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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY

BEST OF UTAH ARTS 2015 Remember the Artys, City Weekly’s annual awards competition that celebrates the best in Utah arts and entertainment? They’re going by a new name this year: The Best of Utah Arts. Check out which artists and groups wowed our readers (and the staff) in 2015. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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PETE SALTAS Pete has worked at City Weekly since 2007 in various departments and currently serves as newsprint division ad director (wanna buy an ad?). He enjoys a nice cigar, Crown Royal, and spending time with family and friends.

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LETTERS Planned Parenthood’s Hypocritical Claims

In reference to Katharine Biele’s defense of Planned Parenthood, It appears that, for Biele [“Ick Factor,” Hits & Misses, Aug. 27, City Weekly], the greatest infraction Planned Parenthood could ever commit would be to actually make a profit from harvested body parts passed on to researchers. The issue is not that an innocent human life was snuffed out to get those parts, but rather that it’s imperative no money is seen changing hands. This is the true “ick” factor. How different would it have been had these same researchers stood outside a Nazi concentration camp and asked a guard, “Excuse me, but those individuals you’re about to kill, can we have their organs? We’re working to end cancer.” Reason tells us that it is immoral to derive benefit, whether monetary or scientific, from the intentional demise of an innocent human being and not condemn the cause of that demise. But, of course, for Planned Parenthood, the “demise” is everything. That’s why—from its very name to the “sevices” it “provides”—a lexicon of soft and innocuous words has been put forward to dull any potentially guilty consciences. Who, after all, could be against “women’s health” or object to pap smears or mammograms? The truth is that the centrality of Planned Parenthood is the for-profit business of ending the lives of “inconvenient” human beings through abortion, and convincing women this is a reasonable proposition. The hypocrisy of

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes. the whole thing is that the very women about whose health they claim to care, they would just as soon have aborted some 15 to 20 years earlier and not batted an eye. Like its founder, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood regards the value of the human person as a conditional circumstance, hinging entirely on the degree of its desirability as judged by another. Fortunately, the God of Judeo-Christianity revealed we are all made in his image and likeness and infinitely precious in his sight. We all have value, regardless of our “utility”. Yes, to Biele, Herbert’s response to the PP videos might appear as a “knee-jerk” reaction, but it’s only after the sudden realization by many in the state that we have been unwitting accomplices to the horrific practices of this deceitful organization.

Layton

indignities both real and imagined. He calls it all “bullshit” and encourages his audience to open their windows and shout to the rooftops that, “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore!” Soon, millions are following Beale’s lead as his angry rants become more and more unhinged. Sound familiar? It’s hardly a stretch to imagine Donald Trump in the role of Howard Beale, ranting on about Mexican rapists, bossy women and corrupt politicians. Indeed, it’s surprising that Trump hasn’t appropriated Beale’s “mad as hell” mantra for his campaign. In the end, Beale was undone when he simply could not top himself. He ran out of rage. Low ratings (and the Ecumenical Liberation Army) ultimately spelled his demise. It will be interesting to see if Chayefsky’s 40-year-old script proves to be as prophetic in its ending as it has been so far in foreseeing the future.

Is Donald Trump ‘Mad as Hell’?

North Salt Lake

JAMES SORLEY

The brilliant writer and satirist Paddy Chayefsky may have died in 1981, but I’m sure he must be enjoying a huge and satisfying belly laugh somewhere right now. In 1976, Chayefsky authored the Academy Award-winning screenplay for Network, a satirical look at television, celebrity and the dehumanizing effects of modern life. In Network, Howard Beale, a flamboyant and very angry television personality, creates a ratings sensation when he threatens to commit suicide on the air while ranting about

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PRIVATE EY

Draper’s Caper

T

he best thing about converting the present Utah Prison site in Draper into some kind of south valley highrise business and commerce district or high-tech recreational campus (both options posited in a recent story by Matt Canham in The Salt Lake Tribune), is that I won’t be around to see it. It will occur long after my departure from this earthly tether, so I won’t be here to grouse about it. Or, it’s possible I’m wrong—that Draper is such a lucrative plot of dirt, that the project is built on a fast track, in which case I’ll bid an overdue adieu to all of you and just up and leave. I don’t support moving the Draper prison. It’s been there as long as I can remember and it’s doing just fine as it is. If we must have a new prison—and clearly we must, because in this modern world, incarceration is big business—the dictates of maximizing profits per prisoner warrant that Utahns become more efficient in the warehousing of its prison population. We can call it humanity or compassion or whatever we want, but the truth is, prisons are one of the most sustainable growth business models ever created. All a government needs to finance a new one is a couple of well-placed tears running down the cheeks of a prisoner’s family member or a gaudy report from a resident expert psychiatrist describing in great detail the cruel and unusual punishment society places on a person spending time behind bars after being convicted of performing a cruel and unusual act on a fellow member of our society—like bouncing a check or getting caught with a roach clip. Our prisons are chock full of low-level criminals— and they’re always in good supply. It doesn’t hurt when greasy developers and slimy politicians enter the mix—sometimes they are one and the same in Utah. They talk of great opportunity and big money. I don’t understand that. Utah is perhaps 90 percent a recreational zone to begin with, and it often comes at low or no

cost to enjoy. When I was young, some folks took their fishing poles down along the Jordan River that flows past the prison to catch a catfish or two. Others sneaked into the warm springs that abut or reside on the prison property for a quick skinny dip. Is that the kind of recreation they have in mind? It’s really just hype to somehow mitigate the smoke and mirrors of this great land heist. There was a nice piece of art that accompanied the Canham story. It showed a rendering of what the current Draper site might look like if the prison moves, and the property is rebuilt with skyscrapers. An adjoining cutline suggests that the drawing doesn’t even go far enough for Draper Mayor Troy Walker, who envisions the construction of a battery of 50-story buildings—making them easily the tallest in Utah—at what is currently called Point of the Mountain. It should be renamed What’s the Point of This Fiasco? Dreamers took us to the moon, but Mayor Walker’s idea is a nightmare. You know Utah. You’ve seen all this before. This is sellable. The tall structures look nice, they look bold, they dwarf what is currently downtown Salt Lake City, they look like, uhh, San Jose. Except it’s not San Jose. What that prison site is destined to look like is what Draper already looks like—Ikea Land. It wasn’t that long ago that my friends and I would ride horses in Corner Canyon and through Dimple Dell. Then homes and subdivisions sprung up all over Draper’s farmland and pastures, and you’d be lucky to spot a horse in Draper these days. And, of course, the new homeowners didn’t like the smell of horses, so the horse-property folks were slowly forced elsewhere.

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Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

@johnsaltas

You don’t see mention of that in today’s hype about rebuilding Draper. You put some 50-story buildings, and you’re going to force other people out. It’s reasonable to assume a desire to drive to Provo or Salt Lake City, despite having to drive through Draper. Are those developers so delusional that they believe not only can the city of Draper house the requisite number of people who will work in those buildings but they have discovered the answer to the question: “Who in their right minds would actually make Draper a destination?” It also wasn’t that long ago that we’d venture out to a great little Mexican restaurant on 12300 South for a bite and some beers. Here’s a portion of what our City Weekly listings say about it: “Guadalahonky’s is Draper’s original Mexican restaurant and has been open since December of 1988, when most of the neighbors were cows.” Things change. The food remains stellar but the cows are gone. Guadalahonky’s used to be a welcome respite along a sleepy road in a sleepy burg. Now, if you’re not looking really hard, you can drive right by it, so surrounded is it by strip malls and crappy fast-food eateries. That’s what’s coming. More ticky-tack. Think Phoenix. There’s only one solution, really: Move Draper. The whole friggin town, just pick it up and move it. Take the prison and Mayor Walker, too, and just start over. Draper is a mess—can’t get in and can’t get out—and it will be a tax drain for decades, as roads and infrastructures are taxpayer built to accommodate the wild plans of developers who will sell out as soon as they can to the highest bidder. And the next bidder will do the same, until Ikea Land becomes reality. CW Send Private Eye comments to john@cityweekly.net.

I DON’T SUPPORT MOVING THE DRAPER PRISON. IT’S BEEN THERE AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER AND IT’S DOING JUST FINE AS IT IS.

If you were rebuilding the Draper Prison site, what would be your centerpiece? Scott Renshaw: It’s always interesting when new developments pay homage to the history of the location. Maybe there could be a sculpture made out of handcuffs, or an exercise yard. Brandon Burt: Corrections is becoming such a profit-driven growth industry in this country, I’d be a fool not to build another prison. Except this one would be fancy—a fancy prison for those fancy criminals. Mikey Saltas: Let’s just revert to the Game of Thrones “sky cells.”

Jerre Wroble: We should thwart all the plans of the salivating developers and return it to the lovely stretch of green that Sugar House Park is, which is the former site of the Utah Prison before it moved to Draper. Year by year, little by little, the joggers, the ducks, the picnickers, the sledders gradually release all the bad ju-ju in the land, and balance is restored. That’s what Draperites need and most assuredly should have: a big lovely green park.

Stephen Dark: Visit the prison and you may at times find yourself being harangued by geese protecting their goslings near the gate. Corrections officers at the gate complain about their angry beaks. I’d wager that a lake of significant size where wildlife could gather would be a welcome addition to a Draper landscape that’s typically residential and commercial while harking back to more rural times. Tiffany Frandsen: Let’s get gardens to grow there. At least a section could be community gardens.


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Enough ODs

The Centers for Disease Control just awarded Utah a $3.76 million grant to help prevent deaths from prescription-drug overdoses. In 2014, 289 people died from overdoses, and the Legislature keeps trying to figure this out. Utah is fortunate to have Rep. Carol Spackman Moss, D-Holladay, on the issue. She helped pass bills allowing dispensing and administration of an opiate antagonist to patients suspected of overdose, and another bill decriminalizing actions of those trying to help. Now, she’s getting ready for a bill to equip first responders with needed prescription drugs to counter overdoses. Some states, like Illinois, have passed pilot legislation to require locking caps for opioid prescriptions. These are all keys to preventing overdose death, but if Utah is serious about prevention, it should get behind upcoming legislation to legalize medical cannabis, sponsored by Sen. Mark Madsen, R-Saratoga Springs.

The Pine Whine

A fake Christmas tree at the Capitol—could there be a worse idea? Even though there’s plenty of cash in the Capitol operating fund, the tree’s pricetag would be in the range of $16,000-$44,500, and the tree could cost up to $4,600 to put up each year. Maybe Utah has become suddenly conscientious about cutting down live trees, or maybe someone worries about a fire disaster, such as the one that burned the Governor’s Mansion in 1993. Or maybe they just don’t want to pick up dead needles. Actually, the trees have been damaging the Capitol columns and, yes, fire is a danger, according to a Salt Lake Tribune story. Whatever. Tradition aside, it may be time to rethink the practice of installing a pine tree each December at the Capitol altogether. If we’re going to go fake, why not a replica of Karl Momen’s Interstate 80 landmark sculpture, “The Tree of Utah”?

Coal Mining Blues

Forget the “war on religion.” Conservatives in Utah have another war to think about: the “war on coal.” The Deseret News is running a series on the challenges to the 161-year-old state industry that employed 1,605 people and generated nearly $594 million in production last year. Sad, but true for those employed: The industry isn’t exactly thriving. A Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Dennis Waggoner, president of the Escalante-Boulder Chamber of Commerce, tells it like it is: “Coal prices in the U.S. have declined from $140 per ton in 2008 to $40 per ton in 2015. It doesn’t matter how deep the seams are because the prices will dictate production. Coal is not the energy source of the future.”

Ever wanted to visit a traditional market in Morocco? Stephanie Panos, above left, and friend, Allison Navar, met at the University of Utah and launched the online boutique, InternationalGypsy.com. The pair are currently visiting cities in Morocco and posting on their websites photos of art, jewelry, fashion and home décor they’re finding on their travels—along with back stories and profiles of the artists. Customers are invited to order goods from the marketplace via online flash sales; the pair will bring (or ship) these items back to customers. Look for them in Casablanca Sept. 13 and Fes Sept. 16.

Why Morocco?

Stephanie Panos: First, we decided we were going to Morocco—we decide to go somewhere new every year. I don’t know exactly how we decided on Morocco, but they are pushing tourism, so we got really decently priced flights.

And how did you decide the cities?

SP: The locations were based on research. Casablanca is going to be the most wellknown name, so that can draw people in by being recognizable. Fes is the oldest GothicArabic city, and it is also the largest nonmotorized vehicle city in the world. Both are full of medinas, little shopping areas. The medinas in Marrakesh, where we stopped Sept. 8 and 9, were supposed to have a lot of snake charmers and monkey dancers.

Is this your first international boutique sale?

SP: This is the first time doing it. We’re super-excited about this. We go somewhere every year, and we see all of this amazing stuff. We want to be able to not only share lots of stuff, we want to be able to share the experience we have. We’re going to do profiles on the people we meet who are creating the art we feature. Those profiles will be on our website, and it’ll tie back to what they create in our store.

How does it work?

SP: We’re going to go into a city, meet the craftsmen, take pictures and post everything. Then, it’s going to be available while it’s posted. We’ll buy everything before we leave the city, so we have no inventory on-hand. We probably will end up having a few extra things that we’ll sell later, but we’re trying to promote getting it while you can. We’re going to be carrying a lot of stuff, so we don’t want to carry too much extra.

How does this benefit Utah’s community, or expand their cultural experience?

SP: It’s our way of bringing a piece of a different part of the world back, trying to promote the idea of getting an authentic import. Originally, I was toying with the idea of “globally local.” It’s local, on a global scale—a window into another person’s world. We’ve been featuring artists from Utah on our Instagram—jewelers, henna artists—and we want to embrace the idea of creation across the board, featuring artists everywhere. Internationally, we’re promoting Morocco, because that’s where we’re going. But we’re huge fans of the local culture here in Utah, as well.

—TIFFANY FRANDSEN tfrandsen@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Lockheed Martin’s claim of fusion power “in a decade” has my Spidey-sense tingling. Is there any merit to their claim? It seems like fusion power is always just a decade away—is there reason to hope anyone is going to create workable fusion power in our lifetimes? —Kevin Miller Depends on how long you plan on living. At the rate things were going, the timeline for commercial fusion power was up there with the half-life of radium. Sure, Lockheed Martin’s bid could crash and burn, but current efforts don’t seem noticeably more promising and it’s not my money. So why not? Lockheed engineers raised eyebrows worldwide when they announced last October that they were pursuing a new type of compact fusion reactor. They planned on testing their design in a year, they said, with a working prototype in five years. The skepticism stemmed from the lack of technical detail provided, and the feeling we’d heard this before. However, enthusiasm in some quarters was also high—the reactor is being developed by Lockheed’s Skunk Works research and development team, responsible for, among other things, the SR-71 Blackbird (the fastest non-rocket plane ever built), the F-117 stealth bomber, and the F-22 that replaced it. Lockheed Martin is a public company with an image and stock price to protect, and you’d think they wouldn’t be foolhardy enough to promise a breakthrough without something to back it up. Then again, Microsoft seemed pretty confident about Windows 8. The details released by Lockheed are sketchy, but apparently the company has decided to go with a smaller-is-better approach to containment design. In a hot-fusion reactor, a mixture of deuterium and tritium, two heavy forms of hydrogen, are injected into an evacuated chamber and heated to millions of degrees to form a plasma in which atoms fuse together, releasing energy. This insanely hot plasma must be contained in a small space not only to keep the reaction going but also to allow safe extraction of the heat needed for power production. To date, most fusion-reactor designs have been of a type called a tokamak (a Russian coinage), which suspends the plasma in a superconducting magnetic field shaped like a giant donut. The drawback of a tokamak is that it’s huge and complicated but can contain only a small amount of plasma. The Lockheed people claim that by shrinking the reactor, they can hold more plasma relative to the energy required to maintain the magnetic field, resulting in 10 times the power production. Furthermore, they say their system is safer and more stable than a tokamak—as the plasma pressure increases, so does the strength of the field, containing the plasma even more securely. Beyond these efficiency advantages, there’s obvious benefit to having something powerful enough to run 100,000 homes but small enough to fit in a semitrailer. On pa-

SLUG SIGNORINO

Fusion Power

per at least, the compact and safe design could make it suitable for powering ships, airplanes and even spacecraft. Lockheed isn’t alone in breaking away from the tokamak herd. General Fusion, for example, uses a sphere filled with liquid lead and lithium to contain the fusion reaction. Others have redesigned the tokamak to look more like a cored apple than a donut. It’s hoped that, within a decade (a familiar-sounding timeframe, admittedly), these so-called spherical tokamaks will achieve the critical “net power production” point—that is, where they’re producing more power than they consume. We’re not there yet. In 1997, the Joint European Torus set a record for producing 16 megawatts of power for a few seconds—an impressive number, but only 65 percent of the power that went into running it. In 2014, a laser fusion experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility managed to generate “fuel gain greater than unity.” Is that good? Absolutely. Does it mean we’ve crossed the net power production threshold? Alas, no. Still, it’s more progress than some fusion efforts have made. The current leader in money spent vs. watts produced—and that’s not a title you want to hold—is the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, or ITER. A monster of a project at 10 stories tall and costing more than $18 billion, ITER utilizes a traditional tokamak design and hopes to produce fusion energy sometime after 2027—which is, I note, more than a decade away. By reaching its goal of 500 megawatts of power from 50 megawatts of input energy, ITER would set the stage for the next phase, called DEMO, projected to start construction in 2030 and possibly finish by 2040. DEMO wouldn’t be one plant but rather a sort of joint venture in which multiple parallel efforts would somehow produce a single reactor to serve as the prototype for multiple commercial-grade utility reactors, which would, in turn, begin construction after 2050. Right after that, Jesus comes back. The one fusion reactor of demonstrated practicality is the sun, one of your more plus-size phenomena, suggesting Lockheed’s small-is-beautiful approach is no sure route to success. On the other hand, you have to like the idea of a test design in a year. The tech world has taught us you learn from your wrong turns. Therefore, fail fast.

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago, IL, 60654.


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ENVIRONMENT

Killing Fields

Utah pays hunters $500,000 a year to kill coyotes.

I

f you live in rural Utah, or just occasionally find yourself curled up in a sleeping bag on some lonely patch of desert, chances are good you’ve been awakened by the rambunctious, wild yells of a pack of coyotes. There is no official effort in Utah to gauge the health of the state’s coyote population, but wildlife officials, farmers and hunters say that the population is robust, if not abundant. It is this abundance—and the disappeared sheep and deer fawns that came with it—that led in 2012 to the creation of the state’s Predator Control Program. The program pays a $50 bounty for every dead coyote scalp brought to wildlife managers’ attention. In 2014, the state paid out $352,050 in bounties and another $140,000 to 14 contracted coyote slayers, who were given $10,000 to $14,000 each to target specific areas where the state’s mule-deer populations were deemed at risk. These efforts led to the killing of 7,041 Utah coyotes in 2014. In addition, contract bounty hunters killed 236 coyotes. And combined with other coyote-killing programs as well as kills by fur trappers, who killed 4,336 coyotes—the number of documented coyotes shot and trapped since 2012 is 25,025. In the midst of this slaughter, an endangered gray wolf—thought to be a coyote—was shot and killed by a hunter in December 2014 in Beaver County. While wolves are an utter rarity in Utah, at least one wildlife-advocacy organization has accused the Beehive State of erring for not suspending its bounty-hunting program as soon as it became aware of a possible wolf roaming the area. And with only marginal rises in the deer fawn survival rate

DUSTIN STETTLER

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RON STEWART

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12 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

NEWS

“In Utah, they have a history of disrespect for endangered species and I think that’s what happened here.” —Robin Silver, co-founder of the Center for Biological Diversity

More than 7,000 coyotes were killed for $50 each in 2014, and an endangered wolf got caught in the crossfire. since the program was implemented— fawn survival was at 61 per 100 does in 2011 compared to 64 in 2014, according to Leslie McFarlane, the mammals coordinator for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources—some question whether all of this killing is worthwhile. “In Utah, they have a history of disrespect for endangered species, and I think that’s what happened here,” says Robin Silver, co-founder of the Center for Biological Diversity in Flagstaff, Ariz. “I think they made an administrative decision to put this wolf at risk, knowing a hunter would make a mistake, or pretend to have made a mistake, so that they wouldn’t have to deal with wolves there.” McFarlane says Utah wildlife officials had documentation of a possible wolf in the area one month prior to the killing. But she says neither she nor anyone else at the state level knew for sure that a wolf was in the area. Furthermore, she says, because coyotes are not protected in any way in Utah, they can be killed at any time, without regard to the bounty program. “We get random wolves that can move through the state, but we don’t stop the entire program because a wolf moves through the state,” McFarlane says. “The state doesn’t have the authority to shut down coyote hunting in the state. It’s a nonprotected species that anyone can take at any time.” This is little consolation for Silver, who has filed open-records requests in Utah in search of the parties responsible for declining to suspend the bounty

program when the wolf was spotted. He says that Utah’s bounty program, which McFarlane believes is the only one of its kind in the country, must be suspended when wolves are known to be in the area. If not, he fears more endangered wolves could be killed. The wolf, named “Echo,” killed last winter, was collared in Wyoming and, in the lead up to its final moments in Utah, was spotted on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. “There will be wolves in Utah again,” Silver says. “Wolves wander. This female proved to us that they will wander. The next time that we notice that there’s a wolf in Utah, the coyote-bounty hunting program better be shut down in the area, or we’re going to demand the state of Utah doesn’t deserve federal funds because they’re knowingly violating federal wildlife laws.” Silver added that the wolf’s presence in the Grand Canyon State was something he and his fellow Arizonans were excited and proud of. “It’s a big deal for us that we’ve got our first wolf to the Grand Canyon in a century,” Silver says. “We like that down here, and the state of Utah took that away from us ...” Wolves, coyotes and mule deer aside, the bounty-hunting program was born in Utah to protect another key group: ranchers. The bill that installed the bounty program, sponsored by Sen. Ralph Okerlund, R-Monroe, was not only intended

to ensure a thriving mule-deer population, but, according to Okerlund, also to protect sheep herds. According to the Utah Wool Growers Association, sheep ranchers lose 27,000 animals each year to predators. Like McFarlane, Okerlund says it is difficult to tell whether or not the bounty hunting program has been effective. The small rise in the survival rate of fawns could be as much due to recent mild winters as to fewer coyotes. But in general, Okerlund says, he’s hearing from sheep growers across the 10 rural counties he representas that there are fewer coyotes. “I don’t have any hatred for predators,” Okerlund says, noting that when he was a boy, it seemed like a lot more hunters came from out of state than do today to hunt the large herds of mule deer, which he believes have suffered in the jaws of coyotes. “I think [coyotes are] part of the ecosystem. We just got to the point where there are too many of them and too few livestock and wildlife that are being affected by them.” Matt Mickel raises sheep in Sanpete Valley. Like the state of Utah, he doesn’t have any hard numbers to show that there are fewer coyotes, and he can’t say for certain whether or not he’s lost fewer sheep since the advent of the bounty program. But one key factor— the rising number of people attempting to kill coyotes and the animal’s morewary behavior—tells him the coyote’s numbers must be dropping.


ENVIRONMENT

DUSTIN STETTLER

NEWS

The coyote bounty-hunting program went into effect in 2012 as part of the Mule Deer Protection Act.

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thriving and growing strong,” he says. “I feel like they’ll be probably the last animal alive on earth.” But where Mickel sees little danger in the widespread hunting of coyotes, Silver sees a lack of regard for wildlife from the state of Utah. That Utah doesn’t keep tabs on its coyote population while simultaneously spending half a million dollars a year working toward culling its numbers, Silver says, is “despicable.” And Silver says the Mule Deer Protection Act, which was passed in 2012 in tandem with the creation of the Predator Control Program, is little more than a livestock protection act, which is one more way farmers and ranchers are being subsidized by the government and abusing public lands. “Most cattlemen don’t like to have predators on public lands, because they have to watch the calves. Right now, they use our public land as feed lots,” he says. “It’s another way that you prove in Utah that your farmers and ranchers are welfare queens, but you won’t admit it. That’s why you have a bounty program in Utah.” McFarlane says although Utah’s bounty program is unique, it isn’t the only state that allows coyote hunting where wolves are present and could be mistakenly killed. The responsibility, she says, ultimately rests on the shoulders of the person wielding the gun. In Echo’s case, no charges were filed against the two hunters involved. “Our agency cares very much about endangered species. None of us would have these jobs or work in these positions if we didn’t care about wildlife or endangered species,” McFarlane says. “Quite honestly, the onus falls on the person that has the gun and is out hunting to know what they’re shooting at and to know what they’re taking.” CW

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This has led to at least one unintended consequence: In the past, when Mickel had problems with coyotes killing his sheep, he hired a government trapper to take care of it. But over the past two years, Mickel says, his hired trappers have had a more difficult time catching the culprit—a fact he traces to the wisdom of coyotes and the herds of people trying to kill them. Once a coyote is summoned by a hunter or trapper, Mickel says if that coyote isn’t killed, it learns quickly to not fall for the trick again. “They hear you, they see you, they smell you, you shoot and miss,” he says, “It’s almost impossible to call a coyote again.” To ensure that hunters don’t double-dip and get paid twice with the same coyote hide, the ears on the pelts are notched. Then another measure is taken: a tooth is pulled. This tooth analyses, state data shows, indicates that 50 percent of the coyotes killed in the bounty program in 2014 were less than a year old. Another roughly 35 percent were no older than two. “Old, smart coyotes get more educated, because there are so many people out trying,” Mickel says. “When we have problems, we have some coyotes come in that are killing on us. I feel like we are having a harder time getting it controlled than we used to.” To combat predator kills, Mickel says, he allows his sheep to give birth in an enclosed area, guarded by dogs. The lambs don’t leave until they’re a month old, to give them a better shot at surviving. Mickel says he’s never been asked if he worried about the health of the coyote population—which, apart from its hunger for his livestock, he says he enjoys. A few decades ago, he says, hunters and ranchers used poison to kill coyotes. Hunting alone, he says, won’t kill them off. “It’s been sought after, hunted, tried to exterminate for 150 years, and they’re still

SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 13


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14 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

FILM SCREENINGS

Equality Utah and Kayenta Homes are sponsoring a screening of Tab Hunter Confidential among the red rock cliffs of Southern Utah. Tab Hunter will attend the screening, too. It’s all part of the DocUtah International Documentary Film Festival, TuesdaySaturday, Sept. 8-12, St. George. Dixie State University brings together independent filmmakers, film students and citizens of the world in an educational setting. A seminar series runs throughout the festival. Buy tickets at DOCUtah.com.

POLITICAL SPEECH

Eight lesser-known patriotic songs for your 9/11 Spotify playlist:

8. “Speak American or Git!” (Billy Ray Palin)

7. “Freakin’ on Tha Dance Floor (Do You Remember 9/11?)” (Def Panels feat. Iggy Azalea)

6.

“God Bless the USA and, Begrudgingly, New York City” (Ronnie Lee Gurnblatt)

5. “The Red, White & Blue

(This PBR’s for You)” (The Ironic Product-Placement Specialists)

4.

“You Say 9/11 Was an Inside Job, I Say My Foot’s Goin’ Inside Your Ass” (Rufus & The Rageaholics)

3. “There’s No ‘I’ in America” (Illiterate Johnson)

2.

“Big Ol’ Jet Airliner … Is Staying Right Here on the Tarmac” (Steve Miller’s Other Band)

1. “Freedom Isn’t Free—

But These Wal-Mart Prices Practically Are!” (The Ironic Product-Placement Specialists feat. Iggy Azalea)

If you’re a Utah Republican or just an incredulous Democrat, you’ll want to hear Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, speak at the Elephant Club Luncheon on Tuesday, Sept. 15, at the Alta Club, 100 E. South Temple. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. If you want to hear the first black GOP woman representative talk about her 2012 loss, her 2014 victory and how she’s been focusing on local control and freemarket solutions, then get a ticket: $35 for loyal party members and $50 for those who’ve not yet joined the majority. RSVP by noon on Saturday, Sept. 12. Contact the UTGOP office at 801-533-9777 or email elephantclub@ utgop.org.

MS WALK

Take a few steps on Saturday, Sept. 12, to help fund research to cure MS. The Northern Utah Walk MS 2015 is sponsored by Questar Gas and takes you, your friends and even your (leashed) dogs along 3 miles of the Ogden River Parkway. There’s even an award for best-dressed pup. Check-in is at 8 a.m. at Big Dee Sports Park, 1375 Park Blvd., Ogden. You can register at WalkMSUtah.org, by phoning 801-424-0113 or emailing utahevents@nmss.org.

TREE PLANTING

TreeUtah and Auric Solar are partnering to plant 750 trees along Parley’s Creek in Parley’s Nature Park on Saturday, Sept. 19, from 9 a.m.-noon. Register to help plant by visiting TreeUtah.org. Then on Wednesday, Sept. 23, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., you can join TreeUtah at its permaculture orchard—the EcoGarden—to dig in the dirt and help clean up trash and invasive plants. The EcoGarden is near DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North.

9/11 MEMORIAL

The Utah Philharmonic Orchestra is playing pieces both tragic and triumphant at Remembering Through Music: Memorial Tribute to 9/11. For $5—free for veterans, military, first responders and their families—audience-members will hear Barber’s “Adagio for Strings,” Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man and Dvorak’s New World Symphony. There will also be a patriotic sing-along. Music starts at 7:30 p.m. at Draper Park Middle School. For tickets and more information, visit UtahPhil.org or phone 888-239-6237. Send your event to editor@cityweekly.net


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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 15


S NEofW the

@CityWeekly

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n “And Another Thing, Dad”: Michael May, 44, was arrested in Lincoln County, Kentucky, in August after the Pilot Baptist Cemetery near Stanford reported that he had tried to dig up the grave of his dead father “in order to argue with him,” according to Lexington’s WLEX-TV. May told officers his dad had died about 30 years ago. (Alcohol was involved in the decision to dig.)

Florida’s Best Courtroom In May, suspect David Riffle, charged with trespassing (after shouting “religious proverbs” at patrons of the Hard Rock Casino in Hollywood,

More Things to Worry About Under a 1981 treaty, at least 50 countries, including the United States, have banned their militaries from employing flamethrowers (as “inhumane”), but entrepreneurs have begun to market the devices domestically for $900-$1,600 each (based on the distance of the flame, at 25 feet or 50 feet). Federal regulators appear uninterested (as the contraptions are technically neither firearms nor explosives), and only two states prohibit them outright, though a few jurisdictions believe flamethrowers are illegal under fire codes. The Ohio startup Throwflame has sensed the need for marketing savvy and describes flamethrowers as primarily for “entertainment.” (Recent news reports indicate a slight run on sales under the suspicion that authorities will soon realize the danger and outlaw them.) n After two women accused Sheffield Village, Ohio, attorney Michael Fine of “hypnotizing” and sex-talking to them during office consultations, police and the county bar association opened an investigation in November 2014. Though Fine was being consulted on a custody matter, he was secretly audio-recorded (according to one woman’s lawsuit) touting “powerful whole-body orgasms” and suggesting that he was “the world’s greatest lover”—among details the client recalls only vaguely, if at all. The bar association later said as many as 25 women may have been victimized. Though no criminal charges have been filed, Fine’s lawyer said in August that his client had voluntarily given up his law license and was seeking “medical” help.

Co

N n o i v g em n i 26th m Annual

! of Only 8 weeks away!

NEW for 2015

Picks from all 29 Counties in Utah & The Best of State Street

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WEIRD

Bright Ideas A Chinese woman identified only as Zeng was detained and stabilized at Beijing Capital International Airport in August after being found dazed on the floor at a boarding gate. She had attempted to fly with a bottle of expensive cognac (Remy Martin XO Excellence) in her carryon—a violation of Chinese regulations barring liquids over 100 ml (the cognac was 700 ml, selling for about $200 in the United States) and was presented with the ultimatum to give up the bottle or miss the flight. She drank the contents on the spot (but was subsequently declared too drunk to board).

GRAND OPENING SEPTEMBER 10TH!

Fla.), greeted Broward County judge John “Jay” Hurley at his bail hearing by inquiring, “How you doin’, asshole?” Unfazed, Hurley responded, “I’m doing fine. How are you, sir?” After listening to Riffle on religion a bit longer, Hurley set bond at $100. In August, talking to Judge Hurley from jail via closed circuit TV, arrestee Susan Surrette, 54, “flashed” him as she tried to prove an alleged recent assault. The self-described “escort” and “porn star” (“Kayla Kupcakes”) had lifted her shirt to reveal bruises. (Her bond, also, was $100.)

ber

16 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

Pope Mania Muslim clerics complain of the commercialization of the holy city of Mecca during the annual Hajj pilgrimages, but for Pope Francis’ visits to New York, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia in mid-September, shameless street vendors and entrepreneurs already appear to be eclipsing Mecca’s experience. Merchants said they’d be selling tacky items such as mozzarella cheese statuettes of the pope ($20), a “pope toaster” to burnish Francis’ image on bread, a Philly-themed bobblehead associating the pope with the movie boxer Rocky, local beers Papal Pleasure and YOPO (You Only Pope Once) and T-shirts (“Yo Pontiff!” and “The Pope Is My Homeboy”). The Wall Street Journal quoted a Philadelphia archdiocese spokesman saying, “You kind of have to take it in stride.”

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Reader Quiz

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ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 9.10

Utah Symphony: Beethoven Symphony Festival

Salt Lake Greek Festival

Toni Youngblood & Cordell Taylor After opening its doors in May, Howa Gallery is now hosting its first bona fide exhibition since then, showcasing the works of painter Toni Youngblood and sculptor Cordell Taylor. Youngblood’s abstract-expressionist works are informed by her early Bay Area studies of grisaille, a process of applying paint in layers in multiple steps. At the same time, the dramatic gestures in her brushstrokes suggest a dynamism and motion, and in “Bass Player,” the title even lends an interpretative direction toward music. Indeed, the Atlanta-born artist’s saxophone playing influences her work. This series includes encaustics, a process combining colored pigments and beeswax that has been heated; the volatile nature of the materials also affects the compositions. The industrial heft of Taylor’s sculptures reflects his background: He worked in oil fields and originally studied engineering before turning to art, earning a BFA at the University of Utah in 1992. He has exhibited with the National Sculpture Society in New York, and a number of his pieces can be seen in public locations around Salt Lake City. In works like “#90” (pictured), the impact of modernist design of the 1950s and ’60s can be seen in the geometric shapes and clean, polished metal surfaces. The two artists share a moment of influence, a distinctive dimension in American art. (Brian Staker) Toni Youngblood & Cordell Taylor @ Howa Gallery, 390 N. 500 West, Bountiful, 801-232-5710, Sept. 11-Oct. 3, artist reception Sept. 11, 6-9 p.m. Facebook.com/HowaGallery

| CITY WEEKLY | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 17

In the early 1900s, mining and railroad ventures in the Intermountain West began attracting Greek immigrants to Salt Lake City. As the Greek community began to establish itself in Utah, its vibrant culture, art, music and food became an integral part of Salt Lake City’s downtown cultural scene. The Salt Lake Greek Festival is a celebration of Utah’s Greek communities, and the ancestors who immigrated here more than 100 years ago. Evolving from a small, one-day bazaar that began in the mid-1930s, the Salt Lake Greek Festival has expanded into a three-day event that attracts thousands of visitors to downtown’s Holy Trinity Cathedral. Festival attendees can enjoy a variety of entertainment steeped in Greek culture. Upon arrival, it’s best to make a beeline for the food pavilions. This is where the bulk of the crowd can be found, awaiting savory, meat-stuffed dolmathes or rich, béchamel-topped pastitsio or authentic, overstuffed gyros. In addition to the vast menu of Greek delicacies, the festival is packed with multiple performances that capture the ancient Hellenic traditions of music and folk dancing. For those wanting to take a bit of the action home with them, the Greek market is also open for business during the festival. It’s a great place to pick up some handmade souvenirs or at least some baklava to munch on for the road. (Alex Springer) Salt Lake Greek Festival @ Holy Trinity Cathedral, 279 S. 300 West, Sept. 11-12, 11 a.m.-11 p.m, Sept. 13, 11 a.m.-8 p.m., $3. SaltLakeGreekFestival.com.

FRIDAY 9.11

It took Beethoven a lifetime to write nine symphonies, and you can hear eight of them performed live during an upcoming nine-day stretch over the next two weekends. The Utah Symphony kicks off its 2015-16 season with the Beethoven Symphony Festival, which finds the orchestra performing two different symphonies per night over a four-concert series. It’s a schedule so packed with back-to-backs, it would make even Utah Jazz players wince. The Festival begins Sept. 11, with the performance of Symphony No. 4, followed by the most famous opening phrase in music, with Symphony No. 5’s: “Da-da-da-dum!” The weekend continues with a Saturday concert featuring Symphony No. 8 (Beethoven’s shortest and fastest-paced) and Symphony No. 6. The second weekend (Sept. 18-19) starts with a Friday night concert and Symphony No. 1, which was the composer’s Vienna-music-scene debut in 1800, and Symphony No. 3. on Saturday night the performance will feature Symphony No. 2 and Symphony No. 7, which Beethoven reportedly conducted with such animation at the premiere that he, at times, jumped in the air. What about Symphony No. 9 and the famed “Ode to Joy,” you ask? That special piece gets a weekend of its own, complete with chorale, with holiday performances scheduled for Dec. 4-5. (Geoff Griffin) Utah Symphony: Beethovern Symphony Festival @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. Temple, 801-355-2787, Friday, Sept. 11: Nos. 4 & 5; Sept. 12: Nos. 8 & 6; Sept. 18: Nos. 1 & 3; Sept. 19: Nos. 2 & 7; all performances 7:30 p.m., $10-$63. UtahSymphony.org

FRIDAY 9.11

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Hosted by Dixie State University, this Southern Utah film festival celebrates its sixth anniversary in 2015. It was started by DSU film program director Phil Tuckett in 2010 and focuses exclusively on documentary films, making it one of a relatively small number of such festivals in the Americas—and the only one in Utah. As with most film festivals, it has had growing pains, but in the process, more than 1,100 films have been submitted from over 70 countries. In addition to screenings, DocUtah features filmmaker seminars and panel discussions. This year’s program lists more than 75 films, divided into categories such as music, environment and art. Subjects include the life of screen actor Tab Hunter, the art of glass blowing and the history of psychedelic drugs. The festival has achieved some notoriety this year for its plan to screen the film Prophet’s Prey (pictured), about polygamist Warren Jeffs and the abuses of his Fundmantalist Church ofJesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints sect. DocUtah has found a niche in the growing world of documentary-film festivals, doing its part to help chronicle the way the genre has exploded in recent years. Its tagline—”Come for the films, stay for the scenery”—proclaims the uniqueness of this event in its spectacular surroundings. But the event also aims to “inspire a global connection,” and these examples of the filmmaker’s art are making strides to do just that. (Brian Staker) DocUtah @ Dixie State University, 225 S. University Ave., St. George, Sept. 8-12. For full schedule, visit DocUtah.com

FRIDAY 9.11

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

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DocUtah

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS SEPT. 10-16, 2015


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18 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

A&E The State of Geek TV

Nerdy entertainment flourishes in a changing landscape for series programming. BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

W

ith autumn upon us, that means it’s traditionally the start of the fall television season. Thanks to the power of nerds, more shows than ever have a geek bent, with more still to come. Over the next few months, we’ll be getting new shows like The Shannara Chronicles from MTV and Jon Favreau, we’ll have another Marvel Netflix series in Jessica Jones, and CBS is launching Supergirl. Not too long ago, that would have felt like over-saturation for geeks in the TV medium, yet we still have continuing shows such as Star Wars Rebels, Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead, Arrow, Gotham, The Flash, Agent Carter and many more. There are even some that have nothing to do with existing properties, like Orphan Black and Mr. Robot. There are spinoffs galore coming from many of these shows, too, like Legends of Tomorrow, Fear the Walking Dead, and maybe more shows spawning from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. And we’re also going back to the well of the written word, with shows like The Man in High Castle, based on a book by Philip K. Dick, and Westworld, based on the work of Michael Crichton. It’s a smorgasbord of nerdy entertainment. But, like most entertainment, only a small portion of it is fantastic—and a small portion of it is so bad, I have no idea whether it’s still airing (we’re looking at you, Once Upon a Time). The majority of it, though, is merely OK. And producing shows that are merely OK isn’t a sustainable business model. I wrote a while ago about how Marvel and Netflix teamed to make Daredevil one of the best shows on TV, period, geek themes not even entering into it [“The Devil You Say,” Big Shiny Robot, July 23, 2015, City Weekly]. And yes, I understand Netflix isn’t exactly TV, but the point stands. Star Wars Rebels is another show that is getting it right. Game of Thrones

big SHINY ROBOT

is another. Doctor Who, usually, is too. The most important thing these shows are doing to raise the bar is making them feel meaningful. For too long, television shows felt disposable, because they were. You’d catch an episode once, then maybe a second time in reruns, and you’d never think of it again. In a day and age where shows are binge-watched one episode after another, available on demand in perpetuity, that means that these shows have to do a lot more than they used to. And I would say there’s an even larger responsibility in shows geared toward geeks, because we are one of the most exacting and discerning audiences in history. But shows that feel meaningful are the ones that capture my attention the longest, and will capture the attention of audiences for years to come. There are consequences for every character on Game of Thrones, and I feel that when that show is over, we’ll all feel as though we’ve experienced something. Star Wars Rebels has replicated the feeling that the fate of an entire galaxy is at stake— and we already know where the events lead. With Doctor Who, the fate of the galaxy hangs in the balance in every episode and is starting to arc over entire seasons. These shows don’t feel disposable. And shows need to adapt better to changing consumption habits. Doctor Who was great as a monster-of-the-week show when we consumed TV on a set schedule every week. But in an age where we might watch an entire season in a week, there needs to be more at stake in the overall picture. Doctor Who took a long time to find that balance. Maybe it’s still finding that balance— but at least, it’s trying. A lot of the shows aimed at us geeks are finding the wrong balance. They’re dangling precariously between disposable and meaningful. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D bounces back and forth between those poles constantly. TV producers and directors are trying to figure out what works in this changing television climate, and I’m glad that they’re setting their sights on properties I love. I just hope they don’t ruin too many of them before they learn to navigate this seismic shift. Or survive the zombie apocalypse. Whichever comes first. CW Bryan Young is the editor-in-chief of BigShinyRobot.com

Doctor Who


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

MONDAY 9.14 Dave Chappelle

Given that Dave Chappelle’s career as an actor and comedian spans more than half of his 42 years, it’s ironic that he might still be best-remembered for something he didn’t do—namely, finish season 3 of his popular Comedy Central sketch-comedy program Chappelle’s Show in 2005. The assumption was that Chappelle must be dealing with substance-abuse or mental-health issues—not that a successful, talented comedic performer might have the nerve to decide when enough was enough. But over the course of the subsequent decade, Chappelle has continued to go exactly where his creative spirit moves him, and nowhere else. If that means a performance documentary like Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, so be it; if it means setting a stand-up set endurance record with a six-hour performance, he’ll do it. There’s nothing safe about the way Dave Chappelle approaches his comedy or his career—and being in the audience means never being entirely sure what’s coming next. (Scott Renshaw) Dave Chappelle @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Sept. 14, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $56. ArtTix.org

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Amadeus Utah Repertory Theater Co., Sorensen Unity Center, 138 S. 900 West, Sept. 11-26, FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 20, 3 p.m., UtahRep.org Blackberry Winter Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Sept. 16-Oct. 25, SaltLakeActingCompany.org The Diary of Anne Franks Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, MondaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 3 p.m.; through Sept. 26, HaleTheater.org Drowsy Chaperone Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 7200 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, Sept. 11-Oct. 3, Monday, Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., EmpressTheatre.com Electra 45th annual Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Various Utah venues, 801-832-2458, through Sept. 27; Daybreak performances, Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, Sept. 26-27, 9 a.m., WestminsterCollege.edu/greek_theatre Fiddler on the Roof Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington, 435-251-8000, TuesdaySaturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; through Sept. 12, BrighamsPlayhouse.com Forever Plaid The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, Thursday-Saturday 7:30 p.m., Saturday matinees 2 p.m., through Sept. 19, The-Grand.org Jurassic Park City Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 12, TheOBT.org Oklahoma! Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 12:30 p.m. & 4 p.m.; through Oct. 3, HCT.org Seussical Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-393-0070, Mondays, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 14, TerracePlayhouse.com Shrek the Musical Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry, 435-723-8392, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Saturday matinees 2 p.m., through Sept. 12, HeritageTheatreUtah.com Star Wards: These Are Not The Elders You’re Looking For Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State,

Murray, 801-266-2600, Monday, WednesdayThursday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 9:30 p.m., Saturday, 2:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m., through Nov. 27, DesertStar.biz Tuacahn: Disney’s Beauty and the Beast; Disney’s When You Wish; Sister Act Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 15, Tuacahn.org Utah Shakespeare Festival: Charley’s Aunt, Dracula, The Two Gentlemen of Verona 351 W. Center Street, Cedar City, 800-752-9849, through Oct. 31, Bard.org West Side Story St. George Musical Theater, 212 N. Main, St. George, 435-628-8755, Monday, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 18, SGMusicalTheater.com Wit Wasatch Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Sept. 10-26, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m., ArtTix.org

CLASSICAL &0 SYMPHONY

Beethoven Symphony Festival: Nos. 4 & 5 Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-533-6683, Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org (see p. 17) Beethoven Symphony Festival: Nos. 8 & 6 Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-533-6683, Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org (see p. 17) 22nd annual Eccles Organ Festival The Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, Sept. 13, 8 p.m., UTCOTM.org Suzuki Association of Utah 150-Harp Celebration Concert Salt Lake City LDS Tabernacle, 50 W. North Temple, 801-570-0080, Sept. 12, 4-5 p.m., SuzukiMusicUtah.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Andy Gold’s Big Wet Podcast Wiseguys Comedy, 2194 W. 3500 South, 801-463-2909, Sept. 13, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Dave Chappelle Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Sept. 14, 7 & 9:30 p.m., ArtTix.org (see above) Guy Siedel Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, 801-463-2909, Sept. 10, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Jay Whittaker Wiseguys Comedy Club, 269 25th Street, Ogden, 801-622-5588, Sept. 11-12, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Roy Zimmerman First Unitarian Church, 569 S. 1300 East, Sept. 13, 7 p.m., RoyZimmerman.com


moreESSENTIALS Tom Arnold Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, Sept. 11-12, 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m.,

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Frank L. Cole: The Afterlife Academy Barnes & Noble, 7157 Plaza Center Dr., 801-282-1324, Sept. 10, 6:30 p.m., BarnesAndNoble.com Katha Pollitt: Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., SLCPL.org/thenation Tim Sullivan: Ways to the West The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Carol Lynch Williams: Never Said The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 12, 2 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Katie Mullaly: Land of OR Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Sept. 12, 2 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com David Bigler & Will Bagley: Confessions of a Revisionist Historian Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-521-3819, Sept. 16, 7 p.m., KenSandersBooks.com Jamie Robyn Wood: Bearskin The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 11, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

FARMERS MARKETS

Avenues Street Fair Avenues Salt Lake City, 3rd Ave between O & T Streets, Saturday, Sept. 12, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., SLC-Avenues.org Brigham City Peach Days Brigham City Downtown, Various venues, Sept. 9-12, BCAreaChamber.com CruiserFest Miller Motorsports Park, 2901 Sheep Lane, Tooele, Sept. 11-13, CruiserFest.com Lantern Fest Bonneville Seabase, 1600 N. State Road 138, Grantsville, Sept. 11-12, 8 p.m., TheLanternFest.com Oktoberfest Snowbird Resord, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, 801-933-2222, Saturday & Sunday, noon-6:30 p.m., through Oct. 11, Snowbird.com Pagan Pride Festival Murray City Park, 5175 S. Parkside Drive, Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., SaltLakePPD.org Salt Lake City Greek Festival Holy Trinity Cathedral, 279 S. 300 West, Sept. 11-12, 11 a.m.-11 p.m, Sept. 13, 11 a.m.-8 p.m., SaltLakeGreekFestival.com (see p. 17) Tomato Sandwich Party Wasatch Community Gardens, Grateful Tomato Garden, 600 E. 800 South, Sept. 12, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., WasatchGardens.org Utah Brazilian Festival Gateway Mall, 18 N. Rio Grande St., Sept. 12, 1-7 p.m., UtahBrazilianFestival.com Utah State Fair Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 801-538-8400, Sept. 10-20, UtahStateFair.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Teen Exhibit Art Access Gallery II, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Sept. 11, AccessArt.org Partners Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Sept. 11 AccessArt.org Alla Prima: Acrylic Paintings by Jennifer Seeley Main Library Level 2 Canteena, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 20, SLCPL.org Andrew Fillmore: Proof Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Suite 700, through Sept. 13, MestizoArts.org Aundrea Frahm: We Revolve Ceaseless

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South,Saturday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tuesday, 4-9 p.m.; through Oct. 24, SLCFarmersMarket.org Provo Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 500 W. Center St., Provo, Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 31, ProvoFarmersMarket.org 9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 25, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Park Silly Sunday Market Historic Main Street, Park City, Sunday, 10 a.m., through Sept. 20, 435-655-0994, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Wheeler Farm Farmers Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-792-1419, Sunday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 25, WheelerFarm.com

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

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22 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

Utah’s Got Dance!

THE BEST DANCE SPECTACULAR IN UTAH! SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH AT 8PM (New date, rescheduled from Sept. 12)

Draper Amphitheater will play host to the best and most unique dance show in the State! With dance performers from most every college and university in the state along with some top dance companies and high schools, this is the dance spectacular not to be missed. It will be fast paced with lots of performances with a wide variety from contemporary to hip-hop, modern-jazz, ballet-clogging and everything in between. A jam packed show of group after group. Just look at a few scheduled to perform! University of Utah Hip-Hop (Rhythm) SUU Hip-Hop/Belly Dance Snow College BYU Dixie State Drill Team Jesse Sykes-Popper High Definition Cloggers Underground - Contemporary Juan Diego High School Corner Canyon High School Brotherson Elite Utah Artist Ballet ...And More *Performance groups subject to change. *See webpage for full line-up.

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION VISIT

DRAPERAMPHITEATER.COM

moreESSENTIALS Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Oct. 3, UtahMOCA.org Bill Reed: Fine Gold & Stainless Steel Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 12, SLCPL.org Chalk on the Sidewalk: Works by Layne Meacham Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 25, SLCPL.org Channel 801 Meets Mod A Go Go Mod a Go Go, 242 E. South Temple, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., 18 and over, ModaGoGo.com E.A.T. Bike Tour Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Sept. 12, 9 a.m., UtahMOCA.org Flora+Fauna Alice Gallery, 617 S. Temple, 801-236-7555, through Sept. 11, Heritage.utah.gov Hyunmee Lee Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through Sept. 11, PhillipsGallery.com Illustrating Literature: Drawings by Stephanie Peters Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Sept. 20, SLCPL.org Justin Carruth: Depart Broadway Center Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, 385-215-6768, through Oct. 3, CUArtCenter.org Kate Ericson & Mel Ziegler: Grandma’s Cupboard Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Dec. 19, UtahMOCA.org Lizze Määttälä: Uphill/Both Ways Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Nov. 7, UtahMOCA.org Memento: Paintings by Mary Sinner A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through Sept. 11, Monday-Saturday, AGalleryOnline.com Nature’s Beauty: Photography by Brenda Lower Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Sept. 25, SLCPL.org Toni Youngblood & Cordell Taylor Howa Gallery, 390 N. 500 West, Bountiful, Sept. 11-Oct. 3, Facebook.com/HowaGallery (see p. 17) Rebecca Reese Jacoby Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 25, SaltLakeArts.org

9/10 7pm

9/12

MUS

IC

community center

7pm

MUSIC

with them travelin’ birds

9/18

PAINT P-ART-Y

pre register at mobileartparties.com

MUSIC

with Desi & Cody

7pm

9/29 7pm

9/30 6pm $5 at the door

C

MUSI

with Melissa Moss (Local Artist) Nathan Fox (San Diego, CA) Morning Bear (Denver, Co)

1560 East 3300 South 801-410-4696 dittacaffe.com

Ricardo Levins Morales: Joe Hill Art Exhibit Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 E. 200 South, 801-521-3819, Sept. 1-12, KenSandersBooks.com Rob Wees: Dreams Unfolded Salt Lake Library Sprague Branch, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Sept. 18, SLCPL.org Still Life Exhibition Slusser Gallery, 447 E. 100 South, 801-532-1956, through Oct. 9, SlusserGallery.com Sugar House Art Walk Sugarhouse Coffee, 1100 E. 2011 South, through Oct. 9 Aaron Wallis: The Street Bible Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Suite 700, through Oct. 24, MestizoArts.org Roland Lee: Watercolors Visual Art Institute Gallery 2901, 2901 Highland Dr., through Oct. 2; artist reception, Sept. 11, 6-8:30 p.m., VisualArtInstitute.org Amalia Ulman: Stock Images of War Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Oct. 31, UtahMOCA.org Mall No. 2 Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 12, UtahMOCA.org Movement in Film: A loveDANCEmore Exhibit Sweet Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8651, through Oct. 17, SLCPL.org Richard Lance Russell Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 25, SaltLakeArts.org Rodrigo Valenzuela: Prole CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Sept. 12, CUArtCenter.org The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from National Museum Wales Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Dec. 13, UMFA.Utah.edu Toni Youngblood & Cordell Taylor Howa Gallery, 390 N. 500 West, Bountiful, Sept. 11-Oct. 3, Facebook.com/HowaGallery (see p. 17) Utah Watercolor Society Signature Show Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Sept. 13, RedButteGarden.org


CAMPFIRE GRILL

Glamping & Grilling

DINE

Luxury digs & dining at Conestoga Ranch’s Campfire Grill.

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

TED SCHEFFLER

I

The new campfire food: pan-seared fresh Atlantic salmon

-CREEKSIDE PATIOS-BEST BREAKFAST 2008 & 2010-85 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-LIVE MUSIC & WEEKEND BRUNCH“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

801 582-5807 WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 23

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD

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CAMPFIRE GRILL Conestoga Ranch 400 W. 300 North, Garden City 801-688-0449 ConestogaRanch.com

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS,

Serving American DRIVE-INS AND DIVES” Comfort Food Since 1930

with macaroni, but rather with freshmade campanelle in a silky white cheddar, smoked gouda and provolone sauce, garnished with a crisp-fried slice of coppa. It’s glam mac & cheese. The wood-roasted half-chicken I ordered was presented in quarters, stacked on a bed of roasted fingerling potatoes, encircled with zippy Tuscan cherry tomatoes—a real balancing act. While the dish, in general, was quite good, the chicken was slightly overcooked and a little tough in places. Still, priced at a mere $14.95, it’s a dish I’d try a second time. I would never hesitate to return for the Conestoga Steak Frites ($24.95). This was a gorgeous, 1-pound Angus rib-eye steak cooked medium rare with béarnaise sauce and excellent Parmesan-dusted french fries. The steak was so tender and juicy—one of the best pieces of meat I’ve tasted in a long time. Service at Campfire Grill is very friendly, and manager/consultant Michael Krulin roams the dining room making sure everything is perfect and everyone is happy. And how could you not be, ensconced in Bear Lake’s best dining destination. For dessert, it’s a no-brainer to enjoy the raspberry crème brulee. You are eating in the raspberry capital of the universe, after all. The best way to end a day of Conestoga Ranch glamping? Why, making s’mores with new friends at the communal campfire—or toasting marshmallows under the stars at your private one, of course. CW

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

out—plus a lean, but well-chosen, beer and wine selection. The smallish wine list is particularly justified given the seasonal nature of Conestoga Ranch; it’s not a place that can keep a fully stocked, year-round wine cellar. A bottle from the wine list of GSM Hahn red wine ($30), for example, is very versatile, and pairs well with flavors ranging from fireroasted chicken wings or the Conestoga Ranch Burger ($10.95), to pepperoni pizza with soppressata ($11.95) and the Angus rib-eye steak frites. Chef Gustavo Suclla Schiaffino sources his beef from Bear Lake Beef Co., which, I wasn’t familiar with. It produces Wagyu beef that is out of this world in terms of tenderness and flavor. As we settled in for dinner, we were treated to an amuse-bouche of steak tartare with avocado, baby asparagus, crostini, micro greens, sliced radish and perfectly spaced dollops of citrus truffle vinaigrette. What a glamorous beginning to a glamping dinner. I really liked the fire-roasted chicken wings with homemade apple barbecue sauce. But since I was pacing myself, my son Hank inhaled most of them. The sauce was nicely sweet and tangy. The dish presentation, however, left a bit to be desired, especially after the beautiful amuse-bouche that preceded it. The sliced celery and carrots were unadorned and looked like they might have come pre-sliced straight from a bag. By contrast, a plate of pan-seared fresh Atlantic salmon ($17.95) was lovely to look at. The perfectly cooked, medium-rare salmon was plated atop a bed of puréed potatoes, with spears of charred asparagus poking out underneath, gremolata on top of the salmon and a swish of tomato beurre monte—a very clever way to finish the dish. Campfire Grill Mac & Cheese ($9.95) is far from routine. For starters, it’s not made

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

was recently introduced to glamping at Utah’s Conestoga Ranch, just a short jaunt from Bear Lake. If you’re not hip to the term—I wasn’t—“glamping” is glamour camping. The answer to the website’s FAQ “What does my family need to pack for our Conestoga Ranch adventure?” pretty much sums things up: “Pack as though you were staying at a luxury lakeside resort—because you are.” The accommodations at Conestoga Ranch range from luxurious, semipermanent tents (not your typical two-person Coleman affair) to Conestoga wagons that sleep from two to eight people, depending upon the configuration. We had a big tent with four twin beds in one room and a queen bed in the other, plus a toilet, shower, sink, free Wi-Fi, electricity, heaters and such. As my wife said, “This is my kind of camping!” The tents and wagons are perched on a hill with terrific views of Bear Lake and beyond, and I can’t imagine a better base camp from which to enjoy Garden City’s Raspberry Days and the final weeks of summer in and around Bear Lake. I was visiting Conestoga Ranch not only to luxuriate in its top-notch accommodations, but to check out the ranch’s new restaurant, Campfire Grill. The restaurant itself is a large timber-framed, tented space, which opens up in nice weather to let the outdoors in—al fresco dining at its finest. You needn’t be a guest at Conestoga Ranch to dine at Campfire Grill; the public is invited to enjoy lunch and dinner daily, and breakfast on weekends. In addition to indoor and openair tables, there’s counter seating where you can enjoy watching artisan pizzas being cooked in the wood-burning oven. The first surprise I encountered at Campfire Grill was the price list. For such an upscale facility, the menu prices are very fair. Two eggs with bacon or sausage and toast at breakfast is a mere $6.95. Buttermilk pancakes are $5.95 and a toasted English muffin is only $1.50. During lunch, wood-fired pizzas run $9.95 to $12.95, the latter for a prosciutto and arugula pizza with garlic Béchamel and fresh mozzarella. There are salads, a kids menu, soup and appetizers, too. But the Campfire Grill really shines in the evening, when the full dinner menu is available. The pizzas, burgers and salads are still evening options, but the main dishes stand


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24 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Champagne Dreams

Bubbly is the glamour wine for glamorous times. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

D

uring a recent “glamping” excursion to Bear Lake’s Conestoga Ranch (see p. 24), I found myself wishing I’d have brought some Champagne along. After all, nothing says “glamour” while glamour-camping like a beautiful bottle of bubbly. A while back, I was talking with a well-known California winemaker about Champagne. Although she grew up in wine country, she hadn’t really had much experience with sparkling wines, especially Champagne, until being treated to a birthday bottle of Dom Pérignon. “I suddenly got it,” she said about the Dom. “I could really taste the difference between Dom Pérignon and the cheaper Champagnes I’d had before,

and it suddenly made sense. I could understand why someone would pay $100 dollars for a bottle.” I’ve had a similar experience. Until I spent a week in the towns of Reims and Epernay, in the Champagne region of France, most of the Champagne I’d tasted all seemed pretty much the same. But a week’s immersion in bubbles, in a place where the natives drink Champagne for lunch with their croque monsieur sandwiches, resulted in my realization that no two Champagnes taste exactly alike. Although most Champagne is produced via the same method, no two Champagne houses produce wines that taste alike. Each house has its own style and signature. Getting back to my winemaker acquaintance, because her young wine palate hadn’t been clouded yet by dozens or more Champagne experiences, it was easy for her to distinguish between Dom Pérignon and the handful of lesser Champagnes she’d tried. The difference was as clear as an empty bottle of Cristal. The Dom Pérignon tasted to her like it was worth $100. Now, generally speaking, when it comes to wine, I’d rather have five bottles of $40 wine than one bottle that costs $200. And, although I hesitate to try to quantify something as subjective as a wine-tasting experience, it’s usually the case that the $200 bottle doesn’t taste to me five times better

DRINK than the $40 bottle. So perhaps I’ll sacrifice some quality for quantity, since my budget doesn’t afford me to drink $200 wines habitually. But, for me, the exception is Champagne, where I really do think you get what you pay for. Again, for budgetary reasons I happily drink inexpensive Spanish cavas and domestic sparkling wine more often than classy French Champagne. But a $100 bottle of Champagne usually does taste five times better to me than a $20 bottle. That’s because the elite Champagne producers of France have, over the centuries, created Champagne styles that are so consistent, so refined and so dependable, that they’re actually worth what they cost. A bottle of $160 Salon le Mesnil Blanc de Blanc Champagne sent me straight to sparkling-wine heaven, whereas I’ve had plenty of bottles of

still wine in that price range that weren’t particularly exceptional. And, the best bottle of Champagne usually costs a fraction of the best bottle of Burgundy. Sadly, that bottle of Salon that set me back $160 a decade ago now sells in Utah for a whopping $471. Even as much as I love Salon, it’s not worth sacrificing a car payment for! So the next time you’re glamping—or generally looking to juice up the glamour quotient in your life—my advice is to take the plunge: Go out and splurge on the best bottle of Pol Roger, Krug, Bollinger, Heidseick, Salon, Perrier Jouët, Pol Roger, Veuve Clicquot, Pommery, Roederer, Gosset, Deutz, Dom Pérignon or other great Champagnes that you can afford. You’ll get your money’s worth. CW


197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

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last Thursday Monthly

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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Fall Into Wine

Contemporary Japanese Dining L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S

18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

On Thursday, Oct. 8, Boulevard Bistro (1414 S. Foothill Drive) will host a five-course Fall Wine Dinner, including one of my favorite guilty pleasures: Rosa Regale Brachetto. Dinner kicks off at 6:30 p.m. with a cheese and meat plate paired with Albrecht Cremant d’Alsace NV, followed by a rootvegetable salad with sweet-basil vinaigrette and shaved Pecorino plus Archery Summit Vireton Pinot Gris 2013. A soup course of creamy pumpkin- and butternut-squash soup with balsamic glaze and toasted pepitas is paired with Rosenblum Viognier 2012. The main course is a choice of apple and apricot-stuffed Cornish game hen with sweet corn puree, fig-blackberry compote, and butternut squash mash or pecan-crusted halibut with roasted tomato and garlic wild rice, plus blueberry chutney, paired with Chamisal Stainless Pinot Noir 2013. For dessert, there’s huckleberry mousse in an almond Florentine basket with fresh berries and mint. Alongside will be the luscious Rosa Regale Brachetto 2014. The cost for the Boulevard Bistro Fall Wine Dinner is $85 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Make reservations at BoulevardBistroFoothill.com, or call 801-953-1270.

Our bitters selection is

growing Get mixin’ with our

extensive selection of bitters & cocktail mixers

Farewell, Faustina

Faustina restaurant has permanently closed, according to owner Joel LaSalle. I’ll miss Faustina, but the glass is halffull with the announcement that Mikel Trapp (Trio Restaurant Group) and LaSalle (LaSalle Restaurant Group) are creating a new concept for the Faustina space. They partnered to bring us Current Fish & Oyster and Under Current, so expectations are high. “As beloved as Faustina was to our dining guests, frankly, we were at capacity, and the restaurant was 10 years old,” said Joel LaSalle, co-owner. “We are so excited to literally push out the walls and offer an entirely new Italian bistro dining experience in a few months. We’ve been working closely with Salt Lake City, the Downtown Alliance and the mayor’s office to make sure this fits the urban contemporary feel of the city and fits the needs of the residents.” Former Faustina chef Logan Crew will remain at the helm in the new kitchen cooking “simple and contemporary Italian cuisine.” Quote of the week: Eternity: two people and a ham. —Dorothy Parker Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

caputosdeli.com


GOODEATS Spice up your life! Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves!

TACO TUESDAY & THURSDAY

ALL YOU CAN EAT CARNE ASADA & CARNITAS

$9.99

The Bridge

This laid-back restaurant serves breakfast all day, plus lunch and dinner, all with a Brazilian flair. A full bar is available offering local beer, wine and liquor, plus exotic virgin beverages like imported Guarana Antarctica, a spicy soda with a berry taste. If the weather cooperates, take your taste of Brazil outside to the deck, which overlooks Main Street. 825 Main, Suite 201, Park City, 435-658-5451, TheBridgeCafeAndGrill.com

The Italian Place

Red Iguana

2014 Dinnerthurs sat

Big Daddy’s Pizza

sep 19th

ROBERT BLAND

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Come visit us on Sundays at Wheeler Farm Farmers Market

Dutch, German & Scandinavian Delicatessen

2096 Highland Drive | 801-467-5052 | olddutchstore.com Open Monday - Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 9am-5pm, Closed Sunday

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La Sage Bistro

La Sage Bistro is a pleasant, brightly lit Midvale cafe where everyone is treated like family. Enjoy the signature La Sage Club with ham, turkey, cheddar, tomatoes and Swiss cheese on sourdough bread, or the lighter chicken-salad croissant sandwich. A freshly baked cupcake makes a mighty fine dessert. Call for reservations on Fridays or just drop by for breakfast or lunch any other weekday, as La Sage is closed on the weekends. 6831 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-943-7243, LaSageBistro.webs.com

13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

Serving Breakfast, Soups, Salads & Sandwiches. M-F: 8am - 5pm

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MICHELLE CHISHOLM COUNTRY/POP

r u o Y l Fue Day!

sep 12th

At Big Daddy’s Pizza, you’ll find a wide variety of specialty pizza with both traditional and more exotic toppings, from mushrooms to banana peppers and artichoke hearts. Vegetarian options are available, too. Best of all, Big Daddy’s delivers all night long, 365 nights per year. The pizzerias also feature quick “grab and go” pizzas that are already cooked and ready to pick up. Multiple locations, BigDaddysPizza.com

3600 S. State St. | 801.263.7707 | miranchitogrill2.com

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Deli Done Right

When Ramon and Maria Cardenas started out in the restaurant business more than 40 years ago, they couldn’t have possibly envisioned the wild success of Red Iguana. A perennial people’s favorite, Red Iguana has had a lock on City Weekly’s Best of Utah Mexican category for what seems like an eternity. That’s because the Cardenas family dishes up delicious Mexican and Southwestern cuisine in a funky, fun, boisterous and colorful setting. For authentic Mexican fare, turn to dishes like Red Iguana’s signature cochinita pibil, papadzules, chilaquiles and puntas de filete a la Norteña. And the mole dishes will have you thinking you’re in Oaxaca. 736 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City, 801- 322-1489; 866 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-214-6050, RedIguana.com

ALL DAY - EVERYDAY

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The Italian Place has been building steak & cheese sandwiches for more than 30 years in Provo and Orem. The first Italian Place opened in 1972 and has been serving cheesesteaks to faithful customers ever since. Sandwiches come in half, full and monster sizes, but there are also salads, including the “everything steak” salad. Cookies and cheesecake round out the dessert menu. 1086 S. State, Orem, 801-224-6317; 569 N. State, Lindon, 801-796-5622, TheItalianPlaceUtah.com

$2 MARGARITAS


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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves! Dairy Keen

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voted best coffee house

Dairy Keen—”Home of the Train”—has been a landmark in the beautiful Heber Valley since 1946. This family-run enterprise serves terrific old-fashioned hamburgers, for which it is justly famous, along with a selection of salads, chicken dishes, sandwiches and seafood items. Just as big an attraction are the award-winning milkshakes, which seem to come in every flavor under the Utah sun, including gummi bear and burnt-almond fudge. The sundaes and root-beer floats are also awesome. 199 S. Main, Heber, 435-654-5336, DairyKeen.com

Eddie McStiff’s

With live music and a full bar, Eddie McStiff’s offers more than just great meals. Here, classic American dishes get extra flair from Mediterranean and Cuban touches, plus an extensive variety of housemade sauces—the miso sauce is so beloved that bottles are available to purchase. The restaurant has multiple levels: For a quick bite, have a seat in The Attack, or, for a long, social meal, head to the lovely Garden Room. 57 S. Main, Moab, 435-259-2337, EddieMcstiffs.com

Chinese Beer Wine

Rawtopia

Sake Dim Sum WWW.HOTDYNASTY.COM 3390 S. STATE ST. 801-712-5332

This is Utah’s one-of-a-kind living-food bar, with unprocessed organic dishes, including a curried seaweed roll and broccoli soup. Beautiful plate presentations, healthy dishes and a peaceful atmosphere are the restaurant’s lure. Owner Omar Abou-Ismail swears by the health benefits of raw food. A vegetable purist, gardener and forager, he harvests most of the restaurant’s herbs and spices himself. It all culminates in fine cuisine such as raw pasta made from zucchini piled with greens, sprouts and handchopped vegetables, then topped with a sun-dried tomato sauce and a puréed macadamia-nut & Irishmoss Alfredo-style sauce. And, for dessert, caramelchocolate pie. 2148 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-486-0332, OmarsRawtopia.com

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Food You Will

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ou know it when you see it—art, that is. The world is full of books, movies, visual art, plays, dances and more, and much of that work will exist forever in a way that never touches you. But then, every once in a while, you have an experience that reminds you why art matters. The painting that takes your breath away. The theatrical performance that moves you to tears. The comedian who changes the way you think about something by making you laugh at it. The novel you can’t put down. City Weekly’s 2015 Best of Utah Arts (formerly known as “The Artys”) issue is our chance to thank the creative people in our state for bringing us those revelatory moments. Our readers weighed in with their choices of the best creative work from the past year, and our staff and freelance contributors added some of their personal favorites. And it’s all part of understanding that our experience of living in this place is enhanced by beautiful, thought-provoking acts of creation. We want to honor those responsible for those acts of creation, and perhaps inspire creators to even greater work going forward. We also want to remind readers of the many opportunities they can have throughout a year to attend these performances, read these books, visit these galleries—and have those special moments. Because maybe it’s not so much that you know art when you see it. You know art when you feel it. —Scott Renshaw Arts & Entertainment editor

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BEST THEATER PRODUCTION Mama (Plan-B Theatre Co.) BEST ORIGINAL PLAY Mama, by Carleton Bluford (Plan-B Theatre Co.) Carleton Bluford’s debut full-length play Mama was one of those resonant nights at the theater, all too rare, that stick in the mind months and even years afterward. The script was a marvelously intricate text: straightforwardly meta-theatrical, affectingly clever, thoroughly embracing its central contradiction of being a deeply personal text woven together from others’ stories. That it was the author’s first is simply astonishing. Equally astonishing is the manner in which Plan-B staged it: stark, precise, a framework to highlight the text and the cast’s (excellent) performance of it. Jerry Rapier’s direction revels in the elegant form of function, artful exactly in its ability to cede the stage to the play. Mama is worth all this praise and more, and Bluford’s follow-ups are eagerly awaited. PlanBTheatre.org

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BEST THEATER PERFORMANCE Latoya Rhodes, The Color Purple (Wasatch Theatre Co.) If one actor defined the 2014-15 season in Salt Lake City, it was Latoya Rhodes. She wasn’t in every show, but at times it seemed that way. And to be clear, this is in no way a complaint—indeed, quite the contrary. A versatile performer, Rhodes turned up in everything from Mama to The Music Man, but the highlight of her season was unquestionably her starring role in The Color Purple. A demanding role in its own right, there’s also the precedent of the film and the novel to reckon with. Rhodes’ performance was a great achievement in technique, with verve. WasatchTheatre.org

BEST TOURING PRODUCTION The Book of Mormon (Broadway Across America-Utah) It may have been the most foregone conclusion in any category this year—but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t deserved. The long-awaited arrival of the satirical Broadway smash—about Mormon missionaries in Africa fighting against cultural barriers and their own doubts—allowed plenty of cathartic opportunities to chuckle at the peculiarities of Mormon beliefs. But the play is also a surprisingly effective celebration of the power of mythic stories to give people hope. And plenty of locals are now hoping that Elder Price, Elder Cunningham and company will be returning soon. SaltLakeCity.Broadway.com BEST MULTIMEDIA PERFORMANCE WTF! (SB Dance) The “SB” in SB Dance, of course, refers to the dance company’s founder/director Stephen Brown. The ever-creative Brown employs the initials for various iterations of the group’s name. Currently, on SB Dance’s website, SB stands for “Sweet Beast” Dance Circus. SB is playful like that, known for employing multimedia effects in any given performance to create a multi-dimensional effect. Even its annual WTF! fundraiser is a multimedia affair,

PHOTO COURTESY PLAN-B THEATRE

Reader

Mama (Plan-B Theatre Co.)

incorporating dance, music and video into an effervescent showcase that includes multifaceted fun: wine, theater and food (hence, WTF). SBDance.com BEST DANCE PRODUCTION Almost Tango (Ballet West) Nicolo Fonte, Ballet West resident choreographer, created a masterpiece with Almost Tango, a piece originally choreographed for the Pacific Northwest Ballet in 2002 but which made its Ballet West debut in spring 2015. Almost Tango has the precision and technique of the best ballet, the seething sensuality of the most passionate tango and the experimental composition of modern dance. In all of the above aspects, it succeeds. An especially courageous touch was the addition of dancers obscured by a screen and elevated above the stage. It could have detracted from the movement on stage but instead added intensity and depth to the work. BalletWest.org BEST CLASSICAL/OPERA PERFORMANCE OR PRODUCTION The Pearl Fishers (Utah Opera) Utah Opera’s canny ability to match the eye with the ear on its productions was once more confirmed by the delights on display during its performance of George Bizet’s challenging tale of a romantic tangle between two best friends over a priestess they both love, Pearl Fishers. Martin Lopez’s gorgeous costume designs perfectly showcased bravura performances by Craig Irvin and Derrick Parker as the best friends, and soprano Andrea Carroll as their love interest. Despite the libretto’s at times lumpen implausibility, this UO production was yet another feather in the cap of a company that seems to rarely, if ever, miss. UtahOpera.org


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RirieWoodbury

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BEST INDIVIDUAL DANCER Bashaun Williams One of the highlights of Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.’s ensemble, Bashaun Williams brings his own majesty to the stage with every performance. A University of Utah graduate who spent time in both the ballet department and the U’s resident dance company, Williams joined up with RWDC nearly five years ago as one of three men currently performing with the company. The elegance, grace and determination he brings to the stage shines through every performance along with an innate passion for every role he’s given—a true standout in Utah dance. RirieWoodbury.com

BEST CHOREOGRAPHY Charlotte Boye-Christensen, Nowhere, (NOW-ID) The most impressive element of the work by Salt Lake City performance company NOW-ID, founded and directed by Charlotte Boye-Christensen and Nathan Webster, is the company’s scope of artistic vision. This summer, NOW-ID presented Nowhere, a sitespecific performance set at Libby Gardner Hall. No other work of art in Salt Lake City brought together as many artists and disciplines as this performance. Based around movement choreography by BoyeChristensen, Nowhere included works of original music, light design, film, performance art and an onsite sound installation. NOW-ID.com

BEST STANDUP COMEDIAN Natashia Mower Not one to shy away from the unspeakable taboos or the socially awkward topics of today, Natashia Mower has become an unabashed force on the microphone. With four years of local gigs under her belt, Mower has risen from being an alternative comedy player to local indie figurehead. She has done so by embracing her own personal experiences and offbeat observations, pushing herself beyond her boundaries to find an enthusiastic audience looking for something both funny and chill. Twitter.com/Tashiamo BEST IMPROV TROUPE ImprovBroadway Provo/Orem collective ImprovBroadway are a triple threat, adding a musical element to the already tricky comedy-improv mix, making up show tunes and choreography on the fly while still bringing the funny. In addition to being family-friendly, ImprovBroadway also proclaim to be first-datefriendly: “How exciting will it be to tell your future children that you and your spouse suggested ‘Nacho Cheese’ as the title of an improvised musical?” reads the IB blog. ImprovBroadway.com BEST PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION No Fixed Address (The Leonardo) No Fixed Address was one of The Leonardo’s top exhibitions in 2014—perhaps even the top exhibition—not for its vibrating lights, hypnotic colors and catchy themes, but because of its subject, homelessness, which affects us all in Salt Lake City. Curated by Jann Haworth, the gallery’s walls were covered with Lynn Blodgett’s large-scale photo portraits of those who reside in Salt Lake City—neighbors in the city, living everyday lives. In essence, the homeless who call Salt Lake City home are no different than anyone else, each aiming for their best. TheLeonardo.org

paper. The patterns in the collages have a quality of action to them, created by the raw-cut paper and soft colors, creating an ensemble that is playful and easy on the eye, yet applied with sophistication. Phillips-Gallery.com

BEST TOURING EXHIBITION Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art (Utah Museum of Fine Arts) With ever-growing numbers of Latino residents in Utah, this exhibition—hosted by the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, and established by the Smithsonian American Art Museum—could not be more relevant. The exhibition showcased the lives of Hispanics of every national origin, through artist representatives, showing audiences just what it is like to make art as Latino artists, and how Latino art enriches modern American art. UMFA.Utah.edu BEST PAINTING EXHIBITION Rebecca Campbell, Boom (CUAC) It’s been a long time since we’ve seen anything in a local gallery as explosive as former Salt Laker, and bi-coastally represented art star, Rebecca Campbell’s oil paintings show under the title Boom in October 2014 at CUAC. These metaphorically apocalyptic images don’t erupt with a dull roar, but there is a sense of precision and exactitude in her brush strokes that serves to heighten the drama. In Campbell’s works, all the technical flash on elaborate, exuberant display is never for its own sake, but works to illuminate the subject matter. CUArtCenter.org

BEST MIXED MEDIA/SCULPTURE EXHIBITION Liberty Blake Sometimes collage and assemblage artworks found in contemporary galleries are a sculpture on the wall with a stuffed bird and a toy car, or cutouts of maps, newspapers and book pages. Liberty Blake raised the bar on the fine art of collage at her Dibble Gallery show in March 2015. Her subdued yet dynamic collage featured rough cuts of softly toned

BEST PUBLIC ART UMOCA Art Truck Taking to the streets initially in 2008 under the initiative of former director Adam Price at what was then known as the Salt Lake Art Center, the Art Truck has been one of the most successful outreach programs in the history of Utah arts. The truck is a wonderfully educational vehicle, roaming the state and visiting schools, community groups and artistic venues. Utilizing the interior as well as exterior surfaces of the truck as canvases to showcase local and national artists, in the past year, the truck featured Brooklyn, N.Y.-based artist Meridith Pingree, who created geometric compositions to provoke questions about art and how it’s made. UtahMOCA.org

UMOCA

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Detail, “Boom 6” (Rebecca Campbell)


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BEST COMICS/GRAPHIC NOVEL ART Sal Velluto No newcomer, Salt Lake City artist Sal Velluto has been drawing comics since the late ‘80s, bouncing between Marvel, DC and various indie imprints, as well as non-superhero gigs. His vivid, classic illustration style practically leaps off the page, simmering in black and white, or exploding in full color. “Comic books are not to be taken for granted,” Velluto says. “There is so much behind this art form which involves the mathematics of visual perception, the psychology of forms and the mythology of modern urban legends. These are the comics I like to draw.” Velluto.com

BEST SHORT FILM Of One Heart, by Doug Fabrizio, Joseph LeBaron & Travis Pitcher The story has all the elements of a classic tearjerker: Tom Brickey relating the story of his daughter, Mia, and the heart transplant that saved her life. But the VideoWest team took that story— which also includes that of the young boy who became Mia’s donor—and told it with restraint and confidence, finding the humanity without resorting to pathos. The result is a wonderfully heartbreaking character study of a loving father wrestling with the realization that a child had to die so his could live. VideoWest.KUER.org/of-one-heart BEST FICTION BOOK Ink and Ashes, by Valynne E. Maetani A thriller that was also a strong coming-of-age story, Ink and Ashes told the story of Claire, a JapaneseAmerican teenager who begins to discover longburied family secrets about her father, who died years earlier. Maetani proved effective at life-anddeath excitement as Claire’s investigation takes her into dangerous places, while the story incorporates a compelling romantic sub-plot. But the story may have been best at exploring a girl gradually emerging from a cocoon of being protected by her family and friends, and claiming the adulthood that can sometimes mean finding out things about the world that change you forever. Valynne.com

BEST JEWELRY DESIGN Peach Treats With an eye for the elegant, Tif Blue has been crafting out her unique line of earrings for a public buying them faster than she can keep creating them. Each design is carefully made with earth-friendly products, customized to desired stud size, featuring designs that cater to each customer’s whims and needs. Whether that involves some standard loops, ear weights, butterfly wings, tentacles, chains, hooks, flowers or whatever else your heart may desire—Peach Treats will have something fantastic for your ears. Facebook.com/PeachTreats

BEST TATTOO ARTIST CJ Fishburn, Cathedral Tattoo There’s a playfulness and sense of humor in CJ Fishburn’s tattoo art not often seen in deadly-serious ink; his flourishes of cartoon-y goofiness, rendered in painstaking detail, would seem as at-home in a comic strip as they are on the human body. “I learned in a shop where there was no flash and our only references were really fine-art books and comics,” Fishburn told CityWeekly.net’s Gavin Sheehan. “From there, I got to know as much as possible what the old guys were thinking when they made them. That’s why I seek out history so seriously.” CathedralTattoo.com

BEST POETRY COLLECTION Ultimatum from Paradise, by Jacqueline Osherow There’s an almost-casual conversational quality to many of the poems in Jacqueline Osherow’s masterful collection, so at times it’s easy to forget you’re reading verse. But there’s meticulousness beneath the colloquial, in precisely structured works that explore subjects like memory, her Jewish heritage and architecture—from the echoed first and last lines of the stanzas in “A Crown for Yiddish,” to “At Peter Behrens’ House,” where the refrain “he would join the Nazi Party” betrays a struggle with appreciating the artistic creations of someone associated with evil. It’s a language of the soul, spoken as though Osherow were in the room with her reader. LSUPress.org

BEST FASHION DESIGN Sorry Clementine With a keen ability to mix and match, Suzanne Clements, owner of the Sorry Clementine brand, is all about giving women adorable and affordable outfits, all handmade and one of a kind. Every item has been re-purposed and freshly designed to give new life to older pieces of clothing. You’ll also find interesting combinations of materials that others might not think to combine. Her shop may be gone and her Etsy store closed, but you can still find Suzanne touring local markets and festivals, which has helped make looking for her items a veritable treasure hunt. Facebook.com/SorryClementine

CathedralTattoo.com

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BEST NONFICTION BOOK The Year of Living Virtuously (Weekends Off), by Teresa Jordan Author and visual artist Teresa Jordan set to herself a unique task: a year of meditation on virtues such as temperance, moderation, cleanliness, chastity and humility in the form of an online diary, taking the weekends off for a few vices. The result, however, was far from an uptight series of lectures on right living. Instead, the funny, deeply personal essays crafted by Jordan offered insight into the way we think about virtues, and how they manifest themselves in our lives in ways we don’t always expect. TeresaJordan.com

Sorry Clementine

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-Wish & Spin-

905 E 2100 S • 801-485-RING (7464) • www.StroudJewelers.com

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BEST EVOCATION OF HIGH SCHOOL Bare (Utah Repertory Theater Co.) Because who didn’t go to high school in a suffocatingly restrictive, religiously oppressive environment and have a secret, cataclysmic gay affair? Utah Repertory Theater Co.’s high-school musical, Bare, used the very heightened nature of theatre itself to evoke the emotional truths of the adolescent experience. Love at that age always feels like life or death, a terrifying secret that would yield Armageddon if disclosed. And so, this very specific tale of Catholic-school teens and their debauchery becomes universal. UtahRep.org BEST EXHIBITION MOST LIKELY INFLUENCED BY THE GUTENBERG BIBLE David Wolske, Vessels The art of the printed word is not a new one, but artist David Wolske breaks new ground with his studio and printing press, bringing the word to life. Wolske incorporates color and form creatively into letter and word, to not only present an attractive image, but to convey meaning beyond that which is spelled out by the letter and word. He did just this in his solo show at the Art Barn in March, 2015, creating letters, words, styles and colors in sequences that allowed viewers freedom to create their own meanings, both new and original. David-Wolske.com BEST “EDGE”-Y ART Lindsay Frei, The Painted Edge In a decisive break from the still-life photorealistic images she is widely known for, artist Lindsay Frei took on another form of capturing life, with surprising results. At the Gittins Gallery at the University of Utah in September 2014 with her show, The Painted Edge, Frei grappled with the hard and soft “edges” of being a woman and realities that convey hard or soft edges with moments captured in time. Frei explores the reality of beauty in hard edges—such as intensity of emotion—and softer edges, the masking of the self, such as the sublime, or calm control. Beauty is not one thing, says Frei, but many. BEST ART LEAST LIKELY TO BE FOUND AT COSTCO Sarina Villareal (15 Street Gallery) Sarina Villareal did not depart from working with intensive ideas—even when married, surrounded by the kind of art to be found in any luxury home—in her 15th Street Gallery show in AugustSeptember 2014 (note: Villareal’s work currently can also be seen at 15th Street Gallery through Sept. 15). Surprisingly, her work is more about notions

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of memory and temporality than the lush and colorful floral bursts occupying them. Villareal is always scientific in her approach, asking hard questions, searching for truth. Here, she explored a question of memory: Given a span of time, what will be retained, what will be lost and what distinguishes the two? No easy task, but one this gifted artist takes with aplomb. SarinaVillareal. com BEST ROMANTIC CHEMISTRY Aaron Kramer & Derek Gregerson, The Little Dog Laughed (Wasatch Theatre Co.) Wasatch Theatre Co.’s production of The Little Dog Laughed was hampered a bit by the demands of presenting an opulent milieu on a limited budget. But there was nothing lacking in the performances, with a particularly affecting pair at its center: dissolute movie star Mitchell (Aaron Kramer) and prostitute/boyfriend Alex (Derek Gregerson). Kramer and Gregerson played off each other in a way that, while lacking in the smoothness often facilely mistaken for “good” chemistry in acting, was reflective of the awkwardness their characters felt. Real romantic chemistry is rarely smooth, as these actors showed splendidly. BEST SCRIPTED SHOW WITH AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche (Silver Summit Theatre) The title ensemble of 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche not only performed the post-apocalyptic comedy but welcomed the audience to the bunker, as it were. Silver Summit Theatre managed, in no mean achievement, to create one of the most pleasantly unobtrusive systems of audience participation yet seen in the theater, allowing audience members— given badges with the names of auxiliary characters—the chance to choose the degree to which the performers, skilled improvisers all, included them in ad-libbed banter. The easygoing framing of the participation befits such subjects as lesbians and quiche, themselves quite pleasant. SilverSummitTheatre.org

Plan-B Theatre UtahRep.org

Pick BEST ARTISTIC IDENTITY CRISIS Self_Created Identity (Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts) How do we perceive ourselves? How do we fit in? How do we create individuality in a world divided and categorized by cultures, ethnicities, genders, ethnographic and demographic divisions, social and political groups? Such a vast inquiry was the aim of director and curator of Mestizo Gallery Renato Olmedo-González, in Self_Created Identity, which showcases the work of Ali Mitchell, Willard Cron, Alex Moya and Mari Hernández. Ultimately, identity is a myth, said Olmedo-González, and to find true individuality, one must break through such labels, to transcend limitations, boundaries and parameters, to connect with the authentic self. MestizoArts.org ”Sometimes When I Look in the Mirror” (Ali Mitchell)

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BEST CHILDREN’S SHOW A Year With Frog and Toad (Salt Lake Acting Co.) It is an achievement requiring meticulous calibration to create a live performance piece for dozens of young children and not end up with a riot. A salute of great respect must be given to Salt Lake Acting Co.’s production of A Year With Frog and Toad, part of its ongoing commitment to producing an annual family-friendly show. That its clockwork precision and elegant simplicity made for compelling viewing for parents (and critics) may seem like icing on the cake, it is indeed the cake itself. Hook ‘em when they’re young with quality stagecraft, and kids will grow up to love theater. SaltLakeActingCompany.org

BEST PORTRAYAL OF NEW YORK CITY [title of show] (Utah Repertory Theater Co.) Due to infrastructural realities in the theater, and New York City being the nation’s most populous city, a very high percentage of plays are set in New York. But not all of these plays manage to transcend the writing of “Setting: New York City” on the page to the point of actually resembling the place—which may be trivial to people not from there, but natives can get possessive about their home. Thus, a show like [title of show], splendidly enacted by Utah Repertory Theater Co., hits a particularly sweet note. It was a deeply felt work, marvelously rich in texture. UtahRep.org

BEST FAREWELL TO AN ICONIC FACILITY Adams Memorial Shakespearean Theatre (Utah Shakespeare Festival) For more than 50 years, the Utah Shakespeare Festival has been one of the nation’s most impressive showcases of the Bard’s works. For nearly 40 of those years, they’ve been presenting the beloved plays in the Adams Theatre, an outdoor space so 17th-century authentic that even the Royal Shakespeare Co. and the BBC used it as a filming location. A new, more accessible outdoor theater will open next season, allowing one final opportunity to enjoy great drama the way it might have been experienced 400 years ago. Bard.org BEST ALTERNATIVE ROAD TRIP Tim Sullivan, Ways to the West Those of us who live in the sprawling American West have resigned ourselves to our need for individual cars to deal with the way cities have been designed. But does it have to be this way? Tim Sullivan packed a bicycle on a plane bound for Las Vegas, and began a solo, car-free trip through Western population centers—including Denver, Phoenix, Portland and, yes, Salt Lake City—to discover how cities are exploring alternatives for moving their people. And, as often happens when you get out of your car, what he discovers is fascinating—and even encouraging. UPColorado.com/utah-state-university-press/ item/2672-ways-to-the-west BEST SYMPHONIC SALUTE TO SALT LAKERS Utah Symphony at Gallivan Center On a summery evening in June, the Utah Symphony played a free open-air concert at the Gallivan Center, with a program that featured pieces from operas like Rossini’s Overture to The Barber of Seville and Verdi’s Prelude from La Traviata. The main feature of the performance was Beethoven’s bold and triumphant Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92. The central

BEST FANTASY DOUBLE-FEATURE Jessica Day George, Thursdays With the Crown and Silver in the Blood Utah author Jessica Day George has been such a prolific creator of charming fantasies for young readers that it’s easy to take her for granted. But in the last 12 months, she both continued a popular series, and created a brand-new world. Thursdays With the Crown picked up the cliffhanger of her books built around the mysterious Castle Glower; Silver in the Blood introduced a pair of 1890s New York debutantes who discover that they have strange family connections in Romania. That’s a lot of transporting delighted readers for one year. JessicaDayGeorge.com

location downtown, the absence of a generally costly ticket and a shorter running time than average symphonic performances made for a relaxed and joyful evening at the symphony. UtahSymphony.org BEST SHAKESPEARE ON THE FLY Grassroots Shakespeare Co. In an attempt to be as authentic as possible, the members of Grassroots Shakespeare Co. give themselves only a few weeks to choreograph, create the set, engineer the music and rehearse their productions. As a true democracy, the troupe has no set director, and they make everything—even the music—themselves. The simplicity and sparseness of the set and absence of lighting allows the company to travel and perform in outdoor venues, such as farmers markets. Costumes and props are found by the actors, and the audience is often included in the performance. GrassrootsShakespeare.com BEST ROCK & ROLL BALLET Oh Yeah (Municipal Ballet Co. & Holy Water Buffalo) Salt Lake City’s Municipal Ballet Co. partnered with local folk-rock band, Holy Water Buffalo, from Heber City, in an unusual and annual wedding of the arts. A rock ballet was the result (each year, the ballet company chooses a different local band to tour with). Accompanied by live rock music—not the musical accompaniment generally associated with the grace and elegance of ballet—gives the dancers a chance to prove their playfulness and versatility, a point underscored in their choices of venue, from The State Room to Red Butte Garden and Ogden’s Art Fest. Municipal Ballet Co.’s founder and artistic director is Sarah Longoria, who is married to City Weekly staff writer, Colby Frazier. MunicipalBallet.com

BEST PRIMA BALLERINA (RETIRED) Christiana Bennett, Ballet West Like many little girls, Christiana Bennett started dreaming of becoming a ballet dancer at a very young age—2 years old, in fact. Soon after, she started her rigorous training. At 16, she first danced the White Swan pas de deux and, at 18, she signed her first professional dancing contract. This is one ballerina who clearly took to the stage naturally and h a s been celebrated ever since. But retirement is always a ticking time bomb, and the choice to go out on top is much better than to be forced out against the mirrored wall. So, for Bennett, calling it quits by dancing Odette/Odile this past season after a 16-year-long professional career at Ballet West, is just one more dream come true. BalletWest.org

Ballet West

Pick

Salt Lake Acting Co.

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BEST MODEL FOR FAITH-BASED FILMMAKING Once I Was a Beehive For many secular moviegoers, the label “faithbased film” has generally been an indicator of pandering, self-righteous, often paranoid nonsense. How refreshing to find writer/director Maclain Nelson crafting something that works as satisfying storytelling no matter what your own personal beliefs might be. This story of a non-Mormon teenage girl on a Young Women’s campout with her new step-cousin explores grief, doubt and belief with humor, sensitivity and genuine respect for its characters’ varying points of view. Filmmakers who want to do more than get the like-minded to pat themselves on the back could stand to take a few notes. GirlsCampMovie.com


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Pick

BEST COUNTERCULTURE CULTURE Ed “Big Daddy” Roth: Rat Fink! “Big Daddy” Roth was a legend in the California hot-rod scene of the ’60s and ’70s, with his custom-car designs and the grotesque cartoon character Rat Fink he created. He later converted to Mormonism and came to live in Manti, until his death in 2001. He’s been memorialized by the “Rat Fink Reunion,” held annually in Manti and Southern California, and, this year, his art was put on display concurrently at the Granary Art Center in Manti. If you caught a glimpse of the events, with all the memorabilia and even a custom-car parade in Manti, you saw an example of how the counterculture lives on in a cookie-cutter world. GranaryArtCenter.org

BEST ZINE Browser by Korey Daniel Martin Martin’s works go beyond just being meta, and delve into stronger issues that some zine readers may not have expected to be reading about. Which is what makes Browser an interesting read, as you’re forced to examine the world through the eyes of someone who isn’t satisfied with the way things are. What should be disjointed—and possibly a turnoff—is actually quite blissful to read, as Martin’s artwork gives you a simplistic universe with complicated issues. KoreyDanielMartin.Tumblr.com BEST WORK OF SCENIUS Collective Experience, Rio Gallery “Scenius” is the combination of “scene” and “genius” coined by musician/artist/producer/designer Brian Eno to describe the effect of artists working in a collective environment, in which the whole adds up to more artistic inspiration than the sum of its parts in isolation. This “ecology of talent” was celebrated by the Utah Division of Arts & Museums at Rio Gallery with an exhibition curated by Saltgrass Press’ Stephanie Dykes. The collection of local art ranged from painting and prints to mixed media and performance works, and revealed the particular “scenius” of Salt Lake City in the commonalities of themes and approaches. UtahCulturalAlliance.org

BEST PHOTOGRAPHER WITH A CAUSE Chloe Christine Putting a focus on a side of the local community that rarely gets highlighted, Chloe Christine has donated her time and talents to giving members of the LGBT community a place to shine. Her photography has showcased many members of the trans community, bringing out a beauty that many may choose to overlook, but can’t be overshadowed by intolerance. Her daily work as a photographer is exemplary, but her generosity in this particular field is second-tonone. TheChloeChristine.com BEST NOT-SO-EVIL EMPIRE Alpine Garrison It doesn’t matter what your personal feelings about Star Wars might be; there’s something about watching hundreds of Stormtroopers marching to the Emperor’s theme music that will give you goose bumps. For 16 years, the Alpine Garrison has been having its members attend events throughout the state, dressed in every form of official Empire garb from the loneliest Death Star staffer to the highest-grade Royal Guards. But it isn’t just for cosplay or love of the franchise; they do it for the fans and for charities when possible, making the Empire seem not so evil after all. AlpineGarrison.com

BEST POP-UP ART Guerrilla Gallery (Cecilia Anthony) Being both everywhere and nowhere at once, Guerrilla Gallery adopted the idea that a gallery doesn’t need to be a physical place or even feature a selective theme. Every few months, the “gallery” will select a satellite location—maybe an apartment, maybe a parking lot—set up artwork and performances, and give people who are out on Gallery Stroll a one-time-only experience that will never be replicated. In the winter of 2014, they took the concept online with a live video display, showing that even those who aren’t up to walking around in the cold could get a fantastic exhibition right at home. Twitter.com/PopUpArtUtah

BEST ECLECTIC NEW GALLERY Howa Gallery The former vice president of Howa Construction, Thomas Howa, recently turned his sights toward opening an art gallery in Bountiful, where as an artist, he has had a studio for a number of years. His time pursuing his second career as a painter provided him opportunities to network with local artists, and, as such, the gallery’s opening in May 2015 provided a potpourri of local artistic genres and styles, a cross-section of some of the best local art. Set in a strip mall, it’s decidedly more friendly than some venues that keep the viewer at a distance. Facebook.com/HowaGallery

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BEST TEXTING [con]text, Utah Museum of Fine Arts Art incorporating language or text is so often identified with modernism that it’s surprising what an extensive history the use of language in art has had. [con]text at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts illuminated the development of text-based art tied in with the development of language itself, going all the way back to an ancient Egyptian wall relief, then proceeding to the Plexiglass postmodernism of John Cage and the repercussions of digital culture on language. If “the medium is the message,” the fact that these works all came from the university’s permanent collection made the exhibit even more astounding. UMFA.Utah.edu

BEST INDIE FILM FROM A SMART PHONE Pocket Film Festival Utah has cornered the market on film festivals with the biggest ones taking over Park City every year, but filmmakers are also starting to get creative in the way the smaller ones are presented. The Pocket Film Festival challenged filmmakers to create a film of any length using only the video apps available on ordinary smart phones. The results were fantastic, with movies as short as 12 seconds to as long as a full-length movie, which has already pushed organizers into putting on the second festival September 2015. PocketFilmFest.com

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STAFF

BEST REVELATION OF YOUR DIRTY MIND Chris Coy, Real Sex You might say the most provocative imagery exists in the mind’s eye, and in Chris Coy’s exhibition Real Sex at CUAC, his videos, paintings in “chroma key” green paint used for green-screen video, and other works require the viewer to fill in the blanks and see what is hidden: pixilated images and outlines of figures from pornography and other explicit content. The tension between what is seen on the surface and what is perceived in their subtleties reveals an immensity about the nature of looking and the object. SeeCoy.com


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Pick

BEST GEEKY ADORNMENT Obake Style Formed out of the artistic collaboration between married artists Nick Burke and Magen Mitchell, the two have taken their love for anime, monsters, Japanese culture and pure geekdom to make these badass handcrafted and painted jewelry pieces. Everything from necklaces to earrings to pins can be found in their shop, featuring unique designs not found anywhere else—and most of them for a limited time, as their inventory tends to get plundered during conventions. ObakeStyle.com

Obake Style Courtesy

Oni Bodhi Necklace

BEST ONLINE COMIC STRIP Channelate Deep in the dark recesses of Ryan Hudson’s mind rests a universe where people speak their damned minds, and even the most tragic of outcomes has a morbid silver lining. For nearly eight years, Hudson has been animating his personal thoughts, opinions and insane sense of humor on his website, garnering a dedicated fan base and respect from his peers. He’s taught us the valuable life lesson of learning to do a perfect impression of your twin brother. Channelate.com BEST UP-CLOSE-AND-PERSONAL COMEDY SHOW Comedy & Other Opinions Stand-up comedian Jason Harvey has spent the better portion of his career busting his ass on stage and watching others do the same. So, when the chance to host his own show came about, Harvey turned the evening into a chance for audience members to get to know the comedians a little more. After every set (now at Club 50 West in downtown Salt Lake City), Harvey brings up his talented friends one by one to ask them random questions and see how they do on their feet, both testing their comedic skills beyond a pre-planned set and giving the fans something extra they might not see at other shows. Facebook.com/ComedyAndOtherOpinions BEST STYLE SHOWCASE Utah Fashion Week The Salt Lake City fashion scene may be moving at a slower pace these days when it comes to runway shows, but that just gave Provo the opportunity to pick up the slack. The weeklong semi-annual event (formerly Provo Fashion Week), gives Utah County fashion designers, from the established names to those making their way up the designer career ladder, a chance to show off their goods, from casual wear to bridal gowns. The fall gala scheduled for Oct. 17, Provo fashionistas are looking to step up and make themselves known. UtahFashionWeek.com

BEST NEW SPLASH ON MAIN Art 270 Salt Lake City’s Main Street has seen a number of changes over the past few years. One of the brightest additions came in the form of Art 270. The contemporary art gallery features works from some of Utah’s newer names who haven’t been given a gallery experience yet while also providing a space for experienced hands to experiment with their craft, all while capturing audiences who may be passing by on public transit. Art270SLC.com BEST STORYTELLER SHOWCASE The Bee: True Stories From The Hive There’s no better story than the one you’ve never heard, and that very attitude drives The Bee every month, as new presenters join in on the fun. After picking a topic and finding a venue such as The Leonardo or Urban Lounge, the creators select 10 random names from a hat to present their original stories to a crowd that has no idea what to expect. The showcase has become the ultimate in randomexperience art. TheBeeSLC.org BEST QUICK HITS OF ART 12 Minutes Max Borrowing the format from a Portland-based group, 12 Minutes Max selects performers of multiple disciplines—including music, art, dance, theater, film, even puppetry—and gives those participants 12 minutes to do whatever they’d like in front of an audience filling the Salt Lake City Main Library’s auditorium. It’s completely free to the public, and it doesn’t matter whether you like or hate what you just saw; something new will be coming around in just a few moments. SLCPL.org

thanks are in order for the man who has brightened our days not only with his garishly colored T-shirts, but with his award-winning young adult fiction (e.g., The Unseen Saga), political thrillers (e.g., The Brand Demand) and supernatural occult horror/love stories (e.g., Beatrysel). Not everyone can dye with honor, but Worthen pulls it off. JohnnyWorthen.com

BEST NURTURING OF A NEW PLAY Pioneer Theatre Co.’s Alabama Story In spring 2014, PTC reignited its play-reading series, Play-by-Play, and in so doing, brought playwright Kenneth Jones to Salt Lake City for a weeklong residency to work with a professional director and cast. The result was Alabama Story, a play that received a full production at PTC in spring 2015 to rave reviews. Based on a real-life controversy over censorship of a children’s book from 1958, the production merged civil-rights history and personal stories to great effect. For the American theater to remain vital and relevant, new works such as Alabama Story need to be encouraged. PTC’s Play-by-Play program helps foster those new voices. PioneerTheatre.org

BEST SWING DANCING UNDER THE STARS Excellence in the Community’s Gallivan Center dances During summer’s sunset hours, on various Tuesday and Thursday evenings, the outdoor amphitheater at Gallivan Center came alive with swingers—to clarify: nimble souls dancing to the big-band sounds of Evening in Brazil, Wasatch Jazz Project and David Halliday & the Number Ones, to name but a few. Gallivan Center rolled out a magnificent dance floor BEST ILLUSTRATOR Desarae Lee Lee’s illustrations have a dark but romantic side to them, with intricate detail that still feels messy. She’s able to create an entire universe with nothing but a pen, telling stories of circus freaks, trees made from octopus tentacles, a beautiful ghost haunting a theme park in the night, or flightless birds using a hot air balloon to join their brethren. Other mysteries deep within her works are left for the viewer to decipher, but trust us, it is well worth a look. DesaraeLee.com

BEST UNINTENTIONALLY TEMPORARY ART WORK Josh & Heidi Belka’s Joe Hill Mural 2015 marks the 100-year anniversary of the death of labor organizer Joe Hill, who was executed at the Utah State Prison for what some say was a trumped-up murder charge. Two members of the IATSE local 99 stagehand’s union commemorated Hill’s legacy with a mural on an exterior wall of the union hall at 526 W. 800 South. Within days, the mural was replaced with a U.S. flag design by somebody who disagreed with Hill’s radical pro-labor words. The artists believe the vandals were not management stooges, but may have been union members—which, if true, goes to show how far to the right even the labor movement has shifted over the past century. BEST TIE-DYED NOVELIST Johnny Worthen Prolific local multi-genre fiction author Johnny Worthen says, “I was told at my first Grateful Dead show that you wear tie-dye not for yourself, but for your friends. You’re welcome.” So ex post facto

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BEST NEW DINNER & A SHOW Radical Hospitality Theater Stepping beyond your ordinary theater productions, Radical Hospitality adds arts and dining to the mix to provide a comfortable viewing experience. Playing to their name, the company hosts theatrical productions—like A Streetcar Named Desire—or weekly events like Monologue Monday, and stages these performances in nontraditional venues in Murray and Salt Lake City, then adds a meal and surrounding artwork to create a completely different environment than your typical theatrical setting. RadicalHospitalityTheater.com


while rolling in upscale food offerings served by the Food Truck League. Did we mention the evening’s entertainment (and dance lessons) were free? Kudos to Excellence in the Community’s founder Jeff Whiteley for showcasing U t a h ’ s top-drawer artists in a swank setting, providing the ambiance to elevate the arts experience. ExcellenceConcerts.org BEST TAP DANCING RDT Presents … Bill Evans, 75 In August 2015, dancer Bill Evans celebrated his 75th birthday onstage at the Rose Wagner Center, showing just what someone named one of the country’s top tap artists (according to a Dance Magazine reader poll) can do with a pair of tap shoes. His smooth, elegant body moves fused with his quick, rhythmic feet, delighting those in attendance. Evans interspersed his tap and modern-dance pieces with video and slide presentations highlighting his life as a dancer. The Lehi native recalled fondly his early years with Repertory Dance Theatre, after which he went on to choreograph more than 200 works, 18 of them for RDT. That RDT is also celebrating its 50th anniversary made the occasion ever sweeter. RDTUtah.org

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CL ARIT Y To Make This Life Your Finest Work of Art 801-577-2248 Your Personal Psychic EnchantedEye.com


THE VISIT

To Grandma’s House We Groan

CINEMA

M. Night Shyamalan’s The Visit shows he still doesn’t understand human behavior. BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net

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Deanna Donagan and Olivia DeJonge in The Visit There appears to be a movie happening here, but it’s all flimsy, halfhearted feints at empty air. Becca’s explanation to her brother about how old people get sad and confused and have medical issues, and there’s nothing wrong or creepy about that, may be true—and it’s certainly nice to see older people figuring in what amounts to a horror movie—but that turns out to be a dead-end sidetrack. A few mentions of “the elixir” that Becca would like to acquire for Mom, something that will help heal her relationship with her parents, sounds intriguing, but means nothing. The Visit never gets anywhere near a meaningful—or even shallow—exploration of the relationship between grandparents and grandkids, or family secrets. And though it clearly hopes to elicit emotions along those charged tracks, it does nothing but inspire outrage that Shyamalan has, once again, managed to trick us into wasting our time on anticlimactic banality. CW

THE VISIT

B Olivia DeJonge Deanna Dunagan Peter McRobbie Rated PG-13

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TRY THESE Unbreakable (2000) Bruce Willis Samuel L. Jackson Rated PG-13

The Village (2004) Bryce Dallas Howard Joaquin Phoenix Rated PG-13

Paranormal Activity (2007) Katie Featherston Micah Sloat Rated R

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The Sixth Sense (1999) Bruce Willis Haley Joel Osment Rated PG-13

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mother’s parents, Nana (Deanna Dunagan) and Pop Pop (Peter McRobbie), and maybe there are odd doings afoot at their remote rural Pennsylvania house. Is Pop Pop up to something nasty in the woodshed? Does Nana’s penchant for strange nocturnal behavior mean she’s a werewolf? Why shouldn’t the kids, as Pop Pop instructs, ever come out of their room after 9:30 at night? Why shouldn’t they go into the basement? Is mold really the only unpleasant thing down there? Here’s a “twist” that came as quite an irritating surprise to me as The Visit opened: This is Shyamalan’s found-footage movie, and if he thought he had something to add to this long-played-out technique, there is no evidence of it here. In fact, it appears to be something of a dodge: Becca, bursting with all the pretensions of teenage auteurs, is making a documentary about their trip to share with Mom (Kathryn Hahn), who hasn’t seen her parents in 15 years after a falling out that Mom refuses to talk about. Would a loving mother, as she appears to be, really let her kids go off on their own to the home of people who are practically total strangers? But that’s the least of this scenario’s plausibility problems. Is the Becca character Shyamalan’s shield? Will he claim he was sending up affected, self-important young indie filmmakers who aren’t able to craft an effective movie or tell an entertaining story? As is almost always the case, the found-footage conceit eventually collapses into people running around with cameras, when cameras should be the last thing on their minds.

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think I’ve figured out the secret of M. Night Shyamalan—his “twist,” if you will. I bet he turns out to be an alien sent to Earth to study humanity. Looking for our weak spots, maybe, except he really doesn’t have the first clue about us, and his experiments—which have, so far, taken the shape of movies—mostly go all wrong. He may have imagined, with his flawed understanding of what makes us tick, that The Village and The Happening and (dear God) After Earth were insightful explorations of the human psyche. Or—oh, I bet this is it!—it’s all been one big ongoing test of our patience. How long will we suffer being poked, prodded and generally annoyed if the first such poking (that would be The Sixth Sense) isn’t unpleasant? Obviously, Hollywood would have to be in on it. And to be fair, the idea that studios are headed by nefarious aliens who mean humankind no good would explain a lot. Alas, what is actually going on with Shyamalan—in the great tradition of Shyamalan—is likely so ridiculously mundane as to be barely worth discussing. Maybe he really is just a guy who had one, maybe two (Unbreakable, anyone?) decent films in him. Bor-ring! And now we have The Visit, which is another terrible Shyamalan movie that relies on people behaving in ways real people wouldn’t behave, in a situation that makes no damned sense at all because otherwise there would be no story. And—also in the grand tradition of Shyamalan—there’s pretty much no story anyway. A couple of kids—15-ish Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and her little brother, Tyler (Ed Oxenbould), who’s about 12—spend a week with their


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NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 90 MINUTES IN HEAVEN [not yet reviewed] A car accident leaves a man (Hayden Christensen) convinced he has had an experience with death. Opens Sept. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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KAHLIL GIBRAN’S THE PROPHET BBB While director Roger Allers (The Lion King) stretches to try to turn the philosophical poems of Kahlil Gibran into a story, it’s the way the film stretches the sense of what’s possible in animation that makes it sing. The narrative revolves around a troubled, troublemaking young girl named Almitra (Quvenzhané Wallis), whose widowed mother (Salma Hayek) is working as housekeeper for the imprisoned philosopher-poet Mustafa (Liam Neeson). The thin story follows Mustafa as officials escort him to the ship that will take him away to his home country and Almitra absorbs Mustafa’s life lessons. But it’s the individual segments illustrating those lessons on love, death, work and more, each by a different animator, that make The Prophet a breathtaking display of visual imagination: the geometric wizardry of Nina Paley; the body whimsy of Bill Plympton; the almost watercolor-like abstraction of Joan Gratz. The simple, Disney-style look of the framing story merely feels like a delivery system for those dazzling depictions of wisdom, and the most memorable lesson is that there are many more glorious ways to tell an animated story than just Disney-style. Opens Sept. 11 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG)—Scott Renshaw LEARNING TO DRIVE BBB Learning to drive can be thrilling, risky and surprising, but Learning

THE PERFECT GUY [not yet reviewed] A woman (Sanaa Lathan) finds a too-good-to-be-true new boyfriend who probably is too good to be true. Opens Sept. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) THE VISIT B See review p. 45. Opens Sept. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

WOLF TOTEM [not yet reviewed] A young Chinese student is sent to live among nomadic herdsmen during Mao’s Cultural Revolution. Opens Sept. 11 at Megaplex Jordan Commons IMAX. (PG-13)

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to Drive is none of those things. It is instead a perfectly pleasant 90-minute diversion with little conflict and no major drama—a sunny entry in the sub-genre of Indie Films Where Two People From Different Walks of Life Are Brought Together to Learn About Themselves (still working on the name). Directed by Isabel Coixet (Elegy) with an emphasis on the actors’ expressive faces, the unassuming film stars Ben Kingsley as Darwan, an Indian Sikh working in New York City as a cabbie and driving instructor; and Patricia Clarkson as Wendy, a tony book critic whose sudden abandonment by her husband (Jake Weber) has her seeking new horizons—including getting a driver’s license, which she never needed before. Sarah Kernochan’s screenplay is sophisticated and humorous, respectful of Darwan’s religion (and arranged marriage), if also overloaded with driving-as-metaphor-for-life dialogue. But it’s Kingsley and Clarkson who give it life, using their considerable talent to imbue two fairly unremarkable movie characters with humanity and grace. You could watch these two act all day. Opens Sept. 11 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider

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SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE HANGOVER At Brewvies, Sept. 14, 10 p.m. (R)

ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL At Park City Film Series, Sept. 11-12 @ 8 p.m. & Sept. 13 @ 6 p.m. (PG-13) ON HER OWN At Brewvies, Sept. 14, 7 p.m. (NR) RACING EXTINCTION At Rose Wagner Center, Sept. 10, 7 p.m.; post-film discussion with director Louie Psihoyos. (NR)

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A WALK IN THE WOODS BBB Robert Redford stars as travel writer Bill Bryson in this adaptation of Bryson’s book about his attempt to hike the 2,100mile Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine, accompanied by Stephen Katz (Nick Nolte), a ne’er-do-well old college buddy Bryson hasn’t seen in 40 years. Director Ken Kwapis has worked on a lot of TV comedy, and there’s certainly a jokey sit-com vibe to situations like Katz fleeing from a jealous husband. But Kwapis also allows room for the awkward reunion between the two aging men to evolve, as Redford and Nolte employ their respective personas as stoic outdoorsman and grizzled troublemaker to charming effect. There’s an elegiac quality to the way both septuagenarians use the trail to find out what they still have left in the tank, but the movie itself is a reminder of the value of experience. (R)—SR

WELCOME TO LEITH At Main Library, Sept. 15, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

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THE TRANSPORTER REFUELED [ZERO STARS] There isn’t a single level on which this cheap, crass reboot isn’t a disaster. Jason Statham is wisely nowhere in sight, and his replacement—living underwear mannequin Ed Skein—barely manages to look plausible as the “guy you can just barely make out behind the wheel” in any given car commercial. This time, Frank Martin is a getaway driver for a quartet of hookers robbing their Eastern-European gangster boss, a campaign that relies on the fact that, it seems, absolutely nowhere in the French Riviera has any decent security. The four thieves are barely characters, more like Barbie dolls with different hair; the three (male) screenwriters obviously figured prostitutes pulling heists would look cool and sexy slinking around onscreen. And they do look sexy. Just like the luxury automobiles! And just as much of a manufactured fantasy product. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

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STEVE JOBS: THE MAN IN THE MACHINE BB.5 Alex Gibney’s sprawling exploration of the life of the late Apple Computers co-founder begins with a potentially intriguing idea: Why did people feel such a personal connection to this businessman and the brand he created? What follows from that idea, however, is a combination of conventional biography and exposé, and that means plenty of time addressing the more unpleasant aspects of Jobs’ life and ruthless personality. And through it all, there’s Gibney inserting his narration, which makes it harder to focus on his potentially interesting thesis when we’re hearing compulsive smartphone use described as “like Frodo’s hand to The Ring.” Sure, Jobs was a genius and a jerk, but Gibney spends so much time rambling and musing that we don’t get a chance to understand why so many people only wanted to hear the “genius” part. (R)—SR

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PHOENIX BBBB Christian Petzold’s mesmerizing drama may inspire comparisons to Vertigo, but absolutely nothing here feels secondhand. In post-war Berlin, Holocaust survivor Nelly (Nina Hoss) undergoes reconstructive surgery that changes her face so that her husband, Johnny (Ronald Zehrfeld), doesn’t recognize her, instead thinking she’s a stranger who might pass just enough to help him collect Nelly’s family inheritance. Hoss gives a remarkable performance as a woman forced to play-act her own life, while also conveying the ways in which she has changed that makes her almost the different person Johnny believes her to be. There’s complexity in every key relationship that emphasizes how impossible it might be to find a happy ending after so much horror. And the final scene builds to such a devastating revelation that it’s hard to believe anyone would leave thinking of some other movie. (PG-13)—SR


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Best of Utah

readers ballot2015

vOTE ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET MEDIA & POLITICS Best TV Anchorman ————————————— Best TV Anchorwoman ————————————— Best TV News Reporter ————————————— Best TV News Station ————————————— Best Weather Reporter ————————————— Best Sports Reporter ————————————— Best Radio Station ————————————— Best Public Radio Station ————————————— Best Radio Show ————————————— Best Local on Twitter ————————————— Best Nonprofit ————————————— Best Elected Official ————————————— Best Scandal ————————————— Best Utahn ————————————— Worst Utahn —————————————

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RESTAURANTS Best Atmosphere —————————————

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Heads Will Roll

TV

See It Save It Screw it

Longmire returns from limbo; Kurt Sutter goes medieval with The Bastard Executioner. Longmire Thursday, Sept. 10 (Netflix)

Season Premiere: Cable net A&E canceled modern-day Western Longmire after its third and strongest-yet season in 2014, because the viewership demo was too old. While A&E forged ahead with shrewd new programming like Neighbors With Benefits (canceled after two episodes), Netflix picked up Longmire for a 10-episode Season 4 that continues right where it left off: Wyoming Sheriff Walt Longmire (Robert Taylor) is finally on to the man who had his wife killed, and Deputy Branch Connally (Bailey Chase) once again is on the wrong end of a gun. Think of Longmire as a grizzled cousin to Justified, but with more pathos than clever quips, and binge all four seasons post-haste.

Z Nation Friday, Sept. 11 (Syfy)

Season Premiere: In its debut season a year ago, lo-fi zombie romp Z Nation enjoyed the luxury of airing in a Walking Deadfree zone for a few weeks. This time around, however, spinoff Fear the Walking Dead is eating up all of the viewers and buzz—is there enough demand for all of this chomp drama? It helps that Z Nation doesn’t take itself too seriously in tone (less Dawn of the Dead, more Shawn of the Dead) or budget (an episode of Z Nation probably costs less than Norman Reedus’ hairstylist), but it’s still an iffy affair. The ragtag group of zombie-apocalypse survivors (now led by Kellita Smith, assuming the Rick Grimes badass role nicely) are still en route to California to find a Z-cure, but don’t expect them to cross paths with the Fear the Walking Dead gang in Los Angeles.

Continuum Friday, Sept. 11 (Syfy)

Season Premiere: The creator of Canadian time-travel actioner Continuum had up to 10 seasons in mind to tell his story; the originating network up north said, “Yeah, you’re gonna have to wrap it in four—and you only get six episodes, eh.” Will 2077 cop Kiera (Rachel Nichols) finally be able to stop “terrorist” group Liber8 from altering the future here in the present? And should she? The future Liber8 is

attempting to thwart is an iron-fisted, if outwardly tolerable, corporate dictatorship and zero-privacy police state. Oh, wait—we’re already there. (Sorry, been listening to that whacky Alex Jones again.)

Dancing With the Stars Monday, Sept. 14 (ABC)

Season Premiere: Sigh. This time around, it’s Nick Carter (ex-Backstreet Boy), Victor Espinoza (jockey), Andy Grammer (mid-level pop singer), Hayes Grier (“socialmedia celebrity”), Bindi Irwin (daughter of the Crocodile Hunter), Alexa PenaVega (the Spy Kids movies), Carlos PenaVega (married to Alexa), Gary Busey (noted lunatic), etc., etc. … is there a legal threshold for use of the term “Star”?

The Mindy Project Tuesday, Sept. 15 (Hulu)

Season Premiere: Even though streaming service Hulu is sticking with the old-school, week-by-week network TV model for The Mindy Project instead of dropping all of Season 4 at once (was nothing learned from Yahoo!’s fatal mishandling of Community?), at least Mindy Kaling’s Fox-canceled sitcom lives on. I would tell you that the new season opens with an alternate-lives/paths-not-taken tribute to some Gwyneth Paltrow flick called Sliding Doors, but I’ve never seen it and neither have you, so … welcome back, Mindy!

The Bastard Executioner (FX) The Bastard Executioner Tuesday, Sept. 15 (FX)

Series Debut: As he did with Sons of Anarchy, writer/producer Kurt Sutter has cast himself and wife Katey Sagal in his 14thcentury period series The Bastard Executioner; whether or not every episode runs over 90 minutes remains to be seen. Game of Thrones, Vikings and other dramas have tread this heightened historical ground already—but, unsurprisingly, Sutter’s take is uniquely his own: a bloody, violent, viscerally real world devoid of Thrones’ mystical hoodoo and Vikings’ low-budget cheese. The titular Bastard is Wilkin Brattle (Lee Jones), a war-scarred ex-knight of King Edward I’s army who’s called back to serve, but now as an executioner who takes the lives/heads of the highest royalty and the lowest commoners. It’s a sprawling, dense epic Sutter’s trying to pull off here—but they once said “Hamlet on Harleys” couldn’t be done, and look how Sons of Anarchy turned out. The merchandising angles, though, are somewhat more limited (likely no official Bastard Executioner sword keychain bottle-openers at Hot Topic by Christmas). CW

Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.


ELIGH

True Rhymes

MUSIC CHECK US FIRST! LOW OR NO FEES!

California rapper Eligh’s experimental hip-hop chronicles the darkest and lightest times in his life.

Thursday, September 10

BY TIFFANY FRANDSEN tfrandsen@cityweekly.net @tiffany_mf

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ELIGH

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temptation himself, because, as he raps on “If I Still Smoked” from 80 HRTZ, he’s a “kid who couldn’t stop once his foot to the gas.” Eligh maintains a positive outlook about the difficult events in his life, including getting kicked out of his house. At 17, he decided he was done with school. “I didn’t want to do anything. I didn’t want to work. I didn’t want to go to school. I wanted to make music,” he says. Wilkinson told him to get a job and, when he didn’t, she kicked him out. “That was the best thing she ever could have done,” Eligh says. “I ended up in the Bay Area, and that’s where I began my journey.” He moved in with his aunt, uncle and cousins in Berkeley, Calif., and met Grouch, whose best friend at the time had been dating Eligh’s cousin. Hip-hop had already settled into Eligh’s soul by that time; he caught the bug after seeing the movie Beat Street and buying LL Cool J’s I’m Bad. In seventh grade, he and his friend, Scarub, started rapping in the schoolyard. They called themselves the Boogaloo Badboys. In high school, they started 3MG, their first real rap group. While in the Bay Area, Eligh worked with Grouch and six others in an indie-rap group called Living Legends, which led to Grouch & Eligh. “I’ve been around music since Day 1 and my mom bought me a PlaySkool record,” says Eligh. “She bought me a Bruce Springsteen record [Born to Run] when I was 5, [and it] is like a security blanket for me, like a Linus blanket. I carry it around when I get on the airplane. I still put it on in my headphones, and it makes me feel at peace.” CW

Leann Rimes

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ligh, a rapper and producer from Los Angeles, remembers being a tiny kid, clutching his mom’s legs while she sang folk music at protests. Since then, he has released albums as a solo artist and in three hip-hop groups. He dropped 80 HRTZ (Crowsnest) in August and is already working on the next one, which, he says, is “80- to 90-percent done.” His mother, Jo Wilkinson, never really got the chance to record music as a folk singer, having been a single mother with two kids, but the two of them released an album together—a hip-hop and folk mix called On Sacred Ground (Legendary Music). The album has flowing folk melodies from Wilkinson with Eligh adding beats and rapping some verses. It’s his 18th album—not counting another two dozen with The Grouch & Eligh, Living Legends and 3 Melancholy Gypsys—and not every track has Eligh rapping. Some are purely instrumental. He says sometimes words don’t come to him but, when he loves the track, he keeps it. 80 HRTZ features more tribal beats, some much more subtle than the average club-rap record. Not only were unique instruments used on this album, but the lyrics are as clever and rapid-fire quick as on any previous albums. Each album is different; Eligh says if you don’t try something new on each, the music will get boring. So, to dodge tedium, he switched producers for each of his previous three albums. Given that he’s cranked out so much music in the past 20 years, he says that’s what he needs to do. “I never stop. I always have the chamber loaded, so to speak. No. 1, it’s what I love to do. No. 2, in this day and age, if you don’t constantly put out quality music, or music— period, you can easily get lost.” His music is personal and autobiographical, so darker times in his life produced heavier records. “Pain produces great, heavy music,” he says. One of the most difficult projects to work on was the summer 2005 record he released with 3 Melancholy Gypsys (a trio that includes Scarub and Murs), Grand Caravan to the Rim of the World (Grey Crow Records). One of those tracks, “And If,” is about how easy love is lost if it’s not nurtured. In one of Eligh’s verses, he bleeds for his listeners: You seek my company but I’m not up for that/ Just want to lay you on your back/ Don’t want to conversate in fact/ Don’t know if we should kick it at all/ Don’t want to cause your heart to fall/ Don’t want to be that man/ I’m not the one/ I’m not at all. “I made it during a time when I was super-depressed and either in withdrawals or high,” Eligh says. “It was a bad time, but the album is amazing.” In 2005, after four months of being sick from withdrawals from trying to quit cocaine, depressed and unmotivated to make music or tour, he decided to go to rehab to get sober. “All the horrible stuff was a motivator and produced a certain sound. I really love those albums where I was in that space. On the opposite side, you come out of it and have so much to say and share.” He admits he sometimes envies people when they smoke weed, but resists the


LOUNGE

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THIS WEEK

Return of the Muse

After shutting down in December, Provo venue Muse Music rises again.

COMING SOON

| CITY WEEKLY |

52 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

BY GAVIN SHEEHAN comments@cityweekly.net @gavinsunderground

E

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MUSIC

GRIZ SEPT 24

DJ KARMA SEPT 26

VIP TABLE RESERVATIONS 216.375.4684 • TIX AVAILABLE AT SKYSLC.COM 149 PIERPONT AVE • DOWNTOWN SLC +21

arlier this year, the unthinkable happened: The Provo music scene lost one of its most dedicated all-ages venues. Muse Music—a staple in the community for more than a decade, long before Velour or City Limits were conceived—shut down on University Avenue, effectively closing a chapter within the community. It seemed unreal, as the Provo music scene is currently booming with talent across multiple genres—primarily in electronica, pop and rock. So the closing of the venue immediately left dozens of Utah County bands without a supportive venue. After a history of ownership shifts, principal co-owners Debby Phillips and Darcie Roy found themselves in a jam. Their studio manager moved away, effectively shutting down the recording-studio side, which turned into a makeshift rehearsal space. The venue sold much of the equipment from that area, but proceeds did little to put a dent in their bills. Meanwhile, the cafe area failed to pull in sufficient income from visiting patrons to justify keeping it open throughout the day, and sold little to ticket-holders during gigs. Keeping Muse Music open was grew more and more difficult. “The last few months at the old location were tough,” says Phillips. “Our rent had gone up, and summer business was down. We’d had a fundraiser that got us through a super-tough spot, but we didn’t want to have to ask for help like that again. All-ages venues don’t make a profit as it is; trying to make a third of the space cover the whole building’s expenses was a constant struggle.” In December 2014, they closed up shop. However, neither Phillips nor Roy wanted to

Darcie Roy, left, and Debby Phillips of Muse Music

say goodbye to Muse Music. The duo made plans to bring the venue back in a new location. They spent months trying to find new digs that would accommodate Muse and its amenities but had no luck. Just as they were about to call it quits, they came across a shuttered arcade at 247 W. Center—a bigger space with room to grow—that would keep the venue securely in downtown Provo. Renovating the building brought with it a new set of challenges. The building was in rough shape and required a new bathroom, extensive electrical work and a new stage, all of which the city of Provo and new landlord Rick Horsley of Pioneer Books have been helping Muse’s owners with, right down to the wire before opening. Sadly, one of the changes includes saying goodbye to the cafe end of the business, mainly because it wouldn’t pay for itself in terms of the space it would have consumed. Its removal, however, will allow Phillips and Roy to focus on something more important: being a music venue first. As this new era starts up for Muse Music, Phillips and Roy are looking for a wide array of musicians from across the state, as well as visiting touring bands, to perform in what they hope will become the next premiere all-ages venue in Utah County. In a city with a thriving, increasingly diverse music scene, this will be a fantastic opportunity for undiscovered local acts to capitalize on. “Pop rock is kind of dominating the scene right now, and while they’re great bands, they’re just one slice of the pie,” says Roy, on the current Utah County vibe. “Utah is a hotbed of talent, and it would be a waste to ignore that. Our goal is to expose audiences to the broader range of statewide talent— people are missing out on some great bands! Even though Salt Lake City is a much bigger city, media attention has honed in on Provo, [and] bands have a better shot of ‘making it’ or, at least, growing their fan bases.” CW

MUSE MUSIC: GRAND REOPENING

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Ben Lee

Years ago in Harp, I put forth a theory that Ben Lee is the result of a tryst between Ronnie James Dio and Rhea Perlman from Cheers. It didn’t catch on, but why give up? Especially when you can make a Dio-Rhea joke. Seriously, though. Google pics of all three parties and you start to wonder. Except smilin’ Ben Lee is Australian, and there are no pictures of him flashing the metal hand signal and, although he devoted an entire album to covering punk rockers Against Me!, and had an alternative-rock band called Noise Addict at 16, and did a whole album about tripping on Ayahuasca, he’s yet to show any metallic inclinations. Instead, he just writes these incredibly sweet, catchy tunes that run through the squiggly grooves in your brain— so deep you can’t get ‘em out. Love Is the Great Rebellion is his 11th album, and his first for Warner Bros., and it’s probably gonna be the one that makes him a household name. It’s stocked with songs so good that radio stations, film and TV music supervisors, ad agencies—and even, you know, music fans—will be crazy about. Hop on YouTube and check out the infectious “Big Love.” Avassa and Matthew Love open. (RH) Music Garage Live, 250 W. 1300 South, 8:15 p.m., $15, MusicGarage.com

FRIDAY 9.11

Old 97’S, Salim Nourallah, Hollering Pines

About 10 years ago, alt-country O.G.s Old 97’s played Liquid Joe’s. At the time, they’d just hopped over to New West Records for Drag It Up. This is after releasing Satellite Rides on Elektra in 2001, so they’d traded a major label for a major indie. That’s because the band got caught up in the Time Warner-America

Old ‘97s

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201 East 300 South, Salt Lake City

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B Y T I F FA N Y F R A N D S E N & R A N D Y H A R WA R D

Online merger, which might sound like a bad break—but it’s not. Cameron Strang’s New West label, after merging with Austin indie Doolittle Records (Bottle Rockets, Slobberbone, Hamell on Trial), was the ideal place for a band like the Old 97’s, whose particular brand of alt-country is informed, in part, by the Beatles and the Replacements. New West did a fine job with the boys until they signed to ATO Records—which started at as Dave Matthews’ imprint via major label RCA Records. So Old 97’s have made it once more to the bigs, and their ATO debut, Most Messed Up, came out last year—the band’s 20th together. Fittingly, MMU starts off with a verse that sums up why a band like Old 97’s keeps doin’ what they do: “We’ve been doin’ this longer than you’ve been alive/ propelled by some mysterious drive/ They still let me do it as weird as it seems/ And I do it most nights and then again in my dreams.” That mix of pride, humility and an irresistible urge to make music is why a band like Old 97’s is worth checking out live. They do it because they have to, because the music is in their veins—but they feel lucky to have fans that followed them through the ups and downs of their career. Maybe that’s why, at Liquid Joe’s that night, when guitarist Ken Bethea received a tray of whiskey shots from the club, he shared most of them with the crowd. (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $20, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

SUNDAY 9.13

Dâm-Funk, Brisk & Juggy, Typefunk

In old-school funk—the Parliament-Funkadelic type per-

Ben Lee formed by Lakeside, The Gap Band, Graham Central Station, Rick James, the Dazz Band, Zapp and the Bar-Kays in the 1970s and ’80s—bass guitar is king, but guitar solos still rule, and the grooves compel you to move. It’s all about a good time, which accounts for the passion fans have for it—not to mention, why it’s sampled by so many rappers. Dâm-Funk, bein’ about 45 years old, was around to enjoy these bands in their prime, but is still young enough to want to be more than a funk revivalist. So his “modern funk” is the old-school variety through a 21st-century filter: On Invite the Light (his third platter for Peanut Butter Wolf’s Stone’s Throw label), Dâm-Funk hits all the funky hallmarks via modern technology and good ol’ keytars. The upshot will please the O.G.s as much as the youngbloods. (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., free, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com »

Dâm-Funk

PHOTO COURTESY MATTHEW SCOTT

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WEDNESDAY 9.16

LIVE

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Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley, Stephen Marley, Jo Mersa Marley, Morgan Heritage, Tarrus Riley

Noah Gundersen

Let’s get the obligatory stereotypical weed & reggae joke out of the way by saying, I dunno, something about dreads set ablaze by spliffs. Wocka, wocka, done. Now let’s discuss the real reason to attend the first Catch a Fire tour, in which Bob Marley’s family and friends celebrate the music of their legendary patriarch in the year he would have turned 70. Having passed away at 36, Marley has been gone nearly as long as he was alive—that’s 3 1/2 decades of Bob Marley music that was never written. Except the man left behind a legacy of offspring and friends to carry on his creative fire. So tonight, expect copious Bob covers alongside original music by musicians who learned at his bare feet. Also appearing will be Black-Am-I, Skip Marley, and Jemere Morgan. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $38 advance/$45 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

The religious music which singer-songwriter Noah Gundersen grew up listening to may be the source of his folk music’s gospel undertones, but the music’s poetic resonance and vulnerability come straight from Gundersen’s soul. His newest wistful and passionate record, Carry the Ghost (Dualtone Music Group) comes into the world barely 18 months after his first full-length, Ledges. Somehow, he hasn’t run out of things to say about loss, doubt and faith, and hasn’t run out of deeply personal and sincerely raw ways to sing them. Opening is Gundersen’s fellow Seattle artists, Ivan & Alyosha. The folk-pop quintet play a more energetic rock show than headliner Gundersen, with a variety of upbeat, triumphantsounding anthems, calmer, heartfelt ballads and drowsy love songs from this year’s release, It’s All Just Pretend (Dualtone Music Group). (TF) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $16, TheStateRoom.com

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WE HAVE THE

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SATURDAY

with IRISH DANCERS, HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS, PIPERS & DRUMS at

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32 Exchange Place 801-322-3200 11:00am - 1:00am www.twistslc.com

STATE

300 S.

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JOIN US TO CELEBRATE ½


SATURDAY 9.12

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Texas-based Bowling for Soup and Los Angelesrooted The Dollyrots have more pop-punk cred than an entire Warped Tour lineup, and are songwriters who can write circles around ‘em, to boot. Bowling for Soup—best known for their jokey paean to nostalgia, “1985”—is touring Songs People Actually Liked Vol. 1: The First Ten Years 1994-2003 (Que-So), an anthology that had to be split into volumes because each of their 10 albums have three or four songs that qualify. You may have heard The Dollyrots’ ubiquitous “Because I’m Awesome” in movies and on TV, but they have six albums full of similar fist-pumpers, including two from 2014: Barefoot and Pregnant and the acoustic Love Songs, Werewolves and Zombies—both on Arrested Youth Records. (Randy Harward) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $22 in advance, $25 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

58 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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WILL BOLTON

Bowling For Soup, The Dollyrots

An Eclectic mix of olde world charm and frontier saloon

Special Oktoberfest Bier

Food

9.10

Dylan Roe

9.17

Talia Keys

9.11

Talia Keys & Friends

9.18

Stonefed

9.12

Chicago Mike Beck

9.19

Gleewood

9.16

Michelle Moonshine

9.21

The Steepwater Band $12 advance, $15 day of

ENJOY FALL

ON THE

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| CITY WEEKLY |

SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 59


CONCERTS & CLUBS THURSDAY 9.10

FRIDAY 9.11

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael Quartet (The Garage on Beck) Baker Street Blues Band, Spirit Tribe, Grizzly Brothers (Kilby Court) Ben Lee (Music Garage, see p. 54) Bill & Diane (Green Pig) Dave Bowman Trio (Gracie’s) Dylan Roe (The Hog Wallow Pub) Josh Wright (Gallivan Center) Kid Cadaver, Cinders (The Loading Dock) La Luz, Will Sprott (The Urban Lounge) Shannon Runyon Trio (The Spur Bar & Grill) Smiling Souls, Whassup, Feed the Horse (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ

Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door) Elephante (Sky)

Aesthetic Perfection, Voicecoil, Tragic Black, Image Down, The Creature from Jekyll Island, Firewinder (Area 51) The B Sharps, Jeff Dillon, The Beam Me Up Ska-Ts, LSDO (The Loading Dock) Chicago Mike Beck (The Spur Bar & Grill) Diet Cig, Rich Girlz (Kilby Court) Hemis, King Vibration, Gryzzleebeats, Icy Blu, Sequence (The Woodshed) Heritage, Patwa (The Complex) Hotel Le Motel (Brewski’s) Kemosabe, Stereo Sparks (Downstairs) Leddfoot (Club 90) LeAnn Rimes (Sandy Amphitheater) Luis Miguel (Usana Amphitheatre) Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheelers (Egyptian Theatre)

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET The Old 97s, Salim Nourallah, Hollering Pines (The Urban Lounge, see p. 54) The National Parks, Attic Wolves (Velour) The Puddle Mountain Ramblers (Fats Grill) Skunkndub (Funk ‘n Dive Bar) Sparrow, Bill & Diane (Green Pig) Spawn Breezie, David Rhythm, DJ Westafa, Benny Briggs, Okim, Reece Purcell (Liquid Joe’s) Talia Keys (The Hog Wallow Pub) Today is the Day, Abigail Williams, Burn Your World, Through Eternal Mourning (Metro Bar) Uniphi, Vocal Reasoning (The Royal) Van Lady Love, Minx, Static Waves (Muse Music, see p. 52) Wayne Hoskins Band (The Outlaw Saloon) Whiskey of the Damned (Ice Haus)

DJ

DJ Juggy (Downstairs Park City)

THURSDAY

all-you-can-eat lunch buffet $8.95

GOING OUT TONIGHT?

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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| CITY WEEKLY |

60 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMEDIANS IN THE CLUB WITH COCKTAILS HAL SPARKS

9.18-9.19

STEVE HOFSTETTER

10.9-10.10

MATEEN STEWART

10.18

DAVID KOECHNER

11.5-11.7

SOCIAL CLUB STANDARDS IMPROV & OPEN MIC NIGHT @ 7pm

9.10

REAL SALT LAKE WATCH PARTY (vs. Houston Dynamo) @ 5:30pm

9.12

RSL TOWNHALL MEETING/ 9.15 WATCH PARTY (vs. Santa Tecla) @ 6pm ON THE MIC PODCAST @ 7pm

9.16

JULIAN McCULLOUGH

11.12-11.14

WHAT DO YOU THINK, UTAH? @ 7pm

9.23

MARK CURRY

12.11-12.12

2015 ConComic Bash @ 9pm

9.25

ADAM CLAYTON-HOLLAND

12.18-12.19

GEEKSHOW PODCAST @ 7pm

9.26

REAL SALT LAKE WATCH PARTY (vs. SJ Earthquakes) @ 5:30

9.27

JOHN HILDER

1.8-1.9

12-3PM live band karaoke free 9pm-12pm thirsty thursday all pints $2

LIVE BAND Friday, Sept.11th & SATURDAY, Sept. 12th

Leddfoot FRIDAY

September 18th Adult comedy improv @7:30PM $5 cover (includes show & live band) appy hour free 5-6PM line dance lessons free 7-8:30PM

SATURDAY

September 12th $5 cover(includes band and dj party) live band and dj dance party w/ dizzy d 9pm comedy hypnotist Don spencer

UTAH’S FAVORITE HYPNOTIST IS BACK WITH MIND-SUCKING FUN! 9PM - tickets $10 - Available Now

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SATURDAY 9.12 LIVE MUSIC

A.J. Croce (Ed Kenley Ampitheater) Angelspit, The Gothsicles, Adrian H and the Wounds, Red Death Romantics (Area 51) Bang Tango, Lily Gray, Dirt Cheap, Reloaded (The Royal) Black Uhuru (Park City Live) Bowling For Soup, The Dollyrots, Ivory Tribes (The Urban Lounge, see p. 60) Chicago Mike Beck (The Hog Wallow Pub) Clarice Assad, Off the Cliff (Moab Music Festival) Dragtenders (Club Jam) Element A440, A Balance of Power, Loss of Existence, Dezecration (The Loading Dock) Entheos (In the Venue) Gamma Rays, Sparrow (Green Pig) Grizzly Goat, City of Salt, Fyre & Reign (Muse Music)

SUNDAY

football on the big screens!

free give aways, food & drink specials

home of the steel city mafia! jazz brunch: feat. the mark chaney trio 12pm-3pm brunch specials $4 bloody marys & $3 mimosas

MONDAY

football on the big screens! free give aways, food & drink specials

margarita & mai tai monday $3 ladies night out - vendor show free to attend, shop til you drop!

monday, sept. 14 7pm TUESDAY

taco tuesday 2 for $2 texas tea $4 free karaoke w/ zimzam ent 8pm

WEDNESDAY

texas hold ‘em poker free 8pm breaking bingo w/ progressive jackpot free 8-9:30pm whiskey wednesday select shots $3 FREE POOL EVERYDAY DART BOARDS GIANT GAMES

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| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

tuesday

LOCAL NIGHTS OUT

FOLK HOGAN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

3

Bloody Marys, bud tall boys, Mimosas & Screwdrivers

PHOENIX RISING

THUR

thursdays

Weeknights OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

come sit on our big deck

nfl jersey giveaways every game day

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HIGHLAND live music


MONDAY 9.14

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Mynabirds, Bad Bad Hats

Dreamy, smooth and drifting, the new record from The Mynabirds, Lovers Know (Saddle Creek), sounds like it was inspired by an abstract painting of a babbling brook. Washington, D.C., indie pop-pianist and singer Laura Burhenn puts on an intimate show—even her most upbeat songs (which don’t get much more energetic than “Semantics,” from the new release) still have a subtle slow harmony counteracting the walking-paced beat. Check out the new ladypower music video for one of those pumped up songs, “Wildfire,” which shows that you don’t need to be forceful to be happy, free and confident. She’ll be joined by her backing band when she comes to Kilby Court; Minneapolis indie rock band Bad Bad Hats opens the concert. (Tiffany Frandsen) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 8 p.m., $12, KilbyCourt.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

SEPT 16:

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

SEPT 10: 8 PM DOORS

WILL SPROTT COLOR ANIMAL

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

OLD 97S

SEPT 12: 8 PM DOORS

SEPT 14: 8 PM DOORS

SEPT 18:

BOWLING FOR SOUP

THE DOLLYROTS IVORY TRIBES

8PM DOORS

SEPT 19:

DIRTY FENCES

FAUX FEROCIOUS BREAKERS DJ NIX BEAT

9PM DOORS FREE BEFORE 10PM $5 AFTER

SEPT 20: 8PM DOORS

COMING SOON Sept 21: Sept 22: Sept 23: Sept 24: Sept 25:

“Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough” ~Mark Twain

19 East 200 South | bourbonhouseslc.com

Shilpa Ray Ken MOde Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats A Place To Bury Strangers Gloe Album Relase + Dark Seas Return From Tour Sept 26: FREE SHOW Flash & Flare Sept 28: The Fratellis Sept 29: Cannibal Ox Oct 1: Young Blood Brass Band Oct 2: RED FANG & CASPIAN Oct 3: DUBWISE Oct 5: Shadow Windhawk & the Morticians Oct 6: Re-Up Presents DJ Krush Oct 7: Gardens & Villa Oct 8: Wartime Blues Oct 9: The Circulars Tour Send Off

TEMPLES

THE SALT THE SEA & THE SUN GOD TAVAPUTS

SALIM NOURALLAH THE HOLLERING PINES

| CITY WEEKLY |

62 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

LA LUZ

SEPT 11: KRCL PRESENTS 8 PM DOORS

ELIGH

DEMATLAS BURNELL WASHBURN BETTER TASTE BUREAU DJ JUGGY SEPT 17: SLUG LOCALIZED 8 PM DOORS

Oct 10: The Fresh Prince Of Belair Party Oct 12: Frank Turner Oct 13: Angel Olson Oct 14: Destroyer Oct 15: Youth Lagoon Oct 16: IAMX Oct 17: DIIV Oct 19: Murs Oct 20: SKULLCANDY PRESENTS AlunaGeorge

QUIET OAKS ALBUM RELEASE

HEAPS & HEAPS HOLY WATER BUFFALO DAISY & THE MOONSHINES

CONTROL FREQ: NEMA 515

NVIA DEVAREAUX TYPEFUNK

THE VIBRATORS

JAIL CITY ROCKERS NIX BEAT Oct 21: Oct 22: Oct 23: Oct 24: Oct 28: Oct 29: Oct 30: Oct 31:

A Silent Film FREE SHOW Slug Localized Deafheaven Breakers King Dude Albert Hammond Jr Small Black HALLOWEEN with Flash & Flare + Max Pain & The Groovies Nov 2: Heartless Bastards


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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 63

MONDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

Ask your server for details or to sign up for the bus

SEP 11

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWNTOWN

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net!

SEP 11


CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

CONCERTS & CLUBS Johanna Johanna, Try Try Try, Waterloo Rats, Eat Crow (Kilby Court) Joshua James (The Barrelhouse) Joy Spring Band (Sugarhouse Coffee) Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheelers (Egyptian Theatre) The National Parks, Strange Familia, John Lane (Velour) Phoenix Rising (Funk ‘n Dive Bar) Radkey (Music Garage) Rage Against the Supremes (The Spur Bar & Grill) Renee Plant Band, Steve Hatch (Ice Haus) Rock of the ’70s (Sandy Amphitheater) Six Feet in the Pine (O.P. Rockwell) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) St. Boheme (Viridian Center) Steve Bassett Band (Fats Grill) Tim McGraw, Chase Bryant, Billy Currington (Usana Amphitheatre) Wayne Hoskins Band (The Outlaw Saloon) Whiskey of the Damned (Piper Down)

DJ

Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) DJ Kyle Flesch (Sky)

SUNDAY 9.13

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET The Mynabirds, Bad Bad Hats (Kilby Court, see p. 62) So This Is Suffering (The Metro Bar)

TUESDAY 9.15

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

MONDAY 9.14

WEDNESDAY 9.16

Dâm-Funk, Brisk & Juggy, Typefunk (The Urban Lounge, see p. 54) Gamma Rays (Green Pig) Hocico, Reaxion Guerrilla, Vain Machine, Vengeance Tampon (Area 51) The Maension, Skull Theory, I Like My Trike, Late Night Savior (Liquid Joe’s)

LIVE MUSIC

Dirty Fences, Faux Ferocious (The Urban Lounge)

Mark Knopfler (Red Butte Garden) Dan O’Connor, Tommy Gun, Riddled With (Kilby Court) September Mourning, Thira, Lionfight, My Enemies & I, Poon Hammer, I’m Alive (The Loading Dock) Wasatch Jazz Project Big Band (Gallivan Center)

LIVE MUSIC

Aubree Liz, Casey Truman, Bridger Hall, Andrew Langdon (Velour)

Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals (Red Butte Garden) Damian Marley, Stephen Marley, Morgan Heritage, Tarrus Riley, Jo Mersa, Black Am I, Skip Marley (The Complex, see p. 56) Days, Apatheater (Kilby Court) Eligh, Dematlas, Burnell Washburn, Better Taste Bureau, DJ Juggy (The Urban Lounge, see p. 51) King Los (Music Garage) Noah Gundersen, Ivan & Alyosha (The State Room, see p. 56) The Numerators, Odet (Diabolical Records) Michelle Moonshine (The Hog Wallow Pub) Pete Sands (Fats Grill) Phoenix Teen (Utah State Fairpark) Ryun Wilde (The Spur Bar & Grill) Tab Benoit (O.P. Rockwell)

DJ

DJ Matty Mo (Willie’s Lounge)

The Barrelhouse Live

Featuring a line up of Local and touring bands, with a new bar offering an extensive beer and cocktail menu. Joshua James Sept. 12 9pm $10

John Allred Sept. 18 8:30pm $10

Holy Water Buffalo Oct. 3 9pm $10

The Barrelhouse Craft Beer Bar

Over 150 Craft Beers, classic cocktails & beer cocktails, pool tables, foosball, shuffleboard, darts, and couches for lounging.

64 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

• OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR. • ENJOY DINNER & A SHOW NIGHTLY. • MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSIONS. FIND OUR FULL LINE UP ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE.

| CITY WEEKLY |

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Announcing Ogden’s newest Live Music Venue & Craft Beer Bar

• ENJOY OUR AWARD WINNING SHADED/ MISTED DECK & PATIO.

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Mon-Fri 2p-2a Sat-Sun 11a-2a

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326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565


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a i c a t s a n A

801-888-8842


Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1.With 22-Down, something commonly protected by a 20-Down 2.2015 film that came under fire for being set in Hawaii but having no non-white actors 3.Where to see Leonardo's "The Last Supper" 4.Mai ____ 5.Kind of ray 6.Figures in some Renaissance paintings 7.Ideally 8.Hinduism, e.g.: Abbr. 9.Dungeons & Dragons, e.g. 10.They're often spit out during the summer 11.Start of Caesar's boast 12.Steenburgen and Cassatt 20.It's represented by this grid's long row of vertical black squares (and, judging by the circled letters, it's doing its job) 22.See 1-Down 24.2002 animated movie with the tagline "A Hero Will Rise. On Four Legs" 30.Smokestack emission 32.Hooded vipers 33.Big do 34.1971 Santana hit

37.35mm camera type 38.NFL pauses 40.Nearly overflowing 47.Milano of "Charmed" 53.Eponymous brewer Bernhard 54.Kind of question 55.Lively dances 56."Don't worry about me" 57.Mass. neighbor 62.____ de toilette

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1.Uncle ____ 4.Network that put out a 2009 book of movie-themed crosswords 7.Like some verbs: Abbr. 10."Paris, Texas" director Wenders 13.Boxer Laila whose last name appears backwards in her first name 14.High-level, as a farm team 15.Prefix with liberal or conservative 16.Signature Obama health measure, for short 17.Alternative to :-) 18."____ be a pleasure!" 19.Elite athlete 21.Fictional captain who says "Thou damned whale!" 23."Grey's Anatomy" locale: Abbr. 25."No ____ is worse than bad advice": Sophocles 26.64-Across alum Carvey 27.Almost never 28.1994 Peace Prize sharer with Rabin and Arafat 29.Josh of "How I Met Your Mother" 31."Solaris" author Stanislaw 32.Before now 35.Words before Galilee or Tranquility 36.Have ____ for life 39.Do just what the doctor ordered 41.Bart and Lisa's grandpa 42.Mello ____ (soft drink) 43.Commoner 44.It contains M.S.G. 45.Composer Stravinsky and others 46.Pelvic bones 48."Silent Spring" topic 49.Sister 50.It may be struck in a field 51.Holy animal? 52.Bloated, as the stomach 55.Malaysian designer who created a high-end line of women's shoes 58.Legendary marathoner Waitz 59."I think ...," in texts 60."... or ____ gather" 61.Kindle and Nook, for two 63.White House website address ending 64.See 26-Across 65.On the ____ (in hiding) 66.Apt name for a crime boss 67.Music genre that influenced No Doubt 68."Your point being ...?" 69.Expected 70."Dexter" airer, for short

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


INSIDE /COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 67 / SHOP GIRL PG. 68

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 69 / URBAN LIVING PG. 70

COMMUNITY

BEAT

On the Edge L

The Front has routes for both beginners and experienced climbers.

a Pilates Reformer class, and members can take advantage of one free class a month, with additional classes at a discounted rate. Not sure you want the commitment of a membership? Day-passes are also available. As an added bonus, dog owners can bring their furry friends to The Front’s fenced-in dog area while they climb! If you haven’t checked out The Front yet, there’s never been a better time to do so. “We have big things happening this fall and winter.” says Honnold. The Front is expanding its space to a total of 50,000-square feet of climbing area. The new facility will have all the amenities you see at the current Front, plus rope climbing, a separate area for climbing instruction, a café and more. The Front is hoping to be ready to open its new area by October, but employees are leading tours now of the new space on Tuesday and Thursday nights at 7 p.m. Space on tours is limited, so call ahead or sign up at the front desk. n

THE FRONT CLIMBING CLUB 1450 S. 400 West 801-466-7625 Monday through Friday, 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. FrontSLC.com Instagram: @thefrontslc

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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 67

New expanded climbs and amenities are due to open this fall.

community@cityweekly.net

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ooking for a new way to work out and meet cool people? Check out The Front Climbing Club, the first commercial climbing gym in Salt Lake City. The Front features a spacious indoor-rock-climbing area specifically designed for bouldering, with routes for beginners to hard-core competitive climbers, as well as plenty of space to just hang out with friends. “It was built by the community for the community, and I think that’s apparent in the way it feels today,” says Kaitlyn Honnold, graphic designer for The Front. She says The Front Climbing Club was far ahead of its time with the concept of community space. “It’s not about maximizing square footage of climbing wall space,” Honnold says. “It’s about creating an atmosphere where people feel comfortable, where they can come sit on their laptop or read a book and [then] do some climbing.” Long-time Front customers couldn’t agree more. “The staff does their best to help you feel welcome and a part of the community,” says club member Nick Oakey. “As an intermediate climber, I feel comfortable trying new routes and challenging myself without feeling judged by those more experienced.” It even has some soul. “It is a smaller gym that is run and maintained by climbers, so it doesn’t have that empty corporate feel that most gyms have now,” says Front member Adam Bullough. “The routes are frequently changed by the hands of creative and experienced climbers that know how to make the most of what they have.” The Front also offers classes and a welcoming atmosphere to those who are new to climbing. “I love ushering those firsttimers through the initial process of rock climbing,” says assistant manager Nathan Williamson. “[I love demonstrating] the technique, the shoes, the training tips—and then watching them go!” In addition to climbing and community spaces, The Front offers yoga classes, cardio equipment and a weight room—all of which are included with membership. There is also

send leads to


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Spilled

my arteries.... the animas river my veins.... the san juan a beautiful yet fetid lake powell.... my heart your words.... 3 million gallons of toxic mine waste spilled into my current.

68 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

post your free online classified ads

at:

Weddings, Parties & Corporate Events

michaels/miguel Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

SHOP girl

Indian Bazaar T

here is a place in Utah where the colors of India are on display in a 13,000 square-foot furniture warehouse. C.G. Sparks (454 S. 500 West, 801-519-6900, CGSparks.com) is a furniture and home store like you’ve never laid eyes on in Utah— or in the United States, for that matter. The owners make frequent stops to Rajasthan into the cities of Jaipur, the “Paris of India,” and Jodhpur, the “Blue City,” to scout out magical treasures this region offers. You will be transported to a civilization that’s over 5,000 years old with C. G. Sparks’ array of antique furniture,

CHRISTA ZARO comments@cityweekly.net

Follow Christa: @christazaro @phillytoslc

lights, artwork, textiles, hardware and accessories. Its new furniture is equally creative with reproductions of classics and retakes made with reclaimed materials such as wood, iron and brass. C.G. Sparks’ huge warehouse sale is Sept. 18-19, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. It’s the biggest sale of the year, with savings up to 75 percent off. You may want to camp out—because the deals are that good. The experience may give you full on sensory overload. The only thing missing is the smell of sandalwood. n

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Bollywood Market Tote, $15, originally $35 (available while supplies last). Gudri Quilt: $125 a traditional Indian blanket, upcycled with vintage saris patched together. No two are alike.

Ganesha plaster statue: small, 3 1/2 inches $430; medium, 5 1/2 inches, $670; large, 8 inches, $1,040. One of the most important deities in Hinduism, Ganesha is a god depicted with an elephant head and human potbelly body. He is revered as the remover of obstacles and the god of success. This item is for indoor use only, and ready to paint and decorate—imagine the possibilities. Personally, I see lots of gold, red and orange.

Sideboard: $1,320, teak credenza in weathered blue finish. Damachia: $600, traditional Indian wedding chest used by brides to carry belongings to their new life. The piece features raised, teak decorative wood carvings.

Goshen Farmhouse Pendant Light, $35, regularly $120. Light is hand-formed steel in vintage blue and will look great in a bar, kitchen or office setting.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) “More and more I have come to admire resilience,” writes Jane Hirshfield in her poem “Optimism.” “Not the simple resistance of a pillow,” she adds, “whose foam returns over and over to the same shape, but the sinuous tenacity of a tree: finding the light newly blocked on one side, it turns in another.” You have not often had great access to this capacity in the past, Aries. Your specialty has been the fast and fiery style of adjustment. But for the foreseeable future, I’m betting you will be able to summon a supple staying power—a dogged, determined, incremental kind of resilience.

the “wheady mile,” you must navigate your way through one further plot twist or two. There’s a delay or complication that demands more effort just when you want to be finished with the story. Be strong, Libra. Keep the faith. The wheady mile will not, in fact, take forever. (Thanks to Mark Forsyth and his book Horologicon.)

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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | 69

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Trying improbable and unprecedented combinations is your specialty right now. You’re willing and able to gamble with blends and juxtapositions that no one else would think of, let alone propose. Bonus: Extra courage is available for you to call TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “The fragrance from your mango groves makes me wild on as you proceed. In light of this gift, I suggest you brainstorm with joy.” That’s one of the lyrics in the national anthem of about all the unifications that might be possible for you to pull Bangladesh. Here’s another: “Forever your skies … set my heart off. What conflicts would you love to defuse? What inequality in tune as if it were a flute.” Elsewhere, addressing Bangladesh or lopsidedness do you want to fix? Is there a misunderstanding as if it were a goddess, the song proclaims, “Words from your you can heal or a disjunction you can harmonize? lips are like nectar to my ears.” I suspect you may be awash with comparable feelings in the coming weeks, Taurus—not toward SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) your country, but rather for the creatures and experiences that Is feeling good really as fun as everyone seems to think? Is it realrouse your delight and exultation. They are likely to provide ly so wonderful to be in a groove, in love with life, and in touch even more of the sweet mojo than they usually do. It will be an with your deeper self? No! Definitely not! And I suspect that as you enter more fully into these altered states, your life will excellent time to improvise your own hymns of praise. provide evidence of the inconveniences they bring. For example, some people might nag you for extra attention, and others may GEMINI (May 21-June 20) There have been times in the past when your potential helpers be jealous of your success. You could be pressured to take on disappeared just when you wanted more help than usual. In more responsibilities. And you may be haunted by the worry the coming weeks, I believe you will get redress for those sad that sooner or later, this grace period will pass. I’m just kidding, interludes of yesteryear. A wealth of assistance and guidance Sagittarius! In truth, the minor problems precipitated by your will be available. Even people who have previously been less than blessings won’t cause any more anguish than a mosquito biting reliable may offer a tweak or intervention that gives you a boost. your butt while you’re in the throes of ecstatic love-making. Here’s a tip for how to ensure that you take full advantage of the possibilities: Ask clearly and gracefully for exactly what you need. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) In this horoscope, we will use the Socratic method to stimulate your excitement about projects that fate will favor in the next CANCER (June 21-July 22) Why grab the brain-scrambling moonshine when you may even- nine months. Here’s how it works: I ask the questions, and you tually be offered a heart-galvanizing tonic? Why gorge on hors brainstorm the answers. 1. Is there any part of your life where d’oeuvres when a four-course feast will be available sooner than you are an amateur but would like to be a professional? 2. Are you imagine? According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you hesitant to leave a comfort zone even though remaining my fellow Crab, the future will bring unexpected opportunities there tends to inhibit your imagination? 3. Is your ability to that are better and brighter than the current choices. This is one fulfill your ambitions limited by any lack of training or deficiency of those rare times when procrastination may be in your interest. in your education? 4. Is there any way that you are holding on to blissful ignorance at the expense of future possibilities? 5. What new license, credential, diploma, or certification would LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) As I hike up San Pedro Ridge, I’m mystified by the madrone trees. The be most useful to you? leaves on the short, thin saplings are as big and bold as the leaves on the older, thicker, taller trees. I see this curiosity as an apt metaphor AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) for your current situation, Leo. In one sense, you are in the early stages The story of my life features more than a few fiascos. For of a new cycle of growth. In another sense, you are strong and ripe and example, I got fired from my first job after two days. One of full-fledged. For you, this is a winning combination: a robust balance my girlfriends dumped me without any explanation and never of innocence and wisdom, of fresh aspiration and seasoned readiness. spoke to me again. My record label fired me and my band after we made just one album. Years later, these indignities still carry a sting. But I confess that I am also grateful for them. They keep VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) I hope it’s not too late or too early to give you a slew of birthday me humble. They serve as antidotes if I’m ever tempted to deride presents. You deserve to be inundated with treats, dispensa- other people for their failures. They have helped me develop an tions, and appreciations. Here’s your first perk: You are hereby abundance of compassion. I mention this personal tale in the granted a license to break a taboo that is no longer useful or hope that you, too, might find redemption and healing in your necessary. Second blessing: You are authorized to instigate own memories of frustration. The time is right to capitalize on a wildly constructive departure from tradition. Third boost: I old losses. predict that in the next six weeks, you will simultaneously claim new freedom and summon more discipline. Fourth delight: PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) During the next three months, you will discover and uncork a It’s never fun to be in a sticky predicament that seems to have new thrill. Fifth goody: Between now and your birthday in 2016, no smart resolution. But the coming days could turn out to be you will develop a more relaxed relationship with perfectionism. an unexpectedly good time to be in such a predicament. Why? Because I expect that your exasperation will precipitate an emotional cleansing, releasing ingenious intuitions that had LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) A “wheady mile” is an obsolete English term I want to revive for been buried under repressed anger and sadness. You may then use in this horoscope. It refers to what may happen at the end find a key that enables you to reclaim at least some of your lost of a long journey, when that last stretch you’ve got to traverse power. The predicament that once felt sour and intractable will seems to take forever. You’re so close to home; you’re imagining mutate, providing you with an opportunity to deepen your conthe comfort and rest that will soon be yours. But as you cross nection with a valuable resource.


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70 | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

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FANTASTIC MASSAGE

hat is 160 years old this year? It’s the Utah State Fair (USF) in Salt Lake City on North Temple and 1000 West. It’s different from the Salt Lake County Fair, which just finished a successful week of offering rides, food and excellent people watching. Come Sept. 10-20, you get a chance to eat deep-fried Twinkies, buy a “Sham Wow” or Confederate flag (or not), try to win a SpongeBob pillow and look at baby pigs. Sadly, attendance in this old tradition over the past decade has gone down for various reasons. State fairs have been a national institution in America since folks started raising cows and chickens. In the beginning of the 19th century, efforts were begun to promote agriculture and livestock and show off new farm products. If a farmer could prove he had the best steer or the most productive egg-layer by winning a ribbon at a fair, not only did he earn bragging rights for his animal-husbandry skills, but he could sell livestock for more money throughout the following year. Local fairs were held for fun and good old-fashioned competition. Winners then moved on to the county and then state levels to vie for grand prizes. Women got into the act through baking, canning and quilting competitions. The first state fair was held in Syracuse, N.Y., in 1841. As Americans moved from the farm to the city, state fairs expanded to include carnival rides and games of chance; pig, horse and car races; food offerings; displays of home and farm products, etc. Utah’s first fair, the Deseret Fair, was held in 1856 and moved from location to location downtown for decades until finding a permanent home at the Fairpark. The Utah Legislature privatized the Utah State Fair Organization in 1995, giving the gubernatorial-appointed board of directors a mandate to make the fair profitable. Thus, the fair has downsized, and this year, there will be no grandstand acts, no big cheap concerts whatsoever. Instead of sitting on the bleachers and listening to Weird Al, 38 Special or Amy Grant for a few bucks, this year, there is only the Royal Hanneford Circus appearing Sept. 14-20, with three shows daily. The USF continues to promote Utah and local products with events by the Utah Dairy Council, Utah Beef Council, Utah Wool Growers Association and the Utah Farm Bureau. “Utah’s Own” Food Court features locally grown and prepared foods from around the state. Most of us don’t live on a ranch or farm in Utah, so going to the fair each year is not only educational but an adventure. I’m partial to giving out mental blue ribbons to the wild mullets sported by the ride operators and visiting the giant butter sculpture each year while munching on fry bread. See you at the fair Sept. 10-20! n Content is prepared expressly for the Community section and is not written by City Weekly staff

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City Weekly Sept 10, 2015  

Best of Utah Arts 2015

City Weekly Sept 10, 2015  

Best of Utah Arts 2015