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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY WHO GETS TO LAUGH?

Salt Lake City is ready for the satirical The Book of Mormon—but when does satire cross the line? Cover illustration by Mason Rodrickc

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STEPHEN J. QUIGLEY Mock of Ages, p. 17 Stephen J. Quigley writes about culture and design in Greenville, S.C. You might see him passing through Utah this summer as he and his family cut a swath across America in their late-model Sprinter van.

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LETTERS Music to My Ears

Great articles by Randy Harward on David Lee Roth and Rush [“Hello, Dave,” July 16; “Semi-Permanent Waves,” July 9, City Weekly]. Please tell me Harward still has the audio clip of David Lee Roth saying “fuck you”—and, pretty please, could he make it available? At least to me? Because that would be truly cool. I like the idea of using it as an email notification. Maybe even a ringtone, properly edited. I know it’s a long shot but, wow, that would be great.

ANDY TOOMEY

Jacksonville, Fla.

Requiem for Gyll

Brandon Burt’s July 11 City Weekly.net blog essay on Gyll Huff was very lovely. I stumbled upon news of Huff’s death obliquely referenced in Facebook postings. I had to Google him to find the blog piece. What a force of nature he was! We did lots of different things together during my time in Salt Lake City, from 1978-84, and afterward when I visited. The last time Huff and I were onstage together, we pruned shrubs at the arts festival while dada-esque moments happened around us. Thanks for sharing.

TOM HAGOOD

West Yarmouth, Mass.

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes.

Soothed by Anti-Trump Prattle

Jim Catano’s column [“Trumped Up,” July 16, City Weekly] bemoaning Donald Trump’s announced presidential candidacy as frivolous and unserious is music to my ears, since I picked up this rag to read to pass the time at a local laundromat one late night (I usually pick up City Weekly for Ted Scheffler’s dining reviews, since his commentary is apolitical). I have lent my support to Donald Trump ever since he announced his running for president, whether on the Republican Party ticket or going rogue, like Ross Perot and Theodore Roosevelt, that could split the election for a historical first as a duly elected third-party president. There are two reasons why my support for Trump stands (even though I disagree with him on some issues): 1. The Donald tells it like it is on the vexing crisis of illegal immigration, unlike the cowardly and complacent competition concerned with the purse strings of the corporate masters such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Wall Street, that love exploitable cheap labor and intended to displace American citizens and legal immigrants. 2. “The Trumpinator” is serious in his intention to win the presidential candidacy, even if he gets booted off the Republican Party ticket through the party’s utter corruption and fraud, as happened to Ron Paul in 2012. The more attacks that are levied on Trump, the stronger he will be, with his record-setting climbing polls made up

of discontented voters sick and tired of political gridlock and the dismal economy exacerbated by unenforceable immigration and retrogressive free-trade agreements. Donald Trump is winning the hearts and minds of the “silent majority.” That is why self-professed liberal or plutocratic tools like Catano are scared that Donald could win the election and turn things around, rebuking the disastrous administrations of the past five decades, especially reversing the antagonistically anti-American worker policies of Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. The sound of Catano’s self-righteously prattling and pontificating whining—being so frightened of Donald Trump becoming president that mockery and derision must be elevated in order to attack him—is soothing.

AARON HEINEMAN Provo

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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PRIVATE EY

Scribe Tribe

Last week, City Weekly played host to the annual convention of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia (A AN) here in Salt Lake City. Our convention hotel was the Little America. Here’s all I have to say about that: If you want to impress your industry friends, plan your next convention with the folks at Little America. Rooms, meals, meeting space, the beautiful surroundings and general ambience were simply stellar. It didn’t hurt that Salt Lake City now boasts tons of great restaurants and fun clubs. Our stomping grounds made lasting impressions that will become parts of stories that will alter how Utah is perceived. All of us at City Weekly thank you, SLC. And, yeah, that comes from the newspaper that formerly blasted the late Earl Holding (who built and owned Little America and the Grand America) as frequently as any media could. We were not fans of the process that watched entire city blocks fall to Holding’s vision of redevelopment—and particularly of the lackadaisical role of our own Redevelopment Agency, which rolled over and played dead for Holding. From the balcony of our former office on 400 South, across the street from Holding’s property, we were close witness to the buildings being knocked down one by one. So, we mocked his parking lot with weekly photos of the piles of dirt and rubble. We groaned when the small businesses were displaced, one by one. Only in late 2013, the last holdout, the Flower Patch floral shop, was bought out and torn down. Now his dirt lot—once the site of The Newhouse Hotel, The Terrace Ballroom, Gadgets and many other businesses—has been sold to the LDS Church and is a paved parking lot. We don’t consider that great progress, but after 30 years of bitching about it, it is what it is—some people have only known it as a parking lot, so it might as well be a good one. And, his two hotels are simply a knockout punch, since no one really expects such elegance in Salt Lake City. And elegant they are, five stars each. Not quite so for the AAN attendees, noted

mostly for motley tastes in personal dress and grooming. In their defense, that motley look is not always the day-to-day appearance of our peeps, but is the result of simple math: Eight hours of seminars, plus two hours of eating, plus three hours of figuring out where to drink, plus nine hours of drinking, plus two hours of sleeping and showering, leaves no time for considering where to part one’s hair. That’s the natural outcome for an industry that has long been rated one of the highest in alcohol consumption (and formerly cigarettes) in the land, ranking up there with divorce attorneys, penny-stock traders, prison guards and members of the Utah Legislature when attending private junkets to Duluth, Minn. The only difference between AAN attendees and Utah politicians on a junket is that AAN attendees don’t have time to watch hotel porn—and even if they did, they would pay for it themselves and not foist the service onto taxpayers. Oh, and the AAN attendee probably wouldn’t be related to one of the stars of the porn show. You caught that, didn’t you? Utah not only again ranks among the highest states in porn watching, but also, a subculture of Mormon porn star participants is, uhh, on the rise. Just Google “Fusion Mormon Porn,” and you can read all about it. That’s the end of today’s publicservice announcements. Back to AAN. You likely know that the newspaper industry is reinventing itself. The past decade hasn’t been kind to the newspaper industry, particularly since 2011 or so, but not everyone up and died. In fact, nearly everyone survived, some better than others, but none has been spared the blade of budget costcutting and downsizing. Persons who spend all day commenting on newspaper comment boards—I call them The Waking Dead—save

STAFF BOX

B Y J O H N S A LTA S

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

few kind words for the newspaper industry. All day long, they get it wrong about the economics of the business of newspapers, ironically on newspaper websites. They still believe that all their posts somehow contribute to the net bottom lines of newspapers, since they create more clicks, page views and viewers—which they also wrongly believe are sellable, proof being that all they do is sit on their asses and type, not spend. A caveat: I appreciate good, honest commentary on any topic—even that which is disagreeable. But today’s comment boards, especially at The Salt Lake Tribune, are merely places where University of Utah fans can attack BYU fans, who can attack drinkers who can attack pious Mormons. Write a story about a waterculvert break in Tooele County, and somebody will blame the Cougars and someone else will blame Obama. Then it starts over the next day under a story about kittens in campgrounds. The innocuous becomes inane; any news becomes the pivot point for the next round of repetitive comments. And real news is missed. That’s not the newspaper business that I, nor that my contemporaries in the alternative press, know. Now we’ve spent another energizing week buttressing each other and learning about how we can blend the next rounds of innovative technology and compelling storytelling into formats that will continue to attract a new generation of young readers to our world. We scour and scorch looking for new ways to fund good journalism. Find them or not, we write on, we party on. So, yeah, Tribune—good luck with that new subscription model. We would have asked you to present that concept to our conference, but, to be honest, the idea sucks. CW Send Private Eye comments to john@cityweekly.net

What was your No. 1 takeway from last week’s AAN Conference?

@johnsaltas

THE ONLY DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AAN ATTENDEES AND UTAH POLITICIANS ON A JUNKET IS THAT AAN ATTENDEES DON’T HAVE TIME TO WATCH HOTEL PORN

Pete Saltas: Eric Bright (Deseret Digital Media) hosted the best session. What he’s doing over there is fascinating, and we can learn a lot from his model. It’s disruptive, so naturally a lot of people were offended. Aside from that, I was happy that a lot of visitors were truly impressed at the sites and sounds Salt Lake City has to offer. We’re growing up!

Scott Renshaw: That journalism is still in the hands of passionate, committed people, and that if you try to out-drink any of them, you will die.

Derek Carlisle: That the association of alternative newsmedia is one witty, liberal, fun and amazing bunch of folks that I can count on to print it the way it should read!

Bill Frost: Don’t trust a man over 50 with a ponytail. Or any man with a ponytail, really.

Doug Kruithof: Content=marketing and commerce. Content does not=journalism.

Molli Stitzel: How impressed people were with Salt Lake City, and especially the food scene here. It made me found proud to call myself a SLC’er.

Jerre Wroble: Former Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson reminded journalists of their crucial role in holding government accountable. Keep asking questions, keep digging and fact-check your sources.

Brandon Burt: Uri Victor from Vox Media presented some truly inspiring ideas about collaboration, problem-solving, creativity and getting egos out of the way in an editorial/production environment. Also, City Weekly is so good at parties, it’s almost scary.


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Cash Transit

The question is: Do you believe the Utah Transit Authority? UTA has not exactly earned the undying trust of the public, although the Utah Legislature continues to act as though the quasigovernmental organization has learned its lesson that it is still a good thing for the state. We can only hope. It looks like a sales-tax increase will be on a statewide ballot sometime soon, and all the optimists in Utah will likely vote it in. Because UTA has been so startlingly bad at moving around people who rely on public transit, it now says it will increase bus service by 20 percent over five years and increase service late at night. Meanwhile, UTA’s board, according to The Salt Lake Tribune, heard that ridership is decreasing by almost 2 percent—and UTA moves only about 3 percent of all commuters anyway. Maybe more money will change that. It hasn’t yet.

Challenge the Voters

Salt Lake City decided to go with vote-by-mail for its primary election on the mayor this year. Some voters are bemoaning the loss of their yearly outing to the voting booth, but vote-by-mail promises to capture many more voters by giving them time and leisure in which to research and make their decisions. One letter writer to the Deseret News, however, thinks it’s just terrible, because voting should be a challenge: “The more challenging it is to vote, the greater the likelihood that only informed voters who truly care will make it to the polls,” he said. That, unfortunately, smacks of elitism and voter suppression. Utah isn’t going there.

Flag Snag

Let’s talk about the First Amendment. Hank Williams Jr.—the guy whose song was pulled from Monday Night Football—performed at Red Butte Garden recently, waving his Confederate flag while a concession stand sold them as souvenirs. This, after the bloodshed at a South Carolina church. Well, what can you say about the many Utah fans who snapped up the flags and spit in the face of propriety? Nothing. It’s their right. But it was also the right of ESPN to end its association with Williams, and it should have been the right of the nonprofit Red Butte to stop the sales. Williams cried about the First Amendment with ESPN and would have done the same with Red Butte. No matter what the official line, it is everyone’s right to leave a venue, boycott a product or stop watching a television show if they’re offended.

PHOTO COURTESY ALONZO RILEY

BIG SHINY ROBOT!

The collaborative “scrap materials” project of a group of Salt Lake City artists, Tiny Club is billed as “the most intimate new venue along the Wasatch Front,” and delivers groovy tunes and a miniature light show to cozy crowds of up to eight people. The roving party has made appearances at the Utah Pride Festival, Sugar House Park and Liberty Park drum circle, where artist Nate Hansen (pictured above), along with videographer Alonzo Riley, hosted a free ice-cream party while filming a promotional music video.

What is this little hangout, anyway?

It’s a tiny club. It’s a miniature mobile venue, a dance hall—it’s a lot of things. Today he’s discovering himself as an ice-cream truck.

Why did you create it?

I like to trip people out in a very positive way, you know? To break down some weird social barriers and give people the chance to have a good time doing something different.

How did this start?

I’ve built multiple venues. This is my latest. Over the years, I’ve built underground art spaces, shop spaces, houses, etc. I do construction for a living, so I basically move into places I’m not supposed to and make them kind of interesting and nice for a while until they tell me to leave.

This is your first mobile venue, then?

No, we’ve been doing mobile shows on and off for a couple years, mostly at Burning Man. This is the first one you can actually get inside, though. It doesn’t take much to pack the dance floor. You can comfortably fit seven or eight people in there.

Where are you at in the construction process?

We’ve been working on it off and on for about six months. Now it’s getting down to the end. But it’s always being put together, always evolving, changing shape over the course of the day.

How has Salt Lake City responded?

It’s been awesome. Everyone is falling in love with this thing, and we just got it started. It’s very exciting.

What are the plans for Tiny Club? Is it available for parties/events/bookings?

We’re available [Tiny Club’s Facebook page can be viewed at TinyURL.com/TinyClub]. This is really just for fun, but we’re thinking about going on a road trip and hitting some festivals. I might take it to Burning Man this year. We’ll see. But next year, I think I’ll be doing the circuit and cruising the country wherever it takes me.

—ALLISON OLIGSCHLAEGER comments@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE Primo-therapy

BY CECIL ADAMS

I found something online about a man in Canada who’s cured cancer using hemp or marijuana oil and says it’s able to cure even terminal cases. Is this for real? If so, what the heck— the cure for cancer has been here all along? —Amy Spears

Think about your question for three seconds, Amy, and riddle me this: If marijuana actually fought cancer, wouldn’t someone have noticed a massive drop in malignancies back when the teens of the ’60s hit late middle age? We’d have 20 million more Baby Boomers puttering around suburbia, and makers of adult diapers would now be enjoying record profits. Instead, cancer is projected to be the No. 1 cause of death in America by 2030, even as the nation’s love affair with weed rages on. None of which is to say that chemicals in marijuana won’t ever prove to be medically useful, but I personally wouldn’t opt for a Phish concert over chemotherapy just yet. The guy you’re talking about is, I’m guessing, Rick Simpson, a crusader for the health benefits of cannabis oil. Simpson, whose medical training apparently consists of 25 years maintaining the boilers at a Nova Scotia hospital, claims that ingesting the stuff and/or rubbing it on the skin can remedy anything from diabetic ulcers to cervical cancer (no words of advice for topical application in such cases, however). According to Simpson, he’s cured his own skin cancer and treated many hundreds of other “patients” besides. If seriously ill people feel they’ve gotten some relief this way, I’m not going to tell them they haven’t. Nonetheless, there’s still this thing called the scientific method. In fairness, Simpson’s not alone in supporting this theory. Rather a lot of research has purported to show the medical value of marijuana, but most of it was conducted between the 1840s and the 1920s. This was a period during which the medical community also thought cocaine could cure tuberculosis, so conclusions drawn in those days should probably be taken lightly. Anyway, this enlightened era ended in the early ’30s, when a wave of state and federal statutes made marijuana illegal throughout the U.S. Since then, studies investigating its theoretical benefits have been extremely scarce—only 6 percent of recent scientific articles on cannabis have dealt with possible therapeutic use as opposed to potential for harm. This may be because no one can get their hands on the goods: All marijuana used in American research is produced on the University of Mississippi campus and tightly controlled by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, an organization whose name may tell you something about its ideological bent vis-à-vis weed. Walk around any university medical or psych lab and you’ll find dozens of flyers looking for paid research subjects who are “already habitual marijuana users,” but you’ll rarely find any offering to pay you and provide your supply. As a result, a lot of the scientific research is based on rats, using synthetic cannabinoids to mimic the effects of weed. Because it’s not

SLUG SIGNORINO

done on humans (except illegally), it’s difficult to extract too much from such research. Even still, there’s some pretty compelling stuff out there. Here’s how it works: Endocannabinoids are a group of compounds (lipids, to be precise) naturally produced in the brain during certain types of neural activity—mostly having to do with appetite, pain sensation, mood and memory, but also relating to cardiovascular tone, immunity, movement and reproduction. When you introduce plant-based cannabinoids like THC into your system, they mimic these endocannabinoids and appear to thus affect the same areas. The beneficial effects of weed on pain and appetite are sufficiently well accepted that medical marijuana is legal in 23 states for cancer and HIV/AIDS patients, and the synthetic forms of THC known as dronabinol and nabilone are FDA-approved to fight the nausea that accompanies chemo. More excitingly, though, increasing cannabinoid levels have in fact been found to reduce tumor growth in mice in several different trials, by both inducing cancer-cell death and preventing proliferation, in almost all types of cancer cell tested. Let’s be very clear: This doesn’t mean that smoking weed or eating it or rubbing yourself with it will get rid of a tumor. The endocannabinoid system is extremely delicate, and adjusting it incorrectly can actually stimulate tumor growth—Simpson may have been aggravating his skin cancer even as he was treating it. But there’s definitely something interesting going on here. Researchers are also looking into how fiddling with the endocannabinoid system can alleviate seizures. I won’t bother going into the mechanics here, epilepsy being arguably even more complicated than cancer, but it’s enough to know somebody’s working on it. Other studies are focusing on Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and multiple sclerosis, because of the way endocannabinoids affect movement. Will Rick Simpson be remembered someday as a visionary? We’ll see. For now, he’s apparently encouraging sick people to screw around with their neurological function without bothering too much about science. But serious investigations into endocannabinoids in general do look promising. A long-term study on the health of undergraduate “research assistants” at the Ole Miss weed farm might prove informative as well, but then again I’m no scientist.
n

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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SLC mayoral candidates Chapman and Robinson shake up the race. BY COLBY FRAZIER & ERIC S. PETERSON comments@cityweekly.net

O

ftentimes elections generate “also rans”—the lesser wellknown candidates who, let’s face it, can sometimes seem like single-issue loons: (“Rent’s too high!” “Liberate the lizard people!” etc.) They can be like that party crasher who shows up unanounced at midnight and starts picking fights and smashing plates, while everyone else wonders, “Who the hell is that guy?” In this year’s Salt Lake City mayoral race, however, the wildcard candidates are as serious and experienced as more well-known contenders. Dave Robinson, a native Utahn who has worked as a ranch hand but now owns a small construction and consulting company, says that he’d like to see more done to protect the Cottonwood canyons and the city’s watershed. George Chapman, a retired U.S. Navy officer, is also a longtime community organizer who wants more transparency in the city administration and the way it communicates with residents and wants public-transit authorities to focus on expanding bus service rather than investing in costly transit projects. Both Robinson and Chapman, as it turns out, stand to make an already contentious race even more interesting to watch.

Dave Robinson: “A great little city”

Dave Robinson has worked as a hand on a Utah County sheep farm, a horse breeder in Texas and Ohio and, at 47 years old, now owns a small construction and consulting company. But he’d like his next job to be mayor of Salt Lake City. If Robinson manages to wrangle a seat in the mayor’s office, it would be his first political perch. “Thought I would just start with the mayor,” he says. Although a long shot for the job— Robinson has done little fundraising to compete with the moneyed forces fueling the campaigns of former state Rep. Jackie Biskupski, and incumbent Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker—Robinson has honed in on several key areas of interest where he says Becker, who is eyeing a third term, has failed the city. Chief among these are the land-use

COURTESY PHOTO

Mayoral Wild Cards

POLITICS

PHOTO COURTESY GEORGE CHAPMAN

NEWS

“I believe that Mayor Becker has failed in his administration to protect the watershed, protect open space and protect the backcountry.” —Dave Robinson, Salt Lake City mayoral candidate

Dave Robinson wants to stop the Mountain Accord, expand public land in the canyons and facilitate affordable housing. issues of the Wasatch Range’s canyons, which provide the lion’s share of Salt Lake Valley’s drinking water and are under constant threat of development. Robinson—whose consulting firm, SS Consulting LLC, represents several of the private landowners in the canyons—says that, rather than focusing its resources on acquiring private property in the canyons and setting it aside as public land, the Becker administration has resorted to litigation. Robinson says Becker’s hand has guided the Mountain Accord process, an ambitious multi-year effort to draw up a plan for the central Wasatch’s future, which has resulted in visions for a train line up Little Cottonwood Canyon and a tunnel connecting Little and Big Cottonwood canyons. “I believe that Mayor Becker has failed in his administration to protect the watershed, protect open space and protect the backcountry,” Robinson says. A more plausible transportation solution for the Wasatch, Robinson says, is increased bus service during the winter. And when it comes to resolving conflicts between private landowners and land managers, Robinson says rather than dropping coin on the costly Mountain Accord process, which has already run up a multimillion-dollar tab, the money should be spent on acquiring the land and protecting it. According to Robinson, if the city took half of what it’s spent on the Mountain Accord and lawsuits over the years, it could have purchased and protected 3,000 acres. “Instead, they say that they’re retiring close to 2,000 acres—it’s nuts—through

Mountain Accord,” Robinson says. As a man involved with the construction industry, Robinson also says some city-zoning ordinances must be tweaked to help facilitate construction of affordable housing. One example of where the city’s laws are nonsensical, he says, is an ordinance that allows accessory dwellings to be constructed atop garages, but restricts the height of garages to 9 feet—making it impossible to build the apartment. Robinson, who grew up in American Fork and served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, came out as gay in his late 30s. Even with the recent onslaught of rights for same-sex couples, Robinson says he believes advocacy organizations need to bolster resources in a crucial area: sexually transmitted diseases in the LGBT population. For example, he says as the country set its sights on marriage equality, the rise in mobile apps offering “anonymous on-demand sex” rose significantly. But the hours of STD testing at the Utah Pride Center remained stagnant. As mayor, Robinson says he would encourage gay-advocacy groups to expand their services. Robinson would also like to see the city’s Pride Parade improved by luring more of the city’s quality gay talent to perform and participate. Presently, Robinson says, there are no gay-specific winter games, the market for which, he says, is robust and could provide substantial economic gain in Utah. As mayor or not, Robinson has already made some progress on making such an event a reality. “We’re

actually preparing to roll out the queer games that will be anchored here in Utah and that, over the years, will provide hundreds of millions of dollars for the state of Utah,” he says. During the city’s large conventions, such as the Outdoor Retailer show, a drought of hotel beds consistently plagues the city. It is perhaps not surprising that as an owner of My Host Housing, a housesharing business aimed at bridging this hotel-bed gap during large conventions that Robinson would like to see Salt Lake City embrace the shared economy, alongside with building new hotels. “I think we have a great little city,” Robinson says. “I think this city has a greater potential for a sense of community than anywhere I’ve lived, and I believe that comes from the tone that is set from the mayor’s office and city leadership.” (CF)

George Chapman: “That Guy at All the Public Meetings”

George Chapman is what one might call a public-meetings groupie. He’s one of those guys who attend the most boring-sounding committee and working-group meetings. He sits through the most tedious bureaucratic minutia, forcing his eyes not to glaze over between moments when he sees something very interesting and important. As proof, Chapman proudly shows off a handout he picked up from a March meeting of the Wasatch Front Regional Council. While many politicians speak in “all of the above” terms when it comes to public transit development and projects, one handout he shows a reporter,


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George Chapman wants to change the city’s approaches on public transportation and homelessness.

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JULY 23, 2015 | 13

“We didn’t know until we found little piles of poop there,” Chapman says. He doesn’t favor relocating the shelter, but believes in a multi-pronged approach that would include social workers, an improved campus on the site of the shelter and increased police foot patrols. “The drug dealers can’t seem to be stopped, but you can stop the drug buyers if you have officers walking out there ready to stop anyone looking to buy,” Chapman says. Chapman has many beefs with Becker but most stem from his feeling that Becker is not being transparent in his dealings and is working unilaterally without a robust civic process. Instead of raising taxes that would require public hearings, Chapman says the mayor has taken to increasing fees. He points to a March 2015 council staff report that shows the Mayor’s Office seeking “significant” lighting fee increases for a number of neighborhoods, compared to 2014, with fee increases that “range from 2.88 percent to 151.96 percent” in 12 city neighborhoods. “That’s an easy way to raise money so they can say, ‘We didn’t raise taxes,’ ” Chapman says. He also challenges the city’s Open City Hall website as a disingenuous way of interacting with citizens. “I contend that face-to-face interacting with people in real time, right there, works better,” Chapman says. Even he is if elected, he says he wouldn’t stop making the rounds at neighborhood-level public meetings. “I’ll continue to go to my community council meetings. I want to work for Salt Lake City’s citizens and businesses,” Chapman says. “I don’t think I’m going to be sitting on a throne at City Hall.”CW

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titled “2015-2040 Transit Cost Summary” shows a plan for 32 percent of public-transit monies to be spent along the Wasatch Front going to new projects, 62 percent to continuing existing services and a minuscule 6 percent devoted to “Local Bus & Rail Service Expansion.” He points to long-term plans in the capital city for three new downtown rail lines, including the Sugar House Streetcar expansion that could cost upward of tens of millions of dollars each. “That could be used for 20 or 30 new bus lines,” Chapman says. As a devotee of public meetings, Chapman says he too often has seen how those in power talk quietly about big plans and only seem to truly engage with citizens as an afterthought. Chapman says he’s been to more than one community-council meeting where a city representative would ask community members for feedback on a project only after the project was well on its way to completion. “When you see everything I see when you go to these meetings, you just want to stop it and wring somebody’s neck and say, ‘Let’s get real!’” Chapman says. Previous to becoming a public-meeting gadfly and now dark-horse mayoral contender, Chapman worked professionally as an engineer. He got his degree from the University of Utah before relocating to San Diego to work as an officer in the Navy. He served during the final days of the Vietnam War, where his naval group helped rescue refugees from the war-torn nation after the fall of Saigon. Working in the military during the Cold War, he learned to despise rising hawks like former Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld before it was cool to do so. “They were idiots back then, too,” Chapman says. Chapman eventually retired from the service and worked with a variety of cellphone companies in Utah, where he also threw himself into public meetings and political organizing. While he enjoys working at the grass-roots level, he feels now he has to challenge incumbent Becker to effect lasting change. Increasing bus service for early risers and late-night workers is key for Chapman. On the transit front, he also questions plans to place high-density developments adjacent to the Sugar House Streetcar line, that will tower over single family homes. When it comes to funding, he says the city could do well to invest in smarter, more responsive traffic signals for busy thoroughfares. It would not only ease congestion, it would improve air quality by not keeping motorists idling at red lights. He also faults the mayor for the homeless situation, saying that Becker’s lack of leadership has turned the homeless shelter into a dangerous place that many homeless people avoid for fear of violence. Chapman can attest to that personally, as he recently discovered that the homeless occasionally camp out in the backyard of his home near Memory Grove.

PHOTO COURTESY GEORGE CHAPMAN

NEWS

Do You Suffer from recurring urinarY TracT infecTionS?


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14 | JULY 23, 2015

CITIZEN REVOLT

THE

OCHO

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

Eight 2015 Days of ’47 slogans passed over in favor of “Pioneers: Forging a New Future”:

8. “The Inspiration for Pie & Beer Day”

PIONEER DAY

Pet Adoption Celebrate the Days of ’47 by adopting a dog, 30 pounds or more, for $47 from July 20-24 (shelter is open Friday, July 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m). Fees for cats 1 year or older are waived during July; kitten fees reduced to $50 for one, or $70 for two. Adopt one rabbit for $20, or two for $30. Humane Society of Utah, 4242 S. 300 West, Murray, 801-261-2919, UtahHumane.org. Freedom of Religion Press Conference The Native American Church is protesting Utah laws that prohibit its sacramental use of peyote. Hear from at least two speakers, including David Hamblin, member of the Tahteya Topa (Four Winds) Native American Church of Utah. Eldon Talley will moderate. Four brief, traditional, Christian peyote church songs will be sung. Utah Capitol south steps, 350 N. State, July 23, 10:30 a.m. KRCL’s Pie & Beer Day 2015 Featuring pie from the Copper Onion, Eva Boulangerie, Tulie Bakery, Carluccis Bakery, Pago, Cafe Trio, Beer Bar, Taqueria 27, 3 Cups & Great Harvest, with beer pairings from Red Rock, Uinta, Wasatch, 2 Row, Squatters, Shades of Pale, Bohemian, Hoppers, Desert Edge & Epic Brewing. It all happens at Beer Bar, 161 E. 200 South, July 24, 3 p.m. until the pie runs out. Tickets $20, available at the door on the day of event. Proceeds benefit KRCL 90.9 community radio. KRCL.org

@

CityWeekly

7. “168 Years of Progress …

POLITICAL ACTION

Salt Lake City Mayoral Debate Sponsored by Sugar House Community Council. Westminster College, Vieve Gore Concert Hall, 1840 S. 1300 East, July 28, meet & greet the candidates 6-7 p.m.; debate 7:15-8:30 p.m. SugarHouseCouncil.org

and Pageants”

6. “Your Only Chance to See a Horse on the Street All Year”

$25

5. “There’s No Better Place to

Be If/When the Rapture Happens”

4. “Your Corporate Headquarters Will Probably Understand”

3. “That Parade with

No Irish or Gay Overtones”

2. “Pepsi’s Days of ’47

Featuring Brian Regan, Smash Mouth and Flo From Progressive Insurance”

1. “Pioneers: Time-Traveling Cyborgs Sent to the Past to Establish SkyDeseret”

AUDITIONS

gets you a tube, a life vest & your shuttle! FLOAT THE RAPIDS OF THE WEBER RIVER • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

FOR RATES & INFO VISIT:

www .BAREFOOTTUBING. com

• 801.648.8608

Salt Lake Symphony Auditions The Salt Lake Symphony invites musicians to audition for the 2015-16 season. Gardner Hall, U of U Campus, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 7 p.m. Openings in all string sections—violin, viola, cello and bass—including principal cello. Call 801-250-9419 or visit SaltLakeSymphony.org for audition information.

OUTDOORS

Summer Mulch Madness Learn proper mulching techniques to help urban trees retain moisture and remain healthy throughout the summer. Big Cottonwood Regional Park, 4300 S. 1300 East, Wednesday, July 29, 6-8 p.m. Pre-register at TreeUtah.org.

WORKSHOPS FOR KIDS

Engineering Learning Festival Seven students from MIT & Harvard will offer three workshops—all free to middle- and highschool students—to promote STEM education. Students build a robot, program a computer, launch a model rocket and find their inner genius. The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, Friday & Saturday, July 24-25. Free, but space is limited; attendees must pre-register at TheLeonardo.org. Got a volunteer, activism or community event to submit? Visit editor@cityweekly.net


NEWS

Curses, Foiled Again Police who accused Alexander Katz, 19, of stealing a car in Logan, Utah, said he and his girlfriend had to abandon the vehicle and call a cab because he didn’t know how to drive a stick shift. The car’s owner spotted the vehicle being driven off and called police, who found Katz and his girlfriend waiting outside a nearby convenience store for their cab. Police Chief Gary Jensen said that although Katz couldn’t drive a stick shift, his girlfriend could and was giving him directions while they tried making their getaway. “I’m not 100 percent certain why she doesn’t just get around and get in the driver’s seat so they can take the car and use it,” Jensen said. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

QUIRKS

n A shoplifting suspect in Okaloosa County, Fla., managed to evade sheriff’s deputies chasing him but only after his car hit several mailboxes, which ripped off the car’s entire rear bumper. The license plate was attached. Deputies traced the plate to Devin Ramoe Stokes, 20, who told them he was sorry for the deed and the damage. (Northwest Florida Daily News)

Ablution Solution Spas in Japan now offer ramen-noodle baths. The baths are filled with ramen pork broth and synthetic noodles. Soaking in the broth is said to be good for the skin and to boost metabolism. “Lately people are very concerned about having beautiful skin, and they know the effect of collagen, which is contained in our pork-based broth,” said Ichiro Furuya, owner of the Yunessan Spa House in Hakone. (Time)

10 minutes in the tub before scraping down and showering off the sticky substance, which is then used for the next customer. “Usually we lose some material on each person, and every time we add material for each person. But to dump the whole thing is impossible, as the material is expensive.” (International Business Times)

Private Justice The backlog of court cases in Florida is prompting people waiting for trials to turn to private judges. They promise speedy and private settlements, “not in open courtroom, where everyone and their brother is attending,” said Robert Evans, a public judge for 20 years before he went private. “My marketing motto is: ‘How would you like your trial tomorrow?’” Orange County Chief Judge Fred Lauten conceded that “private judging comes with a cost,” pointing out that people who “can’t even afford an attorney … they’re not going to be able to afford a private judge.” (Orlando’s WKMG-TV) n Los Angeles County authorities charged David Henry, Tonette Hayes and Brandon Kiel with impersonating police officers after the three showed up, two of them in uniform, as a “courtesy call” to inform sheriff’s Capt. Roosevelt Johnson they were from the Masonic Fraternal Police Department and setting up operations in the area. The agency’s website claims jurisdiction in 33 states and Mexico and, through the Knights Templar, traces the department’s roots back 3,000 years. “When asked what is the difference between the Masonic Fraternal Police Department and other police departments, the answer is simple for us,” the website says. “We were here first.” Henry, 46, identifies himself as “Chief Henry 33,” and the website refers to him as “Absolute Supreme Sovereign Grandmaster.” Johnson said the purpose of the purported police department is unclear. (Los Angeles Times)

Compiled from mainstream news sources by Roland Sweet. Authentication on demand.

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n Azerbaijan’s Naftalan Heath Center now offers oil baths, which the spa’s doctor insisted cures up to 70 ailments. “Naftalan kills everything: viruses, bacteria and fungi. Its consistency is unique and pure. It does not contain any dirt,” Dr. Hashim Hashimov said, adding that customers are allowed only

BY ROL AND SWEET

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JULY 23, 2015 | 15


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16 | JULY 23, 2015

O

n July 28, the 2011 Tony Awardwinning musical The Book of Mormon arrives at last in Salt Lake City for a two-week touring company run— and you’d better believe the locals were ready. Within minutes of tickets going on sale, website orders were backed up hundreds deep. If you don’t have a ticket yet, you might need to pray for intervention from Heavenly Father. The show has been popular and acclaimed enough that it’s easy to understand a general eagerness to find out firsthand what all the shouting is about—but it also feels like we in Utah, no matter our religious affiliation, have a sense that this show somehow belongs more uniquely to us. Is a show that pokes fun of the predominant local faith something we’re ready to laugh at even more than audiences in other places? And if so—why? In a climate where it feels like humor is becoming ever more controversial, we celebrate the arrival of The Book of Mormon by asking who gets to make touchy jokes, and who gets to laugh. Freelance writer Stephen Quigley relates his experience seeing the show in conservative Christiandominated South Carolina. Local actor Alexis Baigue talks about 15 years as a cast member in our own local satire that often targets Mormon foibles, Saturday’s Voyeur. And actor Charles Frost—better known as proud Mormon mother Sister Dottie S. Dixon—tells his own unique story of first seeing The Book of Mormon in New York City. As audiences get ready to enjoy the show, we look at how there’s no easy or obvious response to satire, whether it’s laughing out loud or thinking, “That’s not funny.” Comedy can be funny that way. CW —SCOTT RENSHAW Arts & Entertainment editor scottr@cityweekly.net

Who Gets To Laugh?

Salt Lake City is ready for the satirical The Book of Mormon—but when does satire cross the line?


Mock of Ages

SALTLAKECITY.BROADWAY.COM

A non-Mormon from South Carolina reflects on the satire of religion and The Book of Mormon. BY STEPHEN QUIGLEY • comments@cityweekly.net

SALTLAKECITY.BROADWAY.COM

Stephen Quigley: “Mormons are easy targets.”

Elders rethinking their mission call (The Book of Mormon)

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SALTLAKECITY.BROADWAY.COM

An elder called to Africa (The Book of Mormon)

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Who’s converting whom? (The Book of Mormon)

JULY 23, 2015 | 17

Stephen Quigley writes about culture and design in Greenville, S.C.

| CITY WEEKLY |

divinity of Christ or perhaps the Immaculate Conception? Having lived here, I can firmly say I don’t think so. Would it be funny to mock the congregations of one of our many Baptist churches? What about Bob Jones University, whose own missionary network spans the globe? While there is enough comic fodder to send a production of B.J.U. to Broadway, we in Greenville won’t be the ones to do it. Because in Greenville, we live among the people of Bob Jones. They are our neighbors. We do business with them. We who live in Greenville know Bob Jones alumni who transcend the Christian fundamentalist stereotypes with which we are all familiar. So for us, should mocking the LDS religion be any different? Yet, when the musical came to Greenville, we did laugh. Sadly, we laughed at the obvious racism demonstrated when the lead African character, Nabulungi, played the fool by confusing a rusty old typewriter for a cell phone. Ironically enough, Africans, as a population, knew how to text long before Americans. For Stone and Parker, wouldn’t it have been smarter to have cut this bit out, to make the Africans consistently wiser than the religious colonizers, as was portrayed in other scenes? We laughed generally with the kind of schadenfreude only attained through great ignorance, the result of a homogenous society lacking in counter-statement. A few hit the exit doors right away, but for the most part, the audience in Greenville cheered this musical from start to finish. We even gave it a standing ovation so long and loud it was as if the audience believed the players would be inclined to do another scene as an encore. No, we didn’t want to give up that triumphant moment; we didn’t want to exit the theater doors to the natural light. We laughed, not realizing that Stone and Parker pulled no punches—that they were also mocking our religion and our town. The Book of Mormon, many would argue, is obviously satire. Its purpose is to make audiences laugh. To mock. To let off steam. Who cares? But does satire work when the audience is ignorant? Is it satire at that point? Perhaps it is just sophomoric, in that Mormons are easy targets. Do I get to laugh when I don’t actually know anyone who is LDS? And is it worse when I do laugh? It is a testament to Mormons that they have tolerated this musical production in the manner they have. In a 2011 National Public Radio interview, Stone and Parker were asked how they thought LDS Church members would respond to their musical: “They’re going to be cool,” Stone said. “We weren’t that surprised by the church’s response. We had faith in them.” Instead of protesting, the LDS Church took out ads in the musical’s playbill stating, “You’ve seen the play, now read the book,” and, “The book is always better.” So, will there be Mormons rioting in the streets of Salt Lake City? I doubt it. The satire will obviously hold a different meaning for the people in Salt Lake City than it did for the people in Greenville. In Greenville, we don’t know Mormons, so it is especially easy—as hypocritical as that may be—to laugh. In Salt Lake City, however, the audience members—unlike others who have watched the show—may be Mormons, formerly Mormons, and have Mormon neighbors, colleagues and friends. It will be interesting to know who in the audience, in this community, will be laughing—and why. Perhaps this musical will offer the non-Mormon Salt Laker a sense of solace through the humor, a kind of signal from the outside world concurring that, yes, the Mormon faith is ridiculous, and we feel for you. Or this musical could act in another way: more like a wedge that drives the community—neighbor to neighbor—further apart. CW

SALTLAKECITY.BROADWAY.COM

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his summer, The Book of Mormon will finally be coming home (so to speak) to Salt Lake City’s Capitol Theatre for a packed 16 shows in 13 days, starting July 28. To be clear, we’re talking about the musical The Book of Mormon, not Joseph Smith’s translation of the golden tablets. That Book of Mormon is, of course, revered by 15 million worldwide members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the hundreds of thousands of Mormons belonging to other sects and splinter groups. No, this Book of Mormon is the Matt Stone and Trey Parker version—the creators of television’s South Park. The Salt Lake City showing, however, won’t be the first time the musical has played in a town marked by religious fervor—the musical ran at the Peace Center in Greenville, S.C., in November 2014 for eight shows. The Greenville showing was significant because, while the Book of Mormon is largely a mockery of the LDS religion, it’s also critical of religion in general. While not LDS, Greenville is the home of Bob Jones University, a bastion of fundamentalism—of the Christian kind. The reaction the play received in Greenville is noteworthy. The musical has been hugely popular, spreading a kind of cross-cultural schadenfreude to cities where citizens don’t even know anyone of the Mormon faith—and why should they, having endured a Mitt Romney presidential campaign? For Salt Lakers, Mormon or not, get your ticket, have a night out, but be prepared to squirm in your seat and lower your head so your neighbors don’t see you laughing at what your conscience tells you is really wrong. For one who is not of the LDS faith, there is much to mock. As Jon Krakauer writes in Under the Banner of Heaven, the LDS faith is the only major religion that formed during the time of the printing press. Because of this, we know of the many outrageous sexual exploits of its founder, the exploits of Brigham Young, and the religion’s historically contradictory views and practices as regards race—and let’s not forget the “magic” underwear. Again, it was the effect of the printing press that gave mankind more perspective on Smith and his followers. LDS leaders, in turn, had less control of their narrative. It is interesting to think, as Krakauer points out: What else would we know about Jesus, Buddha or Muhammad had they lived during this same age of pundits and paparazzi? In our American pluralistic society, it is important to realize the relative nature of faith and the xenophobia that fundamentalism can manifest. While it is easy to mock the LDS faith as the musical does, it is equally important to consider that one’s own faith can be just as easily mocked by another who does not share that belief. In fact, because our respective cultures tend to isolate us from others, we don’t always know that there is someone out there in the world systematically mocking our own faith and its beliefs. This belittling humor is a culture’s defense mechanism, designed to create divisions in humanity and solidify boundaries of power and influence. Because faith cannot be reasoned—only believed or rejected—what makes one faith more “correct” than another? For a believer of any kind, it hypocritical to think that one has a right to laugh at another’s beliefs. In this argument, the only people off the hook are the ones who believe in nothing. By mocking a major religion—one that is not the playwrights’ own, The Book of Mormon begs the ethical question of its audience: Who gets to laugh? This question is especially interesting in the context of Greenville, S.C., where we celebrate less diversity and—many would argue—more fundamentalism. Would the average citizen of Greenville think it funny for non-Christians to laugh at the absolute truth of the Bible, the


A conversation with longtime Saturday’s Voyeur actor Alexis Baigue. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

City Weekly: Were you raised in the LDS Church yourself? Alexis Baigue: For 19 years. When all of my peers were starting to leave for the mission field, that’s when I was starting to go, “Look over there!” and ran away. At that point, I’d already lost my testimony … and I’d realized I was gay, and that wasn’t going away magically, despite all the praying and fasting. … A year later, I was singing and dancing onstage in Saturday’s Voyeur, while my peers were out sweating in the mission field. CW: Do you recall your first experience watching Saturday’s Voyeur before you were a cast member? AB: It was 1995 … about six months after I’d stopped going to church. I didn’t really know anything about it, except that it was supposed to be funny, and I don’t think I even really knew that it was about local culture and politics. … It really, in a wonderful way, blew the top of my head off. It’s an experience that I hear a lot of people describe when they come to Voyeur, especially their first time … that it was such a unique catharsis. … It took the significance out of things that had heretofore seemed so … heavy, important and sacred. By singing and dancing about them in a light way, [the show] asked the question, “Well, is it really that significant?”

CW: Was there any specific joke that you can recall thinking, “Am I allowed to laugh at that?” AB: It was Family Home Evening in Saturday’s Voyeur, and Nevins and Borgenicht took the song “Sodomy,” from Hair. And I think they just altered a few words. This young girl is going to present some lesson to the family, and she sings, basically, “Intercourse, ejaculate, contraception with a rubber—father, why do these words make us shudder?” or something like that. … It seemed so inappropriate to show an adolescent girl singing these words that I wouldn’t even use, except with my closest friends. … That’s the part that has burned itself onto my brain. And in a way—if we’re talking about what’s appropriate and what’s not— why shouldn’t an adolescent girl be asking questions about sexuality to her family? So in that way, it was horrifying and amazing and inappropriate and wonderful. CW: Voyeur has often targeted not just the influence of the LDS Church in local politics, but the beliefs of the faith. What are your thoughts about jokes that are aimed not at the way the LDS Church manifests itself in public life, but at the beliefs themselves? AB: I think that’s a really great question, and one that I’ve asked, especially this year, where the show really is looking at belief and doctrine and … the narrative of Joseph Smith that has been created and re-created and re-created. … I think there is value in asking the question, including in a satirical way, “Should we really honor this belief?” … We who want to be respectful of other people are often reluctant to risk being disrespectful of beliefs [or] ideology, because

we don’t want to hurt people who hold them as sacred. But we can respect people and still question even their beliefs—if not necessarily in conversation, certainly in the context of satire. OK, you think this belief is really sacred. Well, let’s really look at it. Why? What really works about it, or what doesn’t work about it? Should we really be honoring it? And I think that we can still honor anyone … without necessarily honoring the thing that they believe, or the practice that they follow. CW: Can you remember a time when you thought a Voyeur joke went too far? AB: My experience with this play—with any text—is to make it as good as I possibly can. … I feel like I’m an attorney, in that I may not agree with what my client has done, but I am here to argue my client’s case. … Regardless of what opinions I have about the content or the quality or anything, I have to take it and just try to make it as awesome as I can for the audience. The only time I’ve really gone, “Ugh?” In 2012, at the end of the show, President Marriott or Elder Marriott, whatever he was called, … the big Mormon muckety-muck representing the entire church hierarchy … at the end of the show, he reveals himself to be the devil. And I was like, “Really? What are we saying, that any particular apostle, or all the apostles, or the whole church, they’re the devil?” I mean, I wasn’t, “Oh, that’s too mean.” It just seemed too simple. CW: Do you feel like Voyeur can only work because it’s produced in Utah—not just in terms of references that only locals would get, but are we “allowed” to make jokes that non-Utahns perhaps shouldn’t get a pass at making?

“Elder” Alexis Baigue in the “Let’s Get It Straight” program in Saturday’s Voyeur in 2014.

AB: Maybe. I think there’s no “true” answer to that. That’s for the audience in those particular places to say. If someone comes to see Saturday’s Voyeur or any show, and they think it’s not funny, or just too harsh, too strident, they won’t continue to buy that product. … But from a social perspective, I do think it’s a useful question. Whether it’s Mormons in Utah vs. out of Utah, Muslims in Europe—yeah, where socially are we being responsible? Is it a good thing to attack the hierarchy or the beliefs, or is it irresponsible? And I don’t know the answer to the question.

CW: A lot of comedians lately are pushing up against what you get to make a joke about. Should there be rules about who gets to make certain jokes? AB: [pause] I don’t know. [laughs]

CW: So, for example, do you feel more comfortable hearing a gay comedian tell a gay joke versus a straight comedian telling a gay joke? AB: Yeah, I guess so. Yeah. But, it’s rare that I have heard any comedian tell a gay joke that it was like, “Oh! They shouldn’t! They don’t understand what it’s like!” The way I will throw around with my gay friends “fag” or “faggot,” and if I heard a straight person say that, I would be like, “Wait, that’s our N-word. You don’t actually get to call me a fag.” … It’s really on an individual basis. And I think there are plenty of people who are of the opinion that The Book of Mormon shouldn’t be making those jokes, or Saturday’s Voyeur shouldn’t be making those jokes, and a lot of people who think they should, and we love it. CW: Have you had friends or family talk to you about something they personally felt was offensive in a Voyeur production, and how did you respond? AB: Most of the time, they don’t. I wish they would more often. … A year and a half ago, I was having a conversation with my mom about all kinds of serious topics [and] near the end, the topic of Voyeur came up. She said, “I just want you to know I’m not actually coming to see the show this summer.” And I was surprised; she’d made it

PHOTO COURTESY SALT LAKE ACTING COMPANY

A

ctor Alexis Baigue is a cast member in Salt Lake Acting Company’s annual musical satire Saturday’s Voyeur, created by Allen Nevins and Nancy Borgenicht. He spoke with City Weekly about his 15-year history working on a show that—like The Book of Mormon—often makes the LDS faith a target for jokes.

PHOTO COURTESY SALT LAKE ACTING COMPANY

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View from a Voyeur

2015’s Saturday’s Voyeur has Alexis Baigue in a robe.


through 13 Voyeurs in which I’d acted. And I went, “What was the straw that broke the camel’s back in your 13th Saturday’s Voyeur?” And, of course, my mind is going to all the things in the show: “Oh, she’s watching this guy get it on with a girl in a baptismal font.” Anyway, she said, “Well, it’s when those two girls, at the end of the play, they were going to go on their missions. And then they just started kissing. Sister missionaries are not lesbians.” I found that very funny; it was just a silly, throwaway part of the show compared to things that I thought were legitimately too hard on her faith. But she was a sister missionary, and I think really valued the service that she did. … She came to see the show that summer anyway. CW: In a couple of recent Saturday’s Voyeur productions, the show has used closeted gay men married to women as punch lines. How do you walk that line of not making people who are in some ways the victims become the butt of the jokes? AB: Making fun of individuals who go along with what they’re told—I like that we have taken on [both] the hierarchy and the individuals who follow through on it. … It may be really shitty that the apostles are giving really harmful, hateful advice to their membership on how they should live their lives. But ultimately … it’s the individuals. So it is valuable to go, … “Why are you taking their bullshit prescription? You are also worthy of some critique: you—a gay man marrying a woman—and also you—the woman. Come on, you have eyes in your head; everyone knows he’s gay. You, too, are worthy of criticism. Yes, the situation you’re stuck in is heartbreaking, but you’ve got to take responsibility.”

with the LDS Church over the years—albeit from a different perspective, having dealt with acceptance and rejection of my creation Sister Dottie S. Dixon, the accidental activist Mormon mother of a gay son—I have had to develop chunky skin to navigate the opinionated waters of Utahns. The East Coast Mormons who indicated they “enjoyed” The Book of Mormon when it premiered on Broadway are very different Mormons than those living under the Zionic bubble. One thing I am most positive about is this: Growth and comfort never co-exist. So go and enjoy, laugh and learn, listen and hear, feel and experience your humanity. CW

Sister Dottie S. Dixon

JULY 23, 2015 | 19

Charles Lynn Frost is an actor and activist in Salt Lake City.

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I am a smack-dab-in-the-middle Baby Boomer, born in 1954. Throughout the 1950s and through the 1980s, all I was ever exposed to had a Mormon tentacle attached to it. Fast-forward to Sept. 15, 2011. I was married in New York City to my husband, Douglas, and saw The Book of Mormon for the first time that evening with 28 other people on my theater tour who had also been raised Mormon. There we sat in the Eugene O’Neill Theatre, dead center. Anticipation was high as everyone waited to see the show. Curtain up: A giant panoramic backdrop complete with Dee’s Family Restaurant, the Brigham Young statue, Eagle Gate and the Salt Lake Temple. Spooky that all my past Mormonism bubbles up, my heartbeat increases, and OMG yes, that old Mormon guilt floods my brain. I know way too much about what I am about to witness, and it makes me terribly nervous. Metaphorically, I pinch myself. Am I really on Broadway watching musical theater—something most all gay men adore? Did I just get married to the man of my life sitting next to me? Is everyone giddy with the giggles/wiggles? Yes! The backdrop flies up, and we hear the first chimes of “Hello”—among the greatest musical openers in any Broadway show. We are titillated, and off into an amazing theatrical experience—one we all relate to, parody at its finest. Firstly, let’s deal with definitions of parody: 1. a piece of writing, music, etc., that imitates the style of someone or something else in an amusing way; 2. a bad or unfair example of something. Really, very seriously, it all comes down to being able to laugh—and laugh heartily—at oneself, and one’s own background, beliefs and baggage. For me, The Book of Mormon is a brilliant example of the first definition of parody. However, if you can’t quite get that Mormon stick pulled out, you will find the second definition making you squirm in your seat. A few favorite highlights. n The best romantic Broadway couple ever are elders Price and Cunningham. These two rival Tony and Maria. n How daringly and adeptly the genius writers and composer—Trey Parker, Matt Stone and Robert Lopez— explore and expose such heavy themes as war, poverty, famine, female circumcision, dying of dysentery and AIDS— just to name a few—all while juxtaposed against the rigidity of the LDS religion, regimen and delusion, and with a plentitude of laughter. n The hilarity of homosexuality, and how well it accents top-notch tap-dancing. n All of Mormon repression brilliantly placed in one gigantic full cast number titled, “Turn It Off.” n The demonstration of testimony in the powerful Elder Price solo, “I Believe.” n The beautiful, hopeful and helpless ballad, “Sal Tlay Ka Siti,” sung by the character Nabulungi, which leaves anyone with a heart shedding several tears. Mark my words: The Book of Mormon will eventually become the longest-running, largest moneymaking, multiaward-winning musical in musical-theater history. This very fact pisses off the brethren in unspeakable ways. “That money’s not coming home? What?” However, when I went back to see The Book of Mormon on Broadway in 2013, the LDS Church had taken out a full-color, two-page playbill centerfold advertisement that read, “You’ve seen the play … now read the book.” I still have not decided if that move was sheer marketing effulgence or dimwitted desperation. As a theater professional myself who has had some fun

Scott Renshaw is City Weekly’s A&E editor

BY CHARLES “SISTER DOTTIE S. DIXON” FROST • comments@cityweekly.net

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CW: It sometimes seems like the general defense for risky humor is that people vote with their laughs. How much should we be asking ourselves why we find something funny? AB: That is how comedy, especially satire, works. There should be—often, if not all the time—some question about propriety on all sides: consumer, producer, etc. [But] if I’m not making the audience uncomfortable to some degree, at least some of the time, I don’t think I’m doing my job. And that includes comedy. … You’re sort of doing a service by making people laugh, hopefully. And when I’m in the audience, I do look at whether it’s responsible of me to laugh. We’ve often had the experience of laughing then [covers mouth] … is it OK to laugh at this? That’s when it’s the best: When you’re trying to hold something in, but something is happening despite your attempts to not let it happen. That’s a really great indicator of what’s actually happening: If they’re laughing, and actually trying to repress the laughter, then there must be something really juicy in there. CW

Humor has the power to make us laugh—and to change the world.

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CW: This year feels like Voyeur was more wide-ranging in its religious targets than previous years have been. Is that a better, worse or neutral development? AB: For me, I don’t feel like it really makes my job any easier or makes me any more comfortable, although you’d think that it would. I’ve been saying as long as I’ve been acting in this, that we’re an equal-opportunity offender, … and this year, there’s a little more to back that up than usual. But even when the whole show or the scene is really just looking at what we’re dealing with here in Utah, I don’t have a problem with that. Because that is what I’m swimming in, I guess. I like it, though. I don’t think it makes it any easier, but I do like it. It’s like the writers have said, “It’s all silly.”

Sublime Parody


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THURSDAY 7.23

You Are Here: Svavar Jonatansson and Jared Steffensen Long known as an anchor for the art-gallery scene in Park City, Kimball Art Center is preparing to relocate to a new facility in September—a temporary space in Bonanza Park—while its permanent home is under construction. You Are Here, which will be the last exhibit ever to be hosted at the location that has served as Kimball’s home space for almost 40 years, pairs local artist Jared Steffensen with Icelandic photographer Svavar Jonatansson. Jonatansson’s Inland/Outland: Utah is a multidisciplinary project with local composers Matthew Durant and Devin Maxwell, comprising four short video pieces shot in time-lapse that take a stunning, if idealized, vantage point on the magnificence of Utah landscapes. Three massive panoramic photos of the Colorado Plateau dominate another wall, and Jonatansson has also mounted a series of smaller, photographic stills taken at scenic viewpoints in the state, with reference points indicated on a map. Seeing Home as Somewhere Else, Steffensen’s contribution to the exhibit, looks at his home state through the eyes of cinematic works that used the state as a backdrop. Placed adjacent to Jonatansson’s video installation—with its sprawling scenery and booming soundtrack—these abrupt segments with their disjointed soundtrack act as a commentary on it. What is lacking in both of these visions of the state is a sense of the experience of living here, but they examine the idea of place as a work of art itself, in the eyes of the perceiver. (Brian Staker) You Are Here: Svavar Jonatansson and Jared Steffensen @ Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, 435-649-8882, Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday, noon-7 p.m.; through Aug. 23, free. KimballArtCenter.org.

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS JULY 23-29

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FRIDAY 7.24

FRIDAY 7.24

FRIDAY 7.24

You’re running a huge risk if you decide to stop your lighthearted musical in its tracks to invoke a major tragedy. And it goes to show how wonderful the rest of the lighthearted musical is that such an invocation somehow feels emotionally resonant, rather than exploitative. Adam Gwon’s Ordinary Days begins with the kind of bustling, life-in-the-big-city setup that could easily feel more like a parody of offBroadway theater than actual off-Broadway theater. The through-sung plot follows the mostly parallel plots involving two pairs of characters in Manhattan: Jason (Matthew Wade), who has just moved in with his girlfriend, Claire (Mandi Barrus), with immediately tension-generating results; and anxious grad-student Deb (Brighton Hertford), who meets bubbly aspiring artist Warren (Thomas Kay) when he finds her lost thesis notes. Gwon’s charming songs provide a strong foundation for the four leads to explore these stories of quarter-life dissatisfaction, with Hertford standing out in a terrific, often hilarious performance as the high-strung Deb. Director Chase Ramsey makes effective use of Amanda Ruth Wilson’s minimalist set of colorful movable blocks, keeping the scene changes brisk to maintain an appropriately upbeat tempo. It all builds to Barrus’ performance of the anthemic “I’ll Be Here,” which packs a no-dry-eyein-the-house punch as it pulls that aforementioned tragedy into Ordinary Days’ exploration of moving on to life’s next chapter. That risky move pays off, serving as an exclamation point on a tuneful, funny and sad tale of yearning. (Scott Renshaw) Utah Repertory Theater Co.: Ordinary Days @ Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave., July 25, 7:30 p.m.; July 26, 3 p.m., $16$18. UtahRep.org

The prickly pear and sego lily are in bloom! Blink and you’ll miss them. If you don’t know the fun facts about these two Utah native wildflowers—that one can be used to make a delicious magenta-hued margarita, and the other is the state flower—it’s time to head up to the Wasatch Wildflower Festival and get acquainted with local botanical beauties. And if you don’t have vacation plans in the near future, landing yourself up in Cottonwood canyons this weekend is a great alternative. The towering peaks of Albion Basin at Alta, dotted with varieties of Indian paintbrush and bluebells this time of year, is as dreamy a vision as one may hope to find in the French Alps. The Cottonwood Canyons Foundation and its generous partners offer this free, communityoriented event at the end of July each year to celebrate the diversity of wildflower life in Utah. The packed schedule at all four ski areas—Alta, Snowbird, Brighton and Solitude—has something for everyone. Guided hiking tours and “kid walks” are run by trained volunteers ready to share their knowledge and inspire a sense of stewardship in the community to help protect our treasured landscape. Plus, who doesn’t want to find flowers with awesome names like witches’ thimble, monkey flower and elephanthead lousewort? Check out the Silver Lake boardwalk, Albion Meadows trail and the Sunrise ski lift to Solitude Lake, where Alpine shooting stars and rosy pussytoes are waiting to be discovered. Flower identification geeks, hikers, photo opportunitsts and simple nature-lovers will be more than pleased. (Deann Armes) Wasatch Wildflower Festival @ Brighton, Solitude, Alta & Snowbird ski resorts, Big and Little Cottonwood canyons, 801-947-8263, July 24-26, free-$5. CottonwoodCanyons.org

Twenty-one years ago, Cal Nez started the Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow (NACPP). Once a small gathering of local tribe members, the event now coincides with Utah’s Pioneer Day, and attracts audience members and performers from all around the West. Though there are many kinds of powwows, the NACPP is a competitive powwow, traditionally called a “special.” For years, this annual gathering has attracted the best dancers from across many states and tribes. This year, competitors in the categories of men’s traditional, women’s fancyshawl and men’s grass dancers will perform to the drum beats of the Sage Point Singers from Fort Hall, Idaho. For those new to powwows, Nez suggests paying close attention to the tempo of the drummer’s songs, and how well the dancers match the rhythm. Powwow judges are looking for dancers who best follow the tempo. “There is an ebb and flow to powwows,” says Nez. “Every drum group brings their own style and sets the mood of the whole event.” In addition to dancing, the powwow features a drum contest, food booths, arts and crafts, commercial booths and fireworks. A traditional teepee encampment erected temporarily for the festival will culminate with a best-in-show award chosen by powwow attendees. But the one event that Nez says everyone should see is the Grand Entry, held at noon and 5 p.m. This ceremony is awash in color and movement, as all the dancers congregate in a procession honoring and welcoming the indigenous nations. (Katherine Pioli) Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow @ Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, July 24 & 25, noon-11 p.m., $10. Facebook.com/NACIPPowwowFestival

Utah Repertory Theater Co.: Ordinary Days

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Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow


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The Devil, You Say

Netflix’s Daredevil might be the ideal filmed manifestation of the Marvel Universe. BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

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fter taking a few months to digest Marvel’s Daredevil, I think I can make this pronouncement: We should crown it the best thing Marvel Studios has done in the superhero genre since the inception of the so-called “Marvel Cinematic Universe.” Since the release of the first Iron Man feature in 2008, Marvel has been relentlessly tying every piece of its universe together on screens big and small, from The Avengers to Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Comic-book movies weren’t able to do that kind of unified world-building before; copyright law and licensing agreements prevented it. It’s certainly something from which Marvel has benefited, doing its best to replicate comic books’ serialized feeling of a giant shared universe that ticks by one issue at a time. As hard as the Marvel movies try, though, they don’t quite get there. These films and shows are adaptations of comics, but they often don’t cut to the heart of what we love about the published medium. Their limited running time and high budgets force producers and directors to make decisions and compromises that provide the most bang for the buck. The cliffhangers and serialized nature of the story feel more like vague references extraneous to the films proper rather than a truly shared storyline. When I was a kid, the comics I always seemed to hate most were adaptations of movies. Ever read the adaptation of Batman Returns? Or Dick Tracy? Even the more recent adaptations of the X-Men movies from the early 2000s fell flat. They all felt like pale imitations of the source, which was in itself an imitation of a real comic. That’s how many of these new Marvel movies feel to me. They’re one-shot specials that don’t fit into what we know or love about the medium of comics. They’re entertaining, sure, but something is off about them. Daredevil, however, has transcended these problems and captured what makes superhero comics great in a way no other Marvel property has so far. Part of it has to do with

the format. A 13-episode limited television series replicates the pace of your average graphic novel, only more densely. Matt Murdock’s superhero origins are expertly folded in to a story with a driving mystery and the most compelling villain the Marvel Universe has created. Vincent D’Onofrio’s Wilson Fisk—the Kingpin of Crime—is allowed to develop nuance and dimension that the movies simply can’t acheive. We alternate between rooting for him and against him because we love to hate him (and hate to love him) so much. Some might wonder why I’m not singing the praises of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. if it’s the TV format that’s important, but that’s only part of the equation. From the beginning, S.H.I.E.L.D. has never felt as though its writers had an endgame in mind; its sprawling narrative is so tightly tied to the aforementioned Marvel movies that it easily loses its focus. It constantly has “shiny-keys” syndrome and, since it’s on a major broadcast network, can feel a bit … homogenous. Daredevil manages to keep a laser-tight focus on a small group of characters in a very narrow spot in New York City. The events of other movies are ment ioned—hel l, the events of The Avengers and the destr uction w rought on New York City create the

Marvelous Marvel: Daredevil (Netflix) backdrop for Daredevil—but no compromises are made. Meanwhile, Marvel Studios release of Ant-Man includes at least three completely unnecessary scenes that feel tacked on in order to build the broader universe. Daredevil’s focus seems to get tighter and tighter as the show goes on. Daredevil is the lightning in a bottle that Marvel should be trying to replicate; I haven’t been more riveted by a superhero comic-book adaptation than I have during my time watching it. And with the promise of The Walking Dead’s Jon Bernthal as fan-favorite antihero The Punisher, my guess is we’re going to get something special out of Season 2. If they keep this up, I won’t need another Marvel movie again. They’ve got three more Netflix series coming: Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and The Defenders. If they’re all as good as Daredevil, Netflix can just give Marvel all my money for me. CW


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FRIDAY 7.24SATURDAY 7.25 Rich Vos

Now closing in on his 60th year, tattooed, Jewish New Jersey native Rich Vos knows a thing or two about stereotypes. At one time a regular on satellite radio’s Opie and Anthony show, Vos became the first white comic ever to appear on HBO’s Russell Simmons’ Def Comedy Jam, and his deadpan humor made him a mainstay on the New York black comedy circuit. A Season 1 finalist on NBC’s Last Comic Standing—to which he returned for Season 3—Vos finds humor in such standard comedic topics as parenting and relationships—but also golf and his recovery from addiction. Despite having once sworn they would never produce a husband-and-wife podcast, Vos and wife Bonnie McFarland’s weekly podcast, My Wife Hates Me, is available at GloryHoleRadio.com. (Brandon Burt) Rich Vos @ Club 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-961-1033, July 24-25, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15, 50WestSLC.com

PERFORMANCE THEATER

1776 The Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, through July 25, Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; EmpressTheatre.com 1776: America’s Musical Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-393-0700, Monday, Friday, and Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; no performance July 24, through July 25, TerracePlayhouse.com A Midsummer Night’s Dream Shakespeare in the Park, Murray Park Pavilion, 296 E. Murray Park Ave., 360-620-5463, July 27-28, 7 p.m. The Book of Mormon Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Tuesday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 2 & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6:30 p.m.; July 28-Aug. 9, tickets extremely limited, SaltLakeCity.Broadway.com Disney’s Beauty and The Beast Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3300, through Oct. 17, Tuacahn.org Disney’s The Little Mermaid Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Aug. 1, HCT.org Disney’s When You Wish Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3300, through Oct. 16, Tuacahn.org Grease’d: Happy Days Are Here Again! Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 7 & 9:30 pm; Saturday, 2:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m.; no performance July 24; through Aug. 22, DesertStar.biz Into the Woods Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, 7:30 pm, through Aug. 15, HaleTheater.org JFKFC Testmarket Theater Co., Sugar Space,

616 E. Wilmington Ave., July 23, 8 p.m., TestmarketTheater.com Joseph Smith: Praise to the Man Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington, 435-251-8000, July 25, 2 & 7 p.m., BrighamsPlayhouse.com Neil Simon Festival: Chapter Two, The Foreigner, I’m Not Rappaport, They’re Playing Our Song Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-327-8673, through Aug. 8, SimonFest.org Ordinary Days Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave., Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday matinee, 3 p.m., through July 26, UtahRep.org (see p. 21) Rose in Flames Utah Festival Opera Company, Dansante Building, 59 S. 100 West, Logan, 435-750-0300, July 28, 7:30 p.m., UFOMT.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, WednesdaySaturday, 7:30 pm, Sunday, 1 & 6 pm, through Aug. 30, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre: La Bohème, Carousel, How to Succeed in

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IC MUS

with chris and emmy 1560 East 3300 South 801-410-4696 dittacaffe.com


moreESSENTIALS Business Without Really Trying, Man of La Mancha Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, through Aug. 8, UFOMT.org Utah Shakespeare Festival: Amadeus, Charley’s Aunt, Dracula, Henry IV Part Two, King Lear, South Pacific, The Taming of the Shrew, The Two Gentlemen of Verona 351 W. Center Street, Cedar City, 800-752-9849, through Sept. 5, Bard.org Vanessa Schukis: Bon Appétit Utah Festival Opera Company, Dansante Building, 59 S. 100 West, Logan, 435-750-0300, July 25, 7:30 p.m., UFOMT.org West Side Story Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6 & 8 p.m., through July 26, EgyptianTheatreCompany.org The Wizard of Oz Sundance Summer Theatre, Sundance Resort, 8841 N. Alpine Loop Rd., 866-734-4428, Monday, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m., through Aug. 7, SundanceResort.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Bach & Vivaldi St. Mary’s Church, 1505 White Pine Canyon Rd., Park City, July 28 & 29, 8 p.m., StMarysParkCity.com Curtis Stigers Celebrates Sinatra Utah Symphony, Deer Valley Snow Park Outdoor Theater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive, Park City, July 25, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org

Jerry Mabbott Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, July 25, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

Rich Vos Club 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, 801-961-1033, July 24-25, 7 & 9:30, 50WestSLC.com (see p. 24)

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 25, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Balloon Bash Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, July 25, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., ThanksgivingPoint.com Days of ’47 Downtown Salt Lake City, July 24, sunrise service, Temple Square, 7 a.m., parade goes from South Temple, State Street, to Liberty Park (600 E. 900 South), 9 a.m.; marathon/half-marathon/10K, 500 S. Wakara Way, 5:30 a.m.; rodeo, July 21-25, EnergySolutions Arena; DaysOf47.org Downtown Farmers Market, Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South, Saturdays at 8 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 24, SLCFarmersMarket.org Fiddlers ‘n Fireworks Heber Valley Railroad, 450 S. 600 West, 435-654-5601, July 24, 7 p.m., HeberValleyRR.org Layton Triathlon Layton Commons, 465 N. Wasatch Drive, Layton, 801-335-4940, July 25, 8 a.m.-noon, LaytonTriathlon.com Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, July 24-25, noon-11 p.m., Facebook.com/ NACIPPowwowFestival (see p. 21) Ogden Pioneer Days Downtown Ogden, 801-621-1696, July 24, Grand Parade, Washington Boulevard (30th Street to 20th Street), 9 a.m., Fireworks, Ogden Pioneer Stadium, 668 17th St., 9 p.m., OgdenPioneerDays.com

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moreESSENTIALS CHECK OUT PHOTOS FROM...

7 . 1 8 UR B A N A RTS FEST

VISUAL ART

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26 | JULY 23, 2015

Park Silly Sunday Market Historic Main Street, Park City, Sunday, 10 a.m., 435-655-0994, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Peruvian Fest Utah Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-864-9222, July 25-26, PeruFestUT.com Pioneer Day Celebration—Logan Willow/ Horseshoe Park, 419 W. 700 South, Logan, July 24, Parade starts at 195 S. 100 West, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Pioneer Day Extravaganza—Provo North Park, 500 W. 500 North, Provo, July 24, 10 a.m.,-2 p.m., Provo.org Pioneer Days This is the Place Heritage Park, 2601 E. Sunnyside Ave., 801-582-1847, July 24-25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., ThisIsThePlace.org Provo Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 500 W. Center St., Provo, Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., through Oct. 31, ProvoFarmersMarket.org SoulWorks Fair Dancing Cranes Imports, 673 E. Simpson Ave. (2240 South), 801-815-0588, July 25, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. BettyPNamaste.wix.com/soulworks Utah Pioneer Days—West Jordan West Jordan Arena, 8125 S. 200 West, West Jordan, July 23-24, 6 p.m., UtahPioneerDays.com Wasatch Wildflower Festival Brighton, Solitude, Alta & Snowbird ski resorts, Big and Little Cottonwood canyons, 801-947-8263, July 24-26, CottonwoodCanyons.org (see p. 21)

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Adjunct Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 25, UtahMOCA.org

UPCOMING EVENTS:

BLACK REBEL

MOTORCYLCE CLUB

FARMERS MARKET

THURSDAY, JULY 23 GATES OPEN AT 5PM MUSIC 7PM

SATURDAY, JULY 25 8AM-2PM

AT PIONEER PARK

AT PIONEER PARK

PARK SILLY AT PARK CITY’S HISTORIC MAIN ST

SUNDAY, JULY 26 @ 10AM-5PM

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Brian Lindley A Light in the Dark Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 31 Darin Jones: Celebration Hotel Monaco, 15 W. 200 South, 801-805-1801, through Nov. 30, Monaco-SaltLakeCity.com Duane Linklater: salt 11 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Drive, 801-581-7332, through Aug. 1, UMFA.utah.edu Eleanor Schultz: Controlled Burn: Pyrography Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through July 31, SaltLakeArts.org From Crayons to Krylon: Paintings by Alex D. Hall Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Aug. 3, SLCPL.org Highlights of the Collection Tour Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, University of Utah, through Oct. 7, UMFA.Utah.edu Jared William Christensen: Strange Environment Corrine and Jack Sweet Branch Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8651, through Aug. 15, SLCPL.org Jerry Hardesty: Exposed Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Monday-Saturday, through July 31, SLCPL.org Justin Carruth: Depart Broadway Center Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, 385-215-6768, through October 3, CUArtCenter.org Milton Neely: Metal Art, a Natural Inspiration, Salt Lake City Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-594-8623, Monday-Saturday, through Aug. 27, SLCPL.org Svavar Jonatansson and Jared Steffensen: You are Here Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Aug. 23, KimballArtCenter.org (see p. 21)


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S

L A I T SSEN

E

SLC DINING

Eating SLC Fifteen can’t-miss dining destinations for visitors & locals alike.

DINE DerekCarlisle

ME SUM

NING I A T TER R EN

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

Who doesn’t love a vast selection of cheese, meats and fine chocolates?

Be sure to check out our growing bitters and cocktail mixers collection. Just in time for summer.

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

caputosdeli.com

A

s the restaurant critic for Salt Lake City Weekly, there’s no question I hear more frequently than, “Where should we eat?” This is especially true on state holidays like Pioneer Day, when visiting friends and relatives descend upon the city. So, here are 15 terrific Salt Lake City eateries that I’d stake my reputation as a food writer on. Whether you’re visiting our fair city or call it your home, you owe it to yourself—and your taste buds—to give them a try. Valter’s Osteria (173 W. 300 South, 801-521-4563, ValtersOsteria.com) is named for Valter Nassi, who runs this classic Italian restaurant like a maestro leading an orchestra, all the while taking time to hug customers old and new, and kiss the hands of dining damsels. Be sure to try his linguine alla vongole and the signature chicken picatta. There is no shortage of Mexican eateries in our city, but when the band Los Lobos comes to town, they always head to Red Iguana (736 W. North Temple, 801-322-1489, RedIguana.com), a perennial winner of the City Weekly Best of Utah Award for “Best Mexican.” Mole magic is practiced in this funky, lively cantina-restaurant— a place so popular that a second location, Red Iguana 2 (866 W. South Temple, 801214-6050) became necessary. Operated by the Cardenas family for decades, it features South of the Border fare that’s hard to top. For refined Mexican fare, head to Frida Bistro (545 W. 700 South, 801-983-6692, FridaBistro.com), named for Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. The bistro offers flavors and ambiance as vibrant as Kahlo’s paintings, with dishes ranging from blue corn-dusted calamari and roasted jalapeño aioli, to grilled buffalo tenderloin with creamy cotija polenta. Local pho aficionados rave about Pho Tay Ho (1766 S. Main, 801-466-3650, PhoTayHo.com) owner Hoang Mai’s perfectly balanced beef broth: a long-simmered brew, artfully enhanced with hints of cinnamon and brought to its full potential with the addition of fragrant, fresh Thai basil at the table. Classic pho options include rare steak, well-done flank, tendon, meatballs, well-done brisket and tripe, plus others. Plan an excursion to Salt Lake City’s Avenues neighborhood and when you do, be sure to stop in at one of its charming dining establishments. With a feel like it’s in Portland, Ore., or Berkeley, Calif., Avenues Bistro on Third (564 E. Third Ave., 801-831-5409,

Av enue sBi s t r o O nT h i r d .c om) Pho-nomenal: Pho Tay Ho’s pho with rare steak is a cozy, eclectic eatery with a big focus on local, artisan foodstuffs. The spicy chicken with Diner (4160 Emigration Canyon Road, crunchy tortilla coating is outstand- 801-582-5807, RuthsDiner.com)—a Utah ing, as is the service and friendly owner, tradition since 1930—is located in lovely Kathie. Meanwhile, Avenues Proper Emigration Canyon, and was originally situRestaurant & Publick House (376 Eighth ated in the old trolley car. Today, the sunny, Ave., 385-227-8628, AvenuesProper.com) sprawling patio is a favorite spot for breakfast combines a microbrewery—Utah’s small- and lunch, and classic dishes like meatloaf est craft brewery—with a hip, full-service and pot roast still pepper the menu. restaurant. Stop in for a brew and the killer Just 4 1/2 miles up Millcreek Canyon duck fat-tossed “Prop-corn” or go whole is another classic Utah dining destinahog with Proper’s poutine. tion: Log Haven (6451 E. Millcreek CanLocated about a 60-second walk from yon Road, 801-272-8255, Log-Haven.com). the City Weekly offices is a hidden gem It’s a historic log mansion in the Wasatch called From Scratch (62 E. Gallivan National Forest surrounded by a lake, casAve., 801-538-5090, FromScratchSLC. cading waterfalls, ducks (and a very friendly com) where, as its name suggests, virtu- cat) roaming the grounds, featuring the creally everything on the menu is made from ative cuisine of longtime chef Dave Jones. scratch, including doughs milled in-house, In the 15th & 15th neighborhood of Salt Lake housemade ketchup and mustard, mozza- City is a small “restaurant row” that packs a rella and more. The Margherita pizza here big punch. Fresco Italian Cafe (1513 S. 1500 is, quite simply, the best in town. East, 801-486-1300, FrescoItalianCafe.com) Since opening a few years ago, The Copper is located in a small house with garden-patio Onion (111 E. 300 South, 801-355-3282, seating (in warm weather). The upscale menu TheCopperOnion.com) has seen few quiet features fresh, local and seasonal ingredients moments. An instant hit, Ryan Lowder’s res- with dishes such as tortelli in brodo, Meyer taurant attracts both visitors and loyal locals lemon and parsley gnocchi, and Wagyu-beef by the throngs. Whatever else you eat here, be panzanella salad. A couple of doors down certain to include a side of scorched shishito is Mazza (1515 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9259, peppers and the signature ricotta dumplings MazzaCafe.com), a Middle Eastern restaumade from ricotta produced in-house. rant with options ranging from falafel, shaFor many, myself included, Takashi warma and kebabs to complex dishes such as (18 W. Market St., 801-519-9595) isn’t just lamb and rice dolaa. And, for a taste of France, the best Japanese restaurant in town; it’s head across the street to The Paris Restauthe best restaurant period. The restaurant rant & Zinc Bar (1500 S. 1500 East, 801-486doesn’t take reservations, and a line forms 5585, TheParis.net). The Paris’ bistro fare promptly at 5:30 p.m. each evening as pa- includes classics like escargot, foie gras de catrons wait their turn for Takashi’s superb nard and duck confit, as well as Provençal and sushi, sashimi, nigiri and cooked dishes. Mediterranean dishes. Nobu ain’t got nothin’ on this place. Now, get out and enjoy a taste of SLC! CW Consider a couple of canyon restaurants, just a short drive from downtown. Ruth’s


Come Celebrate Peruvian Independence Month!

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197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

ASiAN Grocery STore

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Asian Snacks • Sauces • Spices • Vegetables • Seafood • Tea & more

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3390 South State Street | www.chinatownsupermarkets.com

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$6 HALF PITCHERS

Noodles • Hot Pot • Dry Pot • Dim Sum • Boba Tea • Fruit slush • Milk Shakes

PIE & BEER DAY!

HOME BREWS $10 PITCHERS & SELECTION OF PIES!

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3390 South State Street | www.Hotdynasty.com Party Room available for Reservation: 801-809-3229

JULY 23, 2015 | 29

DURING OUR MID-DAY AND LATE NIGHT MENUS

FRIDAY, JULY 24TH


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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

LUNCH • DINNER

Contemporary Japanese Dining

SUSHI • SAKE

18 MARKET STREET, SLC • 519.9595

Sommelier Selections

On Wednesday, July 29, sommelier Louis Koppel will host a “Sommelier Selections” wine-tasting dinner at BTG Wine Bar (63 W. 100 South, BTGWineBar.com) with food prepared by Chef de Cuisine Justin Gomes. Wine pairings include Lorenza, Calif., Rosé, 2014; Campovida, Campo di Bianca, Mendocino 2013; Hecht & Bannier, Faugères, France 2010; and Broadbent, 10-Years-Old Verdelho Madeira. Call 801-359-2814 for pricing and reservations.

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

NOW OPEN!

Small Biz Boot Camp

Small Biz Triage offers business training for small-business owners via workshops and boot camps, with an emphasis on “injecting humanity into their business.” On Tuesday, July 28, from noon-2 p.m., Small Biz Triage will be in Salt Lake City to offer a free “Fund/Sell/Save Boot Camp” for food & beer business owners. It’s a 90-minute, intensive course on funding (crowd-funding, loans, etc.); selling (marketing, email, branding, events and such); and saving (pricing, financials, backoffice setups, etc.). The workshop/boot camp is free and open to the first 25 foodbusiness owners/managers who sign up. And, Small Biz Triage says, they’re buying the first round at Squatters for attendees after the workshop. The event will be held at Holodeck, 175 W. 200 South, Suite 100 (Garden Level) in Salt Lake City. To sign up, visit SmallBizTriage.com.

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457 As seen on “ Diners,

Serving American Drive-ins AnD Dives” Comfort Food Since 1930

New Bakery Boss

Utah-based Kneaders Bakery & Cafe (Kneaders.com) announced that current CFO David Vincent has taken on a new role as president (and will also remain CFO) of Kneaders. Vincent’s promotion is evidence that sometimes you really can start at the bottom and work your way to the top: He began his career at Kneaders 18 years ago, washing dishes and making sandwiches. In a press release announcing Vincent’s new position, Kneaders co-founder Colleen Worthington said, “Dave has played an integral role in refining the Kneaders brand which has directly contributed to the success and growth of the company. His leadership will undoubtedly continue to greatly influence the success of the brand.” Quote of the week: Sex is good, but not as good as fresh sweet corn. —Garrison Keillor Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

-CreeksiDe PAtios-Best BreAkfAst 2008 & 2010-85 YeArs AnD GoinG stronG-DeliCious MiMosAs & BlooDY MArY’s-sAt & sun 11AM-2PM-live MusiC & weekenD BrunCh“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

4160 Emigration Canyon road

801 582-5807 www.ruthsdinEr.Com


DRINK

Downtown Drinks Liquidity & libations in the City of Salt. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

W

SPICY AHI ∙ SHOYU AHI ∙ KALUA PIG ∙ SWEET CHILI SHRIMP OYSTER TAKO ∙ SPICY CALIFORNIA & MANY MORE!

NOW SE RVING

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!

801-355-0543, CopperCommon.com), where chef Jamison Frank’s dinner and snack menus raise the bar (ahem) for downtown drinking and dining. And just down the block, Salt Lake City’s chicest new cocktail bar— Under Current (279 S. 300 East, 801-574-2556, UnderCurrentClub.com)— caters to an upscale crowd looking for classy drinks and the food to go with it in a sleek, contemporary atmosphere with exposed steel girders, walls of glass and high barrel ceilings. And that’s only skimming the surface of dozens of great watering holes in downtown Salt Lake City. The dining & bar guide in City Weekly’s City Guide contains even more recommendations. Cheers! CW

F F O 50% SHI U S L L A S L L O & RY E V E R Y D AY !

Beer & Wine WHY WAIT?

A L L DA

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HAWAIIAN S TY LE S A S H I M I

Hamm’s tallboy to its selection of 150 spirits. Two old-school bars downtown have been satisfying dedicated dive denizens for decades, in part due to their friendly, no-nonsense nature. Cheers to You (315 S. Main, 801-575-6400, CheersToYouSLC.com)—look for the throngs smoking outside—offers billiards, karaoke and comfy banquettes in an atmosphere reminiscent of the bar in the ’80s TV show, Cheers. Meanwhile, Murphy’s Bar & Grill (160 S. Main, 801-359-7271, MurphysBarAndGrillUT.com) has a distinctly Irish bent (just take a gander at the green carpet), cheap drinks, old-fashioned leather booths and food ranging from bangers and mash to pulled-pork nachos. Genial, talented bartenders craft killer drinks with top-flight ingredients at Copper Common (111 E. 300 South,

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

hen I uprooted myself from New York City in 1992 and moved to Utah, I knew very little about this place but was lured by the mountains. I’d assumed, like many newcomers, that booze was either off or under the table. So, what a surprise it was on my very first night here to find myself drinking excellent beer at Salt Lake City’s first craft brewery: Squatters (147 W. 300 South, 801-363-2739, Squatters. com). Since then, the Squatters brew crew has gone on to win a gaggle of national and international awards for its beers, and the venerable brewpub should be near the top of your list of places to imbibe in Salt Lake City, along with the other faves that follow. One of the more popular drinking spots downtown, with very good gastropub grub to boot, is Gracie’s (326 S. West Temple, 801-819-7565, GraciesSLC.com).

It’s a sprawling, two-level funhouse with a rooftop deck, live entertainment, plenty of nooks and crannies to watch a game, and some of the friendliest servers in town. Let the pub crawl begin at two hot spots adjacent to each other: Bar X and Beer Bar. Modern Family’s Phil Dunphy (Ty Burrell) is involved in both, and each has its own unique appeal. Bar X (155 E. 200 South, 801355-2287, BarXSaltLake.com) serves up classic and craft cocktails in a cozy speakeasytype atmosphere, while Beer Bar (161 E. 200 South, 801-355-3618, BeerBarSLC.com) offers a mind-bending selection of brews and beer cocktails, plus artisan sausages, Belgian fries, and tons of fun in a large, open communal space. Wine aficionados will want to visit BTG Wine Bar (63 W. 100 South, 801-359-2814, BTGWineBar.com), where you’ll find more than 75 wines offered “by the glass” (hence, BTG), 2-ounce taste, or flights, plus an excellent selection of cocktails, beers, small bites and wines by the bottle. Pick sommelier Louis Koppel’s brain while you’re there; he’s all-knowing about wine. Whiskey Street (323 S. Main, 801-433-1371, WhiskeyStreet.com) is the bustling home of the braised pork-belly corndog and a terrific spot to belly up to the 72-foot cherrywood bar for a cocktail, pint or glass of wine. Or, check out the granitetopped bar and comfy, cushioned bar stools at Bourbon House (19 E. 200 South, 801-746-1005, BourbonHouseSLC.com) where libations run the gamut from a $4 16-ounce

Kelsey Clement

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

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M-Th 11-10•F 11-11•S 12-11•Su 12-9

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801.566.0721•ichibansushiut.com NOW OPEN! 6930 S. STATE STREET • 801.251.0682

JULY 23, 2015 | 31

AND ASIAN GRILL


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WE CATER!

FREE FACE PAINTING EVERY MONDAY

WE HAVE HATCH NEW MEXICO GREEN CHILES

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Authentic Mexican Food and Cantina

165 S. West Temple • SLC 801-533-8900 (Below Benihana across from the Salt Palace)

BlueIguanaRestaurant.net

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves!

FAPRPEETIZEERase

h Purc With Entrees of 2 y it h a n a li d w Not v er offer o th /15 08/05 Exp.

Better burger... meet better breakfast! ser ved 7:00 - 11:00 am M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

Deli Done Right 2014

Apollo Burger

Apollo Burger opened its first location in Salt Lake City back in 1984 and has grown since then to more than a dozen locations around the state of Utah. Of course, the classic Apollo burger is a must-try, but there’s much more to the Apollo experience than just the burgers. For example, the cheesesteak, Reuben, gyro, chicken souvlaki sandwich, corn dog and chef salad offer plenty of tasty options. Of course, you’ll want an order of baklava for dessert. Multiple Locations, ApolloBurgers.com

Bambara

TACO TUESDAY & THURSDAY

255 Main St • Park City Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main) 435-649-3097

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

At Bambara, Chef Nathan Powers dazzles guests nightly with his superb, but unpretentious, fare (his own favorite dish on the menu is steak frites). The full-exhibition kitchen, makes a meal here like enjoying dinner and a show. Bambara’s warm house-cut potato chips slathered with blue cheese are irresistible, as are the delectable crab-stuffed piquillo peppers with corn tartar sauce and crisp chorizo. Manager Guy Wheelwright runs a very tight ship, and the service is top-notch in every way, leaving you to only concern yourself with enjoying every last bite. 202 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-363-5454, Bambara-SLC.com

Bangkok Terrace

Located at the Gallivan Center, Bangkok Terrace focuses on fresh, flavorful Thai cuisine. Its central location makes Bangkok Terrace a convenient lunch option for folks who work downtown, or for shoppers on their way back from City Creek. Begin your meal with chicken satay, fried-wonton dumplings stuffed with ground chicken and mushrooms, or pot stickers. For the main course, options abound with Thai-style barbecue, salads, curries, noodles and stir-fried dishes. Popular menu items include the classic pad thai and drunken noodles—wide rice noodles pan-fried with meat, onion, jalapeños, Thai basil and garlic sauce. 61 Gallivan Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-355-0068

Guadalahonky’s

Open since 1988, when cows still overran the Draper area, Guadalahonky’s serves up a huge menu of TexMex and American treats with a fuego menu to satisfy spice enthusiasts. Start dinner with complimentary chips and delicious housemade salsa, then move on to chicken wings with your choice of sauce. Choose a burger with beer-battered fries if the South of the Border isn’t calling to you, or bite into a chimichanga smothered in enchilada sauce, or asada tacos served with made-from-scratch Spanish rice. If you feel like kicking back with an adult beverage while ordering from the full menu and checking out your favorite team on the flat screen, stroll into the adjoining bar, Donkey Tails Cantina. 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-3838, Guadalahonkys.com

PATIO NOW OPEN

Aug 1st Aug 8th

PAUL & MARK BALLADS & SHANTIES

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369 @

Patio Now Open

Eddie turner power blues trio live on 7/30

7pm-10pm $20 with a $15 food min

call for details 801-583-8331 tickets available in the City Weekly store cwstore.cityweekly.net

BREAKFAST • LUNCH SMALL PLATES & DINNER ENTREES

1615 SOUTH FOOTHILL DR. 801 583 8331 • BLEUBISTROSLC.COM TUES-SAT | 4:30-10PM SAT | 9AM -10PM • SUN | 9AM -3PM


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net This laid-back restaurant serves breakfast all day, plus lunch and dinner, all with a Brazilian flair. A full bar is available offering local beer, wine and liquor, plus exotic virgin beverages like imported Guarana Antarctica, a spicy soda flavored with berries. If the weather cooperates, take your taste of Brazil outside to the deck, which overlooks Main Street. 825 Main, Suite 201, Park City, 435-658-5451, TheBridgeCafeAndGrill.com

Granato’s

When Frank Granato established Frank Granato Importing Co. in 1948, his aim was to provide Italian and Greek immigrants in Utah—along with the rest of us—high-quality meats, cheeses, imported foods, breads and first-class customer service. Today, Frank’s son Sam carries on the tradition as one of Utah’s leading and most dependable food purveyors. The daily panini special at Granato’s is always good, as are muffaletta and fresh mozzarella sandwiches. But, the big daddy of ‘em all is the Il Grande: mortadella, ham, pepperoni, Genoa salami, banana peppers, artichoke, onion, tomato, lettuce, provolone, oil and vinegar. Multiple locations, Granatos.com

Hunan Express

No surprise here—at It’s Tofu, you can expect to find tofu in many, many variations. The menu is Korean, with killer kimchi and Korean soon dishes. Among the specialties are seafood soon tofu, Asian beef rib soon tofu, pork bulgogi soon tofu, deep-fried tofu and tofu beef teriyaki. All dishes are available in three different levels of spiciness: mild, medium and very spicy. 6949 S. 1300 East, Cottonwood Heights, 801-566-9103, ItsTofu.com

Vinto

My Thai restaurant is a cozy, family-owned and -operated eatery, where the flavors are bold and the service friendly. During lunch, there are the popular combos, with choices of excellent curries and stir-fries. Be sure to try the panang and massaman curries, as well as pad siew, spring rolls and, of course, the sticky, delicious pad thai. You can extinguish the heat of fiery dishes with sweet Thai iced tea. 1425 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, 801-505-4999, MyThaiSLC.com

BEST RUEBEN

n i n t h & n i n t h & 2 5 4 s o u t h m a in

Nick’s Greek Cafe

2014

Mediterranean cuisine is this cafe’s specialty. For a quick lunch or dinner, there are fresh Greek salads, as well as sandwiches and hot dogs. For fare that’s a little more exotic, delve into the Dolmades, avgolemono, moussaka, spinach pie and more. You’ll want to finish up your meal with Nick’s housemade baklava, of course. 1600 Snow Creek Drive, Park City, 435-658-2267, NicksGreekCafe.com

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

Talisker on Main

Talisker on Main is the Talisker Club’s first-ever nonmember dining establishment. The restaurant features a modern combination of classic flavors creating a unique, stylized interpretation of America’s favorite foods, emphasizing purity and simplicity. To begin your meal, try the quail, scallops or roasted meat consommé. For a main course, indulge in the pan-roasted lamb loin or beef short ribs. In addition to the deliciously creative cuisine, Talisker on Main offers special amenities such as 66 private wine lockers, a private library and chef’s table. 515 Main, Park City, 435-658-5479, TaliskerOnMain.com

Ichiban Sushi

2005

2007 2008

voted best coffee house

A Casual

Dining Experience

Ichiban is has been serving fresh, quality sushi in Salt Lake City for more than 30 years. It’s perfect for a date, dinner with friends or large parties. Since it’s housed in a former church, you can enjoy your sushi beneath beautiful stained glass windows. Start your meal off with some tasty Japanese-style pork pot stickers. All of the chef’s specialty rolls are delicious, but be sure to order the Jazz roll, which has tuna, salmon, shrimp, avocado and firewater. Check out the Pinwheel, too, which has fresh tuna, crab, salmon, kaiware and yamagobo, all wrapped in cucumber. If you’re looking for something heartier, then check out the soul-food menu, featuring crispy catfish and fish & chips. Then, wash down your meal with some sake. 336 S. 400 East, Salt Lake City, 801-532-7522, IchibanUtah.com

ow in open for lunc & d

SERVING

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801-634-7203 | 5244 S. Highland Dr.

JULY 23, 2015 | 33

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Restaurateur David Harries’ (he also created Trio, Fresco, Riverhorse and the Park Cafe) Vinto is a casual but modern bistro featuring wood-fired pizzas, flatbread sandwiches called piadine, salads, soups, antipasti and dolci. Definitely give the housemade meatballs with grilled bread and pomodoro sauce a try. The thin-crust pizzas are very popular, as is the piadine—the grilled-vegetable version is a knockout. Vinto also offers daily soup, salad, pizza and pasta specials, as well as a range of desserts (the housemade gelato is sensational). Wines are priced at $6-$7 per glass or $27-$29 per bottle, keeping things simple. By the way, the décor at Vinto is also a knockout. 418 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-539- 9999; 900 Main, Park City, 435-615-9990, Vinto.com

My Thai

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It’s Tofu

The Italian Place has been building steak & cheese sandwiches for more than 30 years in Provo and Orem. The first Italian Place opened in 1972 and has been serving cheesesteaks to faithful customers ever since. Sandwiches come in half, full and monster sizes, but there are also salads, including the “everything steak” salad. Cookies and cheesecake round out the dessert menu. 1086 S. State, Orem, 801-224-6317; 569 N. State, Lindon, 801-796-5622, TheItalianPlaceUtah.com

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As one might surmise by its name, Hunan Express specializes in dishes from China’s Hunan region. The menu ranges from economical family combination dinners to pot stickers, char shu, teriyaki chicken and beef, hot & spicy Szechuan pork, Hunan beef, moo goo gai pan, lemon chicken, walnut shrimp, green-bean chicken, kung pao shrimp and much more. Kids seem to like the fried rice, lo mein noodles and sweet & sour dishes here. And there’s delivery available for you to enjoy your Chinese feast at home. 1771 W. 4700 South, Taylorsville, 801-965-9008

Bröst!

The Italian Place

er

The Bridge

here... Summer is

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by


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34 | JULY 23, 2015

SOUTHPAW

Outside the Box-ing

CINEMA

Southpaw upends familiar underdog sports-movie expectations. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

hanks to Rocky, we all know how the story’s supposed to roll in a boxing drama about a guy from the streets getting a title shot. The scrappy underdog, lacking the resources of his rival, has to make do with a never-quite-a-contender old trainer who has the fighter punching meat, or whatever new equivalent a screenwriter can come up with. Maybe there’s a girlfriend—or a mother, or some other family member—to fret over whether the focus on making it to the top is distracting him from important things like his health. Such filims are economic fairy tales, of a sort—visceral variations on an American dream of bootstraps success, where their bodies are the only currency they have to put in the game. Southpaw—written by Sons of Anarchy creator Kurt Sutter, and directed by Antoine Fuqua (Training Day)—starts in a place that seems counterintuitive. Billy Hope (Jake Gyllenhaal), a kid from Hell’s Kitchen raised in the foster-care system, is already the undisputed, undefeated lightheavyweight champion of the world when the film begins. He’s happily married to similarly up-from-the-’hood Maureen (Rachel McAdams), with a 10-year-old daughter, Leila (Oona Laurence), living a dream life in a mansion. There’s no rags-to-riches story possible here; if not for Jim Lampley providing an improbable level of ringside exposition about not just the fighter but also his wife, we wouldn’t even know there had ever been rags. But there’s a shake-up on the way in Billy’s life. A sudden tragedy—captured with an emotional intensity that left me holding my breath, so I’ll be damned if I’m gonna spill the beans, even if trailers have already done so—leaves Billy reeling. And there’s no escaping the realization that he

was the one responsible. That’s when it becomes clear that Sutter and Fuqua are taking Southpaw in a surprising direction. It turns into the story of someone whose career success didn’t change the quality that most threatens his long-term chances for happiness. Southpaw is going to have to break Billy Hope down again in order to have him build himself back up the right way. Structurally, there’s a battle going on in Southpaw between the familiar sports drama it seems to be working against, and its unique character arc. It’s still a movie in which the down-and-out Billy finds that old trainer— gym manager “Tick” Wills (Forest Whitaker)—and it still gives us an old-school training montage on the way to the Big Fight, as a bankrupt Billy considers a big payday facing the new champ (Miguel Gómez). Individual moments and snippets of dialogue make it feel as though Fuqua almost should’ve committed to pure melodrama, rather than gritty edginess. Maybe the goal is providing a pure crowd-pleaser; maybe it’s delivering something more complicated. Maybe it doesn’t always work as Southpaw tries to tiptoe through the DMZ between those two things. Gyllenhaal, though, finds yet another reservoir of intensity for a tricky role, much as he did for last year’s Nightcrawler. Billy’s defining trait as a fighter is his refusal to defend himself—proving to himself that he can take any kind of punishment before his bottled rage takes over—and Gyllenhaal shows us the consequences in both emotional and physical form. His chiseled body may draw attention—the way it always

Jake Gyllenhaal in Southpaw seems to happen when an actor transforms him/ or herself physically—but he’s just as good at the subtle slurring of a guy who’s taken a lot of punches to the head, and the residual psychic damage of an early life dependent on never backing down from a challenge to his manhood, even if there are always consequences. A comfortable rapport never quite develops between Gyllenhaal and Whitaker—the latter mostly playing one note of no-nonsense coach-y-ness—and the script sometimes feels as though it’s jumping over key interpersonal dynamics between Billy and his entourage, including his slick promoter (Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson). Yet even as it builds to the obvious climactic fight in the ring—the kind where both boxers are pummeling each other in a ridiculous fashion—Southpaw manages to remain focused on the idea that there’s no external enemy who needs to be vanquished. Billy Hope has already been the better fighter; all that remains is to find out whether he becomes a better man. CW

SOUTHPAW

BBB Jake Gyllenhaal Forest Whitaker Rachel McAdams Rated R

TRY THESE Rocky (1976) Sylvester Stallone Talia Shire Rated PG

Training Day (2001) Denzel Washington Ethan Hawke Rated R

Sons of Anarchy (2008) Charlie Hunnam Katey Sagal Not Rated

Nightcrawler (2014) Jake Gyllenhaal Rene Russo Rated R


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. ALOFT BB You can’t say writer/director Claudia Llosa doesn’t give you a hint right from the opening image of a frozen landscape of blowing snow: This is gonna be one chilly, remote movie. Her story moves back and forth between two timelines: one following a woman named Nana (Jennifer Connelly) as her attempts to help her terminally ill youngest son bring her into contact with a faith healer; the other 20 years later, as Nana’s older son Ivan (Cillian Murphy) and a documentary filmmaker (Mélanie Laurent) try to track her down after a long estrangement. The structure is meant to lead viewers to an understanding of both Nana’s actions and Ivan’s reactions, on the way to what one assumes will be their fraught reunion. But while Llosa crafts a few tense set pieces—two of them involving the threat of breaking lake ice—the emotional undercurrents simply never develop any resonance in the performances, either of mama-bear determination or wounded-child intensity. A story that’s meant to be about profoundly heartbreaking life moments somehow winds up feeling purely theoretical. Opens July 24 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

UNEXPECTED BBB Overwritten in places and dramatically slight, Kris Swanberg’s film is nonetheless a charming tale of the friendship that develops between a white high-school teacher (Cobie Smulders) and her black student (Gail Bean) when they both become pregnant at roughly the same time. Extensive precedent may flag that plot synopsis as cause for alarm; it feels for almost its entire running time as if it’s on the brink of becoming a White Savior movie. It never does, as Swanberg and co-writer Megan Mercier see the issue coming and address it. Instead, the fact of their having written a movie about pregnancy where the heroines are neither supermommies nor trainwrecks but instead—of all the things—normal human beings should be praised. And the performances by Smulders and Bean give are charming and harmonious with each other, and the casting of Elizabeth McGovern as Smulders’ mother is uncanny in their resemblance. That bit of serendipity is much like that which graces Unexpected as a whole: It may not be a masterpiece, but its heart is in the right place, and it’s the kind of movie where that’s wholly sufficient. Opens July 24 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Danny Bowes

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE FIFTH ELEMENT At Gallivan Center, July 27, 8:45 p.m. (PG-13) I AM BIG BIRD At Main Library, July 28, 7 p.m. (NR) NANKING At Main Library, July 25, 2 p.m. (NR) THE NEW RIJKSMUSEUM At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, July 29, 7 p.m. (NR) THE THING (1982) At Tower Theatre, July 24-25 @ 11 p.m. & July 26 @ noon. (R) YES MAN/LIAR LIAR At Brewvies, July 27, 10 p.m. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES

JULY 23, 2015 | 35

MINIONS BB Their mystery was part of their charm; their Minion-ness is essential to their humor. And none of that is present here, as the yellow blobs emerge from decades of isolation in 1968 to seek a new evil

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ANT-MAN BBB We’ve grown accustomed to the apocalyptic stakes of modern blockbusters—and part of what makes this adventure refreshing is that it finds fun in small-scale action. Recently paroled burglar Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) is recruited by scientist Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) to wear a high-tech suit that can shrink him to insect size and help thwart the hawkish plans of Pym’s protégé (Corey Stoll). There’s plenty of parental/surrogate-parental angst in an attempt to find an emotional center, and it all feels like background noise, despite Rudd’s charms. But the set-pieces are full of simple pleasures, combining the slickness of a heist thriller with special-effects-driven fisticuffs in the most playful comic-book story since Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man films. AntMan reminds us that you can still have a blast at the movies, even when a life-or-death fight can be contained inside a briefcase. (PG-13)—SR

MR. HOLMES BBB Many Hollywood movies are built around a star playing a pop-culture character, and there are far worse things than “Sir Ian McKellen as Sherlock Holmes.” This adaptation of a Mitch Cullin novel weaves between three timelines: in 1947, where an increasingly dementiaaffected Holmes lives with his widowed housekeeper (Laura Linney) and her young son; on a trip to Japan to find a folk remedy for his memory lapses; and 30 years earlier, as Holmes takes his final case. The mystery of that case is never particularly fascinating, and director Bill Condon proves simply functional at keeping chronological balls in

PIXELS B.5 One thing you can say about Adam Sandler and his movie-making crew is that they’re dependable: No matter the premise, you can count on them to take the sloppiest, laziest approach imaginable. Director Chris Columbus and regular Sandler screenwriter Tim Herlihy expand Patrick Jean’s 2010 short film, as 1980s videogame prodigies (Sandler, Josh Gad and Peter Dinklage) are called on by the president of the United States (Kevin James—wait, what?) to save the world when an alien invasion takes the form of vintage video-game characters. The plot plays out like the mutant spawn of GalaxyQuest and Ghostbusters, with the supporting cast and some of the visual concepts—most borrowed directly from Jean’s short— providing the only spark of imagination. But mostly this is a messy attempt to make a movie for 10-year-olds built entirely on Gen X nostalgia, requiring expository descriptions of every video game

SOUTHPAW BBB See review p. 34. Opens July 24 at theaters valleywide. (R)

boss to serve. Minion scouts Kevin, Bob and Stuart (all voiced by director Pierre Coffin) settle on the world’s first female supervillain (voice of Sandra Bullock), who plans to take over the British monarchy, which allows for lots of poking fun at Englishness. Minions on the whole is mildly cute—kids will laugh at their slapstick antics—but the Minions don’t really work as the heroes. The movie demands that they behave in an un-Minion-like manner entirely contrary to why we fell in love with them in the first place. Can’t we just let Minions be minions? (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson

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PAPER TOWNS [not yet reviewed] A high-school student’s magical night with the girl next door is complicated by her sudden disappearance. Opens July 24 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

premise between the tossed-off pop culture references. Anything that could have been fun about turning nerds who peaked in pre pubescence into heroes is lost in a movie where the most creative idea anyone had was, “What would it look like if Q*bert pissed himself?” Opens July 24 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR

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CARTEL LAND BB.5 Matthew Heineman attempts a two-part narrative in his exploration of vigilante justice against Mexican drug cartels, but instead winds up with something fragmented and frustrating. On the Mexican side of the border, Heineman profiles Autodefensas”groups in Michoacán (launched by physician José Mireles) on a town-to-town mission to root out the Knights Templar cartel; in the United States, we see a self-styled patriot militia in southern Arizona (led by military veteran Tim Foley) trying to catch smugglers. Heineman captures terrific moments during the Autodefensas’ campaign, as their growing power leads to perhaps-inevitable corruption, mixed feelings by local citizens and internal rifts over strategy. But there’s nothing nearly as compelling going on with Foley’s group, nor does Heineman really explore interactions with “official” law enforcement in the same depth. At some point, he needed either to find a compelling reason to keep the American vigilantes in this film, or to keep the focus entirely on the genuinely gripping material in Mexico and the far more complex protagonist in Mireles. If anything, he simply emphasizes that we in America are kidding ourselves if we think “cartel land” applies to us to the same degree. Opens July 24 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


CINEMA CLIPS the air. Mostly, it’s about the pleasure of watching McKellen’s performance, subtly affecting at conveying a man famed for his dazzling mind trying to cope with its deterioration. A sometimes over-plotted story works even if it’s mostly about that one casting pitch. (PG-13)—SR TESTAMENT OF YOUTH BBB.5 Vera Brittain’s 1933 book about her experiences during World War I make up one of the great women’s war stories. This adaptation is a compassionate, distressing tale of a woman’s determination to find her own purpose in an era when that was not kindly looked upon. The conflict between generations and the profound impact the war has on Vera (Alicia Vikander) and her peers is built up over every small victory of Vera’s, and how every victory comes with a price. Vera makes the decision to leave Oxford University (after fighting to get in!) to work as a military nurse because she’s desperate to serve the war effort in one of the few ways allowed to her—and then becomes a close-up eyewitness to human destruction ravaging her generation. The tiny heartbreaking moments pile up until they’re almost unbearable. (PG-13)—MAJ

36 | JULY 23, 2015

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TRAINWRECK BB.5 This rambunctious, hard-R-rated romantic comedy showcases writer/ star Amy Schumer’s sweetly poisonous manner, though it’s overlong and meandering (and director Judd Apatow isn’t one likely to tighten those issues up). She plays a 30-something writer whose life is a series of commitment-free one-night stands, drinking and weed-smoking— in other words, the sort of movie lifestyle normally reserved for male characters; it befalls a sports doctor (Bill Hader) she’s profiling for a story to tame her wild ways and help her grow up. Schumer stays disappointingly close to rom-com formula, and the film is burdened by unnecessary cameos and tangents. But the laughs outnumber the groans by a wide margin, thanks to Schumer and Hader’s virtuosity, plus funny supporting performances by such unlikely suspects as John Cena, LeBron James and Tilda Swinton. (R)—Eric D. Snider

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Science!

TV

Vital Voluntary Vile

Sci-fi ’toon Rick & Morty returns for Season 2; I Am Cait could finally rid us of all things Kardashian. Wayward Pines Thursday, July 23 (Fox)

Series Finale: For a second, there were rumors that Fox might Under the Dome us and crank out a second season of Wayward Pines, even though it was originally billed as a “10-episode limited series.” But! Tonight is indeed the end of the story of a bizarre little Idaho town (yes, redundant) wherein a Secret Service agent (Matt Dillon) learns the truth about why he, nor any other townies, can ever be allowed to leave. It’s a hell of a twist; if you’ve yet to visit Wayward Pines, either due to the previously mentioned Dome factor or the presence of producer/director M. Night Shyamalan, I’m not going to spoil it here. Hulu it; on-demand it; think of it as a 10-hour movie—just do it.

I Am Cait Sunday, July 26 (E!)

Series Debut: Believe it or not, I have no problem with Caitlyn Jenner’s transition from Bruce being used as a marketing ploy for an E! reality show about, of course, Caitlyn Jenner’s transition from Bruce. In fact, I’m all for it, because I Am Cait could very well be the series that wipes all other Kardashian/Jenner-related programs off of television. Who’s going to care about those famous-for-noth-

Rick & Morty Sunday, July 26 (Adult Swim)

Season Premiere: When it premiered in 2014, Rick & Morty seemed almost too smart for its own good: Boozehound sociopath scientist Rick (voiced by Justin Roiland) drags his slow-witted nephew Morty (also Roiland) along on increasingly dangerous interdimensional trips to alternate universes, all of which end up with Morty nearly being maimed or molested, and Rick lamenting the utter stupidity of humankind—kind of a twisted sci-fi cartoon take on the Doc/Marty dynamic of Back to the Future (or as close as you can get without receiving a cease-and-desist from Robert Zemeckis). But, now that Roiland and co-creator Dan Harmon are (cult) heroes of the animation world, Season 2 looks to be even more unhinged, profane and frighteningly scientifically plausible than ever. You don’t need another season of Cosmos—you just need Rick & Morty.

The Bachelorette Monday, July 27 (ABC)

Season Finale: Since Kaitlyn (popular name, huh?) Bristowe is pretty much the best Bachelorette ever, here’s hoping she chooses none of these clowns.

Last Comic Standing Wednesday, July 29 (NBC)

New Season: The checkered history of Last Comic Standing is loaded with “losers” who went on to fame (Amy Schumer, Gabriel Iglesias), “winners” who’ve had to claw their way back (Iliza Shlesinger, Josh Blue) and head-scratching footnotes (Ant? God’s Pottery?). Season 9 of LCS is about as necessary as seasons 3-8 (read: not at all), but new additions Norm Macdonald (as a judge alongside returnees Roseanne Barr and Keenen Ivory Wayans) and Anthony Jeselnik (as the host) rate a look: Both comedians have been banished from NBC late-night (Macdonald was fired from Saturday Night Live; Jeselnik quit as a writer for Late Night With Jimmy Fallon) for being too “edgy,” and now they’re back in primetime? Is no one running NBC anymore? Is it just like the night shift at an Arby’s over there? CW Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.

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New Series: What’s worse than a radio show repurposed as a TV show? Nothing. At least The Glenn Beck Radio Program on The Blaze, with its white microphones and illusion of floating in “Heaven,” attempts to add a visual element—Beck may be a frothing lunatic, but he does understand showmanship (as most prophets of doom do). The rest, from tabloid talkers to sports yakkers, are just cameras pointed at mannequins in headphones. Sex With Brody goes the extra mile into hell by giving Brody Jenner—one of the myriad talentless dependents of The Artist Formerly Known as Bruce—a forum to give advice as a “sexual connoisseur,” propped up by a “comedian” sidekick so bland I’ve already forgotten his name twice. Which brings us to …

Rick & Morty (Adult Swim)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Sex With Brody Fridays (E!)

ing idiot sisters and their tedious shows about … what, exactly? … when this drops? If Caitlyn can rid us of Kim, Khloé, Keebler, Khrunky and the rest of the Kardashians klogging up kable, she truly is an American hero. [Cue “The Star-Spangled Banner,” flags, balloons, etc.]

| CITY WEEKLY |

JULY 23, 2015 | 37


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38 | JULY 23, 2015

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What everybody should know about Provo’s musical ecosystem. BY COURT MANN comments@cityweekly.net @TheCourtMann

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W

hen I began working on this piece, I started by writing a list of questions. My task was to give readers a primer on Provo’s music scene, and I scrawled various questions that readers might want answered. I’ve covered the Provo scene for the past two years as a reporter at the Daily Herald, and before that, more informally, as a friend and fan of various Provo musicians. The ecosystem is intricate; how could I sum up my perspective (and it’s only my perspective) in a single, succinct piece? Well, I can’t. But as my list of questions ballooned—things like “is the scene better than Salt Lake City’s?” (probably) and “is it all Mormon?” (no)—I realized none of them quite mattered, nor did my ability to answer them here. All those questions hinged on one. It was the final one I wrote down: “Should Salt Lake City even care about the Provo scene?” The answer was not as obvious as I thought it might be. Though much of it is genuinely praiseworthy, the most compelling thing about Provo’s music scene—at least to me—isn’t actually the music. At least, not directly. The scene’s current narratives are so much broader, and on many levels way more existential. It’s not just about a good song or album or band. These broader, deeper narratives are the things that are worth your attention. Just maybe. It’s only been two years, and my perspective has surely shifted, but things definitely felt different two summers ago. Imagine Dragons, which started in Provo, were riding the biggest of waves from its single “Radioactive,” which was enjoying the longest run on the Billboard Hot 100 of any song ever: 87 consecutive weeks, finally ending in May 2014. Neon Trees (also Provo music alums) had two successful albums and a few hit singles under its belt. Local band Fictionist, signed to Atlantic Records, was working on its major label debut. The Moth & The Flame, probably the scene’s most cherished darling at the time, had just moved to Los Angeles and was working with some big-timers out there. And not too long before all of that, Joshua James and Isaac Russell had gotten serious major label attention. Big things had happened, big things were happening and it seemed big things were about to happen. The initial success of James and Russell, followed by the rather meteoric success of Imagine Dragons and Neon Trees, and then the signing of Fictionist, fostered this idea within the music scene— whether conscious or otherwise—that local musicians would just get plucked up by the larger music industry. They would be given the resources to transcend whatever barriers might have once existed for Utah-based musicians. I somewhat expected my time at the Herald to be spent documenting similar rises to national prominence. In hindsight, it seems a bit naïve, but at the time, it wasn’t far-fetched. The scene was on that kind of trajectory. Then that trajectory changed. Imagine Dragons kept releasing successful music, though nowhere near the same degree as “Radioactive.” Same goes for Neon Trees. Fictionist

The Fictionist: One of the gems of Provo’s music scene. were dropped from Atlantic. The Moth & The Flame signed to Elektra, but their full-length follow up to their 2012 debut album still hasn’t been released. A handful of other Provo musicians have enjoyed recent brushes with notoriety, but they’ve all been relatively minor by comparison. The relevant narrative two summers ago—Provo-bred artists interacting with sizeable national audiences—was what many of us forecast as the dominant future narrative. The most pertinent story since then, though, hasn’t been the music scene’s interaction with a national audience. It’s been the scene’s interaction with the Provo community as a whole—and how, for the most part, they’ve both embraced one another to a surprising degree. Further, it’s about how this has undoubtedly changed both communities and the way they view/define themselves. And how those new identities aren’t fully formed, or haven’t been grown into, quite yet. Not an identity crisis, but an identity re-evaluation. Is the Provo music scene about music? Well, yes. But it’s about a lot of things these days. It’s about Utah Valley’s unrelentingly entrepreneurial culture. It’s about the changing role of counterculture. It’s about the music industry’s approach to aspiring artists. It’s about lofty, raw ambition being challenged. It’s about the deep-seated desire for recognition, within both the music scene and the larger Provo community. The desire to be noticed, to be reckoned with, to be respected by the national community—yet still consider oneself separate from it—is quintessentially Utahn, isn’t it? Indeed, it’s at the root of Utah’s pioneer history. What’s happening in Provo isn’t just Provo’s story. It is a manifestation of Utah’s ever-reoccurring story. And that is the reason why you should maybe care about the Provo music scene. Just maybe. CW Part 2 in this series will run online July 30 at CityWeekly.net. Court Mann is a features reporter for the Daily Herald in Provo. Follow him on Twitter at @TheCourtMann.


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MUSIC

Apocalypse Twang

Coloradan gothic country band Slim Cessna’s Auto Club aren’t gods; they just play them onstage. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

M

aybe your bible is leather-bound with gilded, wafer-thin pages. Perhaps it’s actually called the Bible. To a Slim Cessna’s Auto Club fan, their bible might be a gatefold album cover with paper inner sleeves—and its title is more verbose. SC 102: An Introduction for Young and Old Europe, the Coloradan gothic country band’s double-vinyl, single-DVD release, is a collection of parables, proverbs and lies. These were never intended to be anyone’s gospel, but they inspire devotion just the same. When you meet one of the indoctrinated SCAC fans, they evangelize in much the same way as a zealot of any denomination. It goes somethin’ like this: “What? You’ve never heard of my god? You haven’t heard his/ her Word? Listen—and be forever changed!” Cessna himself laughs at the notion that his band’s followers are fanatical. “I think we do have that,” he says. “The people that get it, get it really hard. I think music-lovers, which is what we are, get what we do.” A Slim Cessna’s Auto Club song is the domain of deeply flawed characters. Like the six-foot-four, 220-pound, gold-digging, transgender heroine of “That Fierce Cow Is Common Sense In A Country Dress,” who wants to find a gentleman to court her with “hard candy, chocolate bears, doodads and fox furs.” Or, the musky, husky “Magalina Hagalina Boom Boom,” who wants to teach co-lead vocalist Munly Munly that “beauty’s deeper than skin.” Or, the amoral fatcat Mr. Beerbohm, who, in “Hallelujah Anyway,” forces a would-be preacher to impregnate his daughter, whom they both know will die during delivery—in order to carry on Beerbohm’s bloodline. Some of these characters seek salvation and find damnation. Others rot in an earthly limbo, never finding answers. This makes SCAC songs intensely entertaining, relatable and even—like parables and proverbs—instructive.

The spirit of Slim Cessna’s Auto Club

Cessna gives all the credit to Munly. “He’s been writing all the songs for some time,” Cessna says. “As far as I’m concerned, he’s on par with Flannery O’Connor in terms of the imagery and the American experience and superstition. He’s so gifted and has such a wild imagination.” Delivery is key to the efficacy of SCAC’s messages. When the band plays live, the bearded, bespectacled and behatted Cessna stands tall beside the shorter, gaunt but fiery Munly. Bathed in red, blue and purple light, the two sing as though every show is a hot, sweaty, crowded tent revival—which it certainly is. As fans stand shoulder-to-shoulder in front of the stage, the six-member band often does likewise. It’s especially crowded on the SC 102 DVD, Live at the Lion’s Lair, where five former bandmates join SCAC to celebrate the band’s 20th anniversary. It’s like the hoedown at the apocalypse—or, as Jello Biafra, erstwhile singer of the Dead Kennedys and proprietor of SCAC’s former label Alternative Tentacles, put it: “[SCAC is] the country band that plays the bar at the end of the world.” Of course, when you start talking about the end times, that’s when a lot of people stop listening. What’s more, Cessna and company don’t need to be deified. They’re just a profoundly entertaining band that wants to continue being what they are. Devoted fans help keep them there, but there is such thing as overthinking something. After all, A Guide To Young and Old Europe is just an allusion to the fact that SCAC is trying to get a foothold in Germany. That’s where the record—which is more of a greatest-hits compilation—was originally released in 2012. Now, the band is releasing it stateside on their own label, SCAC Unincorporated, in order to re-introduce themselves to American audiences. To spread the Word, so to speak. “I think that, when I was a teenager, it would’ve been cool to have a cult band,” says Cessna. “You know, where only a certain population had ever even heard of us. But right now, we’re just tryin’ to pay some bills and figure things out.” CW

SLIM CESSNA’S AUTO CLUB

w/Utah County Swillers The Urban Lounge 241 S. 500 East Thursday, July 23 10 p.m. $12 advance, $14 day of show


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THURSDAY 7.23

LIVE

Melt Banana

SATURDAY 7.25 TORCHE, MELT BANANA

While the incredible stoner-drone metal juggernaut Torche, promoting Restarter (their first for Relapse Records), headlines this show, they hit Salt Lake City a lot more often than Japanese noise rockers Melt Banana. So let’s talk about them instead. Just a few songs in, Melt Banana hit you with fast blasts of Ichirou Agata’s arrhythmic guitar, peppered with drum machine and video-game controller bleeps and blips, together with the flittering cheeps of vocalist Yasuko Onuki, all at breakneck tempo. Fetch (A-Zap), the band’s 2013 LP, found them a two-piece, even more mechanistic without a live drummer, and faster and lighter sans bass, as though that was an extravagance. Is it metal? Is it electronica? Is it noisepop? It makes you feel, just maybe, what it’s like to be inside a video game for players with extremely short attention spans, in which each “play” only lasts a minute or so but shoots you through with an absolute adrenaline jolt. Hot Nerds also appear. (BS) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $15, TheUrbanLoungeSLC. com

Father John Misty

THE KYLE GASS BAND

Kyle Gass is one half of the venerated, immortal, holy-rock duo Tenacious D. (Who’s the other guy? I guess you’ll never know.) The KGB’s eponymous debut CD, according to the band, is “10 original tracks of complete and utter geniusness.” They also mention magical journeys, questionable women, “heartfelt softy jams,” and gypsies who “hold the keys to the very origins of rock & roll.” Finally, there’s a caveat: “Belt up, dick-tip, because you’re about to go on the ride of a lifetime.” Sounds like half the D might be as fun as the whole thing. (RH) O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $12, OPRockwell.com »

The Kyle Gass Band

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHEN ALBANESE

He may not enter Pioneer Park via hot-air balloon (as he did at Hall’s Island in Minneapolis), but Father John Misty—former drummer of Fleet Foxes, aka Joshua Tillman, J. Tillman, Farmer Jah Misery, or just FJM, for brevity—still puts on quite a show. Onstage, Tillman blends a nonchalant attitude with deep soul, banters with the crowd, and dances sassily. Expect to hear songs from his February 2015 release, I Love You, Honeybear (Sub Pop), which showcases his clever and ironic wordplay. Somehow, nonchalance is not only common in an FJM performance, it isn’t awkward seeing him switch between couldn’t-care-less and deeply soulful; when bantering between songs and while singing, his wordplay is clever and ironic, and his attitude—and dancing—is sassy. Co-headlining with FJM is Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (aka BRMC), a dynamic and gritty San Francisco, Calif., rock-n-roll group. Other than attitude, there’s not much overlap in the tones of tonight’s performers, with BRMC edging into outlaw-country and punk, but these guys are mostly pure garage psych rock. The trio’s new album Live in Paris is out now on Vagrant Records. (TF) Twilight Concert Series, Pioneer Park, 350 N. 300 West, 7 p.m., $5 in advance, $10 day of show, limited tickets available at CWStore.CityWeekly.net, TwilightConcerts.com

PHOTO COURTESY EMMA TILLMAN

FATHER JOHN MISTY, BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB

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7.27 LIVE MONDAY SUGAR RAY, BETTER THAN EZRA, UNCLE KRACKER, EVE 6

COURTESY PHOTO

Nostalgia tours are for reminiscing. Where were you when you first heard Sugar Ray’s “Fly?” How about Eve 6’s “Inside Out?” Better Than Ezra’s “Good?” Uncle Kracker’s “Follow Me?” While the nostalgia will be heavy tonight, all of the acts have continued to release new music. Sugar Ray vocalist Mark McGrath is also preparing his debut solo EP. Better Than Ezra released, All Together Now (The End) in 2014. Uncle Kracker dropped Midnight Special (Sugar Hill) in 2012, and Eve 6 put out Speak in Code (Fearless) that same year. The bands of the Under the Sun tour (sans Eve 6) even got together to record the single “B.Y.H.B” (Bring Your Hot Body) under the moniker Uncle Ezra Ray. You have to wonder if Uncle Kracker dominated this, because the tune is, in essence, a lame mainstream country song. (TF) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7 p.m., $35-$50, RedButteGarden.com

WEDNESDAY 7.29

New York City quartet Chappo veer away from dance rock on their latest, Future Former Self (Majordomo). The new sounds blend psych rock, glam and archetypal New York City garage rock into an infectious—and still bootyshaking—mix. Yukon Blonde, hailing from British Columbia, are a good pairing for this bill. Their light, summery On Blonde (Dine Alone) is equal parts laid-back, hazy groove and upbeat, danceable joy sounds. It has been nearly three years since they last played in Salt Lake City, and they seem to be getting more use out of their synthesizer, with more experimental and produced sounds than in either their debut (recorded under their former name, Alphababy) or their 2012 release, Tiger Talk. (TF) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 8 p.m., $10, KilbyCourt.com

Farewell tour, final tour, goodbye tour, “No More Tours” tour—are they ever really serious? Mötley means it. They’re the first band to sign a contract to never again tour under the name Mötley Crüe after 2015. They revealed the deal alongside the tour announcement in January 2014, according to Loudwire. Does that make the legendary foursome the most forthright band in sleaze metal? Is that worth more than the piles of money they’d rake in with, say, a Fake Encore Tour 2016 (You Knew We’d Be Back!)? The worst they’d hear about it are a few message-board told-you-so’s and some interview questions they could fend off with canned, publicist-written answers. But, man, they sealed the deal. This is it. You gotta give them credit for that—and for hitting Salt Lake City a second time on their way out. And with Alice Cooper! (RH) Energy Solutions Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $59.50-$125, EnergySolutionsArena.com

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TUESDAY 7.28

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LIVE music JULY 24 & 25 Kaleb Austin

Spirits • Food • Live Music 7.23 Tracorum

7.30 Morgan Snow

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8.01 Phoenix Rising

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JULY 23, 2015 | 45

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

LIVE MUSIC

COURTESY PHOTO

Easton Corbin (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Father John Misty, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (Pioneer Park, see p. 42) Latin Jazz Factory Allstars (Garage on Beck) Robyn Cage (O.P. Rockwell) Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, Utah County Swillers (The Urban Lounge, see p. 40) Thrive, Strange, Misi & Co (The Complex) Todo Mundo (The Woodshed) Zongo Junction (Newpark Town Center)

FRIDAY 7.24

TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS

Oklahoma band The Turnpike Troubadours are rowdy and wild country-roots players, but behind the energetic and loud outermost layer, their songs are—true to country form—stories of pain, loss and love. They call their genre “Red Dirt,” and it’s exactly what it sounds like: music that comes from and sounds like it should be listened to whilst traversing open, dirt roads (red dirt, if you can get to it). Their upcoming self-titled release (Bossier City Records) is expected out later this year, and if the guitar-riff heavy single, “Down Here” is any indication, it’s a continuation of their rootsy, southern-rock alternative-country sound. (Tiffany Frandsen) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 9 p.m., $18, TheComplexSLC.com

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THURSDAY 7.23

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FRIDAY 7.24 LIVE MUSIC

AR-X, SikSet (The Moose Lounge) Che Zuro (Snowbird) Hallovved, June Brothers, EL 84 (Granary Row) Jon Wayne and the Pain (The Woodshed) Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Rumba Libre (Midvale City Park) Symbol Six, Charlatan, Scarlet Canary, Away at Lakeside, Wounds of Valor, Buried Out West (Metro Bar) The Turnpike Troubadours (The Complex, see left) Christopher Howley Rollers (The Spur Bar & Grill Wyatt Lowe (Garage on Beck)

DJ

DJ Bad Boy Brian (Sandy Station) DJ Choice (The Red Door) DJ Jarvicious (Sandy Station) DJ Night (Outlaw Saloon) DJ Scotty B (Habits)


Kemosabe, Planetaries, Stereo Sparks (Downstairs Park City)

(Kilby Court) Wasnatch, Natural Roots (Granary Row)

KARAOKE

DJ

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 7.25 LIVE MUSIC

Carter Brothers (The Spur Bar and Grill) Clint Lewis (Snowbird) Headquarter (Fats Grill) Jay William Henderson, Quiet House (Velour) Jeremiah Maxey (The Spur Bar and Grill) The Kyle Gass Band, Candy’s River House (O.P. Rockwell, see p. 42) Michelle Moonshine (Garage on Beck) Penrose, Berlin Breaks, The Last Wednesday (The Royal) Telluride Meltdown (The Spur Bar and Grill) Toby Beard (The State Room) Toby Keith, Chris Janson, Ned Ledoux (Usana Amphitheatre) Torche, Melt Banana, Hot Nerds (The Urban Lounge, see p. 42) Young Rising Sons, Hunter Hunted, Cruisr

HOMO LEVITICUS

JULY 23: 9 PM DOORS

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Atala (Metro Bar) Coliseum, La Verkin (The Urban Lounge) Cutler Family Fiddlers and Pizzicato Strings & Co. (Ed Kenley Amphitheater) Lyle Lovett & His Large Band (Red Butte Garden)

JULY 28: 8 PM DOORS

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COMING SOON

JULY 23, 2015 | 47

Sept 23: Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats Sept 24: A Place To Bury Strangers Sept 28: The Fratellis Sept 29: Cannibal Ox Oct 1: Young Blood Brass Band Oct 7: Gardens & Villa Oct 8: Wartime Blues Oct 12: Frank Turner Oct 13: Angel Olson Oct 14: Destroyer Oct 16: IAMX Oct 19: Murs Oct 20: AlunaGeorge Oct 29: Albert Hammond Jr

| CITY WEEKLY |

Aug 30: Melvins Aug 31: Millencollin Sept 1: Babes In Toyland Sept 2: Crooks On Tape Sept 3: Shuggie Otis Sept 5: UZ Sept 10: La Luz Sept 11: Old 97s Sept 12: Bowling For Soup Sept 13: Dam Funk Sept 14: Dirty Fences Sept 16: Eligh Sept 18: Quiet Oaks Album Release Sept 20: The Vibrators Sept 21: Shilpa Ray Sept 22: Ken MOde

Aug 3: Chicano Batman Aug 4: Your Meteor Tour Send Off Aug 5: FREE SHOW Grand Banks Aug 6: Lee Gallagher Aug 7: Dubwise with Metaphase Aug 8: Dusky Aug 12: The Bee Aug 13: Tinariwen Aug 17: Locrian Aug 18: KMFDM Aug 19: FREE SHOW Kaleb Hanly Aug 20: FREE SHOW Mimi Knowles Aug 21: Shiba San Aug 22: Burnell Washburn Aug 26: AJ Davila Aug 28: Chelsea Wolfe Aug 29: The Get Up Kids

JULY 24TH 8PM

KARAOKE

ANDREA GIBSON

CHRIS PUREKA

VELOSITY ( CA) VILE DESCENT (CA) LEGION (SLC)

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JOHNNY SLAUGHTER, THE BIPOLAR EXPRESS

HARLEQUIN (CA)

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8 PM DOORS

JULY 23RD 8PM

DJ Battleship (Brewskis) Chaseone2 (Gracie’s) DJ Jeffrey B (Sandy Station) DJ Juggy (Downstairs Park City) DJ Marshall Aaron (Sky) DJ Night (Outlaw Saloon) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Elvis Freshly (Cisero’s)

Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

JULY 22: BENEFIT SHOW

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The funky Monophonics, complete with a steamy horn section, have a new album out, Sound of Sinning (Transistor Sound), and the sensual and psychedelic record lives up to its name. It’s a slinky blend of jazz, funk and soul, with backup vocals that sound like they were picked right out of California in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Since they were raised in the San Francisco Bay area, maybe the psychedelic ‘60s soul lingered, and then steeped into the retro-minded band’s bones. The Weekenders (rock & rollers from Salt Lake City) and Nate Robinson (a punk/ ska artist from Utah Valley) open. (TF) Blues, Brews & BBQ, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, 4:30 p.m., free, Snowbasin.com

KARAOKE

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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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48 | JULY 23, 2015

PHOTO COURTESY ABBY WILCOX

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A Giant Dog, Blind Pets, The Ladells (Kilby Court) Andrea Gibson, Chris Pureka (The Urban Lounge) Between the Buried and Me, Animals as Leaders, The Contortionist (The Complex) G. Love & Special Sauce (The State Room) Reckless Kelly (O.P. Rockwell) Rezet (Metro Bar) Sugar Ray, Better Than Ezra, Uncle Kracker, Eve 6 (Red Butte Garden, see p. 44)

OPEN MIC & JAM

Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig Pub)

Open Mic (The Royal) Open Mic (Velour)

DJ

DJ Stereo Sparks (Cisero’s)

WEDNESDAY 7.29 LIVE MUSIC

Andrew Cole (Snowbird) Anthony Raneri, Laura Stevenson (Kilby Court) The Hoot Hoots, Advent Horizon, The Thrill Collective (Garage on Beck) JP Whipple (Fats Grill) K.Flay, Vinyl Tapestries, Lost, the Artist (The Loading Dock) Lady Antebellum, Hunter Hayes, Sam Hunt (Usana Amphitheatre) Motherlode Canyon Band (The Complex) Mötley Crüe, Alice Cooper (Energy Solutions Arena, see p. 44) Shannon Runyon (O.P. Rockwell) Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Vinyl Williams (The Urban Lounge) Vain Machine, Rare Facture, New Shack (Club X)

KARAOKE

Clean Comedy Open Mic (Club 90) Open Mic (Sugarhouse Coffee)

TUESDAY 7.28 LIVE MUSIC

Chappo, Yukkon Blonde (Kilby Court, see p. 44) G. Love, Special Sauce (The State Room) Imagine Dragons (Energy Solutions Arena) Lower Dens, Young Ejecta (The Urban Lounge) Parachute (In the Venue)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke (Brewskis) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed) Karaoke With ZimZam (Club 90) Taboo Tuesday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon)

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JULY 23, 2015 | 49


Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

7. Trap during winter, perhaps 8. Before surgery, informally 9. 978-0553213119, for "Moby-Dick" 10. New Year's ____ 11. Some chest-pounding, briefly 12. Contractor's fig. 14. Back-to-sch. time 19. Online news aggregation inits. 21. Jolly Green Giant's outburst 24. "Curses! I never win!" 25. Owner of Moviefone 26. There are 100 in one cent. 29. Crashes into 30. "That's what ____ said" 31. Dr. of hip-hop 34. "Stee-rike!" caller 35. Elsa's sister in "Frozen" 36. Tito, the King of Latin Music 38. City map abbr. 39. FEMA offering 40. Deli offering 41. "Norma ____" 44. Guest appearance? 45. Yo-Yo Ma, e.g. 50. Actors without lines 51. Pass with flying colors

52. "Hardball" host Matthews 53. "____ luego!" 55. Like much music of the '90s 56. "The Bold and the Beautiful" actress Sofer 57. Looking up 58. Strands of biology 59. Chest protector? 60. It's targeted for extraction 61. Thus far

ACROSS

1. Prepare for a fresh start ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme 2. First name in online news 3. Economist's concern 4. Reason for an R rating 5. One with millions of followers 6. 2003 film bomb that becomes 4-Across when a letter is subtracted from its title

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

Last week’s answers

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. "The Big Bang Theory" character from India 4. 1958 Best Picture winner that becomes 6-Down when a letter is added to its title 8. King or queen 13. Arrow-shooting Greek god 15. Like many Keats poems 16. Replies to an invite 17. Cutting remark 18. "Your Movie Sucks" author 20. In a 1952 novel, he wrote "I am invisible ... simply because people refuse to see me" 22. "You're ____ talk!" 23. Gadget's rank in cartoons: Abbr. 24. Wray of "King Kong" 27. Young ____ (kids) 28. Smash hits: Abbr. 31. Way in or out 32. ____ de deux 33. Home of Waikiki Beach 35. Taxing times? 37. Barack Obama's first White House Chief of Staff 40. Curtain call chorus 42. Woodsy odor 43. PC key 46. Running ____ 47. Roseanne's husband on "Roseanne" 48. Las Vegas block? 49. Gift shop buy 50. Speed-of-sound name 54. "... and ____ a good-night!" 56. TV journalist who wrote "War Journal: My Five Years in Iraq" 59. Tennis legend who won 12 Grand Slam singles titles in the 1960s 62. "Pleeeeeease?" 63. Cara of "Fame" 64. "____ jungle out there" 65. Morse code taps 66. Still-in-development apps 67. Utters 68. Fanatic

SUDOKU

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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | JULY 23, 2015

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Covenant’s corporate mission is to promote “good, moral products into the world,” Lacy says. “We try to help our authors and employees work toward this goal every month.” Covenant’s writers love sharing their words with others. “I’m not sure who I’d be without writing stories,” says Krista Lynne Jensen, author of Falling for You and the recently released Kisses in the Rain. Jensen submitted her first novel to Covenant in January 2009 and now has five books and a novella out with them. “Writing stories of triumph and courage gives me hope, and a way to share that hope with others,” she says. Covenant’s employees are just as excited about the company. “I’ve been working at Covenant for about three years now, and I love it more and more every day,” says editor Stacey Owen. “It is such a privilege to be associated with talented people who sacrifice their time and energy to produce uplifting literature. I’m daily grateful for the opportunity I have to be a small part of helping those books through the publication process.” Readers interested in meeting some local authors can head down to Brigham Young University’s Education Week, Aug. 17-21. “We have a large group of authors … doing signings from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday through Friday” during that event, says Lacy. In addition to its monthly schedule of publishing new books, Covenant also has a new feature film, Miracle Maker, releasing in November 2015. Writers who want to submit their work to Covenant may email their completed manuscript with a one-page cover letter, one-page plot summary, and a completed author questionnaire (available on Covenant’s website), to submissionsdesk@covenant-lds.com, or mail it to their offices in American Fork. n

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

eaders interested in clean entertainment should check out Covenant Communications, a locally owned and operated publishing company. Covenant Communications publishes fiction and nonfiction that, content-wise, are in line with standards of morality for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints—so no sex, swearing and minimal violence. This makes Covenant’s books and films popular with those looking for clean entertainment for themselves and their kids. “Not all of our books have LDS content,” explains Stephanie Lacy, Covenant’s Public Relations and Marketing specialist. “Our books and products are largely marketed towards the LDS market; however, some of our books and movie are marketed nationally.” Lacy has worked with Covenant about a year and a half, and she loves working there. “My colleagues are great to work with, and I love helping and working with the authors as well,” she says. “I like being able to promote good products that I believe in, and helping our authors to promote their projects which they have poured their hearts and souls into.” Covenant Communications was founded in 1958 by Lou Coffered. The company was bought out by Deseret Book Corporation about 10 years ago and is currently a division of that umbrella company. Covenant’s books are currently produced in the United States, Canada and China. The company also produces and sells films and other entertainment products, as well as home décor and a fashion line for women, Sweet Salt Clothing (SweetSaltClothing.com). These products are sold all over the United States and in select stores internationally, as well as all major retailers online. Utahns can find Covenant products in local Deseret Book or Seagull Book locations, as well some larger chain stores.

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ARMS OF VENUS

I am the arms Of Venus de milo. What I hold so tightly Only scars me With anxiety My body displaced I hold my silenced voice from crumbled fingers Digging deeper into the earth Dimitra Kambouris DeHoog

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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52 | JULY 23, 2015

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Stocking Daily Essentials I

f you are looking for a thoroughly essential shopping experience, look no further than The Stockist (875 E. 900 South, 801-532-3458, instagram @the_stockist) in the 9th & 9th district. Formerly Fresh Boutique, which started across the street, The Stockist is a men’s and women’s clothing boutique that has moved to a modern, clean and industrial-designed retail space with 20-foot-high ceilings and an all-glass storefront. They have ditched their skateand boarding-wear (well, kind of, but more on that later) for an American Heritage look that keeps getting better with time. This is not a shop for frills and garden-party dresses; instead, it’s about classic clothes that are timeless and effortless, like premium denim, cotton T-shirts and Red Wing boots. The shop owners are a brother and sister duo named Ian and Helen Wade, who stock the store with brands like Current Elliott, Won Hundred, Levi’s Made and Crafted, Herschel bags, Nixon Watches, Woolrich, and Brixton. This fall, store manager

Brett Devereaux is beaming about adding new lines and upping the fashion ante with Norse Projects, Save Khaki and H by Hudson. In the back of The Stockist is another shop called Iron & Resin. The Ventura, Calif.-based clothing store opened a popup in The Stockist and filled it with surf, skate and predominately moto-inspired merchandise. This stuff is so cool and heavily influenced by the relaxed California cool we all try to emulate (come on, admit it, we all do it). There are men’s tees and hats emblazoned with their motto, “freedom riders,” board shorts, button-down cotton shirts, utility jackets and grooming products from Juniper Ridge and Baxter. This is gritty (in a good way), bad-ass clothing. I’m not talking California rainbows and “surf’s up” bullshit. Their vibe is a little rock & roll, rambler, moto and Americana. Whether you’re going to work, motoring around town or just hanging out, let the Stockist be your source for your everyday clothing essentials. Step in the back to get down and dirty. n Follow Christa: @phillytoslc

@christazaro

Check out both the relaxed and the gritty at California-inspired Iron & Resin

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n Herschel Studio Collection Sutton Duffel, waterproof and made with tarpaulin: $100. This bag is so fierce, and it’s definitely unisex. n Levi’s Made and Crafted Thumb Tack Slim Jeans: $178. Manager Brett Devereaux reports men’s cropped tapered jeans are in for fall. Also, the Made and Crafted line is like the G Wagon of Levi’s—high-end, hard to get and you won’t find them anywhere else in this city. n The Journeyman Wallet from Tanner Goods: $60 n Washed Oxford Button-Down by Apolis: $124 n Magazines: Kinfolk $18, Man of the World Limited Edition: $35


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) The Latin motto “Carpe diem” shouldn’t be translated as “Seize the day,” says author Nicholson Baker. It’s not a battle cry exhorting you to “freaking grab the day in your fist like a burger at a fairground and take a big chomping bite out of it.” The proper translation, according to Baker, is “Pluck the day.” In other words, “you should gently pull on the day’s stem, as if it were a wildflower, holding it with all the practiced care of your thumb and the side of your finger, which knows how to not crush easily crushed things—so that the day’s stem undergoes increasing tension and draws to a tightness, and then snaps softly away at its weakest point, and the flower is released in your hand.” Keep that in mind, Aries. I understand you are often tempted to seize rather than pluck, but these days plucking is the preferable approach. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) When I talk about “The Greatest Story Never Told,” I’m not referring to the documentary film about singer Lana Del Rey or the debut album of the rap artist Saigon or any other cultural artifact. I am, instead, referring to a part of your past that you have never owned and understood . . . a phase from the old days that you have partially suppressed . . . an intense set of memories you have not fully integrated. I say it’s time for you to deal with this shadow. You’re finally ready to acknowledge it and treasure it as a crucial thread in the drama of your hero’s journey.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Actress and musician Carrie Brownstein was born with five planets in Libra. Those who aren’t conversant with astrology’s mysteries may conclude that she is a connoisseur of elegance and harmony. Even professional stargazers who know how tricky it is to make generalizations might speculate that she is skilled at cultivating balance, attuned to the needs of others, excited by beauty, and adaptive to life’s ceaseless change. So what are we to make of the fact that Brownstein has said, “I really don’t know what to do when my life is not chaotic”? Here’s what I suspect: In her ongoing exertions to thrive on chaos, she is learning how to be a connoisseur of elegance and harmony as she masters the intricacies of being balanced, sensitive to others, thrilled by beauty, and adaptive to change. This is important for you to hear about right now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You’re entering a volatile phase of your cycle. In the coming weeks, you could become a beguiling monster who leaves a confusing mess in your wake. On the other hand, you could activate the full potential of your animal intelligence as you make everything you touch more interesting and soulful. I am, of course, rooting for the latter outcome. Here’s a secret about how to ensure it: Be as ambitious to gain power over your own darkness as you are to gain power over what happens on your turf.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Charles Darwin is best known for his book The Origin of Species, which contains his seminal ideas about evolutionary biology. But while he was still alive, his best-seller was The Formation of Vegetable Mould Through the Action of Worms. The painstaking result of over forty years’ worth of research, it is a tribute to the noble earthworm and that creature’s crucial role in the health of soil and plants. It provides a different angle on one of Darwin’s central concerns: how small, incremental transformations that take place over extended periods of time can have monumental effects. This also happens to be one of your key themes in the coming months.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) A philanthropist offered $100,000 to the Girl Scouts chapter of western Washington. But there were strings attached. The donor specified that the money couldn’t be used to support transgender girls. The Girl Scouts rejected the gift, declaring their intention to empower every girl “regardless of her gender identity, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.” Do you have that much spunk, Capricorn? Would you turn down aid that would infringe on your integrity? You may be tested soon. Here’s what I suspect: If you are faithful to your deepest values, even if that has a cost, you will ultimately attract an equal blessing that doesn’t require you to sell out. (P.S. The Girl Scouts subsequently launched an Indiegogo campaign that raised more than $300,000.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A researcher at the University of Amsterdam developed software to read the emotions on faces. He used it to analyze the expression of the woman in Leonardo da Vinci’s famous painting, the Mona Lisa. The results suggest that she is 83 percent happy, 9 percent disgusted, 6 percent fearful, and 2 percent angry. Whether or not this assessment is accurate, I appreciate its implication that we humans are rarely filled with a single pure emotion. We often feel a variety of states simultaneously. In this spirit, I have calculated your probably mix for the coming days: 16 percent relieved, 18 percent innocent, 12 percent confused, 22 percent liberated, 23 percent ambitious, and 9 percent impatient.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Over 10,000 species of mushrooms grow in North America. About 125 of those, or 1.25 percent, are tasty and safe to eat. All the others are unappetizing or poisonous, or else their edibility is in question. By my reckoning, a similar statistical breakdown should apply to the influences that are floating your way. I advise you to focus intently on those very few that you know for a fact are pleasurable and vitalizing. Make yourself unavailable for the rest.

JULY 23, 2015 | 53

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “What makes you heroic?” asked philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Here’s how he answered himself: “simultaneously going out to meet your highest suffering and your highest hope.” This is an excellent way to sum up the test that would inspire you most in the coming weeks, Virgo. Are you up for the challenge? If so, grapple with your deepest pain. Make a fierce effort to both heal it and be motivated by it. At the same time, identify your brightest hope and take a decisive step toward fulfilling it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Consider the possibility of opening your mind, at least briefly, to provocative influences you have closed yourself off from. You may need to refamiliarize yourself with potential resources you have been resisting or ignoring, even if they are problematic. I’m not saying you should blithely welcome them in. There still may be good reasons to keep your distance. But I think it would be wise and healthy for you to update your relationship with them.

| COMMUNITY |

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) I’m a big fan of the attitude summed up by the command “Be here now!” The world would be more like a sanctuary and less like a battleground if people focused more on the present moment rather than on memories of the past and fantasies of the future. But in accordance with the astrological omens, you are hereby granted a temporary exemption from the “Be here how!” approach. You have a poetic license to dream and scheme profusely about what you want your life to be like in the future. Your word of power is tomorrow.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20) The ancient Greek philosopher Thales is credited as being one of the earliest mathematicians and scientists. He was a deep thinker whose thirst for knowledge was hard to quench. Funny story: Once he went out at night for a walk. Gazing intently up at the sky, he contemplated the mysteries of the stars. Oops! He didn’t watch where he was going, and fell into a well. He was OK, but embarrassed. Let’s make him your anti-role model, Gemini. I would love to encourage you to unleash your lust to be informed, educated, and inspired—but only if you watch where you’re going.


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54 | JULY 23, 2015

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n meetings this past month, the topic of affordable housing came up within 15 minutes of the opening prayer or the gavel coming down. Given that I specialize in affordable housing, I listened to comments people made, including, “We need more affordable housing!” Affordable housing is housing deemed affordable to those with a median household income as rated by a country, a state, region or municipality by a recognized Housing Affordability Index. Area median income is determined by the federal Department of Housing & Urban Development, based on U.S. census data. The median family income in the Salt Lake County area for 2015 is $72,200, and for Utah, overall, it’s $59,770. If you purchase a home, basic lender math takes one third of your gross pay per month from your total income to determine what your maximum house payment can be each month. That’s not counting debts you may carry. Using that rule of thumb (mind you, it’s not scientific but a generalization for example purposes), a Salt Lake County family making $72,200 would bring home $6,000 a month, allowing for a $2,000-per-month house payment. If current mortgage rates are hovering around 4.5 percent annually, and you bought a home with a $400,000 mortgage, you’d have a principle/interest payment of $2,026.74 per month. That’s a nice house buy! None of the folks in my meetings this past month presented themselves as homeless and living at a shelter, so obviously, most folks have a roof over their heads and can afford it. I think what people were really getting at was that they’d like their housing to be more affordable and to have more options. Sadly, that’s not going to happen given the fees that are charged to developers. Why? Local governments often have impact fees they charge to developers on every unit built—and that’s on top of permits, inspections, tests and construction costs. Owners have no incentive to build low-income housing with these fees added on to building costs. Despite what some believe, there is no rule in most areas in Utah that a home builder or developer has to devote any percentage of new projects to low-income housing. This is coming forward in Park City, where the city required Ivory Homes to set aside about one third of its new housing project for employees of Intermountain Healthcare to bid on first. Park City has a goal to make 7 percent of its housing stock affordable by 2020. n [Editor’s note: Babs De Lay is a candidate for Salt Lake City Council District 4.] Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff.

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City Weekly July 23, 2015  

Who Gets to Laugh?

City Weekly July 23, 2015  

Who Gets to Laugh?