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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY PUSHED TO EXTREMES

Captain Wanderlust wants his weed and guns back—and hopes there’s still time to save the Consitution. Cover photo by Justin Higginbottom

16 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 20 A&E 28 DINE 39 CINEMA 43 TRUE TV 44 MUSIC 59 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR ROBBY POFFENBERGER

Five Spot, p. 8 Hailing from Tooele (the Paris of the West Desert), Poffenberger has worked as a copy editor, A&E reporter and opinion writer at a number of papers. He’s a Utah Valley University student, a movie buff and a potato-chip connoisseur.

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LETTERS City Weekly’s Mixed Report Card

Oh, it’s so difficult being a (retired) journalist and journalism professor! We see the good, bad and misspelled all around us. Uplift: Your investigative reports, specifically Eric Ethington’s “Boondoggled” piece [Opinion, June 21, City Weekly] is what we wish had wider readership and, therefore, more public awareness and action. And I would have loved to have been his teacher for no other reason than bragging rights. Downside: To be honored by the Utah Headliners’ Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists [house advertisement, June 21, City Weekly] is wonderful. Except (and you did see that coming!), I don’t know if part of your award includes a spell check, since, as you report, you received 2nd Place (Eric S. Peterson, “Get in the Game”) for best “colum.” Be assured, Peterson is well-deserving of the prize. Not so much to the editor of the side-bar acknowledging Peterson and other members of your staff. Item last: There are many us who look to you for actual news and are quite thankful for your presence.

ROB BRANCH Murray

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes.

Negative Reviews Kept Us On the Ball

I was recently reminded of the great service food critic Ted Scheffler and City Weekly have contributed to the experience of Utah diners. I was in the restaurant business for 33 years with Hansom House, Zaccheo’s and Mr. Z’s. Scheffler is knowledgeable not only about food service, quality, ambience and value; he is also candid and sincere in relating the good and bad experiences in dining at the places he reviewed. Any negative comments have been, in most cases, to our benefit—they kept us on the ball. At the age of 80, I’m looking forward to my retirement. But I was always appreciative of Scheffler’s work, especially when few articles at the time were being written in an objective manner. Thanks for the memories, and keep up the good work!

JOHN T. ZACCHEO Salt Lake City

Enhanced Torture Is for Amateurs

Thank you for publishing Zach Hagadone’s article “The Silent Partner” [June 18, City Weekly]. It was insightful and informative on a topic of discussion sorely lacking in elegant discourse. As a veteran professional interrogator of 22 years, I applaud your efforts to bring to light many of the painful consequences of delving into the dark side of interrogation, euphemistically referred to as “enhanced interrogation techniques,” but which, in reality, are simply torture. Most people simply do not understand what good in-

terrogation actually consists of. They mistakenly believe that brutal, base and aggressive techniques are necessary when fighting a determined and evil foe. We perpetuate this pattern of ignorance by using the term “enhanced” interrogation. This conjures ideas of “better,” “stronger,” “improved” and “more effective.” We should call abusive interrogation techniques what they really are: amateur interrogation techniques. If we use accurate terms, we can avoid costly mistakes— such as when both Utah senators voted against the McCainFeinstein Anti-Torture Amendment. Our representatives felt obliged to vote for torture, because they were ignorant of the abysmal record of amateur interrogation techniques. Thankfully, the amendment passed overwhelmingly, showing that America is ready to move forward in improving professional interrogation.

TORIN NELSON

Former interrogator /human intelligence officer, U.S. Army Midvale

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Assimilate Bliss

T

he long-anticipated Supreme Court decision on Friday, June 26, found millions of LGBT Americans finally exhaling the breath they’ve been holding for months—years, even—safe in the knowledge that our nation’s wearying appeals process has finally exhausted itself. The highest court in the land has spoken, and it’s spoken in favor of freedom to marry. Marriage is an individual liberty from which none are barred. Sure, the war against homophobia isn’t over. Too many states lack Utah’s newly implemented anti-discrimination laws (which could use some beefing up of their own). Transsexual women live in constant fear of physical violence, homeless LGBT youth fill the streets and Orange Is the New Black’s Piper Chapman still hasn’t said the word “bisexual.” But the battle for marriage rights is finally over. In this, at least, we can celebrate. So why all the negativity? Sanctimonious “radi-kewl queers” everywhere have taken to the web, posting doctored versions of those already-tacky Human Rights Campaign red-and-pink equal signs, the stacked horizontal dashes replaced by the words “abolish” and “marriage.” “Is our lives’ ambition to become fully integrated into the patriarchal, heteronormative, hierarchal power structure?” they cry. “Assimilationism! Marriage isn’t radical!” Which, like … right. Marriage isn’t radical. Marriage is fundamental. To an extent, I take their point. It’s true that marriage was established as an elaborate property contract. It’s true that the institution has been used—and often still is—to subjugate and exploit women. And I, too, think our people deserve much better. But whether we like it or not, we live in a society that places a high practical premium on marriage. A couple’s married status offers them unique social and legal benefits, securing their union, finances and existing or potential family from the insecurity that has plagued our community for decades.

BY ALLISON OLIGSCHLAEGER

The movement for marriage equality isn’t a new thing. It has its roots in the AIDS crisis of the 1980s, a painfully critical point in queer history. The exclusive right to visit a dying partner in the intensive-care unit mattered quite a bit. And it continues to. It’s not like the samesex couples in the four cases adjudicated by the Supreme Court sued for white picket fences and seats on the PTA board. They sued to adopt each other’s children, either from previous relationships or conceived/ adopted together. They sued to have their marriage recognized on death certificates and subsequent parallel headstones, just as others have sued for the marriage-contingent rights to spousal insurance coverage and immigration benefits. We have sued for married visitation privileges, tax rates and more. So I take issue with the accusation that celebrating a newly available option constitutes “assimilating to heternormativity.” I’m excited to access state-sponsored marriage’s numerous perks, not replicate its original structure—how could I? Same-sex relationships, by nature, challenge heterosexism and subvert the gender hierarchy. As my visibly exasperated hero, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pointed out during the Obergefell v. Hodges arguments, same-sex couples wouldn’t be seeking access to that sort of subjugating relationship anyway. Only after “a change in the institution of marriage that made it egalitarian where it wasn’t,” Ginsburg said, did marriage present an appropriately advantageous option to queer people. Even if marriage is bad for society, why hold us to a higher standard? Why expect LGBT elders who have been together for 50 years to risk their ability to make necessary medical decisions for each other in

6 | JULY 2, 2015

their final years? Why ask same-sex couples to jeopardize the status of their longawaited adoptions? Forget the noble questions—don’t my partner and I deserve the chance to spend irresponsible amounts of money on matching bridal gowns, should we so choose? That’s what it’s about, really: choices. Other than a brief bout of happy tears, the SCOTUS decision on June 26 had very little immediate impact on me. I’m in no position to get married any time soon, if ever, but the knowledge that I could if I wanted to— that no one could deny me, not in a single state—brings a sense of legitimacy I never knew I was missing. To those cocooned in radicalism, an affirmation of your value and acceptability by the U. S. federal government may not mean much. I applaud you. But to LGBT children, to our more conservative or rural siblings, to the millions of ordinary Americans who experience same-sex attraction, this validation matters. Do not underestimate the importance of this tacit reassurance of normalcy. Keep fighting the good fight, of course. All remnants of misogyny must go, and marriage isn’t immune from criticism. All I ask is that anti-marriage activists keep their flippancy in check. This victory, arrived to at last, represents so much to so many. It comes at great personal cost to many of our forbearers, decades too late to benefit them in the way it was intended. As heirs to the fruits of their struggle, the least we can do is honor and celebrate their efforts. CW

I TAKE ISSUE WITH THE ACCUSATION THAT CELEBRATING A NEWLY AVAILABLE OPTION CONSTITUTES “ASSIMILATING TO HETERNORMATIVITY.”

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STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What was your reaction to the Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality? Molly Stitzel: Love

is finally being recognized for what it really is—love! There is nothing more to it and politics should not be involved. Love is love.

Andy Sutcliffe: Thank you, Presidents Obama, Clinton, G.W. Bush and Reagan for giving us five jiggery-pokery, activist judges!

Nicole Enright: That some Republicans are still trying to argue about it being a states-rights issue. You sound so damned stupid. Wake up and bring yourselves into this century with everyone else.

Pete Saltas: Reading the posts about all the dummies moving to Canada, of all places. Canada was only the fourth country in the world to legalize samesex marriage (thanks, Wikipedia). The haters of marriage equality and the ACA are probably camping out together in the furthest reaches of the tundra.

Jeff Chipian: The reactions. Positive ones were OK, but the negative posts were out of control—especially ones about the flag having stripes of different colors.

Ryan Carillo: Seeing the lives that were truly changed by the ruling. Social media incredible last week; there was so much positivity and love.

Jeremiah Smith: The best part, without a doubt, was not having to look at Facebook all weekend. I already knew what everyone was on about.

Jerre Wroble: Managing editor Brandon Burt and I had an excuse to sip cocktails at Bambara. No dive bars for us on such an auspicious occasion.


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Up to Code

It always helps to research your issue. That’s what Salt Lake City Councilman Kyle LaMalfa found out after persuading the council to pass a temporary ordinance blocking the opening of the INN Between, a much-anticipated homeless hospice. Acting with bureaucratic aplomb, the council feared that these dying people weren’t dying fast enough, and the facility was acting as a homeless shelter rather than a skillednursing facility. And, gee, they wanted it to comply with ADA requirements because, well, the dying weren’t on the streets anymore, where nobody cares about ADA. Cooler heads prevailed when an architect explained the International Building Code, and a director at the Utah Department of Health, Joel Hoffman, explained licensing requirements for in-home hospice care. Meanwhile, Fire Engineering Co. is donating a sprinkler system, and the INN is on the road to opening. LaMalfa seemed satisfied, according to hospice director Kim Correa.

Justice Ain’t Cheap

Well, justice for Geist will have to wait—at least until the dog’s owner finds enough money, starts a GoFundMe campaign or gets the Legislature to change the law. Sean Kendall would have to post a bond to cover attorney fees and court costs as he files an intent to sue both a police officer and Salt Lake City for shooting his dog in his yard. This infuriates his lawyer, former Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson, who has pitted himself against mayoral candidate Jackie Biskupski (she helped renew the law in 2008). Biskupski sees it as a simple renewal; Anderson says it removes discretion from the court. But politics aside, Kendall will have to come up with some cash, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. He turned down a $10,000 settlement, and now sees how expensive it is to defend principle.

Rough Rulings

We are so danged sorry that our governor is “disappointed” with all the latest Supreme Court rulings. Being a lawyer— oh, he’s not—he says, “It appears the plain meaning of the text of the law no longer matters to the court. I have said from the beginning, the Affordable Care Act is flawed.” And of course, he wants to “repeal and replace” the law with Republican policies that frankly don’t exist. Then, on same-sex marriage: “I am disappointed with the decision by the court to usurp state authority and overrule the voice of the people of Utah as demonstrated by legislation with regard to marriage. I am also very concerned with the overwhelming trend to diminish state autonomy.” Well, then. With the effort to take over federal lands, it looks like Utah’s government is disappointed the state can’t secede.

Utah’s bird scene is soaring. As such, many citizen scientists leave their nests at dawn from April to October and travel to University of Utah’s Red Butte Garden, where they catch and band birds (averaging 15-20 birds each day). In the process, they gather data on bird migration, population and gender. U of U graduate student Jordan Herman, pictured at right (wearing a scarf ), is one of the leaders of the local banding project. Soon, she will be researching bird ecology at Bale Mountain National Park in Ethiopia, where the U of U has another banding station. To find out more about volunteering with the U of U’s Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology lab, contact Herman at jordan.m.her@gmail.com

Isn’t the idea of having people get up at the crack of dawn to band birds … um, for the birds?

North American ornithologists (people who study birds) have been losing sleep since the early 1800s to band birds in the name of conservation and science. Given that the earliest record of bird banding in Europe was from 1595, we can assume that humans have been banding birds for nearly half a millennium. Nowadays, hundreds of bird-banding stations exist across the North America.

How do you catch the little things?

We catch birds using a network of 16 nets called mist-nets. Once the nets are opened (half an hour before sunrise) we check them every 30 minutes and extract and band any trapped birds. Because the nets are so fine, they are nearly impossible for the birds to see, so birds will incidentally fly into our nets as they go about their daily business (like foraging or defending territories).

Don’t they put up a fight?

As bird lovers and professional scientists, it is our top priority to handle birds safely and quickly in order to minimize their stress. Even then, we receive plenty of bites and squawks that let us know when a bird is ready to be released. Sometimes, they use their ultimate and most effective weapon on us: poop!

Birding is a feather in Utah’s cap, right?

Birding in Utah is unique because our Great Basin, Mojave Desert, Colorado Plateau and alpine ecosystems encourage a great diversity of wildlife and plants. So far, 457 bird species have been documented in Utah.

How about those citizen scientists?

Thanks to citizen science, we have been able to collect a massive data set on birds all over the world. EBird.org is a website regularly used by citizens to record bird observations year-round. Simply by using this site, you can become an active citizen scientist and contribute to bird research and conservation efforts in your area.

How do you know if you’re a bird of a feather with the bird banders?

Fellow bird nerds love to visit our station. We have hosted local birding groups like the Great Salt Lake Audubon Society and, most recently, we had three visitors from the U.K. who made the journey to Utah just to experience birding in the Southwest. Birding is a language that is understood across all continents.

—BY ROBBY POFFENBERGER comments@cityweekly.net


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CONGRATS TO CITY WEEKLY’S EDITORIAL STAFF FOR WINNING TOP HONORS FROM THE UTAH HEADLINERS CHAPTER OF THE

Best Newspaper Reporter 1st Place: Stephen Dark

Personality Profile 1st Place:

Eric S. Peterson “Blood Brothers”

Review/Criticism 1st Place:

Scott Renshaw “St. Vincent”

Arts & Entertainment 1st Place: Kolbie Stonehocker “Neon Trees”

Criminal Justice Reporting 2nd Place: Colby Frazier

“Invisible Man”

Religion/Values Reporting 2nd Place:

Kolbie Stonehocker, Stephen Dark “Death Becomes Her”

Opinion Column 2nd Place

Eric S. Peterson “Get in the Game”

Best Single Blog Post 2nd Place: Colby Frazier, Colin Wolf “Anniversary of Spanish Fork Concert”

Personality Profile 3rd Place:

Carolyn Campbell “Multiplicity”

IF WE DON’T PRINT IT, WHO WILL?

STRAIGHT DOPE

BY CECIL ADAMS

What is it with car alarms? They go off 24/7 for any or no reason to create a constant urban din. Do they deter any thefts, are they required by law, or are they just a way to lard on the features? —Samuel Press, shell-shocked in Vermont Listen, Samuel, if you’re tormented by the constant urban din of Vermont, you’ve got a pretty low annoyance threshold. I’m going to work on the assumption you’re a refugee from New York City, where historically car alarms have been more of an issue (although speaking as a big-city habitué I’d say this is one irritant that may have crested a good 20 years ago). Browsing on the interwebs, I found a claim from back in 2003 that noisy car alarms cost New Yorkers $400 million annually, based on an ingenious but basically harebrained calculation of the extent to which car alarms diminish the quality of life for those in hearing range. One wants to say: Suck it up, crybabies. Admittedly, that’s the attitude of someone not currently being driven bats by a blaring alarm, and one wants to be supportive of one’s fellow city dwellers. So here’s the best case I can make for why car alarms should be banned. 1. Car alarms have middling, but certainly some, effectiveness as a theft deterrent, research suggests. We learn this from Farrell et al (2010), who use the straightforward method of comparing (a) the number of cars with a given antitheft technology against (b) the number of cars with that technology that get stolen. Sixty-three percent of cars have alarms, we learn (based on U.K. data), whereas only 41 percent of stolen cars have alarms. Forty-one is 35 percent less than 63. Ergo, car alarms are 35 percent effective in deterring theft. 2. This is considerably less potent than what Farrell’s numbers suggest is the single most effective antitheft measure, namely a tracking device on your car that lets the cops (or you) determine its whereabouts if bad guys abscond with it. Effectiveness: 77 percent. 3. On the other hand, car alarms work better than the most common antitheft measure nowadays, central locking (powered door locks controlled by a button on the key or fob)—32 percent effective. And they’re way better than window security etching (inscribing the vehicle ID number on the glass), 14 percent, or mechanical steering-wheel locks, 7 percent. In fact, cars with the latter two antitheft measures experience more theft attempts, leading one to wonder what exactly the detailers are inscribing on those windows: “Bet you can’t steal this car?” 4. This is off the track of my argument, but since you asked, car alarms aren’t required in the U.S., and I haven’t heard of them being required elsewhere. Canada, Australia, and many European countries require “electronic immobilization”—put simply, ignition kill switches. Are alarms and such an excuse to add on extras? I suppose, but the common view is that the real security ripoff isn’t an alarm, it’s window etching.

SLUG SIGNORINO

4. Up to this point things aren’t looking good for the anti-car-alarm crusade. No worries. The question of interest isn’t whether car alarms work, but whether other less obnoxious technologies work as well or better. Answer: absolutely. As we’ve seen, vehicle-tracking devices are the most effective antitheft measure, and it appears combinations of measures are more effective yet. 5. To quantify the efficaciousness of vehicle antitheft devices, Farrell and friends in a 2011 paper presented a metric they called “security protection factor,” or SPF, along the lines of the scheme used to rate sunscreen. The higher the SPF the better; a car having an antitheft device or devices with an SPF of 10 is ten times less likely to be stolen than a car having no security. 6. A car alarm all by itself, according to Farrell and company, has an SPF of just 1.2, whereas central locking is rated 2.7. (This appears to contradict the results reported in paragraph 3 for reasons not explained— ask Farrell.) But an alarm plus central locking has an SPF of 5. Pile on the technologies and the multiplier effect becomes more pronounced. At the top of Farrell’s list of antitheft technologies, with an SPF of 25.4, is the following fourplex: central locking plus an ignition kill-switch plus a tracking device plus, yes, an alarm. Farrell calls this the ACET configuration. 7. This isn’t helping, you say. Patience. A close second on the list of efficacious antitheft packages, with a 25.2 SPF, is central locking plus an ignition kill switch plus a steering-wheel lock but no damn alarm— the CEM configuration, in Farrell argot. 8. There’s your opening, alarm haters— you can get equivalent protection without the racket. Understand, we’re talking strictly about theft of the car; separate SPF ratings are calculated for protection against theft of a car’s contents. In the latter category ACET trounces CEM 6.6 to 2.5—a noisy alarm offers more protection against somebody stealing a car stereo. What’s more important, though—your stereo or your neighbors’ sanity? We’ll have to give that some thought. But at least there’s an argument to be made.

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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Jared found his love for art through his first passion, skateboarding. Through absorbing his surrounds he attempts to create unique and special pieces. As he matured, different forms of creation filled his creative toolbox. From SLCC to the University of Utah he studied fine art, graphic

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NEWS Change Has Come

EQUALIT Y

“Every individual has a fundamental right to marry, whether the governor likes it or not.” —U of U law professor Clifford Rosky

How Utah advanced marriage equality, and what happens next. BY COLBY FRAZIER & ERIC S. PETERSON comments@cityweekly.net

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

A

few days before Christmas in 2013, when U.S. District Judge Robert Shelby tossed the state of Utah’s same-sex marriage ban in the gutter, allowing more than 1,000 same-sex couples to wed, a thick wave of change spread across Zion. Because the Utah Attorney General’s Office failed to file a routine request that Shelby’s ruling be put on hold until higher courts could hear the case, gay couples in the Beehive State immediately began to wed. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver had little sympathy for Utah, and a panel of judges denied the state’s request to halt the weddings. Then, on Jan. 6, 2014, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor put an end to Utah’s 17 days of marriage equality. Six months later, on June 25, 2014, the 10th Circuit Court—in an echo of Shelby’s ruling—once again tossed out Utah’s ban, and in doing so, made gay marriage legal in Utah and five other states. Rulings favoring the right of same-sex couples to wed followed in the 4th, 7th and 9th District Courts. But in November 2014, the 6th District court that represents Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee upheld state bans on gay marriage, a ruling that sent this generation’s loftiest civil rights issue to the highest court in the land. As this wildfire of court proceedings spread across America, the foundation of Shelby’s ruling—that bans on same-sex marriage deny rights to equal protection and due process under the 14th Amendment—was sewn into the rulings. And on Friday, Utah attorneys and gay marriage advocates saw Shelby’s handiwork in the Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision that once and for all brought marriage equality to all 50 states. “I would say that today’s decision validates that Judge Shelby’s decision was and is the gold standard in constitutional jurisprudence,” says Paul C. Burke, a local attorney who has been at the forefront of same-sex marriage battles. “The court endorsed the reasoning and rationale of Judge Shelby’s decision in every respect.” In his opinion written for the court’s

Marriage-equality supporters gathered June 26 at City Creek Park for Salt Lake City’s “Decision Day” rally. majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy quotes from a single appeals court case: Utah’s Kitchen v. Herbert—a fact that Clifford Rosky, a University of Utah law professor, says shows how much impact this case and Shelby’s logic had on the Supreme Court. Rosky said the Supreme Court’s ruling is a “ringing endorsement of the findings of Judge Shelby and the 10th Circuit that laws like Amendment 3 violate a fundamental right of same-sex couples to marry.” As Gov. Gary Herbert and other conservative Utah politicians lamented the court’s decision, a high-minded position emerged, which has become the default conservative talking point on any topic involving the balance of power between federal and state governments: that of states’ rights. “I am disappointed with the decision by the court to usurp state authority and overrule the voice of the people of Utah as demonstrated by legislation with regard to marriage,” Herbert wrote. “I am also very concerned with the overwhelming trend to diminish state autonomy. I believe states should have the right to determine their own laws regarding marriage.” While Herbert, the Utah Legislature and perhaps even the citizens of Utah (Amendment 3, which banned gay marriage in the Beehive State, was approved in 2004 with 66 percent of the vote), would support laws here that violate a person’s constitutional rights, that is not reason to allow it to happen, Rosky says. “All of these arguments represented to the Supreme Court, they were ex-

plicitly rejected today,” Rosky says, referring to states’ rights. “Every individual has a fundamental right to marry, whether the governor likes it or not. Fundamental rights are subject to the outcomes of no elections. We don’t take votes on fundamental rights.”

The Next Battle

The next frontier in the area of equal rights, Rosky says, might well be in passing state and municipal laws regarding discrimination against LGBT folks in the marketplace. According to Rosky, the Legislature made Utah the first Republican-controlled state to pass a statewide LGBT anti-discrimination law when, earlier this year, it prohibited workplace and housing discrimination. Still, Rosky says much work remains to be done to protect people from discrimination where they shop, eat and recreate. Battle lines are now being redrawn around what some consider the defense of religious liberty—a term others call a license to hate—especially in the way Rosky fears new laws would allow private business to marginalize LGBT citizens. In Washington, D.C., Utah’s own firebrand Sen. Mike Lee started preparing for the bad news at the beginning of June by reintroducing a bill he had first penned in 2013 seeking to bar the government from denying any person or group tax-exempt status for exercising their religious conscience rights. Troy Williams, executive director of Equality Utah, however, has lambasted the bill as a federal version of the controversial religious freedom bill passed

in Indiana that would allow business owners greater legal standing to turn away gay customers from their places of business. “It would allow individuals and businesses to freely post signs that say ‘Gays Not Served Here,’ ” Williams said in an Equality Utah statement. “Much like Indiana’s recent unpopular efforts, Sen. Lee’s legislation would allow faith to be used as a defense against any claim of discrimination.” While critics worry Lee’s bill is a federal version of the Indiana bill, Lee has said the focus is on protecting religious schools and organizations. Conservative backers point to comments made during a 2015 Supreme Court hearing when U.S. Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli was asked whether a religious school could lose its tax-exempt status for opposing same-sex marriage. He responded, “It’s going to be an issue.”

Government-Free Marriage

On a policy front, Connor Boyack of The Libertas Institute has pushed for another option to change the marriage game: government-free marriage. Given the libertarian idea that government ought to mind its own business —which to libertarians, comprises a fairly narrow set of tasks—Boyack’s institute is organizing for a model that would subtract government out of an equation he maintains should only be about the union of two loving people. His group points to a proposal in 2015 that passed out of the Alabama Senate, but that was not heard by the House before the assembly adjourned. That bill


EQUALIT Y

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

NEWS

The Classic Snake River Whitewater!

Activist Mark Lawrence, pictured with arms raised, was a leader in the fight against Amendment 3, which banned same-sex marriage in Utah.

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JULY 2, 2015 | 13

Bill Duncan, director of the Center for Family & Society at conservative Utah think tank the Sutherland Institute, says his organization is looking to support short-term defensive positions like Lee’s legislation, but he says conservatives have to dig in for the long haul, the same way they have been slogging for decades now through the abortion issue. “It’s a big cultural thing,” Duncan says. “It’s not like, ‘Oh, well, let’s quickly amend the Constitution and fix that politically. I don’t see that being a possibility at this point.” Duncan says the culture has to protect conservative citizens from being bullied for sticking to their old-time religion before political leaders can make any kind of headway on the issue again. “We have to do some cultural work just

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Another Roe v. Wade?

to make it comfortable for politicians to say they support this,” Duncan says. Quin Monson, a political science professor at Brigham Young University and director of the school’s Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy, says that conservatives can’t expect to treat this high court loss the way they did the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion. The reality, he says, is it’s not an apples-to-apples comparison between these two fights. Whereas attitudes have budged little on abortion over the past 40 years, this “is just not the case for gay-marriage attitudes that have seen dramatic change in less than 10 years,” Monson says. He points out that on issues of same-sex marriage and antidiscrimination, popular opinion has shifted. A 2014 BYU poll found 41 percent of active Mormons in the state favored at least civil unions for LGBT couples. “Politicians pay attention to that kind of thing,” Monson says. “They may not change their attitude, but it will change what they choose to do and speak up about.” Smart politicians, he says, have already circled their wagons around the issue of religious liberty and recognize that, at this point, they need to focus on making sure people of faith are protected in a world of such fast-moving changes in opinion. He points to Utah as leading this movement at the state level because of its joint religiousliberty and LGBT anti-discrimination bill passed in the 2015 session. Wherever Utah ends up in future battles surrounding equal rights, it has for the better part of a decade been at the forefront of legal cases and discussions surrounding marriage equality—a fact that doesn’t surprise the University of Utah’s Rosky one bit. “We’re not afraid to be different, and I think that that can lead to some surprising results,” he says. CW

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sought to abolish judges from issuing marriage licenses. Instead, marriages would be enacted by contract. Boyack says, in Utah, it would be “an inversion of the status quo,” with people contracting their unions and then using the contract to apply for health, tax and other benefits that come with marriage. He says that despite the ruling, the fights over marriage will continue, and lawsuits will be filed back and forth by LGBT and religious liberty activists so long as marriage is still tethered to the government. “We can get back to the place where people live and act according to their own definition of what their relationships and actions are, and we can have tolerance and mutual respect,” Boyack says. “But so long as the government is the middleman, I don’t see that happening.” A government-free marriage bill is expected to be heard in Utah’s next legislative session.

May 16th - Sept. 27th Schedule a time now! 10:00am - 12:00pm or 2:15pm


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CITIZEN REVOLT

THE

OCHO

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

FOURTH OF JULY

Eight still-available names for your next militia group:

8. The Gr8 Salt Lake H8 M8s 7. ‘Merican ‘Migos: Latinos Against Open Borders

6. Tighty Whiteys 5. Rainbow Raiders: Gays for Guns & Gin Fizzes

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

4. The Freedom Fatties

OUTDOORS

Lawn-Chair Brigade

3. Citizens Against Science & Stuff

2. Posse Galore 1. Patriots for the Constitution

With the Exception of a Few Points That Conflict With Our Narrow View of the World and/or We Don’t Understand Even Though It Was Written By God So Maybe We Really Just Like to Bro Down in the Woods Wearing Camouflage and Drinking Beer All Weekend While Discussing Our Mutual Hatred of Brown People, Gays and Gun Laws but It’s All Good

The ’Merica Film Fest Celebrate Independence Day a few days early with a double-feature presentation that includes Mars Attacks! and Team America: World Police. Enjoy a Stars & Stripes party in the bar starting at 7 p.m. $10 per person. Brewvies Cinema Pub, 677 S. 200 West, Thursday, July 2, 8-11:30 p.m. U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services Independence Day Celebration Sixteen immigrants from 10 countries will become citizens, celebrating the U.S.’s 239th birthday. Guest speakers include Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch and Retired Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen “Hal,” age 94, also know as the WWII Candy Bomber. The day begins on July 3 with a flag ceremony with a 21-gun salute at 9:30 a.m.; the Cries of Freedom musical at 10 a.m.; at 10:15 a.m., the mayor speaks; the naturalization ceremony is at 11:30 a.m. Military vehicles from WWI to present will be on display. Scera Park (NW corner of park), 675 S. State, Orem, Friday, July 3, 11:30 a.m. USCIS.gov Freedom Is Fundamental Yoga Class Join Kristine Summers for this special All Levels Vinyasa Flow practice. We Are Yoga, 2645 Parleys Way, Suite 100, July 4, 10-11:15 a.m. Sugar House Arts Festival Pet Parade As part of the Sugar House Chamber 4th of July Arts Festival, the pet parade starts at Fairmont Park and ends at the main stage off Highland Dr. and 2100 South. Registration fee is $30 with 50 percent of the proceeds donated to The Farm. Check in/registration will be from 8:30-9:15 a.m. in front of Fairmont Aquatic Center, 1044 E. Sugarmont Drive (2225 South), Saturday, July 4, pet parade starts promptly at 9:30 a.m. SugarHouseChamber.org Annual Patriotic Concert at Temple Square Utah National Guard 23rd Army Band, 15 E. South Temple, July 4, 7:30 p.m.

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net! CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

Full Moon Lift Rides For a truly unique experience, enjoy a Sundance lift ride by the light of the full moon. Adults $17, children under 5, free. Sundance Resort, 8841 N. Alpine Loop Road, Provo, July 2-3, 8:30-11 p.m. SundanceResort.com Be Moved Tour Family-friendly longtail cargo bike maker Xtracycle invites community members to meet Xtracycle’s inventor and cargo-bike pioneer Ross Evans and test ride Xtracyle’s new electric-bike line, including the EdgeRunner 10E, the Limited Edition 9E and other bikes. Catch their one stop in Salt Lake City: Saturday Cycles, 605 N. 300 West, 801-935-4605, Saturday, July 4, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Xtracycle.com

CLASSES

Libations at The Leo: Beertastic: The Science of Beer Making Enjoy a selection of refreshing brews as Adam Curfew, director of production at Squatters, guides you through the science of beer making. $55/person. The Leonardo at Library Square, 209 E. 500 South, July 2, 7-9 p.m. TheLeonardo.org Got a volunteer, activism or community event to submit? Send it to listings@cityweekly.net


S NEW RKS

Curses, Foiled Again A shoplifter made off with $150 worth of produce from a supermarket in Belfast, Northern Ireland, but surveillance video showed the thief wearing a Manchester United shirt with “Benson 22” printed on the back. That evidence led police to Paul Robert Benson, 24, who pleaded guilty after District Judge Mervyn Bates told him he might as well have been wearing a “neon sign” identifying him. (Britain’s Metro)

QUI

n A uniformed police officer put his cellphone down on a counter when entering a deli in Bayonne, N.J., but returned to find it missing. Only one other person was in the store: Alvaro Raul Ortega, 34. The officer asked him about the missing phone, and Ortega admitted taking it. The officer arrested Ortega for theft. (Hudson County’s The Jersey Journal)

Second-Amendment Follies Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed a law allowing state residents without concealed-weapons permits to carry their firearms for 48 hours during an emergency evacuation. Supporters of the measure said that guns left at home risked being taken by looters, while opponents argued that evacuations were already high-stress situations without adding guns, which could make public shelters more dangerous. (Reuters)

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n Colonial Williamsburg has proposed increasing hands-on activities at the living history museum by opening firing ranges for 18th-century black-powder muskets. “We think that giving [guests] the opportunity to handle the device, feel the weight of it, the noise, the smell, the recoil, it will provide a fun, enjoyable and of course, educational experience,” officials said, noting the range is expected to open this fall, with six to eight lanes where shooters can load and fire the muskets. (Norfolk’s WTKR-TV)

n The Boy Scouts of America ordered a ban on water gun fights. The organization’s revised National Shooting Manual also forbids Scouts from using “marshmallow shooters that require placing a straw or similar device in the mouth.” (The Washington Times)

Hand Babies & Holy Erections Muslim televangelist Mücahid Cihad Han warned his Turkish audience that Islam strictly prohibits masturbation and “that those who have sexual intercourse with their hands will find their hands pregnant in the afterlife.” (Turkey’s Hurriyet Daily News)

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n When a California court ruled that the state was financially obligated to provide sex-reassignment surgery for convicted killer Michelle-Lael Norsworthy (previously Jeffrey Bryan Norsworthy), a state panel recommended that she be paroled before the surgery. (Associated Press)

n Police arrested Marlon Paul Alvarez, 19, after he was observed removing an AK-47 rifle on display at a pawnshop in Davie, Fla., and stuffing it down his pants. He then pulled it out, put it back and grabbed another assault rifle, which he promptly put down his pants. Owner Kevin Hughes noticed Alvarez limping out of the store, confronted him and recovered the $830 weapon. “It’s one thing to try to steal a firearm,” prosecutor Eric Linder said. “It’s another thing trying to steal an AK-47.” (South Florida Sun Sentinel)

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Problem Solved After complaining for 15 years about school buses cutting him off by running a stop sign while leaving their parking lot in Tulsa, Okla., Josh Holocker posted a video making his case. The Union Public School system responded by replacing the stop sign with a yield sign. “Now, someone is just going to drive right out,” Holocker lamented. (Tulsa’s KOKI-TV)

BY ROL AND SWEET


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16 | JULY 2, 2015

PUSHED TO EXTREMES Captain Wanderlust wants his weed and guns back—and hopes there’s still time to save the Constitution.

I

By Justin Higginbottom • comments@cityweekly.net

n spring of 2014, Stephen Dean was at Cliven Bundy’s ranch in Nevada during a stand-off. Dozens of militia members—the patriotic type, many well-armed and dressed with the preferred number of cargo pockets for combat—held the line against Bureau of Land Management rangers. The dispute had something to do with cows. A couple of months later at Dee’s Restaurant in Sugar House, over a hamburger, fries and fry sauce, Dean is giddy talking about the encounter. Just imagine: a line of protesters, cowboys and militiamen all on horseback, refusing to obey BLM orders to vacate. “It’s ancient archetypal imagery,” Dean says. He is talking about the horse: It’s a symbol of the Wild West, he explains, as well a sign of power and strength in American Indian culture. “You definitely had ‘We the People’ coming at ’em,” says Dean. (Every once in a while, as if it were a patriotic tic, he throws in “We the People” while talking.) “We didn’t want to shoot anybody, but … I guarantee, if one shot would have popped off … they would have died. Every one of them would have died,” says Dean. It’s unclear whether he means the militiamen or the

Making of a Militiaman

Growing up, Dean describes himself as just your average Mormon kid. He wasn’t very political. He liked adventures, hiking, exploring. He knows Utah “like you wouldn’t believe.” Things changed in 1999 as Dean was working at an adventure club when, at age 30, he had unlawful sex with a minor. “We had consensual sex. For three days in a row. The problem with it was, a 17-year-old can’t give consent. … I’m not trying to downplay it. It was wrong,” Dean says. He sounds like he gets it. Nevertheless, three nights of sex with a minor is three thirddegree felonies. Even after he got two charges dropped, he had fines to pay, group therapy to attend, and was placed on the sex-offender registry. His face would come up in a database if his name was searched. He says getting a job with a felony was difficult. But what really got to him was not being allowed to own a gun or ammunition. Like many good Mormon kids, he grew up in a culture of owning firearms. Suddenly, he found himself one of the millions of felons in the country who cannot bear arms. “So I’m wondering. … Well, what I did, it was not violent. There was no gun involved. There was no threats, no intimidation. … Why, all of a sudden, are you going to take my right to protect my family, myself, my friends, my property? Why

rangers. Probably both. Dean told a CNN interviewer at the ranch that “tyranny in government” brought him to Nevada, and he was described as a member of the People’s United Mobile Armed Services militia. But, unlike other militia members, he wasn’t armed. He was there with his didgeridoo. “I’m hoping you can see the brilliance of the ‘armed’ part of this,” Dean says. “You see, I’m attacking the psyche. … You want me to blow my didgeridoo into your third eye for half an hour? That’ll wake you up.” At one unpredictable moment, he suddenly stands in the diner to show a leather gun holster on his hip, only to pull from it a mobile phone. He really didn’t bring a gun to Bundy’s ranch because it is illegal for him to carry a firearm in the United States. And this fact has had life-altering ramifications. Stephen Dean calls himself Captain Wanderlust on his Facebook page. He is a self-described militia leader, state coordinator of a fringe constitutionalist organization known as the National Liberty Alliance, and a felon. Every militiaman has a story.

are you going to take that away?” says Dean. It was enough to turn him into a Second Amendment activist. “It started there,” Dean says. He spent more than a decade on probation, all the time thinking about these kinds of things, growing bitter towards the government. And before his final parole-officer visit, he looked in the mirror, and stuffed two live .22-caliber bullets in the gauged holes of his ears. In his mind, he was using his First Amendment rights to protest not having Second Amendment rights. When the parole officer saw his ears, he recalls, he was immediately searched and handcuffed. A couple of weeks later, police arrested him at work. He was sentenced to a year and a day in a federal penitentiary. Federal prisons have a unique culture, Dean explains. For example, when you arrive as a prisoner, you meet with leaders of a gang corresponding to your race. And one of the first questions his newly acquainted white gang members asked him, Dean says, was why he is a felon. And Dean was suddenly known as a sex offender in federal prison. “You know what that means? They’re going to rape you. They’re going to kill you,” he says. He says he pleaded, begged, told the gang members to give him just one chance, a little time. He could get a letter from the girl’s

mother explaining the whole situation. He wasn’t a pedophile. He was in general population for less than a week before he was placed in solitary confinement for his own safety. “This is where they put prisoners who kill cops,” says Dean with an incredulous stare. They called it “the SHU.” And he stayed there for around nine months, getting only one hour per day to walk around in an outdoor cage. Placing an inmate in “involuntary protective custody” is a common practice in prisons across the country. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, in 2011, more than 80,000 inmates had been placed in solitary confinement, a large number of those for protective custody. But, even while in solitary, Dean says, he still had to deal with the other inmates. When they passed, he claims, the guards would let them kick the steel door, the sound reverberating off the concrete walls of his cell. They would keep him awake. They would shout, “pedophile” and “child molester.” “I’m sitting there braiding parts of my bed sheet, not even conscious to what the fuck I’m doing. … Like, your mind starts to play tricks on you. You start looking at your veins, you know— your mind’s weird when you want to check out, when it’s so painful, when it hurts so much. You’re so alone. You haven’t seen the sun for five months,” he says, now with anger in his eyes.


Vote Dean for Sheriff

“What can We the People do when our public officials, police, prosecutors and judges violate the Constitution and purge their oath of office?”

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—A “public notice” from the People’s United Mobile Armed Services

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as unconstitutional, as well as to punish those enforcing them. They want to create “We the People” courts and use public courtrooms for the trials. “‘We the People’ paid for those freakin’ buildings,” Dean says. They have sent affidavits, stamped by NLA officials, spelling out these demands, to all 94 U.S. District Courts. Dean explains that the only constitutionally compliant court is a common-law court. And a major maxim of this law is that prosecution requires an injured party. Safe to assume, NLA’s version of a common-law court would not prosecute some forms of statutory rape or bullet jewelry. He believes it would have saved him. And he believes it will give him restitution. Dean thinks the militia and grand-jury calls

Stephen Dean: “So I’m wondering. …Well, what I did, it was not violent. There was no gun involved. There was no threats, no intimidation. … Why, all of a sudden, are you going to take my right to protect my family, myself, my friends, my property? Why are you going to take that away?”

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JULY 2, 2015 | 17

Stephen Dean doesn’t look like a typical militia member. He looks like he might be going to the annual hippie Rainbow Gathering (that he said he wanted to attend) rather than running firing drills in the desert. It’s unclear how many recruits are in the People’s United Mobile Armed Services. When asked, Dean merely points to the group’s Facebook page, which has a little more than 200 “likes.” Also, Dean—under the name “Captain Wanderlust”—appears to be the only one posting to the page. Anyway, patriot groups are thriving in the country. The Southern Poverty Law Center recorded more than 1,000 groups in 2013, including 240 militias, organized to oppose the so-called New World Order. Today, acronyms are cheap. Back at Dee’s Restaurant, Dean explains how he decided in 2014 to run for sheriff in Millard County. (While not allowed to carry a firearm, a felon can be sheriff in Utah). “That’s mostly just to rock the boat,” Dean says about his write-in candidacy. Although he does plan to campaign—to “stir things up,” to “get my message out.” His message? That catch-all charge of corruption: corruption of the police, the prosecutors and the politicians. But especially corruption at the local level, he explains—and, most especially, corruption in the town of Delta, Utah (population 3,500). When asked for an example of this corruption, he doesn’t hesitate. As he jumps into the story, the listener gets the feeling he’s told it many times before. He talks about that time in Delta when cops pulled over his friend, who was driving Dean’s van at the time, on suspicion of a suspended driver’s license. Now, how did this cop know his friend had a suspended license, Dean wonders, which his friend indeed had. “They took him to jail. Why not just write him another ticket?” Dean says. Dean figures the police took his friend to jail because they wanted to search Dean’s van, and they wanted to search the van because Dean had been posting militia fliers outside of grocery stores. His flier reads in part: “A public notice to the citizens of Utah from the People’s

United Mobile Armed Services: What can We the People do when our public officials, police, prosecutors and judges violate the Constitution and purge their oath of office? We the People create a grand jury to hold them accountable. …” The yellow sheet of paper named Dean as “Chief Captain” of the militia and provided his phone number. The “grand jury” to which the flier refers is the means by which a group named the National Liberty Alliance (NLA) and its supporters hope to counter what they see as unconstitutional laws and prosecution in the country. A brief introduction to NLA commonlaw grand juries: “Common law” refers to law created by custom and precedent rather than statutes. It comes from the English legal system. A grand jury judges the validity of an accusation before one is sent to trial and prosecuted. What the NLA wants, and what Dean advocates, is the creation of common-law grand juries to override laws they see

Justin Higginbottom

He took some solace in reading. Friends sent him things printed from the Internet—”patriot stuff.” And when he got out in November 2011, he was ready for the revolution; that idiosyncratic type of revolution favored by the Old Right and followers of Alex Jones. Not only was he ready—he wanted to participate. He wanted to be on the front. Like at Bundy’s ranch. “Because if it wasn’t me, who? And if not now, when?” says Dean, sounding very patriotic indeed.


Gage Skidmore

Justin Higginbottom

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If a peaceful revolution doesn’t work, Dean says, “it will come down to what happened at Bundy’s ranch … but shots being fired.” (Photo of Cliven Bundy at a July 2014 forum in Mesa, Ariz.)

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18 | JULY 2, 2015

legal system beginning to stack up. First, Dean sees the requirement of a driver’s license when the driver is not using his vehicle for commerce restricts his freedom of travel (there is a small movement in the United States, including Dean, who believe that requiring a driver’s license for noncommercial vehicles is unconstitutional). Then, when his van was searched without a warrant referring to the specific drugs that the cops hoped to find, Dean believed it violated his Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches. Finally, by confiscating his medicineman card and his marijuana sacrament, Dean said prosecutors infringed on his First Amendment freedom of religion. He later attended a meeting in Delta where candidates were introduced for the upcoming election. Unsure of his intentions, he waited until the end of the meeting, stood up and asked the date for the election. He was still mad about what had happened to him: spending more than $500 to get his van out of the impound lot and losing his medicine-man card. He told the room he was going to run for sheriff. Dean says Millard County Sheriff Robert Dekker, who happened to be in the room, offered to get him the application. “I say, ‘OK, and while you’re at it, while you’re getting me that application to become sheriff … why don’t you get my medicine-man credentials out of evidence and give them back to me?’” Dean says. The clerk for the Millard County court, Marki Rowley, said she recalled him standing up in the meeting and announcing his run. But she said he never filed the paperwork. The NLA message boards still refer to him as running for “Common Law Sheriff” in Utah.

Stephen Dean: “When the dollar does crash, … we need to be able to barter.”

caught the authorities’ eye. Or maybe he was coming off as a meth dealer. He says he had made friends with local Delta kids who come to the hot springs where Dean holds a small artist gathering called the Pantheion [sic] Festival. The kids had a house— what Dean describes as a meth house when he first arrived—that they dreamed of turning into a hostel for the festival, once the meth was under control. And there Dean was, coming and going, in his white van. “I don’t know if you’re familiar with meth,” he says, “but apparently, it’s quite powerful. … I won’t go there. … I prefer the natural medicines.” The police found marijuana in Dean’s van. But to Dean, that is “sacramental herb.” True story: He is a card-carrying member of the Okleveuha Native American Church. He says he was using his medicine man knowledge to get the Delta kids off hard drugs. “Sometimes … an Ayahuasca ceremony can totally reboot your system … or a huge hit of DMT can just like—Boom!—just shut off the computer and power it back up again,” Dean explains. He has the thousand-yard stare of someone who has seen things. The president and principal medicine chief of the Okleveuha Native American Church, Man Found Standing, provided a detailed letter to the court in Dean’s defense: “As a medicine man, all of the plants, herbs, essential oils, minerals, animals, and so forth that are used by Stephen Dean in traditional Native American Ceremonies fall under the protection of Native American Free Exercise of Religion Act (AFERA), Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), and other acts of Congress pertaining to Native American Religion, Pre-Eminent Treaty and the U.S. Constitution.” Dean later sued prosecutors of the town of Delta for $150,000, citing religious discrimination (the case was thrown out June 16, 2015). After the cops found Dean’s “sacramental herb,” Dean felt the corruption of the police and

People’s Court

Later that summer in 2014, Dean is outside a Salt Lake City building he says is his studio. When he is not busy with militia-type activity, he makes art and music. He builds things like a greenhouse fueled by a hot spring. He raises chickens and goats. “When the dollar does crash, …we need to be able to barter,” he says. The building looks to be boarded up, and he says something about a slumlord owning it, but doesn’t go further. He sits on a chair by the door and starts to explain why Salt Lake City chief prosecutor Padma Veeru-Collings is “impersonating a public servant.” He refers to a scuffle that he had with a friend near Liberty Park. The cops were called as he was packing up his van to leave for the drum circle. A cop was “asking us for ID, so I asked him for his ID,” says Dean. Dean was charged with disorderly conduct— which is how he developed his interest in the Salt Lake City prosecutor. He went to the City Recorder’s office, and asked for Veeru-Collings’ oath of office but came away empty-handed. It’s true: The City Recorder’s office, where oaths of office are usually kept, for some reason does not have anything on file for Veeru-Collings. Ac-


ardson responded with a five-page letter quoting Thomas Jefferson, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, David Hume and Lysander Spooner. Say what you will, NLA supporters know their 19th century philosophers. Dean writes a Benjamin Franklin quote on a piece of paper toward the end of the interview: “Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”

Dean accused Judge Dale A. Kimball, above, of violating his constitutional rights when Dean was convicted of carrying ammunition while a felon.

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” —The Second Amendment

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So much in the modern patriot or common-law or constitutionalist movement is abstract. The meetings and YouTube videos describe esoteric interpretations of the law: The government will, any day now, take our guns. Martial law will, any day now, be instated. Those orchestrating formation of the “New World Order” are always hidden. But Stephen Dean is a real person. He faces real consequences. His suffering at the hand of the government, mostly brought on by his own actions or defiance, is real. For those keeping track; he is a convicted sex offender with subsequent convictions for firearm and drug possession. And it’s not over yet for him. There was an alert made on the National Liberty Alliance website at the end of March 2015: “Emergency! Emergency! Emergency! Re: Steven [sic] Dean, NLA Utah leader & member arrested … please do flood the jail with phone calls demanding Steven Dean’s immediate release.” The post provided Dean’s booking number and various phone numbers for the jail. The rumor was that it was an FBI sting. Agents had befriended Dean and tricked him into target shooting. At least some of that is true, according to court documents. Dean was arrested for unlawful transport of firearms, including a shotgun and an assault rifle. The evidence the U.S. government was planning to present to the court included audio recordings dating back to September 2014, video labeled “footage of field shooting,” and FBI reports. It’s likely he was being monitored by federal agents for nearly a year. After spending a few months in federal prison, Dean was released on parole on June 16, according to court documents. One condition of his parole is that he may not associate with any groups who want to overthrow the United States. Last year, Dean talked about how his political work at this point was peaceful. “This is the peaceful revolution. This can work. The common-law grand juries in every county. Not just Utah, but the entire country,” he said. He seemed eccentric, nonthreatening and genuinely hopeful—although it didn’t take much prodding to have him spell out what might happen if government officials across the country do not, in fact, show up for extrajudicial court hearings. “If this doesn’t work, it will come down to what happened at Bundy’s ranch … but shots being fired,” he said. He said that, someday, he would have his firearms back, when enough people are there to back him up on it. There just aren’t enough right now. And, he said, he didn’t want to be put back in that hole. The next time he goes in, who knows who he will be when he comes out. “I want peaceful revolution … but if it can’t be peaceful, I will arm myself with a firearm. I will shoot back after being fired upon. I won’t shoot first,” he said. CW

Photo courtesy U.S. District Court

Making of a Militiaman: Part II

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cording to a records clerk/technician, in her 22 years at the recorders office, such things have occasionally happened: “Sometimes, they just don’t send them to us,” she says. In a phone call, Veeru-Collings verified that she had, in fact, taken the oath of office. Still, Dean is impassioned, believing such things invalidate the charges he is fighting. Convinced the misplaced document somehow has greater importance beyond a mere bureaucratic filing error, Dean says, “So, actually, Padma Veeru-Collings has been impersonating a public servant, the chief prosecutor of Salt Lake City Justice Court for one year, three months and seven days. Since she was hired. … That alone could make all of the prosecutions under her for that length of time null and void.” “Null and void” is more patois from the NLA. It means “unconstitutional.” These are foreign courts, Dean says of the courts in which he continues to find himself. War courts. Admiralty maritime law courts without jurisdiction. “That’s why the oath of office is so important. When they take the oath now, it brings them back … under the Constitution,” he says. But this “Padma thing” is minor compared to Judge Dale A. Kimball, he continues. Dean says he found himself in the chambers of Judge Kimball, federal judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah, holding an affidavit requiring Kimball’s presence at a citizen commonlaw grand jury. He was amazed he had made it through security, cell phone and all, simply telling court workers he had documents to deliver. The affidavit, created by Dean, accused Kimball of violating Dean’s constitutional rights when he was convicted of carrying ammunition while a felon. Judge Kimball wasn’t present at the time of Dean’s visit, and he had no idea Dean was in his chambers, says Dean. (The federal courthouse has since moved to a new building with tighter security.) Dean made his way through a door of the judge’s chambers to the courtroom where he thought Kimball was presiding. When he interrupted the hearing and announced he had something to give Kimball, he was swarmed by marshals, and a judge was evacuated from the courtroom. Dean says he later just mailed the documents. Judge Kimball relayed through his court clerk that he had no recollection of the incident. In early April 2014, Eugene Richardson, described as a fellow patriot by Dean, sent similar documents by certified mail notifying a judge of St. George’s 5th District Court of Utah about his constitutional transgressions and declaring Richardson’s intent to form a grand jury. A few weeks later, Richardson received a response from Brent Johnson, general council on behalf of the administrative office of the court. It read, in part: “You seem to be operating under the assumption that anyone can form a grand jury. This assumption is incorrect and leads to the conclusion that you believe this country can be operated through chaos and anarchy. … If you establish a competing system, based on your disagreement with elected leaders, then another group of citizens could disagree with your states and establish their own competing system, leading to anarchy as numerous competing groups are established.” The letter ended with Johnson welcoming Richardson to contact him and discuss the issue. Rich-


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THURSDAY 7.2

Salt Lake Acting Co.: Saturday’s Voyeur 2015 After more than 30 years, Saturday’s Voyeur isn’t in the business of surprising people. Like many artistic stalwarts, its appeal at this point lies more in its comfortable familiarity than anything else—giving the gentiles of Salt Lake City a public forum for laughing away their frustrations at local institutions. For any given annual production, then, the only question is how well it executes its formula—and the answer this year is: “Pretty well.” Where in some years, writers Allen Nevins and Nancy Borgenicht make an effort to keep their songs and sketches focusing on one single central plot, this version simply fires away at recent hotbutton topics—the excommunication of Ordain Women activist Kate Kelly; standards for “modest dress”; official LDS church acknowledgment of Joseph Smith’s taking of underage brides— while showing more than usual willingness to offend every other religion as much as it offends the Mormons. And while the show still shows a tendency to drop references simply because they obviously will get whoops and applause, the enthusiastic cast nails some lively and creative variations on the show’s parodies of show tunes and popular songs, including a version of Jesus Christ Superstar’s “I Don’t Know How to Love Him,” which features one of the best couplets in the show’s history. Most Valuable Player honors, though, go to Robert Scott Smith, whose preening interpretation of the prophet Joseph Smith captures a lot of what Voyeur is all about: telling a bawdy joke with such enthusiasm that you’re laughing at the telling as much as the joke itself. (Scott Renshaw) Saturday’s Voyeur 2015 @ Salt Lake Acting Company, 138 W. 500 North, 801-363-7533, through Aug. 30, $44-$55. SaltLakeActingCompany.org

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FRIDAY 7.3

SATURDAY 7.4

MONDAY 7.6

Antelope Island State Park is an underappreciated gem in northern Utah, worth a visit nearly any time of year—excluding the height of summer, when the heat and sun keep the masses away from the treeless desert island surrounded by salt water. It’s heavenly if you go at night, which makes the annual Antelope by Moonlight bike ride—held this year on July 3 during the full moon—one of the best events our state park system has ever created. The ride is a true party. Hundreds of people show up for the event, many in costume; I’ve seen a bicycle-riding squid and a team of neonglowing cheerleaders (some people pump jams from portable speakers). The theme this year is Back to the Future, with prizes for best costume. And the whole ride—which is not a race, so leave your jersey at home—has a chill vibe rarely found in group athletic events. For safety, all participants must have front and rear headlights or reflectors and wear a helmet. And, a few recommendations from a ride veteran: Start time is 10 p.m. but arrive at least 30 minutes early to grab a decent parking spot, get your T-shirt and wrist band, and find a place at the starting line. Riders leave from White Rock Bay at 10 p.m. Also—considering that you will probably be driving home around 1 a.m.—to stay awake on the road, bring loud music, coffee, sunflower seeds, and, most effective of all, friends. (Katherine Pioli) Antelope by Moonlight Bike Ride @ Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, Syracuse, July 3, 10 p.m., $35. AntelopeByMoonlight.com

As per tradition, fireworks will light up the Salt Lake Valley sky this Independence Day at multiple locations. While it looked like Sugar House might not be able to put on its annual show this year, the Sugar House Chamber of Commerce—along with major donor Apollo Burger, and some help from Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County—stepped in to make it happen. Radio station Mix 107.9 will broadcast patriotic songs. Before the fireworks, enjoy the Sugar House Arts Festival, with around 100 artists and vendors, the third annual Pet Parade and other activities. West Jordan’s celebration begins with its annual Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeo, featuring some world champions and other top-ranked cowboys. West Jordan City’s parade starts in the morning and runs north on Redwood Road from West Jordan’s City Hall to 7000 South. Despicable Me 2 will be shown at Veterans Memorial Park before the fireworks, which will end the night with a bang. Salt Lake City’s annual firework show will be held at Jordan Park. Sandy City holds its annual celebration the Sandy City Hall promenade, with festival, evening parade and music. See pp. 25-26 for information about other local fireworks shows. (Shawna Meyer) Sugar House Arts Festival @ Highland Drive, 2100 South to Sugarmont Plaza, July 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., free. Fireworks @ Sugar House Park, 1400 E. 2100 South, July 4, 9:45 p.m., free. SugarHouseChamber.org West Jordan’s Independence Day Celebration @ Veterans Memorial Park, 8030 S. 1825 West, July 4, 9-10 p.m., free. WJordan.com Salt Lake City’s Independence Day Celebration @ Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, July 4, 10 p.m., free. SLCGov.com/SCLEvents Sandy City 4th of July @ South Towne Promenade, 10000 S. Centennial Parkway, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., fireworks 10 p.m., Sandy.Utah.gov

Las Vegas isn’t the only place in the region to get a fix of prop hoops during the off-season any more. For the first time since 2008, summer NBA basketball returns to Salt Lake City; the Utah Jazz will host a four-team summer league—the Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers and San Antonio Spurs—that will play games in EnergySolutions Arena. The Jazz squad is scheduled to feature Dante Exum and Rodney Hood, who just finished their rookie seasons. It will also showcase 2015 first-round draft pick Trey Lyles—a 6-10 power forward out of Kentucky—and second round picks Olivier Hanlan of Boston College and Daniel Diez from Spain. Tickets to sit in the lower bowl at ESA are as low as $8 for one day ($5 for upper bowl), and $15 for a three-day pass. Games are scheduled for 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. nightly, with the Jazz in the 7 p.m. slot each day, playing Boston (featuring first-round picks Terry Rozier and R.J. Hunter) on Monday, San Antonio on Tuesday and Philadelphia (with Duke’s Jahlil Okafor) on Thursday. The return of summer ball to Salt Lake City revives a tradition that saw the “Rocky Mountain Revue” run most years from 1984-2008. At one point, 16 different NBA teams were sending their prospects to Utah in the summer. Players who got their first taste of professional hoops in Salt Lake City include Tim Duncan, Dirk Nowitzki, Kevin Durant, Steve Nash, Tony Parker and Carmelo Anthony. Who’s next on the list? Find out this week. (Geoff Griffin) Utah Jazz Summer League @ EnergySolutions Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 801-325-7328, July 6-9, 5 p.m. & 7 p.m., $5-$15. UtahJazz.com/SummerLeague

Antelope by Moonlight

Fireworks for Freedom

Utah Jazz Summer League


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Summer Glamp

Enjoy comfortable camping options in Utah and beyond. BY KATHLEEN CURRY & GEOFF GRIFFIN comments@cityweekly.net @TravelBrigade

LOW OR NO SERVICE FEES!

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C

amping is really fun—until it’s not. Sleeping out under the stars is glorious—until you wake up with a sore back. Connecting with nature is wondrous—until you realize you and your partner both smell like a toxic combination of sweat, dirt and campfire smoke, and you’d gladly trade all of your outdoor equipment for one hot shower. If you enjoy the outdoors but also like some civilization thrown in, “glamping” offers the best of both worlds. Spend time enjoying hikes, outdoor recreation, s’mores around the campfire and everything else that’s fun about camping. Then, when you’re ready, turn to the “glamour” side and take a shower with real plumbing before drifting off to sleep on an actual indoor bed on a real floor in an enclosed space. If you’re a traveler who wants to mix the beauty of the outdoors with the comforts of the indoors, check out these options close to home and in beautiful locations in neighboring states. Conestoga Ranch (400 W. 300 North, Garden City, 844-464-5267, ConestogaRanch.com)—located near Bear Lake in Garden City, Utah—became Utah’s newest entry in the glamping arena when it opened on July 1, 2015. Visitors will be able to choose between glamping “tents” (with real beds, bathrooms and hot showers) and Conestoga covered wagons (which will have real beds, fire pits outside and access to a luxury bathhouse). The wagons are mobile, so if you have a large group, you can circle the wagons in one spot and be together. There will also be an on-site restaurant serving breakfast selections and familystyle dinners, a small bar with beer and wine, and a place to rent equipment for fun out on Bear Lake. You can also pick up supplies for your own fire-pit dinner including “haute dogs” made with Kobe beef. No trip to Bear Lake is complete without getting a famous raspberry shake, and the Conestoga Ranch Shake Shack will be whipping them up all summer long. Moab Under Canvas (13784 Highway 191, Moab, 801-895-3213, MoabUnderCanvas.com) laid claim to being Utah’s first glamping location when it opened in 2013 just outside of Arches National Park. MUC features Safari tents with kings beds, safari furniture table, lantern and wood burning stove with complimentary firewood.

They also have teepee marquees that are based on a traditional teepee design. Each of the seven sides can be flipped up or down depending on the weather or time of day, or sides can be lifted to join up with other teepees to accommodate groups. Guests can add the bed & breakfast option or order a picnic lunch for their adventurous day ahead. Besides visiting nearby Arches and Canyonlands national parks, guests can arrange packages that also provide rock climbing, mountain biking and other outdoor activities. Fireside Resort (2780 Moose Wilson Road, Wilson, 877-660-1177, FiresideJacksonHole.com) is situated just minutes from Grand Teton National Park and the town of Jackson, and just over an hour from Yellowstone. Fireside features 23 “Jackson Hole” rustic cabin rentals. Beds are covered in plush linens and duvets, and topped with goose pillows. Full kitchens are provided so you can whip up a meal to serve out on your private deck. There are also living-room areas featuring flatscreen televisions and WiFi. Besides being enjoyable in the summer, the cabins are the perfect hideaway for a winter getaway, since Fireside is located just minutes from skiing at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. El Capitan Canyon (11560 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, 866-352-2729, ElCapitanCanyon.com) is situated in a prime spot at the north end of Santa Barbara and just off California’s famed Pacific Coast Highway. Speaking of the Pacific, the ocean itself is less than a mile from the canyon that holds El Capitan. The site offers a variety of accommodations, including large yurts and canvas

An artist rendering of glamping in style at Conestoga Ranch.

tents with beds and electricity, as well as cedar cabins that feature a full bathroom— where you can soak in a large tub—plus a kitchenette and outdoor deck. Don’t want to pack everything for your evening meal? Just stop by the on-site Canyon Market & Deli and pick up one of its signature barbecue kits that includes everything for a camp-style fireside dinner with s’mores for dessert. Safari West (3115 Porter Creek Road, Santa Rosa, 800-616-2695, SafariWest.com) in California’s wine country lets you get wild and spend the night glamping in the “Sonoma Serengeti” surrounded by giraffes, zebras and even a cheetah or two. Don’t worry: They’re in enclosed areas. You can enjoy a daytime safari through the park to see the animals before bedding down at night in a luxury tent built on a high wooden platform, complete with a private bathroom and hot shower. Have dinner at the on-site Savannah Cafe before sitting on the deck outside your tent watching and listening to the animals as the sun sets. If you’re a bit put off by traditional camping, then try glamping, and reintroduce yourself to the outdoors while being a bit pampered. CW Kathleen Curry and Geoff Griffin host the Travel Brigade Radio Show and Podcast. You can find them at TravelBrigade.com.


Saturday, July 4, 2015 10:00 am - 6:00 pm Highland Dr. 2100 S. to Sugarmont Plaza

& the Sugar House Chamber

100+ vendors, live music, street performances & children’s activities. 3rd Annual Pet Paraderegister online or the day of at 8:30am at Fairmont Park.

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JULY 2, 2015 | 23

For more information, visit: sugarhousechamber.org/ArtsFest

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Tune into The Mix 107.9 at 9:45pm to watch the fireworks with a live soundtrack!

One of the biggest firework show in Utah on the 4th! Fireworks show starts at 9:45pm

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MONDAY 7.6 Samba Fogo

Patterned off of the samba schools in Rio de Janeiro, Samba Fogo will immerse viewers in an Afro-Brazilian drumming, music and dancing experience this Monday evening at Red Butte Garden’s Family Night. Expect to be on your feet and moving to the rhythms of this talented group—and don’t be surprised if you’re pulled onstage, asked to don a feather headdress and strut your stuff in front of the 12-strong drum line. Children are encouraged to take part. Samba Fogo has been taking their message of community outreach to Salt Lake City since 1990. Everyone is invited to weekly dance classes for adults and adolescents of all levels, every Thursday night at the Salt Lake City Arts Hub. They also have a kid’s drumming and dance camp in July. To see them in action, take a peek at their popular YouTube channel; the dancers are amazing aerialists. (Paul Skiba) Samba Fogo @ Red Butte Garden, Visitor Center Courtyard, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, July 6, performances at 6 p.m. & 7 p.m., Regular Garden Admission ($6-$10), Garden Members Free. RedButteGarden.org

PERFORMANCE THEATER

1776: America’s Musical The Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, Monday, Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., matinée July 11, 2 p.m., through July 25, EmpressTheatre.com 1776: America’s Musical Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-393-0700, Monday, Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through July 25, no shows on July 4 & 24, TerracePlayhouse.com Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivans, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 17, Tuacahn.org Disney’s When You Wish Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivans, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 16, Tuacahn.org The Compleat Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 Main, 801-355-4628, Monday, Friday, Saturday, through July 18, The OBT.org Disney’s The Little Mermaid Hale Centre Theatre 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-9849000, Monday-Saturday, 4 & 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 12:30 & 4 p.m.; through Aug. 1, HCT.org The Foreigner, Neil Simon Festival Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-327-8673, July 8, 16, 22, 30, Aug. 5, 8 p.m.; matinees July 18, 24, Aug. 1, 7, 2 p.m., SimonFest.org Grease’d: Happy Days Are Here Again! Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m.; no performances July 4 & 24; through Aug. 22, DesertStar.biz Harvey Centerpoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Monday, Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m., through July 3, CenterpointTheatre.org Into the Woods Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Saturday matinees, 3 p.m., through August 15, HaleTheater.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Scera Shell Outdoor Theatre, 699 S.

State, Orem, 801-225-2787, Monday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8 p.m., SCERA.org The King and I CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, through July 19, CenterPointTheatre.org La Boheme Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre, Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-750-0300, July 8 & 23, Aug. 1 & 7, 7:30 p.m.; matinees, July 17 & 25, 1 p.m., UtahFestival.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, June 24-Aug. 30, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 pm, Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org (see p. 20) Utah Shakespeare Festival: The Taming of the Shrew, Henry IV Part 2, King Lear, Amadeus, Charley’s Aunt & South Pacific 299 W. Center St., Cedar City, 800-752-9849, through Sept. 5, Bard.org West Side Story Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m., Sundays, 6 p.m., through July 26, EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Utah Symphony: Patriotic Pops w/ Beth Southard & Gary Mauer Snowbasin Resort, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, July 3, 8 p.m., 801-620-1000, Snowbasin.com; Deer Valley, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, 801-533-6683, July 4, 5:30 p.m., DeerValley.com Utah Symphony: Mozart & Mendelssohn St. Mary’s Church, 1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City, July 8, 8 p.m., 801-355-2787, Arttix.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Adrenaline with Christian Pieper Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, July 5, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Jay Whittaker Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, July 2, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Keith Barany Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, July 3, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com


moreESSENTIALS LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Jen White & Valynne Maetani: Survival Strategies of the Almost Brave Barnes & Noble University Crossings Plaza, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, 801-229-1611, July 7, 6 p.m., BarnesAndNoble.com Jessica Day George: Silver in the Blood The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 7, 7 p.m.

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

80th Annual Oakley Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration 960 W. Center St., Oakley, July 1-4, 435-783-5734, OakleyCity.com America’s Freedom Festival Provo’s patriotic

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celebration encompasses many events, including: Freedom Awards Gala Utah Valley Convention Center, 220 W. Center Street, 801-851-2200, July 2, 6:30 p.m.; Freedom Days Center Street, July 2-4; Grand Parade University Avenue & Center Street, July 4, 9 a.m.; Fine Arts Show, 151 S. University Ave., July 3-4, 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.; Stadium of Fire, Lavell Edwards Stadium, BYU, July 4, 8 p.m., $29$175, FreedomFestival.org Black Powder Faire Bonneville Seabase, 1600 N. Highway 138, Grantsville, 435-884-3874, July 2-4, Seabase.net Downtown Farmers Market, Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South, through October 24, Saturdays, 8 a.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org Farr West Freedom Festival 5K Run/Walk 7 a.m.; Breakfast, 7 a.m.-8:30 a.m.; Flag Ceremony, 8 a.m.; Parade 9:30 a.m.; Booths 5 p.m.; Papa George Souvlaki Dinner, 5 p.m.-8 p.m.; Awards Ceremony,

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Salt Lake City Buddhist Temple

JAPANESE

OBON FESTIVAL Saturday, July 11, 2015

211 West 100 South, SLC, UT Ogden Taiko Drum Performance At 7:00 P.M. Traditional Japanese Dancing At 8:00 P.M. Food Served At 1:00 P.M.

FREE ADMISSION PU B LIC WEL C O ME SLBUDDHIST.ORG

moreESSENTIALS 7 p.m.; Skydivers, 9 p.m.; Fireworks, 10 p.m., Farr West City Hall, 1896 N. 1800 West, Farr West Fourth of July Celebration and Parade Sandy City Hall, Sandy, 801-568-7100, July 4, FlagRaising, 6:50 a.m., 5K, 7 a.m., Activities, Food, Booths, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Youth Arts Festival, 10 a.m.,-2 p.m., Scotty Haze Band, 12 p.m., Simply B, 1 p.m., Michelle Moonshine Trio, 2 p.m., The Zero Summers, 3 p.m., Son of Ian, 4 p.m., Preston Creed, 5 p.m., DJ, 8 p.m., Metro Music Club, 8:45 & 10:30 p.m., Fireworks, 10 p.m. (see p. 20) Holladay Fourth of July Festival Children’s Parade, Pine Park, 2120 E. 4500 South, 8:30 a.m.; Fireworks, 10:10 p.m. Hot Rock’n Fourth Ogden Pioneer Stadium, 668 17th St., Ogden, 801-814-9043, July 3: Family Plaza, 1-8 p.m., Food Vendors, 5-9 p.m., Demolition Derby, 6 p.m.; July 4: Family Plaza, 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Car Show, 1-6 p.m., Band: Two Weeks Notice, 1-3,

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4-6 p.m., Marcus the Magician, 3-4 p.m., Food and Retail Vendors, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Demolition Derby, 12-7 p.m., Fireworks, 10 p.m. International Folk Festival Sandy Amphitheater, 9400 S. 1300 East, Sandy, July 8, 8 p.m., SandyArts.com July 3 Celebration/July 4 Festivities The Canyons, 4000 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, 435-649-8111, July 3: Magician, Face-Painting, The Hired Guns, DJ Velvet at the Umbrella Bar, Photo Booth, 3-6 p.m., Mechanical Bull, 4-7 p.m., Soulstics 6-8:30 p.m.; July 4: 5K, 8 a.m., Activities, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Parade, 11 a.m., Parlour Hounds, 5:30 p.m., George T. Gregory Band, 7 p.m., Fireworks, 9:40 p.m., CanyonsResort.com Liberty Days This Is the Place Heritage Park, 2601 E. Sunnyside Ave., 801-582-1847, July 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., ThisIsThePlace.org Midway Small Town Fourth Midway Town

Square, July 4, 6:30 a.m.; Fireworks, 10 p.m. Murray Fun Days Murray Park, 296 E. Murray Park Ave., July 4, Parade, 8:30 a.m., Fireworks, 10 p.m., Murray.Utah.gov Park City Fourth of July Parade & Celebration Parade, 11 a.m. on Main and Park Avenue; Fireworks at Dusk, ParkCity.com Park Silly Market Main Street, Park City, 435-655-0994, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Salt Lake City’s Independence Day Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, July 4, Fireworks 10 p.m. (see p. 20) South Salt Lake Freedom Festival Parade starts at 2280 S. 300 East, and end at 3050 S. 500 East, July 4, 9:30 a.m., SouthSaltLakeCity.com Sugar House Fourth of July Arts Festival Sugarmont Plaza, 2100 S. Highland Drive, July 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fireworks, SugarHouse Park, 9:45 p.m. (see p. 20)


moreESSENTIALS Western Stampede West Jordan Arena, 8035 S. 2200 West, 801-569-5100, Rodeo July 2-4, 7 p.m.; July 4, Flag Ceremony, 9:30 a.m., Parade, 10:30 p.m, Movie, 9 p.m., Fireworks, 10 p.m., WesternStampede.com (see p. 20)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Adjunct Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 25. Brian Lindley: A Light in the Dark Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; through July 31 [con]text Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through July 11. Corinne Geertsen, Josanne Glass, Dan Toone Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284,

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

through July 10. The Cost of Anything Alice Gallery, 617 South Temple, 801-245-7272, through July 10 Duane Linklater: salt 11 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Drive, 801-581-7332, through Aug. 1. Eleanor Schultz: Controlled Burn: Pyrography Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; through July 31, SaltLakeArts.org Highlights of the Collection Tour Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, July 4-5, through October 7 Jann Haworth: Round Trip Modern West Fine Art, 200 S. 177 East, through July 16 Jared William Christensen: Strange Environment Corrine and Jack Sweet Branch Library, 455 N. F Street, 801-594-8651, MondaySaturday, July 6-Aug. 15

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JULY 2, 2015 | 27


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28 | JULY 2, 2015

ME SUM

NING I A T TER R EN

S

L A I T SSEN

E

LITTLE AMERICA/GRAND AMERICA

Coming to America(s)

DINE

Dining big and small at Little and Grand Americas.

Be sure to check out our growing bitters and cocktail mixers collection. Just in time for summer.

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

caputosdeli.com

T

he Fourth of July holiday is about nothing if not celebrating America. So with that in mind, I decided to turn my gaze this week—and my palate—toward a couple of all-American Utah institutions: Little America and the Grand America. As many Utahns already know, Little America—a chain of four hotels—was the creation of the late Robert Earl Holding, the billionaire owner of Sinclair Oil Corporation. The first Little America, located in Wyoming on Interstate 80, began as a two-pump service station and motel with 12 rooms and a 24-seat cafe. Today, Little America Wyoming offers travelers 140 rooms and, with 55 pumps, was, at one time, the world’s largest filling station. Salt Lake City’s Little America Hotel was built in 1955 and has undergone periodic renovations, including a major one in 2014, which introduced contemporary flair to the hotel, as well as its shops and restaurants. In 2002, Earl Holding’s grand dream came true with the opening of his Grand America Hotel—not only the most opulent and luxurious hotel in Salt Lake City, but one of the grandest in the country. Although I’ve spent quite a bit of time in the Grand America and its Garden Cafe restaurant since it opened, it occurred to me recently that in all the years I’ve lived in Utah and written about food, I’d never eaten at Little America. For shame! It was time to investigate. Walking into the Lucky H Bar & Grille, I had to check myself: “This is Little America?” I thought. The newly decked-out Lucky H Bar—a place where you can actually get a cocktail, beer or glass of wine without ordering food, by the way—sports a soothing blue-and-tan color scheme, a post-modern looking circular-shaped bar, and contemporary lighting and fixings. As for the Grille—Little America’s upscale restaurant—it looks like a classy steakhouse, with big, comfy chairs and banquettes, lots of soft materials to help soak up sound, and a see-in kitchen where you can watch Executive Chef Berhard Götz and his team do their work. During a visit to the Lucky H Grille for dinner, we had a young server from Chile named Paulina. It was one of her first days on the job, but she couldn’t have been sweeter or more accommodating. Perusing the surprisingly lively wine list—with se-

DEREK CARLISLE

Who doesn’t love a vast selection of cheese, meats and fine chocolates?

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

lections from around the world and more than 20 wines by the glass—we zeroed in on a reasonably priced Rosé from Italy: La Valentina Cerazuolo Rosé ($32/bottle). Even more impressive, it arrived at our table at the perfect pouring temperature: not too warm, not too cold. The menu at Lucky H Grille is much like Little America itself: a mix of old and new. Formally trained in Germany, Chef Götz has more than 40 years of culinary experience and joined Little America in 2004. He’s been featured on PBS’ Great Chefs of America TV series. His menu ranges from Continental classics like escargot with garlic butter ($11), French onion soup ($7) and homemade gravlax ($8) to more nouveau offerings such as Vietnamese spring rolls with shrimp and peanut-hoisen sauce ($8), pan-seared sea scallops with lemon mosto oil, arugula, salsa and citrus-garlic butter ($11), and sesame-seared ahi tuna cooked rare with Asian slaw and wasabi dressing ($14). For starters, we shared the assorted appetizer platter ($15)—an artfully presented plate of one very tasty crab cake with remoulade, a single seared scallop, one jumbo shrimp on shredded lettuce with cocktail sauce, and a generous portion of homemade gravlax with capers. I’d have minced the red onion that accompanied the gravlax rather than serving it in thick slices. And, for sharing purposes, how about two scallops and two shrimp? I don’t think that would tip the kitchen’s food costs too much. In all, though, it’s a very good appetizer to share, or better yet, to enjoy alone. There are Mad Men-style throwbacks to a less-liberated era on the Grille menu, such as Prime Rib, which comes as a 14-ounce “Gentlemen’s” cut ($34) or a more petite 10-ounce “Lady’s” portion ($28). But then there are also up-to-date choices like a Mary’s free-range, all-natural roasted chicken ($22). I must say, this tender, perfectly roasted half-chicken with natural garlic pan jus was one of the best things I’ve eaten lately. Unfortunately, it shared

Lucky H Bar & Grille’s Vietnamese spring rolls and pan-seared sea scallops. the plate with baby carrots straight from the bag and big, yellowish, unappealing mounds of broccoli. A house salad (salad, veggies and a choice of potato or rice come with all Grille entrees), similarly, could have used some work, presentation-wise. A giant cucumber slice required the use of a knife and fork to eat and an equally oversized chunk of underripe tomato necessitated the same. I did appreciate the varied choice of dressings offered, however, and that they came in small bowls (but with no serving spoon), allowing customers to dress their salads the way they like. Meanwhile, over at the Grand America’s Garden Cafe, I was impressed by top-notch service and dishes like spaghetti Bolognese ($16), with an Italian sausage ragout, roasted garlic cream sauce and tossed with Gold Creek Farms parmesan. The ahi tuna tartare with green onion, pear, ponzu sauce and wasabi crème fraîche was also excellent. Longtime local restaurateur/manager Regis Perret, formerly of the St. Regis in Deer Valley, has recently taken over the food and beverage director duties at the Grand America, and the service and menus are already showing evidence of his expertise and professionalism. Finally, be sure to stop into the Grand America’s La Bonne Vie, an eye-popping Willy Wonka-esque shop filled with worldclass pastries, cookies, cakes, macarons and baguettes, prepared by the hotel’s superb executive pastry chef Xavier Baudinet. Happy Birthday, America! CW

LITTLE AMERICA Lucky H Bar & Grille 500 S. Main 801-596-5704 SaltLake.LittleAmerica.com

THE GRAND AMERICA Garden Cafe/La Bonne Vie 555 S. Main 801-258-6708 GrandAmerica.com


, e u q e b r a b g n i n n i w d r a w a t s u j t o N o o t e r a f n a c i r e m fresh A

’ S T I BANaD l l i r g n a c i r e m

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

440 MAIN ST. 435.649.7337

banditsbbq.com

JULY 2, 2015 | 29

3176 East 6200 South 801.944.0505

PARK CITY, UTAH

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COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS, UTAH

PATIO OPEN  FULL BAR

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Monday - Kid’s Eat Free Tuesday - All You Can Eat Bbq Wednesday - Half-Price Apps And Drink Specials In The Bar


@critic1

Contemporary Japanese Dining LU N C H • D I N N E R • CO C K TA I L S

1 8 M A R K E T ST R E E T • 8 01 . 5 1 9.9 59 5

Zucca on the Move

Before you can say “zucca”—the Italian word for a specific type of pumpkin similar to butternut squash—Ogden’s Zucca Trattoria & Market (MyZucca.com) will be relocating. Zucca is my favorite Ogden restaurant, and when I heard it was moving, I was sort of hoping it would bring its terrific Italian fare closer to Salt Lake City. But the Ogdenites win: Zucca will be moving from its current location in South Ogden to 225 25th St. in downtown Ogden. Zucca closed its South Ogden restaurant near the end of June and will reopen in August. Stay tuned here for details.

ninth & ninth & 254 south main

2014

Pro & Amateur Cooks Unite!

The Park City Culinary Institute (CulinarySchoolUtah.com), which offers a culinary education aimed at wouldbe professionals, is joining forces with Utah’s premier cooking school for the home chef: Salt Lake Culinary Center (SaltLakeCulinaryCenter.com). Commenting on the partnership of the two culinary educational organizations, which will take place starting in January 2016, Park City Culinary Institute’s director, Laurie Moldawer, said, “Combining recreational and professional training will take both programs to a higher level.” Diane Sheya, director of Salt Lake Culinary Center added, “This opportunity will allow our facility, and us by association, to participate in the entire culinary spectrum; from home cooks to certified professionals.” While Salt Lake Culinary Center caters primarily to the amateur home cook looking to up their kitchen game, Park City Culinary Institute offers an intensive certification program for professionals with a tuition of $6,495.

2005

A Casual

Dining Experience ow in open for lunc & d

Sugar House Spitz

Spitz, “the home of the döner kebab,” is coming to Sugar House (1201 E. Wilmington Ave.). According to the owners, the new Sugar House location of Spitz—complete with a new patio area planned—is scheduled to open July 6. Quote of the week: I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself than be crowded on a velvet cushion. —Henry Dave Thoreau Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

2007 2008

voted best coffee house

er

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N

30 | JULY 2, 2015

FOOD MATTERS

SERVING

tapas & more 5pm-9pm

by 801-634-7203 | 5244 S. Highland Dr.


F F O 50% I H S U S L L A S L L O &R aY ! d Y r E V aY E all d

Beer & Wine WHY WaiT?

and asian grill

ASiAN Grocery STore

Do you love beer & animals?

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

M-Th 11-10•F 11-11•s 12-11•su 12-9  noW opEn! 9000 s 109 W, sandY & 3424 s sTaTE sTrEET  801.566.0721•ichibansushiut.com Asian Snacks • Sauces • Spices • Vegetables • Seafood • Tea & more

3390 South State Street | www.chinatownsupermarkets.com

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sign up to volunteer at the

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a benefit for

full details at utahbeerfestival.com

3390 South State Street | www.Hotdynasty.com Party Room available for Reservation: 801-809-3229

JULY 2, 2015 | 31

Saturday, August 15

Noodles • Hot Pot • Dry Pot • Dim Sum • Boba Tea • Fruit slush • Milk Shakes


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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Toasting America’s Birthday

Sip these warm-weather wines on July 4. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

S

ince 2015’s Independence Day happens to fall on a Saturday, I suspect some of us will be celebrating America’s birthday a little more—um, patriotically than if it occurred midweek. And, given the weather patterns of the past few weeks, it’s going to be a hot one. So, for this Fourth of July, if you’re planning to picnic, barbecue, go boating, camp or light up the neighborhood with fireworks, I’d suggest locking up those meaty Cabernets, Burgundies and Barolos and choosing lighter, low-alcohol wines that can be pleasurably and abundantly quaffed in the warmest weather.

When thinking about drinking on the Fourth (or on any warm day), think first about what you’ll be eating. Burgers and hot dogs? Paella or pizza? Barbecue chicken and bratwurst? Then choose wines (or beer) that will complement the food you’ll enjoy. And, as I’ve advised in the past, it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me to raid your wine cellar for rare vintages or hard-to-find boutique wines that you’re probably going to chill in a bucket of ice and serve in plastic cups. So, I look to lessprestigious, toasty winemaking regions for my July 4 celebration sippers, such as New Zealand, Australia, Chile and the South of France. Soft, fruity wines are terrific in the backyard, at the picnic or on the porch. One of my favorites is Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare Rosé from California. For fuller-bodied Rosés it’s tough to find better summer wines for a better price than Rosés, from Provence. I’d suggest Tavel Château Aquéria, for example. But if you can find it, try a bottle of Rosé Coeur de Grain from Domaines Ott with a lobster roll for an exceptional warm weather lunch or July 4th treat. Looking for something a little more exotic? It’s worth a little legwork to scout out Albarossa Salice Salentino Rosato. This bone-dry southern Italian “pink” wine reminds me of strawberry pie in a bottle; it’s

DRINK terrific slightly chilled on a hot summer day. Then again, it’s hard to beat Spain’s Marqués de Cáceres Rosé (for about $9) in the bang-for-yourbuck pink-wine sweepstakes. Grilled foods call for red wine with enough tannins to fight spices, smoke and bitter burned flavors. For foods off the grill (even charred chicken and fish) I often turn to Zinfandel. Zins from Ridge or Ravenswood (particularly the Vintner’s Blend) can be good, inexpensive choices. Ditto for Cline and Rancho Zabaco. Then again, so is an Australian Shiraz like Rosemount or my current favorite Aussie fruit bomb Zin, called Bulletin Place Shiraz. If you choose to go for a slightly lighter red—and in especially hot weather, I would—you can’t go wrong with a versatile, fruity Beaujolais like

Brouilly Château de la Chaize. You can drink it with everything from grilled rib-eye steak doused in barbecue sauce to marinated quail with rosemary. In the world of white wine, Pinot Grigio is a good choice for a lighter, low-alcohol white wine on the Fourth, as are Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Gewürztraminer, Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc. The raspberry-laden Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand is a slam-dunk for summer sipping, as is the less expensive Santa Rita Reserva. For a hint of the French Riviera, try Pascal Jolivet Sancerre or maybe Didier Dageneau Pouilly-Fumé. And from this country, St. Supery Sauvignon Blanc is a fine choice. Alsatian wines are also wonderful backyard barbecue thirst-quenchers; look for Pinot Blanc and Riesling from solid producers like Zind-Humbrecht, Trimbach, Hugel and Schlumberger. Enjoy your Fourth of July celebration! CW


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves! El Azteca Taco Shop Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

NOW OPEN!

El Azteca has become a Provo tradition since its opening in 1962. Now, the Rubio family’s second and third generations continue that tradition. As the first Mexican restaurant in the valley, El Azteca introduced many authentic South of the Border dishes to Utah County, such as chile rellenos, chimichangas, authentic tacos, quesadillas, tortas and many more. El Azteca also serves 15 varieties of fruit punch. The self-service salsa bar allows customers to customize their tacos and other Mexican fare. 46 E. Bulldog Blvd., Provo, 801-375-9690; 78 S. State, Orem, 801-225-7773, ElAztecaTacoShop.com

WE CATER!

FREE FACE PAINTING EVERY MONDAY

WE HAVE HATCH NEW MEXICO GREEN CHILES

retail packs available 5lbs for $17.00 1lbs for $4.95

3956 W. Innovation Drive (13400 S) 801-565-8818 • salsaleedos.net

OPEN

MON-THUR 11AM-10PM FRI-SAT 11AM-11PM SUN 11AM-9PM

Luna Blanca Taqueria

As seen on “ Diners,

-Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

Moab Diner

ALL YOU CAN EAT CARNE ASADA & CARNITAS

$9.99

$2 MARGARITAS ALL DAY - EVERYDAY

3600 S. State St. | 801.263.7707 | miranchitogrill2.com

T H E TA STE OF S UM M E R

4160 Emigration Canyon road

801 582-5807 www.ruthsdinEr.Com

6213 SOUTH HIGHLAND DRIVE | 801.635.8190

JULY 2, 2015 | 35

The Moab Diner claims to have the best green chili around, and so far, there’s no reason to dispute that claim. For anything you order—whether the breakfast burrito, veggie omelet or the house specialty Sweetwater skillet—if you yell, “Smother it!” it will be so. Serving up classic ‘50s diner fare for nearly classic ‘50s diner prices, the Moab Diner offers ambiance, fast service and great food in a restaurant that’s always packed to the rafters. And then, if you’re not completely stuffed (or even if you are), try the ice-cream treats. Banana splits, sundaes and a kids cone (that’s larger than what you’ll find in most of the higher-priced chains) will be a perfect accompaniment to a hot Moab day. 189 S. Main, Moab, 435-259-4006, MoabDiner.com

TACO TUESDAY & THURSDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

Gloria’s Little Italy is a family-run business that features a warm, cozy trattoria atmosphere and rustic, authentic Italian cuisine. Begin a meal with antipasti of bruschetta, calamari fritti or a Caprese salad before moving on to minestrone or Gloria’s fresh tomatobasil soup. Pasta offerings include arrabbiata, carbonara with pancetta and eggs, and the traditional amatriciana. Vegetarians are not forgotten here, where there are vegetarian sauces to replace the meat sauce. For dessert, try the cream-filled chocolate cake ball, served hot with ice cream. 1 E. Center St., Provo, 801-805-4913, GloriasLittleItaly.com

-CreeksiDe PAtios-Best BreAkfAst 2008 & 2010-85 YeArs AnD GoinG stronG-DeliCious MiMosAs & BlooDY MArY’s-sAt & sun 11AM-2PM-live MusiC & weekenD BrunCh-

Gloria’s Little Italy

Spice up your life!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Serving American Drive-ins AnD Dives” Comfort Food Since 1930

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457

Luna Blanca Taqueria offers reasonably priced, authentic Mexican dishes in a relaxed atmosphere. Located at the base of Big Cottonwood Canyon, it really is the ideal posthike restaurant. Enjoy the beautiful view from the patio while you start your meal with guacamole and chips. On the menu, you’ll find a variety of specialty tacos, burritos, quesadillas and salads, all made with quality ingredients. There are also plenty of options for vegetarians, and there’s even a kids menu that will please the pickiest eaters. The restaurant has a variety of beer available, but the house margarita is truly the perfect way to complement any of the tasty food. 3158 E. 6200 South, Holladay, 801-944-5862, LunaBlancaTaco.com


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36 | JULY 2, 2015

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net High West

South Jordan • 10500 S. 1086 W. Ste. 111 • 801.302.0777 Provo • 98 W. Center Street • 801.373.7200 Gift certificates available • www.indiapalaceutah.com

Foothilll’s Best Restaurant

Patio

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • SMALL PLATES & DINNER ENTREES

1615 SOUTH FOOTHILL DR. • 801 583 8331 • BLEUBISTROSLC.COM TUES-SAT | 4:30-10PM • SAT | 9AM -10PM • SUN | 9AM -3PM

Better burger... meet better breakfast! ser ved 7:00 - 11:00 am M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

With a distinctive mellow taste in country music, High West has a rustic intimacy that makes the former horse livery—now distillery and restaurant—a pleasure to visit. This up-market roadhouse displays a cultivated taste in everything from its Spanish cheeses to the whiskey and chocolate pairings for dessert. The entire property was moved back five feet to provide ample space for a comfortable, well-designed patio. In the basement, you’ll find the distillery and a chalkboard demonstrating the chemical complexities that go into High West’s offerings. 703 Park Ave., Park City, 435-649-8300, HighWest.com

House of Tibet

House of Tibet is a family-run restaurant where you will find a friendly environment and traditional Tibetan décor. Specialties here include Tibetan momos—similar to Chinese potstickers—vegetable curry, spicy potatoes, lamb curry, chili chicken, fried noodles and rice, lentil soup and more, including some Chinese and Indian dishes. Stop in at lunchtime for the inexpensive all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. 145 E. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-1376, HouseOfTibetSaltLakeCity.com

Grappa

This is the restaurant that began Bill White’s Park City restaurant empire. For many loyal customers, it’s still his best. Situated in a house at the top of Main Street in Old Town, Grappa is a popular eatery, and diners flock to get a table in the cozy, busy dining rooms and outside on the sprawling patios in summer. Calamari fritti is always a great way to start a meal, and the filet mignon can’t be beat. A superb Italian wine-studded list rounds out the wonderful Grappa experience. Unsurprisingly, Grappa also offers an extensive selection of grappa liqueurs. 151 Main, Park City, 435-645-0636, GrappaRestaurant.com

Faustina

13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

Faustina is a gorgeous, eye-catching restaurant, with a menu focused on carefully crafted contemporary American food. Try the sensational stuffed chicken breast or the grilled lamb chops with a sour cherry reduction. Also, give the Asiago cheese-crusted scallops with a tomato-saffron broth a go. An eclectic wine list rounds things out. For dessert, dig into the white chocolate budino, or espresso creme brulee. 454 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-7464441, FaustinaSLC.com

Deli Done Right

clos e june d 28july ˜ 6

2014

PATIO NOW OPEN

JUly 11th july 18th

MICHELLE CHISHOLM POP/COUNTRY

STAND UP COMEDY

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369 @

here... Summer is

Bröst! BEST RUEBEN

La Caille

La Caille is a stunning jewel of a restaurant tucked into the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon, complete with beautiful grounds to wander. French for “the quail,” La Caille features French cuisine in an exquisite dining atmosphere. Begin your meal with escargot, ratatouille or lobster bisque. For the main course, partake of steamed mussels, sturgeon caviar or rack of lamb. For dessert, finish up with bananas Foster flambéed with caramel rum sauce or chocolate mousse. And please, walk around the formal grounds—they’re intricate and beautiful. 9565 Wasatch Blvd., Sandy, 801-942-1751, LaCaille.com


20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net rney, u o J d e foo Take a the May/Junh Pick up f Devour Uta issue o

CYTY BYRD @Washington Square

Hires Big H

Hires is a Salt Lake City staple. It’s been around for more than 50 years, and with good reason: The burgers are delicious, garnering national acclaim. The atmosphere is casual, with an old-fashioned feel; servers will bring your meal to your car. You just have to try the classic combo: the Big H burger, fries and a mug of cold housemade root beer; add some fry sauce for a true Hires experience. If burgers aren’t your thing, Hires offers plenty of other tasty sandwiches, so try the grilled Reuben or grilled ham & cheese. Make sure you save room for dessert and treat yourself to an old-fashioned banana split. Multiple locations, HiresBigH.com

Breakfast & Lunch Weekdays

Let Us Cater Your Next Event

450 S. 200 E. • 801.535.6102 CYTYBYRD.COM

Hector’s

Previously Molca Salsa, Hector’s serves up some of the tastiest South of the Border fare in the Salt Lake Valley. Popular combo plates include the carne asada burrito, machaca, chorizo, chimichanga and chile relleno plates. The fresh guacamole and spicy carrots are stars here, and you can’t go wrong with the tortas, especially the delicious carnitas torta. For the latenighters out there, Hector’s is open 24 hours, and minutes away from Interstate 215. 2901 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-3850

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Pace’s Drive-In

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Pace’s is the antithesis of cookie-cutter fast-food chain joints. Do you crave Rainbows, Country Boys and supertasty sodas? Then you’ll love Pace’s. This unique Utah eatery features fresh, old-fashioned burgers, AstroPops, homemade ice cream and onion rings made from scratch, not to mention super-sweettasting Coca-Cola. Pace’s also offers fries, malts, hot dogs and corn dogs, all guaranteed to satisfy your fastfood cravings. 1090 W. 300 North, Clearfield, 801-614-1393; 344 N. Main, Layton, 801-593-6936

Salt City Burger Co.

2335 E. Murray Holladay rd 801.278.8682 | ricebasil.com

197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

JULY 2, 2015 | 37

Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations.

At Ventanas Restaurant, you’ll find authentic Mexican food at prices that won’t hurt your wallet, served in a welcoming, comfortable atmosphere. A standout aspect of this eatery’s look is the chunky log furniture, which gives the interior a mountain-bound touch. Customer favorites are the fresh flour tortilla chips with housemade salsa, the outstanding chile rellenos and the molcajete Ventana—served in the traditional lava-rock vessel that’s heated to cook the food inside—which isn’t overpoweringly spicy but still has rich, full-bodied flavor. 825 25th St., Ogden, 801-627-2475

Check out our daily lunch specials .

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Ventanas Restaurant

All of Salt City Burger Company’s burgers are made from USDA Choice beef, ground fresh daily. The terrific french fries are hand-cut and fried with skins intact. The setup at Salt City Burger Co. is much like Fuddruckers. What you get is a basic burger, and then you load it up yourself with toppings from the fixins bar. There’s no beer or wine, but you can get a good root-beer float, chocolate peanut-butter shake and fresh lemonade. 9176 Village Shop Drive, Sandy, 801-495-4111; 401 W. 500 South, Bountiful, 801-292-5544, SaltCityBurgerCo.com


A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews Yellowtail Japanese Bistro

Wine Wednesdays

Endless ta pas t u e s d ay s

25

$

per persoN me dit r i nas lc .com

1394 s. west temple 801.485.2055

38 | JULY 2, 2015

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REVIEW BITES

Patio Seating ✦ Established 2004 ✦ No Coupon Neccessary... Everyone pays the same

LOW PRICE! 694 East Union Square

SAN DY

www.brittonsrestaurant.com

Best Family Diner

801-572-5148 Open 7 Days a Week! 7am - 3pm

Attractive wood floors, contemporary design features, and beautiful lighting have turned the somewhat sad-looking spot that once was Shogun into a very eye-catching dining destination. The menu still seems to be a work in progress: An order of kushi shrimp was disappointingly small and overcooked. A much better starter would be delicate yellowtail slices, or the lightly seared tuna tataki. Whereas a standard order of nigiri at most sushi bars is two pieces, Yellowtail offers its nigiri a la carte; I recommend the raw scallops, yellowtail belly, tuna and snapper, all served in generous portions over good quality sushi rice. The “bistro” part of the name comes into play with some of its not-so-standard specials. Yellowtail serves foie gras sashimi with balsamic vinegar and yuzu “Jell-O.” There are some bargains to be had on the midday menu, including a combo lunch platter and the lunchtime sushi/sashimi platters which include miso and salad or rice, plus a choice of 10 pieces of sashimi; 12 sushi roll pieces or 10 pieces of “chef’s choice” nigiri. Add a surprisingly good wine list, and you’ll find a solid place to satisfy your sushi and sashimi appetite. Reviewed June 25. 321 S. Main, 801-364-7142, YellowtailSLC.com

Powder

After several different restaurants have occupied the space at what is now the Park City Waldorf Astoria, the current one, Powder, with Chef Ryker Brown, is the best of them all. Start with an artisanal cheese board or charcuterie board sourced from local purveyors, or perhaps a refreshing summer salad like gold, purple and red baby beets served with watermelon, Feta cheese, hazelnuts and watercress, drizzled with white balsamic vinegar. The tasty ahi tuna tataki appetizer is sushi-grade ahi tuna peppered and seared just long enough to create a crisp outer crust, with the interior of the tuna left essentially uncooked, cut into squares and served with radish, micro cilantro leaves, serrano pepper and a ginger-soy-lime vinaigrette. Chef Brown has kicked the fried-chicken comeback up a few notches by preparing his organic chicken sous vide for at least 24 hours, then deep-frying it ever so briefly; the chicken is so tender and juicy that it’s astonishingly delicious. Finish up with hot, sugar-dusted beignets with raspberry coulis and vanilla cream. Reviewed June 18. Waldorf Astoria, 2100 Frostwood Drive, Park City, 435-647-5566, ParkCityWaldorfAstoria.com


MAGIC MIKE XXL

Stripped Down

CINEMA

Magic Mike XXL can’t recapture the substance that made the original more than hunky shirtless guys. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

Joe Manganiello, Channing Tatum and Adam Rodriguez in Magic Mike XXL discarded (though it inspires a great gag about a younger generation of dancers doing a Twilight-themed routine). It’s a movie where stuff happens on the way to the next scene where stuff happens on the way to the final scenes where big stuff happens. A lot of the stuff that happens involves hunky guys dancing provocatively with their shirts off, and let’s be honest: There’s an audience for that. Based on the advance screening I attended, that moviegoing audience would be thrilled to be part of the audience up on that screen, making it rain dollar bills on those hunky, provocatively dancing guys. The accompanying choreography is bold and wild, and shot in a way that dancing is rarely shot in movies anymore, so that you can actually appreciate that athleticism of the routines. But it’s sad that there’s such a gaping hole in the middle of the “let’s put on a show” stuff. Even the final shots—seemingly meant to duplicate the lineup at the end of Ocean’s Eleven—can’t hide that this caper isn’t an effervescent ride. It’s just a movie about male strippers. CW

MAGIC MIKE XXL

BB.5 Channing Tatum Joe Manganiello Jada Pinkett Smith Rated R

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TRY THESE The Full Monty

Ocean’s Eleven (2001) George Clooney Brad Pitt Rated PG-13

Magic Mike

(2012) Channing Tatum Matthew McConaughey Rated R

21 Jump Street (2012) Channing Tatum Jonah Hill Rated R

JULY 2, 2015 | 39

(1997) Robert Carlyle Tom Wilkinson Rated R

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to the annual stripper convention in Myrtle Beach, S.C. a trip on which Mike impulsively decides to join them. What follows is mostly an episodic road trip, as the lads bounce up the coast: a beach-party stopover, where Mike meets a flirty photographer (Amber Heard); an impromptu routine in a convenience store set to “I Want It That Way;” a visit with one of Mike’s old associates, Rome (Jada Pinkett Smith), who’s now running a lavish private male-stripper club in Savannah. Director Gregory Jacobs—Soderbergh’s long-time assistant director, taking over the main chair while Soderbergh still serves as cinematographer and editor—maintains the loosey-goosey performance energy of the original, with plenty of casually entertaining banter. And while McConaughey’s oily Dallas is missed, Tatum carries XXL a long way purely on the strength of his charm and charisma … OK, and also his ridiculous abs. But what’s missing is anything even remotely resembling a story, even the thin mentor & protégé narrative that supported Magic Mike. Carolin (also returning as writer) makes some token stabs in the same economic direction as the original, with members of Mike’s crew variously mentioning their dreams of selling yogurt, becoming artists, singing and acting, etc. Here, though, it all feels like background noise— something to talk about because they need to talk about something on that long trip up to Myrtle Beach. Even the subtext of “male entertainers” facing the downside of their career as they hit their late 30s is quickly

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here’s an important, perhaps counter-intuitive point that must be clear before we start talking about Magic Mike XXL: The original 2012 Magic Mike was not about male strippers. Make no mistake: It contained male strippers. A whooooole lot of ’em, grinding and thrusting away in routines designed to send female audience members—both within the movie itself, and in theater seats—into fits of shrieking glee. But the movie was not fundamentally about male strippers, and that’s why it worked as something besides beefcake eye candy. Director Steven Soderbergh and screenwriter Reid Carolin used that milieu as the backdrop for a Great Recession-era tale of shadow economies, with people working their hardest and resorting to less-thansavory activities in an attempt to stay above water, let alone grab the American dream. From the efforts of Mike Lane (Channing Tatum) to finance his custom-furniture business to under-the-table construction jobs and drug deals, Magic Mike was, at its core, about money—and not just the bills stuffed into the protagonists’ G-strings. Magic Mike XXL picks up three years later, and it’s got entirely different things on its mind—or, more to the point, it really has nothing on its mind. Mike is still running his furniture business in Tampa, mourning the recent end of his relationship with Brooke, when he hears from his old stage buddies— Richie (Joe Manganiello), Tarzan (Kevin Nash), Ken (Matt Bomer) and Tito (Adam Rodriguez)—who are now facing a last hurrah after being ditched by Dallas and The Kid (Matthew McConaughey’s and Alex Pettyfer’s characters, not returning for this go-round). That last hurrah will be a trip


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THEATER DIRECTORY SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. FAITH OF OUR FATHERS [not yet reviewed] Two young men discover the history of their Vietnam War veteran fathers. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) FELIX & MEIRA BBB All “forbidden love” stories are not created equal, and cowriter/director Maxime Giroux find some welcome complexity in a story with more than a few familiar elements. In a Montreal neighborhood, two people begin to form a tentative relationship: Meira (Hadas Yaron), a dissatisfied Orthodox Jewish wife and mother; and Félix (Martin Dubreuil), a man dealing with the recent death of the father from whom he’d long been estranged. Giroux makes some odd editing decisions (like inserting a lengthy bit of footage of a performance by gospel/blues pioneer Sister Rosetta Tharpe) and never quite fully develops Félix’s motivations. But while echoes of stories like The Bridges of Madison County and A Price Above Rubies abound, Yaron gives a lovely performance capturing Meira’s uncertainty and lack of self-confidence. More significantly, Giroux lends richness to the potentially static character of Meira’s husband (Luzer Twersky) and builds the plot to a point where it begins to feel that none of the possible outcomes will leave anyone happy. And he delivers a final shot with the potential for swoony romanticism that instead delivers a particularly jagged kind of heartbreak. Opens July 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

MAGIC MIKE XXL BB.5 See review p. 39. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE OVERNIGHT BBB It feels almost churlish to fault writer/director Patrick Brice for not finding something more insightful in a simply satisfying comedy. Adam Scott and Taylor Schilling play Alex and Emily, newly relocated to Los Angeles and looking for some kind of new connections when their son starts playing with another boy in the park, and they’re soon invited to dinner by the boy’s parents, Kurt and Charlotte (Jason Schwartzman and Judith Godrèche). A very peculiar night ensues, built on the growing realization by the slightly square Alex and Emily that Kurt and Charlotte may be somewhat … out there. Schwartzman is terrific as the über-confident dilettante, and Scott’s nearly as good playing a guy trying to bolster his sense of his own masculinity. The story starts to sag in the middle third as it proceeds inevitably toward more or less exactly where it seemed likely to go, and there are missed opportunities to dig into what married couples are willing to admit they fantasize about. Ultimately, it’s just a solidly funny exploration of clashing personality types—and if it’s not particularly profound, the next laugh is right around the corner. Opens July 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR A POEM IS A NAKED PERSON BB My only other exposure to documentary filmmaker Les Blank has been his remarkable Burden of Dreams—about the arduous production of Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo—so I have to assume that the reason this film remained unreleased for 40 years was that somebody realized it was barely a movie. Shot circa 197374, it follows country/folk/bluegrass singer-songwriter Leon Russell, including recording sessions and live performances—at

least ostensibly. In practice, this is a frustrating stream-ofconsciousness affair that drifts from various musical interludes, to spaced-out interviews with some of Russell’s sidemen and collaborators, to random snippets of Oklahoma local color like a guy punctuating his thoughts on a parachuting championship by chewing glass. Some of the music is terrific, and Blank occasionally finds a lovely sequence like Russell’s version of “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” playing over images of clouds drifting past the moon. But there’s too little direction or focus, or even much of an attempt to make Russell a clear and understandable character. After 40 years, this still looks not like a documentary, but footage of a bunch of stuff that happened. Opens July 3 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

TERMINATOR GENISYS BB.5 The ever-fragile cause-and-effect issues of time travel take a beating in this addition to the science-fiction franchise that’s part prequel, part sequel and part “seriously, who can even keep up at this point?” Like the original film, it begins with Kyle Reese (Jai Courtney) sent back to 1984 to save Sarah Connor (Emilia Clarke)—future mother of rebel-against-the-machines leader John Connor (Jason Clarke)—from a time-traveling robot assassin. But Reese finds a change in the timeline, wherein Sarah has been protected since childhood by a good ol’ T-800 (Arnold Schwarzenegger). Director Alan Taylor and his screenwriters throw in plenty of nods to the first two films—including footage that allows old Arnie to go toe-to-toe with his 30-years-younger self—plus some decently crafted set pieces. But the story gets far too tangled up in exposition trying to rationalize the characters’ actions and the actual stakes if they fail, while ignoring chances to take advantage of the modern-day plugged-in world as a setting. “How?” Reese asks at one point about chronological developments, to which Sarah replies, “Does it matter?” And that might have been the best way to deal with it. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY At Gallivan Center, July 6, 8:45 p.m. (G) HEAVEN ADORES YOU At Main Library, July 7, 7 p.m. (NR) THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS At Tower Theatre, July 3-4 @ 11 p.m. & July 5 @ noon. (PG) RED At Main Library, July 8, 2 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

INSIDE OUT BBBB Any adult basing their “should I see this” decision on commercials has no idea how much emotional complexity director Pete Docter has packed into this terrific adventure, which imagines the emotional “control room” inside an 11-year-old girl whose family has just moved to a new city. The fanciful scenario allows the animators to craft a fantastically detailed world that pops with its own perfect internal logic. Yet, as terrific a technical achievement as it might be, it’s even better at addressing how parents deal with the reality of children transitioning into the more complicated emotional life of adolescence. There’s plenty of fun to be found in the characters and voice performances, but whatever it offers to kids is nothing compared to what Pixar films continue to deliver for adults: storytelling that nails the defining lump-in-the-throat moments of human experience. (PG)—SR


CINEMA

CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

A LITTLE CHAOS BBB.5 In 1682 Paris, King Louis XIV (Alan Rickman) is planning his palace at Versailles, and royal landscape architect André Le Notre (Matthias Schoenaerts) dares to hire a woman: freelancer Sabine De Barra (Kate Winslet). There was no actual female garden designer at Versailles, but so what? Her plight seems awfully familiar to women today; there are men here who scoff, who see her as encroaching on territory that is rightfully male. But this isn’t a political film. It’s pure entertainment: romantic, funny, smart, wise and just plain different. Rickman’s second outing as director is a romp filled with actors who are a joy to spend time with: the always magnificent Winslet; Stanley Tucci, stealing the movie as the King’s brother, outrageously and hilariously; everybody’s new boyfriend Schoenaerts; and Rickman himself an absolute treat as Louis XIV. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

MAX BB.5 There’s deeply weird stuff going on around the edges of this comingof-age/boy-and-his-dog story, about a Marine-trained German shepherd named Max whose handler is killed in action, whereupon he’s taken in stateside by the dead soldier’s family, including troubled younger brother Justin (Josh Wiggins). Director/co-writer Boaz Yakin offers up just enough flag-waving to indicate he’s aiming for the heartland, while also dropping in a startlingly cynical perspective on the way nations use soldiers. And while there’s solid material here about Justin discovering romance and learning hard truths, it’s also a movie that spends much of its running time on an illegal arms deal, and shows Max making independent tactical decisions to gain strategic advantage. The solid construction of the suspense-thriller elements only make it feel stranger that, deep down, Max doesn’t want us to think of it as a suspense thriller. (PG-13)—SR

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CINEMA

CLIPS

ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL BBB Alfonso Gómez-Rejon’s Sundance award-winning adaptation of Jesse Andrews’ young-adult novel has been criticized for focusing on its narcissistic white-boy hero—which seems to miss the point. Yes, high-school senior Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann) does find his narrow, self-loathing view of the world affected by his friendship with cancer-stricken classmate Rachel (Olivia Cooke), and yes, his African-American “co-worker” Earl (RJ Cyler) is rendered in broad, sometimes uncomfortable stereotypical terms. But “depiction = endorsement” accusations don’t line up with the pointed construction of Greg as an unreliable narrator. At its core, Me and Earl is about growing out of the adolescent self-absorption that turns every narrative into one with “Me” at the beginning. The lovely later scenes between Mann and Cooke lend depth to this reminder that a life spent skimming the surface of the people around you is an opportunity missed. (PG-13)—SR TED 2 BBB Seth MacFarlane seems determined to make people laugh in ways they’re not proud of—so mission accomplished, I guess. His sentient, vulgar teddy-bear protagonist and best pal Johnny (Mark Wahlberg) go to court to prove Ted’s legal personhood—and if it makes you uncomfortable to hear arguments for civil rights in the mouth of the perpetually gay-panicky Ted, well, welcome to MacFarlaneLand. Pretty much everything having to do with the “plot” is either ill-conceived or tedious, which makes it fortunate that MacFarlane mostly uses it as an excuse for punch lines. When he nails a gag—like getting Amanda Seyfried to play along with jokes about her resemblance to a certain pop-culture character—it’s hard to resist his energy. Surrender to those laughs, and to the likelihood that you’ll feel guilty about everything you sat through to get to them. (R)—SR

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MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

‘Merican Spoils

TV

M-80 Cherry Bomb Snake

CBS burns off sitcoms, IFC drops The Spoils Before Dying and Hannibal Burress asks Why? The Millers Saturday, July 4 (CBS)

Series Burn-Off: Talk about “unceremonious.” Dumped on Saturdays, on the 4th of July? Damn. Canceled family sitcom The Millers (starring Will Arnett, Margo Martindale, Beau Bridges and J.B. Smoove) deserves a better send-off than this; there are far worse CBS comedies with far less-capable casts (The Odd Couple comes to mind … and now my brain hurts), but at least Arnett’s time is now freed up for more of Netflix’s BoJack Horseman—we all win there. Ultimately, The Millers wasted funny people on aggressively unfunny writing, much like CBS mainstay Mike & Molly (Melissa McCarthy, hilarious; Billy Gardell, hysterical; the show, unwatchable) and, insult to injury, it’s being lowered into the TV grave alongside …

The Greg Gutfeld Show Sundays (Fox News Channel)

New Series: For years, the most intentionally funny show on the Fox News Channel has been Red Eye, a 3 a.m.(!) weeknight free-for-all roundtable of politics and pop culture, hosted by network wildcard Greg Gutfeld. A few weeks ago, he launched his own Sunday-night prime-time solo show, which is apparently supposed to be a mashup of The Daily Show and Comedy Bang! Bang! in the old haunted Huckabee studio (cleared of

Hollywood Cycle Tuesday, July 7 (E!)

Series Debut: Just when I think E! might be turning a creative corner (The Royals—that didn’t suck, right?), they send over something new and stoopid: “From clashing opinions with owners over the best way to get booties in the saddles, to blurred lines in the instructors’ personal and professional lives, get a firsthand look at the obsessive, glamorous world of indoor cycling in Los Angeles.” So, Hollywood Cycle is a reality show about spin classes. What’s next, a series set at a weekly newspaper? Ha!

The Spoils Before Dying Wednesday, July 8 (IFC)

Miniseries Debut: It may have seemed like a bizarre fever dream, but 2014’s The Spoils of Babylon actually did happen. That ludicrously loopy Will Ferrell/Adam McKay tribute to epic ’70s and ’80s miniseries dynasties was as funny as Ferrell’s recent Lifetime flick, A Deadly Adoption, was painfully straight, and The Spoils Before Dying is set up as another “lost masterpiece” from author/director Eric Jonrosh (Ferrell). This time around, the six-episode/three-night event

is a ’50s hard-boiled crime noir set in “the seedy underbelly of Los Angeles’ jazz scene,” centered on a musician (Michael Kenneth Williams—Chalky from Boardwalk Empire!) framed for the murder of his occasional lover, Fresno Foxglove (Maya Rudolph). Kristen Wiig, Haley Joel Osment, Val Kilmer and Michael Sheen also return from Babylon, joined by new additions Kate McKinnon, Tim Meadows and, for no good reason, Emily Ratajkowski (OK, maybe two obvious reasons). [The Spoils Before Dying continues Thursday, July 9 and Friday, July 10.]

Why? With Hannibal Buress Wednesday, July 8 (Comedy Central)

Series Debut: You know him as the comic who definitively outed Bill Cosby, or the boyfriend from Broad City, or the guy who seized the opportunity upon NBC’s cancellation of Hannibal to promote his new show with the Twitter hashtag #ThereCanBeOnlyOne. Why? With Hannibal Buress is a stand-up/sketch show with a twist: It’s taped the week it airs, offering a fresh-ish take on topical news and events— and the way things have been going lately, he’ll have plenty of material to work with (or as much as Buress’ slowerthan-molasses delivery will allow him to squeeze in). CW Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio from Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.

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Series Burn-Off: The worst CBS sitcom ever? Tough call, but I’m still going to have to go with The Odd Couple reboot—even if you’ve never seen it, you’ve probably heard Matthew Perry shouting his lines, wherever you happen to be. As for The McCarthys, its loudmouthed Irish Bah-ston clan with one odd-out kinda-gay son was too bland to be considered truly terrible, and there was no frittered starpower (Laurie Metcalf? Joey McIntyre? What is this, TBS?). But, while this is blowing out its remaining episodes, the final six installments of The Michael J. Fox Show—a legitimately funny series canceled by NBC last year—have never aired in the U.S. For shame, ‘Merica.

The Spoils Before Dying (IFC)

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The McCarthys Saturday, July 4 (CBS)

Jazzys flying Chinese-made American flags, of course). As a one-man show, Gutfeld is no Jon Stewart—but then again, Stewart relies on a team of backroom writers, whereas Gutfeld comes up with his own material (going by his books and editorials, he’s the most clever writer at Fox News, if not the entirety of cable news). Some of the bits do hit, however, and The Greg Gutfeld Show is an intriguing pocket of weirdness in the FNC hellscape—there’s still time before “presidential contender” Mike Huckabee comes back for his studio.

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44 | JULY 2, 2015

MUSIC

PLAYLIST: JULY 4

CHECK US FIRST! LOW OR NO FEES! Thursday, July 2

The Family Crest Kilby Court

Friday, July 3

Arabrot Kilby Court

Sunday, July 5

Kristeen Young Kilby Court

Tuesday, July 9

Tanlines

Urban Lounge

Friday, July 10

Toe

Urban Lounge

Saturday, July 11 & 12

Telluride 2015-2 Day Pass The Ride Festival

Saturday, July 11

Connecting Stars Kilby Court

Arrival: The Music of ABBA Sandy Amphitheater

FRocky Votolato & Dave Hause Urban Lounge

Blitzen Trapper The State Room

Sunday, July 12

Frontier Ruckus Urban Lounge

VISIT CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM FOR MORE SHOWS & DETAILS!

Complicated: A Patriotic Playlist

Happy birthday, America. City Weekly made you a mix. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

T

here are two kinds of people: Those who think Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the U.S.A.” is rousing and inspirational, and those who find it sappy and sentimental. They’re both right, but they both say the other side is wrong. The country is divided between these two camps: Those who’d proudly sport a ’Murrica tramp stamp and those who, if they had to characterize their patriotism on Facebook, would say, “It’s complicated.” This patriotic mix is a little something for everybody.

Dennis Madalone, “America, We Stand as One” (AmericaWeStandAsOne.com, 2002)

If Greenwood’s song is sappy and sentimental, this one doubles down on a double-down. But, like Greenwood, Star Trek stunt coordinator Dennis Madalone’s heart is in the right place. Released in 2002 as a reaction to the Sept. 11 attacks, it’s intended to comfort those who’ve lost loved ones. Dat video, though. It’s corny (baaing vibrato, gratuitous mountaintop hero shots, cheesy digital effects), it’s creepy (angelic possession, petting children on a playground) and it bursts with jingoistic undertones. But that’s one perspective. Close your critical eye, see how it’s an expression of shared sorrow and hopeful inspiration, and it’s a tear-jerker.

Blowfly, “The First Black President” (Fresh Juice, BCM, 1983)

Before Barack Obama, Blowfly—the original dirty rapper—aspired to lead the free world with promises of “chitlins in every pot, ham hocks on every table, birthcontrol pills in every purse, and we’re gonna have an orgy every motherfuckin’ weekend!” Once elected, he realizes it’s not all “Yes, we can.” He uses his coke stash to pacify Superfly Jackson of the United Pimps Association, surrenders his weed to Pope John Paul II and, running out of indulgences, “fucks this bitch again”—to disastrous results. “The herpes?! I resign! Fuckin’ herpes!”

DVDA, “America, Fuck Yeah” (Team America World Police: Music From the Motion Picture, Atlantic, 2004)

Soundtrack to your celebration: From touching to irreverent.

Everybody knows this tune from Team America: World Police by South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. The professed libertarians’ film skewers liberals and conservatives alike. But the song, performed by Parker and Stone’s band, targets the jingoism of the latter group, who love it on purely literal terms.

Violent Femmes, “American Music” (Why Do Birds Sing?, Reprise, 1991)

“Do you like American music?/ I like American music/ Don’t you like American music, baby?” Singer-songwriter-guitarist Gordon Gano likes his own music so much, he let Wendy’s use it to advertise their hamburgers. And he’s a vegetarian. The Femmes’ acoustic punk rock rules, but that was a travesty. Eh, welcome to America.

The Beat Farmers, “Gun Sale at the Church” (Van Go, Curb, 1986)

Some Americans fail to see the irony of loving both God and guns, and that’s the point of this tune by the greatest cowpunk band of all time. “We’ll ask the Lord to forgive us for all our sins/ And we’ll look at the latest in gold-plated firing pins,” sang late singer-guitarist Buddy Blue. That hammers the point home rather well, don’tcha think?

Prince, “America” (Around the World in a Day, Paisley Park/Warner Bros., 1985)

Prince is a musical genius, but it may stop there. An irresistibly funky rocker with a kickass riff, “America” is full of contradictions. For instance, a minimumwage worker who’s “almost dead” isn’t in the black, “but she’s happy she ain’t in the red.” And although Prince trumpets freedom, love, joy and peace in the song, he

drops this turd of a verse: “Jimmy Nothing never went 2 school/ They made him pledge allegiance/ He said it wasn’t cool/ Nothing made Jimmy proud/ Now Jimmy lives on a mushroom cloud.” Huh. Where would Prince be without freedom of speech?

X, “Fourth of July” (See How We Are, Elektra, 1987)

Sometimes patriotism is the furthest thing from your mind—especially on the one night of the year when maybe it oughta be. Originally written by Dave Alvin for the Blasters, then given to X while Alvin temporarily replaced founding guitarist Billy Zoom, the song is a blue lament with striking imagery. Namely, a man sitting alone outside his apartment, smoking and thinking how, while the fireworks burst above him, he and his girl—who’s inside, crying in the dark—have lost the spark. Ouch.

Mötörhead, “America” (Iron Fist, Mercury, 1982)

How does America look to outsiders? Well, this legendary English heavy-metal power trio lists some pros and cons. What’s good? Sinsemilla, Ripple wine, “white line fever,” fast cars, girls and bars. What’s bad? Extreme temperatures and cops. Iconic frontguy Lemmy’s ultimate opinion, sung in his trademark whiskey- and ciggy-ravaged voice? They “liked it fine.” Put that on your website, U.S. Chamber of Commerce!

Ray Charles, “America, the Beautiful” (Ray Charles Sings for America, Rhino, 1960)

America’s pretty screwy right now, but we can all agree that when Ray sings this one, we’re all on the same page. CW


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MUSIC Doc & Roll

Penelope Spheeris revives Decline; Neil Young cranks it up. BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net

The Decline of Western Civilization Collection (Shout! Factory) BBBB

In Penelope Spheeris’ documentary Decline of Western Civilization II: The Metal Years, she asks then-W.A.S.P. guitarist Chris Holmes which town has the best groupies. His answer? “Salt Lake City!” So begins one of the most notorious interviews in the history of rock docs. Floating on an inflatable lounger as his mother watches, poolside, Holmes confesses selfloathing and guzzles from two fifths of Smirnoff (some of which he pours over his head). While it’s by far the most unforgettable scene in the film—which chronicles the Los Angeles metal scene of 1986-88— it’s not the only one. We see a robed Ozzy Osbourne’s views on the metal lifestyle, rehab and his startling imprecision when making bacon and pouring O.J. This balance of poignancy and hilarity made Spheeris’ trilogy of films about the harsh realities, shocking excesses and tremendous appeal of punk rock and heavy metal into certifiable cult classics. That, and the filmmaker’s knack for distilling entire musical movements into taut narratives. The first Decline covers the Los Angeles punk scene of 1979-80, when bands like the Germs, Fear, X, Black Flag and the Circle Jerks ruled. In another cloudy candid interview, Germs singer Darby Crash tells Spheeris that getting loaded is the key to his wild performances. While not a surprising admission, it’s especially powerful knowing that Crash died of an intentional heroin overdose by December 1980. Decline III centers around the late ’90s SoCal gutter punk scene where Naked Aggression, The Resistance and Litmus Green loudly tackled organized religion and homophobia. This, as bands and fans alike struggled with addiction and alcoholism while living on the street or squatting in abandoned buildings—where one of the young punks died tragically during filming. It took decades for Decline I and Decline II to be released on DVD and Blu-ray, leading to exorbitant prices for used VHS tapes on eBay and Amazon. Decline III hadn’t been released at all. The delay, Spheeris explains in the 40page book included in this four-disc set, was due to rights issues and not wanting to dwell in the past. Thankfully, she’s realized that Decline fans cherish nostalgia, and everyone digs a freakshow with substance. Now if she’ll only get around to releasing her 1987 punk/ metal road movie Dudes. (Randy Harward)

The Decline of Western Civilization Collection.

Neil Young + Promise of the Real The Monsanto Years (Reprise) BBB.5

It’s unintentionally apropos: Neil Young’s latest opus, The Monsanto Years, is released amid drama over presidential candidate Donald Trump’s appropriation of Young’s song “Rockin’ in the Free World.” This, of course, led to the Canadian singer/songwriter—whose own political leanings align more closely with Bernie Sanders—publicly excoriating Trump. After 2014’s Storytone—featuring Neil Young songs old and new augmented by orchestral arrangements, some of which worked better than others— this effort, supported by Lukas and Micah Nelson’s (Willie’s sons) band Promise of the Real, is refreshing in its straightforward, mostly unadorned rock sound reminiscent of Young’s famed backing band, Crazy Horse. Young has never been more vocally demonstrative as the cranky old political activist of rock & roll. But does Monsanto come off as stridently polemic, mere social rhetoric? “Wolf Moon” demonstrates that his belief in love and idealistic causes is rooted in a reverence for the natural world. “People Want to Hear About Love” serves as a backhanded way to recite grievances as well as express ambivalence about his role as a songwriter, but it’s also as hummable and anthemic as “Rockin’ in the Free World.” Although his voice might be straining a little at times, it only serves to reinforce the authenticity and heart behind his message. Like The Monsanto Years, in the sense of the corporatist climate we live in, the Neil Young years show no sign of slowing. (Brian Staker) CW


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NIGHT DEMON The metallic assault of Ventura, Calif., power trio Night Demon is going to knock you on your back, so maybe wear some cushions beneath your leather vest this time around. The band’s newest record, Curse of the Damned (Century Media), is their first full-length and is a vicious tribute to, well, the damned. The final track is a re-release of their 2013 song, “The Chalice,” which they had originally released on their debut, self-titled EP. When they play the ferocious tune live, their robed, skeleton-masked Grim Reaper-esque (minus the scythe) mascot, Rocky, comes out and walks around

Night Demon

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EMILY SEVIN

FAMILY CREST Family Crest is just huge. Their most recent release—a gigantically full and cinematic rock album called Beneath the Brine (Tender Loving Empire)—credits 80 people in addition to the seven core San Francisco-based members. Several songs, such as the title track, are heavy and baroque-influenced, mostly manifested through the cello, violin, standing bass and flute, which is a curious juxtaposition to more light-hearted indie tracks like “The World” and “Love Don’t Go.” Their “extended family” includes 400 people, mostly from California, but also scattered across other states—even as far as Croatia. All of these musical cousins are invited to play with Family Crest live and on recordings. They are touring two covers—which is not something they generally do in live performances—but they’re being closed-lipped about what they might be. That said, they have a dark and grandiose cover of Sia’s “Chandelier” in their pockets, so maybe pester them on the socials to pull that one out. Lonely Wild joins them. Kilby Court, 750 S. 330 West, 8 p.m., $10, limited tickets available at CWStore. CityWeekly.net, KilbyCourt.com

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the crowd, with—fittingly—an actual chalice. These guys don’t waste time with banter; their unrelenting set of heavy riffs and progressive-rock guitar solos is a nearly solid block of sound. Locals Visigoth, Deathblow and Befouler open. Bar X, 155 E. 200 South, 8:30 p.m., $7, BarXSaltLake.com DIRTY RIVER BOYS If metal is not your chalice of tea, yet you’d still like something unholy, there’s the outlaw folk-rock of El Paso, Texas, band, Dirty River Boys. Their sound is narrative-driven, mostly acoustic Southern country rock, with a spit-in-yer-face attitude. Between the four of them (Nino Cooper, Marco Gutierrez, Travis Stearns and Colton James) they play not only the guitar, but also the banjo, mandolin, fiddle, harmonica, snare drum and standup bass. And sometimes, a couple of them will ditch their instruments altogether and dance and flail about in a manic fasion while singing three- and four-part harmonies. It’s a party of drinking music and stories about leaving everything behind. They are touring in support of their most rambunctious and

Family Crest rebellious album, a self-titled 2014 release that sounds like it should have been written while they were jumping onto trains and escaping the law in the Wild West. O.P. Rockwell, 628 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $5, OPRockwell.com

FRIDAY 7.3 LUCIA MICARELLI, FUNKY METERS, DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND Violinist Lucia Micarelli has played her diverse set of both original music and classical repertoire in jazz clubs and on tour with TransSiberian Orchestra. As far as what to expect when she plays with Funky Meters and Dirty Dozen Brass Band, it could be a gamut of things. The three groups recently contributed to HBO’s Treme soundtrack, a funky New Orleans blues and jazz record, so chances are good that the violinist will bust out some funky and jazzy strings. She has been »

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working on a third album (her first in more than 10 years), but also has a mash-up that starts out as a gentle and distraught melody called “Nocturne” and busts into a screaming cover of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Deer Valley Resort’s Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 South Deer Valley Drive, Park City, 7 p.m., $40-$75, DeerValley.com

SATURDAY 7.4 ELECTRIC CATHEDRAL, CHARLES ELLSWORTH, THE JUNE BROTHERS The electro-blues rock—with a heavy ‘60s and ‘70s groove—of Salt Lake City band Electric Cathedral comes to Burt’s Tiki Lounge. Yes, that Burt’s Tiki Lounge—the dive bar that shuttered back in October, with next to no warning. Before you get excited, it’s not a re-opening. Burt’s sold their liquor license to Sapa Sushi Bar and Asian Grill (which shares a wall with Burt’s) and, in order to keep the license, they have to be open a few days each month. Lucky for us, that means there are a few more chances to enjoy Burt’s before it’s all over. That included a revival of DJ Feral Cat’s Soulville event last weekend—which may happen one more time later this month. Burt’s Tiki Lounge, 726 S. State, 9 p.m., $4

Thievery Corporation

SUNDAY 7.5

THIEVERY CORPORATION Saudade (ESL Music), the most recent release from Thievery Corporation, starts out with a breezy, French bossa nova track, “Decollage.” Given Thievery Corporation’s trip-hop/acid jazz sound, it might be expected that the album will gravitate toward stronger beats, but it doesn’t. This year’s Thievery Corporation tour is more laidback than the last time they came through Salt Lake City four years ago—but don’t fret: Fan favorite and Grammy award-winning “Lebanese Blonde”—off The Mirror Conspiracy and included on Zach Braff’s Garden State soundtrack—has still consistently been on set lists. The Washington, D.C., duo are DJs, but rather than playing and mixing pre-recorded tracks, they are bringing a slew of artists (such as Lou Lou Ghelichkhani, who sings on more than half of the tracks on the new record) to contribute nonchalant vocals, lounge-like brass section and steel drums. Park City Live, 427 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $79.50-$125, ParkCityLive.net

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SUNDAY 7.5 Kristeen Young

It’s got everything: Chaos, drama, contagion. No, no, not the story about Morrissey canceling the remainder of his 2014 tour, because of a lung infection he claims he got from art-rocker Kristeen Young, his opening act. All of this refers to Young’s most recent record, a vicious and feisty 11-song tirade called The Knife Shift (KristeenYoung.com) that features the St. Louis, Mo., artist pounding the piano. Her live performance is raw, overpowering and sure to shake the garage that is Kilby Court. She is joined by the female-fronted FEA, plus local bands Mermaid Baby (indie) and James Allen Spirit (psychedelic). (Tiffany Frandsen) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 8 p.m., $8, KilbyCourt.com

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Andrew Cole, Blair Crimmins and The Hookers (Snowbird Resort) Bandemonium II (Diabolical Records) Cyhi the Prince, Mimi Knowles, Na-g, Theodore Greek, Airzona, J Vision, Kahleel Shykee, Rap Game, Naveah, DJ Freshness (Stereo Room) Electric Cathedral, Charles Ellsworth, The June Brothers (Burt’s Tiki Lounge, see p. 50) “Fare Thee Well” Grateful Dead Simulcast (The State Room) Journey, Olivia Holt (Lavell Edwards Stadium) The Moth & the Flame, Westward the Tide, RKDN (Velour) Tony Holiday, Talia Keys, Stonefed (Garage on Beck) W James Woods, JT Draper, Michelle Moonshine (Fats Grill)

Arabrot, Ghold (Kilby Court) Beach Party, Flash & Flare (Urban Lounge) Blair Crimmins & the Hookers (Brewskis) Caveman Boulevard (Funk ‘n Dive Bar) Darin Caine Hellhound Express (The Spur Bar & Gril) Falling in Reverse, Ghost Town (Murray Theater) “Fare Thee Well” Grateful Dead Simulcast (The State Room) Minx (The Woodshed)

EAGLE RARE 17YR

Life+ (Sky) Lucia Micarelli, Funky Meters, Dirty Dozen Brass Band (Deer Valley Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, see p. 48) Natural Roots (Liquid Joe’s) Riverhouse Band (Hog Wallow Pub) Rosie & The Ramblers (Garage on Beck) Soulistics (Canyons Resort) Standing in for Joe, Prairie Dogs (Fats Grill) Tony Holiday (Green Pig)

SATURDAY 7.4

LIVE MUSIC

WILLIAM LARUE WELLER SWEET CORN SORBET

“Private Whiskey Pairing Available Upon Request”

Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door)

FRIDAY 7.3

THOMAS H HANDY FIVE SPICE ELK CARPACCIO

$125/Person, includes Small Plates & Gratuity Very Limited Seating RSVP to info@bourbonhouseslc.com

DJ

Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (Habit’s) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

VAN WINKLE 12YR GRILLED PEACH W/ WHIPPED MASCARPONE

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Dirty River Boys (O.P. Rockwell, see p. 48) Family Crest, The Lonely Wild (Kilby Court, see p. 48) Fayuca, True Press, Ease Up (The Woodshed) Ancient River (The Urban Lounge) Jake Dreier Blues (Gracie’s) Joe McQueen (Garage on Beck) Night Demon (Bar X, see p. 48) Party Favor (Sky) Quarterbacks (Diabolical Records) Rick Gerber (Hog Wallow Pub) Rose’s Pawn Shop (Newpark Concert Series) Teenage Bottlerocket, The Bombpops, Problem Daughter, Hi-Fi Murder (The Loading Dock) Teki, Daverse, Rebel Zion, Shy (The Complex) Terence Hansen Band (The Green Pig)

GEORGE T. STAGG CURRIED DUCK SPRINGROLL

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THURSDAY 7.2

SAZERAC 18YR CAPUTO’S BURRATA


American Bush Jobs Rentals ll e S / y u B Trade

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MONDAY 7.6 Widowspeak

Washington duo Widowspeak are as shoegaze as they are haze-pop. It’s a sleepy sound, but if you cut through Molly Hamilton’s almost whispered, gliding (think Mazzy Star), psychedelic vocals, there’s quite a lot going on with Robert Earl Thomas’ faded but complex guitar riffs. Their third record, All Yours (Captured Tracks), comes out in September, but they have released two tracks in anticipation of the late-summer record, on which they’ve experimented with some light organ (on the title track) and harmonica (on “Girls”). Local bands Koala Temple and Albino Father open this performance, and they are joined by Lord Huron for the remainder of their tour. (Tiffany Frandsen) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $10, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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54 | JULY 2, 2015

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

CONCERTS & CLUBS

An Eclectic mix of olde world charm and frontier saloon

Spirits • Food • Live Music 7.02 Dylan Roe

7.09 Talia Keys

7.03 Riverhouse Band

7.10 Root of the Rocks Party

7.08 Michelle Moonshine 7.11 Devils Club

Chaseone2 (Gracie’s) DJ E-Flexx (Sandy Station) DJ Juggy (Downstairs Park City) DJ Marshall Aaron (Sky) DJ Night (Outlaw Saloon) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Elvis Freshly (Cisero’s)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SUNDAY 7.5 LIVE MUSIC

“Fare Thee Well” Grateful Dead Simulcast (The State Room) Candy’s Riverhouse (The Spur Bar & Grill) Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck) Kristeen Young, FEA, Mermaid Baby (Kilby Court, see p. 53) Mark Cheney Trio (Club 90) The Moth & the Flame, Static Waves, Baby Ghosts (Velour) Tanlines, Mas Ysa (The Urban Lounge) Thievery Corporation (Park City Live, see p. 50)

KARAOKE

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3200 Big Cottonwood Rd. 801.733.5567 | theHogWallow.com

Widowspeak, Koala Temple, Albino Father (The Urban Lounge, see above)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub)

OPEN MIC & JAM

Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig Pub)

TUESDAY 7.7 LIVE MUSIC

Head North, Light Years, No Good News, Casey Bolles (The Loading Dock) Taylor Caniff, Michael Wood (The Complex)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke (Brewskis) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed) Karaoke With ZimZam (Club 90) Taboo Tuesday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon)

OPEN MIC & JAM Open Mic (The Royal) Open Mic (The Wall) Open Mic (Velour)

Entourage Karaoke (Piper Down) DJ Ducky & Mandrew (Jam) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed) KJ Sparetire (The Century Club) Sunday Funday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon)

DJ

DJ

LIVE MUSIC

DJ Street Jesus (Bourbon House) DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) DJ Kemosabe (O.P. Rockwell)

MONDAY 7.6 LIVE MUSIC

Love Cop, Jawzz, Big Baby (Diabolical Records) Na-G, Kid Machine, Davin Nebeker (Velour) Tracings (The Loading Dock)

DJ Stereo Sparks (Cisero’s)

WEDNESDAY 7.8 The Chickens (Deer Valley Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Crazy Steve (Area 51) Electric Cathedral, Charles Ellsworth, Grand Banks, Crook & the Bluff (The Urban Lounge) Eternal Sleep, The Beautiful Ones (Garage on Beck) Reef The Lost Cauze, Diabolic, Adlib (Area 51) Kaz Mirblouk, Red Telephone, Lemon & Le Mule, Heavy Dose (Kilby Court)


CONCERTS & CLUBS

Utah

A RelAxed gentlemAn’s club dA i ly l u n c h s p e c i A l s pool, foosbAll & gAmes

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Lord Dying (Area 51) Matt Frey (Spur Bar & Grill) Michelle Moonshine (Hog Wallow Pub) My Body Sings Electric, Lotus Crush (Metro Bar)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Spur Bar & Grill) Entourage Karaoke (Piper Down) Karaoke (The Wall) Karaoke (Outlaw Saloon) Karaoke (The Royal) Karaoke (Funk ‘N Dive Bar) Karaoke (Area 51) Karaoke (The Century Club) Karaoke Wednesday (Devil’s Daughter) Wednesduhh! Karaoke (Jam)

$2 pAbst tuesdAys $2.50 RAinieR wednesdAys

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2750 south 30 0 wes t · (8 01) 4 67- 4 60 0 11:3 0 -1A m m o n -sAt · 11:3 0A m -10 pm su n

OPEN MIC & JAM

Jam Night Featuring Music Glue (The Woodshed) Open Mic (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ

DJ Matty Mo (Willie’s Lounge) DJ Street Jesus (The Green Pig Pub) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs)

TheWordCW

17 TV'S INCLUDING 3 - 150" BIG SCREENS

WEDNESDAY NIGHT ACOUSTIC SHOW WITH JOHN THOMAS DRAPER WITH SPECIAL GUEST ALAN MICHAEL 8PM.

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OPEN AT 11AM. FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS. KILLER LIVE MUSIC STARTING AT 1PM

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BACK FROM USA TOUR! Friday, July 3 Spur bar

Park city - 9 pm to 1 AM

Friday, July 17 Recycle utah fundraiser Park city recycling center 1951 Woodbine Way, Park city 7 pmto 10 PM

JULY 2, 2015 | 55

1/2 OFF SELECT APPS 4PM-7PM

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| CITY WEEKLY |

ANNUAL SUGARHOUSE STREET FAIR!

EVERYDAY

TUESDAY

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SATURDAY, JULY 4

APPY HOUR

MONDAY

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1

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56 | JULY 2, 2015

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

5 MONKEYS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885, Karaoke, Free pool, Live music A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287

Saturday, August 15 Featuring

over 100 beers, karaoke stage, live music, local food carts. gluten free & much more! cider area. a benefit for

BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CANYON INN 3700 E. Fort Union, SLC, 801943-6969, DJs CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. THE CENTURY CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South,

@ 200 E. & Library Square

SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs

TICKETS on sale now at utahbeerfestival.com

CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-649-

$15 GA $25 early beer drinker | DD & VIP information available online.

CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-

5044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs 262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC,

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

The festival that proves Utah LOVES beer!

801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music

beer festival sponsors

THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DO DROP INN 2971 N. Hill Field Road (400 West), Layton, 801-776-9697. Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801943-1696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed. LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070

LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 THE OFFICE 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages THE PENALTY BOX 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music THE WOODSHED 60 E. 800 South, SLC, 801-364-0805, Karaoke Sun. & Tues., Open jam Wed., Reggae Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat. ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs


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JULY 2, 2015 | 57

@


Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

55. Member of the Allies in W.W. II: Abbr. 56. Aromatherapy spot 57. Critical 59. Do lunch

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Tayloe Ross, 1924) 18. Like some verbs: Abbr. 22. "Boyhood" actor Ethan 25. "The Godfather" composer Nino 26. Suffix with lemon or orange 28. "Skedaddle!" 29. Singer DiFranco 30. Many activists' concerns: Abbr. 31. Alex's mom on "Family Ties" 34. Prosperity 35. Language from which "ukulele" comes 36. Popular nasal spray 37. Cheerios grain 38. Thurman of "Pulp Fiction" DOWN 39. Chess piece that is 1. Fix, as a photocopier muy importante 2. When Matt Lauer wakes up before going to 40. Cousin of Inc. work, reportedly 43. Mayflower passen3. Time's 1981 Man of the Year ger, e.g. 4. The Beach Boys' "____ Around" 44. Mythical Aegean Sea 5. The "her" in Beethoven's question "Who dweller comprehends her?" 45. Sings like 24-Across 6. Rain man? 46. Turner of Hollywood 7. Not quite 47. Dweller on the Yodo 8. Midwest city representing average tastes River 9. Off the mark 48. Meet, as a challenge 10. Needs no alterations 51. Pen knives? 11. Expert 53. Org. with lots of big 12. "Oedipus ____" shots? 15. First U.S. state to elect a female gov. (Nellie 54. Superiors to cpls.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Cesar Chavez's org. 4. Crime writer Rankin 7. Great ____ 10. Distant 13. Ojani ____ (J. Lo's first husband) 14. Guard dog, at times 16. Freezer stock 17. "Frida" director 19. Cowpoke moniker 20. "____ you clever!" 21. Triumphant cries 23. Flag holder 24. Singer reportedly buried with a bottle of whiskey, cigarettes, a lighter and ten dimes 27. "The Handmaid's Tale" author 32. Worldwide: Abbr. 33. Actress Mara of "House of Cards" 34. "When can I expect you?" (or a question whose answer is "central" to solving 17-, 27-, 42- or 58-Across) 40. Fall faller 41. Identical 42. NFL Hall-of-Famer whose uniform number, 56, is retired by the New York Giants 49. Land-grabber, e.g. 50. Yard sale caveat 52. Shackled 55. Grind, as teeth 56. Word with bunny or jump 58. Actor whose Twitter bio reads "Some know me as Mr. Sulu" 60. Green shade 61. Defer payment, perhaps 62. 4x4, e.g. 63. "Atlas Shrugged" author Rand 64. Suffix with lion 65. Bering, for one: Abbr. 66. Votes against

SUDOKU

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| CITY WEEKLY |

58 | JULY 2, 2015

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

Gerald Nixon

COMMUNITY

BEAT

Quirky Chic W

send leads to

community@cityweekly.net

“Retro Betty is a reflection of me: new and trendy mixed with vintage and a funky, fun vibe.” Shoppers are bound to find something extra special at Retro Betty—dresses with a Boston terrier print, plaid bow ties, vintage cameras, glittery birthday candles, pastel cake pans, pineapple-print sneakers, ribbon banners, lighted marquee signs and more. Parrish’s favorite part of running Retro Betty is watching customers find new treasures. “My customers get the biggest grins on their faces when trying on the clothes,” Parrish says. “They love that they have found something different and unique that they know no one else will have. And they love finding unique gifts for their friends and family.” Retro Betty’s customers agree. Daybreak resident Chris Jensen went to Retro Betty on a friend’s recommendation when he needed to find a birthday gift for his mother. “I came in to get a gift for my mom,” Jensen says. “I ended up getting her a cake stand and some cufflinks for myself. It’s a great store. I will definitely be back!” Erda resident Cindy Nelson also loves Retro Betty. “It’s just a darling place. I’m glad I stumbled on it. I’ve found some great items, and I am looking forward to finding more!” n

INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 59 SHOP GIRL PG. 60 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 61 URBAN LIVING PG. 62 POETS CORNER PG. 63 SLC CONFESSIONS PG. 63

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

RETRO BETTY

2821 S. 2300 East 801-467-2222 Monday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Facebook.com/retrobettyslc @retrobettyslc

APPLY NOW

| COMMUNITY |

hether looking for a flamingo print dress or vintage decorations for an Independence Day barbeque, Salt Lake City residents with an eye for the classic and the unique should head to Retro Betty, an East Bench boutique that opened in August 2012. Retro Betty sells both new and vintage items. The shop offers one-of-a-kind clothing, accessories, furniture and gifts. “We are an affordable boutique with hip, trendy items with a vintage twist,” says Retro Betty owner Amanda Parrish. “It’s a fun shopping experience.” Featuring fashions of another era—floral shirtdresses, T-strap heels and full skirts, as well as swimming suits, jewelry, and home décor—Retro Betty provides customers with a singular shopping opportunity. Retro Betty features items for both women and men, with a huge selection of classic men’s shirts, fedoras, ties and cufflinks alongside racks of vintage dresses with a rockabilly edge and Peter Pan-collar blouses. Retro Betty’s clothing sizes run from XS to XXL, so it has something special for everyone. “I love Retro Betty’s vintage dishes and glasswear collections,” says Murray resident Stephanie Lauritzen. “Every piece is unique and affordable, and the solid selection saves me from digging around piles of junk at the D.I.” Retro Betty’s eclectic offerings are the result of Parrish putting a lot of thought into fun fashion. Parrish, who ran cafes, restaurants and clothing booths at local street fairs for nearly 10 years before opening Retro Betty, always knew her passion was in clothing. “I have always been drawn to vintage,” Parrish explains.

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JULY 2, 2015 | 59

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Is it the change in the view or Belief in the truth or what Why and how that was all a dream I put into myself My instinct tells me to give up now Would be letting go soul within soul I am still everywhere but also on the ground

60 | JULY 2, 2015

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It’s a BLAST To Rent Through Partlow!

LOOKING FOR ROCHELLE GAMBLE (Maiden Name). She would be in her late 50’s now. Has Family in Salt lake. Grew up in Germany in early 70’S. Lived in Salt lake City in at least 1975. If you can point us in the correct direction it would greatly help Thank you. We are an Overseas Brat group planning a reunion for the Hanau Brats. Please contact us at Hanaubrats@gmail.com or 757-389-0003 no solicitation.

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Poets Corner

FOR A FREE LISTING OF ALL OF OUR RENTALS, PLEASE DROP BY OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT 440 S. 700 E. STE #203

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SHOP girl

Home Is Where the Heart Is A

fter 2 1/2 weeks of visiting my hometown of Philadelphia, shopping in the Hamptons and spending time on the beach in Ocean City, N.J., I am reminded why I love Salt Lake City. Yes, I love the shopping, the attitude and the food—but what I love most is that Salt Lakers have so much heart. That spirit is abundant in the city’s innovative, talented and hard-working shop owners like Ashley Rothwell-Campagna of Apt. 202 (955 E. 900 South, 801-355-0228) in the 9th & 9th district. In 2009, I wrote my first Shop Girl column on Apt. 202, and now, six years later, I have come home to an even better boutique, in its brand-new, modern location. Ashley is a local girl who went to college in New York to ski race and then got busy in the San Francisco advertising world for 10 years. She returned home with a love for fashion and a desire to open a business.

CHRISTA ZARO comments@cityweekly.net

Her clothes are classic with an edge, less Los Angeles and more New York City. I shop all over the world and I realize that Salt Lake City is just small enough that you can still get personal attention—Ashley and her staff know everyone by name. The shop offers brands like Splendid, Bailey 44, French Connection and even Rachael Zoe. Kai body products, Volcano candles, Hanky Panky underwear and gorgeous seasonal jewelry such as gold-filled ear climbers and ear cuffs are represented among the beautiful dresses and breezy casual clothes. Ashley’s favorite brand of hybrid jeans is DLX because they fit many body types and don’t stretch. Ashley reports this summer’s trends include culottes, track pants, rompers and two-piece dresses. Looking ahead for fall, she says get ready for boho-chic looks like bell bottoms and fringe. But forget fall—summer’s just getting started! Let’s focus on the best summer can offer at Apt. 202. n Follow Christa: @phillytoslc

@christazaro

WE NEED YOU!

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN GAINING EXPOSURE TO CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIAL AND MANUFACTURING WORK ENVIRONMENTS PLEASE APPLY. IF YOU HAVE A TRADE, WANT ADDITIONAL WORK OPPORTUNITIES, BETTER PAY, WE CAN HELP YOU! PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON WITH ALL TRADES STAFFING BETWEEN 7AM AND 1PM MONDAY THRU FRIDAY AT 321 EAST 2100 SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84115. BRING 2 FORMS OF ID AND A WORK HISTORY OR RESUME. Splendid nautical stripe tote w/ leather handles: $118; Gorjana gold earrings: $65; Ella Moss blue & white-striped flowing top w/ Aztec beading: $126; Gorjana bracelet w/ attached ring chain: $85; DLX hybrid jeans, white w/ distressed bottoms: $178


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) To determine whether you are aligned with the cosmic flow, please answer the following questions. 1. Would you say that your current situation is more akin to treading water in a mosquito-ridden swamp, or conducting a ritual of purification in a clear mountain stream? 2. Have you been wrestling with boring ghosts and arguing with traditions that have lost most of their meaning? Or have you been transforming your past and developing a riper relationship with your roots? 3. Are you stuck in a gooey muck? Or are you building a flexible new foundation?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) It’s the power-building phase of your astrological cycle. To take maximum advantage, convey the following message to your subconscious mind: “I know you will provide me with an abundance of insight, inspiration, and energy for whatever intention I choose to focus on. And during the next four weeks, my intention will be to cultivate, expand, and refine my personal power. I will especially focus on what author Stephen R. Covey called ‘the capacity to overcome deeply embedded habits and to cultivate higher, more effective ones.’“

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Taurus singer Sam Smith won four Grammys this year, largely on the strength of his hit single, “Stay With Me.” The song has a lush gospel choir backing up his lead vocals, or so it seems. But in fact, every voice in that choir is his own. He recorded twenty separate harmony tracks that were woven together to create the big sound. What would be the equivalent in your world, Taurus? How could you produce a wealth of support for yourself? What might you do to surround yourself with a web of help and nourishment? How can you amplify and intensify your efforts so they have more clout? Now would be an excellent time to explore possibilities like these.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) I’m a big fan of science and logic and objective thinking. Most of us need more of that good stuff. The world would be a saner, safer place if we all got regular lessons on how to be more reasonable and rational. But in the immediate future, Scorpio, I’ll steer you in a different direction. I believe you will benefit from injecting your imagination with primal raw crazy wild mojo. For example, you might read utopian science fiction and fairy tales about talking animals and poetry that scrambles your intellectual constructs. You could remember your dreams and ruminate about them as if they were revelations from the Great Beyond. You may also find it healthy to fantasize profusely about forbidden and impossible and hilarious adventures.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your words of wisdom come from Leo artist Andy Warhol: “Sometimes people let the same problem make them miserable for years, when they could just say, ‘so what.’ That’s one of my favorite things to say. ‘So what.’“ Can I interest you in that approach, Leo? It has similarities to the Buddhist strategy of cultivating non-attachment—of dropping your fixations about matters that can’t be controlled or changed. But I suspect you would draw special benefits from the breezy, devil-may-care spirit of Warhol’s version. So start there.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) I think you will generate good fortune for yourself by choosing between two equally invigorating but challenging tasks: losing your illusion or using your illusion. Both are quite worthy of your attention and intelligence. To succeed at either would fuel your emotional growth for months to come. You probably can’t do them both, however. So which will it be: Will you purge the illusion, or put it to work for you? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Do you sometimes imagine yourself to be an underachieving underdog? If so, I suggest you start weaning yourself from that fantasy. Do you, on occasion, allow people to take advantage of you? It’s time to outgrow that role. Do you ever flirt with being a self-pitying martyr? Say bye-bye to that temptation. Cosmic forces are conspiring to relieve you of tendencies to act in any or all of those ways. I’m not saying you will instantly transform into a swashbuckling hero who knocks people over with your radiant self-assurance. But you will, at the very least, be ready to learn much, much more about how to wield your vulnerability as a superpower.

JULY 2, 2015 | 61

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In her late twenties, J. K. Rowling was a single mother living on welfare. That’s when she began work on her Harry Potter books. Craig Newmark had turned 42 by the time he founded Craigslist. One of the world’s most oft-visited websites is HuffingtonPost. com, which Arianna Huffington established when she was 54. As for Harland Sanders, creator of KFC: He didn’t begin building the global empire of fried-chicken restaurants until the age of 65. I hope the preceding serves as a pep talk, Virgo, reminding you that it’s never to late to instigate the project of a lifetime. The time between now and your birthday in 2016 will be an especially favorable phase to do so. Start ruminating on what it might be.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “I find a lot of people physically attractive, but finding people mentally and spiritually attractive is different and much harder for me.” So says 40ozshawty on her Tumblr page. If you share that frustration, I have good news. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you’re due to encounter a higher-thanusual percentage of mentally and spiritually attractive people in the next six weeks. But I wonder how you’ll deal with this abundance. Will you run away from it, and feel overwhelmed by the prospect that your life could get more interesting and complicated? Or will you embrace it and daringly welcoming the interesting complications?

| COMMUNITY |

CANCER (June 21-July 22) “I am trying to be unfamiliar with what I am doing,” said composer John Cage in describing his creative process. That’s excellent counsel for you to meditate on, Cancerian. The less expertise and certainty you have about the rough magic you’re experimenting with, the more likely it is that this magic will lead you to useful breakthroughs. To bolster Cage’s advice and help you get the most from your period of self-reinvention, I offer you this quote from Picasso: “I imitate everyone except myself.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) There are lots of inquiries and invitations coming your way— perhaps too many. I don’t think you should pursue all of them. In fact, I suspect that only one would ultimately make you a better human being, a braver explorer and a wiser lover. And that one, at first glance, may have not as much initial appeal as some of the others. So your first task is to dig deep to identify the propositions that are attractive on the surface but not very substantial. Then you’re more likely to recognize the offer that will have lasting value even if it doesn’t make a spectacular first impression.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Born under the sign of Gemini, Gustave Courbet (1819-1877) was a French painter who upset traditionalists. Unlike many of his contemporaries, he wasn’t interested in creating idealistic art based on historical and religious themes. He focused on earthy subjects about which he had direct experience, like the day-to-day lives of peasants and laborers. So even though he became a highly praised celebrity by his mid-thirties, the arbiters of the art world tried to exclude him. For example, they denied him a place in Exposition Universelle, a major international exhibition in Paris. In response, Courbet built a temporary gallery next door to the main hall, where he displayed his own work. As you strive to get your voice heard, Gemini, I urge you to be equally cheeky and innovative. Buy yourself a megaphone or erect your own clubhouse or launch a new enterprise. Do whatever it takes to show who you really are.


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

62 | JULY 2, 2015

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CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS. 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET

here was a time when people would stroll around town, socializing, shopping and enjoying the best the city had to offer. Then, suburban malls showed up in the ’60s. Luckily, biking, walking and downtown have come back. Now, people hang above State Street on 200 South at Bar X, Cedars of Lebanon and Taqueria 27, or mosey down Main Street for yummies from Eva, chops at Lamb’s Grill or breakfast at the Royal Eatery. If you’re one of the folks who have rediscovered strolling downtown, you’ve certainly walked past the corner of glass windows at Peter Prier & Sons Violins (308 E. 200 South, 801-364-3651, PrierViolins.com). There, you see beautiful unvarnished instruments being made or hanging on the walls in various stages of creation. Just imagine making a fine instrument yourself—hundreds of hours of designing, carving, sanding, gluing, varnishing and drying wood into a thing of beauty. Peter Prier was one of the world’s best at making violins, cellos and violas. Sadly, our city lost him—he passed June 15 at the age of 73. Peter was born in Germany and began playing the violin at age 7. He loved the instrument and entered the violin making school in Mittenwald, going on to make violins in a shop in Stuttgart. In 1960, after graduating from school, he immigrated to the United States to work at Pearce Music Company in Salt Lake City and play violin with the Utah Symphony. He had to give both up after enlisting in the military during World War II, but came back and picked up his fiddle with the symphony. He began caring for the instruments and needs of the string section of his fellow musicians. He opened his own violin shop in Salt Lake City and, in 1972, established the Violin Making School of America and also a bow maker’s school. Prier crafted 160 violins, 17 violas, 29 cellos, 2 basses and 3 classical guitars. Musicians and concert soloists such as Lord Yehudi Menuhin, violinist and conductor Joseph Silverstein and violinist Daniel Heifetz, as well as many others, play Peter Prier’s instruments. His sons will carry on the family tradition and we will continue to see intensely focused men and women in the windows of the school making lovely creations. A friend told me once that during their interview for enrollment at the school, Prier asked an unusual question: “What did the doorknob look like when you entered the room?” The master luthier was a necessary and proud stickler for details. n [Editor’s note: Babs De Lay is a candidate for Salt Lake City Council District 4.] Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY ING ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOM TAG YOUR PHOTOS

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GARDEN CAFE @ FRIENDSHIP MANOR HAS TWO OPEN POSITIONS. FT Cook and FT Dishwasher. Great Benefits include Insurance, Paid leave, Daily Meal & Retirement. Great hours - Evenings off. Email resume to bill@ friendship-manor.com

NOW HIRING Package Handlers Interested in a fast-paced job with Career advancement opportunites? Join the FedEx Ground team as a Package handler. Starting wages Up to $12.31/hr depending on sort start time Qualifications * 18 years or older * Pass a background check * Able to load, unload, sort packages and other related duties. All interested candidates must attend a sort observation at our facility prior to applying for the position. For more information or to schedule a sort observation, go to

www.watchasort.com FedEX Ground is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color. religion, sex, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other protected characteristic.


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ANONYMOUSLY CONFESS YOUR SECRETS SOMETIMES AFTER I PISS ILL TURN THE FAUCET ON JUST SO PEOPLE THINK IM WASHING MY HANDS, BUT IM NOT REALLY

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JULY 2, 2015 | 63

 I was at a traffic light waiting to cross the street. There was a old lady that looked like she needed help. I just crossed. I don’t want to look like some boy scout.


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64 | JULY 2, 2015

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City Weekly July 2, 2015  

Pushed to Extremes

City Weekly July 2, 2015  

Pushed to Extremes