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ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans ransgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender ranssexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman // Cisgender // Gender No onforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gend xpression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man // Transgender woman isgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity // Intersectionality ender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans // Transgender man ransgender woman // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderqueer // Gender Identity ntersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender // Transsexual // Trans Stephen Dark ransgender man // Transgender woman-By // Cisgender // Gender Non-Conforming // Genderque Gender Identity // Intersectionality // Gender Identity // Gender Expression // Transgender

Undocumented queer Latina Ella Mendoza asks if Utah LGBT leaders are doing enough to fight for transgender rights.


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY LOST IN TRANS-NATION

By Stephen Dark

Undocumented queer Latina Ella Mendoza asks if Utah LGBT leaders are doing enough to fight for transgender rights. Cover by Mason Rodrickc

20 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 28 A&E 35 DINE 42 CINEMA 46 TRUE TV 47 MUSIC 67 COMMUNITY

MUSIC EDITOR RANDY HARWARD

“Come, My Fanatics” p. 48

Randy has covered music for City Weekly since 2001. He’s published pieces in nearly two dozen magazines and newspapers, including Guitar World, CMJ and Request. He was a writer and editor at Harp magazine and is senior editor at large of Blurt.

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LETTERS Decker’s One of a Kind

Colby Frazier’s extremely well-written, engaging piece on Rod Decker was a treat for the mind [“In Rod We Trust,” Oct. 8, City Weekly]. But, hey, the topic was an easy mark: a unique individual who has ignored the trendy mores of television journalism and excelled through his unique, brusque and entertaining style. Salt Lake City has been the beneficiary of Rod’s many years of defying-the-mold and focusing on information— sans the fluff.

LYNN LEHMANN Salt Lake City

Emigration Canyon Needs New Trustees

The residents of Emigration Canyon have an important choice this election and must select two new trustees for the Emigration Improvement District (EID). For many years, the current EID board has levied the highest taxes allowed by law on those of us who live in the canyon. Unfortunately, EID spends little revenue on services canyon residents need or request. As a resident of the lower canyon, I see very little return for my taxes. Much of our money has been spent, against our will, on construction of wells and water infrastructure that mostly will benefit future development. Unsurprisingly, certain land developers will profit handsomely if previously unsellable

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes. lots gain access to water and can be sold. Water improvements are normally funded by commercial developers the land. But EID spends our money on this infrastructure, and the private developers will reap all the profits. Frustratingly, these new wells so are large, they risk drying out the smaller wells that the canyon’s current residents rely on—possibly leaving some of us without potable water. Residents who raise these issues in public EID meetings are condescendingly dismissed and bullied into submission. During the current elections, we must ask ourselves who has our best interests in mind. It is abundantly clear to me that the two EID trustees up for re-election, Michael Hughes and David Bradford, do not fairly represent our interests.

long and need to be replaced. Maybe it is time to really listen to the words coming from the leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Every election time, Mormon leadership tells church members words to the effect: “Know the issues and know the candidates. Then pick the one who has your same thoughts in mind.” Never vote a straight ticket and never pick a candidate who is already employed by the party in power. And remember, if he is a church leader who says, “I don’t know how anyone can be anything but a Republican,” he is either prejudiced or stupid. Isn’t it time we took care of someone besides politicians?

Salt Lake City

West Jordan

Replace Legislators Responsible for Prison Fiasco

Correction: Traces Organic Garden is located at 1432 S. 1100 East. City Weekly’s Oct. 1 Shop Girl column, “Fall Into Autumn,” listed an incorrect address.

BRYAN WARF

I am an old man, and I have never written to a newspaper before, so here goes. Who in hell said it is cheaper to sell good bottomland with buildings on it than starting over with mass tailings on swampy ground. And then building a new prison there instead of fixing up the old one and adding to it? Swapping super-good bottomland for swampland shows who stands to make the buck out of this fiasco! If any of your representatives in the Legislature voted for this move, they have sure as hell been in office too damned

DERRELL ESPLIN

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Shoe Gazing “I

have measured out my life in coffee spoons.” So says Alfred Prufrock in T.S. Eliot’s famous poem, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” The image has stuck with me since I first read the line in college in the 1960s. It sticks because it is an assessment that is concrete but ordinary, forlorn but frank. It resonates with the part of me that seeks to evaluate life experience in real time. When Ed Koch was mayor of New York City, he buttonholed people in the subway, asking effusively, “How am I doin’?” It is a useful question to ask oneself, I think. Honest answers could result in course corrections. At my age, however, I am more inclined to look over my shoulder and evaluate the course itself. “How have I done?” I ask. Unfortunately, no fixed set of metrics is available for answering the question. Everyone has his own criteria. Some are better than others. A recent story in The New York Times got me thinking about the coffee spoons of my life, those insignificant details which might be more telling than they seem to be. The story was about Converse Chuck Taylor All Star basketball shoes. When I was a kid, I got a new pair of Chuck Taylors every June at Auerbach’s department store. Everyone called them tennis shoes. They had ankle-high canvas tops and rubber soles. When the white tops got dirty, I washed them in a bucket of soapy water and dried them in the sun. By the time I reached Highland High School, lowcuts were the fashion—black ones to match the school colors. I wore them with white wool athletic socks. The same socks were de rigueur for Bass Weejun penny loafers, the other must-have shoe in those days. Wearing those shoes year after year was dictated by adolescent insecurity. They denoted membership in a certain social group—the in-crowd. To be an outsider in high school—to wear Hush Puppies with laces—was to be a pork chop at a vegan potluck. Only beta males were secure enough to show up occasionally in cowboy boots.

The Army took away my Weejuns 10 years later. At the beginning of basic training at Fort Dix, I was issued black combat boots. The platoon sergeant made me mail the loafers home in a cardboard box. No need for tennis shoes, either. We ran in boots, every day, mile upon mile. I wore the boots longer than I expected. In the meantime, Chuck Taylors morphed into a “punk signifier of anti-fashion, anti-establishment views,” Elizabeth Semmelhack told The New York Times. (She is the chief curator of the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto, and recently curated a Brooklyn Museum show called The Rise of Sneaker Culture.) Weejuns gained status as “classic.” On its website, the G. H. Bass Shoe Co. asserts the loafer is the footwear of choice for the “ fa sh ion-for w a r d crowd.” Because I don’t identify with either Sid Vicious or Ryan Gosling, those iconic shoes no longer have a place in my closet. The combat boots are gone, too. I must say I was more engaged with them than with any other shoes I have owned. I spent countless hours in the barracks with my friends, sitting on footlockers talking, smoking and spit-shining our boots. It was as social as a quilting bee, and the resultant shine enhanced our “military bearing.” Not that we cared a whit, but in practical terms, the better one’s military bearing, the better one’s treatment by the sergeants. After parting ways with the Army, I returned to Utah, where I found collegiate fashion much changed. Bass Weejuns had been supplanted by Earth shoes. You wore them with flare-leg, corduroy Levis, blue chambray shirt and down vest. Designed by a Danish yoga instructor, Earth shoes had a thick sole offset by a posture-improving

STAFF BOX

BY JOHN RASMUSON

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“negative heel.” Nobody wore Nike or its running-shoe ilk. The Oregon-based company was in its infancy, and jogging hadn’t caught on yet. I fell into step in cinnamoncolored Earth shoes. I was still wearing them when I got a job in New England, not far from the headquarters of Converse Inc. Styles were different in that part of the country. People stared at my parka without sleeves and shoes without heels. In Boston, yuppies dressed to the nines in L.L. Bean rustic wear: chamois shirts and Maine hunting shoes in winter; polo shirts, chinos and Sperry Top-Sider boat shoes the rest of the year. Every New Englander owned boat shoes. I probably wore out four or five pairs before my arches began to complain. After a few painful bouts of plantar fasciitis, I gave up boat shoes for cushiony Børns and Rockports. I am evidently not the only one to forsake the fashionable for shoes with arch support. The Chuck Taylor shoe of my youth has now been improved with Nike’s patented running-shoe technology, according to The New York Times. (Nike bought Converse in 2003.) The upshot is that the shoes look the same but feel better. Sales of 100 million pairs are forecast. Choosing comfortable Rockports may be the only shoe decision I have made by myself. For most of my life, I have been a conformist, allowing others to choose my footwear. I wore the shoes I believed provided leverage, status or acceptance at a particular point in time (while Prufrock was in the kitchen fiddling with the coffee pot). That I won’t be buying upgraded Chuck Taylors is not so much a telling detail as it is a rejection of past practice. Even if the shoe fits, I will no longer wear it. CW

What do your favorite pair of shoes say about your personality?

WHEN I WAS A KID, I GOT A NEW PAIR OF CHUCK TAYLORS EVERY JUNE AT AUERBACH’S DEPARTMENT STORE. EVERYONE CALLED THEM “TENNIS SHOES.”

Kathy Mueller: My red cowgirl boots are sensible, a little sassy and always up for a good time. We have a lot in common.

Jeff Chipian: My New Balance athletic shoes, which I wear everyday, tell the world I have given up on finding a girlfriend and that I am an overweight guy who never runs or exercises. Basically, zero shits are given at this point in life.

Scott Renshaw: I own exactly five pairs of wearable shoes. My favorite is whichever one is weather- or occasion-appropriate. That alone says everything you need to know about my personality.

-Elizabeth Suggs: My favorite shoes don’t have shoelaces, but not by my choice— the laces were stolen, and I’m too stubborn to replace them.

Brandon Burt: I have a pair of black Caterpillar “Second Shift” workboots. The personality traits they reveal are that I like to keep my feet warm in the winter, and I don’t want to on the ice.

Molli Stitzel: I pretty much wear my Rainbow flip flops 24/7 outside of work. Having recently moved here from Florida, I guess they’ll be in storage this winter.

Bryan Bale: My favorite shoes are my holesin-the-soles Converse Chuck Taylor lowtops. I like to think they say I’m downto-earth, but they’re more likely saying, “this guy can’t afford a new pair of shoes.”

Jeremiah Smith: My black cowboy boots look good and are comfortable. But they’re a little hard to take off, and that might say something about me. People closest to me call me a “non-relaxer.” Having shoes that are difficult to take off plays into that rather well.

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net.

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A Service of SALT LAKE

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UTAH JOB CENTER brought to you by CITY WEEKLY is the best and last job board you will ever need to use!

If it weren’t the sage grouse, it could be that cute blackfooted ferret, the Utah prairie dog or the gray wolf (oops, someone already shot one of those!). These and other animals are endangered in Utah, and it falls to the evil federal government to protect them from man’s harm. The operative word here is “evil,” and that is why the sage grouse has become a metaphor for federal intrusion. Utah would fight any plan to save the sage grouse because permeating the entire discussion are the extractive industries—coal in general, and the Alton Coal strip mine specifically. Alton, with a history of bad deeds, wants to expand operations. And Utah, most vocally Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, is all in favor of more mining. After all, there’s money in them thar hills.

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If you don’t want to save the sage grouse, maybe puppies will pull your heartstrings. They certainly made a difference to the Salt Lake County Council. Early this month, the council voted unanimously to prohibit pet stores from selling dogs, cats and rabbits from commercial breeding mills. The Humane Society of the United States says 2 million–4 million dogs bred in puppy mills are sold each year to uninformed consumers. Bad breeders are on the rise, partly due to the demand for designer dogs, Michigan State University’s Animal Legal and Historical Center notes. Only 26 states so far have laws against puppy mills. The County Council is leading the way. “The lack of overarching federal law and lack of state law enforcement leads to the problem of puppy mills,” the center says.

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You know what they say: “You can’t avoid conflicts of interest in this state.” The Salt Lake Tribune—again—detailed how legislators with obvious conflicts of interest continue to influence and vote on laws to which they have some personal ties. The most recent glaring example is Medicaid expansion. The prison move also had a lot of developers and others who stood to benefit. Not surprisingly, the Center for Public Integrity gave Utah an overall grade of D—with an F on Legislative accountability, which includes conflict of interest. A report is due out in November, and Utah may not show up much better, according to Joel Campbell, associate professor of communications at BYU. Why does this matter? “Conflicts of interest interfere with the basic ethical principle of fairness—treating everyone the same,” a Santa Clara University report notes. And they undermine trust.

STRAIGHT DOPE Killer Nuts If juglone can induce cell death in humans, how are walnuts good for us? Is it juglone in walnuts that causes walnut/pecan allergy? —Maja Ramirez

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here is, admittedly, something a little uncomfortable about a phrase like “cell death.” Cells are what we’re made of; death is bad; etc. So given certain facts, Maja, yours is a reasonable question: Walnut trees, along with other members of the Juglandaceae family (pecan, hickory), do produce a compound called juglone. And the 2005 study you linked to in your email, from the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, did indeed find that juglone induced death in the human cells researchers applied it to. The authors concluded their report with the suggestion that “since juglone is present in human health and beauty products, a further understanding of its effects on human cells is warranted.” They weren’t the first to wonder about juglone’s potential effects on human wellbeing. Scientists before and since have explored that very question—but mainly what they’re looking at is whether a little juglone might actually be a good thing. First, though, let’s back up. The various nonalimentary benefits of juglone, medicinal and otherwise, have been well-known for ages. (And it’s nonfood uses I’m talking about exclusively here: juglone, found in the walnut tree’s roots, bark, leaves, wood, and green nut-hulls, is unrelated to allergies triggered by eating the nuts themselves.) In the early 20th century, for instance, American doctors prescribed juglone to treat various skin conditions; it’s been used as a folk remedy around the world to battle inflammation, fungus, intestinal issues—you name it. In addition to enumerating its long career as a natural medicine (as well as an ingredient in hair dye), a 2012 literature review suggests we haven’t yet tapped juglone’s full potential, including as an herbicide and biocide—the authors propose using it to rid ships’ ballast water of invasive marine species. These properties, too, are already folk knowledge. Lazy fishermen used to dump unripe walnut hulls into ponds to take advantage of juglone’s toxic effects; the stunned fish would float to the surface, easily collectible. And as an herbicide, juglone will be familiar to backyard gardeners as the reason you don’t want to grow some vegetables too close to a black walnut tree, the richest source of juglone in the Juglandaceae family: it inhibits the respiration of certain plants (including tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and eggplant) living within the walnut’s root zone, which in a mature tree can extend up to 80 feet. So far, so good: this is potent stuff, and humans have figured out some crafty ways to deploy it that, often as not, exploit its unique lethality. But inside the body? That 2005 paper you cite found two responses juglone produced in human cells: necrotic and apoptotic. Necrotic’s no good. That’s the capitalD death you’re worried about but scientists evidently aren’t—I wasn’t able to find much

more research into juglone’s necrotic tendencies. They’re far more interested in getting juglone to induce apoptosis, which is the naturally occurring process, also known as “programmed cell death,” by which our bodies cycle out cells that are no longer wanted, or that present a threat to our health. Scientists’ thinking is this: Can juglone be used to produce an apoptotic response in something really nasty inside of us—say, cancer? The research has been promising. A 2009 study in Cell Biology International reported on exposing, in vitro, a chemotherapy-resistant line of melanoma cells to juglone; the juglone did enough of a number on the cells and their tendency to proliferate that the scientists suggested the compound might be characterized as an anticancer agent according to criteria put forth by the National Cancer Institute. Similar reactions have been observed when juglone has been let loose on leukemia, prostate cancer and cervical carcinoma. And we haven’t exhausted juglone’s medical possibilities even where cancer’s not concerned. One recent study found that its antimicrobial properties prove effective against Acanthamoeba, a common protozoan that can cause granulomatous amebic encephalitis, a rare but highly unpleasant infection of the brain and spinal cord that affects people with compromised immune systems; researchers floated the idea of using juglone as a disinfectant in hospitals. It’s shown potential as an antiviral agent, too, as when it was recently pitted to salutary effect against the protein 1a8g, an enzyme in HIV. I’ll allow as to there being one distinct danger associated with a full-grown black walnut tree, as evidenced by the long-running saga of several Toronto residents trying to get permission to remove such a tree from their neighborhood. It seems the walnuts fall so hard and heavy that somebody getting seriously beaned is, to hear the locals tell it, practically inevitable. When in 2007 the city council considered their most recent anti-tree petition, one witness cited her 87-year-old mother as a potential victim: “A good whack from one of those fruits is probably going to see the end of her.” “Walnuts do fall,” Toronto’s parks chief admitted, “and they could cause a little bruise.” But the council still blocked the tree’s removal, deeming the hazards it posed to be, apparently, quite negligible.

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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David Ezekiel Brooks is the founder and project director at Revolution United, a nonprofit that organizes open-source projects to benefit the community. Brooks serves on the all-volunteer Bicycle Advisory Committee, a group that meets monthly to advise Salt Lake City’s Transportation Division. To celebrate the opening of a new pedestrian- and bike-friendly intersection at 300 South and 200 West, the committee plans to host Bikertoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 17, from noon-4 p.m.. The block party will feature live music, a beer garden, a giant-screen TV with the Utes vs. Sun Devils football game as well as friendly, bike-loving people celebrating the new intersection. As the city’s emerging bike infrastructure continues to electrify and occasionally confound downtown denizens, City Weekly asked Brooks to expound on the bike committee’s vision.

How do you gauge the success of Salt Lake City’s new bike lanes?

Based on the reports provided to us in the bicycle advisory board meetings, which are transparent to the public, there has been an increase in revenues for more businesses along the 300 South bike lanes than there have been businesses that have suffered. This has been the biggest argument for most businesses: That they will lose customers because of the loss of parking spots. So far, this hasn’t been the case.

Are the protected bike lanes safe? What about at intersections?

Over time, bike lanes are safer. There was a roll out phase at the beginning where there were a number of close-call incidents and actual accidents, but now that drivers and bikers have become accustomed to the bike lanes, those numbers have gone down, and will continue to go down.

What is so special about the new 300 South & 200 West intersection?

This intersection design is only the second to be rolled out in the United States. They have proven to be very successful and in use for a long time in Europe.

How do you account for the popularity of the GREENbike program?

The popularity of GREENbikes is a perfect example of why we need more bike lanes, and it demonstrates that the demand is there. Community Gardens, Lyft, Community Tool Sheds and other similar services will continue to grow as we as a civilization begin to run out of space and realize that we have to work together.

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What got you involved with the Bicycle Advisory Committee?

A bicycle is one of the most sustainable inventions for transportation, because we are the main power source. This combined with my desire to do something more for humanity is what told me to apply to be part of the Bicycle Advisory Board. I haven’t regretted a single second of it.

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Some Salt Lake City Sister Cities Board members say they’ve been shut out. BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @ericethington

F

rom cultural and student exchanges to foreign dignitary visits, Salt Lake City’s relationship with other cities around the globe is built and maintained by Salt Lake City Sister Cities, part of an international organization composed of community volunteers and citizen ambassadors. But over the past five years, members of the local Sister Cities Advisory Board claim that Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker’s administration has been quietly excluding them from those relationships, and city staff have been claiming to represent Sister Cities to foreign governments. According to city code, Salt Lake City Sister Cities is an “advisory board”— meaning that, while it is supposed to be in charge of managing relationships with foreign cities, it does not have the power to take official action on its own. Any action taken, such as coordinating a cultural festival or arranging a visit to another sister city, must be approved by the mayor’s office. Currently, the all-volunteer board manages six active relationships, partnering with Chernivtsi, Ukraine; Izhevsk, Russia; Keelung, Taiwan; Matsumoto, Japan; Torino, Italy; and Trujillo, Peru. For years, board members say, the program ran smoothly and efficiently with frequent communication between the board and then-Mayor Rocky Anderson. But they say things changed quickly after Becker’s election as mayor. “It felt like the communication was just shut off,” says Jinger LaGuardia, who oversaw the relationship with Torino at the time and now serves as the board’s vice chair. “We have been told never to contact the mayor himself, and feel like we’ve been shut out of the process.” “What the mayor’s office is doing is illegal,” claims Sister Cities Board member Nicole Gallo. “According to the city’s own code, staff members cannot claim to be Sister Cities representatives, nor can they create a subcommittee to organize Sister Cities events without anyone on the Sister Cities board being involved.” Mayor Ralph Becker declined to comment on this story. In July 2010, representatives from Torino, Italy, contacted the Salt Lake City Sister Cities Board to say that an invitation would be forthcoming for Salt Lake

POLITICS City to participate in Esperienza Italia 2011, a celebration of the 150th anniversary of Italy’s unification. As part of the celebration, Torino officials invited many of its sister cities to attend, offering booth space for cities to feature their relationship with Torino. “I was so excited about it,” says Gallo. “I saw Mayor Becker shortly after at an event at Westminster [College] and told him the invite for Salt Lake City as a sister city was coming, but he said he wasn’t going to be able to attend, because he would be busy with his re-election campaign.” As far as these board members knew, that was the end of it; they assumed the invitation had been rejected. But several months later at an event hosted by the governor, several people congratulated LaGuardia on her upcoming trip to Italy. “I was completely embarrassed,” LaGuardia says. “I had no idea what they were talking about. And when I told them that, I was immediately questioned about my credentials and whether or not I was really the Torino representative for Sister Cities,” she says. Email records obtained through a GRAMA request by City Weekly show that when the invitation from Torino arrived at the mayor’s office, it was forwarded to Joanne Milner, education-partnership coordinator for the Mayor’s Office. A former Salt Lake City Council member and Utah House representative, Milner says she assumed it was because she had just finished producing a documentary about Italians who immigrated to Utah. She began putting together a proposal for herself and a Salt Lake City delegation to attend the festival in Italy the following year. “We were shocked,” says Gallo. “[Milner] never once reached out to the Sister Cities Board about the event, even though the invitation was addressed to the city as a Sister City.” Milner disputes that, saying, “I sent them an email inviting [the Sister Cities Board] to participate, but I never heard back from them.” Records received from the city through a records request did not contain any emails from Milner to the board. Gallo says once the board found out about Milner organizing the delegation and presentation, the Sister Cities Board immediately reached out to the mayor, but their requests were rebuffed. “After numerous requests for information about the delegation traveling to Italy representing the Sister City,” says LaGuardia, “I was told by [the mayor’s] staff that I could not address the mayor or the city council, but that they would look into it.” Records revealed hundreds of emails planning the trip between Milner, the Utah Office of Tourism, Salt Lake City officials, officials at the LDS Church, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, and what was then the Salt Lake Convention & Visitors Bureau, among others.

ERIC ETHINGTON

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NEWS Sister Saga

Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office staffer Joanne Milner has incurred the ire of some Sister Cities Board members for allegedly taking over the program and silencing its volunteers. Several emails from Milner to the Torino organizers claimed that Becker would be attending the event and that Milner would henceforth be the point person for the two cities’ relationship. But Becker was not planning to attend: In addition to the private conversation Gallo says she had with Becker, minutes from the Sister Cities Board meeting from fall 2010 also show city staff telling the board Becker would not attend due to his re-election bid. “Well, it was a hope that he would go,” Milner told City Weekly. The presentation Milner spent months putting together revolved around FamilySearch—the genealogical arm of the LDS Church which also runs the Family History Library—under the theme of “Salt Lake City as the Genealogy Capital of the World.” Three representatives of the LDS Church’s FamilySearch were selected to travel with Milner and the Salt Lake City delegation and would agree to offer a genealogy presentation at the Italian festival. However, according to emails from the records request, Torino rejected

the initial proposal Milner put together for being too religious in nature. Erica Albarello of Torino’s International Affairs Department wrote to Milner four months before the June event, on February 14, 2011, saying, “I have to communicate to you that the FamilySearch project sponsored and strictly connected to The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-day Saints is actually not suitable and appropriate within the framework of the institutional celebrations.” Records show Milner then sent an email to both LDS Church and Salt Lake City officials delivering the bad news, adding that she had called Albarello directly to fix the situation. “I told [Albarello] that genealogy and the Family History Library are the major attraction for visitors in our city,” wrote Milner. “I told her that we, like they, separate church and state.” Milner proposed the group obtain endorsement letters from Gov. Gary Herbert, then-Senate President Michael Waddoups and other city and state officials who would say that the church’s presentation of a genealogy exhibit would not promote the church.


NEWS

one month before the event, she asked Italian officials to make sure they booked lodging for Becker. Milner now says that, at the time, “it was up in the air whether or not he’d be able to make it.” In an internal city email dated May 6, 2011, Milner says that, the previous week, she mentioned to the mayor that the city of Torino was offering to pay for his hotel accommodation, and that “[i]t would be a great getaway weekend in Torino.” Torino’s organizers had planned several events for Becker, including an official reception and tour guides. And according to email records, it appears that the delegation still took advantage of those perks. The only coverage of Salt Lake City’s participation in Esperienza Italia 2011 came from the LDS Church-published Church News. The piece, published on Oct. 29, 2011, read, “Sister Milner … noted that apostle and future Church President Lorenzo Snow had gone from Nauvoo, Ill., as a missionary to the Torino area, where he baptized some Wandensian Christians. Acquainted with some of the staff of the Church’s Family History Library from a documentary she had produced, Sister Milner enlisted the help of FamilySearch officials.” Not only did the Sister Cities Board not have any participation in the event, say LaGuardia and Gallo, but they also never received any report back on the event or any other updates on what was happening, despite city code requiring that to happen. Milner says she had no idea they had re-

quested the report, but that she would be happy to give them one now. In desperation, not receiving any report back from the city, LaGuardia reached out to then-Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon, asking for help in finding out what had happened, why no representatives of Sister Cities had been included in the planning or execution of the event, and why the Sister Cities Board was now being told by Torino that the Italians will only be working with Milner from now on. According to email records, Corroon contacted Leigh von der Esch, thenmanaging director of the Utah Office of Tourism who has since retired, to ask what happened. Von der Esch replied that her office had provided brochures for the delegation to hand out while they were in Italy, but that UOT had chosen not to travel with Milner and the FamilySearch representatives, nor did they provide any financial assistance other than the brochures. Members of the Sister Cities Board also took their concerns to Salt Lake City Councilman Charlie Luke. According to a meeting transcript, LaGuardia and Gallo asked Luke to find out what public monies had been spent on the Sister Cities event without the notification or approval by the board. Luke told them, “The financial questions you raise, I think, are very good questions. One of the things that we can do is request that [there] be an audit done of where the money is coming from, how it’s being allocated. Just

to make sure everything is aboveboard.” However, in a recent interview, Luke said the audit never took place. “Unfortunately, everything kind of fell through the cracks during some staff transitions,” he says. According to records obtained by City Weekly, Salt Lake City spent a total of $11,514.08 on the delegation’s trip to Italy, including costs for flights. However, the city also received two reimbursement grants to offset the costs: one from Zions Bank for $5,000, and another from the LDS Church for $2,000, bringing down the total public cost to $4,514.08. When Becker created the position of education coordinator shortly after he was sworn in as mayor in 2008 and hired Milner, the position was described as responsible for “working on Becker’s behalf to build partnerships between public education and the city, the business community, universities, colleges and nonprofit groups.” Yet, to this day, some Sister Cities Board members say they still are not in contact with their counterparts in Torino because the Italian officials are working only with Milner. Former mayor Rocky Anderson is disappointed. “We worked so hard to work closely with these great volunteers to set this up and keep those Sister City programs going,” Anderson says. “I’m still proud of what we were able to accomplish together. We [built] a strong program, and we were fully supportive of it. It’s mortifying to see what has happened [since then].” CW

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Milner also sent a letter on official city letterhead to Torino, saying, “It is true that the [LDS Church] subsidizes FamilySearch due to the importance that it places on the family; however, FamilySearch is predominantly volunteer-driven.” City Weekly contacted FamilySearch, which confirmed that the majority of its volunteers are missionaries for the LDS Church, and that the church does not subsidize—but rather owns and operates—FamilySearch. When asked whether her language was purposefully written in a way to imply that FamilySearch and the LDS Church are completely separate, Milner said, “Well, part of it is public. It’s a public facility. Anyone can walk in, like a library of sorts. It’s public, per se.” In actuality, the Family History Library is a private building owned by the church, but the public is welcome to use its facilities. The appeal and the endorsement letters worked, and Salt Lake City was added back to the list of presenters, although Raffaella Scalisi, head of Torino’s International Affairs Department, wrote back to Milner that “We would like to ask you to prepare a multidisciplinary presence, as other cities are doing.” One week before the event, Milner notified Torino that Becker would not travel to Italy with them because of “conflicting responsibilities.” Milner’s 2010-11 emails to Torino had frequently referenced Becker’s attendance at the event. In an email sent

POLITICS

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THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

DESIGN PRESENTATION

It’s Salt Lake Design Week and that means it’s time for PechaKucha Night. Devised in Tokyo in 2003 as an event for young designers to meet, network and show their work in public, it’s now a worldwide celebration set in hundreds of cities. The presentation format is simple: 20 images x 20 seconds, keeping presentations concise and audiences engaged. Presenters this year will showcase architecture, graphic design, art, industrial design, urban art, photography, motorcycles, advertising and film. Addictive Behavior Motor Works, 547 W. 700 South, Friday, Oct. 16, 7-11 p.m. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Pechakucha.org/cities/salt-lake-city

FUNDRAISING

Eight scariest Halloween attractions for your buck this season:

8. Unplanned

Parenthood’s Pap Smear of Fear With “Dr.” Gary Herbert

7. The Whole Foods

Gluten-Free Corn Maze®

6. Ted Nugent’s

Trunk-or-Treat Gun Swap & BBQ

5. NPR’s Endless Pledge Drive With the Scary Home Companion

4. Night of the

Living Hipsters at Granary Row

3. Becker’s Bike Intersection of Insanity at Broadway & 2nd West

2. Your Local

Early-Voting Station

1. The House of

If you read the West View community news, you know how vibrant Salt Lake City’s west side is. Taste of the West Side is a fund-raiser for the newspaper featuring entertainment and food offerings from restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Admission is $50 for a VIP pass, which includes all the food vendors; $60 adds two adult beverages. There are also $5 singleplate passes and a $4 per drink cash bar. It costs $10 more to purchase tickets at the door, so register at the event website. Sugar Space, 132 S. 800 West, Thursday, Oct. 22, 6-9 p.m., WestViewMedia.org/taste

POLITICAL DEBATE

Salt Lake County voters have received their ballots in the mail already, but that doesn’t mean they have to make up their minds and vote right away. There are still debates in the Salt Lake City mayoral and City Council races on the horizon: Mayoral debate: Hinckley Institute of Politics, U of U Orson Spencer Hall, 260 Central Campus Drive, Tuesday, Oct. 20, noon-1 p.m.; Salt Lake City Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 28, 7 p.m. Council District 5, 6 & 7 debates: Clayton Junior High, 1470 S. 1900 East, Wednesday, Oct. 21, 6-8:30 p.m.

AUTHOR TALKS

Surprise! This is Utah Archives Month and it’s not just for nerds. The free brownbag lunch-hour gatherings are scheduled at noon. On Wednesday, Oct. 21, hear Sarah Alizabeth Fox, a freelance writer, editor, and folk historian, discuss her newly published book Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West. Then, Wednesday, Oct. 28, historian Brian Cannon will talk about the book he co-authored with Charles Peterson, The Awkward State of Utah: Coming of Age in the Nation. You heard it right: Awkward! Utah State Archives Building, 346 S. 455 West, Wednesday, Oct. 21, noon; Wednesday, Oct. 28, noon; UtahArchivesMonth.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

1,000 Recycled Ochos Send your events to editor@cityweekly.net


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S NEofW the

Democracy Blues Randy Richardson, 42, vying unopposed for the Riceville, Iowa, school board (having agreed to run just because he has two kids in school) failed to get any votes at all—as even he was too busy on election day (Sept. 8) to make it to the polls (nor were there any write-ins). To resolve the 0-0 result, the other board members simply appointed Richardson to the office. Riceville, near the Minnesota border, is a big-time farming community, and registered voters queried by The Des Moines Register said they just had too much fieldwork to do that day.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Protecting Our Freedoms The bold, shameless leering of David Zaitzeff is legendary around Seattle’s parks, and more so since he filed a civil complaint against the city in September challenging its anti-voyeurism law for placing a “chilling effect” on his photography of immodestly dressed women in public. Though he has never been charged with a crime, he roams freely (and apparently joyously) around short- skirted and swimsuit-clad “gals” while himself often wearing only a thong and bearing a “Free Hugs and Kisses” sign. Zaitzeff’s websites “extol” public nudity, wrote the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and explain, for example, that a woman who angles her “bod” to offer a view of “side boob” is fair game for his camera. Zaitzeff’s complaint—that the law criminalizes photography of a person’s “intimate areas” (clothed or not) without explicit permission—is distressing him.

WEIRD

Medical Marvels Researchers recently came upon a small community (not named) in the Dominican Republic with an unusual incidence of adolescent boys having spent the first decade or so of their lives as girls because their penises and testes did not appear until puberty. A September BBC News dispatch referred to the boys as “Guevedoces” and credited the community for alerting researchers, who ultimately developed a drug to replace the culprit enzyme whose absence was causing the problem. (The full shot of testosterone that should have been delivered in the mother’s womb was not arriving until puberty.) Leading Economic Indicators The serpentine queue extended for blocks in September in Lucknow, India, after the state government of Uttar Pradesh announced 368 job openings (almost all menial)—eventually resulting in about 2.3 million applications, 200,000 from people with advanced degrees (even though the $240/month positions required only a fifth-grade education, according to an Associated Press dispatch). About 13 million young people enter India’s job market each year. New World Order At a September convention on ethical issues involving computers, a researcher at Britain’s De Montfort University decried the development of devices that might permit human-robot sex. Though no human would be “victimized,” the researcher warned that such machines (some already in service) will exacerbate existing “power imbalances” between men and women and pave the way for more human exploitation. One critic challenged, offering that such robots would be no more demeaning to women than, say, vibrators. However, the researcher ominously warned that there may someday be robots resembling children, marketed for sex. (A September USA Today dispatch from Tokyo reported that the company SoftBank had banned sex, via its user agreement, with its new 4-foot-tall human-like robot—even though “Pepper” features nothing resembling genitalia.) n Thailand’s “Last Resort Rehab” at the Wat Thamkrabok Temple about 100 miles north of Bangkok resembles a traditional drug-detox facility (work, relaxation, meditation)—except for the vomiting. At the “Vomit Temple,” Buddhist priests mix a concoction of 120 herbal ingredients that are nasty, according to the temple’s methamphetamine addicts interviewed for a recent Australian TV documentary. Said one, of the rehab agenda: “Vomiting is at 3 p.m. every day. Foreigners must vomit for the first five days. The vomiting is intense.”

Finer Points of the Law People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals filed a federal lawsuit in California in September on behalf of an endangered crested black macaque that wandered up to an unattended camera on a tripod and clicked a selfie. The camera belonged to photographer David Slater, who claimed copyright to the photo even though “Naturo” actually snapped it. The shot might be valuable to Naturo since it has become viral on the Internet. (Though the photo was taken in Indonesia, Slater’s publisher is based in California.) n Jose Banks, now 40, filed a $10 million lawsuit in 2014 against the federal government because jailers at Chicago’s highrise Metropolitan Correctional Center failed to guard him closely enough in 2012, thus enabling him to think he could escape. He and a cellmate had rappelled 17 floors with bed sheets, but Banks was re-arrested a few days later. Still, he claimed that the escape caused him great trauma, in addition to “humiliation and embarrassment” and “damage to his reputation.” (In September, the U.S. Court of Appeals turned him down. Wrote the judges, “No one has a personal right to be better guarded.”)

Recurring Themes Many in conservative Jewish communities still practice the tradition of Kaporos on the day of atonement, but the critics were out in force in New York City’s Borough Park neighborhood in September to protest the ritual’s slaughter there of 50,000 chickens. (A synagogue raises money by “selling” chickens to members, who then have butchers swing the chickens overhead three times, thus transferring the owners’ sins to the chickens. Ultimately, the chickens are beheaded, supposedly erasing the humans’ sins. Protesters ask why not just donate money.) A judge refused to block the ritual but ordered police to enforce the sanitation laws governing the beheadings. Recent Headlines From the Foreign Press “London Zoo Monkey-Keeper and Meerkat-Keeper ‘Fought Over Llama-Keeper’” (a British human love triangle, September, The Guardian). “Man Suffering From Constipation for 10 Years Has 11-Pound Stool Removed” (Chengdu, China, August, Central European News). “Naked Spanish Clowns Anger Palestinians” (a pro-Palestinian demonstration in Jerusalem backfired, September, YNet News). “Swedish Porn Star Jumps Into Spanish Bullfighting Ring to Comfort Dying Bull” (Malaga, Spain, September, The Local). Readers’ Choice 1. In August, Che Hearn, 25, who police said had just shoplifted electronics items from the Walmart in Round Lake Beach, Illinois, was picked up while on foot near the store. Police found that Hearn had actually driven his car to the Walmart but that while he was inside shoplifting, a repo agent (who had followed him to the store) had confiscated it. 2. Astronaut Edgar Mitchell (the sixth man to walk on the moon) told a reporter in August that “my own experience talking to people” has made it clear that extraterrestrials are trying “to keep us from going to war” with Russia and that U.S. military officers have told him that their test missiles are “frequently” shot down “by alien spacecraft.” More Things to Worry About Peter Frederiksen, 63, a gun shop owner in Bloemfontein, South Africa, was detained by police in September pending formal charges after his wife discovered 21 packages labeled as female genitals in their home freezer. There was no official explanation, but one officer called them the result of “mutilation of private parts of a woman, cut out and kept as trophies.” One was marked with the name of a woman, “2010,” and “Lesotho” (a kingdom within South Africa). A News of the Weird Classic (November 2009) New Zealand’s Waikato National Contemporary Art Award in September (2009) (worth the equivalent of $11,000) went to Dane Mitchell, whose installation consisted merely of the discarded packaging materials he had gathered from all the other exhibits vying for the prize. Mitchell named his pile “Collateral.” (Announcement of the winner was poorly received by the other contestants.) Thanks This Week to Gerald Sacks, Maria Nilles, Dave Kanofsky, Robin Daley, Chuck Hamilton, and Gary Goldberg, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.


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NIKI CHAN

Undocumented queer Latina Ella Mendoza asks if Utah LGBT leaders are doing enough to fight for transgender rights.

By Stephen Dark • sdark@cityweekly.net • n June 5, 2015, Ella Mendoza made history in Utah. She was the first undocumented queer Latina to give a speech at the Utah Pride Festival. For the first time in Pride’s nearly 40-year history of celebrating Utah’s LGBT community, organizers lumped together rallies for transgender, lesbian, sexually fluid and polyamory groups into one, a decision that had angered some in the transgender community who felt that one march for all diluted their own message. But such frustration was dwarfed by the anger 25-year-old Mendoza vented as she stood on the steps of the Capitol that Friday evening as the rally’s final speaker. The co-founder of Utah’s chapter of Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement said, “This world was made strange, because the white people came here in the first place and decided that trans people were wrong, that gender was a thing. They decided to put [up] these walls. I saw this and said, ‘White people, you all look fucked up.’” In a powerful voice, she contrasted those in the crowd who had attended college with her own experience at the age of 19 years old: being homeless for 18 months, living in a shelter and “wondering, ‘Where are my rights?’” As her fiery oration grew, she condemned “the romantic notion behind ‘saviors,’ behind helping victims.” She told the crowd, “I am not your token; I’m not your token survivor. My trans sisters are not your token trannies. We are not here to make you feel good about saving us.” Then she spoke of the 75 undocumented trans women of color held in detention centers across the United States. “Our survival is not a request. It’s a demand,” she said. Finally, she turned to the festival itself. Calling the rally “the poor people’s party,” she referenced the annual Grand Marshal Reception—which was being held at the same time. The shindig honored

Ella Mendoza

@stephenpdark the parade’s 2015 grand marshal, Janet Mock, a transgender woman of color, TV reporter, author and national celebrity. Many at the rally wished to hear Mock, but were effectively blocked either by wanting to march for their community, or because they couldn’t afford the $50-per-head tickets. “How come we’re here, and they’re over there?” Mendoza said. “Do you realize that if Janet Mock was aware of this shit, she’d be pissed?” Mendoza, along with her Familia chapter’s co-founder, Eusebio Echeveste, joined Adrian Romero, leader of Stand for Queer Lives, both 20 years old, to lead the march to Salt Lake City’s Library Square, where the festival was taking place. But not all were pleased with Mendoza’s remarks about white privilege. The next day, one woman complained that it is white men, not white women, who enjoy privilege. Another argued that despite “white privilege,” there are still white trans people suffering in jail. Mendoza learned later the person lodging the complaint was a transgender person who herself had a criminal history and had ties with a white supremacist group. Talking about race, Mendoza realized she was hitting some nerves. “I never thought I would feel threatened in my own movement.” Familia began in Los Angeles in late 2013, says national coordinator Jorge Gutierrez. “Part of the vision came from seeing that there was a lot of undocu-queer youth organizing and yet our identities and sexual orientation weren’t being fully honored and included in all the immigrant work we were doing.” In December 2014, Mendoza and Echeveste founded Familia in Utah. Later, they attended a regional conference in New Mexico. “A family loves you and supports your losses and celebrates your life. That’s why it’s called ‘Familia,’” Mendoza says. At the conference, they learned

“I am not your token; I’m not your token survivor. My trans sisters are not your token trannies. We are not here to make you feel good about saving us.” —Ella Mendoza, Familia chapter co-founder

that their concerns about marginalization by the LGBT community were identical to those of Familia chapters from seven other states who attended. “Every state was saying the same thing.” Mendoza recalls. Transgender women of color “are being silenced, we are being left behind.” While the mainstream LGBT community has focused on marriage equality for the past 10 years, the need for a strategy to combat issues facing people of color within the movement— issues like discrimination, police violence and homelessness—became undeniable, Gutierrez says. “The further you step away from that identity of a gay white cis man, the more difficulty you have asking for resources, for your voice to be heard, or to be part of the power table,” he says. “That’s why, for us, doing intersectional work is at the very critical core of who we are. We embody many identities, and by default, you can’t push one issue at a time; we have to push different issues.” This has led to a distinct uneasiness between minority and mainstream LGBT communities that Mendoza—in speeches, press conferences and even a cartoon, “Ellita,” she draws about her life—puts her finger on with, at times, merciless precision. LGBT advocacy group Equality Utah’s executive director Troy Williams believes the solution lies in communication and education. “Transgender people face twice the national average of unemployment, trans people of color face four times,” he

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others insist be addressed. Alejandro Mora is a board member of T of Utah, a transgender education and advocacy group. “As a community, we are tasked with challenging the damaging perception that LGBT identities and politics are for and about white people,” he wrote in a statement prepared for City Weekly. “It is the responsibility of our state’s LGBT advocacy organizations to take on the intersection of race, sexuality and gender identity and expression head on.”

“What I am working on is bringing all these different groups together” —Marian Edmonds-Allen, Utah Pride Center executive director

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would not be able to survive on the streets, and so she got him a plane ticket to New York City, where their uncle lives. The siblings have not seen each other in five years. “I miss my brother. I wish I never sent him, I wish I could have kept him—but for what, you know?” She pushes up her glasses and wipes away tears. “I couldn’t keep my family together. I tried.”

Mendoza grew up in a gated community in La Molina, a suburb on the outskirts of Lima, Peru. Her parents were separated. She remembers her mother taking her to visit relatives at the shantytown her mother grew up in, Tahuantinsuyo, named after the Kingdom of the Incas. While Mendoza would complain of Tahuantinsuyo’s impoverished conditions, her mother told her she wanted her to remember her roots and her people. When Mendoza was 12, she, along with her younger brother, went to live with her father in Utah. Her mother flew with her to Salt Lake City, then said farewell at the Salt Lake City International Airport before flying back to Peru. “We didn’t really say goodbye. I just thought it was, ‘See you later.’” It’s been 13 years since she has

“I felt sick to my stomach,” said Eusebio Echeveste, Familia chapter cofounder, after his father told him he was “an alien” and he Googled the term.

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seen her mother. “I didn’t think that was the last time I was going to see her.” Shortly after Mendoza moved to the states, her mother hit hard times and lost her home. All Mendoza knew about Utah was the image of a salt-shaker over a lake on a puzzle. During her teenage years in Layton, “I truly believed I was one of them,” she says, meaning an American. But, while she was in high school, she learned she was not only undocumented, but that pathways to college and scholarships open to her friends were closed to her. She ran away from home at age 19 and lived on the streets for a year and a half. She bounced from one friend’s couch to another, cleaning houses and babysitting in exchange for a bed, in between the one week per month she was permitted to stay at an Ogden shelter without papers. If she had documentation, she could have stayed at a shelter for three months. Sometimes, the best she could get was sleeping for a few hours on a toilet in a Walmart, her foot propped up against the door, her head on her knee. “I tried to be the best homeless person I could be,” she says. Being on the streets was, in a sense, liberating. Being undocumented, she had always lived “in the shadows,” she says. Suddenly, even though her immigration status remained the same, her attitude toward it changed. “I could breath the air, I was so happy,” she says. “I felt that air, I felt that breeze, the world seemed wide open. Even in my homelessness, I found my freedom, my happiness, my peace. Stepping out of the shadows is good. I was out as queer, out as undocumented.” Yet, despite such freedom, she still struggled with fear. “I think my biggest struggle was how unrelatable I felt, how lonely. I didn’t know when it was safe to talk about my documentation. I just felt so alone.” When her 17-year-old brother left their father’s home, Mendoza feared he

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Mora advocates for “general and targeted funding for LGBT organizations of color and partnership-building” and calls for prioritizing increased “visibility for LGBT leaders of color—who represent some of the most vulnerable among us.” With the passage of marriage equality, some LGBT community members wondered if there were any point to keeping the services-focused Pride Center and advocacy agency Equality Utah’s doors open. Pride’s newly minted executive director Marian Edmonds-Allen says the fight is far from over, precisely because of the kind of issues Familia is raising. In August, Mendoza went to a transgender picnic and met Edmonds-Allen. When EdmondsAllen offered the center’s help to Familia, she recalls Mendoza sharply putting her in her place. “You know what?” Mendoza said, “If you want to be an ally, get the Pride Center in order,” referring to its lack of services for minorities and lack of diversity. Edmonds-Allen didn’t know what to say. Mendoza “is exactly right,” she concedes.

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says. “They’re worried about survival, putting food on the table, making sure the rent is paid.” The challenge for white LGBT communities that want to address these issues, he says, “is how do you access these communities and know what their needs are if they’re not around you?” Mendoza and Echeveste identify as bisexual, while Romero uses the more general term, queer. Their stories speak to a growing number of children, teenagers and adults embracing a spectrum of gender identities, all at a time when the topic of transgender is trending in America, as the popular Amazon TV series Transparent and extensive media coverage of Caitlin Jenner’s transition would attest. According to the American Psychological Association, “Transgender is an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity, gender expression or behavior does not conform to that typically associated with the sex to which they were assigned at birth.” Mendoza says she is “cispassing,” meaning that she appears cis-gender—defined as someone who is comfortable with being the sex assigned at birth. But, she says, she is gender fluid: That is, “I’m always both male and female.” Her group, Familia, are rabble-rousers. “We’re a couple of brown undocumented queers standing up and saying ‘fuck you’ to the system,” Mendoza says. That’s a reflection of the culture of the national organization that saw one of its members, Jennicet Gutierrez, interrupt President Barack Obama during a speech he was giving to demand rights for detained undocumented trans women, only to be shouted down by representatives of other LGBT groups. “I don’t believe in equality,” Mendoza says. “I believe in solidarity. I believe in revolution.” At the heart of their struggle is what Mendoza believes is a taboo subject in Utah’s LGBT community: namely, white privilege. “People don’t want to know the privilege they have,” she says. Along with the relative lack of support the LGBT community has shown the fledgling group until recently, the hostile reception to Mendoza’s remarks at Pride showed that the marginalized state of trans people of color in Utah’s LGBT community remains highly sensitive. And it’s one that Familia and


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Eusebio Echeveste also learned he was undocumented while in high school, having grown up believing he was American. When Echeveste was filling in applications for college, he realized there were questions he had about his past. His father told him he was “an alien.” When he Googled the term, “I felt sick to my stomach.” He identifies as bisexual but, at times, struggles with the machismo culture of the Latino community that can be oppressive and violent to LGBT members. He and Mendoza met at a Salt Lake City rally. “Her voice was the same as it is now, but less,” Echeveste recalls. “She was still trying to find herself, still trying to find other people who were undocumented. Her speeches were nothing but a punch to people’s faces.” She and Echeveste became close. “We just got connected like bubblegum,” he says. Echeveste met Adrian Romero in high school. Romero had identified as queer at age 11. Romero recalls not fitting in with either gender and strugging with gender dysphoria, in which “your body causes you a great deal of misery. Your body doesn’t want to correspond with the idea you have, the way you want to see yourself.” Romero wanted to be liked and to stop being bullied, and adopted a more feminine identity. “My sister helped me pick out my clothes, shave my arms. I was trying really hard to be feminine and act like other children my age.” That, Romero says, led to depression. “I’m not good at this woman thing, I beat myself up about my masculine voice.” After high school Romero moved out, got a part-time job in a fast-food Mexican restaurant and pursued activism in the form of Stand for Queer Lives, which began one month before Familia, in response to the suicide of a transgender teen from Ohio, Leelah Alcorn, in late 2014. Romero began Stand as a support campaign for youth in the LGBT community. Nationwide, according to a survey by the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National LGBTQ Task Force, each year, a staggering 41 percent of trans people attempt suicide. “I struggled with depression my whole life because of who I am, what I feel,” Romero says. “I struggled with people trying to change me, make me feel ashamed; I struggled with self-harm.” Romero joined Familia shortly after it was formed, because “they were doing what I wasn’t doing: focusing on marginalized people, focusing

“They were doing what I wasn’t doing: focusing on marginalized people, focusing on Latinos and the undocumented.” —Adrian Romero, leader of Stand for Queer Lives

on Latinos and the undocumented.”

WHERE ARE MY PEOPLE?

In June 2012, President Obama announced Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), a program that provides access to work permits for undocumented people who came to the United States as minors. When Familia co-founder Echeveste heard the news, he realized that his horizons, while still limited, had broadened. “‘I can work legally,’” he recalls thinking. “My limits got wider, but I still have limits to what I can do”—such as being unable to secure scholarships to go to college or work for the government. When Mendoza received a DACA work permit in April 2013, she says the world changed, not only in terms of her ability to secure long-term employment—she got a job as a kindergarten teacher in Davis County—but also in the way she saw things. The third year she attended Pride, she asked herself, “Where are the Latino people?” Mendoza joined the immigrant-rights group Salt Lake Dreamers and, with Echeveste, helped organize protests against local deportations. Henia Belia is a former Salt Lake Dreamer who now resides in New York City. Via Facebook, she writes that what had started out as “youth fighting for DACA mostly grew into an intergenerational crew of folks also fighting deportations [and] border imperialism.” The Salt Lake Dream Team came to “a natural ending” in December 2014, Belia writes. “At first we called it a hiatus, as there were only a few of us showing up [and] we couldn’t build our momentum back up,” she wrote. “A lot of undocumented folks are busy surviving, so organizing meetings and events can be tough.” A month after the Dream Team’s mothballing, Mendoza and Echeveste launched Familia. Three people showed up at Mestizo’s Coffeehouse near Rose Park. To boost their numbers, they asked a barista to join them in their group photo. Shortly after, Romero joined. In February 2015, Mendoza sent 16 emails to the Utah Pride Center and Equality Utah announcing Familia’s birth and seeking their support. She received no response. At the time, Pride director Edmonds-Allen was not yet working at the center. EU’s Williams says the emails came during the middle of the legislative session—at a time, he says, when “we were passing a bill to protect them.” Senate Bill 96 provided legal protections in employment and housing for gay, lesbian and transgender communities, JOSH SHEUERMAN

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BUBBLEGUM FRIENDS

“making Utah the first red state to do it. I’m proud of that,” says Williams. Silence wasn’t the only issue Mendoza encountered. Links on the Pride website for services for Latinos were all broken. “What happens when a Latino person comes out as queer?” Mendoza says. “Email Pride, and nobody will ever get back to you. How many people are we leaving behind? That’s my biggest fear.”

HIDDEN VIOLENCE

Familia’s emergence came during a crucial time for Utah’s Pride Center. The service organization had been through an extended period of turmoil that saw first longtime executive director Valerie Larrabee depart, followed by two subsequent replacements also leaving in short order. Critics have long argued that the agenda of Pride, being overwhelmingly about marriage equality, reflected domination by rich, white gay men and women. “It became a club for rich, white queer people to feel good about themselves, that they’re making a difference,” says former Pride Center staff Dayne Law, current volunteer, trans man and board member of T of Utah. “But they’re making a difference in causes they feel good about, not that necessarily are important.” In the past, Law says, when concerned community members brought up the board’s lack of diversity, “they think inclusion means a token person of color or Latino.” Rather than simply adding a person of color to the board, “it’s about changing things that you do in terms of ... programs for the most marginalized communities.” Board member and high-profile hairdresser Matthew Landis has a different take. “One of the reasons I joined the board of the Pride center is I believe it does important work on the ground as a service organization. It’s there to provide a safe space for people, advocate for people, find the services and support that they need—and that means everybody,” he says. Marian Edmonds-Allen took over as executive director of the Pride center in August 2015, after a much-lauded career in social and economic justice, particularly working with homeless youth in Ogden. Edmonds-Allen is keenly aware of the criticism Pride is facing. Indeed, at a press conference upon her appointment, she says among the first questions she was asked was, “What are you going to do for people of color in the community? What are you doing for trans people?” She says the center is working to both improve services

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Adrian Romero


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access for minorities and diversity at the center itself. Some critics have noted a reluctance to address the needs of transgender people, whether in terms of access to a shower for homeless trans individuals (Edmonds-Allen says the center’s shower is available for anyone to use) or publicly addressing violence against members of the trans community. Violence against trans women, both white and of color, is rarely reported in Utah and across the nation. T board member Law says that, by mid2014, there had been 20 attacks in Utah in that year alone. And although community members held meetings attempting to address the violence, “it didn’t come out to anything solid,” Law says. Pride recently instituted a self-defense clinic for transgender and non-binary adults and youth. (“Nonbinary” refers to individuals who do not conform to either female or male gender identities.) “We are very aware if you are transgender, you are at high risk of assault,” Edmonds-Allen says. She plans to develop a street outreach program and a mobile medical clinic. Edmonds-Allen says that the turmoil at the center prior to her arrival reflected turmoil within the community at large. “It seems to be pretty fractured to me,” she says. “There’s a lot of fighting, a lot of arguing, ‘This is for us; this is for you.’” Healing these lines of fracture will take some doing: “What I am working on is bringing all these different groups together,” Edmonds-Allen says. She plans to implement a community council, where groups from across the spectrum of the LGBT community can meet regularly to air their concerns. Landis argues that the LGBT movement is “experiencing growing pains as we strive to be more inclusive.” With Edmonds-Allen at the helm, he believes “we are getting back to where we need to be, refocusing our mission which is reconnecting with our community.”

AND ACCESS FOR ALL

In March 2015, Mendoza and Echeveste “barged into the Pride center,” they recall, demanding a meeting. Several unproductive meetings later, they were told they could march in the Pride Parade. They ended up having the 96th slot out of 100. Dayne Law asked Mendoza to speak at the trans rally. In the weeks running up to the Pride Festival, controversy emerged about the rally’s scheduling. Frustrations about the combined march came to a boil in a Facebook thread on the “Dyke, Trans, Sexually Fluid and Poly rally and march” page. Pride festival supporters tried to address complaints from transgender members of the community who felt the decision to combine the rallies did them a disservice. When it came to Mendoza’s Pride speech, “the ones who really needed to hear that speech were not there,” Law says. “They were with ‘the haves’— they were partying.” As it has done for a decade, Pride held its annual Grand Marshal Reception on the Friday of Pride weekend. Pride board member Landis says the scheduling of the rally and march at the same time was “unfortunate,” but says it was the members of the participating communities who combined their respective demonstrations into one Friday march. Mendoza, however, believes the rationale was financial, since it costs less to police one march than four. EU’s Troy Williams says bringing Janet Mock to Utah was meant to launch conversations, rather than lead to acrimony and allegations of exclusion. “We didn’t intend to marginalize.

But if we did, we’ve got to be better,” Williams says. “I can’t make excuses for that.” He points to a lack of knowledge both in straight and gay societies regarding the transgender community. While most straight people know someone who is gay, very few gay or straight people know someone who is transgender. “We don’t know that there’s a whole community that’s in crisis, that’s facing issues of poverty, violence. [Without knowing someone in the transgender community] there isn’t this urgency,” Williams says. Edmonds-Allen says there are no statistics for Utah’s transgender community, white or of color, as trans individuals are reluctant to come forward for fear of violence. Williams is a fan of Mock’s. “I love a good activist. They call people on their shit, they disrupt the status quo.” Mock in her speech “connected us to our history, that the Stonewall riots were launched by Latino drag queens. It was a riot, not polite gays at a cocktail movement.” Despite such a discourse, Mock was irked by the loud chatter among roughly half the people in the room when she spoke. She furiously called out one group of loquacious males at the bar with their backs to her. Pride’s Edmond-Allen says that problems that dogged the Pride Festival in 2015, such as the cross-scheduling of the rally and the reception, as well as the reception’s high ticket prices, will not reoccur. “I find it tremendously unfortunate, and it’s not anything that will happen under my watch. My goal is to have a community festival where everyone has access to the things they want to have access to.” Despite all the drama, arguments and confrontations, when Sunday, June 7, came around, Mendoza shrugged off the controversy surrounding her speech and got dressed for the Pride parade. She chose her outfit to reflect her identity—a black bikini top to emphasis femininity, fishnets for sensuality, a bandana for radical politics and butterfly wings for the Monarch butterflies who emigrate from South to North America, a symbol of the fight for immigrant rights.

In March 2015, Mendoza, pictured, and Echeveste “barged into the Pride center,” they recall, demanding a meeting. Several unproductive meetings later, they were told they could march in the Pride Parade. They ended up having the 96th slot out of 100.

Continued on p. 26

NIKI CHAN

24 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

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Trans*lations

AUSTEN DIAMOND

“They are challenging power—namely who has it and who has been excluded. Conversations we have had a hard time going to in America—race, gender, indentity, poverty and violence— they’re going right to it.” —Troy Williams, Equality Utah executive director Continued from p. 24

TOMORROW, WE RISE

Late summer 2015, Mendoza learned her mother planned to travel from Peru to New York to meet with her and her brother. Her longtime friend and fellow Dreamer, Itza Hernandez told her she would attend a fundraiser for Mendoza’s plane ticket on Sept. 26. But instead, Mendoza was at a fundraiser the following day to raise bail for Hernandez, who days before had been detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Hernandez was arrested in May 2011 on DUI and assault charges and then detained by ICE. The immigration judge granted her bail, and shortly after, she took plea deals on the charges that left her with two class B misdemeanor convictions. Unbeknownst to her and her bail-bond company, the insurance company holding the bond filed for bankruptcy. Almost four years later, ICE called in 27 people, among them Hernandez, whose bonds were held by the bankrupt company. Most were released. Hernandez was held. An ICE spokesperson in a statement wrote that Hernandez was “a civil immigration enforcement priority,” and would be held without bail until she appeared before an immigration judge on Oct. 29, when she was scheduled for a hearing on her green-card application. Just prior to being detained, Hernandez had started work at a bakery. Caught between anguish and fury, Mendoza helped organize a protest outside Beehive Bail Bonds that saw many of the former Salt Lake Dream Team reunite for their detained friend and activist. She told reporters, “Today is a press conference. Next time, we rise.” Hernandez was a key figure in Salt Lake Dream Team, which was where she and Mendoza met. In a phone interview from a Spanish Fork jail, Hernandez describes herself as identifying as “queer in a non-binary way.” She says “the

only kind of organizing that makes sense is intersectional”—which is responding to where race, gender and other issues overlap in peoples’ lives and can result in systemic social and economic injustice. That way, “you address things from the root of the problem and you’re not leaving anyone behind.” Equality Utah’s executive director Troy Williams says Familia, and particularly Mendoza, “are reinventing and blowing apart all the old ideas about gender, race and class in a very exciting way, but also in a way that’s very disturbing and uncomfortable for the older generations. They are challenging power— namely who has it and who has been excluded. Conversations we have had a hard time going to in America—race, gender, identity, poverty and violence—they’re going right to it.” That’s because all those issues intersect in the lives of trans people of color. So Familia, “are challenging us to engage in these issues that are the most difficult to talk about.” And challenge the establishment she does, including Equality Utah. On Oct. 3, 2015, EU invited Mendoza to attend its annual fundraising dinner, themed “Queer New World.” Online the next day, she condemned EU as unnecessary, writing “white [saviorism] ABOUNDS in Utah.” Small things jumped out at her at the dinner: “the amount of white award recipients, and the people of color GIVING the awards, the gendered bathrooms and the firm line between the classes.” Mendoza says marginalization in Utah is not simply an issue of white privilege, of white entitlement but of Utahns fostering “this whitedominated narrative in a place where color is rare.” She asks and answers her own question. “Where’s the color in the rainbow?” For all its spectrum of colors, when it comes to people of color, “There is no color in that rainbow.” CW Visit CityWeekly.net to see a video of Mendoza’s speech.

It’s a confusing world for the non-transgender person, whether gay or straight, to understand the world that Familia seeks to champion and to educate Utahns about. Here are a few terms to begin the journey.

Gender Identity

One’s internal, deeply held sense of one’s gender. For transgender people, their own internal gender identity does not match the sex they were assigned at birth.

Gender Expression

External manifestations of gender, expressed through one’s name, pronouns, clothing, haircut, behavior, voice, or body characteristics. Typically, transgender people seek to make their gender expression align with their gender identity, rather than the sex they were assigned at birth.

Transgender

(adj.) An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. People under the transgender umbrella may describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms—including transgender.

Transsexual

(adj.) An older term that originated in the medical and psychological communities. Still preferred by some people who have permanently changed—or seek to change—their bodies through medical interventions. Not an umbrella term.

Trans

Used as shorthand to mean transgender or transsexual— or sometimes to be inclusive of a wide variety of identities under the transgender umbrella.

Transgender man

People who were assigned female at birth but identify and live as a man may use this term to describe themselves.

Transgender woman

People who were assigned male at birth but identify and live as a woman may use this term to describe themselves.

Cisgender

A term used by some to describe people who are not transgender. “Cis” is a Latin prefix meaning “on the same side as,” and is therefore an antonym of “trans.”

Gender Non-Conforming

A term used to describe some people whose gender expression is different from conventional expectations of masculinity and femininity. Not all gender nonconforming people identify as transgender; nor are all transgender people gender non-conforming.

Genderqueer

A term used by some people who experience their gender identity and/or gender expression as falling outside the categories of man and woman. They may define their gender as falling somewhere in between man and woman, or they may define it as wholly different from these terms. The term is not a synonym for transgender or transsexual and should only be used if someone self-identifies as genderqueer.

Intersectionality

The interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender as they apply to a given individual or group, regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage. (Sources: GLADD, Oxford English Dictionary)


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ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 10.15

Samba Fogo: Raizes do Samba Samba Fogo is Salt Lake City’s most vibrant and visible link to the local Brazilian community. Each autumn, this talented troupe of dancers, vocalists, musicians and fire dancers produces an evening of Brazilian dance and storytelling. This year’s performance, Raizes do Samba (“Roots of Samba”), explores the art form’s roots in Afro-Brazilian culture and history, as well as Samba Fogo’s own connection to Brazil’s artist communities. “A lot of people who come to our shows enjoy the spectacle, but they don’t realize how authentic our work is, and how close our collaboration is with artists and teachers from Brazil,” says Lorin Hansen, Samba Fogo’s artistic director. Raizes do Samba will feature a number of original works that have come out of such relationships. A musical composition by guest musician Eduardo “Dudu” Fuentes, an award-winning composer and drummer who conducted a drumming workshop in Salt Lake City in September 2015, and a samba dance choreographed by Rio de Janeirobased Alvaro Reys will showcase some of these creative collaborations. Those who have seen Samba Fogo before know that story always binds the performance. Vocalist and musician Solange Gomes weaves beautiful tales and folklore between the sets of high-energy dance and drumming. It’s an important component of Samba Fogo’s cultural mission. After all, explains Hansen, each number has a larger symbolic context. This year, storytelling takes on an even more important role as Raizes do Samba retraces the African roots, from as far back as the 16th-century slave trade, of the samba tradition. (Katherine Pioli) Samba Fogo: Raizes do Samba @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Oct 15-17, 7:30 pm, $18-$20. ArtTix.org

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS OCT. 15-21, 2015

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

THURSDAY 10.15

FRIDAY 10.16

Every atom in the universe may be connected to every other atom, but Los Angeles-based artist Brian Bress makes the Utah Museum of Fine Arts a universe of his own. The museum takes on a new dimension with Bress’ mind-bending video screen performances, costumes and inventive productions, combining to make something unique with surprising complexity and methods. The videos either relate in pairs or groups and become an open door to new thought. “Ridley Tree Sleep” (pictured) is one of Bress’ exciting and unique pieces. Curator Whitney Tassie uses creative license to pair pieces that interact or function together with works from the UMFA’s own collection. “Ridley Tree Sleep” is paired with traditional UMFA portraits on either side, yet this video screen is not just another female portrait; it’s Bress himself, costumed in the guise of a 2-D portrait. His 3-D representation of a 2-D painting, with subtle motion, questions the notion of what a painting can and cannot be. Says exhibition curator Tassie: “Brian Bress’ silent characters cut through the screen, thus acknowledging the relationship between performer and viewer.” Bress himself is animated, costumed and filmed in a manner inspired by children’s television. This gives a new meaning to the conceptualization of the art and costume, detaching Bress from the space of the viewer and into an abstracted place of childhood. This sense of play opens up the art for new levels of discovery, while the viewer finds new connections. (Ehren Clark) Salt 12: Brian Bress: Make Your Own Friends @ Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Dr., University of Utah, 801-581-7332, Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (open until 8 p.m. Wednesday); Saturday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; through Jan. 10, 2016, U of U students and members free, adults $14, youth and seniors $12, children 5 and under, free. UMFA.Utah.edu

For some, coulrophobia is no laughing matter. Fearing clowns is a real phobia—Pennywise, anyone? But what if your alter-ego was a sadistic, foulmouthed gay clown? That’s the focal point of The Hive Theatre Co.’s The Secret Lives of Clowns. Told in three parts—sad, funny and scary— each act follows clown-turned-New York City theater critic Johnny Harris (Austin Stephenson) as he returns to his hometown for his best friend Richard’s funeral. It isn’t long before Johnny starts hallucinating Mr. Wiggles (playwright Jared Greathouse, pictured, right), the aforementioned perverse mental companion. When Johnny learns the gruesome details of Richard’s death—a murder and possible hate crime—he wants to know the truth. The only place he may find answers is at the clown academy he helped found with Richard, Leon (Thomas Bo Brady), and Richard’s wife, Emma Jean (Tiffany A. Greathouse)—all of whom lead secret lives. Even with entirely too much dialogue and exposition—something even Mr. Wiggles points out—it’s a wonder director Sam C. McGinnis V still managed to construct a coherent production. While the play relies heavily on themes of mental illness, inner demons and closeted gay men, no concrete statement is made. Instead, McGinnis and Greathouse want theatergoers to make up their own minds about the play’s message. They even encourage you to put your two cents in by leaving a two-word review following the show. A review like: “loquacious clowns.” (Missy Bird) The Hive Theatre Co.: The Secret Lives of Clowns @ Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, 801-573-4080, Oct. 9-17, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Oct. 17 matinee, 2 p.m.; $15. HiveTheatre.com

Salt 12: Brian Bress: Make Your Own Friends

The Hive Theatre Co.: The Secret Lives of Clowns

FRIDAY 10.16

Robert Kloss: The Revelator There are any number of ways a writer could attempt a fictionalized novel based on the life of Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints founder and prophet Joseph Smith. It could be somber and reverential, like the literary form of a cinematic “great man” biography. Or maybe it could be restrained and reflective, attempting to take a figure who has been chiseled into granite by his believers and make him simpler and more human. Robert Kloss, on the other hand, went for something risky and radical in The Revelator: employing a second-person narration to follow Joseph from a re-imagined childhood as an orphan, through his young adulthood as treasurehunter, and into his visitation by an otherworldly presence that leads to the creation of a new religion. And Kloss employs an almost scriptural language for this task, the “you” of the narrator speaking to Joseph in a way that echoes his sense of always being spoken to, and given a calling. The result is far from conventional, at times turning Joseph into a man haunted by the terrifying messenger of God he envisions as a dark creature. Yet, it’s also a fascinating portrait of Joseph as a man of his time, with followers drawn to his charismatic teachings, and the story of the church’s founding as inextricable from the American mythology of Manifest Destiny, and its accompanying violence. Join the author this week for a reading from this tale of a man who became a prophet, told in way you’ve surely never heard before. (Scott Renshaw) Robert Kloss: The Revelator @ Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., free. WellerBookWorks.com


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SLBUDDHIST.ORG 211 WEST 100 SOUTH

SALT LAKE BUDDHIST TEMPLE WELCOMES PARLIAMENT OF THE WORLD RELIGIONS

10:00 am Introduction to Buddhism

Seminars and Services at the Salt Lake Buddhist Temple

11:00 am Introduction to Jodo Shinshu Buddhism

Seminars sponsored by Buddhist Churches of America (BCA)

12:00 pm Introduction to Chanting and Demonstration of “Gagaku” (Classical Japanese Court Music)

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17:

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Salt Lake Buddhist Temple

Free and Open to the Public

4:00 pm Introduction to Buddhism 5:00 pm Introduction to Jodo Shinshu Buddhism 6:00 pm Introduction to Buddhist Chanting

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18: 9:00 am Meditation Service: 10:00 am Family Service: Dharma-thon, Kieshiki (Receiving Buddhist Name) 11:00 am Panel Discussion: “Future of Buddhism in America” - Bishops Umezu and Matsumoto

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 29

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16:


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30 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

A&E MARIAH O’MALLEY

GET OUT

Horseback at Dimple Dell Park

Down in the Dell

A stretch of urban open space is a reminder of an earlier Salt Lake Valley. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

I

was that little girl—the one who dreamed of having horses. High on a shelf in my parents’ study, an empty apple-juice jar collected all my hopes and dreams for that horse. At most, it once added up to about $22. Eventually, my parents—in an odd twist of parent/child roles—began “borrowing” from the jar when they needed cash. Needless to say, I never got that horse, but I did grow up riding. I can still feel myself in the saddle, the gentle sway of Apollo’s tawny ribs under my tiny knees. Back in those days, you didn’t have to drive much farther that 9200 South to get to a stable surrounded by open space and endless riding trails. By the time I quit riding, sometime around 1996, strip malls, housing developments, offices, warehouses and new roads were already pushing the riding stables farther onto the fringes of the valley. These days, it would seem that there’s no place to ride any more unless you take a long drive away from the Wasatch Front, east toward Heber or north toward Henefer. But, surprisingly, you’d be wrong. There is a fantastic place to ride a stone’s throw from the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon: Dimple Dell Park. On a recent afternoon, a few hours before sunset, my husband and I loaded Cooper and Harley, two of his mother’s horses, into a long silver horse trailer and drove 15 short minutes from her house in South Jordan to the main trailhead for Dimple Dell Park. For someone well acquainted with the open spaces surrounding the valley in the foothills and on mountain trails, but less familiar with the open spaces of the valley,

Dimple Dell was a revelation. The 644-acre Dimple Dell Park follows the Dry Creek drainage, a winding depression that cuts through the middle of a suburban Sandy neighborhood. Established in 1963, when Salt Lake County purchased land along the drainage, the Dell was an early, forwardthinking piece of city planning. It was created to provide a “quality experience for people in a nature-dominated environment.” Wisely designed, this “island of urban nature” includes minor developments and amenities that make it inviting and easy to use. A network of hiking, walking and equestrian trails crisscross the Dell. Picnic sites provide a welcome place to rest in the shade. We saddled the horses and went through the ritual of setting saddle blankets and tightening cinches. Gravel crunched under the horse’s hooves as they settled their weight from side to side. When all was ready, we turned from the parking lot to the trail. Cooper and Harley, nose to tail, stepped out onto a narrow, sandy path. Eventually, the path merged onto the wider main trail and began following the contours of the drainage. From down low in the dell, cottonwood and elm trees, native grasses and brush blocked all view of the houses that ran along either side. The noise of traffic quieted until only the whir of insects was audible. I once saw, on a visit to the Natural History Museum of Utah, two photographs side by side, each taken of the foothills looking from the Avenues to the University of Utah. A span of nearly 100 years separated each frame. The difference between the two scenes was easily visible. As houses moved in, the natural curve of the land disappeared. It’s nice to be reminded of what the Salt Lake Valley once looked like before the houses and roads. Photographs are one way to preserve our home’s natural legacy. A place like Dimple Dell lets us experience that history. Inside Dimple Dell, the city fades away. A handful of joggers passed as we rode the trail. Dog-walkers politely stepped out of the way, pulling their animals aside to let us pass. With the light quickly dimming, we turned back towards the truck and trailer just in time to see a deer and her fawn move off through the evening light and disappear into the park. CW


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M-Sat 8-6 • 9275 S 1300 W 801-562-5496 • glovernursery.com

FRIDAY 10.16

People Productions: The Exonerated

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Cirque du Pierrot Salty Cricket Composers Collective, Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m., SaltyCricket.org

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 31

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

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[Inter]national Connect & Love Dance More: Eveything Tendentious or M in Luck Salt Lake City Main Library Northern Annex Suite, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 16-17, 7:30 p.m., TanjaLondon.com Odyssey Dance Theatre: Thriller Various dates and locations in Salt Lake City, Provo, Richfield & Ivins, through Oct. 31, OdysseyDance.com Samba Fogo: Raízes Do Samba Rose Wagner Center, 210 E. 400 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 15-17, 7:30 p.m., ArtTix.org (see p. 24)

DANCE

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Behold, Zebulon Westminster College Jewett Center, 1840 S. 1300 East, Oct. 22-24, 7:30 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu Big Fish Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, Oct. 14-Nov. 28, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 12:30 & 4 p.m., HCT.org Blackberry Winter Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Tuesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6 p.m.; through Oct. 25, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Breaking Vlad Off Broadway Theatre, 272 Main, 801-355-4628, Monday, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Oct. 31, TheOBT.org Bride of Frankenstein Sackerson Theatre Co., The Warehouse, 1030 S. 300 West, Monday, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m., through Oct. 31, Bride-of-Frankenstein.com Buried Child Silver Summit Theatre, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, 801-541-7376, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m.; through Oct. 25, SilverSummitTheatre.org The Exonerated People Productions, S.J. Quinney School of Law Moot Courtroom, 332 S. 1400 East, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m., Oct. 18, 2 p.m., PeopleProductions.org (see above) The Kreutzer Sonata Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center Studio Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, Oct. 18-Nov. 9, Sunday-Monday, 7 p.m., PlanBTheatre.org Salem Witch Trials Salty Dinner Theater, 801-262-5083, various locations in Midvale, Murray, Sandy, Orem & Layton, through Oct. 29, SaltyDinnerTheater.com The Secret Lives of Clowns The Hive Theatre Co., Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West,

Oct. 9-17, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday matinees 2 p.m.; HiveTheatre.com (see p. 24) Star Wards: These Are Not the Elders You’re Looking For Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, Monday, WednesdayThursday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m.; through Nov. 27, DesertStar.biz Tribes Salt Lake Acting Co., Upstairs Theatre, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Tuesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 1 & 6 p.m.; Oct. 21-Nov. 15, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Utah Opera: Tosca Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 18, 2 p.m.; UtahOpera.org Young Frankenstein Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; through Oct. 30, The-Grand.org You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown Midvale Main Street Theatre, 7771 Main, Midvale, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; through Oct. 17, MidvaleTheatre.com

Full Salt Lake County club liquor license for sale upon DABC approval. Interested buyer must sign non disclosure agreement, have certified proof of approved funds from financial institution and complete proper screening process. Buyer has the option to purchase restaurant/club equipment for an additional cost with the license if desired. 801-992-3154 Please leave name and number.

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What’s worse than being convicted of a crime you didn’t commit? Being convicted of a crime you didn’t commit and ending up on Death Row. The docudrama The Exonerated tells the stories of six people who spent anywhere from two to 22 years on Death Row for crimes they didn’t commit, weaving together text from interviews, letters, court transcripts and case files. People Productions will perform The Exonerated over the next two weekends to raise funds for the Rocky Mountain Innocence Project, a nonprofit that assists the wrongfully convicted in Utah, Nevada and Wyoming. Performances begin Oct. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the University of Utah’s Quinney College of Law, which is also the venue for a 2 p.m. matinee Oct. 18. On Oct. 17, Salt Lake Community College’s South City Campus Black Box Theatre (1575 S. State) hosts a free performance at 7:30. The second weekend features three performances at the University of Utah Social Work Building: 7:30 p.m., Oct. 23; 7:30 p.m., Oct. 24; and 2 p.m., Oct. 25. (Geoff Griffin) People Productions: The Exonerated @ various locations, Oct. 16-18 & Oct. 23-25, $15 PeopleProductions.org, RMInnocence.org


moreESSENTIALS The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of The Goddesses Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Oct. 15, 8 p.m., Zelda-Symphony.com Music for the Soul Tabernacle, 50 N. West Temple, 801-570-0080, Oct. 16-17, 7:30 p.m., LDS.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Adult Improv/Open Mic Club at 50 West, 50 West Broadway, 801-961-1033, Thursday, 7 p.m., Club.50westSLC.com Improv Broadway Studio Theater, Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center, 801-852-7007, Oct. 16, 30, Nov. 6 & 20, 8 p.m. CoveyCenter.org Jason Harvey Club at 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, 801- 961-1033, Oct 15, 9 p.m., Club.50WestSLC.com Laughing Stock Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Friday, 10p.m., LaughingStock.us Marcus Wiseguys Comedy Club, 269 25th Street, Ogden, 801-622-5588, Oct. 16-17, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Mateen Stewart Club at 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, Oct. 18, 8 p.m., Club.50WestSLC.com Orny Adams Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, Oct. 16-17, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

32 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GET OUT | GET GOING | JUST GO

in stands soon for winter 2015 ISSUE

INTER

2•W

15/16

Utah | JUST OING

GO

GET G UT | GET O

Brandon Mull: The Caretaker’s Guide to Fablehaven Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, 801-484-9100, Oct. 15, 7 p.m., ViridianCenter.org John Flanagan: The Tournament at Gorlan Rowland Hall St. Mark’s, 843 Lincoln St. E, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Layne T. Oliver: A Pebble in a Pond Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Oct. 15, 6 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Orson Scott Card: Gatefather Barnes & Noble, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, 801-229-1611, Oct. 21, 7 p.m., BarnesandNoble.com Richard Crangle: Temptations Behind Stained Glass Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Oct. 19, 6 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Robert Kloss: The Revelator Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com (see p. 24) Sarah Alisabeth Fox: Downwind: A People’s History Of The Nuclear West Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-328-2586, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., SLCPL.org Shannon & Dean Hale: The Princess in Black and the Perfect Princess Party The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Oct. 15, 6:30 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Ginormous Pumpkin Regatta Sugar House Park, 2100 S. 1300 East, 801-486-0480, Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., MVSeeds.com Kickstarter Film Fest Broadway Centre Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, 801-321-0310, Oct. 15, 7 p.m., FilmFest.Kickstarter.com Scarecrow Festival Thanksgiving Point Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, 801-768-2300, Oct. 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., ThanksgivingPoint.org Snowbrush Herb Festival AFLA’s UAA Community Art Garden, 633 W. 100 South, 435-764-1532, Oct. 17, 3 p.m.-9 p.m.

HAUNTS & SPOOKY FUN

Black Island Farms Black Island Farms, 3178 S. 3000 West, Syracuse, 801-825-6236, MondayFriday, 4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.; BlackIslandFarms.com Carnivore Carnival George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park, 1544 Park Blvd., Ogden, 801-393-3466, Oct. 16-17, 23-24, 30, 6:30-8:30 p.m., DinosaurPark.org Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, 7:30 p.m. nightly, through Nov. 14, CastleofChaos.com Cornbelly’s Corn Maze & Pumpkin Fest Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-794-3276, Monday-Thursday, 4 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 10 a.m.; Cornbellys.com The Corn Maize The Corn Maize, 2801 S. 3500 West, Ogden, 801-645-5392, Monday-Friday, 4 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.; through Oct. 31, TheCornMaize.com Crazy Corn Maze Crazy Corn Maze, 8800 S. 4000 West, West Jordan, 801-569-2356, MondayFriday, 6 p.m.; Saturday, noon; UtahMaze.com Fear Factory 666 W. 800 South, Monday-Saturday, 7 p.m., through Oct. 31, FearFactorySLC.com Frightmares Lagoon Park, 375 Lagoon Drive, Farmington, through Oct. 30, 5 p.m., LagoonPark.com

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS end Weekiors rr ’s red rocks Wa n Head Bria der ep pow and de

12

lazgeendr Trailcib ence le Snow-s r Trempe Bruce

24

s 10 Tip g iin for Skbies New 36

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mountai Franken

10

Pick up yours for the best in outdoor winter adventure!

9th West Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 25, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Downtown Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South,Saturday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tuesday, 4-9 p.m.; through Oct. 24, SLCFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Anime Banzai Davis Conference Center, 1651 N. 700 West, Layton, 801-416-8888, Oct. 16-18, 9 a.m., AnimeBanzai.org Biketoberfest 300 S. 200 West, Oct. 17, noon, RevolutionUnited.org (see p. 10) Fall Harvest Festival American West Heritage Center, 4025 Highway 89, Wellsville, 435-245-6050, Oct. 16-17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., AWHC.org

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net! CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND


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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 33


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Co

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34 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

Annual

ber

Nove n i g n 26th m i m of

Only 3 weeks away!

NEW for 2015 Picks from all 29 Counties in Utah

Reader Quiz

Q: Which radio show has won the most BOU awards? A: Look in next week’s issue

Submit replies to BOU2015@cityweekly.net Prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd reply $25, $15, and $10 in the City Weekly Store Last week’s answer: “Brighton” has won the most overall awards.

Contact your sales rep to reserve your space TODAY! 801-575-7003 or sales@cityweekly.net

Grimm Ghost Tours 18 W. South Temple, 801-508-4746, Friday 7, 9 & 10:30 p.m., Saturday, 5, 7, 9 & 10:30 p.m., GrimmGhostTours.com Haunted Forest Haunted Forest, 6000 W. 6400 North, American Fork, 801-903-3039, MondaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., HauntedUtah.com Haunted Hollow Haunted Hollow, 1550 S. 1900 West, Ogden, 801-903-3039, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Oct. 31, HauntedUtah.com Insanity Point Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-794-3276, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:45 p.m., through Oct. 31, InsanityPoint.com Little Haunts This Is The Place Heritage Park, 2106 Sunnyside Ave., 801-582-1847, Oct. 15-17, 24 & 31, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., ThisIsThePlace.org Mystery Escape Room The Gateway, 157 S. Rio Grande St., 385-322-2583, Monday-Saturday, 9:20 a.m., MysteryEscapeRoom.com Nightmare on 13th 300 W. 1300 South, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Oct. 31 Nightmareon13th.com Spooktacular Family Carnival The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., TheLeonardo.org Strangling Brothers Haunted Circus 98 E. 13800 South, Draper, nightly, 7:30 p.m. StranglingBros.com The Witches High Tea Grand America Hotel, 555 S. Main, 801-906-0470, Oct. 17, 3:30 p.m., CronesHollow.com Tower of Terror Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, 801-321-0310, Oct. 16-31, 11 p.m., SaltLakeFilmSociety.org Pumpkin Days Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, 385-468-1755, Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; through Oct. 31, WheelerFarm.com WitchFest Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, 801-566-8903, through Oct. 31, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m., GardnerVillage.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Aaron Wallis: The Street Bible Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, through Oct. 24, MestizoArts.org Amalia Ulman: Stock Images of War Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Oct. 31, UtahMOCA.org Bill Reed: Changing Visions: Womanscapes, Botanicals, and More Salt Lake City Library Chapman Branch, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Oct. 29, SLCPL.org Brian Bress: Make Your Own Friends Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 10, UMFA.Utah.edu (see p. 24) Brian Christensen: RECONFIGURE CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Feb. 7 CUArtCenter.org Chad Farnes: Duct Tape Paintings Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through Nov. 20, SaltLakeArts.org Chris Wiley: Black and White CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Nov. 14, CUArtCenter.org Create Your World: Photography by Carol Davis Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Nov. 10, SLCPL.org Dennis Smith David Erickson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, through Nov. 15, DavidErickson-FineArt.com DesignArts Utah 2015 Rio Grande Depot, 300 South Rio Grande St., 801-245-7270, through Oct. 23; Reception Oct. 16, 6-9 p.m., Heritage.Utah.gov Firelei Baez: Patterns of Resistance Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 16, UtahMOCA.org Gallery Stroll Various Salt Lake Art Galleries, 801-870-0956, Oct. 16, 6-9 p.m., GalleryStroll.org Halloween Themed Group Art Show Mod a-go-go, 242 E. South Temple, 801-355-3334, Oct. 16, 6-9 p.m., ModaGoGo.com


HEARTH ON 25TH

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS,

-CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

801 582-5807 WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

the stroganoff overall was disappointing. Rather than thin slices of tender beef that are the norm, this stroganoff contained stringy, dry strands of beef that could easily have been were remnants of a French dip sandwich or the beef short ribs on the menu. And, there was little of it to boot. Mountains of mushrooms all but obliterated what little beef there was in the dish, and I didn’t detect any pork—Berkshire or otherwise—at all. The flavor was bland and lacked seasoning. We had to ask for salt and pepper. A much more satisfying entrée is the quail and dumplings ($28). It consists of seared-then-braised tender quail in a hearty chasseur sauce with lots of wild mushrooms, pancetta, small blue-cheese dumplings, grilled endive and pickled quail egg. The pickled egg did nothing to advance the quail dish, and seemed just plain unnecessary and out of place. But overall, the quail is a very good menu selection. Just because you can cook everything in a wood-fired oven doesn’t mean you should. I refer here to Hearth’s apple bread pudding. Now, I tend to think of bread pudding as a dessert that could best be described as moist; hence, the word “pudding.” But this bread pudding was just slightly soggier than salad croutons, the torn pieces of bread seemingly having met their demise in that hot wood-fired hearth. Utah’s culinary scene could surely benefit from more risk-takers. And, despite Hearth’s sometimes uneven results, I will continue to root for all of them. CW

HEARTH ON 25TH

195 E. 25thSt., Ogden 801-399-0088 Hearth25.com

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 35

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD

Quail & dumplings and other daring plates are served at Hearth on 25th.

| CITY WEEKLY |

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

and pizzas, roast meats and seafood and fire hot desserts. Like virtually everything on Hearth’s menu, the pizzas and flatbreads are eclectic, to say the least. To wit, there’s a buffalo shrimp pizza with cornmeal-crusted prawns, homemade buffalo sauce, pickled carrots, onions and radishes, ranch dressing and Point Reyes blue cheese ($15). The veggie pizza is given Korean flare with zucchini, carrot, sweet roasted corn, sun-dried tomato, sambal, salad greens, radish & onion kimchi, pears and jalapeño-balsamic gastrique ($13). Even the pepperoni pizza—with Creminelli Calabrese pepperoni—has a SoCal-style slant, incorporating sun-dried tomatowalnut pesto, pepperoncini and 18-yearold balsamic vinegar. It may seem a little nutty to pay $15 for something normally tossed to pets. But, once you’ve developed a crack-like addiction to bone marrow, the sky’s the limit. The wood oven-roasted bone marrow at Hearth is a little unusual, insofar as the beef bone (femur) is cut in half lengthwise, as opposed to the customary cross sections. The 16-inch-or-so half-cut bone does make for a striking presentation, however. If you’ve never had bone marrow, it tastes a bit like warm foie gras—nutty and buttery. At Hearth, you’ll spread it on thick slices of house-baked sourdough toast served with roasted heirloom pepper relish, apricot mostardo and caramelized onions. I love stroganoff, so I was immediately attracted to Hearth’s “Slow Food Stroganoff” ($26). It’s described on the menu thusly: “braised local Angus beef, Ballard Farms Berkshire pork, mafaldine noodles, hearty brown sauce, caramelized onions & mushrooms, stone ground mustard crème fraîche, dehydrated mustard and fresh chives.” Hearth’s homemade mafaldine is excellent: thick, pappardelle-style pasta with curly edges like lasagna. Unfortunately,

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-85 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-

I

have been rooting for restaurateurs Shana and AJ Hubbard, since they first opened Jasoh! on Harrison Boulevard in Ogden a dozen years back. Jasoh! eventually relocated to 25th Street and then, in 2013, was rebranded as Hearth on 25th. I confess I root for all restaurateurs; I never want any of them to fail. However, my desire to see the Hubbards succeed has to do with their daring. They don’t play it safe when it comes to the food and drink they proffer, and never have. Exhibit A: Who else would have the chutzpah to put yak tartare on an Ogden menu, grass-fed or otherwise? And, given that yak in any form has got to be a pretty hard sell, charging $32 for grass-fed yak tartare seems downright audacious. I can’t really imagine they move a lot of yak tartare at that price—or, for that matter, seared yak steak at $44. Yes, sticker shock is a reality at Hearth on 25th, where $45 will get you an 8-ounce steak au poivre, and “street tacos” go for $18. This certainly must be Ogden’s priciest restaurant. But as the saying goes, you get what you pay for. And I am not one to shy away from expensive eats. In fairness, you could belly up to the bar at Hearth—called The Title 32B Lounge (named fafter Utah’s266-page Alcoholic Beverage Control Act)—for craft cocktails with hand-cut, reverse osmosis ice and an order of $5 popcorn. It’s cheaper than at a movie theater. And about that popcorn: It’s the best I’ve ever tasted. Hearth’s coconut-curry popcorn is lightly kissed with extra-virgin coconut oil (didn’t know there was such a thing), curry spices, harissa extra-virgin olive oil (didn’t know there was such a thing) and curryroasted cashews. Why not enjoy that killer corn with Hearth’s signature cocktail, the Title 32B: Wild Turkey rye, Averna Amaro, Heering cherry liqueur, Underground herbal liqueur and maple shrub. Other good bar bites and starters at Hearth include tempura-battered calamari with garlic aioli ($12); Belgian-style pommes frites with white truffle oil ($6), black truffle sea salt, shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano, and garlic aioli; and house-made burrata with figs ($13). Hearth on 25th isn’t called “Hearth” for nothing. The centerpiece of the kitchen is, indeed, a hearth—specifically, a Tuscan wood-burning oven used to bake breads

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Serving American DRIVE-INS AND DIVES” Comfort Food Since 1930

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457

A visit to Ogden’s most eclectic eatery.

JOHN TAYLOR

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

You Gotta Have Hearth

DINE


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| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

r u o Y l Fue Day!

Serving Breakfast, Soups, Salads & Sandwiches. M-F: 8am - 5pm

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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

This is

@critic1

L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S

18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

Woktoberfest Returns

UTA H

O R I G I N A L

S I N C E

1 9 6 8

5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT 801.26 6.4182 / H O U R S: M O N-T H U 11 a - 11 p F R I- S AT 11 a - 12 a / S U N 3 p- 10 p

k

ar B e

Now

SAKE TASTINGS

Op

$25 PER PERSON last Thursday Monthly

2335 E. MURRAY HOLLADAY RD 801.278.8682 | ricebasil.com

Celebrate the Harvest

@

CityWeekly

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 37

Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

Quote of the week: He was a bold man who first swallowed an oyster. —King James I of England

Franck’s restaurant (6263 S. Holladay Blvd., FrancksFood.com) will host a Harvest Wine Dinner on Monday, Oct. 26, at 6:30 p.m. featuring a fourcourse menu paired with wines selected by Tyler Heninger and Jeff Carter of Southern Wine and Spirits. The cost for the food is $35 per person with an additional $55 for four optional wine pairings. Menu items include braised bone-in beef short rib, sage-crusted Niman Ranch pork loin, banana squash risotto and more. Phone 801-274-6264 for reservations.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

The community-minded folks at Sandy’s Fratelli Ristorante (9236 S. Village Shop Drive, FratelliUtah.com) will host the eighth annual Fratelli Fights Hunger Dinner on Sunday, Nov. 1, with seatings available from 5 p.m.-8:30 p.m. The five-course fundraising dinner will be held to benefit the Utah Food Bank, and is priced at $50 per person for food, plus an additional $50 per person for optional wine pairings. There will also be a full bar selection available at an additional cost. In addition to dinner and wine pairings, Fratelli will host a silent auction with contributions from Utah Red Zone, Nixon, Ruth’s Diner, Porcupine Pub & Grill, The Dodo, IG Winery and others. In 2014, Fratelli Ristorante raised $5,000 for the Utah Food Bank, and this year, organizers hope to do even better. Reservations can be made by calling 801-495-4550.

italianvillageslc.com A

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Fratelli Fights Hunger

Like your mama made it!

ta as lt ie a n

en

Bountiful’s Mandarin restaurant (348 E. 900 North, 801-298-2406) is closed for deep cleaning, restoration and rest, according to its owners. Mandarin’s popular annual Woktoberfest will take place after the hiatus, weekdays from Oct. 1929. Woktoberfest 2015 is a celebration of small plates, with a special menu and prices ranging from $1.25 to $6.50. Featured menu items include satay chicken noodles, eggplant with garlic sauce, bon bon chicken, crab cream-cheese wontons, Szechwan chicken wings, mu shu pork, Szechwan catfish, pumpkin breadpudding with bourbon-butter sauce, ginger ice cream and more. Uinta Brewing’s Cutthroat Pale Ale and 801 Pilsner beers will also be featured. Mandarin accepts dining reservations for parties of 8 or more. MandarinUtah.com

Sa

Contemporary Japanese Dining

IT


e licat t e D n an m r aura e t G s e &R

Cozy up with a b owl

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves!

of ou potato c heese so r up

The Other Place

This classic, friendly restaurant specializing in Greek & American comfort food has a bevy of longtime loyal customers who come in for The Other Place’s renowned marinated steak & eggs and the seasoned, knowledgeable service team. At this restaurant, generous portions are standard, whether you’re in the mood for a savory lamb dish, a platter of Greek mezedakia, soups, pasta, a sandwich, or a sweet serving of housemade baklava or rice pudding. There are also tasty gyros and kebabs to be had, and breakfast is served anytime. 464 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-521-6567

7903 S. Airport Road (4400 West) 801-566-4855 | WWW.RILEYSSANDWICHES.COM

The Copper Onion

Catering available Catering Available

Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm 20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891

G

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ssen

E

E TM

TO THE GR EE

K!

38 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

Das ist gut

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

The guiding concept at The Copper Onion, conveniently located in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City, is all about fresh, regional, casual cuisine. At The Copper Onion, restaurant specialties include the “small plate” of sauteed chanterelles topped with crisp shoestring potatoes and a farm-fresh lightly fried egg—yolk properly quivering and ready to coat the savory flavors below. Other restaurant highlights are a perfectly balanced arugula salad with sherry vinegar, olives and Parmesan. Sauteed cod with a pale (but intensely flavored) lemon jam on kale and a side of sauteed pea shoots with golden raisins and pine nuts hits all the right notes—balance, texture, color. Good stuff. 111 E. Broadway, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3282, TheCopperOnion.com

Breakfast

Lunch & Dinner

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Beer & Wine

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Szechuan Garden

For more than 35 years, this restaurant has been dishing up Szechuan cuisine in prestigious venues around the world, and he’s a lifetime judge of the National Ranking chef test in the Szechuan Province. Orders of camphor tea-smoked duck, sha cha beef, Da Ching chicken, and hot & spicy eel are all dishes to get the party started in this classic Chinese restaurant. And, true, it’s difficult to choose between intestines hot & spicy in chili broth, or with pickles, but the authentic dish is worth a try. 1275 E. 8600 South, Sandy, 801-233-0027, The-Szechuan-Garden.com OMELETTES | PANCAKES • GREEK SPECIALTIES

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Park Café

For homestyle breakfast and lunch in a comfy, family friendly environment, go no farther than Park Cafe. Take a trip to nearby Liberty Park for a perfect post-meal stroll. Grab a table inside or on the porch and treat yourself to what just may be the tastiest breakfast potatoes in the history of spuds. But that’s not all: The pancakes at Park Café are exceptional, too—thick and nicely crispy on the edges. For a healthy treat, order a delicious eggwhite omelet and then wreck your good intentions with a big side of those breakfast taters or thick, chewy bacon. The efficient, friendly service and Liberty Park location make this cozy spot a truly tantalizing place to drop in for breakfast or lunch. For the latter, the tuna melt is pretty hard to resist. 604 E. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-1670, TheParkCafeSLC.com

13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R


BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Zincredible

Exploring Zinfandel, a uniquely American wine. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

H

juice from Mendocino, Lodi, Napa Valley and Sonoma. I particularly like the ripe jammy flavors of Napa Valley Old Vine Zinfandel ($13.99), with hints of dark chocolate, blackberries and cocoa. But at 14.5 percent alcohol, you might want to sip this one slowly. Ravenswood’s Single Vineyard Designates is a wine series that’s all about terroir. These are vineyard locations that are ideally suited to the grapes grown there: old, low-yield vines that are site-specific. Ravenswood Dickerson Zinfandel ($32.99) offers notes of mint and eucalyptus, along with sweet mid-palate fruit flavors that are well balanced by the wine’s acidity. Invest in America! Drink Zinfandel. CW

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Today, Zinfandel tends to be made most often in a big, robust, high-alcohol style. Blackberry, anise and pepper flavors are typical of Zins from warm climates, while raspberry and strawberry flavors tend to find their way into cool-climate Zinfandels. Either is great to drink with hearty dishes such as grilled or barbecued meats, pasta with red sauces, lasagna, roasts and stews. I’m fond of the American Zinfandels produced by Joel Peterson and his Ravenswood wines. Here’s a trio to try: Ravenswood Vintners Blend Old Vine Zinfandel is a great bang for the buck at $12.99, and an even better bargain when it goes on sale, for $9.99, which happens frequently. It’s big and bold, but simultaneously approachable, with soft tannins and rich fruit flavors. A step up from Vintners Blend is the Ravenswood County Series, featuring

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aving lived and grown up in countries all over the world, I am not especially nationalistic. Jingoism makes my blood boil. Still, I am proud of American jazz, blues, rock & roll, baseball and … Zinfandel. Why Zin? Well, Zinfandel can be considered a uniquely American wine—the only one, in fact. It accounts for more than 10 percent of the grapes grown in California vineyards. And yet, “Zinfandel” sure doesn’t sound American. Indeed, the name Zinfandel is thought to be of European origin, possibly linked to the “Black Zinfardel of Hungary” mentioned in A Treatise on the Vine by William Robert Prince in 1830. Others think it’s a modification of Tzinifánfli or Czirifandli, Hungarian terms that derive from the German “Zierfandler” (“white grape”). It’s much too dense and complex to go into here—thousands of pages of research

have been written—but anyone really interested in the obscure origins of what is called Zinfandel in this country might want to wade into the debates and DNA fingerprinting of Italian and Croatian Primitivo and Tribidrag grapes, versus Zinfandel. Although the matter still hasn’t been settled to everyone’s satisfaction, Zinfandel is thought by some researchers to have genetically descended from Croatian grape varietals. Whatever its etymology, Zinfandel in America dates back to the 1820s, when it was planted on Long Island. By 1835, Zinfandel was being used in the Boston area—cultivated as a hothouse varietal— as a table grape. It is first documented as a grape used for making wine in 1847, in John Fisk Allen’s Practical Treatise in the Culture and Treatment of the Grape Vine. But, it would soon be supplanted in the Northeast by the heartier Concord grape, which could be grown outdoors. In the 1850s, Zinfandel made its first appearance in California, albeit as a table grape that came west with the Gold Rush. It’s thought that Joseph Osborne might have made the first California Zinfandel wine after he planted Zinfandel at his Oak Knoll Vineyard in the North Napa region. A Zin boom followed, and by the end of the 1800s, Zinfandel was the most common wine grape variety planted in California.

DRINK

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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 39

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Deli Done REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews Right Mom’s Kitchen

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Two culinary cultures come together under one roof— Mama Zhang hails from Beijing, while Mama Chen is Taiwanese—and the combination is killer. Don’t expect a cookie-cutter, lunch-buffet Chinese restaurant experience. A lunch of minced pork came in a bowl with brown sauce and the slightest hint of star anise, with a generous mound of steamed white rice, a cold cabbage salad and hard-boiled egg. Noodles, buns, potstickers, fried dumplings and such at Mom’s are lovingly homemade, and taste like it. Another terrific starter/small plate is the green-onion cake—a crepe-thin wheat flour “pancake” with minced green onions between the layers, fried crispy in oil, sliced into wedges and served with its own dipping sauce. The Kung pao chicken and shrimp is the best in Utah, a much more traditional dish that you’ll find in most Chinese restaurants, featuring nothing more than chicken and shrimp fried in oil with peanuts and dried chili peppers, garnished with minced scallions. If you only order one thing at Mom’s, however, make it Mom’s cold noodles with a silky, heavenly peanut sauce. These dan-dan type homemade noodles simply can’t be improved upon. 2233 S. State, 801-486-0092, MomsKitchenRestaurantSaltLakeCity.com

Oak Wood Fire Kitchen 2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369 @

Executive chef/partner David Kimball’s place isn’t just about pizza. The pizza is incredible, but so were other dishes we tried: a gargantuan serving of fried calamari with lemon and parsley on a smear of zippy “feisty sauce”; Oak bread with Parmesan, rosemary, garlic oil and black pepper; incendiary Sriracha-honey chicken wings with shredded carrot slaw and blue cheese. I’m a sucker for spaghetti and meatballs, and the meatballs and sauce here—like most menu items—are made from scratch; the al dente thin spaghetti was lightly coated in tomato-basil sauce, not smothered to death with it. Ultimately, though, it’s the wood-fired pizzas that will bring you back again and again. My baseline for pizza is the Margherita. Unfortunately, so many places screw it up. Not Oak Wood Fire Kitchen, however. It is as good—and as simple—as the best Margherita I’ve ever tasted. Nothing more than top-notch crust, lightly charred bubbles intact, with tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella cheese and fresh basil. Next time, I’ll try the Creminelli prosciutto and arugula pizza with fontina, Parmesan and ricotta. 715 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-996-8155, OakWoodFireKitchen.com

Jack’s Wood-Fired Oven

Stop by at lunchtime, as we did—or apparently anytime, from what I’m told—and there may be a wait for a table. The place is consistently packed and popular. And, with $8-$9 lunch specials that include a personal pizza and a generous salad or soup of the day, why wouldn’t Jack’s be mobbed? A homemade Tuscan potato soup with sausage morsels was one of the best soups I’ve enjoyed in many a moon. And definitely order the addictive Lyon bread to nibble on while you wait. It’s crisp pizza crust with melted cheese—nothing more, nothing less—and it’s sensational. The Margherita pizza at Jack’s was absolute perfection. But, there are other tremendous wood-fired pizzas that demand attention, too. My favorite is The Sunnyside, which is a breakfast lover’s pizza dream: potatoes, cream sauce, prosciutto, bacon, smoked cheddar and—the best part—two sunny-side-up eggs, finished with maple syrup. My wife and I both enjoyed her Cozumel pizza with white sauce, small shrimp, avocado, Peppadew peppers and Caribbean spices. 256 N. Main, Logan, 435-754-7523, JacksWoodFiredOven.blogspot.com

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Ruth’s Diner

One of the oldest restaurants in Utah, Ruth’s opened in 1949 in a Salt Lake City trolley car that Ruth moved up Emigration Canyon. Erik and Tracy Nelson took over Ruth’s a few years back, and so now you’ll find contemporary dishes like Erik’s raspberry chicken alongside classics such as liver & onions or tender, braised pot roast. And breakfast is served into late afternoon, so you can order the famous mile-high biscuits & country gravy for a late lunch if you’d like. In warm weather, the sprawling patio is the place to be, as Ruth’s also features live music from local artists. 4160 Emigration Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-582-5807, RuthsDiner.com

Britton’s

At Britton’s restaurant in Sandy, you’ll find old-fashioned burgers and shakes, along with breakfast items like pancakes, omelets, “garbage hash” and French toast served all day long. A must-try at this cozy restaurant is the famous Hog burger, a burger wrapped in two grilled-cheese sandwiches— it’s crazy and delicious. Also try the house restaurant specialty grilled pork chops. Add a housemade milkshake and you’re good to go. 694 E. Union Square, Sandy, 801-572-5148, BrittonsRestaurant.com In addition to great food, Roosters in Layton also has some of the best local brews, including the rich Junction City

wiches that are all unique to The Robin’s Nest. There’s no boring sandwich here; try options like the Aloha Oink, with black-forest ham, provolone and pineapple salsa on ciabatta; or the Rooster Call, with chicken salad, red onion, provolone and sweet-honey Dijon. All sandwiches come with orzo pasta or house made chips, which can be enjoyed inside or outside, right on Main Street downtown. 311 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6378, RobinsNestSLC.com

O’Shucks Tavern. A full service sushi restaurant and bar, Ahh Sushi serves up very fresh fish along with a choice tapas menu. You can experience the privacy of your own tatami room and choose from a large selection of wonderful wines to accompany your meal at Ahh Sushi. It’s a terrific spot to drop in for high quality sushi rolls, nigiri, sashimi and much more. Look also for Ahh Sushi’s frequent specials and half-priced rolls. 8178 Gorgoza Pines Road, Park City, 435-658-0233

Avenues Bistro

Sawadee Thai Cuisine

Standards include pad Thai & spring rolls. For something more exotic, try honey-ginger duck or Thai curry puff. Tofu can be substituted for any meat dish.Named for its owner, Sawadee specialized in wholesome, family-style Thai cuisine served up in an uber-friendly atmosphere. Hot & spicy dishes include the Thai curries, which can be tamed to your specification. Standards include pad Thai & spring rolls. For something more exotic, try honey-ginger duck or Thai curry puff. Tofu can be substituted for any meat dish and an extensive vegetarian selection with thrill non-meat eaters. Pretty good wine list, too. 754 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-328-8424, Sawadee1.com

Sea Salt

Avenues Bistro in Salt Lake City focuses on organic, freerange, locally sourced ingredients and products whenever possible. Local purveyors of fine foods are represented on the menu, which focuses on new and traditional American cuisine as well as tapas. In the morning, fresh coffee, pastries and other breakfast foods are available for a quick pick-me-up or a leisurely meal. Menu items are selected according to what meats, vegetables, fruits and herbs are freshest and in season. 564 E. Third Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-831-5409, AvenuesBistroOnThird.com

Robin’s Nest

Locally owned and operated, The Robin’s Nest in Salt Lake City was founded on a passion for an all-American favorite: the sandwich. All of the sauces and dressings are housemade, and everything is prepared fresh daily. The menu offers soups, salads and more than 25 sand-

Ahh Sushi

Located in Pinebrooks Quarry Village in Park City, Ahh Sushi Restaurant is a convenient, friendly spot to gather for great sushi plus cold beer, adjacent to the popular

Sea Salt, nestled in Salt Lake City, is a beautiful but casual space— an open and airy restaurant, with wide swatches of white everywhere. The semi-communal tables are a nice touch, too. The menu is extensive, with many dishes based on the owner’s’ Italian grandmother’s recipes. As a tribute to her, some menu items, such as the meatballs and ravioli, carry her name, Nonna Maria. Good starters include olives & focaccia, or the bruschetta alla checca (wood oven baked grilled filone, Campari tomato, basil, garlic and Grana Padano). Pizza and pasta account for much of the main menu, along with risotto and grilled items such as spiced lemon chicken, grilled Shetland Island Scottish salmon and grilled housemade lamb sausage. For dessert, consider the housemade gelato or caramelized peach tart. 1709 E. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-349-1480, SeaSaltSLC.com

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Roosters

Chocolate Stout. If you can’t decide which Roosters beer to order, ask about sampling. Roosters also brews its own root beer, which you can have straight up or “loaded.” If you’re at the Ogden location, enjoy a brew and a decadent basket of naughty fries (fries with pepper jack, gorgonzola and Louisiana hot sauces) on the outside covered patio, upstairs in the restaurant dining area or—if you’d rather have your libations with a side of sports—at the mainfloor bar. 748 W. Heritage Park Blvd., Layton, 801774-9330, RoostersBrewingCo.com

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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 41

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42 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

BRIDGE OF SPIES

By the Book

CINEMA

In Bridge of Spies, Tom Hanks makes moral clarity compelling. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

he first time we see Tom Hanks as insurance attorney Jim Donovan in Steven Spielberg’s Bridge of Spies, he doesn’t seem like the kind of Tom Hanks character we’ve come to know and love. He’s wrangling with an opposing attorney about the disposition of a case he’s working on, a car accident in which Donovan’s client—the insurance company—has argued that it’s on the hook only for one specific accident in which five separate motorcyclists were injured, limiting the monetary compensation. This is weaselly lawyer-speak, it feels like, except that it’s not; Donovan is absolutely committed to a concept of fairness that he thinks is essential in order for the system—any system—to function. That’s the Tom Hanks we know, our modern-day Jimmy Stewart, and that sensibility is crucial as Bridge of Spies unfolds. Opening in 1957, it’s the fact-based story of how Donovan came to be assigned as the public defender for Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance), a Russian spy facing possible execution for espionage. The prosecution and judge want the appearance of a fair trial that holds up America’s ideals during the peak of the Cold War, but they don’t really care about whether it’s actually fair. Unfortunately for everyone, except perhaps Abel himself, Donovan cares. Bridge of Spies—as scripted by Matt Charman with a polish by Joel & Ethan Coen—plays out fairly baldly as an allegory for our contemporary approach to the War on Terror, as fear of an opposing ideology leads both government and private citizens to abandon their principles when those principles prove inconvenient. We see Donovan’s son, Roger (Noah Schnapp), indoctrinated in patriotism—Spielberg makes a sly cut from the bailiff at Abel’s trial instructing those in the courtroom to “all rise,” to the school classroom, as Roger and his classmates stand to recite the Pledge of

Allegiance—as well as terrorized by the seemingly imminent threat of nuclear war. But Donovan pushes repeatedly for a representation of his client that’s not merely perfunctory, even though there’s not any doubt regarding Abel’s guilt. We don’t win, Donovan insists, by putting Abel away during a show trial; we win by demonstrating that the American principles we want to protect from The Other aren’t just as threatened by our own desire for security. Hanks’ ability to make fundamental moral clarity and decency interesting is essential here, as Bridge of Spies eventually turns to focus on Donovan’s role in negotiating the exchange of Abel to the Soviets for downed U2 spy-plane pilot Francis Gary Powers (Austin Stowell). The film spends a surprising amount of time on Powers’ training and preparations for his mission—up to and including an extended CGI-enhanced sequence re-creating the melee in which Powers was shot down— and while it’s thematically important to emphasize that both sides were doing the same thing Americans were so enraged about Abel doing, the story starts to lose focus whenever it drifts from Donovan’s mission. Indeed, there are more than a few places where Bridge of Spies feels clunky, inefficient or formulaic. Donovan’s defense of the vilified Abel naturally results in people threatening him and his family, leading to the inevitable domestic conflicts as Donovan’s wife (Amy Ryan) tries to dissuade him from his dogged pursuit of the case. And as Donovan’s negotiations with

Mark Rylance and Tom Hanks in Bridge of Spies both the Russians and the East Germans take over the story—Donovan attempts to secure not just Powers’ release, but that of a jailed American student—the sheer number of players in this diplomatic game of chicken becomes a challenge to navigate. Yet there’s still an edge to this story of sticking to a by-the-book sense of justice, as Spielberg shows Russian snipers killing Germans trying to flee over the newly erected Berlin Wall in 1961. There’s no attempt to whitewash the idea that totalitarian Communism was a genuine threat to freedom; the only question is how we react to that knowledge. When passengers on a commuter train stare holes through Jim Donovan because they recognize him as Rudolf Abel’s attorney, then later look at him as hero for his actions brokering the prisoner exchange, Donovan himself is the same guy. It’s because of Hanks’ performance that we understand that, whether it’s hard or easy, doing the right thing is still doing the right thing. CW

BRIDGE OF SPIES

BBB Tom Hanks Mark Rylance Amy Ryan Rated PG-13

TRY THESE The Manchurian Candidate (1962) Frank Sinatra Laurence Harvey Not Rated

JFK (1991) Kevin Costner Sissy Spacek Rated R

Catch Me if You Can (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio Tom Hanks Rated PG-13

Captain Phillips (2013) Tom Hanks Barkhad Abdi Rated PG-13


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BRIDGE OF SPIES BBB See review p. 41. Opens Oct. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) COMING HOME BBB.5 The opening act of Zhang Yimou’s engrossing drama suggests that it’s going to be a political tale, as Cultural Revolution-era escaped dissident Lu (Chen Daoming) complicates the lives of his still-devoted wife, Yu (Gong Li), and his daughter, Dandan (Zhang Huiwen), whose career as an aspiring ballerina might be damaged by association. But the meat of the story involves a jump several years later, as Lu—now released as “rehabilitated”—returns home to discover that a form of dementia has rendered Yu incapable of recognizing him. Zhang and screenwriter Zou Jingzhi, working from Yan Geiling’s novel, build a steady stream of heartbreak around Lu’s attempts to cure his wife, while guilt and recrimination infects the relationships between all three family members over the events surrounding that long-ago escape. But it’s the performances by Li and Chen that give Coming Home its greatest power, conveying both the simple tragedy of being lost in a different world, and the strength required to make peace with that loss, before ultimately making emotional sacrifices when faced with the “worse” part of “for better or worse.” Opens Oct. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

FREEHELD BB.5 It’s so hard for a film to fight through the reality that it’s built around people giving speeches, especially when those speeches are meant for an audience that already agrees. Philadelphia screenwriter Ron Nyswaner adapts the true story of Laurel Hester (Julianne Moore), a New Jersey police detective who, after learning in 2005 she’s been diagnosed with lung cancer, tries to have her domestic partner, Stacie (Ellen Page), designated as beneficiary for her pension. Nyswaner and director Peter Sollett spend a lot of time establishing Laurel and Stacie’s relationship— including Stacie’s role as caregiver—as well as offering a welcome change-of-pace role for Michael Shannon as Laurel’s supportive partner on the force. But there are still too many scenes of people standing before the county commissioners (called “freeholders,” hence the title) giving testimony, so we can applaud, while the bad-guy bigots get their talking-point lines, so we can boo. And when Steve Carell shows up as a flamboyant gay activist, the weird shift in tone may offer some much-needed energy, but only serves to emphasize that this is a story more about politics than about people. Opens Oct. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR GOOSEBUMPS [not yet reviewed] The scary teen-book creations of author R. L. Stine (Jack Black) are unleashed upon a town. Opens Oct. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG) WOODLAWN [not yet reviewed] Fact-based story of a high school football team struggling to overcome racial tensions. Opens Oct. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BACK TO THE FUTURE TRILOGY At Tower Theatre, Oct. 21, 4:29 p.m. (PG) FROM DUSK TILL DAWN At Tower Theatre, Oct. 17, 11 p.m. (R) KICKSTARTER FILM FEST At Broadway Centre Cinemas, Oct. 15, 7 & 9:30 p.m. (NR) PHOENIX At Park City Film Series, Oct. 16-17, 8 p.m. & Oct. 18, 6 p.m. (NR) SCREAM At Brewvies, Oct. 19, 10 p.m. (R) THOSE PEOPLE At Brewvies, Oct. 16, 7 p.m. (NR) X96 FRIDAY BLOODY FRIDAY DOUBLE-FEATURE: The Lost Boys / From Dusk Till Dawn At Tower Theatre, Oct. 16, 11 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES 99 HOMES BBB.5 Ramin Bahrani (Man Push Cart) isn’t kidding around with his latest, which begins with real estate agent Rick Carver (Michael Shannon) complaining that a house will be harder to resell because its former owner has messily committed suicide in it. Rick makes his living grabbing up foreclosed-upon homes, and serves as the soulless counterpart to Dennis (Andrew Garfield),

who loses his house to Carver, then takes a job working for him. Carver’s operation requires numbness to the pain of evicting people, plus some actual law-breaking; how dirty will Dennis let himself get? Bahrani’s earnest, didactic style is occasionally strident, but the simple formula gives it the feel of a morality play, with Carver as the devil and Dennis as the tempted good man. Shannon’s magnetic, acid-tongued performance makes the film funnier than you might expect, while Garfield’s expressive tearfulness provides emotional balance. (R)—Eric D. Snider HE NAMED ME MALALA BB.5 Davis Guggenheim’s documentary profile of Malala Yousafzai— the Pakistani teenager who survived an assassination attempt to become a Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist for women’s rights to education—includes a smart structural conceit that just doesn’t work as well as it should. Much of the film follows Malala and her family in exile in England, humanizing her by showing how she’s just a normal teenager. Yet there’s also a lot of time spent on context—both the world of Malala’s home in the Taliban-controlled Swat Valley, and her childhood with an education-committed father. Both sections fall flat in different ways, as Guggenheim captures both the whirlwind of Malala’s public life and those formative years in ways that are respectful without often being terribly illuminating. He mostly seems determined to show how nice Malala is—which feels disappointing, considering her work is all about girls refusing simply to be “nice.” (PG-13)—SR JUST LET GO BB Sometimes a movie just gets too structurally cutesy for its own good—and that’s part of what hamstrings the based-on-a-truestory of Chris Williams (Henry Ian Cusick), an LDS bishop whose life is shattered when his pregnant wife and two of his children

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CRIMSON PEAK [not yet reviewed] A young woman (Mia Wasikowska) moves into the home of her new husband (Tom Hiddleston), and finds it alive with spirits. Opens Oct. 16 at theaters valleywide. (R)

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CINEMA

CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

are killed in a car accident caused by a drunken 17-year-old driver. The narrative moves back and forth with a general plodding lugubriousness between the near aftermath of the accident and legal proceedings months later. But the larger problem is that Just Let Go builds to a revelation that feels designed merely as a big “surprise!” while never helping inform the events of the first hour, except for making the character of Chris’ mother completely preposterous. Well-intentioned lessons about forgiveness and redemption can provide their own emotional impact; a script has a responsibility to create characters who behave like actual people. (PG)—SR THE MARTIAN BBB.5 “I’m going to have to science the shit out of this,” says astronaut/ botanist Mark Watney (Matt Damon) when he realizes he’s been stranded on Mars with no apparent hope for rescue—and the story becomes a celebration of the idea that any problem can be solved once you set aside the distracting nonsense. Damon’s performance captures Watney’s sardonic sense of humor which helps keep him going when prospects look bleak, but there’s also a giddy pride that feels characteristic of many pioneers. While the story takes on a cyclical quality of trying, failing, re-trying, re-failing, etc., the repetition emphasizes that in this survival epic, the hero is the scientific method. With potential catastrophes seeming to introduce nothing but move shit into the modern world, it’s wonderful to consider the possibility that we could science that shit out of it. (PG-13)—SR

PAN BB “Every legend has a beginning” goes the tagline to this “origin story” of Peter Pan—except there’s no way this is that beginning. In 1940 London, 12-year-old orphan Peter (Levi Miller) is kidnapped away to Neverland by the pirate Blackbeard (Hugh Jackman), and Peter’s story is inexplicably turned into an archetypal hero quest. When the single most defining trait of Peter Pan is that he never wants to grow up, it makes literally zero sense to suggest his legend begins with learning to accept his heroic destiny. It’s fair to ask if such a reading ignores what Pan delivers as simple fantasy spectacle, and it is occasionally satisfying on that superficial level. But if you’re going to pull viewers in by telling them you’ll explain how a young boy became Peter Pan, you’d better actually give them Peter Pan. (PG)—SR

PROPHET’S PREY BBB No 2015 horror movie will present a more terrifying monster than Fundamentalist LDS Church prophet Warren Jeffs—and that portrait of Jeffs carries director Amy Berg’s documentary through an often frustrating lack of focus. At times, it’s a history lesson about the church; at other times, it’s a succession of talking-head interviews with former FLDS members; at still other times, it seems to be about the ongoing work by writer Jon Krakauer and private detective Sam Brower to expose wrongdoings by Jeffs and the FLDS. But mostly, it deals with the manhunt and legal cases against Jeffs for his sexual predation, underscored by the creepy, monotonous drone of Jeffs’ own apocalyptic sermons. Despite the fragmented nature of Berg’s exploration, it’s chilling when providing a comprehensive look at what happens when one twisted man convinces enough people that he speaks for God. (NR)—SR


THEATER DIRECTORY SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

MegaplexTheatres.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Comedy Hell Truth Be Told pounds another

TV

Go Time! Slow Time No Time

nail in the sitcom coffin; Satisfaction and The Knick return. Truth Be Told Friday, Oct. 16 (NBC)

Series Debut: Mark-Paul Gosselaar (Franklin & Bash and, of course, Saved by the Bell) has proven he can do funny, as has Tone Bell (the best part of last season’s Bad Judge). Unfortunately, they’re saddled with a tepid, laugh-tracked bro-com that’s paired with the still awful (but now “Live!”) Undateable on Friday nights, and a lone creative note from NBC that reads “We’ve given up on comedy. Just fill 30 minutes and turn out the lights when you leave.” At least they changed the name from People Are Talking—because that makes all the difference—and ponder this: As aggressively awful as Truth Be Told is, it’s still better than any of the new comedies NBC has in the production pipeline. I’ve seen it … the horror … the horror …

Satisfaction Friday, Oct. 16 (USA)

Season Premiere: The debut season of Breaking Bootycall, er, Satisfaction, at least had an out-there premise for a USA series: When white-collar drone Neil (Matt Passamore) discovers that his neglected wife, Grace (Stephanie Szostak), has been sleeping with a hired male escort, he decides to become a man ’ho himself to understand her motivations … or something. Essentially, in season 1, Satisfaction was gorgeous people having sex with even-more-gorgeous people for 10 episodes, culminating with a sorta-reconciliation and oh-so-soapy cliffhanger of Who’s Going to Be Shot? (by the pissed-off husband of one of Neil’s “clients,” laying the irony on thick). After Mr. Robot, Satisfaction doesn’t seem so groundbreaking for USA, but moving the show to Fridays is an interesting play—how better to cap off the week than with 48 Modern Family reruns and a dysfunctional sex soap?

The Knick Friday, Oct. 16 (Cinemax)

Season Premiere: Producer/director Steven Soderbergh somehow made the wincingly effd-up medical system of 1900 New York City fantastically entertaining in Season 1 of The Knick—and, despite what the trailers and promos suggested, it wasn’t entirely due to Clive Owen’s performance as ambitious cokehead doctor John Thackery. The visceral detail and emotional punch skirted the edges of American Horror Story: Old-Timey Hospital, but remained grounded by a solid supporting cast (period dramas live and die by their ensembles) and the conceit that this is all historical-ish. Season 2 finds the Knickerbocker Hospital on the verge of moving to cheaper digs uptown, Dr. Thackery in less-thanpromising cocaine/opium rehab, and the staff scrambling for power in his absence. Oh, and there’s a “new plague” to contend with, as well. Happy viewing!

They Found Hell Saturday, Oct. 17 (Syfy)

Movie: You’re forgiven for being unaware that we’re now halfway through Syfy’s “31 Days of Halloween,” which has featured such Saturday-night original fare as Night of the Wild (meteor infects dogs; dogs chomp townsfolk), Ominous (parents wish dead child back to life; child comes back even more evil and annoying) and now They Found Hell: A group

Truth Be Told (NBC)

a brilliant-and-of-course-good-looking college students working on a teleportation device accidentally open a portal to Hell and end up trapped there, hunted and tortured by demons (original title: They Found Hell and It Totally Sucks, Brah). Dumb fun, but for a more thoughtful rendering of life in the underworld, seek out Adult Swim’s Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell.

Amy Schumer: Live From the Apollo Saturday, Oct. 17 (HBO)

Special: And the countdown to the hotter-than-hot comedian finally bailing on her Comedy Central series Inside Amy Schumer—or at least slowing down production to Louis C.K.’s Louie levels—begins in 5 … 4 … 3 … 2 … CW

Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.


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Whatever “it” is, teenage indie-punk duo Girlpool dwells there. BY TIFFANY FRANDSEN tfrandsen@cityweekly.net @tiffany_mf

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But that’s not really the theme. There isn’t one. Girlpool’s lyrics hit many points on the maturity spectrum. “American Beauty,” from their self-titled EP is (with far less innuendo) about “watching Netflix and chilling” (where “chilling” having equals oral sex). The duo is also reflective and sensitive, as on “Before the World Was Big,” when they sing, “Trying not to think of all the ways my mind has changed/ Mom and Dad, I love you, do I show it enough?” Before the World Was Big encompasses the key paradox of quantum mechanics—not only are they constantly anticipating the next big thing, the “it,” as Tucker calls it, they’re always in “it.” “It” is both the “groove you’re in [and] and the next space in your life,” says Tucker. “It’s always this evolving thing you’re reaching for, and you’re accepting and understanding, and also accepting that you’ll never understand.” The word “Big” also refers to growth and understanding, says Tividad. She says while everyone is always on the verge of The Big (growth), everyone also simultaneously dwells there. “You’re always before something. You’re always in The Before, but you’re always in The Big.” That said, they reserve the right not to clearly define themselves—their significance of their music, their lyrics and their album titles may forever remain in flux. “Meaning is a fluctuation of feeling and … particularly with [Before the World Was Big], it’s always changing,” says Tucker. CW

Thursday 10/15

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hey’re called Girlpool, they’re an indie-punk duo and they sing unabashedly about sex. This combination—which so often adds up to either a female-empowerment theme, or at least quintessential riot grrrl belligerence— means something new this time. But who the hell knows what? The band doesn’t even give it a name. “We don’t really feel comfortable repping anything at all, other than who we are,” says Cleo Tucker, one half of the bare bones band. That’s not to say that Girlpool espouses a “Be Yourself” movement—or any other movement, for that matter. “We’re not a band with an agenda, really. Every feeling we have, we write about. To rep one thing would be limiting for us.” The spare, indie-punk sound, created by two teenage voices (Tucker is 18, and bandmate Harmony Tividad is 19), a guitar and a bass, sounds more like a two-person solo act, with minimal chords and singing half in unison and half in harmony. Girlpool, now based in Philadelphia, met at a Los Angeles experimental music venue, The Smell. Guitarist Tucker and bass player Tividad (there is no drummer) had each played separately in their own punk groups, which may account for part of the duo’s minimalist sound—but they insist it wasn’t intentional. “Nothing is really decided, creatively,” Tucker says. “It’s kind of always improvisation, natural, organic creation.” If there is one unifying theme in the band’s existence, it’s a “mutual desire to start a project that was focused on sensitivity and vulnerability;” an attempt to “do something extremely collaborative.” Even Girlpool’s genre is difficult to pin down on their debut fulllength, Before the World Was Big (Wichita Recordings). Depending on the track, their vocal delivery can be mellow or harsh. Rather than employing the trendy female western-pop voice, the two sort of shout-sing, sans vibrato. But on more harmonic tracks— ”Pretty,” for example, the shout is gone, and they sing softly. They don’t sing like they grew up listening to the female pop or country divas that would have been prominent while Tucker and Tividad were young; their voices are more like the unembellished and slightly breathless intonations of Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst (who just happens to be one of Tucker’s influences). So, while the group certainly falls into indie and punk categories, there’s more to their music than that, and giving it a name is tough. It’s tempting to say, “who the hell knows?” But here’s giving it a shot: Essentially, they are a slightly more punk, two-person Elliott Smith, only since there are already two of them, they don’t have to double-track their vocals, like he occasionally did, to achieve the same echoed effect. There is even ambiguity in the cover art for Before the World Was Big. It’d be easy to assume the title refers to childhood. The cover art (by artist and fellow musician Jaxon Demme, who is their friend in Los Angeles) shows two people, a female and a male with features vague enough that their ages are unclear. But the phrase does evoke a longing to be a kid again, pre-responsibility, pre-big world, and Tucker says, “Harmony and I feel so connected to that part of our spirits. That’s probably communicated in one way or another.”

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Come, My Fanatics

Into the canon of heavymetal horror films enters a new champion. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

F

or all the fanaticism surrounding horror films and heav y metal, it’s hard to come by a truly good heav ymetal horror film. That’s because most of these films were made in the 1980s, when general audiences still thought horror and heav y metal were dumb, loud, excessive and possibly Satanic. Some of these perceptions are accurate—even today. Genre fans can be far too forgiving of weak plots, dumb songs and technical shortcomings. Some horror filmmakers and heav y metal bands seem to bank on this, putting brutality, blood and volume above technique and quality. Sometimes that’s fine. Films like Trick or Treat, featuring Gene Simmons as a radio DJ and Ozzy Osbourne as a metal-hating televangelist, and Rock ’n’ Roll Nightmare, starring bodybuilder/heavy-metal musician Jon Mikl Thor (subject of the recent documentary I Am Thor), are deliciously cheesy. But cheese and camp detract from the merits of heavy-metal music and horror films. That doesn’t mean you can’t put horror, comedy and heavy metal in a blender and come up with something truly special. Deathgasm, the loud-and-proud guitarand grue-fest from New Zealand filmmaker Jason Lei Howden. Howden grew up in the 1980s, the golden age of VHS, Video Nasties, and heav y metal. He had his horror fandom awakened at age 9 when he watched Peter Jackson’s hyper gory 1987 horror/sci-fi film, Bad Taste, in a department store. “Some irresponsible store employee must have stuck a tape on,” Howden says in Deathgasm’s production notes. “I just stood there stunned. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. I watched until the very end, and I think that was the moment my mind was corrupted.” Soon afterward, Howden discovered the music of Cannibal Corpse, Morbid Angel,

The splatter that matters: Milo Cawthorne as Brodie in Deathgasm.

Emperor and Deicide. In high school, he was the outcast with dark fascinations— until he met like-minded Marcus, a big, tough alpha-metalhead who picked up chicks with Slayer lyrics. Howden’s high school experiences form the basis of Deathgasm’s plot: Brodie (Milo Cawthorne), who lives with his fundie Christian aunt and uncle, forms a metal band with his friends—including Zakk (James Blake), the Marcus analog to Brodie’s Howden. They break into the dilapidated home of a former rock star and steal sheet music for an unrecorded song that turns out to be a demonic invocation. Ancient evil is awakened, splatter ensues, Brodie and his titular band—joined by a total babe—have to save the world. It’s the most trite of heavy-metal horror plots, raising Hell. It’s also simple. But it works. The main characters aren’t caricatures; they have just enough depth to be interesting—credit both Howden and the cast, who approach their roles with glee. The dialogue ranges from functional to punchy and even hilarious. The entire film is beautifully shot. The pacing is quick, tight and satisfying, recalling both versions of Evil Dead (Main Reactor, who did the F/X for the remake, also worked on Deathgasm). The blood is copious, the guts are glorious and neither is gratuitous. Best of all, it’s a love letter to horror, heavy metal and its fans. Howden, writing from personal experience (aside from the savingthe-world part), puts his personal touch into the film, deftly balancing simplicity and sincerity. He signals his devotion to horror and metal fans throughout the film with well-placed posters and T-shirts that nod to bands and films that only serious fans would know, like technical death metal-legends, Death; and Howden’s childhood inspiration, Bad Taste. (Incidentally, Howden also once worked for Jackson’s visual-effects company, WETA Digital.) . Few, if any, heavy-metal horror films ever treated fans with such respect. A smart, fun film that, yes, panders to fans but doesn’t treat, or portray, them like idiots, Deathgasm is a simple stroke of genius, and may go down as the best heavy-metal horror film of all time. CW

DEATHGASM

Dark Sky Films, 90 minutes Available on video-on-demand outlets such as Amazon, iTunes and Google Play.


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BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER, TIM HINELY, TIFFANY FRANDSEN & DOUG BRIAN

Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators, RavenEye

Slash has done alright for himself since Axl Rose took Guns ‘N Roses for himself, doncha think? Sure, he got off to a bumpy start with his first solo band, Slash’s Snakepit—which was decent, with flickers of brilliance. But then he climbed back to the top of the heap with Velvet Revolver, and survived that band’s implosion to go on to this current project, which just released its third album, World on Fire (Dik Hayd International). To the credit of both Slash and vocalist Kennedy—perhaps familiar as the frontdude of The Mayfield Four and Alter Bridge—this project isn’t just a vehicle for Slash’s back catalog. Rather, they weave those songs in among their original material without sounding like a disjointed revue. English blues-rock power trio RavenEye opens. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $40 in advance, $45 day of show, DepotSLC.com

William Fitzsimmons

The bard William Fitzsimmons’ spring 2015 release, a seven-song EP titled Pittsburgh (Nettwerk), is a tribute to the city he was born in, as well as his now-deceased grandmother. It’s as sorrowful and sweet as previous records, but this one—which he wrote and produced solo—was 10 years in the making. Fittingly, he’ll play a stripped-down and acoustic set tonight. To prepare for the emotional trip your soul will take, check out his version of The Smiths’ “Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want,” which is somehow even more emotionally tormented than the original. Jake Phillips opens. (TF) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $23, TheStateRoom.com

William Fitzsimmons

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Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators

FRIDAY 10.16

Nobunny, The Nods & Breakers

His friends call him Justin (Champlin). The rest of us mere mortals refer to the dude as Nobunny. The goofy garage-rockin’ oneman band wears a freaky bunny mask—and sometimes not much more—and cuddles with creepy, adult-size mannequins with baby heads (see “Gone for Good” on YouTube). He’s been releasing records since the mid2000s on a variety of labels. Nobunny’s most recent release, Secret Songs (Goner, 2013), is a total gas, nodding to the Ramones, the Cramps, and even Bob Log III. Imagine the most fun you’ve ever had at a gig and multiply it by, say, seven. That’s what you’re in for tonight: seven times fun. (TH) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

Shook Twins

Twin sisters and musical prodigies Katelyn and Laurie Shook emerged from Sandpoint, Idaho, in the early 2000s and soon found their musical identity firmly established, releasing their first album, You Can Have the Rest, in 2008. Shortly afterward, they relocated to Portland, Ore., and chiseled out a unique niche with their quirky folk, complete with unusual musical instruments like glockenspiel, telephone microphone and a huge golden shaker egg. Their use of beatboxing, animal sounds and looping advances the technology of a traditional musical genre on their latest 2014 release, What We Do (Curlypinky). In other words, the Shook Twins are doing something no one else could replicate. Jordan Young opens. (BS) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $15, TheStateRoom.com

MONDAY 10.19 Salad Boys

New Zealand, the other Australia (relax, Salad Boys—joke), isn’t exactly known for its musical exports. I mean, you’ve got Flight of the Conchords, but do comedy acts count? But when something does bubble up from down under the land Down Under, it’s good stuff like Tall Dwarfs, Split Enz, The Clean, Garageland, The Naked and Famous, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, the Datsuns—and the Salad Boys. Metalmania (Trouble in Mind), has the most in common with the jangly indie rock of Tall Dwarfs and The Clean. The latter, probably due to influence and experience; the Salad Boys once served as backing band for The Clean’s David Kilgour. The group isn’t just a bunch of Kilgour acolytes, however. Their memorable, exhilarating songs pull from Hüsker Dü, REM and even My Bloody Valentine for a cocktail of Minneapolis indie rock, jangly Athens college rock and Irish shoegaze that you’re gonna love. (RH) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., free, $5 suggested donation, » Facebook.com/DiabolicalRecords

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Chvrches has the electropop world in the palms of their hands. Their debut album, The Bones of What You Believe, thrust the Glaswegian trio into the spotlight, as frontwoman Lauren Mayberry’s eloquent response to sexism gained her much respect. The band’s latest album, Every Open Eye (Glassnote), is a continuation of their unique, distinctive sound, which is the pinnacle of the new trend in synthpop of minimalist techniques and introspective lyrics. Hundreds of shows in the last two years have helped the band build up an even bigger fanbase that still grows at a fantastic pace. Mansionair opens. (DB) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $25 in advance, $28 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

Moon Hooch

Beats Antique, Moon Hooch

Sitting somewhere between club music, film scores and the wacko gypsy sounds of Gogol Bordello, Bay Area experimental electronic trio Beats Antique is unlike anything you’ve heard before. Hop on YouTube and grab the legal download of their 2014 release A Thousand Faces: Act II (Antique Records) and hear for yourself. (You can stream Act I if you’re not into the whole non-sequential thing.) Then look up all four parts of the group’s 2015 release, Creature Carnival: Live Denver, CO and Asheville, NC and see that there’s as much to see at the show as hear. Openers Moon Hooch, touring behind last year’s This Is Cave Music (Hornblow/ Palmetto), are likewise sonically and visually interesting—they’re a sax-sax-drums power trio that incorporates electronics and stuff like, I dunno, traffic cones in their positively kickass jazz-fusion sound. If you’re in the mood for something truly different, get on up the canyon for this show. (RH) Park City Live, 427 Main St., 9 p.m., $27-60, ParkCityLive.net

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10 brunch buffet

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12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

live music sunday afternoons & evenings 2021 s. windsor st. (west of 900 east)

801.484.6692 I slctaproom.com

Full Salt Lake County club liquor license for sale upon DABC approval. Interested buyer must sign non disclosure agreement, have certified proof of approved funds from financial institution and complete proper screening process. Buyer has the option to purchase restaurant/club equipment for an additional cost with the license if desired. 801-992-3154 Please leave name and number.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 53


SHOTS IN THE DARK

Angie Gonzalez, Mindi Gonzalez

@scheuerman7

Sahra

d Lumpy’s -Highlannd Drive la 3000 E. High 7 801-484-559 / m Facebook.co ys highlandlump

Mika Hill, Nate Diogo

Audie Anderson, Brett Vanwagoner, Tim Larsen, Chris Simonsen, Pete

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

The place to pre-game for the Utah games!

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978 300 S.

STATE

• Food served daily 11am - 12:15am • Live music every Wednesday & Thursday • DJ CHASEONE2 – Fridays • DJ Sneeky Long – Saturdays • Brunch 11:00 - 3:00 Saturdays & Sundays

MAIN

54 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Sara Delaney, Andy Schoonover, Kristin Bailey, Dan Tetzl, Eva Okrent, Mike Tribuzzi

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN

EXCHANGE PL.

32 Exchange Place | 801-322-3200 11:00am - 1:00am www.twistslc.com

400 S.

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413


NO

$ COV ER

MONDAY

ENTER TO WIN CASH & PRIZES

EVE R

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t&

T A bHE eer

The Science of Brewing...

SAT. OCT 17 @ 8:00 PM

STARTS @ POT OVER 9PM FREE TO PLAY

4 sHhOoME OF

$250

JOIN US FOR THE UTAH VS ARIZONA STATE GAME

+

CASH!

SATURDAY

@

OCT. 17TH GEORGE NELSON

GAMEDAY GIVEAWAYS TNF • SNF • MNF

W/ MICHELLE MOONSHINE

9:00PM

1200 S State St.

FREE GAME BOARDS WE HAVE THE CASH PRIZES JOHNNY DOGS SERVED DURING GAMES

Beer & Wine brewing supplies

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM | 165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334 Johnny'sOn2nd_151015.indd 1

10/13/2015 2:00:55 PM

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 55

Scofys.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

7176 South 900 East | 801-938-4505

• Full Bar • 16 Beers on Tap • Lunch & Dinner Served Daily • Live Music • DJ’s • Patio • Watch College & NFL Football with us

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

COME SEE WHAT EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT!

Hours: Sun 10-5pm M-Sat 10am-6:30pm

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MAKE JOHNNY’S YOUR HOME FOR FOOTBALL

801-531-8182 / beernut.com www.facebook.com/thebeernut


The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses—Master Quest

Zelda fans: What would you pay to see a montage of gameplay footage, set to music from the games, performed by a live symphony orchestra? I know one guy who’d gladly fork over all his rupees, force gems and ore chunks to see this third installment of the symphony series based on the beloved series of Nintendo games. This four-movement, 2 1/2 hour symphony promises content from seven different Zelda titles, including: A Link Between Worlds, Ocarina of Time, The Wind Walker, Twilight Princess, A Link to the Past, Link’s Awakening and Spirit Tracks plus new music from the upcoming remake of The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask. You shall … consume … everything! (Randy Harward) Abravanel Hall, 123 S. Temple, 8 p.m., $69, ArtTix.com

LOUNGE

EVENTS

PATIO

THIS WEEK

56 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THURSDAY 10.15

CONCERTS & CLUBS

HALLOWEEN PARTY “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough” ~Mark Twain VIP TABLE RESERVATIONS 216.375.4684 • TIX AVAILABLE AT SKYSLC.COM 149 PIERPONT AVE • DOWNTOWN SLC +21

19 East 200 South | bourbonhouseslc.com


CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

CONCERTS & CLUBS THURSDAY 10.15

OPEN MIC & JAM

LIVE MUSIC

Austin Weyand Acoustic Quartet (Gallivan Center) Omar LinX (Club X) Corey Christiansen Organ Trio (Garage on Beck) Dine Krew, Fuckwitme Committee (Kilby Court) Dylan Roe (Hog Wallow Pub) The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of The Goddesses (Abravanel Hall, p. 56) Roots Like Mountains, Fighting the Phoenix, The Glass House (The Loading Dock) Skylar Grey, Chris Crabb, Commix (Stereo Room) Slash ft. Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators, RavenEye (The Depot, p. 50) Talia Keys (Spur Bar & Grill) William Fitzsimmons (The State Room, p. 50) Youth Lagoon, Moon King (The Urban Lounge)

Jazz Jam Session (Sugarhouse Coffee) Live Jazz with the Jeff Archuleta Combo (Twist) Open Mic Night (Liquid Joe’s) Open Mic Night, Hosted by Once the Lion (Legends Billiards Club)

DJ

Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door) Kill The Noise (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (Habit’s) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/TIYB (Club 90) Ogden Unplugged (Lighthouse Lounge)

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

FRIDAY 10.16 LIVE MUSIC

Big Brother & the Holding Company (Egyptian Theatre) Boombox Cartel (Area 51) Cannabowls (Ice Haus) Christian Coleman’s Blue Zen (Fats Grill) Folk Hogan (Green Pig) Hotel Books, Bad Luck, Until We Are Ghosts, Motives, The Departure, Formations (The Loading Dock) IAMX, Mr. Kitty (The Urban Lounge) The Lost Travelers, Codi Jordan Band (Liquid Joe’s) Night Train (Westerner) Makeshift, L.H.A.W., Angel Reigh, Redd Johnson (Barbary Coast) Max (In the Venue) Metal Dogs (Spur Bar & Grill)

Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

OCT 20:

JENNIFER CASTLE

8PM DOORS

ROME FORTUNE

OCT 15:

YOUTH LAGOON

OCT 21:

A SILENT FILM

OCT 16:

IAMX

8PM DOORS

OCT 17:

8PM DOORS

OCT 19:

8PM DOORS

MR KITTY

DIIV

NO JOY SUNFLOWER BEAN

MURS

RED PILL KING FANTASTIC NOA JAMES

8PM DOORS

FLAGSHIP

SLUG LOCALIZED

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 10.17 LIVE MUSIC

Backwash (Hog Wallow Pub) Billy Shaddox (Garage on Beck) The Black Dahlia Murder, Iron Reagan, Harm’s Way, Maruta (The Complex)

GOING OUT TONIGHT?

COMEDIANS IN THE CLUB WITH COCKTAILS MATEEN STEWART

SOCIAL CLUB STANDARDS

10.18

OPEN MIC NIGHT @ 50 WEST @ 8pm

10.8

10.23-10.24

COMEDY & OTHER OPINIONS W/JASON HARVEY: @ 9PM

10.15

I AM SALT LAKE PODCAST: @ 8PM

10.16

BAT MANORS ARTIFICIAL FLOWER COMPANY

SHAUN LATHAM

OCT 23:

DEAFHEAVEN

DAVID KOECHNER

OCT 24:

RED DOG REVIVAL ALBUM RELEASE

JULIAN McCULLOUGH

11.12-11.14

GAME TYRANT VIDEO GAME TOURNAMENT: @ 10AM

10.17

MARK CURRY

12.11-12.12

HAVANA NIGHTS at 50 WEST: @ 10PM

10.17

ADAM CLAYTON-HOLLAND

12.18-12.19

OPEN MIC NIGHT at 50 WEST: @ 8PM

10.22

1.8-1.9

WHAT DO YOU THINK, UTAH?: @ 7PM

10.28

SCARE YOUR SOCKS OFF W/TOM CARR: @ 8PM

10.29

8PM DOORS

8PM DOORS

11.5-11.7

TRIBULATION

BREAKERS COYOTE VISION GROUP SUN CHASER

Nov 23: FUZZ Nov 28: Little Hurricane Dec 2: Sallie Ford Dec 3: El Ten Eleven Dec 4: Slow Magic & Giraffage Dec 5: DUBWISE with Jantzen & Dirt Monkey Dec 12: RISK! (Podcast / Early Show) Dec 12: Dirt First (Late Show)

JOHN HILDER

SLC LIVE FEATURING: SCHOOL OF 10.30 ROCK, RED YETI, MOJAVE NOMADS, RKDN & FOREIGN FIGURES: @ 7PM

club.50westslc.com

@50westslc

#50westslc

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 57

Nov 10: Peaches Nov 11: Broncho Nov 12: Stag Hare Nov 13: FREE SHOW Starmy Album Release Nov 14: The National Parks Nov 20: Mother Falcon, Ben Solee Nov 21: Fictionist Nov 22: Darwin Deez

| CITY WEEKLY |

90S TELEVISION

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

OCT 22:

COMING SOON Oct 28: King Dude Oct 29: Albert Hammond Jr Oct 30: Small Black Oct 31: HALLOWEEN with Flash & Flare + Max Pain & The Groovies Nov 2: Heartless Bastards Nov 3: Matthew Nanes Nov 4: Here We Go Magic Nov 6: DUBWISE Nov 7: Trash Bash Nov 8: Phutureprimitive Nov 9: The Good LIfe

KARAOKE

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DESTROYER MOON KING

DJ Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Jarvicious (Sandy Station)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ALUNAGEORGE

OCT 14:

8 PM DOORS

DJ

SKULLCANDY PRESENTS

KRCL PRESENTS

8PM DOORS

Mokie (Hog Wallow Pub) Nobunny, The Nods, Breakers (Kilby Court, p. 50) Peewee Moore (Garage on Beck) Shook Twins (The State Room, p. 50) Super Diamond (The Royal) You Topple Over (The Woodshed)


The

Westerner COUNTRY DANCE HALL, BAR & GRILL

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

Coheed & Cambria

First Kiss ditched the makeup. Then Ozzy pissed away all of his mystery with a reality show. Then Limp Bizkit reunited and nobody held a sawed-off shotgun to Fred Durst’s nose and said, “No.” Now, post-hardcore/prog quartet Coheed & Cambria—known for heady, technical concept albums with supplemental illustrated reading material—are benching both on The Color Before the Sun (300 Entertainment). Mostly. The chops are there, but this time they’re proving they can write an album of great songs. Hardcore fans might carp about it (no fuggin’ comic?!), but every tune here is a keeper. So if C&C are bidding to join the mainstream music factory… OK. Thank You Scientist and Silver Snakes open. (Randy Harward) Park City Live, 427 Main St., Park City, 7:30 p.m., $35-75, ParkCityLive.net

Saturday

Friday

NIGHT TRAIN

An Eclectic mix of olde world charm and frontier saloon

Join us for a wicked good time! 10.15 Dylan Roe

10.22 Morgan Snow

10.16 Mokie

10.23 Stonefed

10.17 Backwash

10.24 Michelle Moonshine Trio

NIGHT TRAIN

NO COVER BEFORE 8PM L ADIES’ NIGHT

NO COVER BEFORE 8PM

Saturday, October 24

Scare-tastic

10.21 Kevyn Dern

Halloween

Hoedown

&

co s tu me C ONT E ST

Costume Contest Categories:

| CITY WEEKLY |

58 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

TUESDAY 10.20

CONCERTS & CLUBS

- Sexiest - Best Couple - Scariest -

The winner in EACH CATEGORY will receive $200 CASH $50 CASH to 2nd & 3rd place winners with other prizes & giveaways Mark Owens will be performing LIVE - NO COVER CHARGE BEFORE 8 pm Celebrate Halloween at the Hog Cory Mon * Costume Contest * Prizes

3200 E Big Cottonwood Rd. 801.733.5567 | theHogWallow.com

FREE MECHANICAL BULL RIDES • FREE POOL • FREE KARAOKE • PATIO FIRE PITS

www.we ste r n e r s lc .c om

3360 S. REDWOOD RD. • 801-972-5447 • WED-SAT 6PM-2AM


RIDE T HE

DOWNTOWN

BUS

OCT 17

UTAH VS ARIZONA STATE

OCT 31

UTAH VS OREGON STATE

NOV 21

UTAH VS UCLA

NOV 28

UTAH VS COLORADO

Ask your server for details or to sign up for the bus

UTAH

$20 gets you,

GRAB SOME BUDS

145 PIERPONT AVE

8 01.883.8714 W W W. L U M P Y S D O W N T O W N S L C . C O M

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SPORTS BAR

WATCH ALL UTAH GAMES WITH US! OCT 17

NOV 07

@ USC VS OREGON STATE @ WASHINGTON

ST D BE R! VOTE A B TS R O SP

8 HIGHLAND

0

1

.

4

8

4

.

5

5

2 014 9

7

3000 SOUTH HIGHLAND DR.

WWW.LUMPYSBAR.COM

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 59

RIDE THE LUMPYS EXPRESS TO ALL HOME GAMES.

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCT 31

VS ARIZONA STATE

OCT 24

UTAH UTAH UTAH UTAH

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

HIGHLAND

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

- a pre-game meal-drinks on the bus- a ride to and from game -


CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

10.10 FARMERS MARKET

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET Cody Johnson (In the Venue) Coin & Colony House, Elliot Moss, Flor (The State Room) The Deltaz (The Cabin) DIIV, No Joy, Sunflower Bean (The Urban Lounge) George Nelson, Michelle Moonshine (Johnny’s on Second) JT Draper (Fats Grill) The Last Wednesday, Playing Ghosts (The Royal) Lydia, Seahaven, Turnover, The Technicolors (In the Venue) Michelle Moonshine (Cliff House Gastropub) Night Train (Westerner)

Atrophia (Sky) DJ Latu (Green Pig) DJ Sneaky Long (Twist) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs Park City) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

American Bush

10.9 WOMEN OF THE MOUTAIN

OPEN MIC & JAM

Joy Spring Band (Sugarhouse Coffee)

2630 S. 300 W. SUNDAY 10.18 LIVE MUSIC

801.467.0700

Bridgette London (Garage on Beck) Thou, The Body, Heat Dust, SubRosa, Blood Incantation (Kilby Court) Xavier Rudd, Chadwick Stokes (Park City Live)

KARAOKE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

DJ

KARAOKE

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Bingo (The Tavernacle) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed)

OPEN MIC & JAM

Jazz Brunch: The Mark Chaney Trio (Club 90)

MONDAY 10.19 LIVE MUSIC

NO

UPCOMING EVENTS:

COVER E VER!

Fidlar, Dune Rats (The Complex) Hinds, Public Access TV (Kilby Court) Murs, Red Pill, King Fantastic, Noa James (The Urban Lounge) Salad Boys (Diabolical Records, p. 50)

275 0 SOU T H 3 0 0 W ES T · (8 01) 4 67- 4 6 0 0 11: 3 0 -1A M M O N - S AT · 11: 3 0 A M -10 P M S U N

CHASING SHADOWS

PRESENTS BEN DE LA CREME

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17

AT ABRAVANEL HALL DOORS AT 6:30PM

AT CLUB X

DOORS AT 9PM FEATURING MISS CW2015 HARRIOT WINSTON

KARAOKE

Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue on Highland)

BIG REDD PROMOTIONS PRESENTS

WARRN MILLER’S DJ ROBBIE ROB

| CITY WEEKLY |

60 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

Party Hard Dance Party (The Woodshed) Pistol Rock (Spur Bar & Grill) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tortured Soul, Mooseknuckle, Idlemine, Krypled (Barbary Coast) The Wind and The Wave, Northborn (Kilby Court)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16TH

BIG REDD’S BIRTHDAY WEEKEND NIGHT 1 MAKESHIFT, L.H.A.W. ANGEL REIGN, REDD JOHNSON NO COVER!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17TH

FARMERS MARKET AT PIONEER PARK

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 8AM - 2PM

WHERE’S MY HOVERBOARD

BIG REDD’S BIRTHDAY WEEKEND NIGHT 2 TOURTURED SOUL, MOOSEKNUCKLE IDLEMINE, KRYPLED NO COVER!

A BACK TO THE FUTURE EVENT

AT TOWER THEATRE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21 DOORS AT 4:29PM

4242 S. STATE 801-265-9889

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE at

GREAT

FOOD & DRINK

SPECIALS


Gastro Pub Open for lunch and dinner 365 days a year Enjoy Dinner and a Show nightly Enjoy our Monday Night Jazz Sessions 7:00pm-10:00pm Play Geeks Who Drink every Tuesday at 6:30 Enjoy Brunch every Saturday and Sunday 10:00am-3:00pm

UP TO 200 OFF WITH INSTANT REBATES ON IN-DASH NAVIGATION ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEMS $

FROM AND

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

navigation navigation

00

699

99

$

W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

10AM TO 7PM

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 10/21/15

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 61

AFTER INSTANT REBATES

| CITY WEEKLY |

STARTING AT:

MOD HAVE 1 TOELS 2 WARRANTI YEAR W/ DEALE ES INSTALLAT R ION

BIG SCREEN NAVIGATION ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEMS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Now taking holiday reservations: 1-385-424-2592 326 S West Temple  801-819-7565


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

62 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CANYON INN 3700 E. Fort Union, SLC, 801943-6969, DJs CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. THE CENTURY CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6495044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DO DROP INN 2971 N. Hill Field Road (400 West), Layton, 801-776-9697. Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801943-1696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed.

LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 THE OFFICE 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages THE PENALTY BOX 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music THE WOODSHED 60 E. 800 South, SLC, 801-364-0805, Karaoke Sun. & Tues., Open jam Wed., Reggae Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat. ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

THURSDAY

all-you-can-eat lunch buffet $8.95

12-3PM live band karaoke free 9pm-12pm thirsty thursday all pints $2

LIVE BAND Fri, oct 16th &SAT, oct. 17th

REACTION FRIDAY

appy hour free 5-6PM line dance lessons free 7-8:30PM

SATURDAY

October 17

Be

th

witchin’ party &

Costume contest $100 prize for scariest & sexiest witches

live band & DJ Dance party with Dj Dizzy D 9pm $5 cover includes live band & dj

SUNDAY

football on the big screens!

free give aways, food & drink specials home of the steel city mafia! jazz brunch: feat. the mark chaney trio 12pm-3pm brunch specials $4 bloody marys & $3 mimosas Singles mingle Dj Dance party 7-10pm Ladies free | men $5 free appetizers

MONDAY

football on the big screens! free give aways, food & drink specials

margarita & mai tai monday $3

TUESDAY

taco tuesday 2 for $2 texas tea $4 free karaoke w/ zimzam ent 8pm

WEDNESDAY

texas hold ‘em poker free 8pm breaking bingo w/ progressive jackpot free 8-9:30pm

PRIVATE SPACE FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES & MEETINGS. CALL OR STOP BY FOR A TOUR! 150 W. 9065 S. • CLUB90SLC.COM • 801.566.3254 • OPEN EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK


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CONCERTS & CLUBS

PINKY’S

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

CABARET

Karaoke (Piper Down)

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

OPEN MIC & JAM

Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

TUESDAY 10.20 LIVE MUSIC

Aluna George, Rome Fortune (The Urban Lounge) Coheed and Cambria (Park City Live, p. 58) Girlpool, Batty Blue, Strong Words (Kilby Court, p. 47) Hibria (Metro Bar) Highly Suspect (The Complex) Owl City, Rozzi Crane (The Complex) Rachael Yamagata, My Name Is You (The State Room) Silver Snakes (Park City Live) Taylor Davis (Jeanne Wagner Theatre)

OPEN MIC & JAM

Open Mic Night (Velour) Open Mic Night (The Wall) Whistling Rufus (Sugarhouse Coffee)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (The Woodshed) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke with ZimZam Ent (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 10.21 LIVE MUSIC

A Silent Film, Flagship (The Urban Lounge) Alicia Stockman (Spur Bar & Grill) Beats Antique, Moon Hooch (Park City Live, p 52) Chvrches, Mansionair (The Complex, p. 52) Diabolic (Metro Bar) Escape the Fate, A Skylit Drive, Sworn In, Sirens & Sailors, Myka Relocate, Arsenal of Destruction (In the Venue) The Fabulous Milf Shakes (Garage on Beck) Griffin House, John Louviere (The State Room) James Junius, 32 Hours, Tim Lee (Kilby Court) Pigeon (Twist) W James Woods (Fats Grill)

CHECK US FIRST! LOW OR NO FEES! Thursday, October 15

William Fitzsimmons The State Room

Youth lagoon Urban Lounge

FriDay, October 16

IAMX

Urban Lounge

Super Diamond The Royal

Saturday, October 17

Taste Con 2015 The Fallout

The Wind And The Wave Kilby Court

DIIV

Urban Lounge

Monday, October 19

Hinds

KARAOKE

Kilby Court

OPEN MIC & JAM

Urban Lounge

Karaoke (Johnny’s on Second) Karaoke (Liquid Joes) Karaoke (The Wall) Jam Night Featuring Dead Lake Trio (The Woodshed) Muse Open Mic Night (Muse Music Cafe)

MURS

Tuesday, October 20

Rachael Yamagata The State Room

Girlpool

Kilby Court

Wednesday, October 21

A Silent Film Urban Lounge

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TAG YOUR PHOTOS


Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Coffeehouse convenience for Web surfers 2. Make out, to Harry Potter 3. Brolin or Groban 4. Quite familiar 5. Doesn't split 6. Wallop 7. Folk singer Guthrie 8. Potluck choice 9. HBO rival 10. Nothing but net? 11. Ken of "thirtysomething" 12. "Little Man ____" (1991 Jodie Foster film)

49. Sport with four-person teams 51. Immature newts 52. Give ____ lip (punch) 53. Rooftop spinner 54. "Don't blame me!" 55. Take a card 56. Sign of virtue 57. Bracket shape 59. Suffix with Nepal

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

13. [Forehead slap] 18. Kind of swoop 20. Words before second or minute 24. Burr and Copland 25. Coach Bill whose 49ers won three Super Bowls 26. Like some grazers 27. Do an autumn job 28. Prepares to propose 29. Join, as a table 30. It's twisted on a radio 31. Whom Uncle Sam wants 32. "Self-Portrait Dedicated to Leon Trotsky" artist 33. Whiff 35. Tip off 38. 2014 Pharrell Williams hit "Come Get It ____" 39. Siberian forest 44. ____ Men ("Who Let the Dogs Out" group) 45. 1914 Booth Tarkington novel 47. Neutral shade 48. Tesla Motors CEO Musk

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Financial daily, in brief 4. Equally undesirable 9. Good name for a Dalmatian 13. Rat Pack nickname 14. Organs men don't have 15. ____ skirt 16. Usually blurry tabloid pics 17. Takes the bait 19. Classic 1979 AC/DC album 21. Opposite of WSW 22. Sue Grafton's "____ for Alibi" 23. Napkin's place 25. 2002 Missy Elliott hit 29. Buicks until 1998 34. ____-garde 35. Skid row denizen 36. Move aimlessly 37. Very sudden, colloquially 40. Three-time All-Pro guard Chris 41. Baath Party member 42. "It's ____ wind that bloweth ..." 43. Completely committed ... or a hint to solving 19-, 37- and 50-Across 45. Something to draw 46. Conductor ____-Pekka Salonen 47. Entreat 48. Smog-fighting govt. group 50. 1980 Black Sabbath album 58. 1994 Warren Beatty/Annette Bening movie 60. Kind of contraception 61. Cries at a plaza de toros 62. Fiery ballroom dance 63. Towering 64. Air port? 65. Knight's ride 66. _____ Jima

SUDOKU

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66 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 59 | SHOP GIRL PG. 60

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 61 | UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 62 URBAN LIVING PG. 63

COMMUNITY

BEAT

Hit the Slopes A

community@cityweekly.net

“We walk the walk.” —Julian Carr

DISCRETE CLOTHING 177 W. 2100 South Open 7 days a week 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 385-312-0901 DiscreteClothing.com @discrete

| COMMUNITY |

may check them out online, where they offer free shipping on orders over $50. Or, find them at one of the many retail outlets that carry their goods. Discrete Clothing was first carried at Milosport in 2007 (3119 E. 3300 South, 801-487-8600, Milosport.com) and is currently offered at dozens of retailers throughout the world. And for readers who want a challenge in the next few months, Carr has a full winter “stacked with fun stuff” planned, so follow @discrete on Instagram. For example, Discrete just hosted its Peak Series mountain races. Discrete hosted four races at Alta, Snowbird, Crested Butte in Colorado and Deer Valley, with a $10,000 grand prize. The races focused on shorter distances with an emphasis on conquering peaks. Each race started at the base lodge of a mountain resort and participants ran, scrambled and hiked their way to the peak before descending back down to a party below. While the race series just wrapped at the end of September, Carr encourages readers to keep in touch with Discrete and see what is coming up next. n

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

s temperatures continue to drop, those eagerly awaiting the first snows of winter should check out Discrete Clothing, a locally owned and operated clothing company selling caps, neck gaiters, jackets and everything else you could need for your outdoor adventuring. Discrete began primarily as a headwear company, selling beanies and other hats, but has since expanded to men’s and women’s clothing. “We walk the walk,” says Discrete founder and University of Utah alumnus Julian Carr. “We lead with the message that we love the mountains, streams, the great outdoors and we literally spend every day in them.” Carr believes customers can tell when a company doesn’t really live its values and is proud that Discrete does not fall into that category. “Our great products make Discrete special,” Carr explains. “We like to think we’re the Levi of the outdoor space.” To that end, Discrete features minimally branded quality goods that amplify the individual, not make someone feel like they are defined by wearing Discrete. Discrete also offers customizable products, so if you want a specialty beanie, T-shirt or snapback cap, contact them online. Carr conceived the brand while he was in a college computer science class called “Discrete Structures.” Carr loved the idea of separate and original components making something discrete, which he considered the perfect name for a unique clothing brand. In keeping Carr’s first idea, all of Discrete’s products are named after computer science or mathematical concepts and terms. Carr, who is also a professional skier and will be appearing in a Warren Miller movie this fall, says that Discrete was born from the love of the mountains. “We take that love and distill it into our products, marketing messages and the community we are a part of,” he explains. Readers interested in Discrete Clothing

send leads to

Another word for Discrete Clothing’s “Alias” beanie? Stylish.

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 67


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Frye Jamie Zip Bootie, $325. Mary Jane’s (613 Main, Park City, 435-645-7463, MaryJanesShoes). With a vintage nubuck leather bottom and contrast suede texture on top, this 1-inch heel height, back zip can be worn open or closed. This is a go-to boot from day to night, dress to jeans. Mary Jane’s has been a shoe destination for more than 10 years and they have expanded into clothes and accessories with lines like Current /Elliott, AG, Michael Stars, Freeway and ALO Yoga.

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CHRISTA ZARO comments@cityweekly.net

ow that Indian summer is behind us, it’s time to step into autumn with booties. Booties are everywhere this fall, and they pair well with all lengths of dresses, skirts, jeans and even shorts. If there is one fall accessory you should buy, it’s the bootie. High to low, stacked to flat, peep-toe or closed-toe—they all work. n

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Seychelles Clavichord Bootie, $155. Mary Jane’s This gray (“taupe”) suede bootie has a side zip closure at ankle and 3-inch stacked heel height. An alternative to standard black or brown, gray is perfect to be worn with all colors. Pairs with plaid and denim. Wear with Mary Jane’s buttonup plaid shirts (prep-school shirt) from Current/Elliott and gray jeans.

Sorel 1964 Wedge Bootie, $235.95. Hip & Humble (1043 E. 900 South, 801-467-3130). Among colors, shale uniquely can be paired with either black or brown hues. The bootie straddles fashion and ruggedness, and its waterproof leather and coated canvas make it perfect for Utah’s fall weather. Undercover wedge is super comfortable, making it easy to wear all day. Laces are extra long for optional wrap around styling. Hello, get here quick. Shale bootie is hard to come by.

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Miz Mooz Seymour Ankle Bootie, $184.95 Hip & Humble. Chestnut bootie has knotted ankle strap and side zipper. Steampunk esthetic. Leather flat boot with side slits. Easy to pair with any color jean or vintage-inspired dress.

Bathroom vanities starting at just $190 Mike (801) 473-0883 Español/Mandarin


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Here’s actor Bill Murray’s advice about relationships: “If you have someone that you think is The One, don’t just say, ‘OK, let’s pick a date. Let’s get married.’ Take that person and travel around the world. Buy a plane ticket for the two of you to go to places that are hard to go to and hard to get out of. And if, when you come back, you’re still in love with that person, get married at the airport.” In the coming weeks, Aries, I suggest you make comparable moves to test and deepen your own closest alliances. See what it’s like to get more seriously and deliriously intimate. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Some firefighters use a wetter kind of water than the rest of us. It contains a small amount of biodegradable foam that makes it ten times more effective in dousing blazes. With this as your cue, I suggest you work on making your emotions “wetter” than usual. By that I mean the following: When your feelings arise, give them your reverent attention. Marvel at how mysterious they are. Be grateful for how much life force they endow you with. Whether they are relatively “negative” or “positive,” regard them as interesting revelations that provide useful information and potential opportunities for growth. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is a BBC TV min-series set in the early 19th century. It’s the fictional story of a lone wizard, Mr. Norrell, who seeks to revive the art of occult magic so as to accomplish practical works, like helping the English navy in its war against the French navy. Norrell is pleased to find an apprentice, Jonathan Strange, and draws up a course of study for him. Norrell tells Strange that the practice of magic is daunting, “but the study is a continual delight.” If you’re interested in taking on a similar challenge, Gemini, it’s available.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) One afternoon in September, I was hiking along a familiar path in the woods. As I passed my favorite grandmother oak, I spied a thick, 6-foot-long snake loitering on the trail in front of me. In hundreds of previous visits, I had never before seen a creature bigger than a mouse. The serpent’s tail was hidden in the brush, but its head looked more like a harmless gopher snake’s than a dangerous rattler’s. I took the opportunity to sing it three songs. It stayed for the duration, then slipped away after I finished. What a great omen! The next day, I made a tough but liberating decision to leave behind a good part of my life so as to focus more fully on a great part. With or without a snake sighting, Sagittarius, I foresee a comparable breakthrough for you sometime soon. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Canadian author Margaret Atwood has finished a new manuscript. It’s called Scribbler Moon. But it won’t be published as a book until the year 2114. Until then, it will be kept secret, along with the texts of many other writers who are creating work for a “Future Library.” The project’s director is conceptual artist Katie Paterson, who sees it as a response to George Orwell’s question, “How could you communicate with the future?” With this as your inspiration, Capricorn, try this exercise: Compose five messages you would you like to deliver to the person you will be in 2025.

OCTOBER 15, 2015 | 69

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Every hour of your life, millions of new cells are born to replace old cells that are dying. That’s why many parts of your body are composed of an entirely different collection of cells than they were years ago. If you are 35, for example, you have replaced your skeleton three times. Congratulations! Your creativity is spectacular, as is your ability to transform yourself. Normally these instinctual talents aren’t nearly as available to you in your efforts to recreate and transform your psyche, but they are now. In the coming months, you will have extraordinary power to VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) While still a young man, Virgo author Leo Tolstoy wrote that revamp and rejuvenate everything about yourself, not just your “I have not met one man who is morally as good as I am.” He physical organism. lived by a strict creed. “Eat moderately” was one of his “rules of life,” along with “Walk for an hour every day.” Others were PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) equally stern: “Go to bed no later than ten o’clock,” “Only do The coming weeks will NOT be a favorable time to seek out allies one thing at a time,” and “Disallow flights of imagination unless you don’t even like that much or adventures that provide thrills necessary.” He did provide himself with wiggle room, however. you have felt a thousand times before. But the near future will One guideline allowed him to sleep two hours during the day. be an excellent time to go on a quest for your personal version Another specified that he could visit a brothel twice a month. I’d of the Holy Grail, a magic carpet, the key to the kingdom, or an love for you to be inspired by Tolstoy’s approach, Virgo. Now is a answer to the Sphinx’s riddle. In other words, Pisces, I advise favorable time to revisit your own rules of life. As you refine and you to channel your yearning toward experiences that steep your recommit yourself to these fundamental disciplines, be sure to heart with a sense of wonder. Don’t bother with anything that degrades, disappoints, or desensitizes you. give yourself enough slack.

| COMMUNITY |

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You would be wise to rediscover and revive your primal innocence. If you can figure out how to shed a few shreds of your sophistication and a few slivers of your excess dignity, you will literally boost your intelligence. That’s why I’m inviting you to explore the kingdom of childhood, where you can encounter stimuli that will freshen and sweeten your adulthood. Your upcoming schedule could include jumping in mud puddles, attending parties with imaginary friends, having uncivilized fun with wild toys, and drinking boisterously from fountains of youth.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) For now, you are excused from further work on the impossible tasks that have been grinding you down. You may take a break from the unsolvable riddles and cease your exhaustive efforts. And if you would also like to distance yourself from the farcical jokes the universe has been playing, go right ahead. To help enforce this transition, I hereby authorize you to enjoy a time of feasting and frolicking, which will serve as an antidote to your baffling trials. And I hereby declare that you have been as successful at weathering these trials as you could possibly be, even if the concrete proof of that is not yet entirely visible.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) We humans have put buttons on clothing for seven millennia. But for a long time these small knobs and disks were purely ornamental—meant to add beauty but not serve any other function. That changed in the 13th century, when our ancestors finally got around to inventing buttonholes. Buttons could then serve an additional purpose, providing a convenient way to fasten garments. I foresee the possibility of a comparable evolution in your personal life, Cancerian. You have an opening to dream up further uses for elements that have previously been one-dimensional. Brainstorm about how you might expand the value of familiar things.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Many astronomers believe that our universe began with the Big Bang. An inconceivably condensed speck of matter exploded, eventually expanding into thousands of billions of stars. It must have been a noisy event, right? Actually, no. Astronomers estimate that the roar of the primal eruption was just 120 decibels— less than the volume of a live rock concert. I suspect that you are also on the verge of your own personal Big Bang, Libra. It, too, will be relatively quiet for the amount of energy it unleashes.


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70 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

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hen people who aren’t Salt Lakers talk about the west side of Salt Lake City, they usually mean West Valley City. Technically, WVC is the secondlargest city in the state. But, if you’re in Salt Lake City proper, and people mention the west side, they are talking about Glendale, Rose Park, Euclid, Fairpark and Jackson—or what local officials collectively call The River District. When people say to me, “Let’s meet at 9th & 9th!” I shoot ’em a gang sign and say “9th & 9th westside, baby”! So the entire west side of Salt Lake City proper is now The River District. And, just like its east-side counterpart, it hosts an abundance of successful, locally owned small businesses, restaurants, bakeries, parks and cool neighborhoods. The former Peoples Market—now the 9th West Farmer’s Market—has been held Sundays at Jordan Park for years, and the humble West View paper reports on area news and neighborhoods. What’s that you say? You never go to the River District?—Oh c’mon! You frequent the Red Iguana how many times a year with friends and family? And when the Red Iguana is too packed, you know that Chungas has the best tacos al pastor around, right? You get Mexican hot chocolate at Mestizo in the winter, don’t you? Come out and discover more about the west side of town Thursday, Oct. 22, 6-9 p.m., at Sugar Space (132 S. 800 West) for a “Taste of the West Side.” This benefit for the community newspaper, in partnership with Volunteers of America, The River District Business Alliance and Utah Paper Box will offer multicultural entertainment and amazing food from some of the best restaurants, food trucks and caterers on the west side, like: Rico’s, Red Iguana, Comfort Bowl, Argentina’s Best Empanadas, The Red Food Truck, Dottie’s Biscuit Barn truck, Mestizo and more. What you might want to do in your free time is explore the River District this fall. The best way to do that is to take your bike or longboard on the paved trail that parallels the Jordan River between 1000 West and 1100 West. That trail runs all the way from Utah Lake to the Great Salt Lake. Cheat and ride your bike downhill to the Parkway, ride till you’re done, and then pick up Trax and get home faster. Or stop at Jordan Park (1060 S. 900 West), stroll the free International Peace Gardens in full fall bloom and pick up the trail there. The trees and willows are turning colors just as beautifully as in the mountains nearby. If you want to attend Taste of the West Side, tickets are available at the door. Adult-beverage tix will be sold as well. To experience the Jordan River Parkway and need maps, visit Salt Lake County Parks and Recreation’s website at SLCo.org/recreation/parks. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

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72 | OCTOBER 15, 2015

Poets Corner

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City Weekly Oct 15, 2015  

Lost in Trans Nation

City Weekly Oct 15, 2015  

Lost in Trans Nation