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2 | AUGUST 27, 2015

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY LET’S PLAY!

Gamers scream, swear and fight their way to newfound celebrity on YouTube. Cover photo illustration by Mason Rodrickc

18 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 22 A&E 31 DINE 37 CINEMA 41 TRUE TV 42 MUSIC 59 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR GAVIN SHEEHAN

Gavin Sheehan has worked in Utah media for almost 16 years, seven of them with City Weekly as an A&E/music writer and creator of the entertainment interview blog Gavin’s Underground. He also works with the monthly music publication SLUG Magazine.

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4 | AUGUST 27, 2015

LETTERS On Their Honor

John Saltas is right on with his opinion as to gay Scout leaders [“Camp Out,” Private Eye, Aug. 20, City Weekly]. Something to consider: It is not the “Congressional” Medal of Honor, just the Medal of Honor. It is also not “won” by someone. You are a MOH recipient. The only people I would not send this type of email to are ones eligible to wear the medal. They can call it what they want. I just salute them regardless of what’s on their collar or sleeve. Just offering to you if you want to be, next time, a little more correct.

JOHN H. THOMPSON Ogden

The Phenomenon of Trump

It appears that Jim Catano possesses neither the objectivity nor the wisdom to comprehend the phenomenon of Donald Trump [“Trumped Up,” July 16, City Weekly]. To impose the standard hatred toward anyone who does not exhibit the standard, cool, hip attitudes of U of U babes is an insult to all intelligent people. Does Catano not understand that Trump is blowing everyone else out of the water?

KIMBALL VANCE Salt Lake City

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes.

Medicaid Insanity

This is typical Utah insanity. The Mormon Republicans who make up the vast majority of the Utah Legislature refuse to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and are getting lots of criticism for it. But the critics are all also deliberately ignoring the $8 billion-plus-pound gorilla in the room: the Mormon Church. LDS Church leaders oppose expanding Medicaid under the ACA because they want control over those in Utah who get access to affordable health care, in order to force those receiving benefits to do whatever the leaders want. It’s long past time for critics of this refusal to expand Medicaid to acknowledge and condemn these monsters for all the suffering and death caused by their refusal.

STUART MCDONALD Salt Lake City

Defending the Missionary Program

In an Aug. 13 letter titled “Odd Job Description” [Letters, City Weekly], Ted Ottinger takes sarcastic aim at the missionaries and missionary program of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He’s neither the first, nor will he be the last, to do so. Any organization, be it private, religious, governmental, etc., as highly visible and internationally prominent as the LDS Church, is of course prone to, and expects, such criticism. And while the negative impact of such attacks on missionary service is all but non-

existent, the litany of inaccurate implications, half-truths and outright factual errors deserve a response. Sexual preference is not part of the application; missionary work is service, not sales; and a two-year commitment is not required—there are many other options for length and type of service. The gospel is not a “product,” nor is it based on lies or myths. The absence of one man’s belief in God does not automatically render God nonexistent. The misguided view that Sister missionaries are somehow marginalized and made to feel unwanted is blatantly false. They bring talents and abilities to missionary service that cannot be replicated by the Elders. Would many 18- to 20-year-old men and women apply for the “job opportunity” described by Mr. Ottinger? Of course not. But 1 million-plus and counting have, and will continue to happily apply for missionary service in its actual and true form.

ALAN HUGHES Elk Ridge

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Scout’s Honor

In last week’s Private Eye column, I shot myself in the foot. I wrote that in my life I had met “more Congressional Medal of Honor winners than Eagle Scouts.” I mentioned that I only knew two Eagle Scouts, an old friend Scott Crump and my nephew, Nick Saltas. Letters and comments quickly arrived. Among the first was from my cousin Nick Malkogiannis. He reminded me that his late brother, George, was also an Eagle Scout. George never talked much. Who knew? Thus, it became three Eagle Scouts I’ve known (if there are more, just tell me to shut up, and I’ll buy you a drink). George was a Vietnam War veteran, Army artillery, and is among three of my cousins who saw combat there. Two older brothers also served in Vietnam, with a total of nearly four years in the war zone. Many friends served there—some during the same period that I was a lack-luster war protester at at the University of Utah, dressed as I was in flannel shirts and tattered Levi jeans. I often wore a red kerchief headband. I’m not much of a joiner, though, so I didn’t march or sit in, but it is no secret I didn’t support that war. Yet, over time, I became a bit of a Vietnam history buff, reading scores of books about the war (including an autographed No. 84 of 126 copies of Tim O’Brien’s Speaking of Courage—thanks, City Weekly staff), seeing virtually every ’Nam movie made (try the under-the-radar but very good 84 Charlie MoPic), and scouring YouTube (mostly worthless). So I was really bummed when two persons pointed out that the Medal of Honor is not “won.” It is received. I knew that. Saving lives (paradoxically by sometimes taking other lives) or willingly sacrificing your own life (often by dying upon an exploding hand grenade) is not a contest to be won. For me

6 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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PRIVATE EY to ascribe the word “winner” to the Medal of Honor wasn’t a rookie error on my part. It was laze and complacency. My way bad. Our online version of last week’s story has been updated and now reads, “Congressional Medal of Honor recipients.” But that hardly solves matters, as there is even some dispute—as was also pointed out to me—as to whether the Medal of Honor name itself has been compromised by placing the word “congressional” at the start of it. The Medal of Honor is presented in the name of Congress, but our president actually presents it. Somewhere along the line, it became nearly universally known as the Congressional Medal of Honor, even on the Medal of Honor website. I judged that one a toss-up and, for now it stands as written. Alas, more headache: Lt. Gen. Hal Moore, whom I very briefly met in 2005 at a Veterans Day ceremony for soldiers who fought at the Ia Drang Valley 50 years prior in November 1965 (basis for the movie and book he co-authored, We Were Soldiers Once … and Young), was accorded a Distinguished Service Cross, not the Medal of Honor. I’m damned near certain I saw and met two MOH recipients that day, but Moore was not one of them, despite my saying so last week. So, the score is now Eagle Scouts 3, MOH recipients 2 (awaiting a fog-of-war replay in my mind of whom I actually did meet in 2005). I’m not a happy typist today. However, all of that banging my head reminded me of a war story I was told a number of years ago. I was sharing a golf cart with a Vietnam combat veteran. We were jawing, and we came to a long, twisty, wooded, water-hole par 5. I go, “Hey, if the green was the enemy, how would you approach from tee

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to green?” He goes, “Yeah, I’ve done that before,” and he detailed where he’d set up guys and how he’d move them if it were a jungle mission and not a golf shot. I was impressed. Then he said, “Did I ever tell you they almost put me in for the Medal of Honor?” Whoa. “Yeah,” he said, as he grabbed his driver, “I saved the lives of a full squad of men one day.” He’d told me lots of things over time but little about his own actions. If you know where to look, he’s even pictured in one of the books in my Vietnam book collection. He’s real. He began, “We were in three squads. I was a squad leader. We were in the shit. The VC knew we were there. We were going to attack, one squad at a time. My squad was first up. That’s when I got sick, puking, diarrhea. So the second squad was sent out first. They all got hit. We went out next, but it was over fast. None of my guys got hit. I grabbed a cigarette from one my men, and he said, ‘Thanks, LT. If you didn’t get the shits right then, we’d be the dead ones. You saved us. You should get the Medal of Honor.’ ” He was quietly looking out to the fairway. In another time, I might have guessed he was wearing the thousand-yard stare. I never said a word, just grabbed my driver and hit the ball. Because it doesn’t matter if that story were true or war myth or whatever. My buddy has other valor medals, and he can say whatever he wants about them, what it means to wear them, and how or why one comes by them. Or do not. Back in the 1960s, he was—as is sung in Les Misérables—only a boy. We do the damnedest things to our boys, don’t we? I felt bad for not getting it right because all those boys do and have done what I have not. CW Send Private Eye comments to john@cityweekly.net

I’M NOT A HAPPY TYPIST TODAY. HOWEVER, ALL OF THAT BANGING MY HEAD REMINDED ME OF A WAR STORY

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STAFF BOX

What is a mistake you’ve made that drove you crazy? Brandon Burt: Landscape artist and goodmood guru Bob Ross said, “There are no mistakes—just happy accidents.” I wish I could say the time I floored the accelerator instead of slamming the brake while backing out of a tight parking space resulted in some kind of personal enrichment, but the big scrape on the passenger-side fender haunts me to this day. Mason Rodrickc: I made the mistake of telling the singer of a very unknown band, Little Scream, that I torrented her album and got my ticket for free while at Kilby Court. I ended up buying a T-shirt, a CD and the opening band’s CD out of shame. I felt so bad, but it’s one of my favorite T-shirts and albums.

Scott Renshaw: In a movie review, I once identified Bill Pullman as Bill Paxton. Or maybe it was the other way around. Or maybe I identified one of them as Dermot Mulroney. Or was it Dylan McDermott?

Jeremiah Smith: I often catch myself driving on auto pilot. This drives me to make many mistakes (get it?) Usually I just drive to a familiar places or miss my exit. But once, in Hawaii, I missed an important turn and had to drive for 15 miles before a chance to backtrack. That drove me nuts.

Paula Saltas: Not taking that job as a Utah Jazz dancer. My moves put those other girls to shame. Tiffany Frandsen:

As a youngster, I triumphantly announced to my first grade class that Tone Loc’s “Wild Thing” was by Savage Garden. Making the mistake didn’t so much drive me crazy, but classmates reminding me for the next decade sure did.


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AUGUST 27, 2015 | 7


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8 | AUGUST 27, 2015

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Accident on Purpose

Not that facts ever got in the way of Sen. Margaret Dayton’s thinking, but now she’s mixing them up with fiction and conspiracies. The esteemed senator from Orem was grilling Attorney General Sean Reyes about rumors that the EPA orchestrated the Gold King Mine wastewater spill. KUER channel 7 caught her on tape: “Were you able to discern whether or not there was any truth to the fact that this was an accident on purpose so that they could qualify for Superfund money, or if this really was an ‘accident’ accident?” Besides the “fer-cute” semantics, Dayton showed that she’d already made up her mind. The EPA has been outed as secretive, lax and negligent, but maybe not quite as underhanded as Dayton would like to believe. A Superfund cleanup could hurt tourism, and that may be what she’s trying to protect.

On Shaky Ground

While everyone is scrambling to justify the new prison location in Salt Lake City, legislators seem unmoved by the problems and expense associated with it. OK, the airport is good with it. But did anyone ask the airport about its experience building in that area? The airport spent millions more than expected to shore up the soft soils, and it must maintain 450 acres of wetlands in perpetuity. And now geologists are warning of quake dangers. Oh, and there’s a former landfill nearby. There’s a reason this area hasn’t been developed in the past 150 years, Mayor Ralph Becker said. Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, also noted that the prison relocation commission’s consultant, Louis Berger Group, has paid almost $70 million to settle charges of defrauding the U.S. government. Still, we’re moving on.

The Ick Factor

Utah’s lucky to have Karrie Galloway at the helm of Planned Parenthood here. A staunch defender of women’s health, Galloway, speaking to Bill Gephart, responded to Gov. Gary Herbert’s knee-jerk reaction to “the baby-parts” videos. No, she’s not “disturbed” by medical research. She’s disappointed in Herbert and the “political grandstanding” taking place. For the 50 years, PP has been in Utah, has never broken any rules about funding, and received no state or federal funds for abortions. The money it will lose now—less than $300,000—was to provide education and health care for women. “We’ve made women’s lady parts a political football,” she said. Herbert is punting at the ick factor of fetal parts being sold. Get over it. No one’s profiting from abortion in Utah.

While recovering from addiction, Ian Acker (pictured on far right, with parents Steve and Suzanne Acker, and Lacey Garcia) discovered that if he worked out before a meeting, he could focus better. He began using exercise to fill the void drug use left and recruited others recovering from addiction, creating Fit To Recover (Fit2Recover.org). His group started as three people exercising in Sugar House Park in 2013. By January 2015, it had grown to 70 people in a warehouse that local artists Sarah Kappos and Jarhett Jones and a group of seventh graders painted. In addition to promoting fitness, FTR has a recording studio, a creative writing group and a women’s group, started by Lacey Garcia. Read the full interview at CityWeekly.net.

Why fitness and recovery?

Ian Acker: I’m ADHD and have a hard time sitting for long periods of time. I listen best after a workout. After I worked out, I was more vulnerable, able to talk about my feelings and more comfortable. The release of endorphins and dopamine from exercise allows me to be more vulnerable and break down those walls and insecurities. When you sweat with someone in a workout, and you get through something, it brings through a power that’s greater than ourselves that opens up conversation.

And if you hate working out?

Lacey Garcia: Anybody is welcome, whether you come and exercise or not. [Boot camp] is a bunch of people on a Saturday morning who aren’t hungover—they come out to be a part of something. There’s something here for everyone. We have yoga, creative writing, the womens’ group—if you don’t love to work out, still come. It’s a place to make yourself better.

Why the womens’ group?

LG: As women, it’s easy for us to take drugs and alcohol away and need to fill that void with men. I work in an alcohol and drug treatment center and I see it all the time. I didn’t know how to make friends with women. I started to hang out with other women who had been sober longer than I had. That’s when my own recovery took off and they taught me how to be not only a women in recovery, but a women—period. This is a place where women can come together. I have some women who aren’t in recovery—everyone struggles with something.

Are there ever days you don’t want to show up?

IA: There are plenty of times I want to give up. I want to bail. I’ve never run a nonprofit before in my life. We have a team that knows what they’re doing, but the reason I don’t give up is because what else would I be doing? Sitting in bed? Thinking about doing something else? It beats the alternative. Every time I get to help someone and someone says “thank you,” it makes the past week worth it—even though it’s hard.

Is there research to prove fitness helps recovery?

IA: We’re hoping to pilot a research program and show hard facts that this helps people. [Acker’s father,] is at the University of Utah, in contact with some of the research and development team there and during the fall, it would be nice to get some quantitative data on this place and who’s staying and who’s not. But again, it’s 8 months in and we’re just trying to lay the foundation.

—TIFFANY FRANDSEN tfrandsen@cityweekly.net


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AUGUST 27, 2015 | 9


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10 | AUGUST 27, 2015

STRAIGHT DOPE Wooly Bullies Why did Paleolithic humans kill mammoths? Evidence suggests early people hunted and killed woolly mammoths and butchered them for meat and hides. I realize killing a mammoth must have impressed paleo girls, but before the invention of Tupperware and refrigeration, what did you do with the resulting tons of meat? Either you’d have to have the biggest barbecue ever, or else try to preserve (and carry around) lots and lots of mammoth steaks. Considering the additional problem of drawing every carnivore and scavenger for miles, wouldn’t it make more sense to kill paleo bunnies and other small game? —Curious Vegetarian Bunnies? This is effete modern thinking. For primitive humans, the main concern wasn’t too much food but too little. OK, taking down a mammoth to keep the clan fed for a week sounds like overkill. But if the choice is between sustainable environmental practices and survival, you know what’s going to win. In other words, this seemingly obscure question is a parable for our times. Before we get all big-picture, let’s acknowledge what we don’t know. For starters, we can’t be certain early humans hunted mammoths on a regular basis. Human and mammoth fossils often turn up in the same locations, and stone weapon tips have been found embedded in mammoth bones, so clearly we went after them on occasion. But some experts wonder if we weren’t mainly finishing off mammoths laid low by other causes. That said, the consensus among scientists nowadays is that some human communities took to mammoth hunting in a big way. In fact—and I told you this question had relevance to our own day—we may have hunted them to extinction. Why go after mammoths and not bunnies? For the same reason Costco members drive right past the 7-Eleven—acquiring food in bulk is more efficient. A typical adult mammoth is thought to have been good for well over 1,000 pounds of meat—more than two million calories. Add in the bone marrow and fat, and a mammoth could probably have kept 30 people fed for two weeks. A block of time like that gives you a chance to get organized. Specialization would likely have emerged early in a mammoth-hunting clan. The hunters would prepare their weapons for the next expedition, leaving the food-prep team to focus on what was surely job one for Paleolithic chefs: keeping the leftovers from going bad. No Stone Age cookbooks are extant, but meat-preservation techniques have been known since ancient times. An obvious one during the last ice age would have been freezing, and in fact Plains Indians used to bury meat in the snow during winter; they’d also dry meat after large kills. Chinese historians have found that salt was harvested from inland dry lakes more than 8,000 years ago; many primitive cultures used salt to preserve meats, vegetables, and even their dead. Animal bones at one Paleolithic ruin show signs the meat had been smoked.

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

More exotically, underwater storage has been proposed as a means of meat preservation—experiments by a University of Michigan paleontologist show freshbutchered meat could be stored in a peat bog for up to two years. Archeological evidence points to mammoths being cut into large pieces for transport, with butchery occurring both at the scene of the kill and back at dedicated meat-processing sites. These locations no doubt attracted scavengers, but that may have been less a problem than an opportunity—nosy predators risked joining the mammoths on the spit. Bone accumulations at mammoth butchery sites show some but not many signs of carnivore gnawing. Other animals hunted alongside mammoths include horses, reindeer, wild oxen, wolves, foxes, and yes, bunnies. Mammoths were also valued for their skin and bones—spears and knives made from mammoth ivory could be used to kill and butcher more mammoths. Stretch a dried mammoth skin over a frame of its bones and tusks and you’ve got yourself a tent. So Paleolithic tribes may not have let the mammoths they’d bagged go to waste. That was no comfort to the mammoths. As we’ve seen in other realms, efficient resource exploitation typically results in more consumption, leading some to speculate that our ancestors drove mammoths to extinction. That’s by no means proven. Studies of the Clovis peoples of North America have come to mixed conclusions, with some believing it was too dangerous to hunt Pleistocene megafauna unless they were sick or wounded. Other maintain there just weren’t enough of the biggest animals to make them a primary food source. Analyses of teeth and such indicates mammoths may have been under environmental stress anyway—in other words, we may have hunted them because they were easy targets. To which the obvious response is: so? Easy kill or not, the result would have been the same: fewer mammoths. One study found hunters mainly went after juveniles and females and avoided adult males— a good way to wipe out a species. Fact is, even if we were reasonably scientific and responsible about it, the natural tendency would have been to hunt mammoths till they were gone.

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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Armed Resistance A new report links Utah legislator to patriot groups. BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @ericethington

P

atriot and militia groups are once again on the rise. As of 2012, the Southern Poverty Law Center counted more than 330 such groups, noting that they began gaining traction after the 2008 election of the first African-American U.S. president. The groups are often known for nationalistic and often violent rhetoric as well as armed opposition to the government. Their views are becoming decidedly more mainstream in conservative circles as fears mount over the intrusiveness of Big Government. The Center for Western Priorities, a liberal conservation group opposed to the privatization of public land, recently released a report called “Going to Extremes,” examining ties between militia groups and coordinated effort by lawmakers from the West that call for states to take over public lands. “At the center of the land grab,” the report says, “is Ken Ivory, a Utah state representative and president of the American Lands Council.” The report specifically links Ivory to these groups by pointing to a promotional video that featured Ivory, where he says, “We are in the Second Great Revolution, and it’s a revolution of ideologies.” Ivory also signed a resolution for the group under his official title as a Utah legislator saying that the “arrest of citizens or seizure of persons or property without first notifying and obtaining the express consent of the local sheriff” will not be tolerated. Ivory calls the report and its claims that he’s connected to or supports the tactics of patriot and militia groups “a political hit piece” and “utterly ridiculous. “We’re working on education, legislation and litigation,” says Ivory. “That is the opposite of what we’re trying to work on.” With 67 percent of Utah lands federally controlled, Ivory’s American Lands Council website argues, state ownership of federal lands is needed to better fund education, provide better environmental stewardship of the land, grow the state’s economy and foster energy independence. And the argument appears to be resonating with patriot and militia groups. The patriot and militia movement gained momentum in the early ’90s, with dozens of organized groups threatening to fight back against the U.S. government and what they saw as a coming takeover by the U.N. to create a “One World Government.” But when militia sympathizer Timothy McVeigh detonated a truck bomb in front the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, the movement and its rhetoric became largely shunned—that is, until 2008, when

“I speak at events all the time. We invite all to listen to our story.” —Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan

these types of patriot groups began appearing under names like Oath Keepers, the Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association (CSPOA), Militia of Montana, Hutaree Militia and others. Unlike their ’90s predecessors, many of this new breed began attaching themselves to political movements such as the Tea Party, resulting in their rhetoric and beliefs graduating from the fringes of society into state legislatures, Congress and even into talking points for 2016 presidential candidates. One such group, Oath Keepers claims on its website its members are made up of former military personnel, police and first responders who have taken an oath to “defend the constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic” and to “refuse to obey unconstitutional orders.” Oath Keepers likens its mission to resisting the tyranny of Nazi Germany. The group also lauds Ivory on its website as a leading voice in the “quest for constitutional justice for the States.” Likewise, the CSPOA is made up of current and former county sheriffs who have pledged to refuse to enforce laws they believe to be unconstitutional, and to physically resist efforts by the United States to enforce federal laws—as was the case in the April 2014 standoff between militia members and federal law-enforcement officers at the Cliven Bundy ranch in Nevada. A CSPOA promotional video features Ivory signing the group’s resolution, using his official title of Utah state representative. CSPOA’s founder is former Grand County, Ariz., Sheriff Richard Mack, who is also an Oath Keepers board member. He describes the CSPOA as “the army to set our nation free.” When asked who decides which federal laws are unconstitutional, Mack said, “You read the Constitution and decide. We have to make the determination ourselves.” Mack also was adamant that the U.S. Supreme Court has no authority to decide constitutional issues, arguing instead that the power rests with counties. According to a Southern Poverty Law Center report, Mack founded CSPOA in order to train law enforcement in Oath Keeper tactics. “These are now sheriffs who are learning and willing to learn to become Oath Keeper sheriffs,” Mack said, according to the report. In April 2015, two gold miners on federal land in rural Oregon were ordered to sotp work by the BLM, which found the mine lacked necessary paperwork. After the miners contacted the Oath Keepers, dozens of armed militiamen reportedly were sent along with members of the CSPOA provide security for the mines. This tactic was repeated in August 2015, when Oath Keepers and other anti-government groups gathered at a mine on public lands in Montana. Also in August, heavily armed Oath Keepers were seen on the streets of Ferguson, Mo., which was under a state of emergency following demonstrations related to the anniversary of Michael Brown’s death.

American Lands Council

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NEWS

ENVIRONMENT

Report looks at ties between Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, and patriot groups So why did Ivory appear in a video for the CSPOA and sign its resolution? “I spoke at the convention at the request of Sheriff Mack,” says Ivory, explaining that the video was taken from a speech he gave at a CSPOA convention. He says there’s no difference between his speaking to the militia group and the interviews he’s given to NPR and other media outlets. “I speak at events all the time. We invite all to listen to our story,” says Ivory. “Separately, some folks presented me with the resolution, and it seemed to me to make sense what they were doing with that.” Ivory says the speech and resolution represent his only involvement with these groups, although Mack says they’ve met many times. “We know each other very well,” he says. As a driving forces behind the “take back our federal lands” campaign in the American West, Ivory wants state governments to control public lands, a move that could allow the state to open up public lands for energy development or even private sale. Ivory founded the nonprofit American Lands Council (ALC) in 2012, just before he successfully sponsored a bill at the Utah Legislature demanding such a turnover of public lands. He now travels throughout the West promoting ALC and trying to persuade local governments to sign up as ALC members (fees go as high as $25,000 annually). In June 2015, The Salt Lake Tribune reported that a Washington, D.C., watchdog group filed a complaint, alleging he was scamming local governments into giving taxpayer dollars to his organization on the promise that he can get public lands turned over to them. Ivory called those allegations “a shameful and desperate political stunt.” CW


NEWS Dems Jockey for Position

POLITICS

BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @ericethington

W

Former Rep. Lynn Hemingway: “I thought we had a great candidate in Justin Miller. … But, now, I just feel guilty.”

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many Republicans and even a few Democrats on the blog Utah Politico Hub have grumbled about how long it has been taking when, in 2013, the Democrats almost immediately called for then-Attorney General John Swallow to resign after allegations of financial wrongdoings emerged. But King insists there’s a big difference. “With Swallow, there was a steady drumbeat for months with new information. With Justin, there haven’t been nearly the ongoing revelations of wrongdoing that there was about Swallow. There were the initial set of stories from [City Weekly’s Stephen] Dark, and there have been a story or two since then about the shoplifting stuff, but we haven’t heard anything else about Justin for weeks and weeks now. But I think if Justin stays on and doesn’t see fit to resign, we could very well get to a place where [expelling him from the caucus] happens.” King declined to give a timetable on when that might happen. “That’s their prerogative,” says Miller, “But to be honest, there hasn’t been anything that’s come out significantly since [the allegations] came out. Nothing’s changed from the feds taking on and expanding their case. It’s unfortunate the direction the House caucus has taken with this, because it seems to be entirely politically motivated.” Miller is concerned that in the face of an open investigation, his fellow Democrats have taken a one-sided “shoot-from-thehip” approach instead of waiting for due process to play out. “It’s a little bit more of a guilty-until-proven-innocent mentality that I’ve seen come out of the leadership.” If Miller were to resign or were somehow forced from office by the ongoing federal investigation, a special election would be called within 30 days to find a replacement. Otherwise, Miller will face re-election along with every other House member in 2016, and, Miller says, that’s plenty of time to make his case with the delegates. “There’s a lot going on,” says Hemingway. “To be honest, I was really disappointed to hear that the Salt Lake police gave up the investigation to the FBI. But as far as I’m concerned, everything in the district is on hold. I want to be fair to Justin, but I also want to be fair to the people I represented for eight years.” CW

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ith Rep. Justin Miller, D-Salt Lake City, facing a federal investigation into allegations he stole campaign funds from Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams, Democratic leaders have asked Miller’s predecessor, Lynn Hemingway, to come out of retirement. “I’m running,” says Hemingway, who, in 2014, retired from the Legislature after eight years of service. “I retired because [my wife and I] were planning on moving to St. George. I thought we had a great candidate in Justin Miller, and I wouldn’t feel bad about walking away. But, now, I just feel guilty.” Hemingway and his wife decided against the move, citing the summer heat in St. George. Then, Hemingway says, he was approached with the idea to run again by Senate Minority Leader Gene Davis. “Gene and I had dinner together, and he asked me to consider it,” says Hemingway. Davis’ interest in Hemingway’s candidacy is understandable. Not only have the two been friends “for a long, long time,” but Davis resides in House District 40, which Justin Miller represents. “I supported [Hemingway] when he ran the first time, and I was disappointed when he decided not to run again,” Davis says. Hemingway will not be the only Democrat challenging Miller. Also declared is Amy Fowler, who ran against Miller in 2014 and lost at convention by only a couple of votes. Local accountant Chris Stout also has announced plans to run. But Miller says he isn’t worried about any of the challengers and is planning on running for re-election again next year. “I think Lynn was a fantastic legislator,” says Miller, who was endorsed by Hemingway when he ran for the seat in 2014. But the embattled representative may face other obstacles before the 2016 elections arise. “I think a lot of people in that district are unhappy with Justin,” says House Democratic Leader Brian King. King says he and his colleagues haven’t yet ruled out officially expelling Miller from the House Democrat caucus. “It’s a possibility,” says King, “[but] there’s a feeling among some members of the caucus that ‘innocent until proven guilty’ is more than just a phrase, and that we ought to let this play out a little bit more and see what information comes to light. I think that would give some more time to feel comfortable expelling him.” King has called for Miller to resign, but

UTAH.GOV

Retired Rep. Hemingway looks to re-take embattled successor’s seat.


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14 | AUGUST 27, 2015

THE

OCHO

The Classic Snake River Whitewater!

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

CITIZEN REVOLT

@bill_frost

ENVIRONMENT

May 16th - Sept. 27th Schedule a time now! 10:00am - 12:00pm or 2:15pm

You can build a birdhouse while learning about nature in its most urban form. The Lee Charles Miller Bird Refuge & Nature Preserve— Miller Park, to its friends—has reopened after a $760,000 restoration project that improved public access and made the refuge one sweet place for animals and plants. Here you can experience native plants and wildlife along with many of Utah’s open space advocates. HawkWatch International, Tracy Aviary, Salt Lake City Urban Forestry, Utah Society for Environment Education, the Neighborhood Children’s Art Project and of course, government officials including Mayor Ralph Becker will be there to talk and answer questions about this city environmental project. You can take a bird walk or insect safari, and kids can take home a handmade birdhouse. Miller Park, 1708 E. 900 South, Thursday, Aug. 27, 6-8 p.m.

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Boarders will be mobbing down south in a longboard race and block party. It’s the Push Race, sponsored by Jaceboards, who are bringing on the live bands and food trucks for the event. Get stoked, but no bombing. This is a flat non-downhill race that creates awareness and fundraising for Utah Valley University Enactus’ projects and to create a unique racing alternative to the underserved longboarding community. Sign up on Facebook (The Push Race). UVI Northwest Parking Lot, 1124 W. 800 South, Orem, Saturday, Aug. 29, 4-10 p.m., $20. Facebook.com/pushrace

Eight more-secure cheating website alternatives to AshleyMadison.com:

8. CraigsOtherList.com

PET ADOPTIONS

7. OneDirectionFanMoms.net

Pet-A-Palooza 2015 is the dog- and catadoption event of the summer. Food trucks and live entertainment will be on site. Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, Saturday, Aug. 29, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. SLCo.org

6. TruckstopGloryhole.com/ discreet

5. StateEmployeeSwingers.gov/ utah

4. HushHushHomeTeacher.org 3. AffairMax.com

FOOD CO-OPS

@

TheWordCW -Wish & Spin-

The documentary film Food for Change gets a public screening, thanks to Wasatch Cooperative Market. The film, directed and produced by Steve Alves, comes when cooperatives are losing ground in the state, and chronicles the development and purpose of grocery co-ops in the United States. Utah used to host co-ops that ran the gamut—iron workers, farmers, butchers, wool manufacturers, furniture makers and textile workers. What happened? Find out at the Tower for $5. Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 7 p.m. Wasatch.coop

HUMAN POTENTIAL

“Crossing Over With Psychic Medium John Edward” could be a life-changing experience. Like, crossing over where? Connecting with what on the “other side?” Well, if you still have questions, you can ask Edward—or some ghostly presence, after the performance. Salt Lake City Marriott City Center, 220 S. State, Thursday, Sept. 3, 8-10 p.m. Tickets available at JohnEdwards.net

2. HumpElegance.biz 1. KSL.com/classifieds/jobs/hand

-KATHERINE BIELE 905 E 2100 S • 801-485-RING (7464) • www.StroudJewelers.com

Send your event to editor@cityweeklky.net


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S NEofW the

Cecil Speaks The distress across the Western world in July over the big-game killing of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe was apparently misdirected, according to veteran “animal communicator” Karen Anderson of Elk, Wash., who told Facebook and Internet visitors (AnimalCommunicating.com) that Cecil and she had discussed his demise and that he was over it. Also, Cecil apparently speaks in formal, graceful English, as Anderson quoted him (according to London’s The Independent): “Let not the actions of these few men defeat us,” said Cecil, “or allow darkness to enter our hearts.” “I am,” he added, “grander than before as no one can take our purity, our truth or our soul.” (Anderson’s usual fee to speak with deceased pets is $75 for 15 minutes, but she did not disclose whether she had a client for Cecil’s tab.)

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

The Litigious Society The estate of Dr. Rajan Verma filed a lawsuit in July against the Tralf Music Hall in Buffalo, N.Y., after Dr. Verma fell to his death following a concert when he lost his balance sliding down the banister. The estate claims that there must have been a sticky substance on the railing. The estate’s lawyers said that since alcohol was served at the concert, the promoters should have known to take extra safety precautions for banister-riders.

WEIRD

Chutzpah! In May, three Santa Ana, Calif., police officers who had just raided the unlicensed Sky High Holistic medical marijuana dispensary were caught on the facility’s surveillance video eating supposedly seized cannabis-infused chocolate bars, and an “internal affairs” investigation was opened. However, in August, the Orange County Register reported that the cops went to court to have the video suppressed. Their familiar legal argument is that the video violates their right to privacy—in that they had purposely disabled the cameras before they began munching the contraband and thus had the requisite “expectation of privacy” that triggers the right. (Possibly, they had missed a camera.) n The mother of three children in Grandview, Mo., suspected that Dameion McBride, 22, had sexually molested her two daughters (ages 4 and 8) and son (age 3), but McBride indignantly denied it, claiming that he is a child-abuse survivor himself, and booked himself on the national Steve Wilkos TV show in May to take a lie-detector test to clear his name. However, he failed the test as to each child and was subsequently arrested. (The Associated Press reported that McBride insisted on a police lie-detector test—and failed that, too.)

The Continuing Crisis On Aug. 1, one of the world’s weirdest border disputes came to an end, as India and Bangladesh exchanged more than 160 “enclaves”—sovereign territory completely surrounded by the other country’s sovereign territory (in principle, making travel out of the enclaves impossible unless the enclave had an embassy or another office that issues visas). In fact, there was one Indian enclave (Dahala Khagrabari) completely within a Bangladeshi enclave that is completely inside an Indian enclave inside Bangladesh.

n Who gets badly hurt playing musical chairs? Robin Earnest, 46, told an Arkansas claims hearing that she broke two fingers and was forced into “years” of surgery and physical therapy over a game that was part of a class at the College of the Ouachitas in 2011 and demanded at least $75,000 from the state. The July hearing was dominated by a discussion of the proper way to play musical chairs because the instructor had ordered three students to contest one chair—with Earnest asserting that everyone knows it would be two chairs for three people.

News That Sounds Like a Joke “Green-fingered residents” can show off their hard work each year at the Quedgeley Show in Gloucestershire, England, entering arrangements of colorful, plump garden-grown vegetables. However, attendance has been off in recent years, reported the Western Daily Press, leaving the show’s future in doubt—until organizers announced that this year, to increase the number of entries, supermarket-bought vegetables could be submitted. n “Number Two, Turn to the Right and Growl”: Magistrates in Ceredigion, Wales, fined Edward Davies the equivalent of about $1,130 in June, finding that it was his dog that bit a teenage girl last October, sending her to a hospital with swelling and bruising. Aberystwyth authorities had set up a formal police lineup of dogs from the neighborhood, and the girl had made a positive ID of Davies’ dog as the perp.

Least Competent Criminals Judge Roger Barto, of Waterloo (New York) Village Court, was convicted in August of staging a fake assault on himself to convince doctors to prescribe him pain medication. Officers arriving at the scene found Barto lying on the ground with a shattered porcelain toilet-tank lid nearby from (he said) being smacked on the head by a mugger. However, doctors found an apparent flaw in Barto’s ruse: He had forgotten to actually hurt himself during the “attack”—as medical personnel had found no mark, cut or bruise anywhere on him. Thanks This Week to Dan Bohlen, Dan Wasserman, Bryce Jackson and Charles Smaistrla, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial


The Science of Brewing...

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Let’s Play! G a m er s s cr ea m , s w ea r & fig ht th eir w a y to n ew fo u nd celeb rity o n Y o uTub e.

E

B Y

G A V I N

S H E E H A N

C O M M E N T S @ C I T Y W E E K L Y . N E T

arly in the afternoon, after waking up, showering and grabbing a bite to eat, Dean Richards powers up a computer and turns on some lighting equipment. He sits down in his dining-room-turned-makeshift-studio and pans through his vast inventory of games. He turns on a camera, fires up recording software, kicks the Steam client into action and dons his customary hat. After the game loads to the start screen, Richards hits the “record” button and immediately comes alive as the pleasantly happy and easygoing YouTube personality Ris Grestar. All this takes place in Cottonwood Heights on a typical neighborhood street, in an average split-level home with a tidy facade and maybe one dog barking in the distance. It’s not the type of place you’d expect to find a local YouTube celebrity. But the fact is: An online media star currently resides in our valley, and he’s gaining more fans even as you read this article. This 22-year-old gamer is a Let’s Player, with more than 48,000 subscribers. Simply put, he makes his living playing video games while people watch online. Each month, YouTube sends him a check for showing up to work. If that gig sounds too good to be true, it may surprise you to learn Let’s Play is actually a growing entertainment genre across the globe, with the majority of content creators coming from North America and Europe, and it has become the latest viewing pastime for the coveted 18-to-36-year-old demographic that marketers long to reach.

Let’s Play 101

The uninitiated may be asking: What the hell is a Let’s Player? For starters, Let’s Players (along with a coterie of video bloggers, product reviewers, musicians, comics, rappers, artists and more) live on YouTube, the videosharing website that is the second-largest search engine in the world (next to Google, which owns it). YouTube’s channels have long been a refuge for video gamers eager to connect and share experiences with other gamers. Within YouTube’s first year (it’s only been around since 2005), gamers who created profiles figured out that they could utilize video channels to show off digital clips they recorded from games they played. This trend created a fan base and allowed gamers to tout their achievements with popular games like Halo, World of Warcraft and Call of Duty. The bragging rights spawned into what is commonly known as “the walkthrough.” When playing video games on YouTube, a gamer will play a new video game such as The Witcher 3 from the beginning. That gamer will walk through or play that title all the way until the end, including cut-scenes and visual aids, eventually completing the game and earning the online cred that comes from having done so. Game developers and hardcore gamers have had issues with this over the years, claiming that watching a walkthrough ruined the experience for gamers who were stuck and wanted to finish the game. It encouraged those who needed a cheat guide (which helps players experience the story without having to needlessly struggle with a certain part of the game) but it potentially robs publishers of profits they might have earned if that person purchased the game instead of watching it being played.

On the other hand, gamers who create YouTube videos argue it helps promote the game to those on the fence about buying it. Plus, it provides entertainment to an audience that isn’t likely to plunk down the $60 for a game they weren’t going to play anyway. Gamers began adding commentary to their recordings in the late ‘00s, using headsets they purchased with their console or computers to chat with people through multiplayer games. As the trend grew, personalities emerged to the point that those creating the videos developed personal connections with their audiences, and that resulted in hordes of subscribers and views. According to the video-game blog Kotaku, Michael “Slowbeef” Sawyer first coined the term “Let’s Play” for this particular format roughly five years ago, and shortly thereafter, users like PewDiePie, Markiplier, Cinnamon Toast Ken, Dodger, TheRPGMinx, Cryaotic, Achievement Hunter, Jessie Cox, ProJarod and more began making names for themselves using the new format, transforming it in a few short years into the veritable profession it is today. YouTube is beginning to come to grips with Let’s Play’s use of copyrighted materials. The company is surprisingly supportive of Let’s Players while recognizing the need for system management. “We work to be a home for the entire gaming community—publishers, gamers, viewers and everything in between,” says YouTube’s communications manager Matt McLernon in an email. “That’s why we’ve built the best video-sharing, engagement and copyright management tools so that we’re allowing people to connect around the games they love, while enabling copyright owners to manage how their content is used on YouTube.”


PHOTO CREDIT CAT PALMER

Dean Richards (aka Ris Grestar)

R I S G R E STA R Subscribers

49,586

Joined YouTube Apr 25, 2007 Total of 11,579,214 views and 1,290 uploads

Utah Talent

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of intense horror games, Five Nights at Freddy’s. “As [the audience] was building, it was really awesome,” says Richards, reflecting on his subscribers. “Just having that returning audience and seeing people who were like, ‘I had all these issues at school and everything. Then I came home and watched your video, and now it’s all better.’ Hearing things like that is always great.” That fan base allowed Richards to take gaming from a hobby to a job. The paycheck comes through YouTube’s setup that allows content creators to place ads on their videos. Richards earns a small amount of money every time an ad is seen. (On a side note, YouTube does not count views from viewers utilizing ad/pop-up blockers, and he earns no credit on those views.) As Richard’s audience grew, the monetization of his videos increased to the point where he started receiving checks from YouTube. The money he earns is based on the view-count for each video (roughly 1/10 of a penny per click), as well as the ads he allows YouTube to play at the start and that run along the bottom of his videos. That may not seem like a lot, but once you start posting videos daily with thousands of hits per day— those pennies add up. As of press time, Richards was nearing 50,000 followers (which is more subscribers than all Utah media YouTube channels combined), with YouTube sending him a check for roughly $600 per month. “Anyone can choose to advertise on their videos, and the creator earns the majority share of that revenue,” notes YouTube’s McLernon. “What a creator can earn is dependent on three things: The type of advertisements purchased (video, display, etc.), the creator (how big their channel is/number of subscribers) and the viewer (what country they’re watching from, demographic, etc.).”

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Gaming had always just been a part of Dean Richards’ life growing up. Even as a child, he remembered seeing his dad play Sonic the Hedgehog in the garage. As a younger teen, he would race his brother Dartanian home to play Pokémon Yellow. The Richards brothers were raised in a Nintendo home, venturing outside the brand only to include the dragon platformer Spyro and first-person shooter Halo. When his brother moved away to attend college, he took all the console games with him, forcing Dean to find new gaming experiences in the PC world. This opened up more gaming possibilities and a greater library, not to mention more reliable experiences than his Wii allowed, as it kept breaking down He began watching Let’s Players during his first year of college in 2011. He had moved in with a friend who was gone most of the time for work, so he’d entertain himself by watching YouTube. That’s when he stumbled upon the account of Toby Turner, aka Tobuscus. Then, he began watching two other players—Swedishbased comedic gamer PewDiePie and Ohio-based horror-gamer Markiplier—who served as inspiration and motivation for him to go out on his own. “I showed my little brothers [a video of] Toby playing Slender: The Eight Pages when I went to visit one time. And then they wanted to watch me play it,” Richards said. “But I know that I’m a chicken, and I didn’t want them to watch over my shoulder. “So I said, ‘All right, I’ll record it for you, and then you can watch that.’ I felt more comfortable that way. So, I recorded it, and that was kinda fun because I got to rewatch that and relive

that—but from an audience kind of perspective of myself. It was amusing.” He moved on to other games with his brothers as his only audience, but around the time they started losing interest, others had caught on and noticed his YouTube channel. As comments and subscribers started trickling in, Richards made the decision to start making videos on a regular basis. It was a way of giving back to the community: As someone who had been entertained over the years with YouTube content, it became a heady experience to contribute to the ever-growing free media giant. As his audience continued to grow, he felt an obligation to not let them down, so he put up new content on a daily basis. He took on the moniker of Ris Grestar, a combination of a nickname he created years ago playing the sci-fi role-playing game Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, and a handle he made on a Star Fox forum, based around the popular Nintendo spaceshooter game. Over time, he had the means to purchase and incorporate new recording technology, carefully choosing the right camera, microphone and software needed to make his videos look like those of the pros who had come before him. He studied to make sure the background wasn’t cluttered and that the lighting was well set—not to mention that the computer had sufficient resources that it didn’t lag. He finally snagged a Blue Yeti microphone and went through two cameras before finding one to do 1080p high definition, the Logitech C920 camera. He continued to grow his audience of subscribers and viewers as he screamed and fought his way through games like the action role-playing Oblivion, the fantasy god game Spore, the rampaging damage animal game Goat Simulator and the current king

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the White House

While Richards’ earnings might seem modest for a lot of work (or play), he’s got every reason to be optimistic about his prospects. Consider Mark Fischbach, aka Markiplier. Raised in Ohio, Fischbach grew up an obsessed gamer, with titles like the sci-fi piloting games of the Star Wars: X-Wing series, fantasy shooter game Magic Carpet 2, first-person shooter DOOM and the earth-creating strategy game Populous 3 among his favorites. Fischbach experienced a lot of ups-and-downs in his personal life throughout his teenage and young-adult years, but gaming always remained a source of fun for him. While in college studying to become a biomedical engineer, his brother introduced him to the concept of Let’s Play videos, which were just getting their start. In 2012, shortly after losing his job and girlfriend and while dealing with a swollen appendix, the then-23-year-old Fischbach made the decision to take control of his life and do things he wanted to do. He started with the idea of doing sketchcomedy videos for YouTube, but that morphed into him creating his own identity, which became Markiplier. The hits didn’t come in right away, but his few fans made the venture worth the time. In the beginning, Fischbach said, it was “busy. I was so enamored with the process of making videos and responding to people’s comments and emails that nothing else mattered.

Mark Fischbach (aka Markiplier)

PHOTO COURTESY BREW PR

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20 | AUGUST 27, 2015

Invited to

I always love the feeling of being completely obsessed with a new venture and this was as far down the rabbit hole as I’d ever been. I would delay going to bed and sacrifice sleep just so I could get back to making more videos and seeing what people thought of yesterday’s ones.” Video series on games like Amnesia, Cry of Fear and “Drunk Minecraft” (where he and fellow gamers Bob & Wade take shots while playing) garnered the biggest hits, and in a matter of months, Markiplier’s channel grew from 400 to 10,000. His personality as an excited gamer willing to try anything shone through, even if it terrified him and threatened to give him a heart attack before he turned 30. Within a year, he had racked up 1 million subscribers. Suddenly, without warning, he faced a catastrophic moment for any content creator: YouTube shut down his original channel, and he learned a big lesson at the height of his first run. “YouTube’s early systems were all automated,” Fischbach recalled. “Therefore, there were a lot of false-positives about people trying to exploit the monetization system. I was just one of those unfortunate cases that had their monetization disabled and no one to appeal to. I realized almost immediately that I had to move on, but it was so heart-breaking to lose what I thought was mine.” When asked to comment on the closure of Fischbach’s first channel, YouTube representatives declined to comment. After a conversation with fellow gamer, Wade, over what to do, Fischbach relaunched his channel under a new name and reloaded all his videos, this time complying strictly with the YouTube system. The audience he once had returned in droves and re-clicked all his videos in support of his work and the

community he created. He threw himself into the endeavor, and it paid off big time. His fanbase doubled, and his videos received more exposure than those of most of his peers. Shortly after, in 2014, he moved to Los Angeles to work with Maker Studios and join the growing community of Let’s Players in developing content. Rather than resting on his laurels as an Internet celebrity, Fischbach uses his stardom to benefit charities, such as Best Friends Animal Society Los Angeles and the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. He’s been invited to attend conventions across the United States to meet fans, has taken part in award shows and presentations such as NewFront, and he even was invited to the White House to talk about the impact gaming has on the upcoming generation. The medium has given Fischbach a chance to communicate personally to his audience about topics such as depression and suicide. Being a voice of hope and inspiration to those who may be in a dark place is another way he likes to give back to his fans. As of press time, Markiplier’s YouTube Let’s Play channel just surpassed the 9 million subscriber mark (second only to PewDiePie, aka Felix Kjellber, with over 38 million), putting him in YouTube’s top 50 channels in 2015. In a five-year period, he grew from an unknown gamer to one of the most influential people in new media by simply being himself and doing something he enjoyed. Fischbach wouldn’t say how much he earns from YouTube, but a 2014 Wall Street Journal article noted that Let’s Player PewDiePie raked in $4 million in ad sales annually. It’s enough to motivate gamers like Richards to get into the game.

MARKIPLIER Subscribers 9,084,866

Joined YouTube May 26, 2012 Total of 2,993,547,612 views and 2,492 uploads


PEWDIEPIE Subscribers 38,852,454 Joined YouTube Apr 29, 2010 Total of 9,870,304,398 views and 2,447 uploads

Legal & Ethical

Quandaries

Is It Worth It?

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AUGUST 27, 2015 | 21

It’s easy to compare the rise of Let’s Play videos with that of podcasting. Other media disrupters include Vine’s six-second videos and BuzzFeed’s lists. Each new form of entertainment and news delivery started in the same way: A brave few latched onto an idea and made it popular, and within a few years, fans started trying it out for themselves. Fans can now aspire to their own 15 minutes of fame. While there are no official stats as to how many people try Let’s Play every week, a YouTube search for “Let’s Play” retrieves tens of thousands of hits uploaded within the past week— and more than 1.5 million overall. That should give some idea to its popularity. When Markiplier was asked if the onslaught of new players diminished the work he and others have accomplished, he brushes it off completely: “Oh, pish posh! Good and bad are so subjective. It’s pointless to even try to differentiate the two across the spectrum of people watching on YouTube,” he said. “There’s no point in trying to protect our sand castles just because the beach got crowded. If my channel were to collapse tomorrow under the weight of a thousand shitty channels, it wouldn’t stop me from being me. I’d just move on to something else that I enjoy.” YouTube has chosen to embrace the phenomenon, both by encouraging new content and being more in-touch with members who have highprofile accounts. “YouTube has the most vibrant, diverse and engaged gaming community built by

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Let’s Play:

hundreds of millions of gamers during the past 10 years,” writes YouTube McLernon in an email. “Each member of this community has been at the tip of the spear when it comes to creating new collaborative and interactive formats that have fundamentally reshaped the video game landscape, and pushed YouTube forward.” McLernon noted that YouTube provides gamers with a wide variety of resources, ranging from YouTube.com/creators to its YouTube Spaces. Meanwhile, back in Utah, Richards joins the second wave of Let’s Players expanding the field with diverse commentary. He’s optimistic about his future in a genre where new talent shows up daily, with new games to play and new viewers to share videos with hourly. “In the next few years, I’m hoping to reach 100,000—because it is such a big milestone,” Richards says. “And I’m hoping it will be a lot faster than that. I like to aim low, so I’m not disappointed, but pleasantly surprised. But I’m hoping it will continue like it has been. Right now it’s about 50-100 [new subscribers] a day, which is still great, I’m still very happy about that. I try to have a friendly community, so the people really love me and watch my videos; I feel that they’re the same way. They’re there to have a good time—we try not to argue a lot or put other people down. “I love seeing all those good comments like ‘keep up the good work’ and see people interacting in the comments and having a good time. That’s really exciting.” CW

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As with many genres of media that utilize other creator’s content to create new content, Let’s Play’s sampling of video-game content resides in a legally gray area. Game developers argue they own the copyrights and, therefore, deserve profits made from their creations, while others argue that adding commentary and not showing the full gaming experience is allowed under the claim of fair use. In a March 2015 Wired interview with Let’s Player MasaeAnela, writer Chris Kohler noted that, while developers are entitled to claim advertising revenue from a gamer’s video that uses any videogame footage (or have it removed from YouTube), “they could be stepping over dollars to pick up pennies.” Nintendo, in particular, takes a hard line. It openly challenged gamers through YouTube’s Content ID program (an automated filter that alerts copyright holders of unallowed use of their intellectual property), only to backtrack and start a Let’s Play program of its own. Now, players can basically work for Nintendo on its approved list of games to create videos, and the company will share part of the profits earned from YouTube for using Nintendo content. However, if its done without consent, Nintendo can have videos taken down and/or pursue copyright-infringement in court. Many Let’s Players called foul on Nintendo’s program, and subsequently stopped playing newer Nintendo titles, effectively taking them out of the current rise of content. PewDiePie openly spoke out against Nintendo’s program on his blog, and in April 2015, Polygon documented Let’s Player “Angry Joe” Vargas’ response to Nintendo pulling his content. Copyright issues are one concern; ethical disclosure is another. Many gamers openly admit receiving free games and promotional items. In a March 2015 video, PewDiePie filmed his own adventure as he took a tour of Square Enix in Japan before a Final Fantasy app was released later that spring. PR firms now have established systems where Let’s Players can request free copies of games for their channels, but rarely do players disclose that games were free, raising concerns over the credibility of their reviews. It begs the question: Once a product has been given to a player free of charge from a game developer that will be making more games down the line, with no established code of ethics, how can fans trust the opinions of players?

When asked about this, Mark Fischbach (aka Markiplier) said, “it really doesn’t faze me at all— mostly because I often forget that I am in a considerable position of influence that companies would find valuable. I try not to focus on those sorts of things, because it distracts from what I’m really here to do: make people laugh. Most of the time, if I’m recording a game that I don’t like, I’m not going to upload it, plain and simple. When I’m giving my thoughts on the games that I play, I try to stay as open and honest as possible at all times.” City Weekly attempted to discuss these concerns with several game developers, ranging from local companies such as Ninja Bee to international brands like Nintendo, and even public relations companies such as One PR and Evolve who deal directly with developers and players from various forms of media. However, they either did not respond or declined to comment on this story.


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22 AUGUST 27, 2015

ESSENTIALS

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS AUG. 27-SEPT. 2

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

CFA/DENNIS MECHAM

the

THURSDAY 8.27

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Momentum 2015 When former Ririe-Woodbury dancers Juan Carlos Claudio and Jill Voorhees Edwards curated the company’s first Momentum performance—an evening of works featuring choreography from company alumni—they thought it would be a one-time deal. Seven years later, it has become an annual favorite. Part of what keeps Momentum a refreshing addition to the company’s regular performance season is the variety of styles and expression presented in a single evening. Without an overarching theme, each choreographer’s work stands alone as a unique voice. Returning alumna and Momentum producer Edwards—who, since departing from Ririe-Woodbury, has continued her work in the dance world as a teacher and founder of her own company—says that for the artists, Momentum is an invaluable opportunity to exhibit their personal artistic development in a community that still feels like home. This year, six choreographers show their creations. Four are returning contributors (Claudio, Edwards, Chia-Chi Chiang and Jillian Harris) and two are new (Lehua Estrada and current company member Bradley Beakes). Harris, in particular, takes Momentum 2015 to new creative heights with the mixed-media dance Red Earth Calling (pictured), the first dance film ever to be shown at a Momentum production. Part of an exciting and increasingly popular new wave of dance films, this piece, shot in Moab, tells the visual tale of a young man lost in the desert, slowly enchanted by the spirit of the land. Red Earth Calling is a perfect example of how alumnus works serve as important bridges to the ever-evolving world of dance. (Katherine Pioli)

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Momentum 2015, @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3532787, Aug 27-28, 7:30 p.m., $20 general, $15 students. ArtTix.org

THURSDAY 8.27 Ralphie May

One of the great stand-up comedians is taking the stage at Wiseguys. Ralphie May was voted one of the Top 10 comics to watch by Variety back in 2008, and his Southern swagger and vulgarity make even the toughest critics laugh out loud. His sold-out shows are enjoyed by audiences everywhere, and no subject is off limits; not many can switch subjects—from Dora the Explorer being a little lost Mexican girl to getting stoned with Jesus (“Who do you know that works construction and doesn’t smoke a little weed once in a while?”)—and not lose or offend someone in the audience along the way. May’s no-nonsense approach to life might have you blushing in your seat while your face hurts from laughing as he points out society’s hypocrisies, leaving no sacred cows unscathed. Born in Tennessee and raised in Arkansas, May got his start in the business at age 17 after winning a contest to open for his idol, the late Sam Kinison. With Kinison’s encouragement, May went to Houston to develop his comedic routine, and has since taken the comedic world by storm. He has appeared on Comedy Central, NBC’s Last Comic Standing and recently released his fourth one-hour special Too Big to Ignore. He also released a new comedy special on Netflix, Ralphie May: Unruly—an adjective that pretty much sums him up. (Aimee L. Cook)

Ralphie May @ Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, Aug. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 28-29, 7:30 & 10 p.m.; $25; 21 and over. WiseguysComedy.com

SATURDAY 8.29

TUESDAY 9.1

Every year, the performing arts companies that call the Rose Wagner Center home spend 10 hours creating music, dance and theater performances, all of which share a common theme or concept. When their 10 hours is up, they unleash their collective talents upon Salt Lake City for an evening of singular entertainment. Starting at 9 a.m., Plan-B Theatre, SB Dance, Gina Bachauer International Piano Foundation, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co., Pygmalion Theatre Co. and Repertory Dance Theatre will each create pieces they will perform for audiences at 8 p.m. Before the evening show, attendees are welcome to visit the Rose Wagner Center to see live rehearsals of their favorite local performing-arts groups. The idea for this year’s theme was inspired by an upcoming project by Art Access, a local organization that is dedicated to providing inclusive opportunities for people to create and interact with art. The Dreamers Project is a series of artistic endeavors that will delve into the stories of immigrant culture in order to help people better understand its complexity. All of the proceeds from the evening show go directly to Art Access and the Dreamers Project. As the evening’s performances are developed over the course of this single day, attendees can expect six one-night-only shows that run the gamut of performing arts. The Rose Exposed offers a unique opportunity for fans of these creative companies to see what goes into creating a performance from start to finish. (Alex Springer)

We all hate to be lied to. Yet we’re also fascinated by what happens when other people are lied to. And in Christine Seifert’s lively new book Whoppers, she explores the stories of some of the most intriguing con artists, frauds, charlatans, hucksters and pretenders who have ever pulled the wool over unsuspecting eyes. Many of the names and tales here are likely to be familiar, from the subjects of movies (Catch Me If You Can’s Frank Abagnale Jr.; Quiz Show’s Charles Van Doren) to those whose deceptions made 21st-century national news (like cyclist Lance Armstrong, Oprah-chided memoirist James Frey or Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff). But Seifert also finds lesser-known stories of people whose deceptions were more admirable, like 19th-century abolitionist Mattie Griffith, who wrote a faked Autobiography of a Female Slave to raise money for re-settling her own family’s freed slaves, or Deborah Sampson, who posed as a man in order to fight with the infantry in the American Revolutionary War. From forged photos of monsters and fairies to YouTube-era tricks to a successful attempt to sell someone the Eiffel Tower, Seifert provides an encyclopedia of tall tales and their tellers. Yet she also attempts to understand both what motivated these frauds and why people were willing and able to believe them. Sprinkled with fun bits of trivia, Whoppers makes brisk reading out of the many reasons we practice to deceive. And that’s the truth. (Scott Renshaw)

The Rose Exposed: The Dreamers Project

Rose Exposed: The Dreamers Project @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Aug. 29, open daytime rehearsals, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., free; evening show, 8 p.m., $15, ArtTix.org

Christine Seifert: Whoppers: History’s Most Outrageous Lies and Liars

Christine Seifert: Whoppers: History’s Most Outrageous Lies and Liars @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 1, 7 p.m., free. KingsEnglish.com


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AUGUST 27, 2015 23


VISUAL ART

A Passion Fulfilled

Utah Museum of Fine Arts showcases masterpieces of British landscape painting. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

O

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A&E

8/30 11am

9/1

MUS

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with kevin fernley

6:30pm

MUSIC

with hieronymus bogs

9/4

PAINT P-ART-Y

(pre register at mobileartparties.com

MUSIC

with them travelin’ birds

6pm

9/12 6:30pm

9/30 6pm $5 at the door

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USIC

ne of the most captivating stories in the history of art is the evolution of the tradition of British landscape painting, from the 17th century onward. It’s not just a narrative about an artistic genre; it’s a chronicle of a nation’s relationship with the land and how that relationship has changed over time. The traveling exhibit The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces From National Museum Wales—making a visit at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts at the University of Utah—demonstrates this artistic progression with more than 60 works by some of the most renowned names in art history, from Turner and Constable to Gainsborough and Monet. Luke Kelly, associate curator of antiquities at the museum, is organizing the exhibit and notes that the stop is the result of multidisciplinary coordination. In 2010, Yale University art-history professor Tim Barringer was lecturing here, and he mentioned to UMFA Executive Director Gretchen Dietrich a traveling exhibit of British landscapes he was assembling with the National Museum of Wales seemed like a good fit. After Dietrich’s pursuit of the exhibit, the university became the third of four U.S. stops. The timeline of artworks in the exhibit charts the transformation of Britain from a rural, agrarian society to a powerhouse of the Industrial Revolution and beyond. Kelly observes that Oliver Fairclough, of the National Museum of Wales, organized the works into six sections, corresponding roughly to historical periods. The first, “Classical Visions & Picturesque Perspectives,” finds British artists in the mid-1800s looking toward continental works for inspiration. “British artists like Richard Wilson, who had made the ‘grand tour’ of the continent, would see their artwork, and emulate that,” Kelly explains. “Wilson took the Welsh

with Melissa Moss (Local Artist) Nathan Fox (San Diego, CA) Morning Bear (Denver, Co)

1560 East 3300 South 801-410-4696 dittacaffe.com

Detail of John Constable’s “A Cottage in a Cornfield”

landmark ‘Dinas Bran Castle’ (early 1770s) and transplanted it to an Italian landscape setting.” The next section, “Turner & The Sublime,” is in some ways the most dramatic. “J.M.W. Turner was such a pivotal figure,” Kelly maintains. “Before Turner, landscape was not to be celebrated for its own merits. Landscape was background for portraiture or historical figures. Turner is always looking for a new way to depict atmosphere, light, storms.” Turner’s life was the subject of the Oscarnominated 2014 film Mr. Turner, which will receive a free screening in conjunction with the exhibit on Sept. 30. Turner was experimenting with technique in watercolors, for which he isn’t as well known. “By the 1830s, with ‘Flint Castle,’ you have this gorgeous, light-filled watercolor that almost looks like an oil painting,” Kelly notes. “Truth to Nature’ is the third section, showcasing John Constable, whose rivalry with Turner became the stuff of legend. “Where you can see Turner turning up the atmosphere, Constable is simply celebrating the natural beauty of Suffolk County, where he was from, in his ‘A Cottage in a Cornfield’ (1817).” This section also includes examples of the then-new medium of photography. The exhibit transitions into “Picturing Modernity,” which follows Britain into the Industrial Revolution, with its mines and steelworks. “Turner embraced it; Constable didn’t,” Kelly explains. “Lionel Walden’s ‘Cardiff Steelworks At Night’ (1895-97) is almost an ‘industrial sublime.’ For some, it was awful, but it had its own beauty.” “Monet & Impressions of Britain” provides fascinating glimpses of the French Impressionist’s visits to Britain in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. “Charing Cross Bridge” (1902) is unmistakeable as the artist’s work, yet captures a very different subject matter for him. “Monet embraced the fog; he was enthralled by London,” Kelly notes. Other artists in this section used impressionist techniques to

Detail of Richard Wilson’s “Dover Castle” depict the English countryside. The final section, “Neoromantic to Postmodern,” assembles works in myriad styles, from expressionism to social realism and surrealism. Land art works by David Welsh and Hamish Fulton have a special resonance for the museum, with its interest in that medium. “Fulton is known as ‘the walking artist,’ and went on a tour of the English countryside,” Kelly explains. “He went not to find art, but walking was the art.” In Utah, there is a special relation to this exhibit because, like the British, we have long had a passion for our natural environs as a symbol of our heritage. But amid the struggle between state and federal agencies for control of the land, that relationship is sometimes complicated. The exhibit Constructing Utah Landscape runs concurrently with The British Passion for Landscape, with interactive features to help viewers ponder the questions of how to construct a landscape, and what a “landscape” is. We come to see all these works not as mere artifacts but as “interventions into the landscape,” as Barringer calls it in Passions Green & Dark Satanic Mills, an accompanying book. Those questions are still being pondered by artists all over the world. “What this show tells us,” Kelly believes, “is that English landscape is not a dead subject, but that artists are still enthralled by it. How are artists going to approach it, and how will they build upon it?” CW

THE BRITISH PASSION FOR LANDSCAPE: MASTERPIECES FROM NATIONAL MUSEUM WALES

Utah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah 410 Campus Center Drive 801-581-7332 Aug. 29-Dec. 13 Curator talk: Tim Barringer, Oct. 22, 7-9 p.m., UMFA.Utah.edu


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26 AUGUST 27, 2015

Friday, Sept. 4

DOWNTOWN EVANSTON

Live Music & Entertainment For All!

Saturday, Sept. 5

PRCA RODEO 6:00 P.M. (Gates open @ 4:00)

Sunday Sept. 6

TWO-MAN GOLF SCRAMBLE @ Purple stage

PRCA RODEO 6:00 P.M. (Gates open @ 4:00)

Monday, Sept. 7

POWER WHEELS DEMOLITION DERBY Register Online

PRCA RODEO 2:00 P.M. (Gates open @ noon)

For more detailed info visit our website www.evanstoncowboydays.com

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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

SATURDAY 8.29

Latin Ballroom Lessons With Chelsie Hightower So you think you can’t dance? Or, more to the point, you know you can’t? Wouldn’t it be great to pick up a few pointers from someone who has taken her skills to the national stage, and find yourself with a few Latin dance moves in your back pocket for special occasions—or for making every occasion a little more special? Utah’s own Chelsie Hightower—an alum of both Dancing With the Stars and So You Think You Can Dance? as performer and choreographer—stops in for a visit this weekend at DF Dance Studio, where she will lead a two-hour program of special lessons. Beginners are welcome for the first hour, which will focus on the rumba (a style recommended for beginning dancers), while experience is recommended for refining technique on the chacha during the second hour. No partner is needed for the classes; simply bring your willingness to believe that, with a pro showing you how, you can dance. (Scott Renshaw) Latin Ballroom Lessons With Chelsie Hightower @ DF Dance Studio, 2978 S. State, 801-466-0490, Aug. 29, 12-2 p.m., $35 advance/$40 door. DFDanceStudio.com

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Bridge to Terabithia Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington, 435-251-8000, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, through Aug. 29, 7 p.m., BrighamsPlayhouse.com Caesar’s Blood Utah Shakespeare Festival New American Playwrights Project, Auditorium Theatre, 300 W. University Blvd., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, Aug. 27, 10 a.m., Bard.org Closure Utah Shakespeare Festival New American Playwrights Project, Auditorium Theatre, 300 W. University Blvd., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, Aug. 28, 10 a.m., Bard.org The Diary of Anne Frank Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 3 p.m.; through Sept. 26, HaleTheater.org Disney’s Beauty and The Beast Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3300, through Oct. 17, 8:45 p.m., Tuacahn.org Disney’s When You Wish Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3300, through Oct. 16; Tuacahn.org The Fermi Paradox staged reading, Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Aug. 31, 7 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org Fiddler on the Roof Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington, 435-251-8000, TuesdaySaturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., through Sept. 12, BrighamsPlayhouse.com Forever Plaid The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, Thursday-Saturday 7:30 p.m., Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., through Sept. 19, The-Grand.org Guys and Dolls CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 5, CenterPointTheatre.org Hairspray Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 5, ZigArts.com Jurassic Park City Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 12, TheOBT.org Oklahoma! Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee,

12:30 & 4 p.m.; through Oct. 3, HCT.org Seussical Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-393-0070, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Sept. 14, TerracePlayhouse.com Star Wards: These Are Not The Elders You’re Looking For Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, Monday, WednesdayFriday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2:30, 6 & 8 p.m., through Nov. 27, DesertStar.biz The Wiz Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, Aug. 7-29, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; EmpressTheatre.com Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 30, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6 p.m.; SaltLakeActingCompany.org Sister Act Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 15, Tuacahn.org Utah Shakespeare Festival: Amadeus, Charley’s Aunt, The Comedy of Errors, Dracula, Henry IV Part Two, King Lear, South Pacific, The Taming of the Shrew, The Two Gentlemen of Verona 351 W. Center Street, Cedar City, 800-752-9849, through Sept. 5, Bard.org West Side Story St. George Musical Theater, 212 N. Main, St. George, 435-628-8755, Monday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 29 matinee, 2 p.m.; through Sept. 18, SGMusicalTheater.com

DANCE

Momentum 2015 Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Aug. 27-28, 7:30 p.m., RirieWoodbury.com (see p. 22) Movement in Film: A loveDANCEmore Exhibit Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, Aug. 31-Oct. 17, live dance performance Sept. 5, 3:30 p.m., SLCPL.org The Rose Exposed: The Dreamers’ Project Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Aug. 29, 8 p.m., ArtTix.org (see p. 22)


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28 AUGUST 27, 2015

moreESSENTIALS COMEDY & IMPROV

Crowdsourced Comedy Club at 50 West, 50 W. Broadway, 801-888-9828, Tuesday, 7 p.m., Age 18 and up or 16 with adult (21+), CrowdsourcedLive.com Laughing Stock Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Friday & Saturday, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Ralphie May Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, Aug. 27, 7:30 p.m., Aug. 28-29, 7:30 & 10 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 22) Shaun Paulsen Wiseguys Comedy Club, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, Aug. 28-29, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Christine Seifert: Whoppers: History’s Most Outrageous Lies and Liars The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 1, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 22)

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

fesitival family fun music

sep. 4, 5, 6 labor day weekend

Downtown Farmers Market, Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South,Saturday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tuesday, 4-9 p.m.; through Oct.24, SLCFarmersMarket.org Provo Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 500 W. Center St., Provo, Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 31, ProvoFarmersMarket.org 9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 25, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Park Silly Sunday Market Historic Main Street, Park City, Sunday, 10 a.m., through Sept. 20, 435-655-0994, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Wheeler Farm Farmers Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-792-1419, Sunday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 25, WheelerFarm.com

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

FEATURING Gin blossoms nitty gritty dirt band fastball Rembrandts royal bliss b l a c k j a c k b i l ly Jagertown Motorcycle Rally BBQ Competition chili cook-off WyomingWestMusicFest.com

10th South American Festival Bountiful City Park, 200 W. 400 North, Bountiful, 801-683-9737, Aug. 28, 2-9:30 p.m.; Aug. 29, 12-9:30 p.m., FestivalSudAmericano.com Aki Matsuri Japanese Fall Festival Japanese Church of Christ, 268 W. 100 South, 801-363-3251, Aug. 29, noon-6 p.m., JCCSLC.net Box Elder County Fair Box Elder County Fairgrounds, 320 N. 1000 West, Brigham City, Aug. 22-29, BoxElderCounty.org/fair.htm Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, 801-933-2222, Saturday & Sunday, 12-6:30 p.m., through Oct. 11, Snowbird.com SoulWorks Full Moon Psychic & Holistic Fair Dancing Cranes Imports, 673 E. Simpson Ave., 801-815-0588, Aug. 29, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., DancingCraneImports.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET Timpanogos Storytelling Festival Mt. Timpanogos Park (Provo Canyon), Orem Public LIbrary, The Shops at Riverwoods and SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, Orem, Sept. 2-5, TimpFest.org Utah Renaissance Faire Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-999-8007, Aug. 28-29, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., UtahRenFaire.org Western Legends Round Up Main Street, Kanab, Aug. 27-29, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., WesternLegendsRoundUp.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

18th Annual Teen Exhibit Art Access Gallery II, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Sept. 11, AccessArt.org 21st Annual Partners Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Sept. 11, AccessArt.org Alla Prima: Acrylic Paintings by Jennifer Seeley Main Library Level 2 Canteena, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 20, SLCPL.org Andrew Fillmore: Proof Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Suite 700, through Sept. 13, MestizoArts.org Articles of Clothing Rio Gallery, 300 S. 400 West, 801-245-7272, Aug. 27-28, Heritage.utah.gov/dha/dha-special/things-galleries-rio Aundrea Frahm: We Revolve Ceaseless Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Aug. 28-Oct. 3, reception Aug. 28, UtahMOCA.org The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from National Museum Wales Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, Aug. 29-Dec. 13, UMFA.Utah.edu (see p. 22) Bill Reed: Fine Gold & Stainless Steel Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 12, SLCPL.org Chalk on the Sidewalk: Works by Layne Meacham Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 25, SLCPL.org Faith Hagenhofer: Newland Kimball Art Center Badami Gallery, 638 Park Ave., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Aug. 30, KimballArtCenter.org Flora+Fauna Alice Gallery, 617 S. Temple, 801-236-7555, through Sept. 11, Heritage.utah. gov/dha/dha-featured/things-galleries-alice Doug Leen: Posterity and Parks Kimball Art Center Garage Gallery, 638 Park Ave., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Aug. 30, KimballArtCenter.org Hyunmee Lee Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through Sept.11, Phillips-Gallery.com Illustrating Literature: Drawings by Stephanie Peters Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Sept. 20, SLCPL.org Justin Carruth: Depart Broadway Center Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, 385-215-6768, through Oct. 3, CUArtCenter.org Kate Ericson & Mel Ziegler: Grandma’s Cupboard Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Aug. 28-Dec. 19, reception Aug. 28, UtahMOCA.org Lizze Määttälä: Uphill/Both Ways Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Aug. 28-Nov. 7, reception Aug. 28, UtahMOCA.org


Utah’s Got Dance!

THE BEST DANCE SPECTACULAR IN UTAH! SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH AT 8PM (New date, rescheduled from Sept. 12)

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION VISIT

DRAPERAMPHITEATER.COM

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*Performance groups subject to change. *See webpage for full line-up.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Draper Amphitheater will play host to the best and most unique dance show in the State! With dance performers from most every college and university in the state along with some top dance companies and high schools, this is the dance spectacular not to be missed. It will be fast paced with lots of performances with a wide variety from contemporary to hip-hop, modern-jazz, ballet-clogging and everything in between. A jam packed show of group after group. Just look at a few scheduled to perform! University of Utah Hip-Hop (Rhythm) SUU Hip-Hop/Belly Dance Snow College BYU Dixie State Drill Team Jesse Sykes-Popper High Definition Cloggers Underground - Contemporary Juan Diego High School Corner Canyon High School Brotherson Elite Utah Artist Ballet ...And More

| CITY WEEKLY |

AUGUST 27, 2015 29


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m

Co

Picks from all 29 Counties in Utah & The Best of State Street

Reader Quiz Q: Which, now defunct bar has won the most overall Best of Utah awards? A: Look in next week’s issue

Nove n i g m in 26th

Annual

Only 10 weeks away!

!

8 .2 0 TW I LI GHT CONCERT SE R IES: RUN THE JEW ELS

NEW for 2015

ber

30 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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Contact your sales rep to reserve your space TODAY! 801-575-7003 or sales@cityweekly.net

Submit replies to BOU2015@cityweekly.net Prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd reply $25, $15, and $10 in the City Weekly Store

M O R E P H O T O S A T C I T Y W E E K L Y .N E T /PHOTOS

Last weeks answer: “Log Haven” has won the most romantic awards


EATING IN ROY

The Roy-al Treatment

DINE

Finding classic American fare in Weber County

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

T

TED SCHEFFLER

NOW OPEN!

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457 As seen on “ Diners,

Serving American Drive-ins AnD Dives” Comfort Food Since 1930

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

801 582-5807 www.ruthsdinEr.Com

AUGUST 27, 2015 | 31

4160 Emigration Canyon road

| CITY WEEKLY |

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CreeksiDe PAtios-Best BreAkfAst 2008 & 2010-85 YeArs AnD GoinG stronG-DeliCious MiMosAs & BlooDY MArY’s-sAt & sun 11AM-2PM-live MusiC & weekenD BrunCh-

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You won’t come for the ambience, Burger Bar in Roy serves exotic meat. but the service is super-friendly, and most of the food is very good— and cheap. Bar is Warrens drive-in. It was founded in The étouffée ($13.99) offers a choice of 1950 by Roy Sherriff Doug Warren. Today, crawfish, shrimp or andouille sausage as its Kirk Dean is the owner, but the “from central ingredient, or you can have all three scratch” policy that has kept customers for $15.99. It’s an étouffée that begins with a coming back for 65 years is still in effect. caramel-colored roux before onions, celery The burgers ($3.79-$5.49) are terrific, and and red pepper are added. It’s served over are made from all-natural, fresh-ground white rice, topped with collard greens, and (never frozen), local beef and come on potato there’s sweet housemade cornbread along- buns from Stone Ground Bakery. There are side. Any of the étouffée choices are very a dozen different burgers, ranging from the good, but I like the crawfish version best. classic double to the pastrami burger, turThe jumbo crab cakes (2 for $9.99) with key BLT burger and bleu-bacon burger. To be rémoulade point up a problem at Southern honest, I like the sandwiches at Warrens even Comfort: food temperatures. The crab cakes better than the burgers. It’s hard to beat the were delicious, but lukewarm. Ditto a side Rocky Mountain Reuben ($5.75), made with order of dirty rice. Double-ditto a heaping seasoned brisket pastrami, Swiss cheese, order of pulled pork. The pork was delicious, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on toasted but the temperature of the meat was cool. marble-rye bread. It’s perfect with Warrens’ Isn’t there a microwave in the kitchen for tempura-style onion rings on the side. reheating pre-cooked foods? Half the fun of visiting Warrens is looking On the other hand, fresh-cooked items forward to dessert. The funnel-cake fries like the Southern fried catfish dinner with powdered sugar are irresistible, as are ($9.99) come to the table piping hot. The the homemade scones with honey butter. cornmeal-crusted catfish was so hot, in fact, The tasty shakes are a no-brainer too, but that I nearly scorched the top of my mouth. my favorite ending to a meal at Warrens is For $10, you get 6-8 strips of deep-fried cat- the classic banana split ($3.79). fish, cornbread and two side dishes. I highly Roy might not be a diamond-studded recommend the awesome hushpuppies, and dining destination, but it sure has its I do like the dirty rice, although I’d prefer it gems. CW hotter. Skip the red beans and rice, which for reasons I can’t explain, had chunks of tomato in it. No booze on the menu, but large BURGER BAR WARRENS ROY sodas are refilled free and often. 5291 S. 1900 West, Roy 5331 S. 1900 West, Roy If Cajun-Creole flavors don’t float your 801-773-3480 boat, the barbecue at Southern Comfort is 801-825-8961 very good. Come in on Saturdays for bris- BurgerBarUtah.com Additional locations ket burnt ends ($9.99) or rib racks anytime. throughout You’ll definitely want to give the fried- SOUTHERN Northern Utah chicken dinner ($12.99) a try. It comes with COMFORT garlic mashed potatoes, chicken gravy and 5357 S. 1900 West, Roy MyWarrens.com housemade slaw. 801-825-3300 Just down the road a stretch from Burger

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

he city of Roy (north of Layton and south of Ogden) is not where you might expect to find much fine dining and cuisine. And yet, on the unprepossessing main drag—replete with franchise restaurants, gas stations, auto shops and such—in a block-long stretch of 1900 West, lies a trio of eateries that might surprise you. For example, where do you go to eat shark? I’d never have guessed that the answer would be Burger Bar in Roy—shark was the “exotic meat of the month” for August at the Burger Bar. In July, the rabbit burger was featured. I’m not kidding. Buffalo (bison, actually) and elk burgers are also menu staples. Most people, I suspect, opt out of the exotic and instead order Burger Bar classics such as the Big Ben ($5.49-$8.49). Hey, they’ve been selling the things since Ben Fowler and his wife, Rita, opened the Burger Bar in 1956. Back then, burgers sold for a quarter apiece. Today, Burger Bar goes through 2,500 pounds of potatoes per week for its fresh-made french fries. The burger buns are baked locally at Topper Bakery and the folks at Burger Bar buy local, fresh beef and grind it daily. The basic Ben is a thin, large-in-diameter beef patty on an equally large bun—smaller than a dinner plate or Frisbee, but larger than any I’ve bitten into before. There are eight different permutations of the Big Ben: with or without cheese, and as a single, double, triple or quad. The cheese is nothing fancy—American, I think—as it should be for a classic burger like this. Don’t let the crowds dissuade you. This is a walk-up-to-the-window-and-order affair, and at lunchtime, there are usually 20 to 30 folks out front awaiting their orders. But the service is quick and friendly. And when you bite into a Big Ben burger and take your first slurp of Burger Bar’s oversize shakes and malts (made with real fruit), you’ll have discovered a culinary secret that the folks in Roy have known for nearly 60 years. It’s maddening to me that Cajun-Creole cooking is so damned hard to come by in this state. I’m thankful, then, for Southern Comfort, a Roy restaurant featuring Memphis-style barbecue and Louisiana fare. The décor is sparse; there are a few Mardi Gras masks and paintings of musicians and New Orleans on the walls. Next to the stage (where musicians play on Fridays and Saturdays), there’s a wooden outhouse.


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32 | AUGUST 27, 2015

Patio Now Open

Deli Done Right

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Blues Band

live on 9/16 7pm-10pm $20 with a $15 food min

call for details 801-583-8331 tickets available in the City Weekly store cityweeklystore.com

Glamping Culinary Adventures

PATIO NOW OPEN

Aug 29th sep 19th

BD HOWES BAND CLASSIC ACOUSTIC ROCK

ROBERT BLAND

GUITAR VIRTUOSO & SONG WRITER

BREAKFAST • LUNCH SMALL PLATES & DINNER ENTREES

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r u o Y l e Fu Day!

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growing Get mixin’ with our

2014

Daddy Mack

Our bitters selection is

A new glamping (glamour camping) destination has opened at Bear Lake called Conestoga Ranch. The luxurious site is equipped with a full-service restaurant— Campfire Grill—and will host Campfire Culinary Adventures the weekend of Sept. 18-20 with a chef and sommelier from the Park City Culinary Institute. The hands-on cooking seminars are family-friendly, and will utilize the Campfire Grill’s demonstration-style kitchen, wood-burning oven and outdoor fire pits. Attendees will learn to cook wood-fired artisan pizza, trout en papillote with potatoes, skillet s’mores and more. There’s also a dinner in the Grand Tent including a wine seminar. Hey, that’s my style of camping! Phone 844-464-5267 or visit ConestogaRanch.com for reservations.

extensive selection of bitters & cocktail mixers

Truckin’

SuAn Chow—owner of one of Utah’s pioneering food trucks, the Chow Truck— recently turned me on to a cool new food truck scene. Local foodies Shelly and Mark Olsen have opened the Soho Food Truck Park at 4747 S. Holladay Blvd. The Olsens had a vacant lot and wanted to give back to the food community by creating a food-truck park, so they did exactly that. According to Chow, the lot has seven stalls, with electrical power to each one, plus seating for 100 people with tables, benches, umbrellas and bistro lights. They plan to run the park throughout the year, using heaters in winter. The Soho Food Truck Park is open Monday through Saturday, from 5-10 p.m. Facebook.com/SohoFoodPark

Samba Till You Drop

Saturday, Sept. 12, from 1-7 p.m., Tucanos Brazilian Grill will co-sponsor the 2015 Utah Brazilian Festival. And, no, it’s not about waxing. In addition to Brazilian food and drink, the free event held at The Gateway will include a samba parade, samba lessons, Sambo Fogo drummers and fire dancers, a capoeira (Brazilian marshal art) demonstration, Brazilian music and more. It’ll be a day filled with South American flavors, so come enjoy the fun. Visit UtahBrazilianFestival.com for more details. Quote of the week: So long as you have food in your mouth, you have solved all questions for the time being. —Franz Kafka Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

caputosdeli.com


Italian Village

n in th & n in th & 2 5 4 sou th m ain

italianvillageslc.com

2014

Get your Italian on. 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT M O N -T HU 1 1 a - 1 1 p F R I -S AT 1 1 a - 1 2 a / S UN 3 p- 1 0 p

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2005

2007 2008

voted best coffee house

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Beer & Wine WHY WAIT?

A L L DA

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F F O 50% SHI U S L L A S L L O & RY E V E R Y D AY !

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M-Th 11-10•F 11-11•S 12-11•Su 12-9

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801.566.0721•ichibansushiut.com NOW OPEN! 6930 S. STATE STREET • 801.251.0682

AUGUST 27, 2015 | 33

AND ASIAN GRILL


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| CITY WEEKLY |

34 | AUGUST 27, 2015

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Rosé Roundup

Excellent end-of-summer pink wines BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

A

s summer marches inevitably toward fall, I’m getting in as much warm-weather Rosé drinking as I can. Before we know it, we’ll be stoking the fireplaces and cracking open big, meaty, winter red wines. Rosé, technically, is red wine. That’s because it’s made from red wine grape varieties such as Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault, Mourvèdre, Sangiovese, Tempranillo and others, including even Malbec. However, Rosé drinks like white wine: It’s typically light-bodied, low in tannins and can be bone-dry and acidic. Rosé is made from black-skinned grapes, which are crushed and left to intermingle with the juice for just a short time, usually one to three days.

In red-winemaking, the skins would be left in contact throughout the fermentation process. With Rosé, the skins are discarded, which also removes most of the tannins from the wine. Generally, the darker the Rosé wine, the longer the skins have been left in contact with the juice, and the more tannic the wine will be. Rosé ranges in color from very pale orange to light purple, and although it’s most popular in France, Rosé is now produced in nearly every winemaking region in the world. Since it is usually served chilled, Rosé is perfect for sipping on the deck during the summer months or as an accompaniment to meats and seafood from the grill. But it’s not a wine to ponder or to put away. Rosé is always best consumed within a year or two of its release. Here are a few excellent Rosés to round out your summer: Let’s start in France, where the world’s best Rosés are made. I normally turn to Rosés from Provence when I’m drinking French Rosé. However, I recently came across this nice one from Minervois in the Languedoc: Château du Donjon Rosé Minvervois 2014 ($13.99). Created by the talented winemaker Jean Panis, this 60/40 blend of Syrah and Grenache has strawberry and raspberry notes and an herbal hint. For the price—$7.99—it’s hard to beat La Vieille Ferme Rosé 2014 from Mount Ventoux (the most grueling leg of the Tour

DRINK de France) in Provence. The 2014 vintage produced an easy-drinking, everyday Rosé that’s as soft on the palate as it is on the budget. Over in Italy, Negroamaro grapes are macerated for a mere 12 to 24 hours to create Cantele Negroamaro Rosato 2014 ($11.99). This is a light, bright Rosé that, although it’s not from France, is excellent with Frenchstyle bouillabaisse. It’s also a good partner for pasta dishes with cream sauce. You don’t see all that much Rosé made from Cabernet Sauvignon, but South Africa’s Mulderbosch Vineyards produces one: Mulderbosch Cabernet Sauvignon Rosé 2014 ($13.99). This salmon-colored Rosé is zesty and acidic, with a hearty mineral backbone. It pairs nicely with chicken piccata. Argentina produces a lot of Malbec, so it’s no surprise that Crios Rosé of Malbec 2014 ($14.99) should be made with it, nor that it would, like most Malbec, weigh in at a hefty 14.5 percent alcohol. (Most of the other Rosés mentioned here are around 12 percent.) So, Crios has a lot of body for a Rosé and is brimming with bright raspberry notes. Try it with roasted chicken or grilled sausage. Closer to home, California is producing great Rosé wines these days. You’d swear Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare ($16.99) was from Provence, given its elegant complexity. Subtle, smooth strawberry and

raspberry flavors combined with refreshing acidity make this the perfect late-summer picnic wine. And three more excellent California pink wines should be on your shopping list: Lorenza Rosé 2014 ($17.99), Valley of the Moon Rosato di Sangiovese 2013 ($16.95), and Saintsbury “Vincent Vin Gris” of Pinot Noir 2014 ($16.99). Drink pink! CW


here... Summer is

Bröst!

Chinese Beer Wine Sake Dim Sum

BEST RUEBEN

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| CITY WEEKLY |

197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

PATIO NOW OPEN

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Contemporary Japanese Dining

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz


GOODEATS

Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves! El Chihuahua Mexican Restaurant

El Chihuahua was started in 1978 by the Quinonez family. Since then, the restaurant has attracted devoted customers who appreciate the authentic Mexican cuisine offered. Among the house specialties are tacos de pescado (fish tacos), mole poblano, steak ranchero, flautas, chile colorado, chile verde and carne asada. There’s also a wine, beer and liquor menu available, and you have to try the delicious fried ice cream for dessert. 3926 S. Highland Drive, Holladay, 801-272-8091, ElChihuahuaRestaurant.com

Even Stevens Sandwiches

36 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Besides getting a delicious meal, when you buy an Even Stevens Sandwich, you’re helping to feed those in need. The basic idea is simple: For every sandwich Even Stevens sells, it donates another sandwich to local nonprofits helping to end hunger. The “Sloppy Tina” is a spot-on vegetarian version of a sloppy joe, made with mushroom and chickpeas in a zippy tomato-based sauce. There is also a meat-lover’s sloppy joe, a slow-simmered combo of beef and chorizo topped with pickled red onions and served on a Kaiser roll. There’s a remarkably tasty faux-pot-roast sandwich on the menu, too. Multiple locations, EvenStevens.com

Kobe Teppanyaki

This beautiful Japanese restaurant is situated in a house with a traditional Japanese garden and streams. The specialty at Kobe is tepanyaki, where you get a show along with dinner. The tempura and teriyaki dishes are excellent, but the real draw at Kobe are the steak and seafood offerings like the popular “moo-ouch!!,” which is a grilled New York steak with king crab legs. 6024 S. 1550 East, South Ogden, 801-476-8889, KobeUtah.com

Red Butte Cafe

The Red Butte Cafe, on Salt Lake City’s east side, features an eclectic Southwest-contemporary menu. House specialties include pepita-crusted salmon and grilled sirloin. If you have room after dinner, don’t forget the tempting dessert menu, with offerings like the orangechocolate mousse cake, three-layer chocolate cake and white-chocolate raspberry cheesecake. The restaurant also provides microbrews from Desert Edge Brewery, and don’t forget about brunch on Sundays. 1414 Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-581-9498, TheRedButteCafe.com

CYTY BYRD @Washington Square

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THE DIARY OF A TEENAGE GIRL

Let’s Talk About Sex

CINEMA

The Diary of a Teenage Girl plays fair with complex adolescent sexuality. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

“I

Bel Powley and Alexander Skarsgård in The Diary of a Teenage Girl pursuing normal, healthy sexual behavior. It’s a tour through the life of a girl who looks like—and is treated like—a woman, trying to find boundaries when there don’t seem to be any. That mix of giddiness and danger isn’t easy to sustain over the course of an entire film, and there are moments when Diary veers toward the possibility that it could become the Trainspotting of adolescent female sexual experimentation. But Heller and her cast find too many piercingly honest moments— from Minnie marking Monroe with an “x” of virginal blood, to the cartoon figures that betray Minnie’s self-image—for the movie ever to feel like a wallow in exploitation. And indeed, a mix of giddiness and danger practically defines the adolescent experience. The Diary of a Teenage Girl doesn’t stand in judgment of Minnie, nor does it pretend that everything we see her do is perfectly fine. It merely understands the weird emotional place where the only reasonable response to “I had sex today” would be, “Holy shit!” CW

THE DIARY OF A TEENAGE GIRL

BBB.5 Bel Powley Alexander Skarsgård Kristen Wiig Rated R

| CITY WEEKLY |

TRY THESE Trainspotting (1996) Ewan McGregor Jonny Lee Miller Rated R

Ghost World (2001) Thora Birch Scarlett Johansson Rated R

Fish Tank (2009) Katie Jarvis Michael Fassbender Not Rated

AUGUST 27, 2015 | 37

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) Tim Curry Susan Sarandon Rated R

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by drugs and a liberal attitude toward sex; as she walks through Golden Gate Park, a casually topless woman is among those she sees hanging out on the grass. The underground-comix scene of folks like R. Crumb and Aline Kominsky inspires Minnie’s own burgeoning interest in becoming an artist (with the illustrations turning into a vibrant, often animated part of the movie’s storytelling), and a Rocky Horror Picture Show screening further expands her awareness of the spectrum of sexuality. Even news reports about the highprofile Patty Hearst case feed into Diary’s look at the way emotional need can lead to relationships that aren’t particularly healthy. Because while there’s a welcome sexpositivity to much of The Diary of a Teenage Girl—acknowledging Minnie’s desires even as others around her can only process her behavior with words like “slut” and “nympho”—it’s hardly a grand celebration of Minnie’s post-Sexual Revolution exploits. Powley’s performance is wonderfully layered—wide-eyed and watchful at times, while at other times capturing a still-girlish bouncy physicality—and adds to the humor of scenes like the one in which Minnie’s high-school-age lover expresses his inability to deal with the fact that she pursues her own orgasms. Yet she also clearly gets in over her head, conflating sex with the love and connection she’s missing from her absentee father and a mother who seems to talk to her only to address her physical appearance. Diary doesn’t suggest Minnie is just a typical girl

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had sex today—holy shit!” Such is the stunned realization of Minnie Goetze (Bel Powley), the 15-yearold protagonist of The Diary of a Teenage Girl—and somehow, the admission might seem just as shocking to an audience. It’s 2015, and it shouldn’t be the case, yet here we are: A movie about an adolescent girl’s sexual and emotional coming-of-age still feels borderline revolutionary. There would be nothing particularly worthwhile about Marielle Heller’s adaptation of Phoebe Gloeckner’s 2002 graphic novel if it were just out to be shocking or titillating about budding female sexuality; nobody has ever gone broke appealing to an audience looking to leer. But there’s a welcome complexity to the way Diary explores how its heroine thinks about sex, love and physical intimacy, mixed with a vivid visual imagination to evoke the source material. It’s not easy for a movie to be both playful and cautionary, but Heller pulls it off. That opening proclamation of Minnie’s lost virginity doesn’t address the most complicated part of the encounter: the guy involved, Monroe (Alexander Skarsgård), is the 34-year-old boyfriend of her mother, Charlotte (Kristen Wiig). Nor does it end up being just a one-time event, as Minnie and Monroe continue their affair in secret. But as Minnie begins to record her thoughts about this strange new adult world—both in an audio diary, and in her own cartoon art creations—she begins experimenting with more partners and more relationships that aren’t always easy to navigate. Minnie’s world is 1976 San Francisco, and it’s not possible to overstate how much that period setting permeates her story. The daughter of a twice-married and twicedivorced free spirit, Minnie is surrounded


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change.

38 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK BBB This film comprises everything you’d ever want to learn about Kurt Cobain, probably, ranging from his youth spent pinballing between different homes, the seemingly overnight ascension to grunge godhood and his ever-increasing flirtation with selfdestruction. Whatever your thoughts on his wife, Courtney Love, may be, the home-video footage here will likely intensify them by 3 zillion percent. Director Brett Morgen—whose occasionally animated, Hellzapoppin’ style brilliantly brought the oversize personality behind The Kid Stays in the Picture to life—finds himself on shakier ground here, with a subject who openly derided any attempt at outsider analysis. For someone not already intensely familiar with Nirvana, that central opaqueness may well make this film come across as both overlong (Morgen was given access to thousands of Cobain’s loose-leaf journal entries and doodles, and it sometimes seems like he’s bent on presenting every single one) and frequently shapeless. Miraculously, though, by the time this exhaustive/exhausting film arrives at Cobain’s final legendary unplugged performance, its chaotic scrapbook approach nevertheless feels like the best way to capture the essence of its visionary, unruly subject. The only real way, maybe. Opens Aug. 28 at Megaplex Gateway. (R)—Andrew Wright DIARY OF A TEENAGE GIRL BBB.5 See review p. 37. Opens Aug. 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)

MISTRESS AMERICA BB.5 Noah Baumbach has long been one of the funniest, most generous observers of youth’s honest foibles, so it’s kind of crushing to see him steer toward a particularly aggravating brand of farce. The solid setup follows new Barnard College freshman Tracy (Lola Kirke) as she struggles to adjust socially to her new environs, then finds a readymade friend and life-tour-guide in her soon-to-be stepsister Brooke (Greta Gerwig, Baumbach’s partner and co-writer), a charismatic whirlwind of big ideas that never quite go anywhere. The first half is genuinely charming, both in capturing Tracy’s initial insecurity and loneliness, and in giving Gerwig another great alpha-female show-

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MERU BBB.5 You know a documentary is working when you see its subjects talking about events that have already happened, yet you’re still anxiously wondering if they’ll make it out alive. Co-directors Jimmy Chin and E. Chai Vasarhelyi track the multi-year quest by alpinists Chin, Conrad Anker and Renan Ozturk to conquer the never-beforesummitted “shark fin” peak of India’s Mount Meru, through two separate attempts and several intervening near-disasters that could have killed one or more of them before they even had a chance to try. The filmmakers introduce just enough history to establish the three climbers as characters, while author Jon Krakauer serves as a terrific de facto narrator explaining the particular dangers of this mountain and the general drive that pushes climbers to extremes. But the real star is the intensity of Chin and Ozturk’s GoPro footage of the Meru expeditions, capturing not just the vertiginous reality of the climbs themselves, but the moments at rest when they have a chance to ponder dangers ahead, and how much they’re willing to risk for the chance to stand in a place where no one has ever stood before. Opens Aug. 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

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CLIPS

case. And then the plot shifts abruptly to focus on Brooke’s trip to Connecticut to beg an old flame for funds to invest in her planned restaurant, and the whole thing turns into a parade of people bouncing from room to room, accusing and misunderstanding one another, trading recriminations and generally building the need for some sort of headache medication. Whatever Baumbach and Gerwig want to say about the inspirational charms of life’s colorful, flaky characters, they should be able to find a way to say it without shouting. Opens Aug. 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR NO ESCAPE BB.5 At first glance, it looks like another Liam Neeson flick about beating up cartoon foreigners, but No Escape wants to be Something Serious, even though it’s from horror-filmmaking brothers John Erick and Drew Dowdle, and it stars comic actors Owen Wilson and Lake Bell. The Dwyers of Austin, Texas—hear all that without Wilson’s trademark drawl, because it’s nowhere in earshot here—and their little girls have just moved to an unnamed Asian country where Jack, an engineer, intends to provide access to clean drinking water. But turns out the locals are angry at the Western corporate colonialism his company represents and pick that very moment for a bloody uprising. Once you get past being startled at how unexpectedly fierce Wilson can be, and past the cultural narcissism that Western corporate colonialism is only an issue when it impacts a nice, white, rich American family, No Escape is actually enjoyably intense, as the Dwyers have to get the hell out of Dodge amid violent revolution (getting help from Pierce Brosnan’s shady covert operative). It’s not very plausible, but it’s occasionally the stuff of arm-rest-gripping and breath-holding. Opens Aug. 26 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

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WAR ROOM [not yet reviewed] A family facing emotional struggles turns to the power of prayer. Opens Aug. 28 at Cinemark Jordan Landing. (PG) WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS [not yet reviewed] An aspiring DJ (Zac Efron) attempts to navigate a tricky path to fame. Opens Aug. 28 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AFRICAN CATS At Sorensen Unity Center, Aug. 28, 6 p.m. (G)

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CLUELESS At Tower Theatre, Aug. 28-29 @ 11 p.m. & Aug. 30 @ noon. (PG-13) CODE: DEBUGGING THE GENDER GAP At Main Library, Sept. 1, 7 p.m. (NR) FORGETTING SARAH MARSHALL At Brewvies, Aug. 31, 10 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES AMERICAN ULTRA BB Occasionally, a movie feels like it was built specifically to be a “cult favorite,” and that effort cripples actual filmmaking. Mike (Jesse Eisenberg) and Phoebe (Kristen Stewart) are a stoner West Virginia couple whose lives are upended by a CIA operation to exterminate Mike—who has been a highly trained, memory-wiped sleeper agent without ever knowing it himself. The opportunities inherent in a “superhero” who’s as foggy-headed as he is physically lethal are infinite, but Eisenberg’s inherent edgy energy feels all wrong for this part. In fact, only Stewart seems to grasp how to pitch her performance on a level that feels remotely real, while surrounded by capable actors who

go madly over the top. The moments of non-sequitur silliness collide repeatedly with the vibe of filmmakers who are nudging you throughout and going, “Check this part out; isn’t that crazy?” (R)—SR THE END OF THE TOUR BBB What does a biographical dramatic work owe to its real-life subjects? This fact-based story—about five days journalist David Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg) spent with author David Foster Wallace (Jason Segel) in 1996—collides with that problem. Segel and Eisenberg both do a terrific job at capturing the tentative, often insecure interplay between the two writers; Segel, in particular, conveys a yearning for realness that’s almost never forced or precious. Yet a framing narrative set after Wallace’s suicide in 2008 also suggests that Wallace must have telegraphed that his death was coming, and director James Ponsoldt draws attention to those potentially telling moments. Maybe The End of the Tour doesn’t owe us—or Wallace—anything more. But if “authenticity” is part of that version of Wallace the movie is trying to sell, it’s hard not to ask the question. (R)—SR HITMAN: AGENT 47 B.5 It’s fitting that the premise is built around trying to duplicate the creation of emotionless killing machines, because this feels like someone was desperately trying to mimic a 21st-century Luc Besson production. Hannah Ware plays Katia, a young woman sought by two lethal men—barcoded Agent 47 (Rupert Friend) and slick John Smith (Zachary Quinto)—both of whom claim the other is out to kill her. Who is the Kyle Reese in this pseudo-Terminator scenario, and who the T-101? Does it matter? There are glimpses of hero-origin potential in Katia’s gradual realization of her own badass capabilities. But mostly there’s just a numbing parade of technically proficient yet interchangeable scenes in which Agent 47 mows down a herd of flunkies, punctuated by the possibility that a remorseless assassin might find his soul. It’s the pasteurized, processed, individually wrapped version of Besson-ian Eurotrash cheese. (R)—SR SINISTER 2 BB A sequel to a film as unsettling as Sinister is almost bound to be disappointing—either too tame by comparison, or too nasty. Sinister 2, as it turns out, is both. Returning writers Scott Derrickson and C. Robert Cargill continue their story with the still-nameless cop (James Ransone) trying to prevent a new family—a single mom (Shannyn Sossamon) and her twin sons— from falling prey to the home-movie-loving demon Bughuul. Building on what was revealed in Sinister, the sequel follows one of the boys (Robert Daniel Sloan) as he’s guided by Bughuul’s ghost children. The new perspective opens up possibilities, but the story feels rehashed, and the snuff films the kid finds are grosser (but not scarier) than the originals. Director Ciaran Foy leans too much on the jump scares, too—a sure sign of lack of confidence. (R)—Eric D. Snider STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON BBB The rise and fall and rise of Dr. Dre (Corey Hawkins), Eazy-E (Jason Mitchell) and Ice Cube (O’Shea Jackson Jr.) as they face adversity, unscrupulous managers and the terrifying wrath of Suge Knight, the rags-to-riches portion of this raucous, unexpectedly funny crowd-pleaser is a blast, culminating with the band’s decision to directly provoke noticeably unamused cops in a crowded auditorium. Once N.W.A. hits the top, however, standard flat biopic re-creations unfortunately begin to stack up, compounded by the self-serving dangers of having the surviving subjects produce the movie. Still, that first hour is really something to see, as director F. Gary Gray and his terrific cast (Jackson Jr. does a spookily credible imitation of his actual father) successfully re-create the pressures, excesses and sheer rocketing force that pinned so many unsuspecting ears back, back in the day. (R)—AW

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Dregs of Summer

TV

Let’s Watch! Let’s Wait Let’s Not

Catching up with the worsts of the season (so far). Geeks Who Drink Thursdays (Syfy)

New Series: The version of Geeks Who Drink you play at the local bar can be fun, but would you watch it? What if it were hosted by the guy who used to be Chuck (Zachary Levi) and featured a smattering of semi-celebrities? Yeah, it’s still not a show—but Syfy disagrees. The trivia questions pose as much of a challenge to the contestants and viewers as naming a favorite Wookie, and the drinking is strictly Lightweight Division (at least by, ahem, The Only TV Column That Matters™’s standards). At least Levi does his damnedest to liven this snoozefest up, which is far more than can be said for the host of …

Reactor Thursdays (Syfy)

New Series: Kimberly Stewart is … famous? … for being the daughter of Rod and Alana Stewart, who were last relevant 40-odd years ago. Alana’s husband prior to Rod was George Hamilton, whom I believe was a silent-film actor prior to the Great Depression. There are also some random sons in the mix (Ashley Hamilton, Sean Stewart and others who make Robin Thicke look like a boon to culture and society). E! is somehow squeezing eight(!) one-hour(!!) episodes out of this barely damp gene pool. The Stewarts and the Hamiltons are at least more active than the Kardashians and Jenners, if not more orange.

Return: If it seems like I’m picking on E! here, you’re right! In a programming sea of absolute crap (which includes, but it not limited to, Total Divas, Rich Kids of Beverly Hills, Botched, New Money and anything involving the aforementioned Kardashians), the network has exactly two shows worth a byte of DVR space: The Soup and scripted drama The Royals. Fashion Police used to make it three, but then Joan Rivers assumed room temperature. The show should have joined her, but instead E! ignored that giant sucking sound of the talent void and has now handed the show over to Melissa Rivers (understandable), Giuliana Rancic (the living personification of “Meh”) and Catty Gay Dude No. 457 (because, Fashion). In FP’s first new installment since February, they’ll be critiquing the outfits of the equally worthless MTV Video Music Awards. Joan is rolling over in her velvet shoebox crypt.

WAGS Tuesdays (E!)

New Series: And another slice of genius from E!, this acronym-skirting reality show is about the Wives and Girlfriends of Sports Stars for viewers unaware of VH1’s entire programming lineup. They’re sassy, they’re catty, they’re everything the writers and producers have fabricated for them to oc-

Geeks Who Drink (Syfy) cupy their time with while their husbands are explaining in the locker room “Sure, it’s embarrassing—but it’s on E!, so no one’s gonna see it. Now, let’s get out there and win this game, or match, or tournament, or whatever the hell we’re playing” (this is what I imagine happens in pro-sports locker rooms. Just go with it).

Hollywood Game Night Tuesdays (NBC)

New Season: Few NBC series represent the network’s Screw It We Give Up mentality as perfectly as Hollywood Game Night, now in its third mind-and-ass-numbing season. While, unlike Dancing With the Stars, it actually does have stars, the HGN celebs seem to be performing as if they have guns to their heads while glancing at offstage signs that say “Make it fun, or we’ll make you dead!” Now, put that drama on-screen this fall, and I’m all in. CW Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.

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Stewarts & Hamiltons Sundays (E!)

Fashion Police Monday, Aug. 31 (E!)

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New Series: No network, not even originator E!, has figured out how to replicate the snarktastic magic of Joel McHale and The Soup. They make stinging commentary on news and pop culture of the past week look easy; the sci-fi- and geek-culture-centric Reactor gets it wrong on every conceivable (and inconceivable) level. The host (David Huntsberger, reportedly a comedian) has a personality and presence undetectable to even Ghost Hunters, the featured newsbites and clips are Twitter-ancient by airtime, and the “jokes” are seemingly written by … let’s say … leftover interns from The Wil Wheaton Project.

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The White Buffalo is a creature big enough to hold his songs. BY KIMBALL BENNION comments@cityweekly.com @kimballbennion

T

here’s not much of a story behind Jake Smith’s evocative stage name, The White Buffalo. As a struggling musician trying to stand out years ago, he picked the name out of a hat and stuck with it. But it’s fitting nonetheless for a man whose basic physical attributes already sound like the beginning of a tall tale: bearded, gray-eyed with shoulder-length hair and a barrel chest. Smith’s big, resonant body houses a tactile voice that ranges from smoky growl to tender entreaty, and it gives life to the many narratives in his songs. Lately, Smith’s darker stories have gotten a lot of attention, after some of his songs were featured in the recently ended FX show Sons of Anarchy, a drama about the various sins of a California biker gang. His murky acoustic ballads weren’t written for the show, but they found a comfortable home within its dark universe. But the soul of The White Buffalo is larger than that, and his newly released album Love and the Death of Damnation (Unison) shows that the characters within him are capable of much more than villainy, and that his songs can do much more than brood. “It’s not really bigger,” Smith says. “It’s essentially the same people we used on the last album. It’s just a matter of the songs, and how big the songs could get—how far we wanted to push them, really.” Songs such as the rousing opener “Dark Days” or the celebratory love song “Home Is in Your Arms” get downright upbeat, which Smith admits didn’t exactly come naturally. “I think there’s a really good variety on this album that I haven’t explored in the past,” he says. “There are actually a couple of songs that are just goodtime songs that don’t go into this dark world that I always seem to drift off into.” When writing the sweetly profane country ballad “Go the Distance,” Smith says he had to make a conscious effort to avoid the darkness. “You can take songs in any direction you want to, and I started to go down that road,” he says. “I was thinking, why don’t I just keep it positive?” But Smith at his most sunny still doesn’t make a “feel-good” record. “This [album] seems less serious, but more serious?” Smith says with a question mark in his voice. It is a difficult record to define concisely. There’s enough humor to go with the pain and enough light to go with the dark, that it can be a lot of things at once. There’s a spiritual clash as well, hinted at in the cover image of Smith standing chest-deep in water. He embodies characters who seek a baptismal redemption but aren’t fully immersed just yet. “I like to play with the idea of God, of good and evil, the devil, and what motivates people to do bad things or … to do good things,” Smith says. The line between heaven and hell is thin in The White Buffalo’s narratives. “Last Call to Heaven,” finds lost souls in the perdition of a dive bar. But messy and imperfect people can also be a source of salvation. In the song “Where Is Your Savior,” Smith sings: “She ain’t in the heavens/ She ain’t making you proud/ She wipes away your tears just like she always do/ You might not understand it, but it’s all for you.”

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THE WHITE BUFFALO

Dark sounds from White Buffalo “Maybe you don’t need to be looking to the heavens for salvation,” Smith says. “It’s the people that actually affect your life on Earth that can actually guide you and help you, and there’s salvation in that.” Love has its own complications as well. The song “I Got You,” a duet with singer Audra Mae, explores how love holds a couple captive despite—or maybe because of—dysfunction. Smith sings: “Every single thought inside my head/ Telling me that this old heart is dead/ But I ain’t got no brains in my heart/ I got you.” After a decade of recording, Smith has honed his ability to find the harmony in competing but complementary influences—not only in his lyrics, but in the music itself. Smith grew up in Huntington Beach, Calif., listening exclusively to the country music his parents loved. As a teenager, he dove headfirst into the punk rock of The Descendents and Bad Religion. It wasn’t until he was 19 that he picked up his first guitar. After that, he found that writing his own songs came easily. “They kind of just spilled out of me,” Smith says. “I never was really a writer or anything. I just started writing.” Since then, Smith has carved out a niche for himself that isn’t purely country and isn’t purely DIY punk, but is, nonetheless, pure. “I really try to keep things as honest or as raw as possible,” Smith says. “The idea that you’re going to affect somebody else’s mind, or affect how they feel, is the most important thing.” CW

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MUSIC Cream of Beat Reunited nineties grungepunk trio Babes in Toyland remain a snarling counterpoint to mushy pop music. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net

B

abes in Toyland are back. That might not seem like news, with the array of favorites from previous decades doing the same, but the grunge-punk trio are picking it right back up like there weren’t 14 years in between—and audiences are reacting in kind. Founding the group in the late ’80s, vocalist/guitarist Kat Bjelland, bassist Michelle Leon (who, in 1992, was been replaced by Maureen Herman) and drummer Lori Barbero created a sound that would influence grunge music, the riot-grrl movement and later alternative-rock and indie bands. Their three studio albums Spanking Machine (Twin/Tone, 1990), Fontanelle (Reprise, 1992) and Nemesisters (Reprise, 1995) had a big impact as one of the first all-female units of the time to rock as hard and loud as their male counterparts, and for their provocative lyrics and visual style— the kinderwhore look also associated with Courtney Love. When Herman left the band in 1997, Reprise dropped the band. They released some compilations and a live album before disbanding in 2001. [Note: The day before this story went to press, Maureen Herman left the band. In their respective statements, the band members say the split is amicable. Herman’s replacement is Clara Salyer, formerly of Minneapolis band Prissy Clerks.] A lot of their motivation for reuniting has been their effect on fans. “I have a lot of people tell me that, because of me, they play in a band. That’s wonderful, because there’s nothing better than music,” Barbero explains— especially “if you can influence anyone to do anything that makes them feel better, that makes me really happy, and hopefully, helps make the world a better place.” Both of the towns she has called home— Austin, Texas (where she lived for seven years), and her native Minneapolis—are known for great music. Some new pop music isn’t to Barbero’s liking. She relates the story of traveling with her friend John, complaining to him about the “cream of wheat” music she heard on the so-called alternative radio station. “It doesn’t taste like anything,” she told him. “It’s very mild, and it’s cheap, and … it’s just kind of mushy. I remember when kids liked music that they could relate to, because they could get their aggressions out and feel something. This music is like a girl playing an autoharp reading her diary.” Notwithstanding her aversion to squishy diary-core pop, Barbero still criticizes stereotypes about women in music. “Some people can’t get over the fact women can write a song and play an instrument, because women aren’t supposed to be able to do anything a man can do. So they have to talk about gen-

PHOTO COURTESY ROBIN LAANANEN

N ASO E S ALL ING! B IRST. T O FO IS COM UENCH YOUR FOOTBALL STPHECIAL K KET TO Q LED POR

Grunge-punk trio Babes in Toyland

der, and sexuality and clothes, as opposed to the music.” Babes in Toyland were around before the riot-grrl scene started, but as far as being associated with it, she admits, “As long as we can encourage empowerment for women, that’s really great, and if there’s anything I’m really proud of, that’s it.” Barbero believes her physical strength helped her recover from an accident two years ago, when a 63-pound box fell on her neck at a home-improvement store. After undergoing physical therapy, Barbero adapted her drumming technique. “Before, I was just flying all over the place. Now I’m using my arms more. I’m more straight and basic, but now I throw my torso instead of my neck.” The drummer says “everything fell into place” for a Babes in Toyland reunion tour. This included funding by Powersniff, a music and entertainment company founded by former Google employees (one of whom is Herman’s former boss from the digital-music company Fuzz). The trio may record again post-tour but, for now, they are enjoying playing the old songs for enthusiastic audiences that include younger fans. “We were playing when [some of] these kids were in diapers, so it’s crazy when they know all the words.” For the band, it’s about the thrill of performing music again. “I can’t believe, after all these years, I still really love these songs.” CW

BABES IN TOYLAND

w/FEA The Urban Lounge 241 S. 500 East Tuesday, Sept. 1 9 p.m. $22 advance/$25 day of show TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com


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CABARET

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

By Randy Harward, B r i a n St a ke r & T i f f a n y Fra n d s e n

THURSDAY 8.27 Motörhead, Saxon, Crobot

“Good evening. We are Motörhead … and we play rock & roll,” says singer/bassist Lemmy every time the eminent British power trio plays. Then it gets loud. The breakneck, rumbling ruckus coming from the stacks of Marshall amps—you feel it in your gut, to the extent that you wonder if you’re a song away from incontinence. Those who eschew earplugs risk hearing loss. Well, considering Lemmy drank a bottle of Jack Daniels daily for more than three decades, and smoked enough cigs to circle the world thrice (estimate)—yet looks pretty much the same as he did in Circus or Hit Parader back in the ‘80s, you can tolerate an earache and bubble-gut. After all, Lemmy is 69 years old, has diabetes and rocks a defibrillator, and he still gets up there and crushes it. The new album is called Bad Magic (UDR/Motörhead Music), and it features a guest solo from Queen’s Brian May (“The Devil”) plus a cover of the Rolling Stones’ “Sympathy for the Devil.” Joining Motörhead are Saxon, who were at the vanguard of the late-’70s/early ‘80s new wave of British heavy metal—and also defy age and deliver the goods. They’ll release Battering Ram (UDR) in October. Pennsylvanian fuzz-rockers Crobot open. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $35 in advance, $40 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

Snoop Dogg

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SATURDAY 8.29

Dazed Out: Snoop Dogg, Atmosphere, Dilated Peoples, Brother Ali

In May 2015, Snoop Dogg released Bush (Columbia/Doggystyle), which may refer to pleasures both carnal and, let’s say, medicinal. It’s supposedly Snoop’s last solo album as Snoop Dogg—the rest will be under Snoop Lion, Snoopzilla/7 Days of Funk and DJ Snoopadelic. The odd thing about Bush, however, is that, if it’s his final bow under his original stage name, it’s not even a hip-hop record. It’s pop, flavored with funk—which is Snoop’s dominant influence lately. There’s more singing (mainly from Gap Band leader Charlie Wilson) than rapping, even. But it works. From the first strains of the opening slow jam, “California Roll,” you wanna take Bush out for a sunny drive—and let it play through the night. Now, although Snoop is on to other things, there’ll be no shortage of beats and rhymes tonight. Your boys Atmosphere are on the bill, touring behind last year’s Southsiders (Rhymesayers). So is albino rapper Brother Ali, who’s still riding high on Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color (Rhymesayers, 2012) and the Left in the Deck EP. Finally, long-running underground trio Dilated Peoples will be there supporting Directors of Photography (guess which label). But of course, with Snoop being the headliner, you can expect to hear him spit plenty—and cough up the obligatory party anthem, “Gin and Juice.” (RH) Usana Amphitheatre, 5200 S. 6200 West, 3:30 p.m., $35-60, limited tickets available at CWStore.cityweekly.net, Usana-Amp.com

Motörhead

SUNDAY 8.30

Eagles of Death Metal, Sinner Sinners

If anyone’s counting, it’s been seven years since we’ve had new music from Eagles of Death Metal. That’s enough time to forget why you liked a band in the first place. “Complexity,” the first track on the duo’s fourth album, Zipper Down (Downtown), reminds you in less than 30 seconds. If Jesse Hughes and Josh Homme (Kyuss, Queens of the Stone Age) are ever gonna have a full-on hit, it’ll be this sassy hip-shaker, with its groovy fishhook of a bass line, sing-along lyrics and ridiculously fun Hairspray vibe. In fact, like every other EODM album, the whole of Zipper Down is an absolute boogie-down riot, mixing classic rock with big beats and a stoner-ly metal attitude. Opening for EODM tonight is FrenchDutch duo Sinner Sinners, whose third album XI (SinnerSinners.Bandcamp.com) mines the hard rock and punk rock in the same fast, furious, fist-pumping vein as esteemed Norwegian dirtbags Turbonegro. Expect to leave this show sweaty. (RH) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 7:30 p.m., $20 in advance, $22 day » of show, IntheVenueSLC.com

Eagles of Death Metal PHOTO COURTESY CHAPMAN BAEHLER

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LIVE LOUNGE

EVENTS

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Melvins

Nicole Atkins

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THIS WEEK

COMING SOON

From the bright “Maybe Tonight” on Neptune City (Red Ink/Columbia) and the smoky “We Wait Too Long” (which samples the Kaiser Chiefs’ “Ruby”) on her 2014 release, Slow Phaser (Oh Mercy!), to the moody “Vultures” from Mondo Amore (Razor & Tie), pop-noir singer Nicole Atkins’ discography traverses sultry late-evening sounds and daytime danceable tunes. Her lyrics are clever and wryly opinionated; the mockery extends to modern country music (the thus far unrecorded “As Country Was”) and hipsters alike (“Cool People”). She’s a charismatic, slightly bluesy performer; for a preview of her quirky and fun personality, check out her music video for “Girl, You Look Amazing,” in which she goes on a date with … no one—but that does not stop her from laughing, conversing, dancing and saying a seductive goodbye. (TF) Blues, Brews & BBQs Festival at Snowbasin Resort, 3925 Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, 4:30 p.m., free, Snowbasin.com

Melvins

The Melvins are one of those bands that loom larger than life—from their promethean sound to singer King Buzzo’s topiary explosion of hair, as emphatic as an extended middle digit. Categories/genres/epithets like grunge, metal or stoner rock are too flimsy to contain them—yet they are illustrative, as though the Melvins envelope the musical labels, instead of the other way around, and dwarf those contained therein. In “Hooch” from their epochal Houdini (Atlantic, 1993), Buzzo even seems to invent his own language. Their latest release, 2014’s Hold It In (Ipecac) finds them pared down to a three-piece, yet still cranking it up on songs like “Bride of Crankenstein.” Openers Big Business features Melvins drummer Coady Willis. (BS) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15 in advance, $17 day of show, limited tickets available at CWStore.cityweekly.net, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

The Maine

52 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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It’s a poorly kept secret that up-and-coming musicians make most of their money from concert-ticket sales. So, it comes as a surprise that The Maine, a power-pop quartet from Tempe, Ariz., announced their “Free for All” fall tour, where tickets are free (firstcome, first-served). And why not? Although their albums have been progressively wellreviewed—particularly their latest, American Candy (Warner Bros.)—they haven’t scored a hit single or charted above the low 30s on the Billboard Top 200. They get by thanks to the loyal following they’ve amassed touring with acts like The Academy Is… and The Cab. These free shows are a thank-you to them, and the band plans to be accessible after shows for signings. (Robby Poffenberger) Club 50 West, 50 E. Broadway, 6 p.m., free, 50WestSLC.com

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

CONCERTS & CLUBS THURSDAY 8.27

St. Vincent, Best Coast (Pioneer Park) Suzy Bogguss (Ed Kenley Amphitheater) Three Days Grace, Like A Storm (The Depot)

LIVE MUSIC

After The Burial (In the Venue) BJ Thomas (Egyptian Theatre) Brewfish (The Woodshed) Coma Serfs, Koala Temple, Lazy Susan (Diabolical Records) The Crystal Method (Sky Lounge) Dirt Cheap, Edge of Paradise, My Private Island (Liquid Joe’s) Jordan Young Duo (Spur Bar & Grill) Juana Ghani (Gallivan Center) Like A Storm & Otherwise (The Depot) Luke Bryan, Randy Houser & Dustin Lynch (Usana Amphitheatre) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub) Motörhead, Saxon, Crobot (The Complex, see p. 46) Sin City (Newpark Town Center)

OPEN MIC & JAM

Jazz Jam Session (Sugarhouse Coffee) Open Mic Night, Hosted by Once the Lion (Legends Billiards Club)

DJ

Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door) DJ Kemosable (Downstairs Park City) DJ Matty Mo, Flash & Flare (The Urban Lounge) Matt Calder, DJ Boozhi (Gracie’s) DJ Robbie Rob (Metro Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue on Highland Drive) Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (Habit’s) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Ogden Unplugged (Lighthouse Lounge)

AUG 27: 9 PM DOORS FREE SHOW

MATTY MO +

SEPT 1: 8 PM DOORS

FLASH & FLARE

UPSILON ACRUX

8 PM DOORS FREE SHOW

AUG 29:

THE GET UP KIDS

SEPT 3:

8 PM DOORS

AUG 30:

THE HOTELIER JOSH BERWANGER

MELVINS

8 PM DOORS

BIG BUSINESS

AUG 31:

MILLENCOLLIN

8 PM DOORS

8PM DOORS

SEPT 4: 9PM DOORS

SEPT 5: 9PM DOORS

SUCCESS

CROOKS ON TAPE

GHOST LOGIC

SHUGGIE OTIS

THE RUBES

DUBWISE JOE NICE

ETHICS ILLOOM

UZ

HECKA B2B MR. VANDAL POOKIE B2B MORZFEEN

Aaron Woodall Comedy (HoJaMaJe) The Anchorage, Show Me Island, The Lolos (Kilby Court) BJ Thomas (Egyptian Theatre) Channel Z (Club 90) Chelsea Wolfe, Upsilon Acrux (The Urban Lounge) Colbie Caillat, Christina Perri (Sandy Amphitheater) Dark Seas, Chicago Killers w/ White Mystery (The Woodshed) Designer Drugs (Area 51) DJ Gray (Snowbird) Edge Of Paradise (Liquid Joe’s) Exmag, TBA Word (The State Room) Fox, John-Ross Boyce, Black Mass (ABG’s) Jenn Blosil, Richie Kissinger, The Vibrant

DJ

Big Lady Sue, DJ Jarvalicious (Sandy Station) Flash & Flare (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

COMING SOON

AUGUST 27, 2015 | 53

Oct 14: Destroyer Oct 15: Youth Lagoon Oct 16: IAMX Oct 17: DIIV Oct 19: Murs Oct 20: SKULLCANDY PRESENTS AlunaGeorge Oct 21: A Silent Film Oct 22: FREE SHOW Slug Localized Oct 23: Deafheaven Oct 24: Breakers Oct 28: King Dude Oct 29: Albert Hammond Jr Oct 30: Small Black

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Sept 6: FREE SHOW Selma Sept 29: Cannibal Ox Sept 10: La Luz Oct 1: Young Blood Brass Band Sept 11: Old 97s Oct 2: RED FANG & CASPIAN Sept 12: Bowling For Soup Oct 3: DUBWISE Sept 13: Dam Funk Oct 5: Shadow Windhawk and the Sept 14: Dirty Fences Morticians Sept 16: Eligh & DeMatlaS Oct 6: Re-Up Presents DJ Krush Sept 17: FREE SHOW Slug Localized Oct 7: Gardens & Villa Sept 18: Quiet Oaks Album Release Oct 8: Wartime Blues Sept 19: Control Freq Oct 9: The Circulars Tour Send Off Sept 20: The Vibrators Oct 10: The Fresh Prince Of Belair Sept 21: Shilpa Ray Party Sept 22: Ken MOde Oct 12: Frank Turner Sept 23: Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats Oct 13: Angel Olson Sept 24: A Place To Bury Strangers Sept 25: Gloe Album Relase + Dark Seas Return From Tour Sept 26: FREE SHOW Flash & Flare Sept 28: The Fratellis

LIVE MUSIC

Sound (Velour) Lynch Mob (Sky Lounge) Machine Guns & Roses, Damn that Rooster, Alternative Nation (The Royal) The National Parks (Cherry Hill) Night Train (The Westerner) Otter Creek (9th and 9th Concert Series) Rage Against the Supremes (Spur Bar & Grill) Rick Gerber Band (Hog Wallow Pub) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tony Holiday, Hectic Hobo (Garage on Beck) Transit Cast (Brewski’s) Whistling Rufus (Sugarhouse Coffee)

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CHELSEA WOLFE

SEPT 2:

8 PM DOORS

AUG 28:

BABES IN TOYLAND

FEA

FRIDAY 8.28

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Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

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54 | AUGUST 27, 2015

SATURDAY 8.29

CONCERTS & CLUBS

The Get Up Kids, Josh Berwanger, The Hotelier

The much-maligned emo genre wasn’t always so yucky. It started in the 1980s with Rites of Spring and led to the beloved post-hardcore band Fugazi, whose Ian MacKaye formed his own emo band, Embrace. Plenty of cred and substance, there. Likewise, with late-90s/early 2000s genre leaders Jawbreaker, Sunny Day Real Estate, The Promise Ring … and The Get Up Kids. They all played a poppier, prettier strain of punk that was emotional but sincere—and smart. The ensuing bandwagon overflowed with whiny, insubstantial scene-haired bands, prompting Get Up Kids guitarist Jim Suptic, speaking to Drowned in Sound in 2009, to apologize for influencing them. Apology accepted. Josh Berwanger, who led another noteworthy emo band, The Anniversary, opens along with The Hotelier. (Randy Harward) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $18 advance/$22 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

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56 | AUGUST 27, 2015

CONCERTS & CLUBS SATURDAY 8.29

MONDAY

LIVE MUSIC

American Hitmen, Natural Causes (The Royal) Barsie, The Lovestrange, Big Wild Wings, Alarm Call (Kilby Court) Beard of Bees, Hamartia, The Thrill Collective, Short for Oliver, Guests (The Complex) Beneath Red Skies, I Capture Castle, Aether, Graves of the Monument, Wired for Havoc (The Loading Dock) BJ Thomas (Egyptian Theatre) Brother Chunky (Hog Wallow Pub) Dan Wheldon (Snowbird) The Get Up Kids, The Hotelier, Josh Berwanger (The Urban Lounge, see p. 54) Helion Prime (The Woodshed) Lazlo & The Dukes (Devil’s Daughter) Lee Brice (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater at Deer Valley) Puddle Mountain Ramblers (Johnny’s On Second) RKDN, Coral Bones, Spirit City (Velour) Sin City Soul (Brewski’s) Snoop Dogg, Atmosphere, Dilated Peoples, Brother Ali (Usana Amphitheater, see p. 46) Swagger (Piper Down) Tycoon Machete (Fat’s Grill)

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Annalee’s Jutebox (Spur Bar & Grill) Eagles of Death Metal, Sinner Sinners (In the Venue, see p. 46) Jay Hardway (Sky Lounge) John Daniels (Ogden Amphitheater) Nairma Road, To the Red Carpet, Toy Called God, A Balance of Power, Riksha, Life Has a Way, Unthinkable Thoughts, Dezecration, Poon Hammer (The Loading Dock) Nicole Atkins (Snow Basin, see p. 48) Melvins, Big Business (The Urban Lounge, see p. 48) Shai Hulud, Lions Lions, No Safe Way Home, Ash of August, Wulf Blitzer (Metro Bar) Toxic Holocaust, Lord Dying (Area 51)

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The Maine (Club at 50 West, see p. 52) Millencolin, Success (The Urban Lounge) Yes, Toto (Red Butte Garden)

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TUESDAY 9.1 LIVE MUSIC

Babes In Toyland, FEA (The Urban Lounge, see p. 44) The Dockets, Small Lake City, Turbophonic, The Dropouts (Kilby Court) Los Lonely Boys (Ed Kenley Amphitheater) The White Buffalo, Blackkiss (The State Room, see p. 42) Words Like Daggers (The Loading Dock)

OPEN MIC & JAM

Open Blues Jam (Green Pig) Open Mic Night (Velour) Wasatch Jazz Project (Sugarhouse Coffee)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke (The Woodshed)

WEDNESDAY 9.2 LIVE MUSIC

Annalee (Spur Bar & Grill) Cephras, Rret, Belle Jewell, Andrew Wiscombe (Velour) Crooks on Tape, Ghost Logic (The Urban Lounge) Dusk Raps, Osseous Dusk, Jedi Steve, Radius (Kilby Court) The Home Team, Tonight We Fight, My New Mistress, Versus the Man (The Loading Dock) Nate Robinson (Snowbird)

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DJ Matty Mo (Willie’s Lounge) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs Park City)

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Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. "Climb Ev'ry Mountain" backdrop 2. Birdwatching and scrapbooking, for two 3. "The House of the Spirits" author 4. Heartburn medicine brand 5. Job: Abbr. 6. Slangy turndowns 7. Vowel sequence sung by kids 8. "Shoot!" 9. Budget item?

53. Actress ____ Rachel Wood 55. Garlic-crushing tool 58. Kind of contraception 60. "The Mikado" accessory 61. ____ de plume 62. Enemy 63. Popeye's Olive 65. Org. in "Argo"

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

10. 1880s White House monogram 11. "Good" cholesterol, briefly 12. "Give ____ rest!" 13. When you entered this world: Abbr. 18. "You ____" (2011 Lady Gaga song) 22. ____ Friday's 24. Voiced 26. Blog entry 27. "Whazzat?" 28. Before, in verse 29. Many activists' concerns: Abbr. 31. Be up 35. "Immediately!" 37. Fivers 38. Way out in the country 39. Stanford rival, informally 40. "Immediately!" 41. Back when 42. Sign of summer 43. Red Roof ____ 45. Blue book collector 46. One with a short fuse 47. Magazine extras 49. Singer at Barack's inauguration 50. Not in the dark 52. Opportune

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. "____ Carter III," bestselling album of 2008 4. Region 8. Following "On the Origin of Species," flower that was the subject of Charles Darwin's next book 14. Aug. doesn't have one 15. Modern yogurt flavor 16. Move in the direction of 17. Full discretionary power 19. "CSI" setting 20. Has ____ for (is skilled at) 21. Join, as a table 23. Hamilton and Hunt 25. Mapmaker 30. Calcutta conveyance 32. On trial 33. Chicago-to-Tampa dir. 34. Novelist McEwan 36. Campfire remains 37. Online shopping button (or a direction when solving 17-, 25-, 54- and 64-Across) 41. Perp's excuse 44. Second word of "A Tale of Two Cities" 45. The Eagles, on a scoreboard 48. Word before store or hospital 51. In a bit 54. "Doonesbury," e.g. 56. Swivels 57. Nostalgic style 59. Papier-____ 60. Hoofing it 64. Atlanta institution since 1982 66. "Hell, yeah!" 67. Breeze (through) 68. Grain in Nutri-Grain 69. Marcos who was once the subject of a correction in the New York Times concerning her shoe size 70. Leave rolling in the aisles 71. GPS lines: Abbr.

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


INSIDE /COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 51 / FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 53 SHOP GIRL PG. 52 / URBAN LIVING PG. 54

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support to be the business owner I wanted to be,” he says. Image Studios 360 is run by Tiffany Lewis (Operations Director), Tiffany Everson (salon manager at Fort Union, Sandy and South Jordan), Megan Oviatt (salon manager at Draper), Shaun Olsen (Vice President) and Jason Olsen (President.) Image Studio 360 now has five locations across the Wasatch Front that are home to over 175 salon professionals. “Chances are that most people know at least one person that works at an Image Studios 360 salon,” says Olsen. “We attract some of the top talent in Utah to our salons, and anyone wishing to find a new hair stylist, nail tech, or esthetician can do so easily on our online salon directory” (ImageStudios360. com/salondirectory). Studio space starts at $145 per week. Interested individuals can contact Image Studios 360 online for a free information packet. Image Studio 360 is expanding beyond the Beehive State. “We are seeking select individuals in California, Texas, Florida, Georgia, Colorado, Arizona and Nevada who are interested in opening an Image Studios of their own,” says Olsen. Find franchising information on the Image Studios 360 website. n

Image Studios 360 offers studio salon space for top-notch beauty professionals.

community@cityweekly.net

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ave you dreamed of running your own business, but don’t know where to start? Beauty professionals should check out Image Studios 360, a new business model that gives small business owners a leg-up in the beauty world. “Image Studios 360 was designed specifically for beauty professionals, making it possible [for] them to own their own salon space and be their own boss,” explains Jason Olsen, president of Image Studios 360. “Our concept is simple: We provide an incredible space and atmosphere, you bring your passion, talent and clientele.” Image Studio 360 offers professionals in the beauty industry a way to simplify the business side of their jobs. Stylists and nail technicians who rent Image Studio 360 space get a work space that is sleek and modern, on-site laundry facilities, marketing materials and more. The rent is all-inclusive, so there is no worry about paying for utilities or Internet. Each location has a manager who can troubleshoot when problems arise. This allows the business owner to set his or her own schedule and prices without worrying about a lot of the minor details involved with building a business. In 2009, several creative minds came together to discuss the possibility of creating a new salon-space business model. Thus, Image Studios 360 was born. “We wanted something that would truly disrupt the traditional salon business model and effectively make a much-needed shift in the industry,” explains Olsen. “We offer a studio salon space that caters to all beauty professionals, including hair stylists, estheticians, nail techs, massage therapists and more.” So far, their experiment has been a success. “I love the freedom and support I get at Image Studios,” says Sandy salon owner Michelle Money. “Every established hair stylist should be here!” Stylist Jared Gomez agrees. “Image Studios gave me the resources, opportunity, and

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That Doggie in the Window S

ome people say I’m a little obsessed with my dogs. OK, I’m a lot obsessed. As in, I have their birthdays tattooed on my forearm. Heaven help me, crazy cat ladies, you are off the hook! Guy is an Old English bulldog with lymphoma, and Cooper is a special-needs English bulldog. Because of their unique health concerns and Guy’s inability to get vaccinations due to chemotherapy, I am especially neurotic about what they eat and where they play. Praise be that Salt Lake City is getting on board, and we have some incredible places for you to get your dog shopping/experience on. Ma and Paw’s Bakery (1227 E. 3300 South, 801-487-3838, Ma AndPawsBakeryInc.com) is where it’s at for housemade dog treats. Everything is made with love, without preservatives, and it’s all human-grade. I may or may not have noshed on a few of my kids’ treats (OK, I totally did!). The selection is fantastic: tacos, bones, biscuits and iced cookies—and don’t forget to order a customized “pizza” for special occasions. The bakery can accommodate your pet’s allergies or special dietary needs. Barley’s Canine Recreation Center (2827 S. 2300 East, 801-467-6069, SwimAtBarleys.com) offers a range of

Guy and Cooper

services including daycare, massage and acupuncture, as well as toys, treats, gear for your furbabies and much more. But let’s talk about the year-round, heated dog pool. That’s right, you can take your fur-kids in for private or open-pool swim sessions, assisted or not, all year long! Life jackets, toys, towels and a rinse-off shower are all provided and the sanitation system is top-notch without using chlorine. Just down the street from Barley’s is Dirty Johnson’s Wash (2823 S. 2300 East, 801-486-0683, JohnsonsDogWash.com). It’s like a self-serve car wash, but for your dog. And finish off with the drive-through at BlueStar Juice Bar and Coffee Café. (2795 S. 2300 East, 801-466-4280, The-BlueStar.com) After all, you deserve a treat, too. n

60 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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Renting through Partlow

A pair of pups plunge into the pool at Barley’s Canine Recreation Center

Treats tailored for the tail-waggers.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) You like to run ahead of the pack. You prefer to show people the way, to set the pace. It’s cleaner that way, right? There’s less risk you will be caught up in the messy details of everyday compromise. But I suspect that the time is right for you to try an experiment: Temporarily ease yourself into the middle of the pack. Be willing to deal with the messy details of everyday compromise. Why? Because it will teach you lessons that will serve you well the next time you’re showing the way and setting the pace. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Are you ready to revise your ideas about how love works? Would you consider re-evaluating your relationship to romance, your approach to intimacy, and your understanding of sex? I hope you will not only be willing but also excited to do these things. Now is a favorable time to make changes that will energize your love life with a steady flow of magic for months to come. To get the party started, brainstorm about experiments you could try to invigorate the dynamics of togetherness. Make a list of your customary romantic strategies, and rebel against them all. Speak sexy truths that are both shocking and endearing. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Querencia is a Spanish word with many nuances. At its simplest, it refers to your favorite spot, a place where you long to be. But its meaning can go even deeper. Querencia may be a sanctuary where you feel safe and authentic, or a situation that enables you to draw on extra reserves of strength and courage. It’s a special kind of home: an empowering shelter that makes you feel that you belong in this world and love your life. Can you guess where I’m going with this message, Gemini? These days you need to be in your querencia even more than usual. If you don’t have one, or if you don’t know where yours is, formulate a fierce intention to locate it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) This is the deepest, darkest phase of your cycle. The star that you will ultimately make a wish upon has not yet risen. Your pet monsters seem to have forgotten for the moment that they are supposed to be your allies, not your nemeses. Smoke from the smoldering embers in your repressed memories is blending with the chill night fog in your dreams, making your life seem like a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside a taco. Just kidding about that last part. I wanted to see if your sense of humor is intact, because if it is, you will respond resiliently to all the cosmic jokes in your upcoming tests. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) According to the poet Rainer Maria Rilke, here’s what God says to each of us: “Go the limits of your longing . . . Flare up like flame and make big shadows that I can move in. Let everything happen to you: beauty and terror. Just keep going. No feeling is final.” Whether or not you’re on speaking terms with the Creator, this is excellent advice. It’s time to give everything you have and take everything you need. Hold nothing back and open yourself as wide and wild as you dare. Explore the feeling of having nothing to lose and expect the arrivals of useful surprises. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The sun and the expansive planet Jupiter are currently making a joyful noise in the sign of Virgo, which is your astrological House of Career and Ambition. This does not necessarily mean that a boon to your career and ambition will fall into your lap, although such an event is more likely than usual. More importantly, this omen suggests that you will influence luck, fate and your subconscious mind to work in your favor if you take dramatic practical action to advance your career and ambitions.

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AUGUST 27, 2015 | 61

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The art of effective communication consists of knowing both what to say and what not to say. It’s not enough to simply find the words that accurately convey your meaning. You have to tailor your message to the quirks of your listeners. For example, let’s say you want to articulate the process that led you to change your mind about an important issue. You would use different language with a child, an authority figure, and a friend. Right? I think you are currently at the peak of your abilities to do this well, Cancerian. Take full advantage of your fluency. Create clear, vivid impressions that influence people to like you and help you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) If you have been patiently waiting for a propitious moment to buy a new yacht, pledge your undying love, or get a tattoo that LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Arthur Conan Doyle first used the term “smoking gun” in a story depicts Buddha wrestling Satan, now is as close as you’ll get to he wrote over a century ago. It referred to a time the fictional that propitious moment, at least for a while. Even if you have detective Sherlock Holmes burst into a room to find a man hold- merely been considering the possibility of signing a year-long ing a pistol that had just been fired, along with the fallen body of lease, asking a cute mischief-maker on a date, or posting an a man who had been shot. Since then, the meaning of “smoking extra-edgy meme on Facebook or Twitter, the next three weeks gun” has expanded. Now it’s any piece of evidence that serves would be prime time to strike. Diving into a deep, heart-crazed as compelling proof of a certain hypothesis. If you can’t find the commitment is sometimes a jangly process for you Aquarians, cookie you left in the kitchen, and your roommate walks by with but these days it might be almost smooth and synchronistic. cookie crumbs on his chin, it’s the smoking gun that confirms he pilfered your treat. I believe this is an important theme for PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) you right now. What question do you need answered? What Ready for a ritual? Get a piece of paper and a pen. Light a candle, theory would you like to have corroborated? The smoking gun take three deep breaths, and chant “yummmm” five times. Then spend ten minutes writing down the qualities you would will appear. like your perfect lover to possess. Identify both the traits that would make this person unique and the behavior he or she would VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) At least for now, I suggest you suspend the quest for order display toward you. Got that? When you are finished, burn the and refinement and perfection. The wise course of action is to list you made. Disavow everything you wrote. Pledge to live disengage from your fascination with control, and instead give for at least seven months without harboring fixed beliefs about yourself to the throbbing, erratic pulse of the Cosmic Wow. what your ideal partner should be like. Instead, make yourself Why? If you do, you will be able to evolve faster than you thought extra receptive to the possibility that you will learn new truths possible. Your strength will come from agile curiosity and an about what you need. Why? I suspect that love has elaborate eagerness to experiment. Do you remember when you last plans for you in the next two years. You will be better prepared explored the catalytic wonders of spontaneity and unpredict- to cooperate with them if you are initially free of strong agendas. ability? Do it again!

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) On August 28, 1963, Capricorn hero Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech to a crowd of thousands in Washington, D.C. In that address, he imagined what it might look like if African Americans were free of the bigotry and oppression they had endured for centuries at the hands of white Americans. In accordance with your astrological potentials, I encourage you to articulate your own “I Have a Dream” vision sometime soon. Picture in detail the successful stories you want to actualize in the future. Visualize the liberations you will achieve and the powers you will obtain.


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62 | AUGUST 27, 2015

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Last Notes of Summer S

ummer is on the fast train to fall, and the Twilight Concert Series (TCS) has its last concert of 2015 Thursday, Aug. 27, night at Pioneer Park. Sure, this year has not seen the greatest of interest and attendance for this music venue. The Salt Lake City Arts Council organizes the series each summer. They are the folks who put together the Living Traditions Festival at the beginning of summer at Washington Square. The group also places those exceptionally groovy art pieces on poles around downtown (like the spaceship carrying a pair of missionaries, one white and one blue, out front of Squatters). The TCS is founded on the principles of “connecting audiences with the arts by presenting accomplished world-class artists that represent strong artistic values and diverse social principles.” Its mission is to bring together the community and create a “vibrant and relevant downtown atmosphere” to promote Salt Lake City. To achieve that mission, organizers say they try to make the event accessible, expose fans to diverse musicians and work with the local arts & music scene. I didn’t go to any of the concerts this year because, frankly, I had heard of only one of the performing groups. A staff member admitted that attendance has been lower because the artist lineup has been more “up-and-coming artists who are lesser known.” TCS is funded through private donations, fundraising/door receipts, Salt Lake City Corporation monies and ZAP taxes. Fewer fans mean less income, which not only punches the gut of the organizers’ budget, but also that vendors at the fringes of the concerts. One food-truck owner complained to me after a recent concert that “with maybe 3,000 people in attendance,” they made no money that night in food sales and “people have heard it’s $5 to get in, but when they get to the gate, it’s $10 for day of show.” He said TCS hasn’t done a great job in letting people know of about the two-tiered ticket-sales policy. Kids who arrived with $5 for the gate and $5 for a drink and taco don’t have money to spend on food with the day of show price hike. St. Vincent is performing Aug. 27 and should bring a huge crowd as the last hurrah of this season’s concerts. Arts council staff wants to get more input on possible performers for the 2016 season. Personally, I’d love to see a better mix of genres and even some faded acts that still have relevance—like the ones the Utah State Fair used to book. Oh, did I mention that for the first time ever, the Utah State Fair will hold no concerts in the Grandstand this year? They booked a circus instead. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

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For adults (YOU) Not based on high school grades 801-392-9534

Stevens-Henager College scholarshipshc.com *Scholarship awards are limited & only available to those who qualify.

is seeking qualified candidates for positions in the Payson, UT area.

POSITIONS INCLUDE:

Production • General Labor • Warehouse Welders • Metal Prep • Assembly

SHIFTS

1st Shift: 7am-3pm 2nd Shift: 3pm-11pm 3rd Shift: 11pm-7am

PAY: UP TO $12.50/HR APPLY ONLINE @ WWW.WORKATFOCUS.COM OR CALL (801) 919-7746


APPLY NOW

JOIN SLC’s most FUN AND EXCITING WORK ENVIRONMENT. Earn more than

$30,000 /YR AT ENTRY LEVEL -Daily Cash bonuses and spiffs-Part Time positions Available-Paid TrainingNo Experience Needed

WE SELL HOMES & LOANS TO ALL SAINTS, SINNERS, SISTERWIVES

& BURNERS

57 WEST 200 SOUTH in the heart of Downtown SLC

please send resumes to: SLCJOBS@ELITEPAYGLOBAL.COM Julie A. Brizzée Babs De Lay

GO TO

.COM DRIVERS DRIVERS-CLASS A

NEW 2016 TRUCKS ! Now with Automatics & Manual Transmissions

FedEx GROUND Now Hiring Package Handlers Interested in a fast-paced job with Career advancement opportunites? Join the FedEx Ground team as a Package handler. Starting wages Up to $12.31/hr depending on sort start time Qualifications * 18 years or older * Pass a background check * Able to load, unload, sort packages and other related duties. All interested candidates must attend a sort observation at our facility prior to applying for the position. For more information or to schedule a sort observation, please call 801-299-6540 www.watchasort.com

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Granting loans for 27 years in Selling homes for 30 years Happy Valley- NMLS#243253 in the Land of Zion

LUMENIS Lumenis in Salt Lake City, Utah is looking for full time Regional Service, Sales and Marketing Manager. Domestic & Intl travel req. Duties include: Recruits, hires, develops & retains exceptional talent in the Contract Sales function; devises & conducts basic market research to determine the continued application & future opportunity of existing products in current markets & to better understand product related competitive issues; create campaigns, training & program management for telemarketing of Service programs to existing installed base. Send resumes to Susie. stormann@lumenis.com MATERIAL ENGINEER (DRAPER, UT) Test physical, chemical, & electrical properties of manufactured thin films by our chemical vapor deposition systems, & study thin film coated electronics under various corrosive environments, then perform failure analysis on electronics & improve coating process. Dvlp coating process & recommend machine improvement accordingly, inspect machine/process, deploy new machine/process. Study curing process & water transmission rate of various masking materials, etc. Master’s deg in Material Science/Engg, & 1 yr exp in industry or academia related to material science research or engg reqd. Send resume to HR, HZO, Inc., 12637 South 265 West, Draper, UT 84020 SBARRO’S NOW HIRING Sbarro’s offers flexible schedules, free meal while working, paid time off, opportunity for advancement. Stop the Fashion Place Mall or E-mailsbarro990@ sbarro.com to schedule an interview.

CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS. 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

AUGUST 27, 2015 | 63

FedEX Ground is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color. religion, sex, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other protected characteristic.

Julie “Bella” Hall

| COMMUNITY |

INDUSTRIAL QA ENGINEER (DRAPER, UT) Design, develop & implement quality control protocols & training manual/program for nanotechnology water protection solution & services. Create & implement inspection criteria & procedures. Develop & analyze statistical data & product specifications. Quality Control. Master’s degree in Industrial or Mechanical Engineering required. Six months of Exp. as process engineer or industrial engineer required. Send resume to HR, HZO, Inc., 12637 South 265 West, Draper, UT 84020

FOCUS WORKFORCES is seeking qualified candidates for positions in the Payson, UT area. POSITIONS INCLUDE: Production • General Labor • Warehouse Welders • Metal Prep • Assembly SHIFTS 1st Shift: 7am-3pm 2nd Shift: 3pm-11pm 3rd Shift: 11pm7am PAY: UP TO $12.50/HR APPLY ONLINE @ WWW. WORKATFOCUS.COM OR CALL (801) 919-7746

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Call Today for more Details 1-800-547-9169 (Dial 1) or Check us out Online at MayTrucking.com

NOW HIRING Customer Service and Sales Representatives, In the Salt Lake and Orem Area 801-579-2000. Convergys…your future is calling Careers.convergys.com

NMLS #67180

Loan Officer 801-747-1206 julie@brizzee.net www.brizzee.net

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

We offer: Up to $.45 CPM Guaranteed Pay Packages Bonuses Tuition Reimbursement, Pet on Your Truck, Paid Orientation, Gold Plan Medical, Dental & Vision & the Respect YOU Deserve!

FUTURES THROUGH CHOICES is Hiring Support Staff to work with individuals with Disabilities. www. futuresthroughchoices.org Send Resume: work4ftc@gmail.com

To Place and Find Utah’s Hottest Career Opportunities


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

64 | AUGUST 27, 2015

Poets Corner

Poetry In motion We all make the same mistakes Its all part of the Human race A missed chance of love or heartache A chance at love or just a hard case Is it just sex or love to make It has to be done face to face I know that love is give and take Take whatever you can but leave Plenty of space. Oh and for gods sake Give back what you receive in its place When its love and poetry, you cannot fake Anything else would be a damned disgrace

Top Dollar paiD

801-359-7788 download our new

phone app

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

VOICE LESSONS BY ROGER L.COX

i Can help!

CREDIT TROUBLE? NEED A CAR?

801-895-3947

CarSoldForCash.com

Mark Hurst

Multi-Family

WORDS

For your car, truck or van. running or not, lost title

ROGERLCOX@GMAIL.COM 801-609-IDEA (4332)

Mark Miller Loan Center will get you in a car you deserve today. 801-506-1215 mmsloancenter.com

WINTHEPICKS.COM Propriety Algorithm for Sport Advisement that works WIN your next Pick

Yard Sale

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD

August 29th

$250 RECORDING PROMO

All-proceeds support tiny Teagan’s fight against leukemia

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SALSA LEEDOS CATERS! Call today! 801-565-8818

Full service, 2 songs, 2 vinyl www.audioinnrecording.com Book now! (801) 441-0719

CITY WEEKLY DRIVER WANTED!!! Weber/Davis Delivery Area email larry@cityweekly.net

UTE CAB

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LET ME SCULPT YOUR BODY Massage by Angela 801-953-5771 LMT#4952038

SLOW ROLL SLC party ride every tues 7pm MEET BEHIND CRANK SLC facebook.com/slowrollslc

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GOPRO RENTALS

Let us help you with that selfie! Rent from us! 801-510-5666

BUSINESS IS....PICKING UP!!! I’ll Pick up your dog poop $10 for up to 3000 sq ft Text/call 801-673-4372

CITY WEEKLY STORE Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

City Weekly August 27, 2015  

Let's Play!

City Weekly August 27, 2015  

Let's Play!