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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY

CHESTERFIELD, U.S.A.

Welcome to the unsung rural heartland that you’ve never heard of, just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

16 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 21 A&E 30 DINE 38 CINEMA 42 TRUE TV 43 MUSIC 59 COMMUNITY

SENIOR STAFF WRITER STEPHEN DARK

Stephen Dark worked as a reporter in the U.K. before falling in love with Argentina in the mid-’90s, only to be driven out in 2004 along with his family by social and economic instability. He is the 2015 recipient of the Best Reporter award from the Society of Professional Journalists Utah Headliners Chapter.

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LETTERS Don’t Roll That Way

We all know how bad the air can get along the Wasatch Front. There are all kinds of suggestions about what to do about it. But there’s one idea I haven’t heard anyone talk about. It really bothers me that no one has said anything about diesel pickup trucks. The majority don’t put out that much exhaust, but some do. In fact, some of them are outright offensive. These guys (and I say “guys” because they nearly all are men) are idiots who are protesting Obama’s energy agenda. They are known as “coal rollers.” They purposely adjust their engines to put out more exhaust. I think the Legislature needs to pass a law against this. We did away with second-hand smoke. How about we do away with second-hand exhaust? 

BRENT DAYLEY Santaquin

City Intolerant of Drought-Tolerant Plants

In the past two years, we removed the grass from our parking strip, because we felt it would be the water-wise thing to do. We put in Jupiter’s beard, Russian sage and many other drought-tolerant plants, along with a drip system. Now Herriman City has left a notice to inform us that we are in violation of the city code for parking strips and that we have two days to remove the plants or they will return and remove them..

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes. Our neighbors always comment on how much they like our yard, and we thought we were doing the right thing in a drought-prone state.

WILLIAM HULL Herriman

Life After Obergefell

A major battle in America’s culture war has ended. Sort of. In Obergefell v. Hodges, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples are constitutionally entitled to state marriage licenses under the 14th Amendment’s equal-protection and due-process clauses. Opponents of marriage apartheid celebrate; opponents of same-sex marriage mourn. I fall into the former camp, but I understand the concerns of those who find the ruling devastating. Here are a few tips on how to deal with it: First, if you oppose same-sex marriage, don’t marry someone of the same sex. Pretty easy, right? This isn’t as bad as you’re trying to make it out to be. You’re still perfectly free to be heterosexual and marry someone of the opposite sex. Second, if you are a government employee involved in the issuance of marriage licenses and your religious beliefs keep you from issuing those licenses to same-sex couples, quit and go find work in the private sector. You’re entitled to your religious beliefs. You’re not entitled to a government paycheck for refusing to do your job. Third, if you are a private-sector worker whose job involves weddings—caterer, baker, florist,

photographer or what have you—and your beliefs forbid you to participate in same-sex weddings, by all means stand your ground. Yes, there will be malicious, vexatious and frivolous litigation for awhile as activists try to legally enslave you. But those of us who really support marriage freedom support your freedom, too. We’ll stand with you and defend your rights. You will win out. The only differences post-Obergefell are that same-sex couples now fill out the same paperwork and pay the same fees as heterosexual couples, and for their trouble, are now entitled to the same state recognitions (benefits and penalties).

THOMAS L. KNAPP Gainesville, Fla.

Correction: In the July 2 issue of City Weekly, an incorrect venue was given for a July 2 Night Demon show in the Music Live column and concert listings. The correct venue should have been Club X. A concert date for Falling in Reverse was also incorrect. The band performed in Murray on June 3.

STAFF Business/Office

Publisher JOHN SALTAS General Manager ANDY SUTCLIFFE

Accounting Manager CODY WINGET Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Office Administrator CELESTE NELSON Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

Editorial

Interim Editor JERRE WROBLE Managing Editor BRANDON BURT Digital Editor BILL FROST Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writers COLBY FRAZIER, ERIC S. PETERSON Copy Editor TIFFANY FRANDSEN Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Interns DEREK EDWARDS, ROBBY POFFENBERGER Columnists KATHARINE BIELE, TED SCHEFFLER Editorial Assistants SAM FLORENCE, ABBY REES, MIKEY SALTAS, JACK SWILLINGER

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Contributors CECIL ADAMS, DEANN ARMES, DANNY BOWES, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, MARYANN JOHANSON, BRIAN STAKER, JACOB STRINGER, ROLAND SWEET, JOHN TAYLOR, CHRISTA ZARO Production

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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Road Home

It was really nice to see my favorite Utah governor of the past several years, Gary Herbert, welcome the Pancretan Association of America (PAA) convention to Salt Lake City last week. It was as warm a welcome as one can expect, considering he was speaking to a group he knows little about. Hell, Greeks generally don’t know a whole lot about their Cretan brothers and sisters outside the fact that they throw legendary parties. Herbert was thus an unwitting partner to unleashing on Salt Lake City a party for the ages. Don’t ask. Besides playing nice when being handed accolades from local dignitaries, Cretans also live longer than other Greeks (except maybe persons living on the island of Ikaria), eat more garden greens, consider snails a dinner main course, drink more moonshine (called tsikoudia), herd more goats (which yield both meat and the best cheese in Greece), dance longer and faster, and fire off more rounds of ammunition after weddings or on holidays than does the Utah National Guard during a war games practice. Crete’s beaches are legendary. Zorba and Zeus both called Crete their home. Crete’s mountains rise to nearly 9,000 feet from sea level to mountaintop in barely a few miles, similar to our own Wasatch Front backdrop. More than 100 years ago, thousands of Cretan men and boys—my grandfather among them in 1906—began arriving in Utah to work the coal and copper fields. To some, Utah looked a bit like home. It took my grandfather 27 days to reach America. Seventeen days were aboard a crowded, stinky and dark steamer. One day was for processing at Ellis Island, where a doctor marked his back with a pen, which scared him, since he didn’t know what it meant. He was slid off to the side to join others with the same mark. He found out what it meant when he and the others with the same mark were provided directions to the trains heading west. He was so relieved he cried. He never set foot in New York City, just Ellis Island, but set off across New Jersey, on through Chicago, over the Great Plains and ending up in East Car-

bon, Utah—the community of Sunnyside— on Day 27. The very next morning, he was digging coal with “100 boys from my veeelage.” He left his village of Gavalohori at age 20. He never returned to Crete—a word that brought tears to his eyes every time he spoke of his dear island, “Kriti.” All Cretans know those tears. When he died at age 94, he’d seen everything there was to see about the great Greek migration into the American West. A few years after his arrival, a survey revealed that Greeks comprised around 10 percent of Utah’s population. A few years more and World War I broke out, and he enlisted in the U.S. Army, though he was not yet an American citizen. A few years after that, he married a local girl in Vernal, Utah, the granddaughter of a Mormon Battalion member. Pioneers, both. A few years later, it was back to Carbon County, then finally to the copper mines of Bingham Canyon, where he raised his family. By any measure, he was a good man, a defiant Cretan and a proud American. He wore a suit and tie on Election Day. Yet, many of the locals didn’t take to him or his kind. The newspapers of the era were full of horror stories about the swarthy, unkempt men from southern Europe who were taking Utah jobs away from Utah boys, living 10 to a room in small boarding houses, spending whatever money they didn’t send back home on brothel girls and whiskey. Those scorned men were Utah’s first Italians, Slavs, Austrians and Greeks. And many in Utah didn’t much care for them. Go back 100 years and substitute the word “Mexican” for “Greek” in the headlines, and you have Donald Trump decades before his hair went to crap. Some things never change.

B Y J O H N S A LTA S

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

@johnsaltas

Fear is one of those things. It’s a fact of American politics that for political gain, the most vulnerable are treated with spite and distrust. Every immigrant family knows how hard it was for the first Greeks to come over, how poorly they were treated. How poorly? Well, being paid in scrip, working in the most unsafe conditions (hundreds of Greeks would die in industrial accidents in the Western coalfields and mines), knowing you could lose your job for any reason and not being welcomed into the mainstream culture were bad enough. But when crosses were burned on high hillsides by local elements of the Ku Klux Klan, it became clear that Utah was not the embodiment of the phrase, “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” If you’re gay, it still isn’t, in the governor’s “disappointed” eyes, by the way. The Cretans were especially used to bullies and to the imposed rules and biases of a religious order—when my grandfather arrived in Utah, Crete was still under Ottoman Turk (Muslim) dominion. He left his home, where Cretans fought for 400 years to keep their Christian identity, only to be told here that they were basically non-Christian apes. Say, what? These locals, they thought, are not so different, with their multiple wives, than was the harem culture they left behind. They fought back. In time, they won. So, it was with some awe—and wonderment of what my grandfather would make of it—that Utah’s governor was welcoming 1,000 swarthy Cretans to Salt Lake City. I’d be lying if I didn’t wonder if the governor’s ancestors were among those who didn’t treat the Cretans—all Greeks and southern Europeans—so kindly 100 years ago, and what an irony that would be. CW

OVER 100 YEARS AGO, THOUSANDS OF CRETAN MEN AND BOYS—MY GRANDFATHER AMONG THEM IN 1906—BEGAN ARRIVING IN UTAH TO WORK THE COAL AND COPPER FIELDS.

Describe a time you were a newcomer. Scott Renshaw:

When I moved from California 18 years ago, wondering if I’d ever find caffeinated soda (this was an actual thing I thought about Utah). We moved into our Sandy neighborhood, and a neighbor came by to welcome us, asked if we had kids, and—after we said no—literally never spoke to us again.

Mason Rodrickc: Apparently, there used to be a regular “Furry” gathering at The Coffee Break. I was hungover there one morning, and I watched a tough-looking dude in a cowboy hat walk in. He looked around in disgust, walked to a red kangaroo, chest out, as though he were about to punch the guy. Instead, he ripped the costume head off and made out with the man in the kangaroo outfit. I was ... surprised.

Jeff Chipian: ​Our boat docked in Crete,

Greece, around 4 a.m. We set up deals with three cabbies and accidentally got in the wrong cab. After multiple threatening phone calls, the cab driver turned around and we were met by soldiers with rifles, who were yelling at said cab driver. Cab drivers in Greece are serious about their cab rides. Don’t get into a cab after making a deal with another.

Brandon Burt: At age 3, I was terrified the day Mom first dropped me off at the Happy Times Nursery School. I waited in line to take my turn on the swing, but before I’d been on for 30 seconds, an impatient girl named Robin bit me! Hard! Then she pushed me off the swing. I knew then that girls are bad news.

Josh Scheuerman: In the Belize jungle, we drove past a sign declaring, “Snake Man!” Apparently, one can make a living capturing wild, deadly snakes and asking tourists to pose with them wrapped around their necks. Strange land, indeed.

6 | JULY 9, 2015

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As Utah goes wild with its love of coal and extractive industries in general, the rest of the world is laying claim to renewables. “Actual solar electricity production in the United States is 50 percent higher than previous estimates,” a Scientific American article says. And a Deseret News article quotes the governor’s Office of Energy Development, saying Utah will see billions of dollars in new solar investments over the next 18 months. Wind, solar and biofuels are growing 5 percent every year. Sadly for air quality, biofuels and wood still remain a huge portion of the energy mix. Biomass electricity is heavily subsidized as a “green” alternative—but it pollutes more than coal does, according to a study by the Partnership for Policy Integrity. HEAL Utah believes Utah can generate all its electricity needs with renewables by 2050. The state should make this a priority.

Losing the Green

Salt Lake City’s growing anxiety over population growth must be clouding its vision for the future. Where’s the green space in downtown Salt Lake City? If you’ve driven downtown recently, you can see apartments rising on just about every available piece of land. This, according to a July 5 Salt Lake Tribune article, is at the expense of open, green space. Professor and urban planner Stephen Goldsmith notes development in Sugar House, with its emphasis on community plazas, has been positive, but downtown doesn’t have much to offer. Transit development calls for more and more high-rises, and developers seem to push the envelope, bringing buildings close to the street. The city needs to see that people need friendly open space as well as multiple-unit housing.

The Tippling Point

Here’s a toast to Gov. Gary Herbert, who’s hired an outof-state consultant to help with a 90-day review of state liquor-store operations. This comes on the heels of complaints from customers and former employees who were perplexed by cutbacks and a computerized ordering system that limits stock. Utah Sen. Karen Mayne, D-Salt Lake City, is moving ahead with legislation to address the problems. Meanwhile, the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission released numbers showing a 7.6 percent jump in purchases of alcoholic beverages. The powers that be see this only as an increase in drunks, rather than casual drinkers who make up the majority. Despite market growth, the Legislature cut DABC’s budget by $500,000.

Mormon feminist firebrand Kate Kelly helped found Ordain Women and—until July 4 when she resigned from it—served on its 11-member board. The organization has put pressure on The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, asking that it to give women the ability to officiate in the church’s priesthood. Her actions earned her notoriety in the LDS community, and she was excommunicated from the church in June 2014. Kelly now lives in Kenya with her husband, where she continues to fight as a human-rights attorney. (Read more of this interview at CityWeekly.net.)

I’m jealous of the wildlife photos and fabric patterns on your Instagram feed. What’s the coolest thing about living in Kenya?

The best thing about living in Kenya (aside from regularly seeing giraffes and zebras) is that it’s a wonderful place for creative people. There are fantastic things happening here in art, fashion, music and food. If you can think of something in your head, it can happen here.

What’s the best thing about being ‘post-Mormon’?

Freedom—particularly freedom of thought. You are free to say what you really think and feel. What a simple, but liberating thing that is. It’s delicious.

You’re scheduled to speak at the upcoming Sunstone Symposium (July 29-Aug. 1). Is there a speaker you are looking forward to hearing from?

I would love to hear Michael Ferguson’s talk on “The Religious Brain Project” and the biology of personal religious experience Friday night. Ferguson is not only a bright neuroscientist, but he also started the group Queer Mormons. He’s a Mormon agitator I really respect.

How do you feel about being canonized as a character in Salt Lake Acting Co.’s Saturday’s Voyeur?

It’s very surreal to become a parody and to be such a part of the zeitgeist in Mormon and Utah culture. “Be portrayed as a character in a musical comedy” was never on my bucket list but, now, I’ll pencil it in and cross it off. Because it’s awesome.

What would you say to people who think that Mormon progressives should vote with their feet?

For the most part, I agree, actually. For many, many women, the safer and more peaceful choice it to leave the LDS Church. Life outside the church is abundant and full of amazing opportunities without the cognitive dissonance. If you feel compelled to leave the church, definitely follow that impulse. It can be a very healthy, loving choice for you and your family. However, many people have lots of good reasons to stay. Some are positive: family, community, culture, shared values, etc.; some are very negative: fear, ostracization, lethargy, lack of options, etc. I understand why many women choose not to leave. After all, I didn’t leave by choice! There is no one true way to dismantle patriarchy. It will take people both on the inside [and the outside] continuing to agitate, and people leaving to mark their dissent.

—BY DEREK EDWARDS comments@cityweekly.net


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Office

Republican candidates appear to be coming out of the woodwork every day. Do these people actually all think they can win? Does running for the presidency as a low-profile candidate make any logical sense, or are all these people slightly insane? —Warren McLean

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It’s true that the 2016 list of presidential candidates is growing more unwieldy by the hour. Through last week, the tally of people who’ve filed a Form 2 statement of candidacy with the Federal Election Commission is 424. These include a Federalist Party candidate, an Absolute Dictator Party candidate, and an independent (likely in more ways than one) named Sydneys Voluptuous Buttocks. But perhaps these aren’t the kind of candidates you’re talking about. Mr. or Ms. Buttocks probably understands that he or she’s not going to win, but Republican George Pataki may well not know that. And as a result, he’ll probably spend serious time and money trying in vain to convince the rest of us. So what makes the Patakis run? OK, some of the borderline candidates are just megalomaniacs with a seeming ability to metabolize derision (we’re looking at you, Donald). But the rest of the ever-expanding field is likely thinking: maybe I can actually win this thing, and if not, the boost in cred alone is probably worth it. Those who believe they stand a chance of winning at least the nomination aren’t totally nuts: The primaries are perhaps the only part of the presidential election cycle where the campaign really matters. The post-convention phase of the process, according to many political scientists, is determined by some combination of the state of the economy and the perceived performance of the incumbent party. (It’s thought this basic principle may be true of elections worldwide.) So on this theory, all the oratory, charisma, and excruciating interviews with Katie Couric didn’t really matter—Obama was going to beat McCain in 2008 anyway, because Bush was unpopular and the economy was exploding like a cat in a microwave. The primaries, though, remain relatively open and competitive, for two major reasons: First, starting with the 1976 election, the government has matched the funds of any candidates who manage to raise at least $5,000 in 20 separate states, with a maximum amount per individual donor of $250. This funding lasts only as long as the candidate can maintain at least 10 percent of the vote in the two most recent primaries, but often candidates go all-in on the early contests anyway because of the second reason: studies have shown that a crucial factor in voters’ decision-making processes (as significant as intrinsic candidate preference) is whether a candidate is seen as electable. Which means those who show well in the early going, even if they trailed in polls and/or fundraising (though see below) before the primaries

SLUG SIGNORINO

started, tend to become even more appealing to voters going forward, and also attract more money. This was certainly true in 2008: Clinton’s polling lead of 20 percentage points shrank immediately after Obama’s surprising performance on Super Tuesday. What’s more, the margins of return on this tendency are exponentially greater the less is known about a candidate beforehand. The big caveat to all this is that there’s a limit to how dark-horsey one can safely be, even during pre-primary season. The legislation that introduced matching funds also tried to limit total campaign spending, but the Supreme Court struck that part down, and since then the cost of campaigning has skyrocketed: 2012’s presidential race cost $2.6 billion. So winning the nomination is still quite rare if you aren’t making it rain: Since 1976, there have only been two cases where the candidate with the most money on the eve of the primaries didn’t win the party nomination, and both times the candidate who did—Obama and Jimmy Carter—was still in the top five, fundswise. In other words, you have to start at a certain base level of popularity to hold your own financially, even at the beginning of the race. If you do manage to make it out of the convention, you’re at least in position to hope the economy and the incumbent’s approval rating conspire to put you in the White House. But even if you don’t wind up as the nominee, going through the candidacy process can clearly be an excellent career move. Howard Dean flunked out of the 2004 primaries, but he got elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee. Newt Gingrich parlayed his 2012 run into a high-profile (if short-lived) gig with CNN. Joe Biden, of course, became vice president—hey, whatever floats your boat. With at least 15 recognizable names already in the Republican pack, obviously most of them aren’t going to reach the top level of fundraising success that equates with viability, so a lot of these people are playing for soapbox time now and speaking fees later. Is that enough payout to warrant, say, eight months of grueling travel, degrading debate formats, and New Hampshire cuisine, not to mention the possible revelation of any extramarital affairs you’re having? I’m comfortable with “slightly insane” if you are.

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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NEWS Grave Matters

BUSINESS

“I personally will take great satisfaction in that the cemetery will outlast me, and no private corporation will ever get its hands on it.” —Pleasant Green Cemetery caretaker Hiram Bertoch

An indie cemetery in Magna faces criticism for lack of transparency. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @colbyfrazierlp

COLBY FRAZIER

E

ngulfed by sunburned cheatgrass, mostly bare of trees and surrounded by a copper-mining enterprise that has sustained the west end of the Salt Lake Valley for generations, the Pleasant Green Cemetery looks and feels much as it did when its first burial took place in 1883. It is one of the last cemeteries in the state to allow the dead to enter the ground in receptacles other than caskets. A year and a half ago, one person was buried in a cardboard box. And, unlike most cemeteries, there is no stipulation requiring concrete vaults to prevent the ground from settling around caskets. Those with loved ones lying in the cemetery maintain their own plots, and can do much to honor their dead: They can pour concrete around the grave sites, erect iron and cinderblock fences, place benches and chairs, and plant trees. And on the other hand, as evidenced by some long-forgotten graves covered over by grass, the living can do as little as they’d like. This freedom of expression in disposing of and honoring the dead is what makes the Pleasant Green Cemetery a fiercely beloved 8-acre patch of ground on the outskirts of Magna, where 3500 South terminates at a ribbon of railroad track, and all the land—with the exception of the cemetery—belongs to mining magnates. The cemetery was operated for a century by a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ward before being handed over to a cemetery volunteer, who ran it for nearly three decades before handing it off to another volunteer. Now it has become embroiled in a controversy pitting plot owners and other community members against Hiram Bertoch, the cemetery’s most recent caretaker. Mismanagement, lack of transparency and absence of communication are some of the complaints that have flown against the cemetery. This controversy made its way onto the pages of The Magna Times in May when the customary American flags failed to be placed on the grounds. “My concern as a citizen is that the flags weren’t up on Memorial Day,” says Richard Elliott, co-publisher of The Magna Times. “That just really ticked me off.” But the crux of the controversy seems to hinge on how Bertoch, who took the

Relatives of the deceased buried at Pleasant Green Cemetery can do as much—or as little—as they wish to honor their dead. reins of the cemetery five years ago, has managed the inner workings of the Pleasant Green Cemetery Preservation and Development Association, which supposedly runs the place. The association has a 35-page list of bylaws on its website that currently stipulates that the board of trustees contain eight members. Documents filed with the state of Utah show that—in addition to Bertoch, who is the board president— other members include his wife, Anna Bertoch; his mother, Judy Bertoch; and his father, Henry Bertoch. On July 1, a person named Hannah Bertoch was listed as the board’s director, but later that afternoon, she had been removed from the list. According to Hiram, the woman was a distant relative whose address on the state form was the same as his and his wife’s. The other four board members include people who have multiple generations buried in the cemetery, he says. Fanning the flames of distrust against Bertoch is his unwillingness to tell people who is on the board. In an interview with City Weekly, he declined to name its members, saying the board had voted to remain anonymous. Jim Nicholes, a longtime cemetery volunteer whose parents and grandparents are buried at Pleasant Green, has become the most vocal critic of Bertoch’s management. At one time, Nicholes, who donated a flagpole and has completed numerous back-breaking tasks at the cemetery over the years, seemed poised to take the reins from Bertoch. But Nicholes says he declined Bertoch’s offer to join the board and take over the cemetery when it became clear that Bertoch wouldn’t let him get hold of the cemetery’s books. “He turned everything over but the books,” says Nicholes. “He wants me to do all the work, but he don’t want me to see the books. I don’t really want the

cemetery. I just want somebody with more transparency.” Bertoch, though, says his disagreement with Nicholes came to a boil when he made it clear that Nicholes wouldn’t be running the cemetery; the board would. And if Nicholes wanted access to the books, all he needed to do was take Bertoch up on his offer to join the board. The board, Bertoch says, is the only entity that can look at the cemetery’s finances. “That is inappropriate for them to expect to see everything,” Bertoch says. “The individual who’s saying that we’re not financially transparent was invited to be on the board.” The board, Bertoch says, meets once per year. According to its bylaws, the meeting must take place before Memorial Day. According to Bertoch, the cemetery, far from being mismanaged, is being managed better than ever. He says hundreds of volunteers show up each year to work on projects, and a pair of laborers and grave diggers, ages 18 and 21, are hard workers. But there is one key area where Bertoch takes particular pride: The cemetery, he says, will never fall into the hands of a corporation or funeral home because the board has taken measures to ensure its independent future. “I personally will take great satisfaction in that the cemetery will outlast me, and no private corporation will ever get its hands on it,” he says. This may provide satisfaction to Bertoch, but it provides little comfort to Nicholes and other critics who feel that Bertoch is the problem, not the solution. Todd Richards, a member of the Magna Town Council, says residents have expressed frustration over Bertoch’s failure to respond to queries about plot purchases, as well as his refusal to disclose who serves on the board.

“There’s a board of directors, but he won’t tell who’s on the board of directors,” Richards says. “I know people have had a hard time getting a hold of him to buy plots for people. At this point, it’s been kind of a mess.” Rick Zern, a funeral director at the Peel Funeral Home in Magna, says that although the funeral home has no involvement with the cemetery, it often receives complaints from frustrated residents. Zern says the ability of a funeralhome director to get along well with a cemetery is integral to ensuring a smooth burial and funeral experience for the bereaved. But in the case of Pleasant Green, this “doesn’t happen, because they put roadblocks up for us so that we can’t help the families in need.” Chief among these roadblocks, and high on the list of complaints from residents, Zern says, is the inability to reach Bertoch when he’s needed. Bertoch, though, insists that he can be reached. And he says he’s willing to meet with critics any time—in person or by telephone. He points out that his position at the cemetery is largely voluntary. The association brings in $20,000 in a good year, he says—all of which is pumped back into the cemetery. The veil of secrecy that Bertoch uses to run the cemetery, and the inability to get answers to their questions, though, is what seems to irk Nicholes and other critics most. As he sat last week near the graves of his parents, Nicholes noted that Bertoch likes to say that the cemetery is owned by the families buried there—a stipulation that would rank Nicholes, who has several generations of ancestors buried there, high on the list of being kept in the loop. “All I really want from him is to do the job and be accountable to the public,” Nicholes says. “All I want is accountability.” CW


NEWS M E D I A M AT T E R S The News Club The Salt Lake Tribune experiments with digital memberships. BY ERIC S. PETERSON epeterson@cityweekly.net @ericspeterson

NIKI CHAN

T

Tribune editor and publisher Terry Orme is brainstorming ways to bring cash in for his news operation.

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“We’d say, ‘Hey, look … come out on Saturday morning. We’ll feed you and we can talk politics. You can tell us how full of crap we are because of our election coverage’— that sort of thing,” Orme says. Richard Hanley, a professor of journalism at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut, says this “value-added” kind of paywall is being tested at a variety of newspapers, including The New York Times, which gives its members opportunities to rub elbows with sports athletes, famous authors and political newsmakers. Such efforts have met with mixed results: “The jury is still out,” Hanley says. The Times paywall members “get into these big events with heavy hitters, newsmakers— it’s the insider’s perspective,” Hanley says. “There’s a certain allure to that, but for local newspapers, I don’t know if the celebrity roster is such that it can sustain that model.” This model also presents another challenge: adding the role of entertainer to journalists’ already stacked workload. Orme, however, says that, so far, Trib reporters have been willing to go the extra mile with such events, though he hopes it doesn’t add too much of a burden. “The big danger is that we’re burning people to a cinder,” Orme says. “That’s not just in our newsroom, but all newsrooms.” Orme only expects around 1 percent or fewer of the site’s unique visitors to sign up for a membership. But no matter how small that number, all the funds go to help support the newsroom and help journalists do their jobs better. The move is a gamble, but Orme hopes it’s one that readers will bet on when it comes to supporting the Trib’s role in propping up the Fourth Estate in Utah. “I’m confident in saying that no one has really figured digital advertising out,” Orme says. “So I think it’s a good time to try something new and play on the goodwill of readers, and the fact that people do want to support us.” CW

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he Salt Lake Tribune, like many other daily newspapers, has struggled to figure out how to squeeze a dollar or two from the digital desert of online ad revenues in order to help offset the costs of its online edition. Now, the Trib wants to sell readers exclusive online memberships that would come with special-event invitations and access to an ad-free site where members can read the news without being waylaid by pop-ups or surveys about what kinds of jeans they buy. Whether that “Save-the-Trib” mentality translates into meaningful revenue for the paper, however, is another matter—especially as some media experts question whether such voluntary paywall models can be successful on the local level. To paywall or not to paywall has been a troubling question for the nation’s media bosses, many of whom have seen meager gains in online ad revenue. According to the Pew Research Center’s “State of the Media” report released in April 2015, digital ad revenue across all media grew 18 percent from 2013 to 2014. Unfortunately, the legacy news industry, which includes newspapers like The Tribune, has barely a sliver of that revenue pie. Instead, according to the Pew Center, five technology companies took in half of all display-ad revenue, with Facebook alone accounting for 24 percent of that pie. Tribune editor and publisher Terry Orme says he considered the idea of charging all online readers for content but realized that “we’d take a terrific hit in [web] traffic”— especially when stacked up against competitors like the Deseret News and KSL.com. Instead, the model the Trib is now rolling out will be purely optional. A “premium” $9.99 per-month membership gives readers access to the ad-free site and invitations to special events, while a “sustaining” $4.99 per-month member would receive only special-event access. Orme says the program would expand on the town-hall events the Trib has held in the past, such as its forum on police use of force, or a recent “What Mormon Women Want” event the paper hosted at the Salt Lake City Main Library. Orme says other events would be more hands-on: For instance, a photography class where members could come to the office one day to learn photography basics from Trib photographers and then go out on another day to shoot pictures in Memory Grove. Food writer Kathy Stephenson could teach members how to cook up a mean dish of baklava. Or, members could have a cup of coffee and breakfast with Pat Bagley, other editorial columnists and even Orme himself.


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CITIZEN REVOLT

THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

D I N I N G · B EST O F U TA H · N I G H T L I F E AC T I V I T I ES · W E L L N ESS · S E RV I C ES H OT E LS & T R AV E L · R EC R E AT I O N · R E TA I L · T I C k E TS W/ LOW O R N O F E ES

@bill_frost

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

CONFERENCES cityweeklystore.com

League of United Latin American Citizens National Convention With the theme Familia: The Building Blocks of Our Community, the 86th annual convention & exposition addresses pressing issues for the Latino community, including immigration, civic engagement/voting and education. All events (except meal events) are free and open to the public, including a concert Thursday, July 9, featuring Latin Grammy Award-winning Norteño artist Michael Salgado and American Chicano rock powertrio Los Lonely Boys. Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, July 7-11, LULAC.org/convention

TRAINING & WORKSHOPS

Eight other things Gov. Gary Herbert is “disappointed” about besides the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling:

8. The disappearance of the

Saturday-morning cartoon block.

7. Mr. Mac’s insistence that

Herbert is no longer eligible for the “Missionary Package” discount.

6. Also, that the term

“Missionary Package” now sounds like a gay thing.

5. The back-to-back

cancellations of the Nickelback tour and the Hello Kitty festival.

4. Super Big Gulps are now 40 ounces, not 44: “What’s ‘Super’ about that?!”

3. The Mitt Romney meme “Why don’t poor people just buy more money?” wasn’t real; plausible.

2. Just narrowly missing his dream of living out the classic Pauly Shore movie Jury Duty.

1. Acme Toupee Co. no longer makes his favorite model, “The Rugged Gentleman.”

Leadership Utah Fellowship The Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office of Diversity & Human Rights (ODHR) and the Human Rights Commission are seeking applicants for the annual Leadership Utah Fellowship open to SLC residents who are members of a diverse community. During the 10-month program, fellowship recipients learn how to access and utilize a multitude of community resources and gain insight into civic leadership. Application deadline is July 13. More info at SLCGov.com/ODHR/Events Grants Workshop Need a grant for your grassroots group? The Presbyterian Committee on the Self-Development of People provides grants for groups that are oppressed by poverty/social systems; working on projects to address community issues; and looking for long-term improvements to lives and communities. Crossroads Urban Center/Food Pantry, 347 S. 400 East, Tuesday, July 14, 5:30-7:30 p.m. More info at PCUSA.org/sdop

OUTDOORS

Summer Garden Tour Visit eight unique gardens in Eden and Liberty, Utah. Tour-goers will see elegant outdoor architecture, romantic flower gardens, creativity and quirkiness. Tour maps/tickets available at all of the gardens, so tour-goers may begin at any garden. A central hub will be staffed in Liberty Park, where tickets are on sale the day of the tour. Tickets are $15 before July 9 and $20 day of the tour. Saturday, July 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., OgdenNatureCenter.org

WELL BEING

CARE Fair is Utah’s largest free health-care fair, offering medical and dental treatments at no cost. All care is first come, first served. Services include physical examinations; women’s examinations, including breast exams and cervical cancer screenings; immunizations; dental exams with fluoride & sealant available for children; HIV/STD referrals; diabetes and cholesterol screenings; vision and hearing screenings; mental-health screenings; car seats & bike helmets (while available). No appointment or proof of insurance are necessary. Horizonte Instruction & Training Center, 1234 S. Main, July 10, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; July 11, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. More info at JLslc.org Got a volunteer, activism or community event to submit? Visit CityWeekly.net/addevent


NEWS

Curses, Foiled Again Jamie L. Gordon, 30, told police she was “struck in the head with a bowling ball” by a robber, who took $2,100 from the safe at the bowling alley where she worked in Decatur, Ill. When the manager arrived and gave permission to view the surveillance video, Officer James Weddle observed Gordon pick up a bowling ball and “strike herself twice in the back, left side of her head,” then drop to the floor, where she remained for 13 minutes until another employee found her. Confronted with the evidence, Gordon admitted taking the money and gambling away most of it on the bowling alley’s slot machines before conking herself on the head “to make it look like she had been robbed.” (Decatur’s Herald-Review)

BY ROL AND SWEET

n Police arrested Anh Nguyen, 42, after she argued with a department store manager in Newark, Calif., over the price of a Michael Kors purse. She succeeded in getting a discount but then “began to scream and curse at the manager” because she was still unhappy with the price, police Cmdr. Mike Carrol said. When a loss prevention officer tried to escort Nguyen from the store, she reportedly threw a temper tantrum and bit the officer’s leg. (San Jose Mercury News)

QUIRKS

n While police searched for drugs at the Akron, Ohio, home of Andrew Palmer, 46, a United Parcel Service driver delivered a package, addressed to Palmer, containing four pounds of marijuana. (Cleveland.com)

Handyman Follies Canadian authorities deported Tom Rolfe, 24, for fixing cracks in the wall of his girlfriend’s Edmonton apartment. Even though the British man, visiting on a tourist visa, was doing the repairs for free, officials pointed out that immigration rules prohibit tourists from performing any work that a Canadian could be hired to do. (Ottawa Sun)

Lightning Justice

Lightning set a house on fire in Cape Coral, Fla., but firefighters contained the blaze. While clearing the house, they uncovered a marijuana-growing operation, prompting police to arrest homeowner Jaroslav Kratky, 65. (Fort Myers’s WBBH-TV) Slightest Provocation Police reported that a 28-year-old man was grilling on his patio in Buffalo Grove, Ill., when his upstairs neighbor complained about the fumes coming into his apartment. When the man ignored him and continued grilling, the upstairs neighbor “retorted by throwing a stool and chair down” to the patio, police said. (Chicago Tribune)

Every Little Bit Counts Transit police who nabbed Timothy Chapman, 35, for evading a $2.10 subway fare in Boston found $7,000 in his pocket. (Boston Herald) Poopy Poopers Days before Germany’s new interior ministry headquarters opened in Berlin, authorities reported that someone broke in and stole all the toilet seats, faucets and toilet-paper holders. The thefts occurred two months after burglars stole all the faucets from the new intelligence agency Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND) headquarters. (Britain’s The Telegraph) n Newcomers to rural Loudon County, Va., are causing sanitation problems by not tending to their septic systems or not knowing that the systems need to be cleaned out regularly. “Let’s just say there are folks from Eastern Loudon that had, say, lived in suburbia their entire lives, had been on public water and sewer their entire lives, they move out to some beautiful little hamlet … and all they really know when they buy their house out here is, ‘cool, well and septic, no water bill,’” Algonkian District Supervisor Suzanne Volpe said. “Most of them don’t realize that there’s a problem until the kids come in from the backyard and go, ‘the ground’s all muddy back there, Mom, and it smells funny,’ and by that point they have a serious problem.” (Washington’s WTOP Radio)

Compiled by Roland Sweet. Authentication on demand.

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When Nicotine Patches Aren’t Enough China is resorting to public humiliation to punish smokers. Besides increasing the fine for smoking in public buildings to 200 yuan ($32.20), officials post the names of those who break the law three times on a website to shame them. (The Washington Post)

Happy Ending After spending 46 years without knowing her father’s identity, Melonie Dodaro, a social media consultant in Kelowna, British Columbia, turned to Facebook and located him in just 72 hours. Cees de Jong, originally from the Netherlands, has been living in Thailand for the past 16 years, performing as an Elvis impersonator, an actor and a musician using the name Colin Young. “I guess he’s very, very well-known and a little bit famous in Europe,” Dodaro said, adding she plans to visit her father and his two children, Elvis and Priscilla. (CBC News)

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Lawmakery Warren Jones, a city councilor in Jacksonville, Fla., introduced a bill making it illegal for homeowners to back into their own driveway. Jones said the proposal would crack down on the visual blight caused by owners parking inoperative vehicles backwards so officials can’t read license plates, which Florida requires only on the rear. If the vehicle tag isn’t visible from the street, the measure requires the owner to write down the information with 2-inch-tall letters and post it where city code enforcement inspectors can easily see it from the street. (Jacksonville’s The Florida Times-Union)

Mensa Reject of the Week Adam Hirtle, 30, told police in Colorado Springs, Colo., that he removed his boot and shot himself in the foot on purpose because he wanted to see how it felt. After satisfying his curiosity, he “placed his boot back on his foot and then intentionally shot himself in the foot” a second time, police said. (The Denver Post)

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Welcome to the unsung rural heartland that you’ve never heard of, just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City. By Stephen Dark • sdark@cityweekly.net Photos by Niki Chan

O

n a late spring afternoon on the far northeast corner of livestock, including cattle, chickens, horses, rabbits, goats of West Valley City, a Brink’s security guard waits and even llama in corrals, coops, stables and their back for a ride home outside the fenced-off lot of offices yards. Animals roam around small homes. Shaggy sheep and armored vans, his lunchbox at his feet. graze in one front yard, while a black rabbit in an unfenced Palestinian-born Mohammad Jbailat crosses the street to yard nibbles at grass in another. ask a question. “Have you heard of Chesterfield?” The guard This bucolic portrait of hardscrabble Americana, where says no. Jbailat points behind him at dusty streets and tree- you are as likely to see a barefoot youth with a fishing pole shrouded houses from which emanates the occasional cry over his shoulder as a man on a bicycle collecting scrap metof a rooster. That’s the name of the neighborhood he drives al, lost its boundaries in 1980 when Chesterfield was swalthrough each day in his armored truck, Jbailat says. lowed up by the newly incorporated West Valley City. But, Jbailat worships at the Khadeeja Islamic Center, a as WVC’s director of Neighborhood Services Craig Thomas mosque located directly in front of Brink’s. Its bulbous notes, while Chesterfield’s geographical boundaries might copper-orange dome and elegant fauxhave become “indistinct,” its emotional brick facade contrast sharply against boundaries—at least for its residents— the barbed wire-topped walls guarding endure. These residents remain fiercely whatever wealth the Brink’s vans bring committed to the neighborhood, and to in every day. Jbailat looks at the neighits independence and rural values. “You borhood where Muslims have come to do have some very vested residents who worship for 14 years. “I think it’s pretty,” are very proud of where they live,” says he says. Thomas. “They see themselves as very inThe guard is not alone in his ignorance dependent down there. That’s their home. of Chesterfield. Ask most residents They’re never going to move, and the city of the Salt Lake Valley, and chances is never going to tell them what to do.” are, while neighborhoods such as the Ask any lifelong Chesterfield resiAvenues and 9th & 9th ring immediate dent—or any of the neighborhood’s more bells, they won’t have heard of Chesterrecent arrivals, including refugees and field, which is only a 10-minute drive –WVC Neighborhood Services director Latino immigrants—about what defines from downtown Salt Lake City. One of their neighborhood, and one factor unites Craig Thomas the oldest communities on the west side them: They all display an intense pride of the Jordan River, Chesterfield is bordered on the west at being part of a rural community that, while historically by the busy commercial thoroughfare of Redwood Road, to looked down upon by neighboring townships east and west the east by the Jordan River Parkway trail, to the north by of the Jordan River, has seen its way of life not only survive Interstate 201 and to the south by the Redwood Recreation but even thrive in a valley that has long since succumbed to Center on 3100 South. the rise and fall of strip malls and high-density residential Ride Trax from West Valley City to downtown, and the housing. train briefly glides through Chesterfield, offering glimpses Other than its approximately 4,100 residents (according of livestock in the back yards of half-acre-lot homes. It’s this to a 2010 census), the only people who typically turn off rural lifestyle that is at the heart of what makes the many Redwood Road into Chesterfield are there to drop off or pick unpaved roads of Chesterfield unique. While roughly one up children at the American Preparatory Academy (APA), quarter of Chesterfield is zoned residential—notably the a 6-year-old charter school. Either that, or they are there streets close to Redwood Road—the majority is zoned for to attend a service at one of five neighborhood churches, agriculture. This allows residents to keep a certain number three of which were built in the past 15 years. Chesterfield’s

“THEY SEE THEMSELVES AS VERY INDEPENDENT DOWN THERE. THEY’RE NEVER GOING TO MOVE, AND THE CITY IS NEVER GOING TO TELL THEM WHAT TO DO.”

cheap lots made the area a prime location for large buildings for worship: “Where else can you buy an acre for less than $100,000 two miles from downtown?” Jbailat asks. Apart from the background hum of freeway traffic, the only noises heard tends to be the crowing of a rooster, the clip-clop of a horse being ridden by an elegantly dressed Mexican cowboy and the croaking of frogs on the neighboring Redwood Nature Area. The Salt Lake County-owned reserve sits between Chesterfield’s quiet streets and the Jordan river. “It now looks like the valley did before development,” says West Valley City manager Wayne Pyle of the lush landscape. As Pyle walks along the riverbank with a reporter, dozens of ducks placidly floating in the water erupt into the air as a bald eagle swoops down upon them. But human as well as avian predators have been part of Chesterfield’s history, according to a half-dozen former and current law enforcement officers interviewed by City Weekly. They recalled working Chesterfield’s night-darkened streets over several decades, battling meth labs and a few multigenerational criminal families. However, contemporary Chesterfield, say police officers, is nothing like the mean streets of 30, 20 or even 10 years ago. “They are good people, although they do tend to be looked down on some times,” says West Valley City’s Thomas. Everything has a balance, Jbailat says, and Chesterfield is no exception. “The outlaws came down here to party,” he says. “Now, it’s tipping back the other way.” The churches— First Apostolic, Jehovah’s Witness, Tongan United Methodist and the Khadeeja mosque—”brought good people to this area. One for sure,” he adds with a laugh, meaning his mosque’s spiritual leader, Imam Muhammed Mehtar. (One reason Mehtar bought a house in Chesterfield was so he could raise goats.) Richard Nowak, who founded a Chesterfield-based nonprofit bird sanctuary, questions whether or not— as elderly residents die and developers apply to rezone agricultural land for condos—the community will fall prey to high-density developers. Nowak’s neighbors, he says, “fear that eventually the city’s going to turn this whole area into residential.”


Pyle says he doesn’t see developers attempting to push through high-density residential housing “in the foreseeable future” as far as the farm-holding dominated lanes of Chesterfield are concerned. The city, he continues, has no plans to change Chesterfield. “The development that happens there is pretty slow. It’s gradual, reflective of the pace of life there, and that’s a good thing.”

BARE-ASS BEACH

Louise Griggs, right, in her younger days. Frances and Luann, left, are Griggs’ long-lost sisters.

Livestock is a common sight on Chesterfield’s country lanes.

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Louise Griggs has lived in Chesterfield for 69 years.

JULY 9, 2015 | 17

For decades, Chesterfield was largely left to its own devices when it came to policing. The Salt Lake County Sheriff’s Office had only four officers covering Chesterfield, Granger, Hunter and Redwood. After West Valley City was incorporated, former WVC cop Carl Dinger says, “they started enforcing laws, going into [Chesterfield and other neighborhoods], and it was brutal. It was like the Wild West.” Cops saw Chesterfield as a downtrodden, poverty-afflicted community, close-knit and uninterested in assimilating into the rest of the valley, officers say. According to one law-enforcement officer, in the 1980s, Chesterfield’s claim to infamy was that, “The best dope was out of Chesterfield, Utah. It was Ground Zero for meth labs—at least until the early 2000s, when the Mexicans took over manufacturing and white boys got out of the dope game.” The era of methamphetamine labs died in 2003 when feds heavily restricted pseudoephedrine—a key ingredient in meth found in cold medications. Still, West Valley City Police Sgt. Todd Gray says, throughout his career, one thing remained a constant in Chesterfield: “There were seven or eight families where you arrested the father, the son, the grandson.” He says a few residents still pursue thieving as a lifestyle, venturing out at night on bikes and scooters to steal metal or copper. “It’s a way of life for them, how they get money for drugs.” William “Billy Mac” McCarthy came to know a few of those families intimately when, back in the

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“THE MUSCLE AND THE ASSHOLE”

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Chesterfield’s evolution from homes fashioned out of tents, railcars and dirt-floor shacks to a community of small farm holdings began in 1848, when Mormon pioneers first crossed the Jordan River to populate regions that became known as Chesterfield, Hunter, Granger and Redwood—the four areas subsequently incorporated into West Valley City in 1980. “Chesterfield has always been proud and fiercely independent of spirit,” former WVC Mayor Mike Winder told City Weekly in 2012. In Winder’s history of West Valley City, entitled Let’s Do It, he wrote that, by World War II, a financially strapped Salt Lake County was encouraging families to buy small, $10 lots in Chesterfield to build homes. They did, but the construction materials they had were meager at best. By 1940, 110 families had made Chesterfield their home—some of them in impoverished conditions. “Twenty-three of the 110 families inhabited one-room homes,” Winder wrote. “Some were dugouts. Some were tents. Others were fashioned from ‘rags, packing boxes and burlap. … A one-time chicken coop houses a family of nine persons.’ ” Louise Griggs has lived in Chesterfield for 69 of her 72 years. When she was a child in the 1940s, northeastern Chesterfield was a wilderness of saltgrass, she says, with no trees or streets. Old train cars—ice hanging off their walls in winter months—served as houses. “The only fun place we ever had was the Jordan River to swim in,” she says—at a place they nicknamed “Bare-ass Beach.” Griggs was raised by Ma and Clark Griggs but doesn’t know how or why she was adopted. She had two older biological sisters who were 5 and 7 when they were found wandering downtown Salt Lake City in 1946, victims of neglect, according to local newspaper stories at the time. She has been unable to locate them. “My one dream has been to find Frances and Luann,” she says. “I don’t know who I am, to tell you the truth. I was not well taken care of, but I was surely loved.” At age 5, she’d go down to the river, pitchfork a large carp, then take the fish to an African-American family who lived on Redwood Road, sell it to them for a dollar and, after walking a dozen blocks south,

buy a foot-long hot dog and french fries at Arctic Circle. Fifty years later, after extensive flooding of the Salt Lake Valley floor in 1983, Griggs again used her pitchfork, this time in conjunction with a flashlight, against river rats at night digging under her fence to get at her baby ducks. “The only thing I could do was pitchfork them and that’s what I done.” People made fun of the poverty of Chesterfield children, she recalls. The homes had outhouses. Families would pack water from nearby wells and run their laundry through a ringer. “That’s what makes me appreciate everything I have,” Griggs says in her living room, one wall dominated by a row of photographic portraits of the eight dogs she has owned. “You know how many people ask me that?” she says, regarding why she has spent her life in Chesterfield. She says one big reason is, “I love animals, and I can have them here.” She has horses, dogs and goats, some of them rescue animals. She whistles and calls, “Come!” and two of three horses in a corral behind her small single-floor house trot to the fence to have their muzzles stroked. Griggs is one of the few oldtimers remaining. “Most of the people here, a lot of them died or moved away,” she says.

PHOTO COURTESY MIKE WINDER

This 1960s photograph shows one of the first houses built in Chesterfield during the Great Depression. More than 100 families settled on the land, with financial aid from Salt Lake County. The typically two-room homes had neither central heating nor bathtubs.


Richard Nowak operates Avian Sanctuary and Protection in Chesterfield.

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The Redwood Nature Area, which borders Chesterfield on the east, reflects how the valley looked before urban development.

Jayme Alexander and partner John Sanders run The Stable Place, a shelter for abused horses.

early 1980s, he was a patrol officer for West Valley City, working Chesterfield on his own. One evening in fall 2014, the now-60-year-old ex-cop drove around Chesterfield, detailing in a South Boston drawl his recollections to a reporter. McCarthy grew up in a housing project in Brighton, Mass. A few of the criminals he regularly ran up against in Chesterfield reminded him of some of the tougher characters he’d grown up with back East. He and a fellow patrolman, Carl Dinger—another outsider, from New York state—made Chesterfield a personal project, McCarthy recalls. Those they chased would tell them, Dinger was “the muscle behind the asshole,” the latter being McCarthy. Each Halloween, one Chesterfield home displayed an effigy of McCarthy in blue overalls putting a second mannequin into a makeshift jail. Dinger says, “They hated Billy, because he arrested them all the time.” But McCarthy says he took it as a ribbing by longtime adversaries. Chesterfield residents, McCarthy says, didn’t accept the authority of his WVC badge, seeing themselves as accountable only to Salt Lake County. Most residents, he says, “were good, hardworking people.” Those who did break the law abided by a code of sorts: “In 20 years, I close to never saw them steal from each other,” McCarthy says. “If they did, they never reported it to us. They’d never rat each other out, no matter how much you’d try to twist them or flip them.” The bad guys knew the game as well as he did. “My job is to arrest you; your job is to commit a crime,” he’d tell them. As McCarthy drives around the darkening streets, peering at small, dark houses where men he had arrested still live, he recalls the constant question, “What do you want McCarthy? Why are you always fucking with us?” His answer, he says, was “Because you’re easy.” He’d sit in a darkened car in the early hours and wait for someone to flick a lit cigarette out of their car window—which he says is littering—or drive by without an illuminated license plate and pull them over. When he’d inquire who the driver was, usually somebody he knew well, the response would be, “Fuck you,” to which he would reply, as taught to him by a supervisor, “Not without dinner and a movie.” At the end of his drive around his one-time stomping ground, the former cop turned private-sector worker, grows nostalgic. “I’d chase them, arrest them, let them go. ‘Get you on the next one.’ Wish I was still working here.”

DEALER’S INFERNO

Not everyone, though, is a fan of Chesterfield. One former dealer who spent a year in Chesterfield in 2010, describes the community as an unwitting refuge for white supremacists seeking to hide out. He spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation from gang members he associated with. “All these gang members have family members who live there and were raised in poverty,” he says. “They purchased a house in Chesterfield and never left.” Drug-related activity, he says, takes place in “somebody’s mom’s house, in a basement, in a garage, or a back yard. It’s like this place in the middle of Salt Lake where everybody goes to hide. And it works.” Between midnight and 4 a.m., he would sit in someone’s garage “smoking meth constantly and waiting for people to come over with stolen shit and trade it for drugs.” Outsiders, he says, are not welcome. “There was this underlying tone of something about to happen, something about to pop off,” when he went out there. “If you didn’t grow up there, and they didn’t know who the fuck you are, something will happen to you.” Whatever the late-night gang activity, Sgt. Gray says contemporary Chesterfield is “a lot cleaner and quieter” than it was when he worked it. And credit for that, at least in part, he says, should go to West Valley City’s compliance division. Code-enforcement officer Ricardo Ramos, who has patrolled Chesterfield for 11 years, says his former boss told him all that mattered was, given Chesterfield’s challenging nature, “Keep it clean and tidy.” He points to new houses that replaced nearderelict drug houses, where dozens of cars once congregated late at night. Then he slows down in front of a boarded-up property that belonged to a deported Peruvian man. Now, a bank owns it. “Banks are one of the biggest problems,” he says. “They are slow to respond. $1,000 fine for them, it’s just change.” One house close to the Trax line has been used as a dumping ground by its owner, Ramos says. Several cars, a 5-foot-tall lump of cement and acetylene tanks litter the yard. That morning, Ramos sent the owner a warning citation. If the owner does not act within 10 days, fines of $100-$400 per day will begin accruing. That same morning, Ramos is preparing to serve a $68,000 fine for numerous code violations to a property owner he cannot locate. With Chesterfield, a code-enforcer’s work is never done. “You start at one end, you work your way through, Ramos says. “Then, the next year, you start again.”


TURKEY COURTSHIP

didn’t begin in earnest until 2002. It remains one of the very few undeveloped larger spaces in the valley. Salt Lake County’s Parks & Recreation director Lynn Larsen says the river is a “flyway for bird migration.” Shorebirds such as avocets visit during their annual migrations. While some invasive plant species still remain, much of the wetlands now boasts poplars and bulrushes—an indication, Larsen says, that he and his volunteers are having success “keeping things as they were.”

NEW ARRIVALS

Willow Alexander rides a pony-drawn cart to school.

El Calor Taqueria on Redwood Road is operated by Chesterfield resident Jose Martinez-Hernandez, who came to Utah eight years ago.

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Reclamation work by Salt Lake County has restored riparian wetlands to their former glory.

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While the reserve provides a bulwark against development to the east, residents argue the future of Chesterfield is further cemented by its five religious institutions: an LDS ward house near a business park on Chesterfield’s northern edge, the First Apostolic Church, the Khadeeja mosque, the United Methodist Tongan Church and Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Kingdom Hall. The First Apostolic was a former LDS ward house that was subsequently purchased by a religious group whose members angered local Mormons with their hostility toward the LDS faith—even running an anti-Mormon radio show. In 1986, First Apostolic Pastor William Fitzgerald purchased the 1950s ward house for $65,000, he says. Children threw rocks at the windows, so he set out on a meet-and-greet campaign to distinguish his live-and-let-live attitude from the prior church’s anti-LDS rhetoric. The First Apostolic has grown over the years to include a Spanish-language congregation that shares the building. Members believe in the literal word of the Bible and speak in tongues during the service “when the Holy Ghost is inside of us,” Fitzgerald says. With the addition of three new churches in the past 15 years and the American Preparatory Academy (APA) charter school, which opened in 2009, some residents believe the amount of traffic and activity these properties bring protects the community from further development. “Now they’ll have a harder time of getting rid of us,” Louise Griggs says. Living one street over from Griggs, Mary Gordon—a 10-year resident whose daughter attends the APA—says the school “is the best thing that ever happened to this neighborhood” and has enhanced Chesterfield’s crusty sense of community. APA has 575 students grades K-9, 75 percent of whom qualify for free or reduced lunches. While predominantly a commuter school, some children from Chesterfield attend, although fewer than in the academy’s first years when staff walked its streets, telling neighbors about the new school and encouraging parents to sign up for an enrollment lottery. Currently, the Chesterfield APA has 708 names on its waiting list. Children in uniforms clap enthusiastically, leaning forward in their chairs, as they recite the Gettysburg Address from start to finish. Administrative director Debra Davies says APA’s founder, Carolyn Sharette, opened her first school in a relatively comfortable Draper neighborhood, and was looking for “a place opposite of Draper,” demographically, for her second school. Chesterfield residents, Davies says, were excited by the school’s opening. “Someone saw value

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As much as Chesterfield resembles a countrylane refuge for those who value open space over curb-and-gutter improvements, it also provides a home for two nonprofits that provide shelter for wildlife. One is a sanctuary for abused and neglected horses, the other for rescued birds. The Stable Place on Cassell Street was founded by Jayme Alexander. She moved to Chesterfield in 1999, after she found a 1 1/2-acre lot where she could keep her horses. “If people like you in the neighborhood, you won’t have any problem,” she recalls being told. Alexander, a former truck driver, worked with Valley Mental Health and a private residential treatment facility helping children with behavioral issues work with traumatized horses. One horse had been beaten and was underweight, its mouth scarred from a previous owner using barbed wire as a bit to stop it from bolting. Another horse was rescued by Alexander’s friend from a Vernal kill pen where horses are auctioned to be sent to Mexico and Canada for meat. “We take in in-need horses, we rehabilitate them, and we teach kids natural horsemanship,” says Alexander. The children and the horses, she says, “both get rehab, so to speak.” The horses are rehabilitated and adopted out. In total, Alexander says they’ve placed 30 horses “in their forever homes.” Alexander says Chesterfield “is the best place to live ever.” Her daughter, Willow, rides a ponydrawn buggy to the local school, the American Preparatory Academy. The pony cart, Alexander says, “makes people smile.” Chesterfield, she adds, “is our little inner-city paradise.” Several streets away is Avian Sanctuary and Protection, a bird refuge run by Richard Nowak. “If you are going to live in Chesterfield, you have to accept there are animals here,” Nowak says, describing the neighborhood as a small oasis. He continues, “It depends which way the wind blows, as far as you know which animals are in which yards.” Nowak has a lot of avian company on his small property, taking in 326 birds in 2014. While no-kill shelters may spare cats and dogs, he says birds are euthanized after a week, so local shelters often bring them to him. Many of his feathered charges live in a 1970s-model single-wide trailer. “It’s the only three-bedroom, two-bathroom chicken coop in the neighborhood,” he says. As he walks around his refuge, he’s followed by Mr. T, a turkey that determinedly puffs up its plumage as it thrums, then softly rasps against the ground as it walks. Nowak sits in the front yard while, behind him, a parakeet named Charlie repeatedly squawks, “Come on in,” and several African geese hiss protectively as he holds several chicks in his hand to feed them. A quarter mile from Nowak’s home-comesanctuary, a natural bird refuge marks Chesterfield’s eastern boundary. The Salt Lake Countyowned Redwood Nature Area is a 63-acre mix of restored riparian wetland and manmade ponds and streams that feed its wetlands. John Sanders, Alexander’s partner at The Stable Place, says this border means that Chesterfield—and their little horse farm—“has its own little nook of isolation.” The county purchased the land back in the 1960s. The effort to restore it to wetlands


Jose Luis Pimentel leads his horse, “El Pito,” across his farmyard where he also raises goats.

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HORSE PRIDE

The Khadeeja Islamic Center has served as a place of worship for the Muslim community for eight years.

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in this community,” she says. Still, it didn’t go off without a few minor hitches: “The first day, we had a horse bite,” Davies says. “Goats got over the fence and were running up and down the parking lot.” Although residents feel the churches and the school have been positive additions to their community, there is a downside: the rush of traffic to and from these institutions on roads that were once quiet. “People speed through here like it’s nothing,” Gordon says.

Mohammed Jbailat: “The outlaws came down here to party. Now it’s tipping back the other way.”

Along with the influx of churches and students, Chesterfield has also seen a growing Latino presence, reflected in the evenings by elegant Mexican cowboys exercising their horses on the streets. Jose Martinez-Hernandez came to Utah eight years ago pursuing his dream of owning a restaurant. In Utah, he found a small shuttered restaurant on Redwood Road and Crystal Avenue on the western outskirts of Chesterfield. Its owner was operating a taco stand outside a salón de baile (dance hall). “It was bad, fallen,” Martinez-Hernandez says in Spanish. He reopened the restaurant under the same name of El Calor [The Heat] and built a menu that his cousin, Maribel says, defines what “authentic” Mexican food truly means. “It’s like eating at home, it’s exactly the Mexican taste,” Maribel says. “If we want Mexican food, here’s where we come.” Martinez-Hernandez serves handmade tortillas and his own specialty: mutton barbecue aka barbacoa de Borrego. Come the weekend, he says Latino families arrive from all over the Wasatch Front to eat there. Several years ago, he bought a home in Chesterfield a half block from his restaurant. “It feels like home,” he says. Refugees and families of Mexican descent who moved in over the past 20 years found in Chesterfield’s agricultural zoning an opportunity to re-create the homes they left behind. West Valley City code enforcement officer Ricardo Ramos says he’s encountered people of many nationalities who “come here, and it’s like they still live like they did back in the old country. They tell me, ‘This reminds me of my homeland.’ ” That’s a sentiment Jose Luis Pimentel shares. On a Friday afternoon, Mexican music wafts across an unpaved street from his home, which resembles more a rancho than a Utah agricultural holding. Bare-chested, Pimentel walks around his farm, reflecting in Spanish on crossing the Sonora desert at age 15 in search of the American Dream, with nothing more than a two-gallon bottle of water. It took him eight days to cross the border, plagued by snakes and scorpions. “It was an adventure, but it was very ugly,” he says in Spanish.

He’s worked for 29 years, he says, without a vacation, and he’s tired. He started as a migrant farm laborer, then landscaper, construction worker and, finally, a restaurant worker. In 1994, he bought a house in Kearns but wanted to have a place where he could keep goats and horses, as his family did on their rancho in Mexico where he grew up. Several years ago, he discovered Chesterfield and bought a near-derelict property that was half-buried in garbage. It took many trips to the dump to clear it out, he says. Pimentel shows off his goats and chickens, the latter of which he takes to markets in Provo and Ogden. His pride, though, is a statuesque, well-endowed black thoroughbred, which he calls El Pito (Spanish slang for “the penis”). He takes his horse out for exercise around Chesterfield’s streets, where he knows most of the people and regards them as friends.

“A HIDDEN GEM”

Code-enforcement officer Ramos believes that Chesterfield, with its churches, its residents from many countries and its backwoods, country feel will remain faithful to its identity. “I think West Valley City has something like a hidden gem that I don’t think any other city in the valley has.” The northwestern gateway to that gem is guarded on Redwood Road by a 45-year-old Union Labor Center, home to various union offices. Soft-spoken ironworker union rep Mike McDonald lived in Chesterfield after he married his wife who grew up there. “We bulldogged [steer-wrestled] and pretended like we were cowboys on Sunday and got drunk,” he says. It seems fitting that Chesterfield should have such a bastion of blue-collar values as the labor center watching over it. The old-timers, like McDonald, “guard [the center] with our lives,” he says. That kind of passion is evident in Louise Grigg’s face as she talks about the land she has lived on nearly all her life. She gets up in the early hours for her job at L-3 Communications, working on computer boards. As she walks through her gate, she glances up each morning at the illuminated large cross, mounted on the Tongan church’s roof, shining down through the trees. “If I want to say something to God, I do,” she says. Griggs looks around her garden as dark rainclouds gather overhead, and she prepares to head indoors. “I watched all these trees grow,” she says about the poplars that huddle around her garden and shelter it from the silent street. Then, in simple terms any Chesterfield resident would understand, she says, “I’ll die here,” with a grateful smile. CW


ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 7.9

Trent Call: One of One

In this modern age of constant digital monitoring, the concept of “gaze” is complex. Sites like YouTube raise the question of what is individual and private, and what is communal and public. If you post a video of yourself and only one other person watches it, is it still private? Or does the platform itself make it public? Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has curated the exhibit Panopticon—a metaphor designed to encapsulate the numerous forms of personal, private, social and governmental surveillance used to not only capture social behaviors but to help normalize them. Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. has teamed up with UMOCA to develop the one-time performance Invisible Gaze, a durational piece based on Panopticon that will be performed throughout the main gallery. The dance, created by RWDC artistic director Daniel Charon, uses the show as a backdrop to explore similar issues of how the act of simply watching something can influence it, both publicly and privately. Charon likes to talk about how actually seeing dancers up close and personal—hearing exhalations, witnessing sweat glistening on their moving bodies—helps an audience to unplug from the modern digital standard. Such proximity to the dancers, as well as varying vantage points to view the movement, helps to transform a work into a far more individual experience for the viewer—once again helping to foster a conversation about how the individual gaze may differ from a communal one, ultimately affecting social norms. (Jacob Stringer) Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Invisible Gaze @ Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, July 10, 7-9 p.m., free. UtahMOCA.org

JULY 9, 2015 | 21

June’s monumental Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage has the LGBT community and allies looking for every reason to celebrate. Up next, an entire weekend of independent, documentary and foreign gay-themed films is a damned good one. Yes, please. Utah Film Center presents the 12th annual Damn! These Heels Film Festival, with the biggest, most diverse and impressive lineup yet, including Robin Williams’ (pictured) final role in Boulevard as the closing-night film. Patrick Hubley, artistic director for the film center, is excited about the 22 films this year, each one representing the ever-improving quality and thematic scope of LGBT-inspired films. Although the struggle to come out is still real, especially for teens living in the Bible Belt—as portrayed in the documentary Misfits—Hubley sees the films expanding beyond themes focused solely on sexual identity. Portrait of a Serial Monogamist, for one, is an ingenious romantic comedy about a woman with hilarious relationship patterns we can all relate to—and who just happens to be a lesbian. Gender roles, another all-encompassing theme, are portrayed in the highly anticipated Sundance hit Tangerine. Sexual fluidity is examined in a beautifully shot Chilean film In the Grayscale, about a man struggling to “do right” in his marriage to a woman. And the festival opener, The New Girlfriend, is a promising French comedy that playfully explores transgender issues. Filmgoers are likely to walk away from these films with an enlightened perspective, and not just on LGBT people and culture; these unifying films bring to light the humanity in us all. (Deann Armes) Damn! These Heels Film Festival @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, July 10-12, passes $50 or single tickets $7. UtahFilmCenter.org

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Invisible Gaze

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FRIDAY 7.10

Damn! These Heels LGBT Film Festival

Shon Taylor opened the God Hates Robots gallery space for May’s Gallery Stroll and followed up the space’s phenomenal opening with one-of-a-kind prints by a one-of-a-kind artist: Trent Call (pictured above). During studies for his BFA in painting and drawing at the University of Utah more than 10 years ago, he also found himself drawn to the art department’s print shop, experimenting with the print medium. Now, he has returned to collaborate with printmaking students and professor Justin Diggle. The 45 single-edition screenprints were divvied up, one per student, with the rest halved between Call and the U of U print department. The results became the One of One exhibit. Call began the works in this series without a preconceived design for the final images. Using variables of color and composition, he found his own spontaneous reactions in the midst of the printing process becoming the wildcard in this deck. You might remember Call and Camilla Taylor’s Happy Accidents take on Bob Ross paintings at the same space several years ago; Call re-worked a few to improve several problematic pieces here. Some of these pieces include more than a dozen colors, and even transparent inks. Screen printing is fascinating in its seemingly endless variations in subtleties and nuances of color and texture. This collection is a look at what can happen in the hands of an innovative artist who dares to follow the immediacy of the moment. But don’t delay. The show closes Friday, July 11. (Brian Staker) Trent Call: One of One @ God Hates Robots, 350 W. 300 South No. 150, 801-596-3370, through July 10, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. GodHatesRobots.com

FRIDAY 7.10

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While the Salt Lake City theater scene largely takes a hiatus during the summer months, locations northward and southward pick up the slack with their summer repertory offerings. And while Utah Shakespeare Festival (see p. 22), the Neil Simon Festival and Tuacahn deliver the goods down Dixie way, Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre brings its annual showcase of tuneful classics to Logan for the 23rd season. Once again, the Ellen Eccles Theatre hosts a rotating quartet of main-stage productions, including some of the most beloved works in the entire canon of musical theater and opera. Founder and artistic director Michael Ballam takes the title role of Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha (pictured), including its signature song, “The Impossible Dream.” Rodgers and Hammerstein’s enduring love story Carousel and the charming tale of a corporate go-getter in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying fill out the slate of more contemporary works, while Puccini’s tale of struggling artists, La Bohéme, offers its powerful arias. Yet part of what makes UFOMT so engaging is the lineup of offerings beyond those four principal productions. Enjoy breakfast with the artists, or come early to a show for a talkback session to learn more about the history of the shows. Catch one of the chamber-music concerts or a special offering like Bon Appétit!, a one-woman tribute to Julia Child, or a celebration of the music of Richard Rodgers. It’s more than great theatrical offerings. It’s truly a festival. (Scott Renshaw) Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre @ Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, July 8-Aug. 8, $11-$77. UtahFestival.org

THURSDAY 7.9

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Bid the Adams Theatre farewell at the 2015 Utah Shakespeare Festival. BY KATHLEEN CURRY & GEOFF GRIFFIN comments@cityweekly.net @travelbrigade

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I

n most years, a visit to the Utah Shakespeare Festival is highlighted by something new: a play, an actor, music, a set. The 2015 festival will be highlighted by something old: This is the last year guests can see the Bard performed live under the stars at the Adams Shakespearean Theatre. The venue, which first opened in 1977, was an attempt to re-create the famous Globe Theatre in which Shakespeare’s plays were first produced. It turned out to be so much like the original, when the British Broadcasting Company searched the world for the best place to focus on theater in the Elizabethan period, it found itself filming in Cedar City. For 2016, the plays—and presumably all the ghosts of years past—will move a couple blocks away for the opening of the Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, an updated space that will carry on the tradition of outdoor performances and will be part of the Beverly Taylor Sorenson Center for the Arts. As for 2015, the festival kicked off July 2 and runs through Sept. 5, with the Adams Theatre hosting Henry IV Part 2, King Lear and The Taming of the Shrew, while indoor afternoon and evening performances at the Randall L. Jones Theatre will feature Charley’s Aunt, South Pacific and Amadeus. The fall season runs Sept. 23-Oct. 31. Tickets and schedules can be found at Bard.org. The Taming of the Shrew holds a particularly important historical place with the Festival. Founder Fred C. Adams directed it during USF’s first season in 1962, and it also opened the Adams Theatre in 1977. It will close the Adams Theatre this September, with none other than Fred Adams himself directing. The cast features the real life husbandand-wife duo of Brian Vaughn and Melinda Pfundstein, in the roles of Petruchio and Kate. This is just the second time in the festival’s 50-plus years that it has produced Henry IV Part 2. Henry IV Part 1 was a highlight of the 2014 season, thanks to the performance of Sam Ashdown as Prince Hal, who returns this season along with Larry Bull as King Henry. Both will hopefully stick around for 2016 and the production of Henry V, as the three plays show Hal’s transformation from rock-star prince to responsible king.

As you’re watching King Lear, you might look at Tony Amendola playing the title character and wonder, “Where have I seen this guy before?” The answer is on TV—in Once Upon a Time, Dexter, Seinfeld, Stargate SG-1, The West Wing, Star Trek: Voyager, Continuum, The X Files, etc. In Cedar City, instead of watching him on the small screen, you get to see him go nuts totally live. Moving across the street to the indoor theater, in Charley’s Aunt, Lord Fancourt Babberly ends up dressing up to help a couple of friends romance some young ladies in this 19th century farce. Think about it: There’s nothing funnier than a guy in an old-lady dress wearing a wig and smoking a cigar. The film Amadeus won eight Academy Awards in 1984, including Best Picture, telling the story of Antonio Salieri, who recalls his rivalry with Mozart and even claims to have killed the young genius. The film was based on a 1979 stage play by Peter Shaffer, and Cedar City audiences will get a chance to see USF artistic director David Ivers play Salieri, while Tasso Feldman tackles the role of Mozart. Rock me, Amadeus! Finally, the 2015 season brings the festival’s first-ever production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific. It’s got all the big themes—love, war, race, prejudice— set to some of the greatest melodies in the American songbook. The 250-mile drive from Salt Lake City to Cedar City can generally be completed in just over three hours. Accommodations near the festival range from national chains to unique bed-and-breakfast options such as the Iron Gate Inn (100 N. 200 West, 435-867-0603, TheIronGateInn.com), which even has its own winery onsite.

Larry Bull as Rumour and the title role in Henry IV part 2 The Cedar City dining scene has improved dramatically—no pun intended— in recent years, highlighted by places like Centro Woodfired Pizzeria (50 W. Center St., 435-867-8123, Facebook.com/CentroPizzeria) which features pizzas and local micro-brews, and Sonny Boy’s BBQ (126 N. Main, 435-867-8010, SonnyBoysBBQ.com), which urges you to “put some South in your mouth” in the form of delicious barbecue and sides. A long-time festival staple is The Pastry Pub (86 W. Center St., 435-867-1400, CedarCityPastryPub.com), which features fresh salads and sandwiches. Your best chance of running into USF actors is probably stopping by The Grind Coffeehouse (19 N. Main, 435-867-5333, Facebook.com/pages/The-Grind-Coffeehouse) which keeps them caffeinated through their late-night performances. There’s always something to look forward to with each new USF season, but for 2015, it’s one last chance to look back at the Adams Theatre. CW

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

255 W. Center St., Cedar City 800-752-9849 July 2-Sept. 5, Sept. 23-Oct. 31 $26-$76 Bard.org Kathleen Curry and Geoff Griffin host the Travel Brigade Radio Show and Podcast.


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SATURDAY 7.11

Salt Lake Bubble Run Every time I take my trusty car through an automated carwash and see that sudsy magnificence splattering across my windshield, I can’t help but wonder what it would be like to get out of the vehicle and run around in it. For the good of car washes everywhere, this experience will be made available to participants of the Bubble Run that will be happening at the Utah State Fair Park on July 11. Starting at 8 a.m., the Bubble Run is a 5K that isn’t designed so much as a race, but more as an excuse to get some exercise while getting blasted with multicolored soap suds. While runners are welcome to attempt to beat their own record times, racing is not required. Attendees are encouraged to wear white as a canvas for the colorful bubbles. The soap solution is all-natural, and the colors are washable. All ages and athletic abilities are invited to attend. (Alex Springer) Salt Lake Bubble Run @ Utah State Fair Park, 155 N. 1000 West, July 11, 8 a.m.-noon, $50. BubbleRun.com

PERFORMANCE THEATER

1776 The Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, 7:30 p.m., Monday, Friday, Saturday, matinée, 2 p.m., Saturday, through July 25, EmpressTheatre.com 1776: America’s Musical Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-393-0700, 7:30 p.m., Monday, Friday, Saturday, through July 25, TerracePlayhouse.com And Then There Were None Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, 435-797-8022, 7:30 p.m., July 17-18; matinee, July 11, 1 p.m.; Arts.USU.edu/Lyric Anne of Green Gables Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Brigham City, 435-251-8000, 7 p.m., Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, through July 11, BrighamsPlayhouse.com Carousel Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre, Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, 7:30 p.m., July 9 & 15 UFOMT.org (see p. 21)

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivans, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 17, Tuacahn.org Disney’s The Little Mermaid Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Aug. 1, HCT.org Disney’s When You Wish Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivans, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 16, Tuacahn.org Grease Midvale Main St. Theatre, 7711 S. Main, Midvale, 801-566-0596, 7 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday, matinee, 2 p.m., Saturday, through July 18 Grease’d: Happy Days Are Here Again!, Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, 7 p.m., Monday, Wednesday-Friday; 9:30 p.m., Friday; 2:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m., Saturday; through Aug. 22, DesertStar.biz How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre, Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, 7:30 p.m., July 10, 16; UFOMT.org (see p. 21)


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Into the Woods Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, 7:30 pm, Monday-Saturday; matinee, 3 p.m., Saturday; through Aug. 15, HaleTheater.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Scera Shell Outdoor Theatre, 699 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, 8 p.m., through July 18, SCERA.org La Bohéme Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre, Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, 7:30 p.m., July 8, 23, Aug. 1, 7, 7:30 p.m., UFOMT.org (see p. 21) Last Train to Nibroc Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center, Logan, 435-797-8022, 7:30 p.m., July 9 & 15, Arts.Usu.edu/Lyric Man of La Mancha Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, 7:30 p.m., July 11, UFOMT.org (see p. 21) Neil Simon Festival: Chapter Two, I’m Not Rappaport, The Foreigner, They’re Playing Our

Song Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-327-8673, July 8, 16, 22, 30, Aug. 5, 8 p.m.; matinees July 18, 24, Aug. 1, 7, 2 p.m., SimonFest.org Noises Off Lyric Repertory Company, Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center, 435-797-8022, 7:30 p.m., July 11 & 14, Arts.USU.edu/Lyric/htm Once Upon a Mattress Midvale City Park Amphitheater, 455 W. 7500 South, 7:30 p.m., Monday-Saturday, through July 18, MidvaleArts.com Ordinary Days Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave., 7:30 p.m., Friday & Saturday, through July 26, UtahRep.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, 7:30 p.m., Wednesday-Saturday; 1 & 6 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 30, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Sunset Baby Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, 7:30 p.m., Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, through July 18,

PeopleProductions.org The Compleat Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 Main, 801-355-4628, Monday, Friday, Saturday, through July 18, TheOBT.org The King and I Centerpoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, through July 19, CenterPointTheatre.org The Mystery of Edwin Drood: The Musical Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, 435-797-8022, 7:30 p.m., July 10, Arts.USU.edu/Lyric Twelfth Night Salt Lake Shakespeare, Babcock Theater, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-7100, 7:30 p.m., Wednesday-Friday; 2 & 7:30 p.m., Saturday; 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sunday; Theatre.Utah.edu Utah Shakespeare Festival: The Taming of the Shrew, Henry IV Part 2, King Lear, Amadeus, Charley’s Aunt & South Pacific 299 W. Center St., Cedar City, 800-752-9849, through Sept. 5, Bard.org West Side Story Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, 8 p.m., ThursdaySaturday; 6 p.m., Sunday, through July 26

EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

DANCE

Municipal Ballet Co. and Holy Water Buffalo Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, 6 p.m., July 13, RedButteGarden.org Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company: Invisible Gaze Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, 7 p.m., July 10, UtahMOCA.org (see p. 21) Salt Lake City Ballet Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 4 p.m., July 14, SLCBallet.com

COMEDY & IMPROV

Josh Blue Wiseguys Comedy Club, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., July 10, WiseguysComedy.com Spence Roper Wiseguys Comedy Club, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, 8 p.m., July 11, WiseguysComedy.com Eric Ripley Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W.

Evanston BrewFest SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2015 1:00PM-5:00PM $25 IN ADVANCE | $30 DAY OF

Live Music, Food & Fun! BEER TASTING @ DEPOT SQUARE 21 & OLDER ONLY. natural causes IN THE BEER GARDEN FROM 1PM-5PM

Featured Breweries: Alaskan Brewing Co. Black Tooth Brewing Blue Moon Brewing Co. Bohemian Brewery Deschutes Brewery Epic Brewing Co. Grand Teton Brewing Co. Lagunitas Miller/Coors New Belgium Brewing

O’Dell Brewing Co. Oskar Blues Brewery Prairie Fire Brewing Co Roosters Sam Adams Brewery Co Shades of Pale Brewing Sierra Nevada Snake River Brewing Suds Brothers Brewery Traveler Beer Co.

Uinta Brewing Upslope Brewing Co Vernal Brewing Company Wind River Brewing And more….

EVANSTON.BREWFEST | EVANSTONBREWFEST7.EVENTBRITE.COM


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moreESSENTIALS 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, 7:30 p.m., July 12, WiseguysComedy.com Ben Gleib Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., July 10-11, WiseguysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Alex Caldiero: Some Love Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-521-3819, 7 p.m. July 9, KenSandersBooks.com Kevin M. Schultz: Buckley and Mailer: The Difficult Friendship That Shaped The Sixties The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, 7 p.m., July 9, KingsEnglish.com June Williamson: Thai Food Made Easy The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, 2 p.m., July 11, KingsEnglish.com Local Author Showcase The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, 7 p.m., July 14, KingsEnglish.com

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, through October 24, SLCFarmersMarket.org Damn! These Heels LGBT Film Festival Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, July 10-12, UtahFilmCenter.org (see p. 21) Eat Drink SLC Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South 801-596-8500, 6 p.m., July 9, EatDrinkSLC.com Givestock: A Community Music and Art Fair Performances by Cold War Kids, The Str!ke, Zodiac Empire, Folk Hogan, Charles Ellsworth, and more. Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 801-6083963, noon-10 p.m., July 11, EvenStevens.com Obon Japanese Festival Salt Lake Buddhist Temple, 211 W. 100 South, 1-8 p.m, July 11, SLBuddhist.org Park Silly Sunday Market Historic Main Street, Park City, 10 a.m., Sunday, 435-655-0994, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Payson Scottish Festival & Highland Games Memorial Park, 250 S. Main, Payson, July 10-11, PaysonScottishFestival.org Provo Farmers Market, Pioneer Park, 500 W. Center St., Provo, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, through Oct. 31, ProvoFarmersMarket.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Adjunct Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 25, UtahMOCA.org Brian Lindley A Light in the Dark Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 31 [con]text Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through July 11.

Salt Lake City Buddhist Temple

JAPANESE

OBON FESTIVAL Saturday, July 11, 2015

211 West 100 South, SLC, UT Ogden Taiko Drum Performance At 7:00 P.M. Traditional Japanese Dancing At 8:00 P.M. Food Served At 1:00 P.M.

FREE ADMISSION P UBLIC WELC OME SLBUDDHIST.ORG


moreESSENTIALS

Monday-Saturday, through July 31, SLCPL.org Justin Carruth: Depart Broadway Center Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, 385-215-6768, through October 3, CUArtCenter.org Linda Kalmar: Artisan Glass Masks Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through July 11, SLCPL.org Milton Neely: Metal Art, a Natural Inspiration, Salt Lake City Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-594-8623, Monday-Saturday, through Aug. 27, SLCPL.org Namon Bills: Elements Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 31 Panopticon Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 25, UtahMOCA.org Reclamation Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, July 9-10, AccessArt.org Robert Bliss & Anna Campbell Bliss: Relational Forms CUAC Contemporary Art, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, July 9-10, CUArtCenter.org Scott Tsuchitani: Internment Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Tuesday-Saturday, through August 1, UtahMOCA.org Sean Morello: Constellations & Supersymmetries Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Aug. 1, UtahMOCA.org Shawna Moore, Close to the Edge Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, 435-649-3001, through July 16, GalleryMAR.com

sign up to volunteer at the a benefit for

Saturday, August 15

full details at utahbeerfestival.com

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Corinne Geertsen, Josanne Glass, Dan Toone Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through July 10, Phillips-Gallery.com The Cost of Anything Alice Gallery, 617 South Temple, 801-245-7272, through July 10, Heritage.Utah.gov Davis County Summer Art Exhibit Davis County Administration Building, 61 South Main, Farmington, July 9-10 Duane Linklater: salt 11 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Drive, 801-581-7332, through Aug. 1, UMFA.utah.edu Eleanor Schultz: Controlled Burn: Pyrography Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday; through July 31, SaltLakeArts.org Highlights of the Collection Tour Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, University of Utah, July 11-12, through October 7, UMFA.Utah.edu Eugene Tachinni: in the hands Salt Lake City Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, June 10-July 18, Monday-Saturday, SLCPL.org Jann Haworth: Round Trip Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through July 16, ModernWestFineArt.com Jared William Christensen: Strange Environment, Corrine and Jack Sweet Branch Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8651, MondaySaturday, through Aug. 15, SLCPL.org Jerry Hardesty: Exposed Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200,

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Do you love beer & animals?

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THE PARIS BISTRO & ZINC BAR

Parisian Nights -Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

NOW OPEN!

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457 As seen on “ Diners,

Serving American Drive-ins AnD Dives” Comfort Food Since 1930

-CreeksiDe PAtios-Best BreAkfAst 2008 & 2010-85 YeArs AnD GoinG stronG-DeliCious MiMosAs & BlooDY MArY’s-sAt & sun 11AM-2PM-live MusiC & weekenD BrunCh“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

4160 Emigration Canyon road

801 582-5807 www.ruthsdinEr.Com

French fare makes a comeback at The Paris. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

F

rench food has always been a bit hard to come by in Salt Lake City. When I first moved here in the early ’90s, the only game in town was the late Max Mercier’s Le Parisien restaurant, which featured continental fare like escargot and Chateaubriand. Le Parisien never offered cutting-edge cuisine but provided comfort and warmth with every meal. Then there was the short-lived Tenderfoot, a French bistro opened in Heber by Mercier’s nephew Jeannot Mercier. It was far ahead of its time for Heber diners—an era when few Americans even knew what frites meant. Then it started to seem, in the mid 2000s, that the French bistro and brasserie movement so popular in New York City (Balthazar, Park Bistro, Les Halles, Pastis, et al) was finally taking root here. Au Bon Appetit, where Takashi is now located, hit all the right notes, as did L’Avenue Bistro (now home to The Dodo) across from Sugar House Park. Both are gone, but not forgotten. To my knowledge, the only bona fide French restaurant still standing in Salt Lake City is Eric DeBonis’ The Paris Bistro & Zinc Bar, which has survived our sometimes-fickle palates and Americans’ love/ hate relationship with all things French (remember “freedom fries?”). Having dined at The Paris recently after skipping it for a year or more, I must say that not only is the restaurant surviving, but it’s thriving. I don’t think it’s ever been better. Maybe that’s because of DeBonis’ and Chef Emmanuel Levarek’s renewed commitment to French fare. For a while, Italian and Mediterranean dishes crept onto The Paris’ menu, and fans of French food—me included—felt a little cheated. With the opening of DeBonis’ Sea Salt restaurant, which features Italian and Mediterranean flavors, The Paris kitchen was able to again focus on classic and contemporary French cuisine and all was right with the world. The Paris menu is so chock-full of temptations, it was hard for me to narrow it down to just a few dishes to enjoy and share. I want the charcuterie plate, but if I order that, and the foie gras de canard au torchon, the sweetbreads and the duck confit, will I wind up with gout before the evening’s out? And, I love the steamed moules marinière ($18.95), but the clams in white wine ($16.95) with San Marzano tomatoes, garlic and sor-

JOHN TAYLOR

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

DINE

rel sound great, too. Should I order the all-natural, wood-oven-roasted Mary’s chicken ($26.95) or the steak au poivre with pommes frites ($19.95)? The solution, of course, it simply to eat at The Paris more often—which is definitely on my to-do list. Allured by the special Menu de Saison, we enjoyed a trio of tartine de chèvre aux fèves et radis—thick, toasted baguette slices smeared with a purée of fresh goat cheese and fava beans with radish slices, chervil and a drizzle of olive oil; it was a beautiful beginning. Next came a serving of the best pea soup I’ve ever had: a gloriously fresh bowl brimming with the spring flavors of English peas, fava beans, chives, mint, chervil and crème fraîche ($6.95). Then, remembering I have a physical scheduled for next week, I allowed sanity to prevail and passed on the foie gras, escargot and charcuteries in favor of my single favorite food on the planet: veal sweetbreads ($18.95). Chef Levarek, who hails originally from Paris, knows what to do with sweetbreads. His ris de veau à la Grenobloise is a generous serving of tender, melt-in-themouth, pan-seared sweetbreads, lightly butter-browned, with a heaping helping of fresh chanterelles, and classic caperlemon-parsley sauce. Screw gout. My wife and I were enjoying glasses of Beatrice Defresne Bourgogne Chardonnay ($9.95) and superior table service by the Paris staff and especially our server, another Parisian named Du Bois, when I spied a familiar face. Those who’ve been around long enough to remember the aforementioned Le Parisien restaurant will probably also remember the backbone of Max Mercier’s service staff: a woman named Flo. Well, Flo is still doing what she does best—nurturing customers like they were her own kids—but now she’s doing it at the Paris. Levarek says of Flo, “That’s our matriarch!” With our French server, Du Bois, and the French Chef Levarek in the kitchen, I began to feel like I was back in France

Mussels, shallots & wine: Intoxicating moules marinière myself. Somehow, The Paris Bistro manages to capture and shine on its customers that special light that the City of Lights is so well known for. And we hadn’t even enjoyed our entrees yet. Call me predictable, but I can’t walk into The Paris without ordering confit de canard aux lentilles du Puy ($19.95). It’s a perfect dish of duck confit made in-house, with tiny, dark Puy lentils, wilted spinach and oyster-mushroom confit with fresh thyme in a scrumptious natural broth. The duck: crispy and browned skin with falling-offthe-bone tender confit meat within. It’s a beautiful thing. The missus ordered Moroccan-style salmon ($28.95) and it, too, was spectacular. I’d never encountered salmon with Moroccan spices and flavors before, but it’s something I’ll be trying to replicate at home: grilled Scottish salmon with spicy harissa and vegetable-olive couscous. Yet another winner. Tempted by desserts like the banana and Nutella crêpes; bananas Foster; and strawberry mille-fueille with whipped cream, we finally settled on something a tad lighter: lemon grass crème brûlée ($8.95). It was wonderful, but we weren’t done yet. Having learned that it was recently my birthday, the kitchen sent out a fabulous applestuffed crêpe, caramelized with Calvados, sea salt, crème fraîche and a candle on top. I looked around and, for a moment, thought I was sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower. CW

THE PARIS BISTRO & ZINC BAR

1500 S. 1500 East 801-486-5585 TheParis.net


, e u q e b r a b g n i n n i w d r a w a t s u j t o N o o t e r a f n a c i r e m fresh A

’ S T I BANaD l l i r g n a c i r e m

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440 MAIN ST. 435.649.7337

banditsbbq.com

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3176 East 6200 South 801.944.0505

PARK CITY, UTAH

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PATIO OPEN  FULL BAR

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Monday - Kid’s Eat Free Tuesday - All You Can Eat Bbq Wednesday - Half-Price Apps And Drink Specials In The Bar


BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

2014

Get a Lift

The Lift Cafe has opened at 14 W. 300 South (formerly Pepper’s Pita) in downtown Salt Lake City, and the word around the City Weekly offices is that it’s well worth a visit. The cafe is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., offering breakfast items, soups, salads and assorted sweets. The sandwich selection is especially robust, ranging from the B.L.T. and Italian sub to classic French dip, egg salad, roasted turkey, and an avocado garden sandwich. The focus in the morning is on breakfast burritos; lunchtime soups include creamy tomato, cheesy broccoli, chicken noodle, clam chowder and vegetable beef. Call 385-242-7640 for details.

2005

2007 2008

voted best coffee house

Tasting Davis County

The annual Davis County Taste of the Town event, hosted by the Davis Chamber of Commerce, will take place on Friday, July 24, from 4-7 p.m. at Layton Commons Park. “Taste of the Town seems to grow every year. It is an exciting and energetic event that is perfect for everyone, from young families to senior citizens,” said Angie Osguthorpe, Davis chamber president. “We will have about 25 local restaurants represented, sharing their delicious food samples with our guests, as well as live music and lots of shade under beautiful trees. This year is especially exciting, because we’ve broadened the event to include even more activities for children and young teens. In addition to face painting and balloon artists, there will be an outdoor Nerf dart-tag arena, Disney princesses to meet and mingle with and a children’s area with various activities.” In addition to Layton restaurants like MacCool’s Public House and Roosters Brewing Co., this year’s Taste of the Town will feature new participants from Farmington’s Station Park, including Johnny Rockets, Caffé Torrino, Costa Vida, Harmons and Fizz. The event is free to attend, but tickets for food samples are $1 each and can be exchanged for food at the participating restaurants’ booths.

A Casual

Dining Experience ow in open for lunc & d

Pie & Beer Brunch

SERVING

Looking for a quiet escape on Pioneer Day? Oasis Cafe (151 S. 500 East, 801-322-0404) will offer both brunch and dinner for the first time on July 24— perfect for noshing between parades and fireworks. Quote of the week: Eating is touch carried to the bitter end. —Samuel Butler Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

er

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ninth & ninth & 254 south main

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FOOD MATTERS

tapas & more 5pm-9pm

by 801-634-7203 | 5244 S. Highland Dr.


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3390 South State Street | www.Hotdynasty.com Party Room available for Reservation: 801-809-3229

JULY 9, 2015 | 33

WE HAVE HATCH NEW MEXICO GREEN CHILES

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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Sips of Paris

Paris-worthy, wallet-friendly French wines for summer. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

n this week’s City Weekly Dine column (p. 30), I explore the marvelous French fare that Salt Lake City’s The Paris Bistro & Zinc Bar has to offer. One of the things I didn’t spend much time on is the restaurant’s excellent wine list. There are wines for every budget available at The Paris, and the selection features many hidden or under-the-radar gems—for example, a bottle of Roger Sabon “Prestige” Chateauneuf-du-Pape 2006. Still, you might have a special bottle of wine that you’ve been wanting to drink and decide to BYOB. The Paris offers a customer-friendly policy of waiving the corkage fee on each bottle customers bring in with every bottle purchased from the restaurant. That’s more than fair. Well, whether you’re dining at The Paris, in Paris, at home or elsewhere, here are a few of my Paris-worthy French wines for

the season. In France, ironically, wine drinkers (mostly) don’t fuss too much over wine; they just enjoy them. These are those sorts of wines: no-nonsense, not-too-hard on the budget wines to enjoy without a lot of fanfare. On a warm summer evening, it’s hard to beat a Rosé wine from Provence. One of my favorites comes from the district of Coteaux d’Aix, in the appellation of Provence: Commanderie de la Bargemone 2014 ($17). The Commanderie was founded by Templar knights in the 13th century and today is home to 160 acres of sustainably grown and managed vineyards. Don’t let its White Zinfandel hue fool you; this is a bone-dry, crisp wine with classic Rosé flavors of red currant and strawberry. It’s ideal for picnics or outdoor concerts. Another easy-to-drink and easy-to-find Rosé favorite of mine is E. Guigal Côtes du Rhône Rosé 2014 ($17). This is a 60/30/10 percent blend of Grenache, Cinsault and Syrah that is easy on the palate and the wallet. It’s blended from cuvées of a number of top growers throughout the Rhône Valley, and shows hints of raspberry, strawberry and gooseberry, along with a strong mineral backbone. For a red wine that’s light on the palate—even on a hot summer’s day—I really like Chateau des Capitans Juliénas 2011 ($13.95), produced by the famous Beaujolais

DRINK master, Georges Duboeuf. Made from 100 percent Gamay— the grape synonymous with Beaujola is—th is Juliénas is lightbodied and elegant on the palate, with l ight-to-med iu m tannins. Flavors of strawberry and plum mingle with blueberry and black currant, and the wine finishes with subtle spices. Juliénas would be a good match for foods from the grill. The French wines of Corbieres and Minervois, in the Languedoc wine region, tend to fly a little under-the-radar price-wise and in terms of press. That’s fine with me, since it allows them to remain some of the best bargains from France. I particularly like Chateau Pech-Latt Corbieres 2013 ($15). It’s an organically produced red wine made from 50

percent Carignan along with Syrah, Grenache and Mourvèdre. The wine pours deep, dark red, with red and black berries on the nose. The tannins are big and ripe, with well-balanced, concentrated fruit and spices on the tongue. You can drink this Corbieres now, but it will benefit for a few years of aging, as well. A few other terrific French wine values to track down—either at your wine store or in restaurants—include these recent favorites of mine: Domaine du Tariquet Côté ($15), a Chardonnay-Sauvignon Blanc blend; Guigal Côtes du Rhone Blanc 2013 ($17.75); Côté Mas Blanc Méditerranée 2014 ($13); and Languedoc’s Arrogant Frog Sauvignon Blanc 2013 ($11). Santé! CW


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1615 SOUTH FOOTHILL DR. 801 583 8331 • BLEUBISTROSLC.COM TUES-SAT | 4:30-10PM SAT | 9AM -10PM • SUN | 9AM -3PM

Ahh Sushi

Located just downstairs from Martine restaurant in downtown Salt Lake City, Ahh Sushi is a terrific place to drop in for your sushi fix. Laidback, friendly servers rush between Ahh Sushi and the adjacent O’Shucks bar with plates of half-priced sushi (between 5-6 p.m.) and giant schooners of beer. The Wednesday food & drink specials attract particularly large crowds. Don’t let the fun, friendly atmosphere fool you, though: Ahh Sushi is serious about sushi, and you’ll find some of the best rolls, nigiri and sashimi in town right here, at very fair prices. 22 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-359-6770

BEST RUEBEN

Who doesn’t love a vast selection of cheese, meats and fine chocolates?

Aroy-D Thai Cuisine

Aroy-D focuses on presenting the diner with flavorful dishes highlighting spices and herbs that grow in Thailand’s unique climate. The lunch menu features fare such as pad thai and drunken noodles for around $10. Popular dinner entrees include the pad preaw wan, a sweet & sour stir-fry of meat, vegetables and pineapple; and, of course, curry. The tasty gang-dang curry comes with your choice of meat or tofu, plus bell pepper, zucchini and bamboo shoots, all in a creamy red curry sauce. Almost all dishes can be prepared gluten-free upon request. If you enjoy foreign beers, try Singha (from Thailand) or Sapporo (from Japan). 1167 W. 12th St., Ogden, 801-393-2828, Aroy-D.net

Bombay Grill

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

Be sure to check out our growing bitters and cocktail mixers collection. Just in time for summer.

Experience a local favorite for authentic, fresh Indian food. Begin your exotic meal with pakoras, samosas or aloo chat, which is a tangy blend of potatoes, chickpeas and chopped onion marinated in spices, lemon juice and herbs. Then, tuck into Indian mainstays such as biryani dishes, tandoori specialties, rich masalas and, of course, curries that will make your taste buds happy. For dessert, grab an order of kheer (Indian rice pudding), made with basmati rice and served with almonds. If you don’t have time for a sit-down meal, get your food to go. 3035 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-393-4828

Blue Lemon

At Blue Lemon, you’ll discover a wide variety of healthy, wholesome fare in a vibrant, modern setting—”pure, clean food with a twist.” Start out in this cafeteria-style eatery with a plate of hummus, pesto-chicken flatbread or a spinach & pear salad before moving on to something more substantial, like artisan sandwiches or a full gourmet entree. The chipotle-pineapple barbecue brisket sandwich is tempting, and veggie lovers will enjoy the artichoke and tomato panini. Entrees include lemonchicken Alfredo, citrus-seared Atlantic salmon, blackbean ravioli and fiery fajita-style fish tacos. Enjoy a smoothie like the Strawberry Sweetness or Mango Madness with your meal. Multiple locations, BlueLemon.com

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

caputosdeli.com

JULY 9, 2015 | 35

BREAKFAST • LUNCH SMALL PLATES & DINNER ENTREES

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call for details 801-583-8331

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Patio Now Open

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves!

here... Summer is

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net


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1951 eST. Complete listings at cityweekly.net

Astro Burger

64 Y e a r s West valley 4591 s. 5600 W. | 801.968.2130 absdrivein.com

Hamburgers • Hand-C ut F • Thick S hakes & M ries alts

Better burger... meet better breakfast! ser ved 7:00 - 11:00 am M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

36 | JULY 9, 2015

Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served daily at Astro Burger, where Greek meets American cooking. For a morning wake-me-up, try the gyro & egg sandwich. Burgers range from the classic Astro burger to the mushroom Swiss & chile-verde burger. The patty melt is always a good option, as are Greek menu items like the chicken kabobs, gyro sandwich, lemon rice and baklava. For the adventurous, there’s also a pastrami burrito on the menu. Multiple Locations, AstroBurgers.com

Courtyard Cafe

Located in the Salt Lake City Downtown Courtyard by Marriott, the Courtyard Cafe mainly serves tourists and business folks staying at the hotel. The Courtyard Cafe is open daily for your choice of a cooked-to-order or a full buffet breakfast, and weekdays for dinner. Just outside the restaurant, you can relax near to a cascading waterfall that drowns out the city sounds and allows you to enjoy the star-filled nights in Salt Lake City. 130 W. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-531-6000, Marriott.com

Braza Grill

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Transport yourself to Rio de Janeiro at this authentically Brazilian churrascaria, where an all-you-can-chew parade of grilled meats is served rodizio-style until you say “uncle!” Servers with skewers bearing a variety of beef, pork, chicken, lamb and luscious grilled pineapple rotate among Braza’s tables delivering the goods. There’s also an extensive buffet with tasty items like hearts of palm, feijoada, quail eggs, pastas, salads and a gazillion other options. Seafood lovers aren’t left out, either; there’s a special seafood buffet on Mondays. 5927 S. State, Murray, 801-506-7788, BrazaGrillUtah.com

Crown Burger

Beer & Wine

EV Y A D L AL

At Crown Burger, not unexpectedly, the signature burger is its namesake: a charbroiled cheeseburger piled high with hot pastrami. Crown Burger offers other fast-food fare as well, such as beef burritos, hot pastrami sandwiches, steak sandwiches, gyros, fish burgers, fries, onion rings and other burger varieties. Crown Burger also carries its own version of the regional condiment, fry sauce— a combination of ketchup, mayonnaise and spices, born in Utah. Multiple locations, Crown-Burgers.com

El Chubasco

WHY WAIT?

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GOODEATS

Old Fashioned GOODNESS

AND ASIAN GRILL M-Th 11-10•F 11-11•S 12-11•Su 12-9

9000 S 109 W, SANDY & 3424 S STATE STREET

801.566.0721•ichibansushiut.com NOW OPEN! 6930 S. STATE STREET • 801.251.0682

For years, El Chubasco has been treating locals and Park City visitors alike to authentic, inexpensive Mexican fare. You can find everything from street-style tacos and tostadas to big bowls of menudo, pozole, birria and albondigas soup. The fish and carnitas tacos are not to be missed, and you can customize your meal from the plentiful salsa bar, with an array of different salsas and toppings from fiery to mild—all made in-house. Grab a cold soda or cerveza to round out your meal in this friendly, vibrant eatery. 1890 Bonanza Drive, Park City, 435-6459114, ElChubascoMexicanGrill.com

Roosters

In addition to great food, Roosters also has some of the best local brews, including the rich Junction City Chocolate Stout. If you can’t decide which Roosters beer to order, ask about sampling. Roosters also brews its own root beer, which you can have straight up or

“loaded.” If you’re at the Ogden location, enjoy a brew and a decadent basket of naughty fries (fries with pepper jack, gorgonzola and Louisiana hot sauces) on the outside covered patio, upstairs in the dining area or—if e-in have your libations with a side of sports—at rivrather Dyou’d the main-floor bar. 253 25th St., Ogden; 748 W. Heritage Park Blvd., Layton, 801-774-9330, RoostersBrewingCo.com

Lazy Day Cafe

There’s nothing like a lazy day full of relaxation and comfort food. Lazy Day Cafe offers a calm, homey atmosphere, and stopping here is just like visiting a friend’s house. Their motto is “work to live, not live to work.” This retro cafe/ diner offers both table and counter service, and is open for breakfast and lunch. Try the steamy biscuits with gravy or lemon pancakes with an endless cup of coffee. The Lazy Day burger—a garlic burger complete with blue cheese—is a favorite among locals, along with the pulled-pork sandwiches. Who can say no to comfort food? 2020 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-953-0311, LazyDayCafe.net

Park City Pizza Company

Located in Kimball Junction, Park City Pizza Company serves up delicious, old-fashioned pizza— the kind you can’t get from chains. At Park City Pizza, you can eat in, get a pizza to take out, or have your meal delivered. Popular hand-tossed pizzas include the Weed Eater (mushrooms, olives, peppers and onion), the Mexican (jalapeños), Greek (spinach, artichokes and tomatoes), Santa Fe (chicken, cilantro and tomatoes) and, of course, good old pepperoni. There is also an entire menu of gluten-free options. In addition to pizza, there are also salads, sandwiches and calzones. 1612 Ute Blvd., Park City, 435-649-1591, ParkCityPizzaCo.com

Lamb’s Grill

Lamb’s is one of Salt Lake City’s most durable and endearing downtown institutions. Comforting, classic dishes, like the baby-beef liver & onions or corned-beef hash breakfasts, have been served on the same marble countertop under the same light fixtures since its opening in 1939. Patrons can choose to sit at an original booth or white-linen-topped table for dining. Daily fish specials for lunch and pretheater dinner specials add charm to a moderately priced, elegant menu. 169 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-364-7166, LambsGrill.com

Runnin Cafe

Whether you are looking for a snack between frames or a full meal to satisfy your hunger, the Runnin Cafe has what you need. Conveniently located inside Bonwood Bowl, you are guaranteed to enjoy the food here. The Runnin Cafe is a full-service restaurant, with catering for company parties, private events, league banquets, and more. You can get breakfast, burgers, Buffalo wings, pizzas, nachos, Navajo tacos and more. 2500 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-487-7758, BonwoodBowl.com/runnincafe/cafe. html


Come Celebrate Peruvian Independence Month!

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

Little America Lucky H Bar & Grille

The newly decked-out Lucky H Bar sports a soothing blue-and-tan color scheme, a post-modern looking circular-shaped bar, and contemporary lighting and fixings. As for the Grille, it looks like a classy steakhouse, with comfy chairs and banquettes. The menu is much like Little America itself: a mix of old and new. Chef Berhard Gotz’s menu ranges from Continental to more nouveau offerings. For starters, we shared the assorted appetizer platter of one tasty crab cake with remoulade, a single seared scallop, one jumbo shrimp, and a generous portion of homemade gravlax with capers; for sharing purposes, how about two scallops and two shrimp? There are Mad Men-style throwbacks, such as Prime Rib in both a 14-ounce “Gentlemen’s” cut or more petite 10-ounce “Lady’s” portion. But there are also up-to-date choices like a tender, perfectly roasted Mary’s free-range, all-natural chicken. The house salad could have used some work presentation-wise; a giant cucumber slice and oversized chunk of underripe tomato required a knife and fork to eat. Reviewed July 2. 500 S. Main, 801-596-5704, SaltLake.LittleAmerica.com

Yellowtail Japanese Bistro

After several different restaurants have occupied the space at what is now the Park City Waldorf Astoria, the current one, Powder, with Chef Ryker Brown, is the best of them all. Start with an artisanal cheese board or charcuterie board sourced from local purveyors, or perhaps a refreshing summer salad like gold, purple and red baby beets served with watermelon, Feta cheese, hazelnuts and watercress, drizzled with white balsamic vinegar. The tasty ahi tuna tataki appetizer is sushi-grade ahi tuna peppered and seared just long enough to create a crisp outer crust, with the interior of the tuna left essentially uncooked, cut into squares and served with radish, micro cilantro leaves, serrano pepper and a ginger-soy-lime vinaigrette. Chef Brown has kicked the fried-chicken comeback up a few notches by preparing his organic chicken sous vide for at least 24 hours, then deep-frying it ever so briefly; the chicken is so tender and juicy that it’s astonishingly delicious. Finish up with hot, sugar-dusted beignets with raspberry coulis and vanilla cream. Reviewed June 18. Waldorf Astoria, 2100 Frostwood Drive, Park City, 435-647-5566, ParkCityWaldorfAstoria.com

Fresh homemade food. Family owned. • 3411 Redwood Road • 801.906.0934

197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

Red House

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I’ve only seen two non-Asian customers during my visits, and I consider that an auspicious sign. All of the restaurant’s specials and much of the rest of the menu is written in Chinese; there is an English menu without prices, but those prices are ridiculously low. Start with a plate of a dozen made-from-scratch steamed dumplings—perfectly cooked, fresh-made pasta purses stuffed with juicy minced pork, cabbage and Chinese chives. I normally like to begin a Chinese meal with hot & sour soup, but was told by our friendly server that it was too big for two people. Generous portions are the norm; unless you come with a crowd, there will be leftovers. Often in restaurants, I leave thinking, “I could’ve made that at home.” But the fragrance, flavors and complexity of dishes such as cumin-spiced lamb and garlicky, fiery, slightly sweet pork ribs are another story altogether. My favorite dish so far is shredded, tender pork and soft, airy tofu tossed with peas, carrots and onion in a gorgeous, spicy sauce with anise and ginger notes. Reviewed June 11. 1465 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-821-3622, RedHouseSLC.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Attractive wood floors, contemporary design features, and beautiful lighting have turned the somewhat sadlooking spot that once was Shogun into a very eye-catching dining destination. The menu still seems to be a work in progress: An order of kushi shrimp was disappointingly small and overcooked. A much better starter would be delicate yellowtail slices, or the lightly seared tuna tataki. Whereas a standard order of nigiri at most sushi bars is two pieces, Yellowtail offers its nigiri a la carte; I recommend the raw scallops, yellowtail belly, tuna and snapper, all served in generous portions over good quality sushi rice. The “bistro” part of the name comes into play with some of its not-so-standard specials. Yellowtail serves foie gras sashimi with balsamic vinegar and yuzu “Jell-O.” There are some bargains to be had on the midday menu, including a combo lunch platter and the lunchtime sushi/sashimi platters which include miso and salad or rice, plus a choice of 10 pieces of sashimi; 12 sushi roll pieces or 10 pieces of “chef’s choice” nigiri. Add a surprisingly good wine list, and you’ll find a solid place to satisfy your sushi and sashimi appetite. Reviewed June 25. 321 S. Main, 801-364-7142, YellowtailSLC.com

Powder

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JULY 9, 2015 | 37


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38 | JULY 9, 2015

SELF/LESS

Buried Personality

CINEMA

A director’s distinctive style is lost in the rote thrills of Self/Less.

SIDESHOW

Too Much Min-formation

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net

D

espite a film journalist’s most earnest efforts, we aren’t clued into everything about movies all the time. While many features roll into theaters after months of hype, or a respected auteur’s latest work is greeted with a similarly lengthy period of festival buzz, occasionally, it happens that a new film arrives where we might absorb little knowledge regarding what it’s about, or even who made it. See, John and Jane Q. American Moviegoer? We critics can be just like you, after all. So it came to pass that, on a recent morning, the motion picture Self/Less unfolded before me. And after nearly two hours, when the director’s name finally appeared on the screen, my first reaction was, “That was a Tarsem Singh movie?” The name may be unfamiliar to you, but you’ve probably seen his work, going all the way back to his iconic music video for R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion.” He’s made movies that, no matter what you thought about their overall quality, were never wanting for visual imagination: The Cell, The Fall, even his more commercially mainstream work like Immortals and Mirror Mirror. Of the many things one could say about a Tarsem Singh movie, you could never say it didn’t look like a Tarsem Singh movie. And yet we have this science-fiction suspense yarn, which begins with a multimillionaire New York City real-estate tycoon named Damian Hale (Ben Kingsley) who’s dying of cancer. He’s willing to use his money to destroy the careers of rivals in the interest of preserving his empire, so it’s no surprise that he’s willing to consider using that money to prolong his life—even if that means considering an experimental procedure in which his consciousness

is transferred into a new, genetically engineered host body. But when Damian wakes up in his new body (Ryan Reynolds) and receives his new identity of Edward Kitner, he begins to have hallucinations that suggest someone else might have once occupied that body. Rote conspiracy-thriller elements—built around a plot nearly identical to the 1966 John Frankenheimer film Seconds—ensue, including (but not limited to): dark sedans following people, friends turning out to be secret spies, Internet search-engine research, children in peril. The “mystery” of Damian’s new identity is resolved fairly quickly—you already know if you’ve seen the trailer—leaving little more than the visceral effectiveness of a few individual chase sequences or hand-to-hand combat moments to keep you watching. That empty space easily could have been occupied by a more interesting central performance, but it’s not clear how much of that problem is Ryan Reynolds’ fault. It’s true that he makes little effort to mimic Kingsley’s mannerisms in a way that seems consistent with the way we see other beneficiaries of this procedure behave, or to convey Damian’s supreme master-of-theuniverse confidence now that he’s also a physical specimen, aside from throwing a few elbows in pick-up basketball. That failing, however, seems to be built into the script by David and Alex Pastor, who seem only vaguely interested in digging into the socioeconomic side of this “business,” including those who profit from the sacrifices of soldiers. Self/Less didn’t require a sermon, but it could have used something to anchor the story more firmly as an allegory with a conscience.

Matthew Goode and Ryan Reynolds in Self/Less It could have used more of Tarsem’s distinctive Tarsem-ness, as well, especially in a story with a similar “living in another person’s mind” hook as The Cell. He gets to show off a few stylistic flourishes as strange memories begin to intrude on Damian’s consciousness, as well as a montage capturing Damian/Edward enjoying the hedonistic life afforded him by his healthy new body. There’s also an unsettling sequence in which Tarsem cross-cuts between an argument and a young girl making her way toward a room too quiet and full of toys to be anything but creepy. And that’s about it, as the look of Self/Less remains mostly functional, pushing the story forward without much attempt to expand the concept of a person absorbing another man’s life. Then again, maybe there’s something metaphorically appropriate about that. If this was ever meant to be a cautionary tale about the human cost of valuing corporate “creators” over those who facilitate that creation, maybe we’re seeing the effects in action. Self/Less finds a unique filmmaker’s personality buried beneath something that seems to have no greater goal than continuing to exist. CW

SELF/LESS

BB Ryan Reynolds Matthew Goode Ben Kingsley Rated PG-13

TRY THESE The Cell (2000) Jennifer Lopez Vince Vaughn Rated R

The Fall (2006) Lee Pace Catinca Untaru Rated R

Immortals (2011) Henry Cavill Mickey Rourke Rated R

Mirror Mirror (2012) Lily Collins Julia Roberts Rated PG

I

love the Minions. I thought they deserved their own movie. But I was wrong. Turns out, the Minions are better off without a backstory. Their mystery was part of their charm. Their Minion-ness is essential to their humor. And none of that is present here. Oh, Minions is fine for kids. They’ll laugh at the slapstick antics of the yellow blobs and have a fine time, probably. But the biological evolution of the Minions, which opens the film, makes me wonder how they could have sexual reproduction when they all appear to be male. The cultural history of the Minions—driven to find the biggest, baddest villains to serve and worship until accidentally killing them with their bumbling over-enthusiasm—ends after Napoleon. What, they couldn’t have done the planet a favor and latched onto Hitler? After mysteriously sitting out the bloodiest decades of human history with the worst villains ever, the Minions reemerge in 1968 to seek a new Big Boss. Minion scouts Kevin, Bob and Stuart (all voiced by director Pierre Coffin) settle on the world’s first female supervillain, Scarlet Overkill (voice of Sandra Bullock), who plans to take over the British monarchy, which allows for lots of poking fun at Englishness. Coffin is French, so you’re watching a lot of ethnichumor payback happening here. Some of it is even mildly amusing; it’s not exactly the height of cruelty to suggest that the Brits drink a lot of tea. Minions on the whole is mildly cute, but the Minions kind of don’t work as the heroes. The movie demands that they behave in an un-Minion-like manner which is entirely contrary to why we fell in love with them in the first place. Can’t we just let Minions be minions? And not know so much about them? Please?

MINIONS

BB Sandra Bullock Pierre Coffin Rated PG


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40 | JULY 9, 2015

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE 100-YEAR-OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED BBB That lengthy title is a bit of a misdirection, as it turns out: The abrupt departure by Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson) from a nursing home, minutes before his centennial birthday party, is revealed—through a series of flashbacks and a wildly entertaining road trip—to be the least interesting thing he’s ever done. And yet, it’s thoroughly in character with a man whose hundred years of life have been one extended matter-of-fact refusal to worry about anything or even be concerned with anything, other than eating, drinking and blowing things up (and having a good friend or two to enjoy these things with). Allan’s adventures defy description, and in any case, the fun of this film derives in great part from the performance Gustafsson gives at its center, and the refreshing lightness of director Felix Herngren’s tone. What

results is, rather than the “Swedish Forrest Gump” promised by the film’s marketing materials, something much more genuinely affecting, and funnier. Not all the jokes land, but enough do that it’s a thoroughly satisfying comedy, well-deserving of its status as an international hit. Opens July 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Danny Bowes

such a complicated relationship—yikes, this movie is rough going. She may have been “a complete force of nature,” as one record company exec describes her, but even personality cannot win out over the demands of corporate “art” and contractually obligated fame and a gossip-hungry public. Opens July 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

AMY BBBB She told us that she was self-destructive, that fame would kill her. She said it in her lyrics. She said it in interviews. That’s all right here in this astonishing documentary, one of the best films of the year so far. Long before the death of Amy Winehouse in 2011, the result of years of substance abuse, she shouted her despair for everyone to hear. It’s what made her music so powerful: It was full of raw pain. This is an immense movie, looming in tragedy and portent, an infuriating and dismal portrait of how celebrity warps artistry, wealth warps love, and suffering trumps everything. Of course, “personal responsibility,” etc.: Winehouse was ultimately responsible for Winehouse, but when her fame meant she was surrounded by yes-men, including the father with whom she had

EDEN BBB.5 In one sequence from Mia Hansen-Løve’s decades-spanning drama, two friends drag drunken Paul Vallée (Félix de Givry) up the stairs past a gray-haired woman. “Kids these days,” the woman sniffs, to which Paul replies, “I’m 34!” That’s a pivotal thematic moment in the story, which follows Paul from 1992, when he discovers the emerging electronic-dance music scene in Paris, through his career as a moderately successful DJ and into the present day. But this isn’t meant as a “scene piece” about electronica or any other music trend. Instead, it’s a finely observed portrait of an artist (of sorts) growing increasingly out of touch with his peers as they marry and have children, who never quite seems to realize that, while he clings to the excitement of a life that was perfect for his 20s, he’s gone as far as he’s going to go. Hansen-Løve’s fondness for discursive narratives means that Eden winds and meanders through its 21-year course, with supporting characters disappearing and reappearing. But that’s part of what makes it effective: watching time flow by as one man mostly stays in one place. Opens July 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

THE GALLOWS [not yet reviewed] High school students encounter mysterious events related to a 20-year-old theater production that ended in tragedy. Opens July 10 at theaters valleywide. (R) MINIONS BB See review p. 38. Opens July 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG) SELF/LESS BB See review p. 38. Opens July 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ACE VENTURA: PET DETECTIVE At Brewvies, July 13, 10 p.m. (PG) CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND At Gallivan Center, July 13, 8:45 p.m. (PG) DAMN! THESE HEELS LGBT FILM FESTIVAL See Essentials, p. 21. At Rose Wagner Center, July 10-12. (NR) CREATION At Main Library, July 14, 7 p.m. (NR) LABYRINTH At Tower Theatre, July 10-11 @ 11 p.m. & July 12 @ noon. (PG) THE ROCKETEER At Library Plaza, July 10, dusk. (PG) (T)ERROR At Rose Wagner Center, July 9, 7 p.m. (NR)


CURRENT RELEASES INSIDE OUT BBBB Any adult basing their “should I see this” decision on commercials has no idea how much emotional complexity director Pete Docter has packed into this terrific adventure, which imagines the emotional “control room” inside an 11-year-old girl whose family has just moved to a new city. The fanciful scenario allows the animators to craft a fantastically detailed world that pops with its own perfect internal logic. Yet, as terrific a technical achievement as it might be, it’s even better at addressing how parents deal with the reality of children transitioning into the more complicated emotional life of adolescence. There’s plenty of fun to be found in the characters and voice performances, but whatever it offers to kids is nothing compared to what Pixar films continue to deliver for adults: storytelling that nails the defining lump-in-the-throat moments of human experience. (PG)—SR

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TERMINATOR GENISYS BB.5 The fragile cause-and-effect issues of time travel take a beating in this addition to the science-fiction franchise. Like the original, it begins with Kyle Reese (Jai Courtney) sent back to 1984 to save Sarah Connor (Emilia Clarke), future mother of rebel-againstthe-machines leader John (Jason Clarke), from a time-traveling robot assassin—but there have been crucial changes in the timeline. The filmmakers throw in plenty of nods to the first two films—including footage that allows old Arnold Schwarzenegger to fight his 30-years-younger self—plus decently crafted set pieces. But the story gets too tangled in exposition rationalizing the characters’ actions and the stakes if they fail, ignoring chances to take advantage of the modern-day plugged-in world. “How?” Reese asks about chronological developments, to which Sarah replies, “Does it matter?” Which might have been the best way to deal with it. (PG-13)—SR

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Deep South

TV

No Excuse No Hurry No Way

Rectify and Ray Donovan are as angsty as ever, and The Strain still scares. Rectify Thursday, July 9 (Sundance)

Season Premiere: Critics spent the first two seasons of Rectify trying explain a series that defies description; the dirt-simple outline being “Daniel (Aden Young) returns to his Georgia hometown after 19 years on death row for murdering his childhood sweetheart due to inconclusive evidence, and the God-fearing townsfolk are understandably—and in some cases, violently—wary of his innocence.” Like them, viewers don’t yet know if he did it, either, and Season 3 seems intent on introducing some hard law & order to this dream-state Southern Gothic, much to the distress of Daniel’s long-suffering, supporting sister Amantha (Abigail Spencer). Seasons 1 and 2 are on Netflix—they’re short, they’re fantastic and you should experience them now.

7 Days In Hell Saturday, July 11 (HBO)

Movie: So many questions: Was Game of Thrones’ Kit Harington aware that this would be his first post-Jon Snow role? Has there ever been a tennis mockumentary before? Did Andy Samberg already own that throwback John McEnroe/Andre Agassi wig? As the title states, 7 Days In Hell chronicles the longest match in tennis history, with “bad-boy” American Aaron Williams (Samberg) taking on British prodigy Charles Poole (Harington). At 45 minutes, 7 Days almost strains the limits of what’s essentially a beercommercial sight gag, but Harington and Samberg commit. And really, what’s not funny about tennis?

The Strain Sunday, July 12 (FX)

Season Premiere: Season 2 of Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s vampire-invasion thriller opens with the most terrifying bedtime story in the history of ever, and escalates from there. The Strain’s first season established New York City as Ground Zero for an ancient, horrific, not-sparkly-nor-pretty vampire race’s takeover of the planet; now that it’s in full swing, Centers for Disease Control docs Ephraim (Corey Stoll, still wearing the wig) and Nora (Mia Maestro) may have sussed

out a cure, whereas Prof. Geezer Van Helsing (David Bradley) would just as soon kill ’em all. It’ll never reach Walking Dead-levels of hyper-fandom, but The Strain deserves credit for being faster-paced and more genuinely scary than that zombie soap opera.

Ray Donovan Sunday, July 12 (Showtime)

Season Premiere: As imposing as he and his giant head are, Ray Donovan star Liev Schreiber is always thisclose to being overshadowed by secondary players (namely Jon Voight as Ray’s unrepentant bad-ass father, Mickey). To complicate matters in Season 3, Deadwood scene-stealer Ian McShane joins the show as a billionaire movie producer who hires Ray to retrieve his kidnapped son (discreetly, of course), and lesser threat Katie Holmes also comes onboard (cue the Inevitable Sex With Ray countdown clock). Fortunately, now that Ray’s estranged from his family and acting as a lone-wolf Hollywood “fixer” free of boss/mentor Ezra (Elliott Gould), his swagger seems to finally match his billing. But don’t worry—Mickey’s still a bad-ass.

The Jim Gaffigan Show Wednesday, July 15 (TV Land)

Series Debut: Darren Star’s Younger, which premiered in the spring, was TV Land’s first toe in the rebranding water as the retro-network dumps Baby Boomers in favor of Gen-Xers (can’t keep catering to a demo that’s almost extinct—unless you’re the GOP). Laugh tracks and cheap sets are being replaced with single-camera film and a snarkier

Rectify (Sundance)

attitude, and The Jim Gaffigan Show is a far more gentle bridge between the two than Younger was. If you’ve seen Gaffigan’s stand-up, you know what he and this sitcom are about: Tubby white guy who tries to do right by his wife and kids, whom he tolerates as much as they tolerate him— oh, and he loooves junk food. If you already like his all-inclusive comedy, The Jim Gaffigan Show won’t do you wrong. For slightly more edge, stick around for …

Impastor Wednesday, July 15 (TV Land)

Series Debut: Michael Rosenbaum (Smallville’s Lex Luthor) plays a hard-partying gambling addict who, to escape thugs and loan sharks, assumes the identity of a new pastor who was supposed to take over a small-town parish— and he later learns that the no-show Craiglist hire is also gay, hence, wackiness. Despite the deep-cheese setup, Rosenbaum sells Impastor with rogue-ish charm and some surprising comedy chops. Funny pilot, but will it hold up for nine more episodes? It had better—TV Land has to fill those Dukes of Hazzard slots with something. CW

Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.


RUSH

Semi-Permanent Waves

MUSIC

Reflecting on an on-again, off-again relationship with Rush. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

S

Rush in: One man’s experience amassing a Rush collection

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I didn’t buy another Rush album until Grace Under Pressure. I was in junior high. Rush was in their keyboard-heavy, A Flock of Seagulls Canadian Geese phase. It was 1984; we were transitioning from Orwellian paranoia into Cold War terror. In the video for “Distant Early Warning,” a kid rides a bomb, Dr. Strangelove-style, toward impact. The chorus is urgent: “The world weighs on my shoulders/ but what am I to do?” It wasn’t soothing, but it helped to know Rush was as worried as I was. Dubbing Grace for a classmate yielded reciprocity: a copy of Signals, where I first heard “Subdivisions.” My group of friends splintered into cliques at this new school, and I wasn’t sure where I fit. Once more, Rush understood: “Nowhere is the dreamer or the misfit so alone,” Lee sang. “Be cool or be cast out.” Still, while others went fanatically deep, I was only sporadically into Rush. I don’t know why. I just know that they kept popping into my life. At my first guitar lesson, my instructor handed me a transcription of Rush’s “Best I Can”—a simple song that belied their extraordinary musicianship. (I asked to learn “Tom Saw yer.” He kinda laughed and said, “Someday.”) I befriended my assistant manager at Arctic Circle, who gave many exuberant, yet hazy, late-night sermons about Rush. My first Rush concert—the Roll the Bones tour—turned into an unintended first date with my first real girlfriend. Eleven years after that show, I got to interview guitarist Alex Lifeson for Guitar World. I didn’t expect to tremble and stutter when he came on the line, but I did. Not for long, though, because his calm, friendly demeanor put me at ease. It was a short Q&A, so I didn’t take the time to tell him any of these stories. Also, I figured he’d had his fill. They say you can have too much of a good thing. If so, I’m happy that this on-again, off-again relationship persists. CW

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ometimes a band follows you. I’ve always considered myself a Rush fan. Since I was 10 years old, I’ve owned Moving Pictures (1981) on LP, cassette, CD and MP3. I’ve intermittently owned the band’s storied concept album, 2112 (1976), in various formats—but I can’t find my CD right now. I once owned copies of Signals (1982), Grace Under Pressure (1984), Roll the Bones (1991) and Test for Echo (1996)—but I’ve also lost them, and I’ve never sought replacements. I just found Snakes and Arrows (2007) on my shelves, but it’s still bound in cellophane. The seasoned Rush fan will say, “What?! No Permanent Waves? What about the legendary live album Exit Stage Left?” I understand their importance in the Rush canon. I simply never acquired them. But I’ve heard them. It was unavoidable. Because, in spite of the Canadian prog trio’s perpetual cult status, nearly everyone has a friend or relative with at least one Rush album. Usually, it’s Moving Pictures. In the 2010 documentary Rush: Beyond the Lighted Stage, drummer Neil Peart says Moving Pictures is the moment “when we became us … Rush was born.” So the album, which is being reissued on heavy vinyl this month, is a fine point of entry. After all, it birthed the radio staples “Limelight,” “Red Barchetta” and “Tom Sawyer.” The latter is the first Rush song I ever heard. I was walking to school in fourth grade. Every morning, I’d meet my friends on the corner of 800 East and 2700 South. At least one of us would have a transistor radio tuned to Rock 103.5. One day, this kid named Blair—usually preoccupied with Queen—sang: “A modern day warrior/ Mean, mean stride/ Today’s Tom Sawyer/ Mean, mean pride.” Everyone knew the song but me, but I was initiated seconds later, when the song’s instantly identifiable keyboard intro started. My friends whooped it up. At that age, you’re not supposed to be able to grasp abstract concepts, but we were close enough to intuit the song’s themes of individuality and rebellion. Obviously, the song is inspired by Mark Twain’s classic novel, which speaks to any young boy. As Peart once explained, the song is about “reconciling the boy and man in myself, and the difference between what people are and what others perceive them to be.” What a great time to hear that song, and carry it with you through puberty into adolescence, and then adulthood! I recall hearing “The Spirit of Radio” for the first time on a rare lonely last leg of that walk to school. Singer-bassist Geddy Lee sang of music making my “morning mood” and of “undemanding contact in your happy solitude.” The chorus played as I passed a 6-foot high wooden fence that caused the morning sun to strobe. “Invisible airwaves crackle with life/ bright antennae bristle with the energy.” Suddenly, the lonely day ahead didn’t look so bad. It only occurred to me the other day how Rush continued to follow me throughout my life. This, even as I gave more of my attention to Kiss. Dio. The Fat Boys. Prince. The Replacements.


EVENTS

PATIO

THIS WEEK

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Jazz Professor Jazz guitarist and educator Corey Christiansen shares his groove. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net

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tah has a history with jazz, and not just the basketball team. Corey Christiansen, one of the top jazz guitarists in the world, isn’t just a highly renowned player, but is also a noted jazz educator, as director of guitar studies and assistant professor in the music department at Utah State University. He was the senior editor at Mel Bay Publications, and director of curriculum and artistic director of the guitar department at the Music School in American Fork. He has been a lecturer at Indiana University, and artist in residence at the Atlanta Institute of Music. He was a natural, growing up in a musical family, influenced by his father, Mike Christiansen, himself a guitarist, author for instructional publisher Mel Bay and USU professor. “He always brought home great records for me to listen to,” Christiansen says, recalling that he “just about wore out” Led Zeppelin’s debut album when he was 6. “I just knew from the time I was 6 years old I wanted to be a professional guitarist.” He cut his teeth with his family’s band at age 10, and was playing in rock bands by 11. Playing with older musicians, he says, “helped me grow and develop. I developed a real love for jazz in my late teens.” His studies helped solidify jazz as his groove, as he earned a bachelor of arts at USU, then a master’s of music at the University of South Florida, where he studied with jazz guitar guru Jack Petersen. When Petersen retired, Christiansen replaced him, and taught on campus. “When I started my professional playing and touring career, I had some amazing mentors including Danny Gottlieb, Vic Juris and Willie Akins,” he says. “A lot of great musicians around the world have treated me better than I deserved, for sure, and have kind of taken me under their wing at times and really helped me understand this music.” Jazz is sometimes seen as academic or esoteric, but as an educator, Christiansen attempts to demystify the genre. “It’s become an academic music, but it is also rooted in the blues,” he says. “Jazz needs to be played with feeling, some soul. That kind of playing doesn’t come from school. In school, you learn the repertoire and the theory of the music, but you can’t learn the feel by someone writing things out on a whiteboard.” Christiansen says, he learned from play-

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LOUNGE

MUSIC

Corey Christiansen speaks the language of jazz.

ing with, and listening to, great players— and listening to them play together. “So I guess I try to impart the same thing: How to practice the language of jazz in a methodical way, so you can express it in an artistic way.” Christiansen’s recordings demonstrate how he’s related the language of jazz to other musical idioms, in his own unique way, and they also showcase his composing and arranging abilities. His output has become a stylistic odyssey, adding influences as disparate as Hendrix and country-western to the jazz mix. This is evidenced on his latest, Lone Prairie (Origin, 2013), a collection of jazz arrangements of country tunes, plus a few Christiansen originals. “The Lone Prairie project was my journey to combine all the elements of music that have been a part of my history.” He plans the followup—titled Factory Girl. While teaching, Christiansen continues to tour prolifically. He performed with his Corey Christiansen Organ Trio at the June farewell celebration for KUER jazz director Steve Williams at the Gallivan Center, and had this to say about this local legend, a jazz educator in his own right: “Steve is a Utah treasure. He was more than a DJ. His program was a source of information … and community. He was a great teacher. We all owe him a debt of gratitude.” To catch his act after a number of out-of-town gigs, Christiansen will perform at a funk/soul/ jazz night show at Why Sound in Logan on Aug. 24. CW


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BRIAN WILSON, RODRIGUEZ Nearly 50 years ago, the man brought the world Pet Sounds. Co-founder of The Beach Boys, Brian Wilson has a new album out this year, No Pier Pressure (three years after the most recent Beach Boys release, That’s Why God Made The Radio), and it’s full of Beach Boys-esque harmonies and—as always—is just really excited to party it up on the beach. It’s guest-star heavy, with country singer Kacey Musgraves, She & Him and two of his fellow Beach Boys, Al Jardine and Blondie Chaplin. Jardine and Chaplin are joining him on tour this summer, and even though the three are lacking Wilson’s brothers and vocalist Mike Love, the trio are touring plenty of Beach Boys classics along with the new material: “Little Deuce Coupe,” “California Girls,” “Sloop John B,” “God Only Knows” and way more. The tunes themselves are short, but their set list is quite long. He is joined by Rodriguez, the talented folk rocker fetaured in the 2013 documentary film Searching for Silverman. He doesn’t have a new release this year, but his grimy, groovy tunes are beloved and probably what fans want to hear anyway. Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7:30 p.m., $65-$70, RedButteGarden.org

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SATURDAY 7.11 BLITZEN TRAPPER At the end of their 2014 tour, country/folk jam-band Blitzen Trapper, from Portland, Ore., played Neil Young’s Harvest track by track, and recorded it live. They released that record, Live Harvest (Vagrant), on 2015’s Record Store Day, and now they are touring the covers, as well as original songs. The guys of Blitzen Trapper are more experimental than the average country/ folk band, throwing in electronic effects and art rock elements. David Williams opens. The State Room, 638 S. State, July 11, 9 p.m., $25; TheStateRoom.com, Blues, Brews & BBQ, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, July 12, 4:30 p.m., free, Snowbasin.com ROCKY VOTOLATO Hospital Handshakes (No Sleep Records), the newest release from gloomy Seattle singer/ songwriter Rocky Votolato is as emotional and heavy as his previous releases True Devotion (Barsuk, 2010) and Television of Saints (Undertow). He’s touring solo this time around, sans backing band; it’ll be just him and his acoustic guitar, like the quintessential modern troubadour. That said, he’s bringing fellow singer/songwriters Chris Farren and David Hause. The album itself has a lot of different melodies going on, so even though it will be an acoustic set, this stripped-down performance is going to be quite a bit more than mere strumming of four basic chords underneath the dramatic lyrics. Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $13 in advance, $15 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Blitzen Trapper

MONDAY 7.13 CEREMONY There’s certainly some violence in the rambunctious performance of the hardcore punk band, Ceremony, from California, but they have some very beachy ‘90s garage grooves. Their newest album, The L-Shaped Man (Matador), is calmer (well, at points. Not all the time), but the live performance will be energetic, sweaty and hearty. They also have a giant list of covers, from “California Über Alles,” by Dead Kennedys, to “Pressure’s On,” by Red C. They are the headliners for a full lineup: Tony Molina, Creative Adult, Pure Disgust and Barge. Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 8 p.m., $12 in advance, $14 » day of show, KilbyCourt.com

Rocky Votolato

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TUESDAY 7.14

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INDIGO GIRLS The Indigo Girls heard the news about marriage rights being extended to everyone while preparing for a show near their hometown of Atlanta. Amy Ray and Emily Saliers are both LGBT advocates, and their music is soaked with political and environmental activism. So, yes, their tour is energized right now. They are touring a cover of “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” from The Charlie Daniels Band, with a smoking violinist, Lyris Hung (the symphonic element is scaled way back from 2013, when they played with the Utah Symphony). The women are giving their new record, One Lost Day (Vanguard), away free to all fans who buy a ticket to the show. Caroline Aiken opens. Ed Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Drive, Layton, July 14, 8 p.m., $29-$52, DavisArts.org

THE ARISTOCRATS This trio takes its name from the dirty improvisational joke—a rather apt appellation considering they play a hybrid of metal and jazz fusion. As you might expect, they’re really into blue humor. Their 2011 debut boasts such songs as “Boing! … I’m in the Back” and “Blues Fuckers.” They backed off on the raunchy song titles on 2013’s Culture Clash, and again on their latest, Tres Caballeros (on their own Boing! label). Just a little, though. Caballeros boasts a song called “Kentucky Meat Shower.” Guitarist Guthrie Govan is a newly minted guitar hero, having recently graced the cover of Guitar World. So there’s more to these cats than having the ability to watch their puerility. (Randy Harward) Club X, 445 S. 400 West, 7 p.m., $15 in advance, $20 day of show, Smithstix.com

SONREAL Vancouver hip-hop artist SonReal (alias of Aaron Hoffman), has a raw, piano-heavy EP out this year, For The Town (Blackbox). When he’s not spilling his soul on the stage, he’s an upbeat, quick-paced rapper, with catchy hooks (again, on piano), like on “Preach.” This is his first chance headlining, after just finishing a national tour with Seattle rapper Grieves. He’s a few years into his recording career (his first album, Where’s Waldo, dropped in 2011 on Goodlife, Inc.), and this album—along with the live performance of it—is an autobiographical of the last four years. Local rappers Tell City and Osseous Dusk are playing along with him. Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 8 p.m., $12, KilbyCourt.com


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COMING SOON July 21: Crook & The Bluff July 22: Benefit Show July 23: Slim Cessna’s Auto Club July 25: Torche + Melt Banana July 26: TBA July 27: Andrea Gibson July 28: Lower Dens July 29: Unknown Mortal Orchestra July 30: FREE SHOW After Twilight Party with Matty Mo July 31: Max Pain & The Groovies Aug 1: A.A. Bondy Aug 3: Chicano Batman Aug 4: Your Meteor Tour Send Off Aug 5: FREE SHOW Grand Banks Aug 6: Lee Gallagher Aug 7: Dubwise with Metaphase

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CHARLES ELLSWORTH GRAND BANKS CROOK AND THE BLUFF JULY 9:

JULY 14:

8 PM DOORS

SPECIALS

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Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

GREAT

FOOD & DRINK


SHOTS IN THE DARK P inky’s BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

JOIN US FOR UTAH’S FIRST & ONLY HAPPY HOUR! HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY

AND NEW FOOD MENU

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COME CHECK OUT THE

Thursday, July 9

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W/ HECTIC HOBO friday, july 10

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saturday, july 11

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TERENCE HANSEN BAND

Weeknights monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

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50 | JULY 9, 2015

VOTED BEST CABARET ENTERTAINMENT IN UTAH 3 YEARS RUNNING!

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GREEN RIVER WOOLF BELL BLUES BAND

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JULY 9, 2015 | 51

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KARAOKE STARTS @ 9PM

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STARTS @ POT OVER 9PM ENTER TO WIN CASH & PRIZES

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

SATURDAY 7.11 Hawthorne Heights

Hawthorne Heights have amassed a local following with tender, desperate metalcore radio hits “Ohio is for Lovers,” “Saying Sorry” and “Rescue Me.” They make my inner 13-year-old come out, especially on the former track, which reminds us all to “cut [our] wrists and black [our] eyes.” Ah, the good ol’ days. Long Island hardcore act From Autumn to Ashes— back from a seven-year hiatus—was originally slated to co-headline this bill, but are no longer appearing, due to a “personal emergency.” They’ve promised to make up the dates. Sleepwave and Extinction A.D. and Hollow I Am open the show. (Robby Poffenberger) In the Venue, 579 W. 200 South, 5:30 p.m., $15 in advance, $18 day of show, InTheVenueSLC.com

LIVE MUSIC

Band of Heathens (Newpark Town Center) Brian Wilson, Rodriguez (Red Butte Garden, see p. 46) David Halliday & The New Orleans Project (Garage on Beck) Robyn Kemp (O.P. Rockwell) Sam Vicari, Officer Jenny (Diabolical Records) Scalafrea, Bleeding Crown (The Loading Dock) Sugar House (Liquid Joe’s) Talia Keys (Hog Wallow Pub) toe, StarRo (The Urban Lounge) Triggers & Slips (The Spur Bar & Grill) Zac Brown Band, Muddy Magnolias (USANA Amphitheatre)

FRIDAY 7.10 LIVE MUSIC

American Hitmen, Bury the Wolf (The Royal) Bad Feather (Garage on Beck) Big Bad Voodoo Dadd, Utah Symphony

(Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater at Deer Valley) Big Face and Friends (The Woodshed) Bonanza Town (The Spur Bar & Grill) Brothers Brimm (Brewskis) Duh Inc., Arte Vsop, Sucka Ducka Mob, The Commission (Liquid Joe’s) Electric Cathedral, Charles Ellsworth (Kilby Court) Dead Sara (In the Venue) Dirt Road Devils (Westerner) Gamma Rays (Funk’n Dive Bar) Green River Blues (Fats Grill) Insomniac Folklore (The Dawg Pound) Lake Effect, Quiet Oaks, The Lab Dogs (Hidden Hollow Nature Preserve) L’anarchiste, Haarlem (The Urban Lounge) L.O.L. (Club 90) Nathan Thrills (Moose Lounge) Penrose (Metro Bar) Paul Boruff (Bleu Bistro) Roots of the Rock Party (Hog Wallow Pub) Stacey Board (Snowbird) Talia Keys’ Woodstock Tribute (O.P. Rockwell) Taylor Dayne (Sandy Amphitheater) Third Eye Blind, Dashboard Confessional, Night Terrors of 1927 (The Complex)

PRESENTS

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FRIDAY, JULY 10TH

Appy Hour free appetizers from 5pm-6pm Free Line Dance Lessons 7pm-8:30PM EVERY SUNDAY

Sunday Jazz Brunch 12pm-3pm

full regular menu brunch specials live jazz from the mark chaney trio $4 bloody mary & $3 mimosas • OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR. • ENJOY DINNER & A SHOW NIGHTLY. • MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSIONS. FIND OUR FULL LINE UP ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE.

EVERY THURSDAY Lunch Buffet

12PM-3PM ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BUFFET FOR ONLY $8.95

Comedy Open Mic Night 7PM - FREE - IN THE GREEN ROOM

Live Band Karaoke with This Is Your Band

• ENJOY OUR AWARD WINNING SHADED/ MISTED DECK & PATIO.

2014 326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

9PM-12PM PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT YOU ARE THE LEAD SINGER OF A LIVE BAND! TO SEE THEIR SONG LIST, GO TO

Live Band

FRIDAY, JULY 10 + SATURDAY, JULY 11

L.O.L.

EVERY

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52 | JULY 9, 2015

THURSDAY 7.9

Monday: MARGARITA & MAI TAI MONDAY $3 Tuesday: TACO TUESDAY, TEXAS TEA $4

KARAOKE & PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT W/ ZIMZAM ENT 8PM

Wednesday: TEXAS HOLD ‘EM POKER 8PM-FREE!

BREAKING BINGO W/ PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT 8PM-9:30PM-FREE! WWW.THISISYOURBAND.COM WHISKEY WEDNESDAY Thirsty Thursday SELECT SHOTS $3 ALL PINTS $2 PRIVATE AND SEMI-PRIVATE SPACE FOR MEETINGS AND PARTIES | CALL TO BOOK YOUR SPACE TODAY. | FREE POOL EVERYDAY follow us on facebook & twitter @club90slc • 150 W. 9065 S. • CLUB90SLC.COM • 801.566.3254 • OPEN EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK


The Basement Whiskey Series 1/3 oz Whiskey Pairing Wednesday, July 15th 6:30pm

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FRI SAT

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JULY 9, 2015 | 53

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!


CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

SUNDAY 7.12 Frontier Ruckus

The video for “The Splendid World,” from these indie folkers’ 2014 album Sitcom Afterlife (Quite Scientific), is a single, three-minute tracking shot. The song’s first banjo notes cue a skateboarder, who’s quickly knocked over by a woman with water balloons. Two more skaters replace him, jumping cars and drums, then passing dudes throwing Frisbees, and giving way to a top-hatted hipster on a unicycle. Finally, we see the band themselves—just in time to hear Matthew Milia sing the line, “If I were dumber and detestable, I’d be more successful” while the cast frolics around them. A band this inventive begs to be seen and heard. (Randy Harward) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $10 advance, $12 day of, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Tupelo Moan (ABG’s) Wildfire Country Band (Bountiful City Park) Wirelefant (Metro Bar)

SATURDAY 7.11 LIVE MUSIC

Atrophia (The Moose Lounge) Blind Boys of Alabama, Tony Holiday & the Velvetones (Canyons Resort) Blitzen Trapper, David Williams VII (The State Room, see p. 46) Calee Reed (Stereo Room) Connecting Stars, Ties for Tolliver (Kilby Court) Cold War Kids, The Str!ke, Zodiac Empire, VanLadyLove, Melodicious (Gallivan Center) Devil’s Club (Hog Wallow Pub) Erica Hansen (Ed Kenley Amphitheater) Eternal Summers, Acrylics, Telepanther, Donner Partyhouse (Diabolical Records) Green River Blues (Johnny’s on Second) Hawthorne Heights, Sleepwave, Extinction A.D., Hollow I Am (In the Venue, see p. 52) Justin Martin, Ardalan (The Depot) Kevyn Dern (Snowbird)

L.O.L. (Club 90) Metal Dogs (Brewskis) Mudpuddle (The Spur Bar & Grill) Pigeon, Sly Human (The Royal) Rev Deadeye (Garage on Beck) Rocky Votolato, Dave Hause, Chris Farren (The Urban Lounge, see p. 46) Smokey Robinson with the Utah Symphony (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater at Deer Valley) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonebreed (Barbary Coast) Summer Concert Series (The Canyons) Thalgora, Hisingen, Silent Sorcerer, Through Eternal Mourning (The Loading Dock) Underground Cash Bar (Funk’n Dive Bar) Young Dubliners (Snowbird Resort) The Woolf Bell Band (Fats Grill)

SUNDAY 7.12 LIVE MUSIC

Frontier Ruckus, Daniel Pimentel (The Urban Lounge, see adjacent feature) Mark Chaney Trio (Club 90) Vale of Pnath (Metro Bar)

The

Westerner

54 | JULY 9, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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COUNTRY DANCE HALL, BAR & GRILL

LIVE BAND JULY 10 & 11

An Eclectic mix of olde world charm and frontier saloon

dirt road devils

Spirits • Food • Live Music

wednesdays STEIN WEDNESDAYS

7.09 Talia Keys

7.16 Deception Past

7.10 Roots of the Rocks Party 7.17 Tracorum

FREE LINE DANCING LESSONS · 7PM · NO COVER

7.11 Devils Club

thursdays

FREE WALTZ DANCE LESSONS

7.15 Wesley Cook

7.18 M. Horton Smith & Friends

7PM · NO COVER

fridays

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$

LADIES’ NIGHT NO COVER FOR LADIES

FREE BEGINNER LINE DANCING LESSONS ·

7PM

BIKINI BULL RIDING

CASH PRIZE! FREE TO ENTER!

COMPETITION

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NO COVER BEFORE 8PM

ARRIVE EARLY! FREE TABLE RESERVATIONS

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3200 Big Cottonwood Rd. 801.733.5567 | theHogWallow.com


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

MONDAY 7.13

CHECK US FIRST! LOW OR NO FEES! Thursday, July 9

Toe

Urban Lounge

Friday, July 10

Taylor Dayne Sandy Amplitheater

Saturday, July 11

Telluride 2015-2 Day Pass The Ride Festival

Connecting Stars Arrival: The Music of ABBA Sandy Amphitheater

Rocky Votolato & Dave Hause Urban Lounge

The State Room

TUESDAY 7.14 LIVE MUSIC

Annalise Emerick (Piper Down Pub) Hank Williams, Jr. (Red Butte Garden) The Garden, DJ Genie Factory (In the Venue) Indigo Girls, Caroline Aiken (Ed Kenley Amphitheater, see p. 48) letlive., Charlatan, Turbo Chugg, Visitors, I Capture Castle (The Loading Dock) Lissie, Tyler Lyle (The Urban Lounge) Sarah Bethe Nelson, Max Pain & The Grooves, Rich Girlz (Kilby Court)

WEDNESDAY 7.15

A RelAxed gentlemAn’s club dA i ly l u n c h s p e c i A l s pool, foosbAll & gAmes

$2 pAbst tuesdAys $2.50 RAinieR wednesdAys

no

coveR e ve R!

LIVE MUSIC

The Appleseed Cast, Adjy (The Urban Lounge) The Aristocrats (Club X, see p. 48) The Ataris (Metro Bar) Dave Hahn (Snowbird) Davy Williamson (Fats Grill) Shannon Runyan (The Spur Bar & Grill) Sonreal, Tell City (Kilby Court, see p. 48) Yeah Buddy (O.P. Rockwell) Wesley Cook (Hog Wallow Pub)

2750 south 30 0 wes t · (8 01) 4 67- 4 60 0 11:3 0 -1A m m o n -sAt · 11:3 0A m -10 pm su n

Sunday, July 12

Frontier Ruckus Urban Lounge

Sunday, July 12

Frontier Ruckus Urban Lounge

Monday, July 13 Tuesday, July 14

Sonreal Kilby Court

801.467.0700

HOT GIRLS WANTED APPLY IN PERSON

randy's record shop vinyl records new & Used cd’s, 45’s, cassettes, Turntables & speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

| CITY WEEKLY |

Urban Lounge

2630 S. 300 W.

Frontier Ruckus

American Bush

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Blitzen Trapper

The Anchorage, Be Like Max, The A-OKs, The Beam Me Up Ska-Ts (The Loading Dock) Ceremony, Tony Molina, Creative Adult, Pure Disgust, Barge (Kilby Court, see p. 46) Kings Heir, DateNight (Stereo Room) Lead Foot (Outlaw Saloon) Rush (Maverik Center, see p. 43)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Kilby Court

LIVE MUSIC

“utah’s longest running indie record store” since 1978

Tuesday, July 14 Urban Lounge

VISIT CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM FOR MORE SHOWS & DETAILS!

Tue – Fri 11am To 7pm • SaT 10am To 6pm • CloSed Sun & mon like uS on or viSiT www.randySreCordS.Com • 801.532.4413

JULY 9, 2015 | 55

The Appleseed Cast


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| CITY WEEKLY |

56 | JULY 9, 2015

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

SATURDAY, JULY 18TH

KILT NIGHT WITH

SWAGGER

EVERY THURSDAY @ 9PM

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Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net!

CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND


Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Hammered hard 2. It affects your take-home pay 3. Not as quick on the uptake 4. Prepares, as leftovers 5. Hunter, at times 6. NYSE's locale 7. Son of Eve 8. Kind of tide 9. "Fantastic Mr. Fox" author 10. Affliction whose name rhymes with its

46. Scrabble value of every letter in TEN 47. Country with a gorilla on its 5,000-franc note 51. O'Neill's "____ for the Misbegotten" 53. Egyptian "key of life" 54. "The Phantom Tollbooth" protagonist 55. "Last one ____ a rotten egg!" 56. Impact result 57. Cooke of soul

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

location 11. Caught, cowboy-style 12. Little blobs on slides 13. Austin Powers, e.g. 21. Pop singer Rita 22. Have ____ with (talk to) 25. Not automatic: Abbr. 28. Like the wars between Carthage and Rome 29. Police dept. broadcast 30. The Cavs, on scoreboards 31. ____ Nidre (Yom Kippur prayer) 34. Words after have or take 35. Where streets intersect: Abbr. 36. Quirky 37. Rock's ____ Speedwagon 38. WWII command area: Abbr. 39. Easter colors 40. Odysseus, e.g. 41. Comment before turning in 42. "Keep Out" 43. Art fakers 45. U.S. Olympic swimming gold medalist Dara ____

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Puts away, as luggage 6. Cosmetics applicators 11. "Viva ____ Vegas!" 14. Father of Leah and Rachel 15. "My Heart Skips ____" (1964 country hit) 16. Rev (up) 17. The last 10% of 110% 18. Longtime Vermont senator 19. Makeup of some burgers 20. "Wait for it ..." (see the starts of 27-, 34-, 44- and 52-Across) 23. Knee-slappers 24. Potential pipes 26. Season after printemps 27. Old Vegas clique follow a basic cooking instruction? 32. "Dawson's Creek" actor James Van ____ Beek 33. Put on the Internet 34. U.S. region home to many oak trees? 38. Series starter 41. Like Beethoven's Sixth 44. Someone who gives medical attention to a spud? 48. Cattle call 49. Factory-inspecting org. 50. Miraculous way to walk? 52. Having visions of a Japanese mat while asleep? 57. Jiffy 58. San Fran gridder 59. Opposite of sur 60. In the style of 61. Oscar winner for "A Fish Called Wanda" 62. Anthony who wrote the 2014 #1 bestselling novel "All the Light We Cannot See" 63. ____ Explorer 64. Party throwers 65. Richter and Roddick

SUDOKU

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58 | JULY 9, 2015

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

City Weekly July 9, 2015  

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City Weekly July 9, 2015  

Chesterfield