the from their paychecks. When the same rate it pays locals. AlbJamaicans wanted to move out, ertsons, Four Seasons, Jackson they claim they were told by Hole Mountain Resort and othresort managers if they left the ers all claimed pay rate was not company accommodations, they a determining factor in choosing would be fired. to go out-of-country for employRead ran down a list of alees. They simply couldn’t fill the leged complaints in that case: —STEPHEN PRICE jobs from classified ads. All de“They were supposed to provide nied, as well, that temporary via certain number of hours, and SPRING CREEK RANCH sas were taking jobs away from these employees weren’t getting Americans. enough hours. They are not supKrikorian disagrees, insistposed to be retaliated against if ing, “The effects on American they complain about unsatisfacyounger workers are significant. It allows employers to tory working conditions. When one went in to complain, pay less, but that’s not the only advantage. Employers lock she was sent home for the day. That’s docking wages. The in the workers early in the season. They’ve filled their staffrent was more expensive than they were originally told it ing needs so early that when American kids look for these was going to be,” she says. “They were also told they were summer jobs on college break, the jobs are gone.” going to be taken to Idaho Falls to get their Social Security Economic Policy Institute’s Costa says data supports cards. They kept being put off.” the notion that foreign workers drive down wages. From Calls to Scott Alemany, Newport Hotel Group’s director 2007 to 2014, statistics from the American Community Surof operations, were never returned on this story. vey show little to no wage increase in several select entryHousing has always been a struggle for bosses. Spring level occupations. Creek caught some flak in summer 2015 for boarding a few “Low and stagnant wages are not the result of benign, eastern Europeans in a rundown trailer. General manager abstract economic forces,” Costa says. “They reflect conPrice says the tight housing market caught him by surscious policy choices by lawmakers influenced by powerprise. “[During the recession], we cut back on the number ful corporate lobby groups like the Chamber of Commerce of apartments we had. Then, all of the sudden, everything and the National Restaurant Association.” hit,” he says. The resort is currently building dormitoryThe system builds in inherent fraud. For instance, style housing onsite. The project should be ready by May

BOARDING WORKER BEES

“I DON’T CARE WHAT YOU PAY. NO ONE IS WALKING THROUGH THE DOOR.”

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Attorney Traci Mears: “They were making less than $4 an hour.”

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Jackson Hole, Wyo., immigration attorney Rosie Read: “I felt quite helpless.”

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FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 15


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16 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

and will house 30 employees. In years past, Four Seasons has bought out the Teton Gables Motel to house their temporary visa workers. Resort spokeswoman Nina Braga says housing continues to be a difficult aspect of the program but added, “We work with them. We have some local opportunities offsite and limited housing on property.”

were promised jobs at the Four Seasons. When they arrived in Jackson, the jobs mysteriously vanished. “We have five or six staying with us,” says the Mission’s Brad Christensen. “They said they were recruited by a company called MMI and promised jobs at the Four Seasons, then abandoned when they got here. They weren’t happy.” Christensen says he’s contacted Access for Justice who says they are interested in taking up a case for the misplaced migrants. Four Seasons spokesperson Braga says the hotel has not Price says Spring Creek has migrated toward J-1 visas rather hired anyone directly from Puerto Rico but acknowledged than H-2Bs. The latter has become unpopular with most local they do sometimes work with a third-party contractor called employers for a number of reasons: They are harder to get. The The Service Companies, an outsourcing company that allegtotal number issued in the country is capped at 66,000 a year. edly acquired MMI in 2014. They are also becoming increasingly more expensive, putting The Service Companies’ corporate director of human resourcemployers on the hook for the cost of getting employees to the es, Nikki Bernal, explains how her firm works and says she wantUnited States. And they require proof ed a chance to set the record straight. that an employer could not fill its needs “MMI is not a temporary staffing agency; locally. we are an outsourcing company working Brian Clark, state monitor advodirectly with the Puerto Rican governcate for the Wyoming Department of ment,” she says. She adds that MMI hires Workforce Services, says H-2B use has its own employees after a background tapered off in recent years due to “the check and drug testing. Employees are need for new regulations from the Dethen assigned to property locations partment of Homeland Security and throughout the United States. the Department of Labor.” He added “We only recruit in areas where it is that the slack appears to have been difficult to find employees. The labor taken up with increased use of J-1s. pool in Jackson Hole, as you know, is very J-1 visas are similar to H-2Bs with limited,” Bernal says. “There is nobody two major distinctions: They are who comes to Jackson through us withdesigned for college students from out a job, and our intention is certainly other countries to expand their edunot to burden the city of Jackson or the cation with training in the field while state of Wyoming with our workers.” in America. But these summer break Bernal says that MMI pays airfare for “internships” usually amount to little each employee to Jackson. Workers are more than learning how to operate a housed each with their own room and —JERRY KAMMER paid $10 an hour to start. They are preconveyor dishwasher. There is also a cultural exchange component, which pared for conditions in Wyoming; MMI is largely ignored by both superiors and even purchases winter clothing for them. subordinates. “We had a property in Jackson that “The idea that this is a cultural exchange program is comclosed for a month,” she says. “We were able to keep eight of our pletely bogus. It merely justifies a way to avoid hiring Ameriemployees there deep cleaning. I moved 12 others to another hocans,” journalist/researcher Kammer says. “Our government tel we service in Jackson Hole. Seven others were moved to Colohas set up a system where employers don’t even need to try rado to work a hotel there and some went back home for a while.” to find domestic help,” he says. “It provides the recruitment Bernal admits some employees choose to leave her employprocess for the employer so they don’t even have to get into ment after they arrive. They sometimes find better-paying jobs. that, and to sweeten the deal, there are incentives to hire forOnce their employment with MMI is terminated, they must eign workers because they don’t have to pay the taxes that surrender housing within 48 hours, but Bernal says she underthey would on full-time workers. It’s a $150 million industry stands the hardship of finding housing and has often let employAmerican employers have become addicted to.” ees stay as long as two weeks until they can find something else. Mary Erickson—who heads Jackson Hole’s Community Erickson with the Community Resource Center says hiring Resource Center, where foreigners regularly show up for asPuerto Ricans is a new trend she is seeing at the Four Seasons sistance—says the system creates a burden on social services. and Hotel Terra. These laborers are technically U.S. citizens who “The J-1 is supposed to be an educational exchange, but I don’t do not need a visa to enter the country. “Their economy is in the see that happening. It’s really just labor,” Erickson says. “I betoilet. They are coming to the states in droves,” Erickson says. lieve in the goodness of people, but some of these employers “They don’t have to go through the whole visa process—all they and middlemen have been continuously stretching the rules have to do is just get here. The problem is some are promised jobs as much as they can. And what ends up happening is these and housing, and some aren’t. They are completely unprepared. workers come to us, and it’s a strain on our services. We are They show up here without winter coats or boots.” really not set up to take care of transients. We are intended to The North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA) take care of long-term members of the community.” reports Puerto Rico is second only to Mexico as a source of Jackson Hole’s Good Samaritan Mission has been inuncheap imported labor for the United States. Pew Research dated lately with bewildered Puerto Ricans who claim they Center analysis of Census Bureau data found 84,000 people

left Puerto Rico for the U.S. mainland in 2011. NACLA estimates that annually, that number could be closer to 200,000. “Puerto Rico’s nearly decade-long economic recession has led to people leaving the island for the mainland in numbers not seen in more than 50 years,” the Pew report states. There were 1,026 Puerto Ricans documented living in Wyoming according to the 2010 Census.

BRACERO DE NUEVO

SYNTHETICALLY WESTERN

“THE IDEA THAT THIS IS A CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM IS COMPLETELY BOGUS.”

The effect of guest-worker programs in Jackson Hole is a hand-worked “devil’s bargain,” says Hal Rothman, in his book of the same title. In it, Rothman portrays luxury resort towns like Jackson as modified tourist communities. A place where “neo-natives, attracted to the original traits of a transformed place, have moved in and created a community very different from the one established by locals who came before them.” A few years ago, the Jackson Hole News & Guide polled citizens for a new slogan for the sign at the top of the pass above Jackson Hole, since the sign currently there—”Yonder Lies the Last of the Old West”—was beginning to show its wear. The paper jokingly suggested a replacement: “Jackson Hole, where California plays, and Mexico works.” According to Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s human resource director, Nicola James, the resort employs about 52 foreign workers this winter on J-1 visas. It will hire about the same number of foreign workers this summer. In past years, JHMR has employed more than 250 international workers at any given time. James says the resort gave up on H-2Bs back in 2007. JHMR has an in-house recruiter who regularly visits countries like Argentina. She works with a middle agency called Universal Student Exchange. Albertsons typically hires around 80 foreign temps a year. Xanterra, concessionaire for Yellowstone Park, typically hire 1,000 or more guest workers. Other valley businesses using international laborers include restaurants, smaller hotels, construction firms, lawn care companies and dude ranches. The result? Many employers and employees alike are happy with visa programs. They infuse Jackson Hole’s crunch seasons with grateful workers who create little overhead. They have, however, arguably created a fabricated faux Jackson Hole. An ersatz community of those doing the hard work and those being waited upon. And Oksana, for one, is never coming back. CW Jake Nichols is a contributing writer at Planet Jackson Hole, where this story originally appeared.


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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS FEB. 25-MAR. 2, 2016

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It seems like a no-brainer to combine the awesome talents of the Utah Symphony and Ballet West into one magnificent performance. When it happens, the result is pure magic, as you’re seeing one of the greatest orchestras in the United States musically accompanying dancers representing a world-renowned company. As part of its 75th anniversary, the Utah Symphony will collaborate with other arts organizations; the symphony specifically chose Jeux by Claude Debussy as the signature piece to perform with Ballet West. The performance showcases a garden at dusk, with a boy and two girls searching for a lost tennis ball. Their interactions soon turn into a romp hide-and-seek game, followed by quarreling and an evening of mystery bathed in moonlight. This particular piece is one of Debussy’s lesser-known works, but it offers symphony fans a treat as the pace changes every few bars, creating a playful exchange between the audience and the performers as they move throughout the piece. The Orchestra also will perform other classic works from French and American composers, including George Gershwin’s An American in Paris, Louis Moreau Gottschalk’s Grande Tarantelle and Maurice Ravel’s Concerto in G Major for Piano and Orchestra. A pre-concert lecture is available before the show to all ticket holders in the First Tier Room with Utah Symphony Vice President of Artistic Planning Toby Tolokan, starting at 6:45 p.m. (Gavin Sheehan) Utah Symphony With Ballet West: Debussy’s Jeux @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Feb. 26-27, 7:30 p.m., $18-80. UtahSymphony.org

Broadway Across America: The Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder There’s a tongue-in-cheek “Warning to the Audience” right at the outset of A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder.” Composer Steven Lutvak’s jaunty tune is accompanied by the ensemble’s disclaimer through Robert L. Freedman’s lyrics: “For those of you of weaker constitution / For those of you who may be faint of heart / This is a tale of revenge and retribution / So if you’re smart / Before we start / You’d best depart.” That opener sets the perfect tone for the 2014 Tony Award winner for Best Musical, based on Roy Horniman’s 1907 novel Israel Rank: The Autobiography of a Criminal (which also inspired the 1949 film Kind Hearts and Coronets). It begins with imprisoned Lord Monty D’Ysquith Navarro revealing that he is soon to be executed. And from there, the narrative circles back to his earlier life as the impoverished son of a recently deceased mother, who learns that he is distant heir to the Earldom of Highhurst. Eight other people stand ahead of Monty in the line of succession—and if it takes making sure every one of them is dead in order to move to the front of that queue, well, so be it. Freedman and Lutvak fill their blithely dark comedy with wonderfully catchy tunes like a nobleman’s oblivious musings in “I Don’t Understand the Poor,” and the lively waltz as Monty contemplates taking action with “Poison in My Pocket.” It’s a perfect evening—provided you don’t have a weaker constitution. (SR) Broadway Across America: The Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 1-3, 7:30 p.m.; March 4, 8 p.m.; March 5, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m., March 6, 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m., $37.50-$67.50. Tickets.Utah.edu

FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 17

The stage is empty as audience members enter for Pioneer Theatre Co.’s production of J. B. Priestley’s 1945 drama An Inspector Calls—but it’s not, really. On a platform above the set, women work at sewing machines. A maid enters to leave whiskey and glasses on a table. Before the lights even go down, one thing is already clear: There is a class of people whose life of labor shouldn’t be invisible. The play considers that idea through the story set in April 1912, as prosperous factory owner Arthur Birling (Joseph Dellger) and his wife Sybil (Mia Dillon) celebrate the engagement of their daughter, Sheila (Katie Wieland), to Arthur Croft (John Skelley), the son of Arthur’s chief competitor. But the pleasant evening is interrupted by the arrival of Inspector Goole (Christopher Kelly), who announces that a young woman has just committed suicide—and everyone at the Birling house may bear some responsibility. Director Mary B. Robinson showcases the performances as each member of engagement party is interrogated in turn for callous actions that may have precipitated the loss of a life. Priestley’s text is a fairly unapologetic socialist tract, but it turns on the differing responses of characters to the realization that their privileged obliviousness has consequences—some determined to learn from the experience, others doing everything possible to clear their consciences. The result is dark social satire that’s about what you do with the knowledge that you have the power to ruin a life, or save it. (Scott Renshaw) An Inspector Calls @ Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Feb. 19-March 5, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Monday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m. PioneerTheatre.org

TUESDAY 3.1

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Prohibition seems like an anomaly in American history—an extreme moral and legislative experiment—but it has something to teach us about the country’s temperament, now as well as then, and has parallels that persist to the present day. The Brigham City Museum is hosting the traveling exhibition Spirited: Prohibition in America, featuring artifacts, documents, photos, videos and interactive kiosks about the period. It’s worth a drive if you are interested in the period when the entire country went “dry,” or just American history in general. Visitors to the exhibit will learn what led the nation to adopt the prohibition of alcohol in 1919, the issues it raised, and the journey we as a people took through over a decade to its repeal in 1933. Photos look at what American life was like in the Roaring ’20s, when, despite the ban, the entire country seemed to be on a bender; the culture of speakeasies; the emergence of gangsters like Al Capone; and the role of law enforcement officials like Eliot Ness and The Untouchables. Local photos on the subject of alcohol and tobacco in northern Utah dating back to 1850, are also on display, as well as local artifacts from the Prohibition period. And it’s an interesting slice of Utah history, illustrating the effects of the ban on the Beehive State—where our relationship with alcohol is ambivalent, to say the least, and that ambivalence lives on to the present day. (Brian Staker) Spirited: Prohibition in America @ Brigham City Museum, 24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, 435-226-1439, through March 16. BrighamCityMuseum.org.

Utah Symphony With Ballet West: Debussy’s Jeux

FRIDAY 2.26

Pioneer Theatre Co.: An Inspector Calls

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FRIDAY 2.26

Spirited: Prohibition in America

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THURSDAY 2.25


Cho Girl

What’s your alcohol of choice?

I like tequila. For me, it doesn’t seem like that hardcore of a drink, but it is there.

Margaret Cho talks moms, I remember seeing you in one of your methadone and TV mediums. earliest, if not your first TV appearBY ENRIQUE LIMÓN ance on The Arsenio Hall Show, which elimon@cityweekly.net seems like a lifetime ago … @EnriqueLimon It was. That was over 20 years ago.

F

or comedian Margaret Cho, it’s been a long road to the Fashion Police soundstage. One flecked by growing up in 1970s San Francisco, where she attended grammar school in the Haight, and was later reared by drag queens on the Castro. A path also forever marked by the relationship with her immigrant parents to whom she was (and perhaps still is) the greatest enigma. A lifetime after her 1994 attempt at a mainstream sitcom that caused her to develop an eating disorder, Cho is now more comfortable in her skin than ever and at the top of her dissident game. Her live shows are a transgressive halfway house for those who live against the grain and, for an hour or so, feel comfort in being surrounded by their kin; a safe haven where along with sharing her thought process after getting high (“What would it be like to brush Chewbacca?”), she discusses the raging battle between “fag hags and dick widows,” along with more harrowing moments, like being sexually abused starting at age 5. Not one to be pigeonholed, Cho is set to release American Myth, a music album on April 29. In preparation, she’s previewed tracks like “Fat Pussy” and “(I Want to) Kill My Rapist” on her YouTube channel. The video for the latter features Cho on a Tarantino-esque mission to avenge her molester, aided by an army of schoolchildren. They all don black T-shirts emblazoned with a stylized tribal peony. “That’s my Korean name,” she says. In a candid chat with City Weekly prior to her Wiseguys gigs this weekend, Cho opened up on Hollywood’s diversity problem, tequila and preserving Joan Rivers’ legacy.

Do you still remember that?

Yeah, of course. I’m close with him, too. He did a redo of his show I guess last year or the year before and I was on that. He’s an old friend, and somebody who gave me my start; he’s like my Johnny Carson. He is my Johnny Carson.

In your act, you joke that when you told your mom you wanted to be a comedian, she responded saying, “Oh, maybe it’s better if you just die.” Is it fair to say she’s come around?

Oh, she loves it. She’s really proud and happy and loves my career. She’s thrilled about anything she can do, participate in, which is fun, too.

So do your parents realize you’re kind of a big deal now?

MARGARET CHO: THE WOMAN! THE COMIC! THE LEGEND!

Wiseguys Salt Lake City 194 S. 400 West 801-532-5233 Feb. 26-27, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $25 WiseGuysComedy.com

Yeah, I think so. They’ve figured it out.

The flip side of comedy—and you touch on this so well—is darkness. How do you balance anecdotal stories with the more personal ones?

Well, you have to always be funny, too. There’s gotta be a point to all the things you bring up, whatever it is. I always keep in mind that I am a stand-up comedian; the whole point of my job is to do that, so I always keep that in mind.

New Black is perhaps the most diverse show on TV—racially diverse—and so that’s really a great thing. I think we’re seeing more diversity, but there still needs to be more.

Let’s talk about American Myth and how you got in the mindset for that project.

It’s something that I’ve always done. I’ve done music for quite some time now, and I like to incorporate a little bit into my comedy, too, but it’s also separate.

Along with those vulnerable moments, you seem to be the definiYou’ve crisscrossed the entire coun- tion of defiant. Did you ever reach a I saw the video for “(I Want to) Kill try doing stand-up. Do different cities point where you wanted to give up? My Rapist,” and it moved me to No. I mean, I really appreciate my job, I love have different personalities? If so, tears. Do you think that’s weird? it and I love everything to do with it. [TravNo. That’s very common. I think people feel eling] to different places, getting to do difwhat do you think is Salt Lake’s? Yes, different cities do have different personalities and Salt Lake is very innocent, but then also not. You know, like, whenever I go, I have to go to a state liquor store— which is so weird and depressing—it’s like I’m in some methadone clinic or something.

Dan Santoni

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18 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

A&E

STAND UP

ferent things and meeting people, it’s cool.

Recently, I read an interview with Dascha Polanco from Orange Is the New Black), and it mostly harped on the I feel you. I just moved here, and it does fact that she is a woman minority workhave a needle-exchange-program feel. ing in Hollywood. Are you surprised that, so many years after All-American Yeah! It’s a weirdly controlled substance. Places that would normally serve alcohol Girl, this is still a discussion? there, don’t. It’s just weird [laughs].

Yeah! I mean, there is still not a lot of representation. I think that Orange Is the

a great deal of catharsis with it—even if it’s not your story—seeing all these little kids going and avenging you is a very startling image, and it can be very healing, too.

Cho, the patron saint of outsiders.

to see how much he was kind of honing in on and how much he knew about me without knowing me. I didn’t feel like it was a trick or planned out or anything, I think he’s the real deal.

She also wanted me to remark that you weren’t wearing any makeup.

Oh, no! I don’t like to. If I can help it, I try to get away from my makeup.

Finally, how’s your Fashion Police experience been? In her second voicemail, Mom wanted for me to convey that after Joan Rivers, you’re “the one.” Aww.

and that “all the others stink.” Like you, I have a very strong relation- … Oh no! That’s so funny. It’s been great, I ship with my mom, and she wanted me loved Joan so much and, you know, there’s no way to replace her—that’ll never hapto ask you about your appearance on pen—but we try to make a show that she would be proud of. She loved Fashion Police; Hollywood Medium With Tyler Henry it was her favorite thing that she ever did, so because she says it’s all rigged. we just try to do her justice every week. CW [Laughs] I don’t know, he’s pretty great. Tyler is a really cool kid, and I was surprised


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PERFORMANCE THEATER

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Based on a True Story Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, Feb. 25-March 6, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 4 p.m.; Sunday matinee, 2 p.m., PlanBTheatre.org Big Gay Broadway Sing-Along The Royal, 4760 S. 900 East, Feb. 26, 9 p.m., TheRoyalSLC.com Beauty and the Beast CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-2981302, Feb. 29-March 26, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org The Crucible CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Feb. 26-March 19, Monday & Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org Dallyn Vail Bayles: Broadway Lights SCERA, 745 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, Feb. 27 & 29, 7 p.m., SCERA.org Dirty Rotten Scoundrels The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through March 5, 8 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Feb. 26-March 19, Friday, Saturday and Monday, 7:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Disney on Ice: Frozen Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 801-325-7328, March 2-6, VivintArena.com

The Foreigner Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center, Midvale, 801-819-9954, through Feb. 27, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., MidvaleArts.com A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, Feb. 26, 27, March 4, 5, 7, 11, 12, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 27, 2 p.m., EmpressTheatre.com A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-5817100, March 1-3, 7:30 p.m., Tickets.Utah.edu (see p. 17) The Importance of Being Earnest Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-7100, Feb. 26-March 6, Tickets.Utah.edu An Inspector Calls Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through March 5, FridaySaturday, 8 p.m.; Monday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 p.m., PioneerTheatre.org (see p. 17) Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through April 9, Monday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., HaleTheater.org The Last Five Years The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through Feb. 26, 7 p.m., The-Grand.org My Mormon Valentine: The Original Utah Version of Confessions of a Mormon Boy The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through March 5, 7 p.m.; Feb. 27, 3 p.m., Facebook.com/ MormonBoyLive

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FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 19


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SATURDAY 2.27

Shannon Egan: No Tourists Allowed A Mormon-raised Utah native, journalist Shannon Egan was struggling with alcohol abuse when she decided to head to Sudan to cover humanitarian issues related to the civil war. What better place, after all, to find sobriety than a strict Muslim country that banned alcohol? But the turmoil there only leads to more emotional pain, and a traumatized response to what she sees around her takes Egan’s struggle with substance abuse to another level. No Tourists Allowed is a portrait both of the time and place in which physical atrocities were a regular part of the landscape, and of an individual trying to find her own personal peace. Now five years into her recovery, Egan reflects on sobriety and the nature of journalism in a war zone that can both shine a light on tragedy and make it worse. Join the author for a reading and signing today. (Scott Renshaw) Shannon Egan: No Tourists Allowed: Seeking Inner Peace and Sobriety in War-Torn Sudan @ Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Feb. 27, 5 p.m., free. WellerBookWorks.com

moreESSENTIALS My Valley Fair Lady Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through March 19, Monday & Wednesday-Saturday, multiple showtimes, DesertStar.biz The Pirate Queen Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, 801-984-9000, through April 2, Weekdays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., HCT.org Streetlight Woodpecker Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 6, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m.; March 1, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 27, 2 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, through Feb. 28, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., GoodCoTheatre.com

DANCE

Ballet West With the Utah Symphony Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-5336683, Feb. 26 & 27, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org (see p. 17) Night of Shining Stars Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Performing Dance Co. Hayes Christensen Theatre, 201 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7327, Feb. 25, 5:30 p.m.; Feb. 26 & 27, 7:30 p.m., Tickets.Utah.edu

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Westminster Concert Series: “Call of the Sea” Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801484-7651, Feb. 29, 7:30 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu/Music Ballet West with the Utah Symphony Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-5336683, Feb. 26 & 27, 7:30, UtahSymphony.org Music of the Masses Utah Chamber Artists, Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801581-7100, Feb. 29, 7:30 p.m., Tickets.Utah.edu NOVA Chamber Music: The Mind of a Genius Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 28, 3 p.m., Tickets.Utah.edu Red Dress Event The Browning Theater at Union Station, 2501 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-393-9890, Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., ChamberOrchestraOgden.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Dungeons & Comedy Muse Music Cafe, 151 N. University Ave., Provo, Feb. 27, 8 p.m., MuseMusicCafe.com Comedy Sportz Comedy Sportz, 36 West Center St., Provo, 801-377-9700, Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., ComedySportzUtah.com Don Friesen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-463-2909, Feb. 26-27, 8 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com The Greg Wilson Vegas Room in Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 541-999-5207, Feb. 26-27, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

HumorUs Jewish Community Center, 2 N. Medical Drive, 801-581-0098, Feb. 27, 6:30 p.m., EventBrite.com Margaret Cho Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Feb. 26-27, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 18) Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Quickwits Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Guest Writers Series: Douglas Kearney and Raphael Dagold Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, Feb. 25, 7 p.m., SaltLakeArts.org Tyler Beddoes: Proof of Angels Barnes & Noble, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, 801-229-1611, Feb. 25, 7 p.m., BarnesAndNoble.com Holli Anderson: Five: Out of the Ashes Barnes & Noble Sugar House, 1104 E. 2100 South, 801463-2610, Feb. 27, 1 p.m., BarnesAndNoble.com Shannon Egan: No Tourists Allowed Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Feb. 27, 5 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com (see left) Kathryn Purdie: Burning Glass Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-484-9100, March 1, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Downtown Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., alternate Saturdays through April 23, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org SoulWorks Fair: Season, Reason or Lifetime Dancing Cranes Imports, 673 E. Simpson Ave., 801-815-0588, February 27, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., DancingCranesImports.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

The Art of the Needle Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-965-5108, through March 2, CulturalCelebration.org Spirited: Prohibition in America Brigham City Museum, 24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, 435-226-1439, Feb. 25-March 16, BrighamCityMuseum.org (see p. 17)


BASILICO ITALIAN

Off-Airport Eats

DINE

authentic

Mexican Food & cantina Since 1997

Basilico aims for the hungry traveler. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

JOHN TAYLOR

I

Basilico’s risotto shrimp e spinaci

d w it h N o t v a li f fe r other o 0/16 1 / 3 Exp. 0

BlueIguanaRestaurant.net

165 S. West Temple • SLC

Below Benihana and across from the Salt Palace

801-533-8900

255 Main St • Park City Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main)

435-649-3097

FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 21

2110 W. North Temple 801-890-0071 BasilicoSLC.com

e urchas W ith P trees o f 2 E n any

| CITY WEEKLY |

BASILICO ITALIAN RESTAURANT

EER E FAPR PETIZ

traditional Italian appetizers include calamari fritti ($9.99), zucchini fritti ($6.99), bruschetta ($8.99) and mozzarella fritti ($8.99). Nobody can say that the cooks at Basilico don’t get their money’s worth from their deep fryer. So, we ordered the “tempura shrimp fritti” ($9.99). Apparently, “tempura” refers to the style of butterflying the shrimp, not the coating in which they’re cooked. Five shrimp were blanketed in a breadcrumb coating, deep-fried and served with an unusual housemade horseradish cocktail sauce. I love fried shrimp, but couldn’t detect enough shrimp flavor in these shrimp fritti, which got lost in the breading. I like the perfectly cooked pasta and flavor of Basilico’s spaghetti carbonara ($13.99)—except that it wasn’t traditional carbonara. There was no egg in the pasta (which traditionally is tossed with raw yolk), nor hardly any cheese. The dominant flavors were olive oil, garlic and chili flakes; in essence this was aio e oio with bacon and peas. No doubt, I will stop in and try more items from the Basilico menu when I’m in the vicinity of the airport again. I like their calzones, and want to try the eggplant parmigiana. For sure, I’ll be picking up more pizzas from Basilico to help me recover from long days of air travel. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

TVs in case you want to keep up on the news or watch sports. There are painted murals on the walls depicting foaming beer mugs and glasses brimming with wine. It’s a warm, inviting atmosphere. On my first Basilico visit, it was all about the pizza. And, I’m happy to report that my chef buddy didn’t steer me wrong. The restaurant is equipped with a wood-fired pizza oven in which calzones and pizzas are cooked. Greeted and seated by a very friendly hostess/server, I perused the menu and beverage lists. The latter include a fair array of beers, spirits, cocktails and wine— nothing very exotic, but entirely adequate. Pizzas at Basilico come in two sizes: personal and large. I’m not sure how big the personal pizza is, but the large isn’t all that large: six slices and about 14 inches across. The crust is very thin and crispy and the flavor is bold. Pizza sauces include standard (although better than average) tomato sauce, creamy Alfredo, pesto, barbecue and a verdure pizza with garlic-olive oil sauce. Small pizzas are $11.99 to $13.99, while large pies run $13.99 to $16.99. The $16.99 Italiano pizza was terrific. A nicely balanced pomodoro sauce thinly coats the pizza crust, followed by toppings of mozzarella cheese, sun-dried tomato, roasted red and yellow peppers and a fine grind (as opposed to large chunks) of Italian sausage made from pork and Angus beef. Also appearing on the Italiano pizza we ordered—though not mentioned on the menu—were slices of mushrooms and black olive. There’s a lot to love about this pizza, but the housemade sausage really set it apart. The very first item you see on the Basilico dinner menu, under antipasti, is edamame, which is the last thing I’d expect to find as antipasti in an Italian restaurant. Ditto chicken wings ($9.99) and steak fries ($4.49) served with ketchup. Other, more

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

do a fair amount of traveling, and it seems to be the rule that when I return from wherever I’ve been, it’s usually getting to be late in the evening, and I’m wishing that there were some decent places to eat near the Salt Lake City International Airport. I don’t always want to have to drive into downtown and deal with nighttime parking to find a meal, nor do I usually care to deal with the lines at Red Iguana, Salt Lake City’s default pre- and post-airport dining venue. Well, I was in such a predicament just recently, when I remembered an off-airport place that a chef told me about a few years ago but that I’d never visited. It was a restaurant called Lofte’s Pizzeria and Coffee, located on West North Temple just behind the Radisson Hotel, and only four miles from the airport. My chef friend raved about Lofte’s pizzas and so, being a pizza fiend myself, the eatery had always been in the back of my mind, although pretty far back. But when I found myself hungry and heading away from the airport a week or so ago, I decided to try Lofte’s. As it turned out, Lofte’s Pizzeria and Coffee had permanently closed. There is a Lofte’s Bar and Grill that’s still in business, with a full drink menu and specializing in “exotic” burgers: kangaroo, ostrich, wild boar, elk, buffalo, antelope and wagyu, to name a few. They also serve steaks and prime rib, along with bar bites and a few pasta, chicken and fish dishes. I’m not certain, but I would bet that Lofte’s Bar and Grill shares a kitchen with the adjacent restaurant, formerly Lofte’s Pizzeria and Coffee, which is now called Basilico Italian Restaurant. I suspect a common kitchen because some of the same dishes appear on both Lofte’s and Basilico’s menus. Basilico is a place where you won’t feel like an oddity dining solo. There’s a bar with stools on the right side of the restaurant, and during my visits more tables were taken up by customers dining alone than not. That’s predictable given the neighborhood, made up mostly of industry and hotels aimed at the business traveler: the aforementioned Radisson, Holiday Inn Express & Suites, Motel 6, Comfort Suites, Airport Inn, Candlewood Suites and so on. No one will think you “lonely” for dining alone here. The decor and ambiance are appealing: cocoa-colored wood floors and comfy light brown, cushioned chairs to match, subdued lighting, and a couple of flat-screen


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Food You Will

FOOD MATTERS

LOVE

BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Inversion Diversion

L U N C H

&

Pro Kids

D I N N E R

C O NTE M P O R A RY JA PA N E S E D I N I N G 1 8 W E S T M A R K E T S T R E E T, S L C • 8 0 1. 5 1 9 . 9 5 9 5 S U S H I • S A K E

ProStart (UtahRestaurantAssociation. org/Pro-Start.com) is a nationwide educational program that trains high-school juniors and seniors the skills and techniques to begin careers in culinary and hospitality positions in the restaurant industry. Under the leadership of Melva Sine, president of the Utah Restaurant Association (URA), Utah was the pioneering state for the ProStart program, which began in 1996. “ProStart is more than just a food course,” Sine says. “It helps inspire and educate our future generation of restaurateurs, chefs, managers and culinary professionals.” Currently, Utah ProStart students from 40 different high schools around the state are engaged in regional culinary team competitions being held throughout Utah. The 10 highest-placing teams will go on to compete on Tuesday, March 8, at the South Towne Expo Center for the state championships during the URA’s industry career fair, themed “Passport to Success.” The public is invited to the ProStart cooking competitions. The winning Utah team will go on to the national ProStart competition in Dallas, April 29-May 1. In addition, the 13-episode reality TV series called Utah Prostart Teen Chef Masters is now available to view at Ora.tv/TeenChefMasters.com.

italianvillageslc.com A

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Prime at Canyons Village (PrimeCanyons.com) in Park City has opened and is featuring kosher cuisine and Shabbat lunches and dinners, available either to dine-in or to have delivered to your hotel prior to Shabbat (advance reservations required for all meals). The tantalizing menu at Prime ranges from Kobe beef sliders, homemade sausages with white bean cassoulet, three-alarm chili and Grandma Bella’s chicken-noodle soup, to steak au poivre, chicken pot pie, mustard-crusted salmon, pasta dishes and slow-cooked lamb ribs. Personally, I can’t wait to try the 120-day aged salami chips. Prime also offers “grab & go” selections such as egg salad, turkey and tuna salad wraps, PB & J, a hot salmon plate, chicken plate and more. Shabbat dinners, priced at $85 per adult and $45 per child (under 11), are served Sunday-Thursday, 5:30-9 p.m.; Friday after synagogue service; and Saturday, 6:309:30 p.m.

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Pick up the NEW issue of Devour Utah

Quote of the week: If you keep kosher, the protagonist of your meal is not you; it is God. —Lauren F. Winner, Mudhouse Sabbath Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations.


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| CITY WEEKLY |

SERVING AUTHENTIC CHINESE & JAPANESE CUSINE

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FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 23

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24 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Sipping South Africa, Part 1

An introduction to the wines of South Africa. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

F

or the past couple of weeks, I’ve been on a wine mission. I’ve been tasting my way through some 20 different wines from South Africa. Yes, it’s a lonely job, but somebody has to do it. In the past, I’ve not exactly championed the South African wines I’ve tried, finding most to be mediocre, at best. Perhaps that’s why Wines of South Africa (WOSA)—a not-for-profit group based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, which represents and promotes South African wines to international markets—reached out to me. And so, I decided to once again turn my gaze to South Africa. I’m glad I did. Understanding some of the country’s winemaking history will help to understand the present-day wines. The first South African wines were vinified by Dutch colonists in the late 1650s who made wines from wild-growing native grapes. Those grapes, in tandem with Dutch farmers’ lack of winemaking skills, got South Africa’s wine industry off to a very

DRINK

rocky start. To put a not-so-fine point on it: The wines sucked. And so, a commander of the Dutch East India Co. named Jan van Riebeeck, stationed at South Africa’s southwestern tip (the Cape), sent a missive back to Holland requesting that a shipment of European vine cuttings be sent to him. French vine cuttings, most notably Chenin Blanc, were sent to Riebeeck and, within a decade, Chenin Blanc and Muscat vineyards were thriving on the Cape. Today, Chenin Blanc (also called Steen) is the most widely planted varietal in South Africa, accounting for nearly 25 percent of that country’s wine production. In all, some 40 different grape varietals are grown in South Africa, with most vineyards—or, “wine farms” as they’re called there—concentrated in the southwestern part of the country. As is true with our own country’s polluted past, South Africa’s earliest wine production was based, in part, on slave labor. In 1658, the Dutch brought slaves from Mozambique and Madagascar by ship to work the vineyards. And until the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986 imposing sanctions on South Africa was repealed in 1991—and apartheid itself ended in 1994—most Americans had never tasted wine from South Africa. But by the end of the 1990s, bottles of South African wine were beginning to show up in wine stores in the United States. Flash forward to today, and you’ll discover that South Africa

currently leads the entire world in sustainable and biodiverse winemaking. Black-owned businesses are gaining traction in the South African wine industry as well. According to WOSA, in 2012, 65 percent of all fairtrade wines sold worldwide originated in South Africa. Although Chenin Blanc is South Africa’s most widely planted wine grape, much of it is used for making cheap brandy. That’s a shame, because South Africa produces world-class Chenin Blanc—a floral, peachy wine that is sometimes compared to French Viognier and Alsatian Pinot Gris. Other common white wine varietals in South Africa include Colombard (called Colombar, there), Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Semillon, Riesling and Viognier— the last three mostly used for blending. When I think of South African red wine, I most often think of Pinotage. This is South Africa’s own grape variety—a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, which makes rustic, mostly simple and inexpensive reds. Although Pinotage is synonymous with South Africa, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah are the two widest-planted red-grape varietals. If there’s a South African wine you’re probably familiar with, it’s The Chocolate Block, a hugely popular, rich wine with chocolate-like flavors that’s even made its way into Costco stores that sell wine outside of Utah. CW

Next week in Part 2, we’ll taste our way through a mess o’ South African wines.


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“Private Whiskey Pairing Available Upon Request”

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$125/Person, includes Small Plates & Gratuity Very Limited Seating RSVP to info@bourbonhouseslc.com

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Fresh cheese, tomato jam, spinich, corn & bacon chow chow, sourdough


FREE FACE PAINTING EVERY MONDAY

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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves! Best Chicken & Ribs Greek Food

As the name implies, rotisserie chicken & ribs are No. 1 here, but there are plenty of other options for an on-the-go lunch, including burgers with sides of falafel & hummus. You’ll also discover great Greek fare in this Salt Lake City restaurant, including kebabs, gyros and both beef and pork souvlaki. Sandwiches include chicken cordon bleu, ham & cheese and turkey & cheese; vegetarian options and salads are also available. 111 E. 2700 South, Salt Lake City, 801-466-8311

Bistro 222

South Jordan • 10500 S. 1086 W. Ste. 111 • 801.302.0777 Provo • 98 W. Center Street • 801.373.7200 www.IndiaPalaceUtah.com

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26 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

WE CATER!

Bistro 222 offers classic and simple dishes in a modern upscale environment, all at a reasonable price and right in the heart of downtown. The lunch menu boasts a wide variety of choices, from Mexican to Italian and American, so it might be difficult to choose. For lunch, you can’t go wrong with the roasted beet gnocchi or the tasty mahi mahi tacos. For dinner, try the pan-seared scallops or the creamy spinach and ricotta ravioli. Bistro 222 also offers a variety of gourmet pizzas, like Margherita and prosciutto & arugula. There’s a full bar, too, and more than 80 different wines to choose from. 222 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-456-0347, Bistro-222.com

Caffe Niche

Deli Done Right

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

FEB 27TH

melody pulsipher

MAR 5TH

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This restaurant has evolved over the years, beginning as a limited-menu breakfast and lunch spot, then expanding to offer dinner on weekends. Now, you can enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week, along with brunch on Saturday and Sunday. A premium is put on the use of local products here; there’s not much that isn’t from Utah or its neighboring states of Idaho and Wyoming. This Salt Lake City gem is unique and inviting, with comfy, clean decor and uncluttered food to match, like the organic roast half-chicken, which is

MAR 12TH

Better burger... meet better breakfast! s e r ve d 7 : 0 0 - 1 1 : 0 0 a m M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

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Spedellis.com 2991 East 3300 South

a lesson in roasting perfection: perfectly cooked, with crispy skin and tender, juicy meat marinated in herb, garlic and lemon gremolata, served with a delicious warm salad of red quinoa and arugula. Like everything at Caffe Niche, it’s sensational, down-to-earth cuisine that is creative but not contrived. 779 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-433-3380, CaffeNiche.com

Gabor Brothers Main Street Grill

Gabor Brothers has been serving up homestyle Italian fare on Main Street in Layton since long before it was trendy. Thick or thin crust pizzas are popular here, and they’ll also prepare stuffed pizzas if requested. The calzones are solid and the homemade breadsticks disappear the minute they hit the table. Along with Italian dishes like shrimp scampi, fettuccine Alfredo, linguine with clams and meatball subs, you’ll also find American options such as hamburgers, cheesesteaks, spicy hot wings and crab cakes. Definitely order the pound of steamed mussels with creamy wine-butter sauce. 197 N. Main, Layton, 801-544-4344

Gourmandise The Bakery

Gourmandise offers a mind-boggling, nearly overwhelming selection of desserts, breads, pastries, cakes and bagels. This Salt Lake City bakery recently received updates like a redesigned interior and a new menu, along with wine service that includes wine flights and foodpairing options. Every new day brings a featured quiche made from scratch with quality Gruyère, creme fraiche and other top-notch ingredients, and they are divine. Even more impressive is the new small-plates dinner menu, which is offered in addition to the extensive regular menu—although these “small” plates aren’t very small. 250 S. 300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-3283330, GourmandiseTheBakery.com


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March 2 & 3 at the Salt Palace Convention Center

THE OTHER PLACE

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Grand Ballroom, South Entrance 100 South West Temple 11am - 2pm and 5pm - 9pm, both days

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EDDIE THE EAGLE

Feel-Good Formula

CINEMA

Eddie the Eagle aims for little more than every underdogstory bullet point. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

hy are movies about inspirational stories so uninspired? In a way, that’s a question with an obvious answer. Formulas are formulas for a reason: because they work. Hell, movie reviews often have a formula, too, and it would be more than slightly disingenuous not to acknowledge the value of certain basic elements at providing structure and shape. But what a movie like Eddie the Eagle reminds us is that when it comes to a feel-good story like this one, execution of those basic elements matters—especially if it’s a true story where an audience already knows the outcome. If you’re going to trot out every familiar plot and character beat, you’d better deliver them with some pizzazz. Instead, we get: The “make your protagonist likeable” backstory. Eddie the Eagle opens in 1973, showing English schoolboy Eddie Edwards dreaming big about someday being an Olympic athlete, despite a childhood condition that required him to wear a leg brace. As Eddie reaches adulthood (Kingsman: The Secret Service’s Taron Egerton), his enthusiasm doesn’t wane even remotely, even as he cycles through various possible sports—in an amusing montage that finds him sampling hurdles, pole vault and javelin, among others—on the way to trying out downhill skiing. Egerton throws himself into Eddie’s goofy single-mindedness, doing his best to provide some spark to a milk-drinking nice guy whose single defining quality is his gumption. And mere gumption wears out its welcome after a while. The obstacles, both benign and malignant. While he’s a hopeful for the British Olympic downhill skiing team in the 1988 Calgary Games, Eddie is ultimately rejected by the British federation—the decision that eventually steers him toward the far-less-

carefully overseen ski jumping—because he’s not the right sort for a team that needs to maintain an appealing image for sponsors. Class issues pop up more than once in Eddie the Eagle—he’s essentially hazed by posh Olympic teammates in Calgary, and denied admission to the team lunch—but the screenplay by Simon Kelton and Sean Macaulay isn’t particularly interested in digging into the idea that Eddie was daring to dream bigger than his circumstances of birth should permit. Indeed, they almost make a bigger villain out of Eddie’s father (Keith Allen), who repeatedly tries to steer his son toward practical work like plastering, as fathers are required by law to do. A down-on-his-luck coach with something to prove. This type of character is so prevalent—including Jason Sudeikis playing one just last week in Race—that Hugh Jackman has already played pretty much the same character in Real Steel. This time around, he’s playing Bronson Peary, a one-time hot-shot ski jumper who missed his shot at glory by not maximizing his potential, and is now drinking too much while working as a snowplow operator at the German facility where Eddie starts his ski-jump training. Jackman’s an appealing enough performer, but it’s hard to shake the sense that he’s on autopilot here, growling at Eddie’s plucky refusal to quit on his way toward grudging respect for his new student and, naturally, his own shot at redemption. The training montage. Does Eddie gradually improve after initially demonstrating

Hugh Jackman & Taron Egerton in Eddie the Eagle

comical ineptitude? Yes. Yes, he does. The Big Finish. Eddie the Eagle quite naturally builds toward Eddie’s qualification for and participation in the 1988 Calgary Olympics—only a year after taking up the sport—where he became something of a folk hero for his sheer enthusiasm at simply being there. And that might have been an interesting angle for the movie to take, as Eddie somehow reminded people that the spirit of the Olympics could involve respect for how amazing it was just to be an Olympian. But, just like the notion of Eddie’s opportunities being limited by his social class, that idea barely makes a cameo appearance. Eddie the Eagle shows almost as much determination as Eddie himself, but it’s a determination not to find a unique through-line for this story. He’s an underdog, and we get a chance to root for him, and beyond that, everyone’s work is done here. Pictures of the real-life Eddie the Eagle. We get it: This was a true story. Seriously, whoever is responsible for popularizing this obligatory postscript material has a lot to answer for. CW

EDDIE THE EAGLE

BB Taron Egerton Hugh Jackman Jo Hartley Rated PG-13

TRY THESE Cool Runnings (1993) John Candy Doug E. Doug Rated PG

Miracle (2004) Kurt Russell Patricia Clarkson Rated PG

Real Steel (2011) Hugh Jackman Max Kenton Rated PG-13

Kingsman: The Secret Service (2015) Colin Firth Taron Egerton Rated R


NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. EDDIE THE EAGLE BB See review on p. 28. Opens Feb. 26 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) GODS OF EGYPT [not yet reviewed] A thief and a mythical god take a quest through an ancient land. Opens Feb. 26 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

TRIPLE 9 BB A new film from director John Hillcoat should be reason to celebrate. From 2006’s revisionist Western The Proposition to 2009’s ultra-postapocalyptic The Road to 2012’s Prohibitionera drama Lawless, this is a filmmaker who smashes stereotypes in well-explored genres makes us see familiar stories from new angles. So what happened with Triple 9? How did Hillcoat manage to make an urban heist thriller—about criminals using the murder of a police officer as a diversion—feel so, well, generic? How did he manage to render his terrific cast—which includes such names as Chiwetel Ejiofor, Kate Winslet, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck and Anthony Mackie—as characters too unlikable to be genuinely engaging, but not complex or twisted enough to be intriguing anyway? Is it all down to the script, by newcomer Matt Cook? That doesn’t seem like enough of an explanation. There are certainly moments here that are superbly tense and dripping with anxiety. But then they’re over, and we’re left with a hollow emptiness. Hillcoat’s films have, previously, been haunting; they linger with you long after they’re over. But I had all but forgotten Triple 9 the minute it ended. Opens Feb. 26 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

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THEEB BBB The power in this Jordanian Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Feature comes from its simplest moments—and they might have been even stronger with a clearer sense of context. Set in 1916, it’s the story of a Bedouin boy named Theeb (Eid Al-Hwietat) who tags along when his brother, Hussein (Hussein Salameh Al-Sweilhiyeen), agrees to guide a British soldier (Jack Fox) through the Wadi Rum desert. Eventually, an attack by bandits leaves Theeb alone, depending on a wounded bandit for his survival, and young Al-Hwietat is impressive at conveying the physical and moral trials Theeb faces in a basic survival narrative. But writer/director Naji Abu Nowar provides almost no framework for the era of the Arab Uprising against the Ottoman Turks, or the implications for the lives of simple tribesmen caught in the middle of global-scale conflict. The British soldier’s comment that king and country are the things really worth fighting for collide with Theeb’s devotion to his family and tribe; Theeb proves engrossing in the moment, but misses its chance to really dig into that fundamental distinction. Opens Feb. 26 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

plotting and histrionic performances are at student-film levels. It’s a mediocre but largely unpretentious drama, probably of interest only to those with personal experience with its themes. Opens Feb. 26 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider

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TOUCHED WITH FIRE BB There is a book called Touched with Fire (subtitled ManicDepressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament), but this movie is not based on that book. Rather, it’s writer-director Paul Dalio’s semi-autobiographical story about bipolar characters who are helped by the book—whose psychologist author, Kay Jamison, appears as herself to endorse its contents (oh, boy). Carla (Katie Holmes) and Marco (Luke Kirby) are 20-something poets who meet in a psychiatric ward, where they bring out each other’s manic sides and must be separated. Once released, they pursue a relationship, watched warily by Carla’s parents (Christine Lahti and Bruce Altman) and Marco’s father (Griffin Dunne). The film’s message—take your meds if there are people depending on you—is reasonable but narrowly applicable, and Dalio doesn’t do anything to make it more universal. Moreover, the melodramatic

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Midseason Report

TV

Foolproof(ish) survival predictions for the Big Five network series.

Y

ou’re probably watching few, if any, Big Five (ABC, CBS, The CW, Fox and NBC) network shows via live broadcast anymore. Hell, you’re probably not even watching on an actual television set—do you even own a TV, comrade? Or, as you’ll see in some of the lists below, you’re just not watching them, period. Broadcast networks have taken a particularly brutal beating from cable/satellite and streaming services this season, what with unfair practices like easy-viewing options, non-garbage programming and limited pandering to the lowest common denominator of mouthbreathing ’Merica (E! excluded). Broadcast TV has become AM radio: It’s there, but who’s paying attention? Besides your uncle who believes that the moon landing never happened, Obama is a ninja assassin who snuffed out a Supreme Court justice and the NSA is spying on him though his Keurig? Through intense ratings number-crunching, socialmedia trend monitoring and proprietary government data gathered through household appliances (just kidding … or am I?), The Only TV Column That Matters™ has deduced which series will live on for at least another season, which have a 50/50 chance, and to which you should say goodbye (if you haven’t already—I know you’re out there, Wicked City fans … both of you).

As Good as Dead

Blood & Oil, Galavant, The Muppets, Nashville, Wicked City (ABC). Angel From Hell, Code Black, CSI: Cyber, The Good Wife, Mike & Molly, Person of Interest (CBS). Crazy ExGirlfriend, iZombie (The CW). American Idol, Bordertown, Cooper Barrett’s Guide to Surviving Life, Golan the Insatiable, The Grinder, Minority Report, Second Chance, Sleepy Hollow (Fox). Heroes Reborn, The Mysteries of Laura, The Player, Telenovela, Truth Be Told, Undateable (NBC). While there are some quality series in here that deserve a second chance (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Bordertown, Person of Interest—but, ironically, not Second Chance), at least we’ll finally be rid of the scourge of American Idol. Ryan Seacrest-free TV … the dream is realized [single tear].

Circling the Drain

American Crime, Castle, Marvel’s Agent Carter (ABC). Hawaii Five-0 (CBS). Jane the Virgin, Reign (The CW). Bones, Grandfathered, The Last Man on Earth (Fox). You, Me & the Apocalypse (NBC). Contrary to popular belief, and TNT reruns, Bones and Castle are not the same show, but they are expensive veterans that have likely reached the end of their respective lives—sorry, Mom. And, even though star Haley Atwell isn’t a 98-pound 22-year-old, could ABC cable cousin Freeform please step in and save Agent Carter?

Relax—They’ll Live Forever

The Bachelor, The Bachelorette, Blackish, Dancing With the Stars, Dr. Ken, Fresh Off the Boat, The Goldbergs, Grey’s Anatomy, How to Get Away With Murder, Last Man Standing, Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., The Middle, Modern Family, Once Upon a Time, Quantico, Scandal (ABC). 2 Broke Girls, The Amazing Race, The Big Bang Theory, Blue Bloods, Criminal Minds, Elementary, Life in Pieces, Limitless,

Marvel’s Agent Carter (ABC)

Madam Secretary, Mom, NCIS, NCIS: Los Angeles, Scorpion, Supergirl, Survivor (CBS). The 100, Arrow, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow, The Flash, The Originals, Supernatural, The Vampire Diaries (The CW). Bob’s Burgers, Brooklyn NineNine, Empire, Family Guy, Gotham, Hell’s Kitchen, Lucifer, New Girl, Rosewood, Scream Queens, The Simpsons, So You Think You Can Dance, The X-Files (Fox). The Blacklist, Blindspot, Chicago Fire, Chicago Med, Chicago PD, Grimm, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Shades of Blue, Superstore, The Voice (NBC). Few surprises here, though it is nice to see much-improved players like Superstore, Shades of Blue and Life In Pieces getting reprieves. But do you know anyone—I mean, anyone—who’s ever admitted to watching Scorpion? It’s like the moon landing all over again …

Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv

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CANNIBAL CORPSE

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Death metal’s biggest band, Cannibal Corpse, on achieving acceptance. BY MARC HANSON comments@cityweekly.net

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Mom isn’t quite as far along: “I don’t think my mom has ever read anything we’ve written, and I would never say, ‘Here, Mom— here’s my new CD,’” he says. Many of the band members now have children of their own, which brings a different sort of challenge: How does one explain to their kids that their career is built on music that graphically describes heinous things like rape, murder, cannibalism and mutilation? Mazurkiewicz concedes, “It’s going to be a tough one.” With his 10-year-old daughter, he approaches the subject with ageappropriate information. She doesn’t need to know the gory details, but she’s growing up in a much different world than existed 28 years ago, when Cannibal Corpse was born. “I think [kids] know what’s going on around them; they know of bad things,” he says. “It’s not like the ’50s, where everything’s perfect. Now, everyone is talking about zombies and things. I just want her to understand that what I do is just entertainment.” Cannibal Corpse is part of a certain entertainment niche, where death-metal bands and their fans can explore the darker nature of humanity and safely indulge in their own morbid curiosity. And if one is brave enough to go a little deeper, they will find that under all the blood and guts is some of the most serious, technically demanding music this side of jazz/fusion. The energy is so powerful it puts the listener in the moment. In an odd way, death metal is healing music. “Music itself is a powerful thing,” Mazurkiewicz says. “If we can be of any service like that, where people can feel solace [in our music], or we can help people through hard times … That’s a good feeling, and we’re happy to be a part of that.” CW

MONDAY

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hen Marilyn Manson surfaced in the mid-’90s to exploit teen angst and scare parents, heavy metal fans just yawned. Metalheads seek extremity in volume, speed and aesthetic—especially in death metal, one of the genre’s most extreme divisions. Building on Metallica and Slayer’s thrashy foundation, death metal cranked up the speed, distortion and musicianship—and took dark, disturbing lyrics and gruesome imagery to the next level. By the time Manson showed up, every taboo, sacrilege and depiction of violence had been explored within death metal, and Manson looked like what he is: Alice Cooper 2.0. Death metal bands like Cannibal Corpse stood back and smiled, saying, “That’s cute, kid.” Formed in 1988 in Buffalo, N.Y., Cannibal Corpse were part of the first wave of American death metal that included bands like Death, Deicide, Obituary and Morbid Angel. The band’s controversial lyrics, visceral album art and intense work ethic quickly brought them to the top of the underground metal scene, making them death metal’s best-selling act. But, for a scene that holds a lot of pride in maintaining its underground status, one wonders if death metal’s broadening mainstream appeal is a good thing. “It just shows you that society is changing, not that death metal is changing,” founding drummer Paul Mazurkiewicz says. “The way I look at it, the subject matter is just as brutal. As long as we feel we’re not doing anything different in our way, like playing to the masses to become more popular … I think it’s a great thing.” From Day 1, Cannibal Corpse has proven their metal mettle, never compromising their sound. From the release of the first album, Eaten Back to Life (Metal Blade) in 1990, the band was routinely vilified by the Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC) in its crusade to promote sensible shoes and sanitized lyrics. Former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kansas, even blamed the band, among others, for undermining national character. In response, Cannibal Corpse doubled down with album after album of vicious, precise death metal. The band is still going strong after 28 years, touring behind their 13th release, A Skeletal Domain (Metal Blade). “Now, more than ever, heavy metal is more accepted in the mainstream,” Mazurkiewicz says. “Society has had time to adapt. Generations have been subjected to [death metal], as opposed to when we started.” But has there ever been anything on a Cannibal Corpse album that they would rather their parents not see? “Pretty much all of it, man,” Mazurkiewicz says. “It was strange, though, back in the early days. They just didn’t understand, of course—at all. And they’re not going to. They’re your parents, and they’re not into this kind of stuff, whatsoever.” It may surprise people that the members of Cannibal Corpse all enjoyed fairly decent upbringings. “Our parents know how we are as people, [so] I was never worried [that they’d judge me],” Mazurkiewicz says. They didn’t exactly embrace their son’s buzzsaw-ing songs about blood ’n’ guts, but they came around. “My dad, now, is a big fan. He goes to the shows and listens to the albums.”

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Hip Hop Honcho

Erasole James of Dine Krew immersed in art and artistry. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

T

he apartment complex where Harrison Montgomery lives is populated with creatives. Tyler Reese, co-vocalist of local hip-hop group Scenic Byway, lives below him, and Nick Romer, the band’s trumpet player, lives in the next building. “I always hear acoustic guitar and a beautiful woman’s singing voice coming through the wall,” Montgomery says. “Guy down there? Dances ballet.” Montgomery is probably more familiar as Erasole James of the popular Salt Lake City hip-hop group Dine Krew. So he’s accustomed to—and clearly enjoys—being surrounded by fellow artists. He shares this apartment with his girlfriend Kenzie Udseth, and their artwork, as well as that of their friends, adorns every wall. “Art,” Montgomery says, “is like currency here. I trade paintings, mixtapes, Dine Krew CDs …” He steps quickly around the couch to his coffee table, picks something up, brushes it off, and hands it over for inspection. “Tyler makes things out of polyurethane. One day, I gave him a piece of art and the very next day, he brought me this rolling tray.” Roughly the size of a placemat, the mintgreen tray has black Rorschach swirls that, if you stare closely enough, resemble intricate fractals. “He said it’s an accident.” The look on Montgomery’s face says he loves it nonetheless, partly because of the mutual exchange of art. Montgomery is talkative and affable, a storyteller. Those qualities likely came in handy when he was invited to join his friends in Dine Krew—especially since he wasn’t even into hip-hop at the time. He got a crash course when he transferred from West High to East High, joining his friends Shelby Washington, Larsen Bernard and Josh Marty, along with Judge Memorial student Gus Robertson, to form “the core of the Dine.” At West High, Montgomery was doing his “emotional, Jackass/CKY, ‘fuck the world’ thing. Hip-hop took me out of that—boom, instantly.” Dine Krew invited him into the group just before an end-of-year talent

Erasole James

show in 2008. As a hip-hop tenderfoot, Montgomery had no real influences, no role models or inspirations. Except the ones surrounding him. “I wasn’t comfortable with it,” he says. “I was embarrassed, and I was shy.” Montgomery wrote a single verse to perform with the group. He doesn’t recall the lyrics, but says it’s preserved “somewhere on Facebook.” Dine Krew’s first gig was a hit. His appetite for beats and rhymes whetted, Montgomery plunged into hip-hop music, growing along with Dine Krew. Together, they rose to the top of the SLalt Lake City hip-hop scene, spawning side and solo projects along the way. Montgomery himself has dropped two albums with Dine Krew producer Piccolo as WE-ET’s, and two solo projects. In August, he put out the full-length Tawa’s Nephew (EraJames.Bandcamp.com), a multifaceted tour de force written over two years, created with 11 different producers (including Piccolo) and incorporating jazz, psychedelia and Native American influences Montgomery absorbed from performing with Dine Krew. Last month, he debuted the EP No Time for Era (Damn Son). Both find Montgomery, whose stage name Erasole signifies that it’s time for him to emerge as an artist, having become a sly wordsmith and skilled emcee. But he’s not about to leave his Krew, where he learned the hip-hop ropes. “Larsen and Shelby really shaped me into the emcee I am today,” Montgomery says. “’Cause I never really knew much about music. I wasn’t a historian and never tried to be. I know I’m ignorant to music culture nowadays. I know I should know more about the birth of hip-hop.” Except he’s proof that you don’t need to know everything to make great hip-hop music; all you really need is confidence, and an emotional connection. “Anybody can do it, no matter where you’re from, no matter who you are,” he says. “Those guys made me do it because I saw how much fun they were having, and how positively it affected their lives. Hiphop, and the brotherhood of Dine Krew, really brought us all together in that super special way that no one could imitate, ever.” CW

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THURSDAY 2.25 Freakwater

Freakwater’s Catherine Irwin and Janet Bean are perhaps alt-country’s answer to the Carter Family, with their unusual vocal harmonies. And coming out of the legendary Chicago alternative band Eleventh Dream Day, Bean has indie cred for miles, having founded both bands in the late ‘80s. This puts Freakwater at the beginning of the alt-country/No Depression craze, except they eclipse that descriptor with their individualism. Their brand of country-folk is a study in American gothic—minimal and melancholy (and occasionally menacing)—with a murder ballad here and there, as befitting the genre. Freakwater’s latest album, Scheherazade (Bloodshot, 2016) is their first since 2006, when they released Thinking of You… (Thrill Jockey), a collaboration with experimental indie rockers Califone. A hiatus ensued as Bean and Irwin explored other projects, but Freakwater reunited in 2013 on the occasion of the 20thanniversary reissue of their 1993 album Feels Like the Third Time (Thrill Jockey). The larger ensemble on Scheherazade enables them to more loosely, yet also more fully, follow their musical fables to their seemingly inevitable conclusions. Jaye Jayle (the alter ego of Young Widows’ Evan Patterson) opens. (BS) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $17, TheStateRoomSLC.com

UFO TV CD Release

UFO TV is the former Red Telephone, until the local psych band found out there was already a band in Boston named after the famous song by ‘60s psych-folk band Love. It’s really too bad, because the “Psych Lake City” band is arguably more aligned with the original vision of Arthur Lee & Co. in Love than the Beantown pop outfit. Their new moniker, UFO

UFO TV

TV, is likely to lead you down the internet path of bizarro movies, which itself isn’t a bad thing, but when you think up a name to call your project, consider what similar search results might ensue. Electric Life Light Show is their debut album, self-released, and it’s everything the title suggests, plus they add an extra oomph, recording the tunes live. Joining the band for the occasion are Hot Vodka, Red Dog Revival and The Nods—one of the hottest punk groups in town right now. (BS) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 2.26-27 Hell’s Belles

It seems like there’s at least one tribute band playing Salt Lake City each month. Maybe even each week. But there are three playing this week at The State Room and O.P. Rockwell. On Saturday, O.P. hosts Poor Man’s Whiskey, who play bluegrassy “Californicana” originals, but have an album of Pink Floyd covers and, on Saturday, plan a set of Eagles tunes. On Wednesday, the O.P. stage welcomes the Johnny Cash tribute, Cash’d Out. And Hell’s Belles, an allfemale AC/DC tribute, is a longtime local (and now international) favorite that plays O.P. on Friday

Freakwater and at The State Room on Saturday. They’ve all earned their reputation as top-notch translators of someone else’s music and aesthetic. But if I had to pick one to endorse, I’d go with the Belles, who (somewhat ironically) throw some serious cock rock. Buck-wild Gibson SG-wielding Adrian “Angus” Conner and company have just as much stomp and swagger as the real deal. In fact, maybe a bit too much. Local rock & roll animals Thunderfist open. (RH) Friday @ O.P. Rockwell, 628 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $25-$35, OPRockwell.com; Saturday @ The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $25, TheStateRoomSLC.com

Hell’s Belles


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| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

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SATURDAY 2.27 Heritage Blues Orchestra live music sunday afternoons & evenings 2

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We carry e-cigarette supplies including juices, atomizers, and mods

It’s hard to replace someone like the late New Orleans soul/R&B/jazz legend Allen Toussaint, who was originally scheduled to headline tonight before he passed away Nov. 10, 2015— but the Heritage Blues Orchestra has a head start on their own stardom. Built around a core trio of guitarist/pianist/vocalist Bill Sims Jr., vocalist (and Sims’ daughter) Chaney Sims, and guitarist/vocalist Junior Mack, HBO can range in size from four to nine members—but in any configuration, their sound is huge. Starting, of course, with a solid blues base, the group spices things up with elements of gospel, postmodern jazz, New Orleans brass and even European influences. In their stripped-down lineup—with just guitars, keys, moans, cries and hand-claps propelling their renditions of songs by Muddy Waters, Son House and Leadbelly—it’s powerful music. But with the full nine-member band activated, the rhythm and brass sections adding backbeat and volume? It’s white-hot. There’s a reason HBO was nominated for a Grammy and two Blue Music Awards, and received a Living Blues Critics Poll Award for Best Blues Album. (RH) Eccles Center Theater, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 7:30 p.m., $25-$75, EcclesCenter.org

Animal Collective

WEDNESDAY 3.2 Animal Collective, Rat King

In 2009, The Boston Phoenix called the Baltimore, band Animal Collective “the next logical iteration of the jam-band scene.” Well, their use of electronics and goofy sense of experimentation evokes the same kind of response as jam bands. Namely, that Animal Collective certainly must be possessed of or by some kind of childlike naïveté and, at least on some level, it’s something not to take seriously. Not that that’s a bad thing. But you have to wonder if not taking it seriously is the whole point, if you catch my drift, and (to borrow from George Dubya) ponder whether you haven’t just completely “misunderestimated” them. Their latest, Painting With (Domino, 2016), seems like the musical version of Bob Ross in that any human frailty or failing can be converted, with the right twist of the paintbrush, into “happy little trees.” If you stare long enough at those trees, they have gorillas (or guerrillas) in them—but they aren’t dangerous. Except, maybe, to your mental health. Which needs a little lightening up, anyway. New York hip-hop group Rat King opens. (BS) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $26, DepotSLC.com

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SUNDAY 2.28 The Yawpers

They were just here in November, but here’s another chance to see The Yawpers, as the Denver-based trio continues to tour behind their sophomore release, American Man (Bloodshot). The album is a feast of gritty, sweaty altcountry, influenced as much by classic rock and Minneapolitan punk as country and blues. It’s also informed by great poetry (one poet, in particular—look to the band’s name, or track 8, for a clue) and literature. And, when good words, dirty acoustic guitar and taut slide work combine, you’ve got a great reason to call in sick on Monday. Here are four more: local openers Red Bennies, Cactus Farm, Mañanero, and Utah County Swillers. I’ll be damned: My throat’s a little scratchy. (Randy Harward) Devil’s Daughter, 533 S. 500 West, 7 p.m., $6, DevilsDaughterSLC.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

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BLACK SHEEP Bar & Grill

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WEDNESDAY/SUNDAY

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free karaoke

Wednesdays 7pm-10pm $5 cover JAZZ AT THE 90

Feb 24: open jam night with Joe mCQueen

sundays 12pm-3pm no cover

LIVE JAZZ BRUNCH

feb 28: Chris Petty trio

enjoy food & drinks

WED: TEXAS HOLD ‘EM - FREE 8PM

the crafty crew craft classes Wednesdays 7pm th feb 24 : st. patty’s day wreath to register go to thecraftycrew.org FRIDAY & SATURDAY February 26th &February 27th

qualify for the 2016 national talent quest every tuesday nightWe’re a regional venue!

THURSDAY

all-you-can-eat Lunch buffet $8.95 12pm - 3pm

live band karaoke w/ this is your band - FREE! 9pm - 12pm THURSDAY, MARCH 17TH

st. patricks day party

and our annual lads to lasses fashion show! 7pm

following the show stick around for dj dance party w/ dj dizzy d food & Drink specials including george’s famous corned beef & cabbage dinner free swag I free “photobooth”

Live band: off the record PRIVATE SPACE FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES & MEETINGS. CALL OR STOP BY FOR A TOUR! 150 W. 9065 S. • CLUB90SLC.COM • 801.566.3254 • OPEN EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

THURSDAY 2.25

FRIDAY 2.26

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Chase Bryant + The Wayne Hoskins Band (The Depot) DJ Courtney (Area 51) Faith Johnson + Emily Brown + Goldmyth + Mia Grace (Velour) Echo Mind + Fired Pilots + Middle Mountain (Muse Music Cafe) Freakwater + Jaye Jayle (The State Room) see p. 34 Gold Standard (O.P. Rockwell) Gravespell (The Loading Dock) Harm’s Way + Takeover + Deprive + Repulse (Kilby Court) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) Jeremiah Maxey (Silver Star Cafe) John Davis (Hog Wallow) Ogden Unplugged feat. Simply B (Lighthouse Lounge) Michelle Moonshine (Northfork Table and Tavern) Recess Club feat. Nightfreq Takeover (Club Elevate) Funk n Gonzo + Herban Empire (The Royal) Rock En Español (Liquid Joe’s) Telluride Meltdown (The Corner Store) Therapy Thursdays with Twonk Di Nation + Brillz + Party Favor + Jackal (SKY SLC) UFO TV + Hot Vodka + Red Dog Revival + The Nods (The Urban Lounge) see p. 34

Arcangel “La Maravilla” + Toby Love & Friends (Infinity Event Center) The Battlefield (Snowbasin Ski Resort) The Blue Aces + New Shack + Drape + Haley Hendrickson (Velour) blessthefall (The Complex) The Brocks (Alleged) The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) From Indian Lakes + Soren Bryce (Kilby Court) HÄANA (Summit) Hell’s Belles + Thunderfist (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 34 Jeremiah & The Red Eyes (Hog Wallow) Johnny Cash Birthday Bash with Jackson Cash + A Band Named Sue (A Bar Named Sue) Mr. Vandal + Erasole James + DSz Khensu (The Urban Lounge) see p. 32 NERO (Park City Live) Nervosa (Metro Bar) The Night Spin Collective (Area 51) Please Be Human (The Owl Bar) Scarface (Liquid Joe’s)

SATURDAY 2.27 LIVE MUSIC

All Hope contained + King’s Heir + Fired Pilots + The Shacks (Gezzo Hall)


BIG REDD PROMOTIONS PRESENTS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26TH LEDD FOOT

CONCERTS & CLUBS

WEDNESDAY 3.2

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH

SAL’TRIPIN

Audio Social Dissent 2016, feat. Timmy’s Organism, Wolf Eyes, Video

Critics and music fans slobber over everything that comes out on Jack White’s Detroitbased indie label, Third Man Records, including the 2015 releases by wild garage rockers Timmy’s Organism, far-out noise merchants Wolf Eyes and Austin “hate wave” punks, Video. Naturally, that led to the label trotting out their show-ponies on this package tour, which also features, at least on this date, Salt Lake City’s own prize rock & roll equines The Nods. Quoth the press release, “It wouldn’t be a true TMR affair if it were just greasy riffs, Dadaist rock wreckage, and furious punker spit.” That means there’s limited-edition merch! (Randy Harward) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $12 in advance, $14 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

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CORNERED BY ZOMBIES

FEB 29:

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

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MAR 2: THIRD MAN RECORDS TOUR

DEAD THINGS SUNCHASER FEB 25: UFO TV ALBUM RELEASE 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

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RED DOG REVIVAL THE NODS FEB 26: SLMA CEREMONY 9PM DOORS $5

9PM DOORS FREE BEFORE 10PM $4 AFTER

FEB 28:

MR. VANDAL

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80’S DANCE PARTY! FLASH & FLARE

THAT 1 GUY

FUTURE DEATH NO SUN

WOLF EYES

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ERASOLE JAMES DSZ KHENSU FEB 27:

8PM DOORS

MAR 3:

ALEXANDER ORTEGA

MAR 4:

DUBWISE

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

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AN EVENING WITH...

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bar in town SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 02.25 JOHN DAVIS

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FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 39

Apr 23: PaceWon Apr 28: The Widdler Apr 29: Napalm Death & Melvins May 3: The Slackers May 5: 8th Annual Beat Society May 7: The Beatles Tribute Night May 8: The Thermals May 12: Big Wild May 13: Tortoise May 19: Sticky Fingers June 4: The Velvet Underground Tribute Night July 2: The Rolling Stones Tribute Night Aug 6: Queen Tribute Night Nov 7: Peter Hook & The Light

Enjoy Live Music &

| CITY WEEKLY |

Apr 3: Ra Ra Riot Apr 4: Lissie Apr 5: Night Beats Apr 7: Dumb Luck Album Release Apr 8: Pete Yorn Apr 9: Peter Murphy (Seated Event) Apr 10: DMA’s Apr 12: Matthew Logan Vasquez of Delta Spirit Apr 13: Autolux Apr 15: The Cave Singers Apr 16: Delusions Of Grandeur Apr 17: Cloud Cult Apr 18: The Movement Apr 22: Hook N Sling

SPECIALS

COMING SOON Mar 5: LNE Presents Prince Fox Mar 8: Bernie Sanders Fundraiser Mar 9: FREE SHOW Westward Mar 10: STWO Mar 11: El Ten Eleven Mar 12: Ty Segall & The Muggers Mar 15: Dance Off Mar 16: FREE SHOW Charles Ellsworth Mar 17: FREE SHOW Slug Localized Mar 18: Thriftworks Mar 19: Rob Crow’s Gloomy Place Mar 21: Murder By Death Mar 22: Young Fathers Mar 23: Geographer & Crookes Mar 24: La Luz Mar 25: San Fermin Mar 28: Chairlift Mar 29: Cullen Omori Mar 30: Shannon And The Clams Mar 31: FREE SHOW Golden Plates Apr 1: Dubwise Apr 2: DIRT FIRST

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FEB 24:

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

$5 TICKETS | 21+


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40 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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Friday 2/26

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American Hitmen (The Royal) Andrew Wiscombe (Harley & Bucks Restaurant) Azizi Gibson (In The Venue) Barbaloot Suitz (Hog Wallow) The Battlefield (Snowbasin Ski Resort) Ché Zuro (Deer Valley) The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) HÄANA (Summit) Hell’s Belles (The State Room) see p. 34 Heritage Blues Orchestra (Eccles Center) see p. 36 Johnny Cash Birthday Bash with Jackson Cash + A Band Named Sue (A Bar Named Sue on State) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Luna Lune + Barsie + Kitfox + Kathleen Frewin (Velour) Michelle Moonshine (Park City Mountain) Poor Man’s Whiskey (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 34 Royal Bliss (Kamikazés) Secrets (The Loading Dock) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) STööKI SOUND (Club X) Terence Hansen Trio (Stein Erickson Lodge)

(Garage on Beck) Mike Rogers (Deer Valley) Skizzy Mars (In The Venue) That 1 Guy (Urban Lounge) The Yawpers (Devil’s Daughter) see p. 37

SUNDAY 2.28

WEDNESDAY 3.2

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

The Battlefield (Snowbasin Ski Resort) Blaze Ya Dead Homie (The Complex) Chris Petty Trio (Club 90) The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) The Last Honkytonk Music Series

LIVE MUSIC

Anderson East + Dylan LeBlanc (The State Room) Music for the Masses (Libby Gardner) Ringo Deathstarr + Future Death + No Sun (The Urban Lounge) The Royal Blues Jam (The Royal)

TUESDAY 3.1 LIVE MUSIC

Cannibal Corpse + Obituary +Cryptopsy + Abysmal Dawn (The Complex) see p. 34 Eleanor Friedberger (The State Room) I, Breather (The Loading Dock) Music Makes Music (TH Bell)

Animal Collective + Rat King (The Depot) see p. 36 Audio Social Dissent 2016 (The Urban Lounge) see above Cash’d Out (O.P. Rockwell)

Holladay’s Premier Martini & Wine Bar

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

wednesday

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with special guests betty hates everything | colonel lingus Monday 2/29 hosted by robby reynolds & friends

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FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 41


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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

© 2016

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 43

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

SUDOKU

1. ____ Rida ("Right Round" rapper) 2. Note of indebtedness 3. Made an unwanted pass 4. Quite a lot 5. "That's rich!" 6. "The ____ Love" (1987 R.E.M. hit)

49. Swinging occasion? 50. Everglades bird 51. Scrumptious 53. Build 54. Sue Grafton's "____ for Alibi" 56. "____ se habla español" 60. Carrier letters 61. Alley ____ 62. Curry is in it: Abbr.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWN

7. What a vacay provides 8. Odds opener 9. "Go ahead and try!" 10. Not on time for 11. Chooses for office 12. Al ____ 14. "What's your ____?" 18. End of the workweek: Abbr. 22. "Just kidding!" 23. Capture 24. The "U" of ICU 25. Silk Road desert 29. Examined before robbing 32. "It's f-f-freezing!" 33. ____ Lingus 34. Start of the workweek: Abbr. 35. Doofus 37. Creepy feeling 38. Good name for someone born on 12/25 39. Aboard the QE2, perhaps 40. Butt (in) 44. 12/25 drink 45. Surround with light 46. Armpit, anatomically 47. Kvetcher's attention-getters 48. Does some magazine work

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Garden of Eden tree 4. "What's this?!" 7. Stirred up 13. Circle 15. One shooting the breeze? 16. Cry from Speedy Gonzales 17. With 59-Across, "Don't even ask it!" 19. Spruce up 20. Pink-slip 21. With 59-Across, a roundabout way of asking something 23. With 59-Across, a person can't wait to ask it 26. Jazz saxophonist Coleman 27. "Without ____" (1990 Grateful Dead live album) 28. Fall mo. 30. Rocky's attention-getters 31. USO show audience members 32. Rum-soaked cake 34. Long March leader 36. With 55-Across, 56-Across and 59-Across, a schoolteacher's cliché (that proves to be literally true in this grid ... for a hint, look closely at "56-Across") 41. Make a mistake 42. A seeming eternity 43. Swanson on "Parks and Recreation" 45. Canal zone? 47. Ben Jonson wrote one "to Himself" 48. Jack for Jacques? 49. It's a worrisome feeling 52. With 59-Across, a judge might admonish an attorney for asking it 55. See 36-Across 57. "The Battle With the Slum" writer Jacob ____ 58. Farm machines 59. See 36-Across 63. "Ready when you are!" 64. Trojan's sch. 65. Name-dropper, perhaps 66. Warm and cozy 67. Novel conclusion? 68. Valedictorian's pride, for short


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44 | FEBRUARY 25, 2016

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eing a new mom can be isolating and mentally exhausting if you don’t have the right support system. For moms with little kids and a need to exercise and socialize, Fit4Mom is a dream come true. Currently franchised in a handful of locations along the Wasatch Front, Fit4Mom provides fitness classes and an opportunity to network with other moms. Nicole Bennion, owner of the Murray franchise, is passionate about health and wellness. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in health promotion and worked in corporate wellness for about six years in Iowa. After she had her daughter, she decided to be a stay-athome mom, but eventually she missed the opportunity to help others. “I heard about Fit4Mom and tried a few of their classes,” she says. “They were awesome, and, before long, I started wanting my own franchise.” Bennion launched her Murray business in December 2015 and, so far, has loved the experience of helping new moms socialize and improve their fitness levels. Fit4Mom isn’t just about losing weight or toning up—yes, you will get a great workout in, but there’s so much more. “It’s also about mom nights and giving mothers time to themselves to recharge,” Bennion says. Fit4Mom offers activities for the entire family as well. Classes include playgroups for kids with crafts and learning opportunities. “One class we will focus on colors, another we might learn about the weather,” Bennion says. Fit4Mom Murray currently offers a class called Stroller Strides at 9 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at Fashion Place Mall (6191 S. State, Murray, FashionPlace.com). Participants meet

Fit4Mom participants love the positive motivation and good company.

up outside H&M. “When the weather warms up, we will switch to local parks,” Bennion says. The Stroller Strides class is a 60-minute, total body workout incorporating power walking, strength, toning, songs and activities lead by a certified fitness instructor. The routines are varied so attending class never gets tedious, and attendees can be assured of the workout’s efficacy. Even better, each workout is tailored to different ability levels, so anyone can participate. And because each workout takes place in everyday locations, like the mall or gym, participants can learn the routines and practice at home. The South Valley franchise, with locations in Sandy, Daybreak, Herriman and Draper, also offers additional classes. “The feeling of helping mothers is really the ultimate blessing,” Bennion says. “I think that being part of other moms’ lives and being able to help them feel better about themselves and providing them with an opportunity to hang out with other moms is a great service. Sometimes, as a mom, you feel so alone, so it’s great to get together with other moms and get support from each other.”

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Just one species has a big enough throat to swallow a person whole: the sperm whale. If you happen to be sailing the high seas any time soon, I hope you will studiously avoid getting thrown overboard in the vicinity of one of these beasts. The odds are higher than usual that you’d end up in its belly, much like the biblical character Jonah. (Although, like him, I bet you’d ultimately escape.) Furthermore, Aries, I hope you will be cautious not to get swallowed up by anything else. It’s true that the coming weeks will be a good time to go on a retreat, to flee from the grind and take a break from the usual frenzy. But the best way to do that is to consciously choose the right circumstances rather than leave it to chance.

Make lemonade, of course! You might wish that all the raw ingredients life sends your way would be pure and authentic, but sometimes the mix includes artificial stuff. No worries, Libra! I am confident that you have the imaginative chutzpah and resilient willpower necessary to turn the mishmash into passable nourishment. Or here’s another alternative: You could procrastinate for two weeks, when more of the available resources will be natural. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your Mythic Metaphor for the coming weeks is dew. Many cultures have regarded it as a symbol of life-giving grace. In Kabbalah, divine dew seeps from the Tree of Life. In Chinese folklore, the lunar dew purifies vision and nurtures longevity. In the lore of ancient Greece, dew confers fertility. The Iroquois speak of the Great Dew Eagle, who drops healing moisture on land ravaged by evil spirits. The creator god of the Ashanti people created dew soon after making the sun, moon and stars. Lao-Tse said it’s an emblem of the harmonious marriage between Earth and Heaven. So what will you do with the magic dew you’ll be blessed with?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “People don’t want their lives fixed,” proclaims Chuck Palahniuk in his novel Survivor. “Nobody wants their problems solved. Their dramas. Their distractions. Their stories resolved. Their messes cleaned up. Because what would they have left? Just the big scary unknown.” Your challenge in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to prove Palahniuk wrong, at least in regards to you. From what I can tell, you will have unprecedented opportunities to solve dilemmas and clean up messy situations. And LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) When life gives you lemon juice from concentrate, citric acid, if you take even partial advantage of this gift, you will not be high-fructose corn syrup, modified cornstarch, potassium plunged into the big scary unknown, but rather into a new phase citrate, yellow food dye and gum acacia, what should you do? of shaping your identity with crispness and clarity.

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Slipping into this darkness, These demons they pull me down. Wishing i can stop these feelings, By my chains they keep me bound. Living in fear from the violence, Silence is the only way. Hoping that god will save me, But his hands seem miles away. Wishing i could just touch him, But these demons keep pulling me back. Praying that god will save me, With a full on angel attack. QUINTON CASE Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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FEBRUARY 25, 2016 | 45

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “We are defined by the lines we choose to cross or to be confined by,” says Virgo writer A.S. Byatt. That’s a key meditation for you as you enter a phase in which boundaries will be a major theme. During the next eight weeks, you will be continuously challenged to decide which people and things and ideas you want to be part of your world, and which you don’t. In some cases you’ll be wise to put up barriers and limit connection. In other cases, you’ll thrive by erasing borders and transcending divisions. The hard part—and the fun part—will be knowing which is which. Trust your gut.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You may be familiar with the iconic children’s book Where the Wild Things Are. It’s about a boy named Max who takes a dream-like journey from his bedroom to an exotic island, where he becomes king of the weird beasts who live there. Author Maurice Sendak’s original title for the tale was “Where the Wild Horses Are.” But when his editor realized how inept Sendak was at drawing horses, she instructed him to come up with a title to match the kinds of creatures he could draw skillfully. That was a good idea. The book has sold over 19 million copies. I think you may need to deal with a comparable issue, Aquarius. It’s wise to acknowledge one of your limitations, and then capitalize on the adjustments you’ve got to make.

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THE DARKNESS

| COMMUNITY |

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “Your illusions are a part of you, like your bones and flesh and memory,” writes William Faulkner in his novel Absalom, Absalom! If that’s true, Leo, you now have a chance to be a miracle worker. In the coming weeks, you can summon the uncanny power to rip at least two of your illusions out by the roots—without causing any permanent damage. You may temporarily feel a stinging sensation, but that will be a sign that healing is underway. Congratulations in advance for getting rid of the dead weight.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You have cosmic clearance to fantasize about participating in orgies where you’re loose and free and exuberant. It’s probably not a good idea to attend a literal orgy, however. For the foreseeable future, all the cleansing revelry and cathartic rapture you need can be obtained through the wild stories and outrageous scenes that unfold in your imagination. Giving yourself the gift of pretend immersions in fertile chaos could recharge SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) your spiritual batteries in just the right ways. It’s prime time for you to love your memory, make vivid use of your memory and enhance your memory. Here are some hints GEMINI (May 21-June 20) “Hell is the suffering of being unable to love,” wrote novelist about how: 1. Feel appreciation for the way the old stories of J.D. Salinger. If that’s true, I’m pleased to announce that you can your life form the core of your identity and self-image. 2. Draw now ensure you’ll be free of hell for a very long time. The cosmic on your recollections of the past to guide you in making decisions omens suggest that you have enormous power to expand your about the imminent future. 3. Notice everything you see with an capacity for love. So, get busy! Make it your intention to dissolve intensified focus, because then you will remember it better, and any unconscious blocks you might have about sharing your gifts that will come in handy quite soon. 4. Make up new memories and bestowing your blessings. Get rid of attitudes and behaviors that you wish had happened. Have fun creating scenes from an that limit your generosity and compassion. Now is an excellent imagined past. time to launch your “Perpetual Freedom from Hell” campaign! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Most of us know about Albert Einstein’s greatest idea: the CANCER (June 21-July 22) “A vacation is what you take when you can no longer take what general theory of relativity. It was one of the reasons he won a you’ve been taking,” journalist Earl Wilson said. Do you fit that Nobel Prize in Physics. But what was his second-best discovdescription, Cancerian? Probably. I suspect it’s high time to find ery? Here’s what he said it was: adding an egg to the pot while a polite way to flee your responsibilities, avoid your duties, and he cooked his soup. That way, he could produce a soft-boiled hide from your burdens. For the foreseeable future, you have a egg without having to dirty a second pot. What are the firstmandate to ignore what fills you with boredom. You have the and second-most fabulous ideas you’ve ever come up with, right to avoid any involvement that makes life too damn compli- Capricorn? I suspect you are on the verge of producing new cated. And you have a holy obligation to rethink your relationship candidates to compete with them. If it’s OK with you, I will, at with any influence that weighs you down with menial obligations. least temporarily, refer to you as a genius.

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t’s embarrassing to live in a state where my adult rights have to be micromanaged. Our Legislature is again making the majority of Utahns look stupid and backward by sidelining attempts to rid the state of the Zion Curtain. Legislators don’t want kids watching drinks being made. And yes, this is Utah—the 36th state to ratify the repeal of Prohibition in 1933 (it was Utah’s vote that was needed to pass the amendment). “No other state shall take away this glory from Utah!” yelled a member of the Utah delegation to Congress. Oy vey! Who hid our history? High West Distillery liquor makers like to share the fact that Mark Twain, in his 1872 book Roughing It, tasted the famous Utah-made Valley Tan and remarked it was “a kind of whisky or first cousin to it; it is of Mormon invention and manufactured only in Utah. Tradition says it is made of (imported) fire and brimstone.” Brother Brigham didn’t approve of drunkards and didn’t want valuable grain resources diverted to make the devil’s brew. That was until the holy man’s advisers made him aware that travelers and businessmen were thirsty and would pay good money for booze. Hold onto your stove-pipe hats, brothers: Back then, ZCMI sold beer, wine and that Valley Tan! Converts from Italy and the Mediterranean moved to southern Utah 150 years ago and started mashing grapes for wine. In 1864, Mr. Young applauded them, saying: “I anticipate the day when we can have the privilege of using, at our sacraments, pure wine, produced within our borders.” It was Mormon leader Heber J. Grant who, in 1921, aligned LDS policies with the national temperance movement and made alcoholic beverages off-limits for church members. And then, of course, the state of Utah decided to become the sole purveyor of liquor to sell it to gentiles via the state liquor-store system. Jason Mathis, executive director of the Downtown Alliance, is gently pushing logic at lawmakers, seeking a change in licensing requirements. Utah’s current liquor licenses are based on population. Restaurant licenses are determined by dividing the current population by 7,493, which allows 399 permits. Convention hotels are required to obtain individual licenses for each eatery and bar on their property. The Downtown Alliance is asking that the state require only one license per hotel, thereby releasing dozens of licenses to a huge waiting list. That way, Mormons can continue making money off visitors to Zion, while not increasing the number of licenses for the population. CW Clarification: The owner of Habits at 832 E. 3900 South in Murray says he’s still the owner of the club and that it remains open for nightlife and dining. The Feb. 11 column titled “Rental Blues” may have indicated otherwise.

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City Weekly Feb 25, 2016  

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