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YOUR COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE 2015 UTAH ARTS FESTIVAL

UTORS

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E D i U G R U YO 2015 E H T TO RTS A H UTA AL V i T FES

ART WORK THE BRAiNS AND THE BRAWN BEHiND UTAH'S CiTADEL OF CREATiViTY


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY ART WORKS

The work of art is often done by those who toil behind the scenes. Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

16 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 21 A&E 28 DINE 40 CINEMA 44 TRUE TV 45 MUSIC 59 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR ALLISON OLIGSCHLAEGER

Signing Off, p. 45 An amateur reporter and professional nuisance, this City Weekly summer intern enjoys writing in her journal and asking far-too-personal questions on the first date. She can usually be found taking advantage of the free air conditioning at the public library.

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LETTERS Don’t Throw Veterans on the Trash Heap

I applaud Chuck Tripp’s support of Vietnam vets [“I Mourn the Draftees,” Letters, June 18, City Weekly], but I am saddened that his admonishment of current returning military volunteers smacks a bit of blaming the victim for the woes many face after service. In truth, all of us who have served, regardless of where, when and how, whether volunteers or draftees, are deserving of respect and support. Veterans, without doubt, did not “ask for it,” with regard to lack of physical and mental rehabilitation, high unemployment, lack of housing or other services. Please don’t throw them on the trash heap when they no longer are needed. Some of my veteran friends who have done well have joined me at our local Red Cross Service to the Armed Forces project. We meet with Utah veteran brothers and sisters who haven’t quite made it back to the American dream. We mentor them, intercede for them and get them all kinds of support when they need it. We accomplish a lot for these kids but will do even more when more successful veterans volunteer to join us. Find out more by visiting RedCross.org/utah.

STAN ROSENZWEIG Cottonwood Heights

Challenging the Mayor

This is an election year, and I agree that we should not trivialize sexual harassment nor should we expect our

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes. employees to take the fall for us. I am running for Salt Lake City mayor, and I will hold Mayor Ralph Becker to “focus on legitimate areas of policy and leadership differences among the mayoral candidates.” I have experienced firsthand Becker’s “policy and leadership.” When I suspected millions of dollars were wasted in legal fees and the targeting of private citizens and landowners by Becker’s office and staff, I attempted to communicate my concerns to them. When I proposed legitimate and lasting solutions, I was screamed at, threatened with litigation and told they were “watching my every move.” Becker, I signed the pledge for civility and honesty when I filed to run. You have my personal commitment that the discussions and accountability we’re embarking on are anchored in facts. Salt Lake City

doesn’t sound correct) for those who died. Anybody with even the slightest understanding of eternal truths would acknowledge that these kind souls are now in an existence of perfect peace and love and harmony! Those girls who survived the ordeal are those to whom your “tenderheartedness” should be steered. They spoke of the humble prayers offered up and the “angels” who watched over them, and through divine intervention their lives were spared. If you want to “feel terribly” about anything, feel sorrow for these precious survivors, preserved to continue their battle against the madness of a world gone out of control, with no worthwhile leaders, and with its pain, suffering, disease, war and hunger, and on and on. The message sent is a perfect example of what is printed in this paper week in and week out: little or no comprehension of what is true and real. You should stick to concert listings—at least you’ll be getting something right!

Stick to Concert Listings

Via the Internet

DAVE ROBINSON

Having long read City Weekly, my main interest is in the concert schedule. Having said that, l couldn’t help but run up recently against John Saltas’ never-ending barrage against everything that is good and wonderful and true [“Summer Safely,” Private Eye, June 4]. Having culminated with a sadly misconstrued sorting-out of events at Bear Lake in which four persons were unable to survive the frigid waters, Saltas proclaimed he was “feeling terribly” (even an English failure such as myself knows that

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Boondoggled I

t’s been three years since Utah state Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, who heads the American Lands Council (ALC), convinced his fellow lawmakers to pass a bill forcing the U.S. government to turn over control of federal public lands to the state of Utah. The deadline for the turnover quietly passed in 2014, and the demand was denied. The state is now preparing to spend potentially millions of dollars in court trying to force the feds to give up public lands—but that effort is widely expected to fail as well. Originally, the American Lands Council touted the public-lands takeover as necessary to allow for oil and gas drilling on those lands that would help fund public education. But over the past year, the ALC and its advocates have started to use environmental-conservation language, arguing that Utah, rather than the United States, would be much better suited to care for the environment. The American Lands Council itself (from which Rep. Ivory makes a six-figure salary advocating for his own legislation) is currently facing multiple ethics violations. The Campaign for Accountability has filed complaints in Utah, Montana and Arizona, alleging that the ALC has committed fraud by convincing counties to pay huge membership fees in return for the promise that the takeover of public lands will happen one day. ALC is also facing a complaint from Colorado Ethics Watch that’s been filed with Colorado’s secretary of state alleging ALC is lobbying without a license. A bipartisan research team conducted a poll in 2014 that showed 52 percent oppose the state takeover of public land. The ALC needs to win the hearts and minds of the public and as many elected officials as possible in Western states. The hope is that conservative members of Congress will also take up the effort in Washington, D.C. So, on June 16, Utah lawmakers committed up to $2 million in taxpayer dollars and hired two groups to launch PR campaigns

BY ERIC ETHINGTON

aimed at convincing Utahns and various elected officials that a state takeover of federal lands is an idea whose time has come. The work the groups are doing might be described as lobbying, but, according to the Legislature’s staff attorney Thomas Vaughn, they were hired for “relationship services” (because it’s illegal for the Legislature to spend money on direct-lobbying efforts). The groups chosen to do the work, however, seem to have little relation to ALC’s new “wilderness protection” rhetoric. The first of the two firms, Strata Policy, is run by Randy Simmons and Ryan Yonk. Both Simmons and Yonk teach at Utah State University, an institution that receives $170,000 per year (the fifth highest in the nation) in donations from the conservative Koch brothers. Until 2013, Simmons was listed as the school’s Charles G. Koch Professor of Political Science, and he oversees the Koch Scholars program. (A number of USU students— working for Strata—will be brought in to work on the contract.) Simmons also serves as a senior fellow at the Koch- and ExxonMobil-funded Property & Environment Research Center. In addition to his work at USU, Yonk has written several working papers for the Mercatus Center, a conservative think tank whose founder has received more than $30 million from the Kochs. Simmons and Yonk can take credit for a conclusion they drew in a February 2015 paper: The cause of the 2008 economic crisis was renewable energy. In addition to Strata Policy, the Utah Legislature also hired the New Orleans-based Davillier Law Group, which includes Utahns Frank Pignanelli and Blaze Wharton (both former state legislators) and Doug Foxley. According to the state’s lobbyist disclosure website, Pignanelli and Foxley are currently paid lobbyists for several companies that could benefit from state management of public lands, including Big West Oil and EnergySolutions. Wharton has, in the past,

lobbied for Energy Fuels. Rep. Keven Stratton, R-Orem, who, with Sen. David Hinkins, R-Orangeville, cochair the Commission for the Stewardship of Public Lands, will oversee the two firms. In a phone interview, Stratton weighed in on the commission’s choice of contractors: “Strata has a strength and advantage because of their conservative background,” he says. And although Strata has been almost solely focused on the economic viability of renewable energy, he thinks Strata’s “background in public-lands issues” is a big plus. It might also be asked if Strata and Davillier’s efforts to influence citizens to support a state takeover of public lands represent a conflict of interest, since their other clients could financially benefit from new lands opening to potential drilling and mining. “That’s a good question,” says Stratton, “that needs to be thoroughly vetted. If the conflict of interest were serious enough, they would need to step away. But we have to recognize that there are many interests, and part of checks-and-balances is looking at the issues they’re representing—what they’re recommending—and recognizing that as part of the filter.” Stratton adds: “The idea is, with education [of the public], legislation and litigation, we need to have the landscape covered. And Strata and Devillier have different strengths that can be brought to help things move forward. “A lot of people say that all we’re going to do is rape and pillage and plunder the landscape. But our greatest resource is protecting the landscape. Can you capture those resources in an environmentally friendly way and maintain the pristine landscape? I believe we can. But that’s going to take a lot of thought.” CW Eric Ethington is a journalist, activist and researcher. He also works for Political Research Associates. Follow him on Twitter @EricEthington. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

52 PERCENT OPPOSE THE STATE TAKEOVER OF PUBLIC LAND.

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

How would you volunteer at the Utah Art Fest? Mason Rodrickc: I’d be the judge—not an actual judge, more like a scoffer. I won’t use words; I’ll lean my hand left and right and squint and say, “eeaaaaahh, uh, nuh, mayb—,” shrug my shoulders and walk away abruptly. And get paid.

John Saltas: Help find lost children. Brandon Burt: I want to be the director of Retro. I’d bring back the classics: alligator-on-a-stick, rattlesnake chili and Andy Krasnow art.

Pete Saltas: There’s an age-old art form I’m intrigued by, with techniques and traditions passed down from generation to generation. I’m talking about the folks that run the beer stations. That seems like a fun place to be!

Robby Poffenberger: Festival Greeter. It sounds fun and it’ll look good on my resume when I apply to be a Wal-Mart greeter in my twilight years.

Eric Peterson: Guy collecting canned food items, PBRs and unfinished lunches for the “Starving Artists Relief Effort” table.

Jerre Wroble: I’d volunteer to be amazed. I would stroll about, gawk at fabulous art, eat strange things at food carts, groove to great bands, gulp warm beer and profess to be amazed should anyone ask. It wouldn’t be hard work at all.

Jeremiah Smith: I’d be a stand-around art critic. I’d tell people exactly what I think and still have that big volunteer pin to shield me from their disdain, glares and my ultimate dismissal by security. That’s how it works, right?

6 | JUNE 25, 2015

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

War on Everything

If you believe that the fatal attack on Charleston churchgoers is part of a “war on religion,” then get ready for more ludicrous labeling: In 2007, an armed gunman made his way through Trolley Square, killing five. Indeed, this was part of the “war on shopping malls.” In 1994, 10 people were taken hostage at the Salt Lake City Main Library in the ongoing “war against literacy.” And in 1999, a man entered the Family History Library, killing two in a combination “war on religion/literacy/family.” In a June 18 editorial, the Deseret News would have you believe that the Charleston killings were more about religious worship than race. Despite the ongoing investigation, this is blatantly untrue. Dylann Roof was a white-supremacist sympathizer and, according to a website he frequented, had planned the Charleston murders to kill blacks. This was “an assault on all Americans as well as on a bedrock principle of American liberty—the right to worship freely,” the Deseret News wrote. Wrong.

Red Tape

This week saw bureaucracy meet benevolence. The bureaucrats won. For years, homeless advocates have worked to establish a homeless hospice and, thanks to the Catholic Diocese, Salt Lake Regional Hospital and others, the nonprofit landed at the old Guadalupe School site. Scheduled to open, it was waiting for an occupancy permit from Salt Lake City. Not so fast: The City Council suddenly found religion and decided to push the responsibility to the state. It must fully comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act and, oops, it might be mislabeled as a skilled nursing facility, since the dying homeless would be moved to another facility at the very end. OK, it’s a shelter. What the council doesn’t get is that these people are dying and homeless, and a little help from the city would go a long way toward compassionate governance.

Shining Light on Water

KUED Channel 7 and KUER 90.1 collaborated on a halfhour program about Utah’s uncertain water future. Well, “uncertain” is right. Water is a difficult issue steeped in politics. Of course, the big problem is that pesky rivers run through multiple states, and even efforts to dam up the flow are met with resistance. A 139-mile pipeline from Lake Powell to St. George is still being considered on the merits of an outdated study that made the multibillion-dollar project seem feasible. Whether you believe in climate change or not, conservation, efficiency and pricing strategies should be first considered. KUED and KUER are bringing attention to the problem.

The word ballet conjures up images of pink tutus, those pointed slippers and, yeah, that Natalie Portman movie. World-renowned dancer Kristi Boone knows that for many people, ballet is all about stereotypes. Boone has been dancing ballet exclusively since age 13 and has performed at The Parthenon in Greece, the White House and throughout the world as a soloist for New York City’s American Ballet Theatre (a position from which she recently retired). She’ll make a stop in Salt Lake City for a one-day ballet intensive for young dancers on June 27 at the University of Utah Marriot Center for Dance. For more information, visit AuditionWorkshopSLC.com.

Why devote your life to ballet?

You have to be very smart to do it, because you’re jamming hours and hours and many different ballets into your head. We’re real athletes—you have to have a lot of stamina beyond just trying to look pretty. You have to make the hardest step look easy and the easiest step look hard. And it’s definitely not just a female thing. My husband also danced for ABT— that’s how I met him.

Did the movie Black Swan ring true for you?

Actually, one of my fellow soloists was the body double for Natalie Portman. There are a lot of different personalities in ballet so, of course, you’re going to have some crazy people. In the arts, we all have to be crazy on a certain level. But that kind of stuff? It’s not going on every day. And I thought Natalie Portman did a good job, but did she become a ballerina? No. That was all my friend, Sara.

You’ve traveled the world performing ballet. What places have stood out?

One of the coolest experiences I had was going to Cuba in 2010. That was just an amazing experience, really eye-opening. I definitely felt very lucky to be American after visiting there and seeing the poverty. But the people, the culture—they’re just full of life. It’s crazy to see what they have to make due with.

How did you get into modeling for publications like Glamour?

People would contact American Ballet Theatre, my former company, or see me on my website and contact me to do different things. We’re also very fortunate to get to wear certain designers for certain galas that we have throughout the year. And also, we get to work with amazing photographers in the New York City-area.

Dancing requires skill, precision and years of practice. Is modeling as difficult?

I don’t think you can compare the two. Walking a runway and performing a full-length ballet definitely requires different skills. We’ll just leave it at that.

—ROBBY POFFENBERGER comments@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE Berg Appeal My lawn slowly dies as we here in Southern California suffer another drought and our water agencies reduce deliveries to a slow dribble. Is it technically and economically feasible to harvest icebergs as a fresh-water source? Answer soon, as we’re tired of Navy showers and unflushed toilets! —Marvin Gardens


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BY CECIL ADAMS

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If shower duration is your primary concern right now, the drought may be making your whiskey-and-waters a little too strong. California accounts for about 11 percent of U.S. agriculture by revenue and 12 percent of the nation’s GDP overall. When you guys run out of water, we’re all screwed. We may never see an almond again. Which makes the iceberg idea pretty appealing. With global warming well under way, icebergs should be breaking free and floating past our coasts any day now—and corralling one or two giant frozen chunks of fresh water certainly sounds easier than reducing the excess consumption of several metropolitan areas, or addressing the obvious problems with growing massive amounts of high-water-demand food under semi-arid conditions. And the idea’s not new: proposals along these lines had already been kicking around for a few decades when the Saudi prince Mohammed al Faisal got into the act in the mid-’70s. Seeking water for his country that didn’t have to be desalinated, he formed a company to harvest Antarctic icebergs and tow them up to the Red Sea. Unfortunately the plan stalled, in part because of difficulty balancing fuel economy with enough towing speed to keep the berg from melting en route.
 Icebergs haven’t changed much since then—they’re still unwieldy, slippery, dirty, and melty. But the tech’s gotten better, and we’re desperate, so let’s look at the process. Step one: Get a lawyer. Most legal opinion appears to agree that bergs are generally available on a first come, first served basis, but it’s possible that either the United Nations (under the Convention of the Law of the Sea) or the Coast Guard might intervene in an ice-towing scheme—the latter is in charge of enforcing not only marine commerce safety regulations but also the U.S. Antarctica Conservation Act. Greenpeace could conceivably have some beef with iceberg towing, as might various other environmentalist groups. Step two: Scout a suitable iceberg. What you want is a tabular iceberg—flat top, longer than it is tall—weighing maybe a million to 10 million tons. There are more of these in Antarctic waters than in the north Atlantic, plus there aren’t any polar bears on them; on the other hand, using an Arctic iceberg may save money by minimizing towing distance. If the right berg doesn’t already exist, explosives may be needed to break a usable hunk off an ice shelf or glacier. Step three: Move it. While we currently use tugboats to nudge icebergs away from oil tankers, imparting more long-term direction is trickier. A few years ago, a group

SLUG SIGNORINO

of researchers led by Georges Mougin, Prince Faisal’s engineering guru from the ’70s, used 3-D-modeling software to simulate towing a 7.7 million-ton tabular iceberg from Newfoundland to the Canary Islands. The team calculated that a single tugboat attached to a giant kite, if aided by winds, currents, and Mary Poppins, could do the job in 141 days. What about the melting issue? Ice (bergs included) readily melts in water, even more so when it’s being dragged around. Several solutions have been proposed to deal with this. Team Mougin favors wrapping a “skirt” of geotextile—synthetic fabric typically used to prevent soil erosion or improve drainage—around the entire submerged portion of the iceberg to insulate it from the warmer water. (Remembering that nine-tenths of an iceberg famously lurks below the surface, that’s a lot of geotextile.) Even so clad, the simulated iceberg loses 38 percent of its original mass in transit. Step four: Start making sacrificial offerings to Poseidon, because that’s really all we can do at this point to prevent catastrophe. Icebergs aren’t structurally homogenous and can easily shatter under stress. Keeping tow cables secured to an object whose shape is constantly shifting will also be difficult, and an unexpected storm could set the berg drifting toward cruise ships, commercial vessels, wildlife refuges, or seaports. Cue The Perfect Storm, but with an iceberg crashing into Newport Beach. Step five: Attempt, probably in vain, to limit the energy required to transform the iceberg into usable water. Since we can’t haul the entire berg up on land, the ice will have to be cut up (using heated wires or tubes) and melted offshore and the water transported as needed, which turns out to be labor-intensive and costly. It’s just not particularly easy to cut up a lot of ice, as anyone who’s tried to chisel a frozen hulk in the freezer into individual cubes knows well. Finally, any water slated for human consumption would require treatment to remove pollution, penguin poop, etc., but even water for agricultural use will likely need some desalinization. Needless to say, none of this has reached a level of obvious practicality. I think it’s safe to say that if it’s yellow, you’re going to have to let it mellow for a while yet.

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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12 | JUNE 25, 2015

NEWS

GOVERNMENT

“This would be very meaningful participation for people, deciding how money is going to be spent in their neighborhood.” —mayoral candidate Luke Garrott

People Power

A mayoral contender wants to give citizens the power to fund city projects. BY ERIC S. PETERSON epeterson@cityweekly.net @ericspeterson

T

he most radical campaign issue of the Salt Lake City mayoral race is also the one that no one is talking about. That’s probably because the idea—“participatory budgeting”— has the kind of snooze-tastic name that means little to most people, aside from a few policy wonks like Luke Garrott, a political science professor at the University of Utah, city councilman and contender in the mayor’s race. The participatory budgeting (PB) model sets aside money for citizen’s groups to decide directly on capital project expenditures—structures such as parks and roads—giving them, not bureaucrats or elected officials, the final say. As unorthodox as it sounds, for Garrott, it’s simple. “This would be very meaningful participation for people, deciding how money is going to be spent in their neighborhood,” Garrott says. “What an idea! It’s called democracy.” This model is one that Garrott says should happen at the neighborhood level, but one he would like to see expanded throughout the entire city, allowing special neighborhood delegates to come together in an assembly that could push for the funding of major infrastructure projects on the same scale as the Utah Performing Arts Center or the Public Safety Complex adjacent to Library Square. This push for more “people power” lines up well with Garrott’s academic background, but for some, such as David Everitt, chief of staff to Mayor Ralph Becker, a representative democracy is all about the public trusting their representatives to carry out the citizens’ will or face being booted out at the polls. That rule applies to everything—including the way capital improvement projects are prioritized when it comes to filling potholes or fixing streetlights. “It’s not a perfect system, but I think it does its best to address specific neighborhoods’ needs, but in the context of the whole city,” Everitt says. The PB model is said to have got its start in 1989 in Brazilian cities like Porto Alegre, where citizens wrested control of municipal coffers from corrupt politicians. Since that time,

Mayoral candidate Luke Garrott says participatory budgeting would give citizens more influence over how tax dollars are allocated. Brazilian cities have spent the equivalent of hundreds of millions of dollars on citizen-driven projects. In 2013, researchers published a study of 120 PB cities in Brazil, compared to 130 that did not use the model, and found the PB cities spent more on education and sanitation, and they saw significant decreases in infant-mortality rates. The PB model has now spread to more than 3,000 cities worldwide, including the United States; in 2009, a Chicago city alderman set aside $1 million in the budget for his constituents to use to fund capital projects. According to David Beasley, a spokesman for the Participatory Budgeting Project, an organization advancing the model, there are currently more than 50 PB projects in U.S. cities, counties and school boards. The PB model, he says, is popular because it empowers those marginalized from the traditional civic life: people of color, low-income residents, non-native English speakers, ex-felons who can’t vote and even residents who are not yet old enough to vote. Beasley points to the Boston PB group, which is made up of youths age 12 to 25, who, in recent years, developed community Wi-Fi, expanded a bike-share program and funded water-bottle refilling stations in the city. “Even as young people who can’t even vote, they stepped up as people in their community to make Boston better,” Beasley says. He also says the projects help invigorate communities—but first, a public servant must be willing to cede some control to a community group. While this may be difficult for some politicians, Beasley says the reality is that those who trust their constituents enough to directly drive funding proj-

ects are often rewarded for that trust come election time. “Elected officials who do participatory budgeting get re-elected; that’s something we’ve seen in every instance so far,” Beasley says. “They hear over and over again that their constituents trust them more and feel the reciprocity of that trust.” Garrott says the way Salt Lake City handles capital improvements does provide opportunities for community groups to make applications, but in his experience, such projects rarely get funded. Currently, the Community Development & Capital Improvement Project Advisory Board, made up of citizens from every council district, forwards project recommendations to the mayor’s office. The mayor makes his own recommendations that the council votes on as part of the budget process (with council members likewise adding their own projects to the list along the way). Garrott says that often, the lists of streets, curbs and sewer lines to fix that come from the mayor’s staff are based on the plans of engineers and staff who are far removed from the reality of what’s happening in the capital city’s neighborhoods. “So you’re either going to let bureaucrats do it according to this mathematical formula that no one can understand, or let people who are in neighborhoods and see the needs every day make the priority list,” Garrott says. At this level, Garrott sees the idea as truly empowering community councils, which are mostly powerless right now, he says. For the big-ticket items, Garrott envisions a process whereby public delegates elected by community peers would meet

every two to three years to develop ideas for major infrastructure projects. These projects could then be placed on the ballot, at least on equal footing with bonds driven by public leaders. Such an elaborate system of finding people to represent communities could be an expensive proposition, but Garrott says the money would be better spent than it currently is. “You know how much money we spend now on dishonest public participation?” Garrott asks. “Making decisions ahead of time and then having public ‘engagement’ to ratify a decision that’s already been made?” Chief of Staff Everitt, however, says that the current system is filled with opportunities for involvement. Citizens can comment on the Open City Hall online forum, watch broadcasts of council sessions and take part in dozens of annual meetings and open houses. He also questions the idea of crafting such an elaborate system, especially when voters elect their leaders to lead, not to abdicate that responsibility. “Does the inefficiency of all of this outweigh the political theory of trying to involve more people?” Everitt asks. “Some people want to be involved, but they also want things to move along; they want leaders who get things done.” And if those leaders can’t accomplish the public’s will, then it will cost them at the polls, Everitt says. For Garrott, however, the true test of the public leader is not how they govern but how they empower constituents. “This is the way politics can be more than just a necessary evil—it can actually be a community-building exercise,” Garrott says. “It creates in the individual ownership because they had a say in these decisions that matter.” CW


GOVERNMENT NEWS Digital Divide PHOTO COURTESY JANET ALDRICH

County pulls plug on public computers. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @colbyfrazierLP

L

Thousands of people benefit from the CAT program—but the county says it’s obsolete.

Best Newspaper Reporter 1st Place: Stephen Dark

Personality Profile 1st Place:

Eric S. Peterson “Blood Brothers”

Review/Criticism 1st Place:

Scott Renshaw “St. Vincent”

Arts & Entertainment 1st Place: Kolbie Stonehocker “Neon Trees”

Criminal Justice Reporting 2nd Place: Colby Frazier

“Invisible Man”

Religion/Values Reporting 2nd Place:

Kolbie Stonehocker, Stephen Dark “Death Becomes Her”

Opinion Colum 2nd Place

Eric S. Peterson “Get in the Game”

Best Single Blog Post 2nd Place: Colby Frazier, Colin Wolf “Anniversary of Spanish Fork Concert”

Carolyn Campbell “Multiplicity”

Personality Profile 3rd Place:

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IF WE DON’T PRINT IT, WHO WILL?

JUNE 25, 2015 | 13

Aging and Adult Services, says CAT is being eliminated in part because it provides duplicative services. For instance, she says help with résumés and job-interviewing skills can be obtained through the state of Utah’s Department of Workforce Services, and computer access is available at libraries. But proponents of the CAT program say that libraries are ill equipped to provide the wide variety of classes that CAT offers. Additionally, computers are often in high demand at libraries, and time limits are enforced. “Try interviewing somebody for immigration forms in an hour, or filling out a Department of Workforce Services form that’s 16 pages,” says Dorothy Owen, who retired from the county in 2014 as a social services grant coordinator, and among other duties, helped link up nonprofits with the CAT program. “You can’t just find any old place to do some of this stuff.” The document presented to the county council seemed bent on ending CAT, saying that the program “is producing no effective return on investment and that changes in technology have created greater access for Internet access and training, effectively rendering this program obsolete.” CAT supporters, however, say sheer numbers cannot adequately measure the success of a program utilized by a wide variety of people for many different reasons. In addition to computer access, in 2014, an income-tax assistance program offered in CAT labs processed nearly 3,000 tax forms. The county’s report says the program served 3,559 residents in 2014, but the computers sat idle for three of every four hours they were available. In addition to cuts in hours—which some CAT employees say inevitably led to cuts in participation—CAT’s woes can be traced to marketing, says Anabel Olguin, who worked at the Central City location until being told on June 8 that her position was being eliminated. Chad Zipprich has been teaching computer classes at the Central City location for the past five years. He says his lab is filled with people all day. In the morning, older folks use the lab. By noon during the summer, it’s filled with children. All the while, he teaches courses to whomever wants to partake. “This is a resource that’s going to be missed, I’ll tell you that,” says Zipprich, who on a recent morning was preparing to teach a course on PowerPoint. “It just doesn’t make any sense why they’re cutting this. It’s crazy.” CW

HEADLINERS CHAPTER OF THE

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isa Kendall owns a laptop computer, a tablet and has access to the Internet. But when it comes to basic wordprocessing skills like cutting and pasting sentences, altering font sizes and creating a résumé, Kendall is stumped. “I have all kinds of stuff, but it was the basic skills,” says Kendall. A month ago, she began taking free computer classes offered through Salt Lake County’s Computer Access & Training (CAT) program. “Now we know how to cut, copy and paste. For me, it’s been a huge asset.” Kendall is one of the thousands of people who county officials say utilize the CAT computer labs each year. And on the morning of June 22, she was among a dozen people—including senior citizens, a pair of Mormon missionaries and two children—who tapped away on computers at the Central City Recreation Center. But the program, plagued by waning use, was cut by the Salt Lake County Council on June 23. On June 30, the labs at the Central City, Northwest and Redwood recreation centers will be closed. A report given to the county council on June 2 shows that the four CAT labs, which have a $273,637 operating budget, were underperforming. The report, citing broad Internet access and sweeping changes to technology, calls the program “obsolete,” and notes that the money could be better spent elsewhere. But a few CAT employees, some of whom opted to leave early, told county leaders that the program was worth saving—a sentiment that seemed to resonate with some council members. Councilwoman Jenny Wilson said she wanted to spare the program because it benefits an underserved population for a relative bargain. And, contrary to contentions that few residents would be impacted by the closure, Wilson said, “I see 3,500 people impacted by this program.” As a compromise, the council urged staff to analyze whether a shortfall in services occurs after the closures. If there is a gap, a fix could be created in next year’s budget. “I think it’s a good way to spend $273,000,” says Janet Aldrich, who worked as a CAT instructor for 10 years and retired on June 15 just shy of her 40th year as a county employee. “I’ve just seen it change lives.” Aldrich and several others affiliated with the CAT program spoke in favor of its survival at a County Council meeting on June 18. Since 2013, the CAT program has been administered through the county’s Department of Aging & Adult Services—a poor fit, according to CAT employees who say the program aligns more closely with library services. Becky Kapp, director of the Department of

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14 | JUNE 25, 2015

THE

OCHO

The Classic Snake River Whitewater!

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

POLITICS

May 16th - Sept. 27th Schedule a time now! 10:00am - 12:00pm or 2:15pm

Eight other ill-advised baseball promo themes besides “Caucasian Heritage Night:”

8. “DrinkTill You’re Blind & Win a Free Bat Night”

7.“Male Prostitute Appreciation Night”

6. “God, Guns & Grand Slams: Show Us Your Firearms Night”

5. “Announce Your GOP

Presidential Candidacy Night”

4. “Bring Your Cat to the Game Night”

3. “Mad Max: Fury Road Night” 2. “Recent Divorcees & Widows Night”

1. “At Least It’s Not Soccer Night”

CITIZEN REVOLT Drinking Liberally SLC Meet the SLC Mayoral Candidates: Jackie Biskupski. Piper Down (back room), 1492 S. State, Friday, June 26, 6-8:30 p.m.

OUTDOOR

Utah Tar Sands Resistance & Peaceful Uprising (UTSR/Peace-Up) Protest Vigil at the Book Cliffs The Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining (DOGM) tentatively approved expanding a tar sands mine being constructed by U.S. Oil Sands. In advance of a June 30 DOGM public hearing, UTSR/Peace-Up asks concerned citizens to contact the DOGM board members and Gov. Gary Herbert every day June 22-30, then attend the public hearing. DOGM Public Hearing, Department of Natural Resources, 1594 W. North Temple, Tuesday, June 30, 9-11 a.m. TarSandsResist.org Panguitch Valley Balloon Rally Come out to the launch field each day at 6:30 a.m. and help pilots launch hot-air balloons—you just might be asked to go for a ride. Visit Panguitch’s Historic Downtown on Saturday evening at dusk and witness the awe-inspiring spectacle of balloons glowing up and down Main & Center streets. Panguitch Main Street Organization, 130 N. Main, Panguitch, 435-676-8197, June 26-28, PanguitchValleyBalloonRally.com

VOLUNTEERISM

Utah Arts Festival The UAF takes place at Library Square in Salt Lake City June 25-28. There are volunteer activities for just about everyone. Visit UAF.org/Volunteer-Fest for more information.

SPORTS & FITNESS

2015 Olympic Day & Grand Opening for Spence Eccles Olympic Freestyle Pool Enjoy a free family-friendly afternoon (from 3 to 6 p.m.) at Utah Olympic Park including demonstrations from the National Ability Center, athlete training in the Olympic Freestyle Pool, Olympian “meet and greet,” booths, arts and crafts and more. In the evening, attend the Spence Eccles Olympic Freestyle Pool grand opening celebration featuring the Flying Ace All-Stars. Doors open at 6 p.m.; show begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $10-20; children 2 and under are free. Saturday, June 27, Utah Olympic Park, 3419 Olympic Parkway, Park City, 435-658-4200, UtahOlympicLegacy.org MANA 5K Tobacco-Free Run The Queen Center Pacific Islander Health Network hosts its third annual run to raise awareness of chronic health issues in the PI population. Check-in/on-site registration begins at 7 a.m.; walk/run begins at 8 a.m. Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, Saturday, June 27, QueenCenterUtah.org

Got a volunteer, activism or community event to submit? Visit CityWeekly.net


NEWS

Curses, Foiled Again Police charged Robert Phillip Rivas, 26, with robbing a credit union in Pleasant Grove, Utah, after they discovered receipts showing he had used the stolen money to bail his girlfriend out of jail. They also arrested Rivas’s accomplice, Jesse Ambriz, 28, after officers responding to the robbery noticed him leaving the scene and immediately pegged him as a suspect. “He stood out like a sore thumb,” Lt. Britt Smith said, “wearing a wig, fake beard and fake eyebrows.” (Salt Lake City’s KSL-TV)

BY ROL AND SWEET

Old Habits Die Hard After receiving a call that a woman in Henrico County, Va., had left her children in a car while she shopped, a police officer was unable to arrest the woman because she was in her car when the officer arrived. Instead, the officer swore out a warrant and told her to turn herself in. The woman, identified as Laquanda Newby, 25, arrived at the county courthouse as promised, but she again left her children, ages six and one, in the car with the windows rolled up when she went inside. Surveillance video showed them in the car for more than an hour. (Richmond’s WTVR-TV)

QUIRKS

n Otha Montgomery, 18, successfully eluded police chasing him for running a red light in Eastlake, Ohio, by pulling into a driveway and abandoning the car. He later returned to the scene and asked police officers for his lost hat. They found it, recognized it as the fugitive’s and arrested him. (Cleveland.com)

War of Attrition U.S. military intelligence analysts were “combing through social media,” Air Force Gen. Hawk Carlisle said, “and they see some moron standing at his command … bragging about the command and control capabilities for Daesh, ISIL.” The analysts were able to identify the Islamic State member’s location, and, within 24 hours, bombers destroyed that very building. (Military.com)

n Miguel Martinez, 19, put on a bulletproof vest so his friend, Elijah Ray Lambert, 21, could shoot at it to see if it would stop a bullet. It didn’t. The Sacramento County, Calif., sheriff’s department called the incident an “unintentional killing,” but arrested Lambert anyway. (Chicago Tribune)

Winners & Losers A Seattle couple bought a Powerball ticket that lost in February. They left the ticket in their car until May, when they checked online and discovered it had won $1 million in a second-chance drawing. Meanwhile, someone had broken into their car and stolen a pair of sunglasses, which, the couple told Washington Lottery officials, “were actually sitting atop the winning ticket.” The thief left it, however, and the couple claimed their prize. (Seattle’s KIRO-TV) n Indiana’s Hoosier Lottery unveiled a lottery game featuring bacon-scented tickets. Cash prices in the Bringin’ Home the Bacon game go as high as $10,000, and five players will win a 20-year supply of bacon, valued at $5,000 and paid in annual installments. (Associated Press)

When Guns Are Outlawed When an estranged couple got into an argument over child custody in Decatur, Ill., both the wife and the husband “threw cold baked beans at each other,” police Officer Chad Reed said, adding that the wife “then retrieved a bowl of hot water from the microwave and threw the bowl at her husband’s feet.” (Decatur’s Herald-Review) Compiled by Roland Sweet. Authentication on demand.

! T O B O R Y N I H BI G S News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

exclusively on cityweekly.net

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Way to Go A 70-year-old woman delivering the Kitsap Sun newspaper outside Bremerton, Wash., died after a 62-year-old man delivering the Seattle Times newspaper to the same address accidentally ran over her. Sheriff’s investigators said the victim had parked her car and got out to carry the paper to a customer’s driveway, where the other carrier was backing out. (Associated Press)

Slightest Provocation Clarence Sturdivant, 64, shot his 66-year-old neighbor in Harvey, La., because he wanted a Budweiser, but the neighbor handed him a can of Busch instead. Witnesses said the two then argued over the merits of the respective brands, until the victim threatened Sturdivant with a gun and the Bud-lover responded with a shotgun blast that wounded Busch man in the arm. (Reuters)

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n Suicide bombers Ghulam Rasul and Muhammad Sultan got into an argument while sitting on benches near a traffic circle in Sargodha, Pakistan, according to local police, who reported that during their brawl, one of them accidentally triggered an improvised explosive device in his vest. The explosion killed both men. (Pakistan’s The Express Tribune)

Oy Vey President Obama considers himself the “closest thing to a Jew that has ever sat in this office,” according to longtime Obama adviser David Axelrod. Axelrod revealed that the president “bristled” at charges he was anti-Israel. (The Washington Times)

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JUNE 25, 2015 | 15


16 | JUNE 25, 2015

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BY CITY WEEKLY STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

F

ART

or 39 years, the Utah Arts Festival has been providing the state’s largest and most diverse showcases for every possible kind of artistic expression: painting, photography, sculpture, crafting of clothing and jewelry, poetry, comedy, dance, film, music and more. An average of 80,000 visitors annually (according to UAF’s own statistics) roams through the downtown festival grounds over the course of four days, browsing stalls and watching performances. With all the talent on display, it would not be surprising if a guest’s primary takeaway from the experience is, “Well, I could never be part of that world.” It’s true that not everyone may be destined for artistic greatness, but it’s also important to keep in mind that art isn’t magic. Hundreds of staff members and volunteers employ their own unique sets of skills to make sure that the Utah Arts Festival can happen at all. And all artists are people who have taken whatever raw talent was within them and worked diligently at becoming the best they could be in their chosen medium. If you’re a lover of the arts, the festival shouldn’t be a discouraging experience. Everywhere you look, there are reminders of the sweat involved in getting great work out so people can enjoy it. This year, City Weekly is turning a spotlight on demystifying the Utah Arts Festival. Check out profiles of several of the individuals who coordinate specific areas of the festival, curating work and dealing with the nuts & bolts logistics of putting the festival together. Learn about all of the handson opportunities for festival attendees to make something themselves or learn about the processes that create art. We’ll tell you where to go and how to get there, sure—but we’ll also make the Utah Arts Festival seem a bit less like a passive experience. So roll up your sleeves and find out how to get your hands dirty at UAF 2015. Even a work of art starts out with the work of art. —Scott Renshaw Arts & Entertainment editor scottr@cityweekly.net

WORKS THE BRAINS AND THE BRAWN BEHIND THE UTAH ARTS FESTIVAL


Putting on the show: Steve “Doc” Floor Performing Arts Program coordinator

Adam Love: “What’s going to surprise the crowd?”

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Steve "Doc” Floor: “I go to as many live performances as possible.”

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JUNE 25, 2015 | 17

You typically don’t get to choose your own nickname—the one you get stuck with might tell you a lot about what others think of you. Sometimes, nicknames can be characteristically revealing (Big Ed or Angry Anne) or cryptic and insider (Chazzy or Pinky). If you happen to get one as a child that sticks with you into adulthood, it’s clearly a nickname that’s both well-worn and multi-storied. Utah Arts Festival performing arts coordinator Steve “Doc” Floor has just such a moniker. When asked for his nickname’s origin story, he mentions being called “The Rock & Roll Doctor” when he was at KUER 90.1 in 1979. He’ll also tell you that it mutated into “Doctor Dead,” because, at one point, he was the resident Grateful Dead DJ. When probed even further, he reveals that the root of “Doc” began much earlier: He reluctantly claims there’s no really good story there. “Adolescent teenage boys being boys, and we’ll leave it at that.” As far as his current job goes, it’s hard work for “Doc” Floor and his five subcommittees—folk & bluegrass (including Americana and Celtic), jazz & classical, rock, pop & hip-hop, blues (R&B), world ethnic (“smallest of all, mainly because we’re in Utah”)—to program the performing arts every year for more than 80,000 attendees. He’s seen both the applicant pool and the program at the festival triple in size during his tenure, and—other than the dance companies that are a mainstay (Ballet West, Repertory Dance Theatre, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company and Virginia Tanner’s Children’s Dance Theater)—the music consists of 90 percent new acts every year. “In the beginning, I wasn’t adept at evaluating bands,” Floor says. “Now, I know more about genres than anybody else, and I go to as many performances as possible—especially dance, to personally see as much as possible. I check it all out; that’s what makes it easier. We are evaluating people for a live performance, after all. “I get [told] all the time, ‘I think it would be really cool to be on the committee.’ Well, do you frequent the local bar scene? Because that’s what I need. I need people that are out there seeing bands live.” At the age of 8 (before “Doc” was “Doc”), Floor saw his Uncle Bill Floor’s big band perform at the Terrace Ballroom. He distinctly remembers looking up at the horn section and being enamored—how shiny, how loud, how bombastic. Then his uncle invited him up on stage to join in on a number. Little Steve was sold. At that point, he was simply hooked to music and live performances. After college, Floor studied music more and more, and eventually started a band, Zion Tribe, which played more than 1,000 gigs in 25 years throughout the Intermountain West. In the 1980s, Floor began booking bands around town and doing concert production for KRCL 90.9, even booking weddings and the odd bar mitzvah. All of it—the love and experience of being a performer, stage manager and producer—helps Floor do what he does best: annually doctoring a great performing-arts lineup for the Utah Arts Festival. —Jacob Stringer

RUSSEL DANIELS

By atherine Pioli, Scott Renshaw, Jacob Stringer & Brian Staker comments@cityweekly.net

A look at some of the people who work behind the scenes make the Utah Arts Festival happen.

A writer since before high school, Salt Laker Adam Love earned an Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from Vermont College in 2012. He is currently new programs coordinator in the Division of New Learning at Westminster College. He competed in slam-poetry events at the Utah Arts Festival and other locales for years, and this participation led to his being selected as festival literary arts program director in 2013. On the eve of his third year in that position, he discussed some of the changes taking place, and the challenges and joys of the event. Among the changes this year, the most noticeable is a new Big Mouth Stage location. “It’s bigger, there’s more room, and we have surround sound for the entire area to alleviate any bleeding noise that comes from the festival,” he explains. “But most importantly, we have so much new talent this year—of course, we still have our individual and team slams. But, this year, we’re very excited about The Bee: True Stories From the Hive.” Along the lines of National Public Radio’s The Moth, The Bee, according to Love, “focuses strictly on the microcosm of Salt Lake. Tellers have five minutes to regale the audience with a true story (some funny, some sad, some just as poignant as a Louie episode). The judges in the audience calculate a score, and at the end of the night, one winner. But that’s hardly the point: The point is the stories.” Love is excited about showcasing visiting poets Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, Lauren Elma Frament, William James, Corey Zeller and Sean Thomas Dougherty, who will also be teaching a workshop at the Community Writing Center (see “Hands On,” p. 19), among multiple interactive experiences available there. He is also interested in the ways literature meshes with other arts, such as music, reflected in several literary performers, including Jonah Matranga, lead of the band FAR, as well as a solo project named onelinedrawing; and Annelyse Gelman, poet and vocalist of the band Shoulder Blades. Love is pleased to note the number of applicants to literary events this year is larger than ever. “We’re hoping this continues to be a trend,” he says. “We want to continuously feature new and exciting writers, playwrights, singer-songwriters, cross-disciplinary artists. The sky’s the limit.” There are challenges, even when some events are as popular as slam poetry and local comedy. “We know what works, what draws a crowd,” Love says. “But the bigger challenge is trying to figure out what’s going to surprise the crowd. What’s going to keep the stage fresh? And what will keep first-time viewers awe-inspired and wanting to return?” His vision for the literary arts section of the Utah Arts Festival is expansive, and it helps him meet those challenges: “There is a gold mine of talent in the literary world that most people aren’t familiar with. I’d say my vision is to connect the artists to their unknown audience.” Those connections are at the heart of his passion for the literary arts. “I would love to see necessary and important writers [and] songwriters from around the country and the globe come and share their work with an audience that truly appreciates their craft,” Love says. “Not only do I want the artists to resonate with the audience, but also I want the audience to show the artists there is a reason to showcase their craft in Salt Lake City.” —Brian Staker

NIKI CHAN

Yes, They Can

All about stories: Adam Love Literary Arts Program director


NIKI CHAN

The film pusher: Topher Horman Fear No Film Festival coordinator Topher Horman never really planned on running a film festival. That seems only fitting, since even when he made a film himself, he wasn’t really planning to be a filmmaker. The Salt Lake City native grew up as part of a theater family—“really, the only nonperformer in my family,” he says. “My mom would take me to rehearsals [and I was] always watching the director’s choices, what would work one night, and not work the next night. … I’m so interested in audience reaction.” Horman took that interest in audience reaction to a degree in public communications, which he eventually applied to becoming a special-events coordinator directing pre-game and halftime shows for events like the Orange Bowl, the Sugar Bowl and the Indianapolis 500 parade. “At the same time, I’m also a product of Sundance and Slamdance [film festivals],” he says, “and seeing the envelope being pushed. But I didn’t understand how much independent film was pushing me.” With no background in film production whatsoever, Horman dove into making his own independent feature film in 2002, called Thanksgiving, This Year. The two-year production process was intended, he says, as a calling card for his occupation as an event coordinator: “If you want to produce big events on just pennies, here’s my example.” As he was getting feedback on the film, he showed it to many of the people he already knew in the Utah arts community, including Utah Arts Festival director Lisa Sewell. “Her response was, ‘How would you like to run my film festival?’” Horman recalls. That was 2007, at a time when the Utah Arts Festival’s film component was a much more modest presentation focused around films of contemporary dance. Now, he fields around 500 submissions every year, devoting between 700 and 1,000 hours per year from January till the end of the festival to curating the accepted entries, organizing them into thematic programs and soliciting input from ad hoc individuals when he’s just not sure about whether a specific applicant is right. “It’s easy to eliminate bad ones, and there are also those I can immediately watch and think, this is the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen,” Horman says. “Everything else in that gray area, I start bringing them to people who have expertise in that area. If I have a comedy and I’m not laughing, I’ll take it to someone who’s much funnier than I am. Or if the cadence, editing of the film is wrong, I’ll take it to musicians and say, ‘Tell me if the rhythm is off on this film.’” This year, Horman has taken that fascination with audience response and organized Fear No Film’s various short-film programs around the theme of “impulses”—the reactions that we may not even be aware of consciously. “We’re encouraged to let [film] be a solitary art form,” Horman says, referring to the way most people experience movies. “I’m trying to encourage [viewers] to interact with it—to remind them that they’re part of an audience.” —Scott Renshaw

Planting the artists’ garden: Matt Jacobson Artist Marketplace co-cordinator Matt Jacobson—curator of the Utah Arts Festival Gallery and coordinator of the Artist Marketplace at the Utah Arts Festival—is already plenty devoted to the arts in Utah, having volunteered with the festival for 25 years. Now, he’s planning his wedding around it. “We’ll do the full wedding after the festival,” he told me, just hours before his first small ceremony and reception. “Sometimes, you make sacrifices.” He assured me that putting off the big nuptials party was worth it, especially considering all the exciting things happening at this year’s Arts Festival. “Overall, we’ve seen a consistent improvement in the quality of applications from artists this year,” says Jacobson. “So many people want to get their work in, it’s becoming much more competitive and applicants are really putting forward their best work.” This year, the festival received 615 applicants in the categories of mixed media, ceramics, digital, drawing, fiber, glass, graphics, jewelry, metalwork, painting, photography, sculpture, wearable art and woodworking. Of the 169 artists chosen by a blind jury—artist names and the cost of their work are withheld—48 are local artists from Utah, and 59 will be showing their work at the festival for the first time. During most of the year, from September to May, Jacobson personally picks artists for monthly rotating shows at the Utah Arts Festival Gallery, a gallery for emerging artists in the community. But when it comes time for the summer arts festival, Jacobson takes off his curator hat and lets others do the judging. An eight-member panel reviews applications—each artist submits four images of their work along with a description of their process and artist statement—and decides who will be invited to show at the festival. When it comes to choosing best-of-show awards, 24 jurors— comprised of board members, sponsors and members of the Salt Lake Gallery Association—make the final decision. In the meantime, Jacobson is designing the overall festival experience, making sure everything is in place and running smoothly. Planning the marketplace, says Jacobson, is like putting together a large puzzle. While some arts festivals like to group artists together based on their medium, Jacobson prefers to mix things up, putting big sculpture pieces next to a booth with mixed media, and that booth next to jewelry. “Visually, it makes for a more interesting experience,” explains Jacobson. “And putting all one medium in a single place can do a disservice to the artists. If we didn’t mix art forms, people might bypass other things and just focus on, say, the photography section.” This year, with the live performance stage moved onto the street, the “artist garden” (as Jacobson prefers to call it) will be pleasantly located in a new area under the trees, where artists and patrons will have more space and more welcome shade. “I think the public will like the new setup,” says Jacobson. “They’ll be able to get a beverage and go peruse the art.” —Katherine Pioli

Matt Jacobson: “Sometimes, you make sacrifices.” RUSSEL DANIELS

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Topher Horman: “I’m so interested in audience reaction.”


Hands On Feel like exercising your creative side at Utah Arts Festival? Here’s how. By Scott Renshaw & Brian Staker comments@cityweekly.net

VISUAL ARTS WORKSHOPS

For the fifth year, Mason Fetzer’s distinctive project in the arts festival’s Urban Arts area invites guests to decorate tiles that will be part of a 20-foot mural. This year’s finished mural will be donated to the new Volunteers of America Homeless Resource Center, where it will be installed at the time of the center’s scheduled completion in January 2016. (SR)

PERFORMING ARTS WORKSHOPS Musicians looking to refine their songwriting technique can work with some of the best teachers you could hope for. A two-day (Friday-Saturday) workshop sponsored by Intermountain Acoustic Music Association will feature Utah’s own talented violinist/guitarist/songwriter Kate MacLeod and nationally renowned folk artist John Gorka providing guidance in everything from crafting lyrics and arranging vocal parts to improving live performance and being a better promoter of one’s own work. Register at UAF.org/IAMA. Meanwhile, presented in conjunction with the Arts Festival at the University of Utah’s Dumke Recital Hall (Gardner Hall), Jazz Arts of the Mountain West will present workshops at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday. Topics include ensemble performance and vocal improvisation. Register at SLCJazzFestival.org (SR)

COMMUNITY WRITING CENTER The Community Writing Center is a local resource in Library Square that’s open year round, offering classes, workshops and mentoring. During the Utah Arts Festival, it offers special activities. UAF Literary Arts Program director

Adam Love explains, “The Community Writing Center is a more creative/organic pathway to writing as a creative act for patrons of UAF. It doesn’t showcase performance; the audience, essentially, is its own performance. If you’ve ever been curious about a writing workshop, this is your opportunity to find out what it’s like. It’s free to any UAF attendees who are interested!” The CWC activities make it fun and relatively painless for those who might be intimidated by writing, from offering poetry workshops to classes on creating your own comic book. Love notes, “In the past, they’ve done Magnetic Poetry and the Iron Pen Competition (a 24-hour writing challenge). I think Iron Pen is a great resource for any creative writer in the city who is either established or is new to writing. It’s an opportunity to have a writing experience within a deadline and to offer the best work you can create.” The Community Writing Center activities are some of the most hands-on experiences for UAF attendees. “I think it’s one thing to see writers read/perform their works, but it’s quite another to have the opportunity to try one’s hand with writing,” Love says. “This is just one of many ways CWC promotes writing within the community and how the Community Writing Center works in-tandem with Big Mouth (festival stage).” (BS)

MAKE SALT LAKE MAKERS WORKSHOPS The “maker” revolution has encouraged people from all walks of life with the idea that creativity isn’t limited to a select few and can take on a variety of inventive forms. Once again, the lawn near The Leonardo hosts activities that allow guests of all ages to try their hands at a variety of unique tasks. Have you got a yen for designing practical art? Create a laser-cut LED-light tea lamp. Learn how some of the simplest materials can result in something beautiful by creating imaginative designs out of duct tape, or a mini“canvas” with bathroom tiles and sharpies. Would-be witches and wizards of all ages can make their own colorchanging LED magic wand. And those who never thought they could learn how to knit with needles can find out how to do it with nothing more than yarn and their fingers. (SR)

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URBAN ARTS “100 ARTISTS/1 IMAGE”

Every year, the Utah Arts Festival brings amazing nationally renowned artists to present their work. But it’s not every year that those artists invite guests into the experience of creating art. Celebrated 3D chalk artist Kurt Wenner creates largescale pieces with astonishing illusions of depth, full of remarkable detail. Wenner’s “The Sacred Pool” will be on display near the City & County Building, but it’s not merely a stand-and-watch type of thing; the interactive presentation will allow visitors to take photos of themselves right in the middle of it. Additionally, Wenner will be leading presentations twice daily (4 p.m. & 6 p.m.) in the same location, introducing some of the techniques that have allowed him to amaze so many viewers. And the festival will provide chalk on site, so guests can try their own hands at creating sidewalk minimasterpieces. (SR)

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Strolling through the festival booths representing more than 150 visual artists could inspire you to open up your wallet and bring a great piece of art home. Or it might inspire you to wonder if an artist could be lurking inside you. Some of Utah’s most talented artists are offering opportunities throughout the festival for visitors to learn techniques through hands-on workshops at the Salt Lake City Main Library. Photographer and mixed-media artist Cat Palmer—a winner of multiple awards including several from City Weekly—will present a class on how to create a mixed-media “vision board” that represents your aspirations. Ingrid Hersman instructs in the traditional Ukranian folk art of pysanky egg dyeing, along with providing background in the history and legends of the form. Carrie Trenholm will lead a workshop in the techniques of “fused glass” (also known as warm glass or kiln-formed glass) to assemble pieces of jewelry, portraits or abstracts. Those who have seen the amazing 3-D “shadow boxes” of local artist Marcee Blackerby will have a unique opportunity to make one along with her. And Donna Pence will guide attendees through the process of glass mosaic, including an alternative method of stained glass. Classes do have participation limits, and require a small materials fee (varies depending on the class). Visit UAF.org/workshops for cost, pre-registration, schedule and locations. (SR)

3D CHALK ART WITH KURT WENNER

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PHOTO COURTESY NICOLE MORGRENTHAU

he Utah Arts Festival is all about exposing local residents to a wide array of arts. It also makes it inviting and fun to try your hand at making art yourself. Check out these activities to get your own art on:

PHOTO COURTESY NICOLE MORGRENTHAU

T


of your festival experience.

T

Sugar House Arts Fest

Saturday, July 4, 2015 | 10:00 am - 6:00 pm Highland Dr. | 2100 S. to Sugarmont Plaza 3rd Annual Pet Parade Register online or the day of at 8:30am at Fairmont Park.

Featuring:

Fireworks by Sugar House Chamber The show will start at 9:45pm Biggest firework show in Utah on the 4th! To avoid parking hassles and help eliminate traffic issues, use public transit on that day. UTA is offering extended service on the S-Line until 11:30pm the evening of July 4th

Thank You to Our Sponsors: For more information visit: sugarhousechamber.org/artsfest

Use #iheartsugarhouse for a chance to be featured

he Utah Arts Festival takes place June 25-28 in downtown Salt Lake City on 400 South between State Street and 300 East, noon-11 p.m. daily. Here’s everything you need to know if you’re planning to attend. Tickets: Adult tickets (ages 13-64) are $10 per day Thursday and Friday, $12 per day Saturday and Sunday; seniors (65+) $6; age 12 and under get in free. The “Weekday Lunchtime Special” continues this year, with $6 adult tickets available if purchased Thursday and Friday before 3 p.m. A four-day all-festival pass (available at the festival box office Thursday only) is $35. Festival box offices accept cash only; ATMs are positioned outside the festival grounds for those who need to use them. Purchase tickets and/or enter at any of five entrances on the perimeter of the festival grounds; no need to get backed up at the main entrance on 400 South, where folks will be pouring off the trains. What’s New for 2015: No radical changes are planned for this year, but those who are regular visitors will find some familiar festival feature in new places. The Big Mouth Stage—home to literary events and comedy performances—has been relocated to a spot nearer The Leonardo, where the events will an include more national writers than ever before. The Festival Stage—where dance and musical performances take place—also has a new location on 200 East that allows for a larger stage and VIP “skybox” viewing. Parking/Transportation: Downtown Salt Lake City may be full of parking spaces, but not a lot of them will be convenient to the festival grounds, especially if you’re pushing a stroller or walking with kids. If at all possible, make use of Trax—take (or transfer to) the Red Line and get off at Library Square. Trains usually run every 15-20 minutes, and UTA will be running extended service every day of the festival, with the last train leaving Library Square at 11:30 p.m. to accommodate those staying for the late music headliners. Free valet bicycle parking is also available for those who choose to bike to the festival— and those who do so will also get a $2 discount on festival general admission. What to Bring/What Not to Bring: Outside food and beverage (except for factorysealed water bottles) are not permitted inside the festival grounds. Free ice water is available, however, and bringing a wide-mouth empty reusable water bottle is a good way not to have to make multiple visits on a warm day. Also prohibited: weapons, skates/ skateboards, pets (except service animals) or anything intended for solicitation (posters, flyers, etc.) Do bring: sunscreen/hats/other sun protection, cash (or your ATM card, if you don’t care about the surcharges from a machine that’s not owned by your own bank), weather-appropriate attire (including something for if you plan to be around after the sun goes down), comfortable walking shoes and, of course, ID if you plan to purchase alcohol. Food Vendors: More than a dozen local restaurants and specialty food providers will be represented in the festival food court and at other select locations. Again: Bring cash. Plenty of kid-friendly options will be available—including The Pie Pizzeria, World Dog hot dogs and the PB&J booth in the kids’ Art Yard—as well as offerings from Teriyaki Grill, Dionysos Greek, Crepe Time and more. Seating in the shaded table area is generally hard to come by during peak lunch and dinner hours, so consider eating earlier or later to avoid lines and find a place to sit. Or be bold and friendly, and ask to pull up a chair at an already-occupied (but large) table. Other Important Facilities: A first-aid station (also one of the locations for free water) is located near the northeast corner of The Leonardo. Most of the toilet facilities will be port-a-potties—located in three main groupings hear the Festival Stage, Park Stage and Art Yard—but those who are particularly fastidious or need to change a baby might want to use the restrooms on the lower level of the library building, with access opposite the library auditorium used for the Fear No Film Festival. Schedule of Performances/Music Headliners: Dozens of music groups, dance groups, comedians, spoken word artists and others will be at the festival’s various venues throughout the four days. For a full schedule of events—whether by date or by category— visit the festival website at www.UAF.org/schedule. —Scott Renshaw scottr@cityweekly.net

PHOTO COURTESY NICOLE MORGRENTHAU

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Things have been going pretty awesome for former Utah comedian Jenna Kim Jones over the past few years. After leaving her sweet gig at The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Jones packed up her life and dove headfirst into the Los Angeles comedy circuit. While living the dream of being a professional standup comedian, Jones has become an Internet darling on social media after getting a nod from the Huffington Post in 2012 as one of the “18 Funny Women You Should Be Following on Twitter.” Since that time, she’s seen media success as the narrator for the film series Meet the Mormons, released her own comedy special called #SorryNotSorry through Amazon (filmed at the former Wiseguys Trolley Square location), launched her own podcast under the same name in the spring of 2014, and launched a campaign (supported by Larry King and a variety of comedians) to get to host America’s Funniest Home Videos. Jones has crafted a fantastic comedic niche for herself, appealing to PG-rated audiences looking for humor that isn’t completely disgusting, while at the same time touching on topics that may make those same people uncomfortable. It’s like lighting a campfire to keep them cozy, then swiping her hand through the flames for the thrill— she knows their boundaries and their comfort zones. And isn’t that the sign of a good standup comedian: The ability to make a crowd laugh at whatever you may throw at them, even if they’re not ready to go there, all delivered with the cutest smile? (Gavin Sheehan) Jenna Kim Jones @ Wiseguys, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City June 26-27, 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $12, 21 and over. WiseguysComedy.com

Salt Lake Astronomical Society Star Party For those looking to explore the vastness of space from the comfort of solid ground, the Salt Lake Astronomical Society will be hosting a star party at the Stansbury Park Observatory Complex. Experts will be on hand to help stargazers utilize some of the observatory’s more advanced telescopes, and attendees of all ages are welcome. Organized in 1971, the Salt Lake Astronomical Society has dedicated itself to providing a free and supportive environment to anyone interested in learning more about astronomy. While the society organizes many different events to promote interest in astronomy, its star parties are the most popular. These events take place at various locations throughout the valley, but the opportunity to catch one at the Stansbury Park Observatory Complex offers stellar aficionados a chance to play with sophisticated telescopes. Here, society members help amateur astronomers use Grim & Ealing Telescopes to peer into the cosmic vastness. Due to its location away from the light pollution that exists around Salt Lake City, the Stansbury Park Observatory Complex—aptly named SPOC—is ideally situated for getting a clear look at stars, nebulae and planets that populate the night sky. With the help of SLAS experts, attendees will see the crags and valleys of the moon, as well as magnified views of Mercury and Venus. Star parties typically begin after dusk and go well into the evening, so attendees are encouraged to dress accordingly. (Alex Springer) Salt Lake Astronomical Society Star Party @ Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, 252 Highway 138, Stansbury Park, 435-882-1209, June 27, dusk-11p.m., free. SLAS.us

JUNE 25, 2015 | 21

CUAC Contemporary Art has partnered with the Salt Lake Film Society, which has devoted a sizeable space in the lobby of the Broadway Centre Cinemas for exhibits curated by the notfor-profit arts organization. After the opener— Tyrone Davies’ installation “Cathode Memory” with its nostalgia for the televised image, WildWest variety—Justin Carruth’s collection of paintings, titled Depart, seems like it might more readily accompany movies of the film noir or horror genre. But it’s not an attempt at artistic programming to match anything cinematic, and in reality, the paintings of Depart (such as the one pictured above) manifest some fairly complex expressions of the theme, based on a word that has subtle shadings of significance. These canvases utilize a few expressionistic touches, but what is most striking isn’t the style, as accomplished as it is. Instead, it’s particularly noteworthy that this Captain Captain studios denizen takes on the aesthetic challenge of attempting to represent what is, in a sense, a ghost or an apparition. These figures of departure designate a distance, a separation, under different guises, whether that signifies what simply has left perhaps to return, or what has passed on permanently. Upon contemplation, Carruth’s paintings evoke departures of various sorts, but the tension arises in the fact that the evidence of these absences is still palpably present. This act of return serves to revivify, bring the subject back to life in the form of an image, even if that is only its shadow. It seems fitting for the venue, because in a sense, that is what films do as well. (Brian Staker) Justin Carruth: Depart @ Broadway Centre Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, through Oct. 3. CUArtCenter.org

SATURDAY 6.27

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The Illusionists launched on Broadway in 2014, and subsequently set box-office records. This month, the group makes its debut in Utah, featuring seven of the world’s most talented illusionists, an army of both humorous and scary sidekicks, a dance troupe and a live band. Together, they are bringing the art of magic and illusion back into the 21st century—think David Copperfield meets Cirque du Soleil. There’s a little something for everybody. All the magicians in the group have nicknames. Dan Sperry (The Anti-Conjuror) rocks an intimidating gothic look and is probably the most widely recognizable, thanks to his time on America’s Got Talent in 2010, where he performed an unforgettable trick with dental floss. Jeff Hobson (The Trickster) is a Vegas-style showman and comic. Andrew Basso (The Escapologist) has attempted dangerous escapes from flaming cars, underwater confinement and 150 feet in the air. Aaron Crow (The Warrior) is more of the strong, silent type, and he specializes in weapon magic. Kevin James (The Inventor) uses his innovative mind to create awe-inspiring illusions. The Academy of Magical Arts named Yu Ho-Jin (The Manipulator) the Magician of the Year in 2014; he utilizes graceful manipulation and sleight of hand to baffle the audience. Lastly, there’s Adam Trent (The Futurist) who fuses magic, dance and technology to keep the audience fully engaged. (Shawna Meyer) The Illusionists @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, June 23-25, 7:30 p.m.; June 26, 5 p.m. & 8 p.m.; June 27, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.; June 28, 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m., $25-$75. TheIllusionistsLive.com, ArtTix.org

Jenna Kim Jones

FRIDAY 6.26

Justin Carruth: Depart

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THURSDAY 6.25

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Get Your Kicks Women’s World Cup soccer inspires a desire to see more support for the game. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

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DRAPER-CAPPELLA Draper City Ampitheater June 26th

COPPER CUP CLASSIC Rocky Mountain Raceway July 4th

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ne could hardly distinguish where the cafe’s crumbling façade ended and where the street began. The little shop—and all the others like it along the street—burst with men sitting in flimsy red plastic chairs, drinking fruit smoothies and soda, watching a soccer match. My sister and I sat among them. We were very likely the only white women in Cairo that night in 2010, watching the final game of the African Cup of Nations from a sidewalk cafe: Egypt versus Ghana. We cheered for Ghana, quietly and to ourselves. When Egypt won, the street filled with moving bodies, horns, flags and red flares, and we decided to move quickly home. That was, I think, the night we decided we must go to a World Cup—not just for the soccer, but for the scene, the excitement, the passion. To witness that incredible moment when athletes, sometimes from small and mostly forgotten countries, step onto a field of competition, and into view of the world, and give everything they have to a game. You don’t have to love soccer to appreciate a moment like that. Pulling ourselves reluctantly away from the near-riotous victory celebration, because we knew better than to stay, we began to hatch a plan that would lead, this month, to my sister and me traveling to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, for the 2015 Women’s World Cup. We arrived just hours before our doubleheader match and rushed to the gates of the 56,000-seat Commonwealth Stadium. Forty minutes before kick-off of China vs. Netherlands, the place was deserted. Inside, a few hundred Chinese fans in red shirts and face paint gathered behind the goal box trying their best to drum up excitement—banging gongs, chanting and waving giant Chinese flags—while a speckling of Netherlands fans gazed silently at the field. The whole scene was, to say the least, not what I had expected. Things picked up a bit later as Canada gave a strong performance— tying New Zealand—before an appreciative, though not quite rowdy, home crowd of 35,000 fans. Still, it made me consider, once again, how often women’s sports get overlooked. It’s a strange conundrum considering how many people, including women, play the sport today. When I was a kid, soccer was still gaining popularity in the United States. There were a few coed kids’ teams; I was always on the losing one. Now, nearly 3 million American children play soccer, and nearly half of them are girls. In Canada, almost 50 percent of kids play soccer: twice as many as play hockey. And professionally, the sport is growing for women. Compared to 1971, when only three international women’s teams competed in a total of two matches, today there are nearly 141 international women’s teams playing hundreds of matches. But it won’t grow much more without an audience. When someone says women’s soccer isn’t as interesting as the men’s game, challenge them to actually watch a match in this World Cup. I can assure them that these games are as fast, powerful and interesting as any other, especially now that only the strongest teams remain. So get out, watch these athletes and let them inspire you to get out on the field. CW

WOMEN’S AND COED ADULT RECREATIONAL SOCCER:

Cottonwood/ Salt Lake City coed adult soccer, Meetup.com: A group of around 200 adults, age 18-60, all abilities. Teams not fixed; your opponent one week might be your teammate the next. Summer outdoors, winter indoors. Butler Park Soccer Fields, 2400 E. 7600 South, Cottonwood Heights. New player registration begins Aug. 1, $120/year. Meetup.com Salt Lake County Adult Soccer: Age 16 and up, all abilities. Women’s league Tuesdays, $240 fee. Coed league Wednesdays, $310 fee. $80 for 10 team T-shirts. All games at Murray Fields, 5201 S. Murray Park Lane (160 East). Registration opens July 1, closes Aug. 7. ActivityReg.com Premier Club Soccer: Adults; teams organized by ability level, indoor and outdoor. New coed 6 vs. 6 season starts June 22. Other teams include women’s 4 vs. 4 and women’s 6 vs. 6. Provo. Email admin@premierclubsoccer.com Utah Soccer Arena: Adult league, Latino/a league, and futsal. Single players can be matched with existing teams. Registration currently not open. Open play; first-come-first-served pick-up games, 5 vs. 5 and 6 vs. 6. 90-minute sessions. Thursdays, 8:30 p.m., $5. Murray Arena, 4284 S. 300 West. UtahSoccerArena.com


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FRIDAY 6.26

The Hive Theatre Co.: Cock Over the course of its short lifespan thus far, The Hive Theatre Co. hasn’t been timid about presenting daring productions, venturing into the avant-garde or risking offense. And all you need to do is look at the title of its latest production—Mike Bartlett’s Cock—to wonder if the title is merely a provocation. But there’s more going on in Bartlett’s 2009 Laurence Olivier Award-winning play than attempts to shock. It’s the story of John, a man who is involved in a long-term relationship with another man, a stockbroker identified only as M. But John gets a surprise when he meets a woman—similarly identified only as W—with whom he goes to bed. With whom does John’s long-term happiness lie? Or, perhaps more importantly, what does he have to figure out about himself and his own identify before he can even begin to make that choice? Fluidity can be a funny thing—and strange. (Scott Renshaw) The Hive Theatre Co.: Cock @ Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave., June 26-27, 8 p.m., $15. HiveTheatre.com

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Cock, The Hive Theatre Company, Sugar Space, 616 E. Wilmington Ave., 801-558-2556, 8 p.m.; June 26-27, HiveTheatre.com (see above) The Comedy of Errors Pinnacle Acting Co., The Jewett Center for the Performing Arts at Westminster College, 1250 E. 1700 South, 801-810-5793, June 26-27, 7:30 p.m., June 27 2 p.m., PinnacleActingCompany.org The Compleat Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Monday, Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through July 18, The OBT.org Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivans, 800-746-9882, 8:45 p.m., through Oct. 17, visit Tuacahn.org for showtimes Disney’s When You Wish Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivans, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 17, visit Tuacahn.org for showtimes Disney’s The Little Mermaid Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, Monday-Saturday, 4 & 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 12:30 & 4 p.m.; June 27, 9 a.m., through Aug. 1, HCT.org Grease’d: Happy Days Are Here Again! Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, Mondays, Wednesdays-Thursdays, 7 p.m.; Fridays, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 2:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m., through Aug. 22, DesertStar.biz Harvey Centerpoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Mondays, Thursdays-Saturdays, 7 p.m., through July 3, CenterpointTheatre.org The Illusionists Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, June 25, 7:30 p.m.; June 26, 5 & 8 p.m.; June 27, 2 & 8 p.m.; June 28, 1 & 6:30 p.m. (see p. 21) Into the Woods Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, 7:30 p.m., MondaysSaturdays, through August 15, HaleTheater.org The King and I Centerpoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Mondays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., through July 19,

CenterpointTheatre.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, WednesdaysSaturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m.; through Aug. 30, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Treasure Island: A Modern Day Musical Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, June 26-27, 7 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Utah Shakespeare Festival: The Taming of the Shrew, Henry IV Part 2, King Lear, Amadeus, Charley’s Aunt & South Pacific 299 W. Center St., Cedar City, 800-752-9849, through Sept. 5, visit Bard.org for showtimes West Side Story The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., South Ogden, 855-944-2787, Fridays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., through June 27, TheZiegfeldTheater.com

DANCE

Myriad Dance Co.: Creator’s Grid The State Room, 638 S. State, 800-501-2885, July 1, 8 p.m., TheStateRoom.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Utah Symphony: A Patriotic Celebration Sundance, 8841 N. Alpine Loop Road, Sundance, June 26, 8 p.m. Utah Symphony at Taylorsville Dayzz Taylorsville Regional Park, 5100 S. 2700 West, June 25, 7:30 p.m.

COMEDY & IMPROV

Jenna Kim Jones Wiseguys Comedy Club, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909, June 26-27, 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 21) Paul Sheffield Wiseguys Comedy Club, 269 Historic 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, June 26-27, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Monte Bona: Legends, Lore and True Tales of Mormon Country The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 27, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com


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moreESSENTIALS Nan Weber: Singing in the Saddle Barnes & Noble Gateway, 6 N. Rio Grande St., 801-456-0100, June 27, 1 p.m.

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Saturdays through Oct. 24, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org Gina Bachauer International Piano Festival Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 24-27, 7:30 p.m. Park Silly Sunday Market Main Street, Park City, 435-655-0994, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Trolley Square Flower Market Trolley Square Water Tower, 600 S. 700 East, 801-521-9877, June 25, 10 a.m.-noon Utah Arts Festival 200 E. 400 South, 801-322-2428, June 25-28, UAF.org (see p. 16)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

A Light in the Dark: Brian Lindley Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 31 Adjunct Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 25 [con]text Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through July 11 Corinne Geertsen, Josanne Glass, Dan Toone Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through July 10 The Cost of Anything Alice Gallery, 617 E. South

Summer Patio Paint

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Temple, 801-245-7272, through July 10. Eleanor Scholz: Controlled Burn: Pyrography Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 31 Elements: Namon Bills Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 31 Et in Utah Ego Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Suite 700, 801-596-0500, through June 27 Internment: Scott Tsuchitani Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, Tuesday-Saturday, through August 1 Justin Carruth: Depart Broadway Center Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South, 385-215-6768, through October 3 (see p. 21) Linda Kalmar: Artisan Glass Masks Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through July 11. Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through June 27 Out Loud: Youth Workshop Exhibition Utah Museum of Contemporary Arts, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4210, through June 27 Panopticon Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 25 Relational Forms: Robert Bliss & Anna Campbell Bliss CUAC Contemporary Art, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through July 10. salt 11: Duane Linklater Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Drive, 801-581-7332, through August 1


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YELLOWTAIL JAPANESE BISTRO

Bistro Basics

DINE

Yellowtail reboots Shogun with flair.

Bakery • Cafe • Market •Spirits

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

-Liquor Outlet-Creekside Cafe-Market-

L

NOW OPEN! JOSH SCHEUERMAN

ong gone are the days when the downtown Mikado Japanese restaurant was about the only place to find sushi in the Salt Lake Valley. There are now dozens of eateries specializing in sushi and sashimi, including some really good ones; you’ll even find pre-made or produced-onthe-spot sushi in many local supermarkets. The sushi wars are on. Years ago, before Takashi Gibo opened his eponymous restaurant, Takashi, my favorite sushi and sashimi spot was Shogun. Gibo worked there—it’s where I first met him— along with other talented chefs, including Chef Masatu. Today, Masatu still makes sushi in the space that once was Shogun, but it underwent renovation and reopened as Yellowtail Japanese Bistro a few months ago. My, how that space has changed! Walking into Yellowtail Bistro for the first time, I could barely recall what Shogun had looked like. I remember it was dark, with tatami rooms near the front of the eatery and a sushi bar in back. At Yellowtail, the space—which was long and narrow— has been opened up and looks a lot larger than the old Shogun. There are well-spaced tables now near the entrance, a gorgeous sushi bar that’s nearly the length of the restaurant on the right, and more private dining behind the bar. Attractive wood floors, contemporary design features, and beautiful lighting have turned the once somewhat sad-looking spot into a very eye-catching dining destination. When we first visited Yellowtail, the menu was nothing short of overwhelming. There were some 50-plus different “specials,” side dishes, combination dinners and a la carte options, plus another 30 or so sushi rolls and more than 20 nigiri choices. Since the place wasn’t exactly crowded, I wondered how it could have enough product turnover to assure a constant supply of fresh fish, and how so many menu choices possibly could be of consistently high quality. Well, the menu has since been pared down some, and it still seems to be a work in progress. There are hits and misses. An order of kushi shrimp was disappointing ($6.50). It was a small plate of skeweredand-grilled medium-size shrimp, lacking in much flavor, and overcooked. A much better starter would be delicate yellowtail slices (also called amberjack) with a sauce combining Peruvian ahi amarillo peppers and aojiso, a fragrant Asian herb similar to shiso ($13). Or, try the lightly seared tuna tataki ($13) with zippy black-pepper sauce and garlic chips.

A happy, unexpected discovery at Yellowtail was the wine list—an item often largely overlooked in sushi restaurants. Sure, there’s the fairly standard beer and sake selection (Kirin, Sapporo, Asahi, Momokawa, Hiro, etc.), but I was surprised to find that the smallish wine selection consisted of three French sparkling wines; whites and Rosés from France and Italy; and red wines as varied as Cahors, Primitivo and Rioja from France, Italy and Spain, respectively. A bottle of La Chapelle de la Bastide Picpoul de Pinet 2013 ($36) from France’s Languedoc region is a versatile white wine and a good match for many Yellowtail dishes. Whereas a standard order of nigiri at most sushi bars is two pieces, Yellowtail offers its nigiri a la carte, with most selections priced at $3. Uni (sea urchin) and toro (tuna belly) are higher, priced at $4 and $5 each. I recommend the hotate; I’ve discovered I like raw scallops even better than cooked. And especially delicious are the hama toro (yellowtail belly), maguro (tuna) and tai (snapper) nigiri, all served in generous portions over good quality sushi rice with the standard accompaniments (ginger, wasabi and soy). If you’d prefer to skip the rice, try one of the sashimi options (sliced raw fish with garnishes). They range from $28 for an 18-piece omakase (chef’s choice) sashimi selection to $15 for 9 pieces or 6-piece offerings of specific fish: sake ($12), maguro ($13) and hamachi ($14). Where the “bistro” part of Yellowtail Japanese Bistro seems to come into play is with some of its not-so-standard sushi and sashimi specials. For example, I’ve come to love the ankimo (monkfish liver) served at Takashi; it tastes like foie gras. But Yellowtail actually serves foie gras sashimi ($12/ two pieces) with balsamic vinegar and yuzu “Jell-O.” You can imagine the party on the palate as silky, sensuous foie gras partners with tangy balsamic and citrusy yuzu.

Say “yes” to Yellowtail Japanese Bistro’s 9-piece sashimi dish. There is also a special of lightly grilled toro aburi (fatty tuna) served with fresh (hon) wasabi and sweet tamari ($12/two pieces). Of course, there’s the predictable gaggle of sushi rolls—Firecracker, California, Spicy Tuna, Dragon and such—at Yellowtail, but nothing particularly notable. We did enjoy the Oiran roll ($13.75), where spicy tuna and avocado were rolled in rice and topped with raw salmon, mango, yuzu, tobiko and eel sauce. While the Yellowtail lunch menu offers mostly sushi rolls priced the same as during dinner service, there are some bargains to be had elsewhere on the midday menu. For example, four pieces of tuna sashimi is only $5. There’s also a combo lunch platter ($10) with tempura shrimp and veggies, miso soup, rice, salad and a choice of teriyaki chicken, barbecue beef, tonkatsu (deep-fried pork cutlets) or teriyaki salmon. Even better bargains are the lunchtime sushi/sashimi platters which include miso and salad or rice, plus either 10 pieces of sashimi; 12 sushi roll pieces (four each from three different rolls); or 10 pieces of nigiri (all are chef’s choice). There’s no shortage of sushi in Salt Lake. But if you’re looking for solid sushi and sashimi, combined with an appealing contemporary ambiance and friendly service, give Yellowtail Japanese Bistro a try. CW

ruthscreekside.com 4170 Emigration Canyon Road 801.582.0457 As seen on “ Diners,

Serving American Drive-ins AnD Dives” Comfort Food Since 1930

-CreeksiDe PAtios-Best BreAkfAst 2008 & 2010-85 YeArs AnD GoinG stronG-DeliCious MiMosAs & BlooDY MArY’s-sAt & sun 11AM-2PM-live MusiC & weekenD BrunCh“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

YELLOWTAIL JAPANESE BISTRO

321 S. Main 801-364-7142 YellowtailSLC.com 4160 Emigration Canyon road

801 582-5807 www.ruthsdinEr.Com


, e u q e b r a b g n i n n i w d r a w a t s u j t o N o o t e r a f n a c i r e m fresh A

’ S T I BANaD l l i r g n a c i r e m

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440 MAIN ST. 435.649.7337

banditsbbq.com

JUNE 25, 2015 | 29

3176 East 6200 South 801.944.0505

PARK CITY, UTAH

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COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS, UTAH

PATIO OPEN  FULL BAR

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Monday - Kid’s Eat Free Tuesday - All You Can Eat Bbq Wednesday - Half-Price Apps And Drink Specials In The Bar


@critic1

Hopheads Hunt

Are you a hophead? A lover of hops intended for brewing beers, that is. If so, the Summit Land Conservancy and Wasatch Brewery have your number. Throughout the summer, the Conservancy and Brewery will host a number of hikes called “Hops Hunters Hikes (WeSaveLand.org).” Volunteers will be out on Conservancy protected areas in search of wild hops, first introduced by German miners in the 1800s. The hops will be crafted by Wasatch Brewery into a special edition “open space beer” later this fall. Remaining dates for Hops Hunters Hikes are June 28 (McPolin Farmlands), July 12 (Virginia Mining Claims), July 26 (the Rail Trail) and Aug. 16 (Prospect Ridge). The hikes are “an opportunity for the Conservancy to educate the public about its mission to save land,” according to outreach and development director Sheila Jackson.

A Casual

Dining Experience ow in open for lunc & d

Going to War

On Monday, June 29, a new TV show, which follows on the success of Cupcake Wars, debuts on the Food Network. It’s called Cake Wars, and an upcoming competition—“Girl Scouts”—will feature four contestants competing to have their cake creation chosen to be the sweet centerpiece for a massive Girl Scouts of America celebration, not to mention for a $10,000 prize. One of the contestants will be Utah’s own Laura Burt, owner and head baker of Honey B’s Boutique and Baked Goods in Murray (4700 S. 900 East, Ivy Place, 801-888-9804, BayshoreCakes.com). Self-trained and without any formal culinary education, Laura began baking in childhood with her mother and grandmother. Burt’s Honey B’s Boutique and Baked Goods produces special-occasion cakes, cookies and candies, ranging from opulent wedding cakes to peanut-butter s’mores. Good luck on Cake Wars, Laura!

er

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BY TED SCHEFFLER

N

30 | JUNE 25, 2015

FOOD MATTERS

SERVING

tapas & pincos 5pm-9pm

by 801-634-7203 | 5244 S. Highland Dr. ninth & ninth & 254 south main

2014

Italy @ Tuscany

On Friday, June 26, Tuscany (2832 E. 6200 South, 801-277-9919, TuscanySLC. com) will host a four-course Italian wine-pairing dinner on the restaurant’s garden patio. Dishes like artisan antipasti, homemade gemelli pasta, grilled lamb belly, sausage and brined pork—plus strawberry shortcake—will be paired with select Italian wines. The cost is $35 for food plus $36 for wine. Quote of the week: Of soup and love, the first is best. — Spanish proverb Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

2005

2007 2008

voted best coffee house


Cathedral Church of St. Mark Cathedral host of the

Episcopal

Welcome to slc!

Dear Visitors

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 25, 2015 | 31

Greetings from the Cathedral Church of St. Mark! As you may have heard, the 78th General Convention of the Episcopal Church is being held here in Salt Lake City between June 25th and July 3rd. As the Cathedral host of the 78th Convention, we are offering a number of events. In the pages that follow, you’ll find a host of exciting offerings— lectures, concerts, an off-beat bus tour, even Ballet West— that we encourage you to take advantage of, free of charge. Please feel welcome, and please drop in to see us, even if it’s just for a complimentary cup of tea and a scone!

Welcome to the Cathedral Church of St. Mark and to Salt Lake City. We trust you will enjoy the natural beauty of the area and join us here at the Cathedral for a varied and exciting array of activities. In the following pages, you’ll find a daily schedule of Cathedral events—from a full worship schedule (Morning and Evening Prayer, daily mass) to organ recitals, from the St. John’s Illuminated Bible exhibit to guided tours of our historic Cathedral. We hope this guide provides you with the information you need to help make the Cathedral Church of St. Mark your church a home away from home, during your stay in Salt Lake City.

Dear Neighbors

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ST MARK

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n o i General Convent


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H

The Very Reverend Raymond Joe Waldon

ow many Episcopalians does it take to change a lightbulb? Why do Episcopalians always seem to be so happy? These and other deep questions will be answered as thousands and thousands and thousands of Episcopalians from across the globe arrive this week. To celebrate their arrival, the Cathedral Church of St. Mark is hosting 11 days of activities for our entire community! Hey, we are a 10 minute walk (1,230 steps if you fitness bugs are counting) from the Salt Palace, where the 78th Triennial General Convention of the Episcopal Church meets June 25 - July 3. Every day we will honor the welcoming tradition of cathedrals by offering a complimentary cup of free tea and a treat to every visitor. We have partnered with SWEET PETE’S CANDY (yes, THAT candy store from the hit CNBC television show “The Profit!”) to offer our visitors a yummy piece of their famous gourmet sea salt caramels with their specialty items available in our Mustard Seed gift store. Our historic doors will be open 9:00 am to 7:00 pm for tours (see calendar for exceptions) that will include volunteers who will explain the history of the Cathedral and direct you to our newly opened historical museum walkway, featuring newspaper articles from the 1800’s, historic vestments, and displays from our history. You can also explore all of the HUGE volumes of the hand-written, Illuminated Bible in the modern era (St. John’s Bible). We will have organ recitals at noon. Our grounds will be open so that you can enjoy a brown bag lunch, and our chapel is available to you to have reflective time. THEN GET READY!! At night we have several special offerings. Members of Ballet West will perform IN THE CATHEDRAL and on another night, members of the Utah Opera will be in performance. Utopia Early Music is in concert, exploring the connection between sacred and secular music throughout the Reformation (on period instruments), with some selections requiring audience participation! Canon Andrew White, the Vicar of Bagdad, who works for reconciliation and has a multimillion dollar bounty on his head, is one of our guest lecturers along with scholar Brad Neary who shows how the Illuminated St. John’s Bible was produced. To top it off, we will have the “Underground Bus” tour that will take you to hidden, lesser known, and truly off-beat sites in Salt Lake City: ghosts, sphinxes, hidden gardens –oh, my! AND IT’S ALL FREE. The Diocese of Utah and our 11th Bishop, the Rt. Reverend Scott B. Hayashi welcomes the House of Deputies, House of Bishops, and guests to Salt Lake City. The Diocesan Center is located next door to the Cathedral on the Episcopal Commons, and you are welcome to stop by for a visit. During these 11 days that the Cathedral is celebrating the Convention of the Episcopal Church, we are offering you a chance to walk into the oldest church in continuous use for public worship in the state and receive our hospitality and gratitude. On behalf of our Vestry, members of the Cathedral, and as the Dean of the Cathedral , I extend to you, a “come as you are” invitation to visit a historic landmark in downtown Salt Lake City!

Blessings!

tuesday

June 23 8 P.M.

Thursday

June 26 8 P.M.

saturday

June 28 8 A.M.

tuesday

St. John’s Illuminated Bible Lecture featuring scholar Brad Neary.

Friday

Members of Utah Opera in Concert, featuring Brian Stucki and Tyler Nelson.

Ballet West Performance featuring a dance designed for the Cathedral space. This is a once in a life-time opportunity.

Sunday

Salt Palace Mass Simulcast of Convention Eucharist. Note the public is invited to the Salt Palace.

8 P.M.

St. John’s Illuminated Bible lecture featuring scholar Brad Neary.

5 & 7 P.M.

Thursday

july 2 8 P.M.

JUNE 25, 2015 | 33

Utopia Early Music in Concert will perform a “New Song: A Musical Reformation.” Tonight features guest artists, period instruments, and twice Grammy nominated tenor Chris LeCluyse, who appeared on Conspirare of choral works by Tarik O’Regan.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Evening Cathedral Tours for Utah Night which is a free night for Episcopalians to attend special events sponsored by the Diocese of Utah or explore the city.

SLC “Underground” Bus Tour (See next page for details on our authentic SLC tour)

Wednesday July 1 5-9 P.M.

june 30 9-11 A.M.

Church Flower Arranging Class. Learn to decorate tables and altars from members of our Flower Guild and volunteers. Groups are welcome.

10 A.M.

The Right Reverend Scott B. Hayashi

June 27 8 P.M.

The Choir from the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Madeline for Vespers.

Rite I Mass

Ray+ The Very Rev. Raymond Joe Waldon, Dean

June 25 8 P.M.

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Welcome!

We are open for tours from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm daily (except for June 27). The St. John’s Illuminated Bible is on display. The Allan Tull Library and our rare books collection are open, with members of our Library Committee available. Cathedral Docents are happy to guide you. We have arranged free samples of Sweet Pete’s Candy from the CNBC’s hit show, The Profit. We have 2,000 of their famous gourmet sea salted caramels for our guests with other specialties available in our gift shop. We will have tea and scones as a courtesy to our guests. Organ recitals are daily, Monday thru Friday at noon. We offer Mass daily (varied schedule) along with Morning Prayer at 8:30 am and Evening Prayer at 5:30 pm Monday-Friday. All of our events are free! Please come as you are and know that children are encouraged to tour. We will open our celebration on Monday, June 22 at 6:30 pm with a special presentation, and free meal, from the “Vicar of Bagdad,” Canon Andrew White. Private events held on Cathedral grounds are not listed below.

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32 | JUNE 25, 2015

st. Marks Ca l e n da r o f E v e n ts


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34 | JUNE 25, 2015

our CATHEDRAL History T Cathedral Staff The Very Rev. Raymond Joe Waldon, Dean & Rector The Rev. Tyler Doherty, Assistant The Rev. Jennifer Tucker, Curate The Rev. Elizabeth Hunter, Deacon Canon Rebecca Ball, Children’s Formation Canon Judith Atherton, Mental Health Mr. George Henry, Principal Organist & Choir Director Mr. Chris Wooten, Assisting Organist Mr. Adam Handsen, Assisting Organist Ms. Lydia Herrera, Hildegard’s Food Bank Ms. Laura Reilly, Executive Assistant to the Dean Mr. John O’Shea, Plant Manager The Very Rev. Rick Q. Lawson, Dean Emeritus The Very Rev. Jack Potter, Dean Emeritus The Rev. Canon Diana Johnson, Community of Hope The Rev. Canon Caryl Marsh, Formation The Rev. Michael Milligan, Assisting Clergy The Rev. Leroy Carter, Assisting Clergy The Rev. Linc Ure, Assisting Clergy The Rev. Lee Shaw, Assisting Clergy Mr. Copeland Johnstone, Sacristan TurnKey, Cathedral Chefs and Caterers Ms. Josie Stone, Cathedral Convention Chair/Coordinator Mr. Charles Black, Senior Warden Ms. Patricia Peterson, Junior Warden Mr. Kurt Cook, Archivist Ms. Carolyn Roll, Treasurer Mr. John D’Arcy, Endowments

Bus Tour

he Episcopal Church is very much a part of the frontier heritage of the Intermountain West, with the Cathedral Church of St. Mark serving as a focal point of the Church’s role in Salt Lake City’s pioneer history. The Cathedral is also the first permanent Protestant church established in the Salt Lake Valley and continues to serve as the state’s oldest church in continuous use for public worship. The area’s first Episcopal bishop was Daniel S. Tuttle, a native of the state of New York, who was elected by the Episcopal Church to be the Missionary Bishop in the new territory of Montana. His jurisdiction extended into areas that later became the states of Utah and Idaho. Arriving in Salt Lake City on July 2, 1867, his immediate focus was building a congregation. Bishop Tuttle’s early success meant that he needed a permanent building to house his ever-growing congregation. On July 30, 1870, the cornerstone was laid for St. Mark’s Cathedral, with blueprints for the building donated by Richard Upjohn, founder of the American Institute of Architects. The simple, traditional design was based on the Bishop’s desire to reflect the values and the spirit of frontier America: “The cathedral is to be developed along lines adapted to American ideas and adjusted to American habits,” he admonished. The thick native red sandstone walls and heavy timber roof trusses reflect the determination of the designers and builders to achieve permanence in a frontier community. Listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, the Cathedral still has that original simplicity and strength. The building seats about 500, which at the time of its construction would have held every Episcopalian in the territory! On Nov. 15, 1870, St. Mark’s Parish was formally organized, with services being held in the crypt of the unfinished building beginning. The Cathedral was officially consecrated on May 14, 1874. The cost of the Cathedral had sky-rocked by the time of its completion, with Bishop Tuttle noting at the time, “When completed our church will have cost, I fear, $40,000. Alas! Alas!” The Cathedral has survived its share of disasters including moderate earthquakes and, in 1935, a serious fire that gutted the sanctuary, destroying two beautiful stained glass windows over the altar. The restoration was completed with only minor modifications to the original design. The construction and subsequent history of The Cathedral Church of St. Mark was, and continues to be, a visible demonstration that diverse religious beliefs can thrive in Utah. A minority in number, Episcopalians have always been instruments for social justice and care in this community. After leaving Salt Lake City, Bishop Tuttle reminisced: “Prayers and tears and hopes and fears and sacred memories, as well as altar and walls and gifts and memorials, were consecrated in that noble building in the mountains, to which my heart turns even now in the deepest tenderness.” Please enjoy this beautiful Cathedral. It continues to be a place of refreshment. All who enter may find peace, in a non- judgmental setting.

Sign up online with QR Code Sign Up for the Salt Lake City “Underground” Tour

This VERY unofficial tour explores the gap between the official travel brochures and the stranger, very local Salt Lake that thrives in the shadow of the dominant culture. Visit Gilgal Garden, the Weeping Virgin, Emo’s Grave, and other sites. This 90-minute bus tour, was designed by the Library Committee of the Cathedral Church of St. Mark. Suggested, donation, $5-$15.

5:00pm-6:30pm 7:00pm-8:30pm Pick up point: Cathedral Church of St. Mark 231 East 100 South

Daily Worship Morning Prayer 8:30 am

Evening Prayer 5:30 pm

Mass MTF W TH Sat Sun

12:10 7:00 am 10:00 5:30 pm 8:30 & 10:30 am


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves! Asian Star

Chanon Thai Café

If you think spice is nice and heat is neat, this is definitely the place for you. The Thai cuisine at this funky, friendly and comfy little cafe is truly authentic, particularly when it comes to the heat scale. Order a dish of gang massaman curry spicy, and it will be spicy—seriously! So, order carefully. Absolutely delicious is gang dang, a bowl of red curry with coconut milk, red and green bell pepper, zucchini, Thai basil, bamboo shoots and green beans—all spicy and sweet at the same time. The lard naa is a great choice if you’re in the mood for something more sweet than spicy, and what’s a Thai meal without topping it off with a Thai iced tea? 278 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-532-1177, ChanonThai.com

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2014

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Corbin’s Grille

The heart of Corbin’s Grille is the white-almond wood from California burning in a 6-foot grill, which lends delicious aroma and flavor to the menu’s steaks, ribs, chops, chicken, salmon and lobster. Yummy appetizers include New England calamari, Buffalo wings and fried Brie. Corbin’s also offers an extensive list of wines, beers and cocktails in a snazzy setting. 748 W. Heritage Park Blvd., Layton, 801825-2502, CorbinsGrille.com

Korea House

At Korea House, you’ll discover savory, traditional dishes that are certifiably authentic. The folks here describe the cuisine as “fresh, simple Korean food.” But don’t let that humble description fool you: The food here is very artfully presented and delicious. House specials include gal-bi tang noodles with short ribs, kimchi with pork and bul-go-gi marinated, tender beef. These cooks really know how to barbecue ribs. 1465 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801487-3900, KoreaHouseSLC.com

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Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669

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Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615

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JUNE 25, 2015 | 35

Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821

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KRISTEEN POLHAMUS

june 27th JUly 11th

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Deli Done Right

Chin Wah is an appealing Asian restaurant in Sandy specializing in Cantonese and Sichuan cuisine. House specialties include black-bean chicken, walnut shrimp, Buddha’s Feast, Sichuan pork, shrimp in lobster sauce and Mongolian beef. The Phoenix chicken is a must-try, and there are many combination meals available. Kids will enjoy the fish & chips and burgers. 849 E. 9400 South, Sandy, 801-5613195, ChinWahRestaurant.com

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With a gluten-free menu, vegetarian options and even a liquor menu, Asian Star offers a taste of Far East for every dietary preference. The ornate exterior may seem intimidating, but the dining area is casual. From Mongolian beef to the fish of the day, the food is moderately priced, and an Americanized kids menu is available for the family’s picky eaters. 7588 S. Union Park Ave., Midvale, 801- Foundry Grill The Foundry Grill at Sundance Resort was opened in July 566-8838, AsianStarRestaurant.com 1996. The name is taken from the large foundry wall located in the main room of the restaurant. The word “foundry” Belgian Waffle & Omelet Inn This restaurant is open 24 hours, serving, as its name also implies simplicity and a return to the fundamentals: implies, good omelets and waffles. Also featured are the room, the service and the menu are all an extension of Belgian brunch, and steak & eggs for breakfast. Midnight this idea. At the grill, you’ll enjoy the freshest vegetables isn’t for hoity-toity fare—it’s the time to dive into the and meats cooked to order. The fish tacos and pulledstuff that only an old-school diner can offer. This Midvale pork sandwich are delicious, as is the Alaskan halibut and stalwart serves up a menu with something for every late- rotisserie chicken. In warm weather, the patio opens for night appetite. Dig into a juicy burger or classic sandwich outside dining, and Sunday brunch is offered year-round. or share a banana split with a friend. Or, if an after-hours And since Sundance believes in the preservation of our breakfast is what the doctor ordered, take the restau- resources, all table centerpieces are created from recyrant’s name at face value and enjoy a plate of waffles or cled glass hand-blown at Sundance Resort. Sundance a massive Denver omelet. Any time is the right time; the Resort, 8841 Alpine Loop Scenic Byway, Provo, lights are always on. 7331 S. 900 East, Midvale, 801-223-4220, SundanceResort.com 801- 566-5731, BelgianWaffle.Weebly.com

Chin Wah

NING I A T TER R EN


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36 | JUNE 25, 2015

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Pure Prairie League

High West launches American Prairie Whiskey. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

“W

hiskey” Dave Perkins and his ever-expanding High West Distillery & Saloon crew are nothing if not enmeshed in the heritage of the Old West. Their soon-toopen restaurant and distillery is located at Blue Sky Ranch near Wanship, a working ranch that embraces the traditions of the American West, replete with horses, cattle and Western-style adventures. The labels on bottles of High West products have always captured snippets of the West. Valley Tan Utah Oat Whiskey carries a mug shot of Porter Rockwell—Brigham Young’s infamous “enforcer”—on its label (“valley tan” originally referred to the leather made by Mormon Pioneers). High West’s

inaugural whiskey—Rendezvous Rye—pays homage to the annual gathering of mountain men in the West where they exchanged pelts for supplies; it was called the summer rendezvous. High West Silver Whiskey is named for the silver mines of Park City, home to High West Distillery and, at one time, one of the richest and most productive silver towns in the old West. In keeping with the “Onward!” spirit of the West, High West has launched a new whiskey offering: American Prairie ($34.99/750 mL). It’s a blend of 2-year-old, 6-year-old and 13-year-old straight bourbons (the exact percentages are a secret) that is neither chill-filtered nor carbon treated, and it is aged in new, charred, white American oak barrels. Dedicated to “preserving and promoting the American West,” High West is putting some of its money where its mouth is with this one. The American Prairie Reserve in Montana is a 5,000-square-mile land tract—nearly the size of Connecticut— that’s being restored to “what Lewis and Clark and Native Americans would have seen,” according to High West. When complete, it will be the largest wildlife preserve in the lower 48 states—larger than Yosemite, Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks combined. High West will donate 10 percent of after-tax profits from every bottle of American Prairie Whiskey to the

F F O % 50 I H S U S L L A S L L O Y! &R a d Y r E aY E V all d

DRINK American Prairie Foundation to aid its work on the American Prairie Reserve. The label for American Prairie Whiskey features a pronghorn antelope— North America’s fastest land mammal, clocking in speeds of 55 mph. According to the folks at the American Prairie Reserve, the pronghorn antelope has seen a population decrease since the 1800s of 98 percent, due to habitat destruction. The American Prairie Reserve is helping the pronghorn through ongoing fence removal efforts and by conserving wildlife corridors. I’ll drink to that! So, how does High West American Prairie Whiskey taste? Thick and rich. For folks who enjoy the honeyed whiskeys that are so popular these days, I’d suggest giving American Prairie a try. It’s a little like

biting into a bourbon-soaked candy-caramel apple, with sweet honey, apple and caramel notes, plus hints of cinnamon and allspice. Maybe calling it “Mom’s Apple Pie Whiskey” would be closer to the bone. And for whiskey connoisseurs, High West Bourye ($80/750 mL) is back, with a slightly different taste profile (the High West distillers like it better) than the original Bourye. It’s a premium blend of 9-year-old bourbon along with 10-year-old and 16-yearold straight rye whiskeys, delivering a long, sweet finish and nutty caramel and honey flavors on the palate. This is a whiskey made for sipping, unadulterated by anything but perhaps a teardrop’s worth of water. Look for the mythical Western jackalope on Bourye’s label. Legend has it that “the best way to catch a jackalope is to lure it with whiskey,” say the creators of Bourye—and, they assure us, their whiskey is “sure to attract the most finicky of jackalopes.” CW

Beer & Wine WHY WaiT?

South Jordan • 10500 S. 1086 W. Ste. 111 • 801.302.0777 Provo • 98 W. Center Street • 801.373.7200 Gift certificates available • www.indiapalaceutah.com

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13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net La Jolla Groves

La Jolla Groves is a stunning restaurant serving French and Italian cuisine. With a focus on garden fresh, wholesome food, Chef Kent Andersen consistently wows customers with dishes such as oven-fired salmon with cilantro butter, lemon-roasted chicken, beef tenderloin and sauteed shrimp, as well as beautifully crafted soups, sandwiches and salads. 190 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-456-9500; 4801 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-224-5111, LaJollaGroves.com

Mad Greek Express

At Mad Greek Express, you’ll discover delicious Mediterranean flavors in a fast-food setting. In addition to Greek specialties such as gyros, souvlaki, baklava and the like. Mad Greek also cooks up delicious charbroiled burgers. Also be sure to try the delicious salads and rice pudding. 4504 S. 900 East, Salt Lake City, 801-266-4501

Sandwich Loft

At the Sandwich Loft, you’ll find all kinds of bread and fixings for your tasty sandwich or wrap. The owner,

Sheryl, is very energetic, cheerful and accommodating. The fresh sliced turkey and avocado on whole-wheat bread is a popular favorite, as is the potato salad. 2702 S. 3600 West, West Valley City, 801-968-1018

Mekong Cafe

Mekong Cafe is Midvale’s answer to Bangkok, serving up authentic Thai cuisine in an average atmosphere, but with above-average service. At lunch, try the $7.95 specials, which include a choice of entree, pad thai, rice and a spring roll. For dinner, start off with skewered coconut shrimp or satay chicken. Then, try a po-tak seafood soup, spicy beef larb salad, ginger chicken, green curry pork, ped yang (roasted duck with spinach), glass noodles or Mekong calamari—and, of course, the popular pad thai. 7777 S. State, Midvale, 801-566-5747, MekongOnWheels.com

Off Trax

Primarily a breakfast and lunch spot, Off Trax offers busy commuters and others a fun place to stop and refuel. The barbecue pulled-pork sandwich is awesome, and so are the burgers. Other good options include fish

Asian Snacks • Sauces • Spices • Vegetables • Seafood • Tea & more

3390 South State Street | www.chinatownsupermarkets.com

197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

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2335 E. Murray Holladay rd 801.278.8682 | ricebasil.com

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Check out our daily lunch specials .

ASiAN Grocery STore

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Foothilll’s Best Restaurant

Patio Noodles • Hot Pot • Dry Pot • Dim Sum • Boba Tea • Fruit slush • Milk Shakes

1615 SOUTH FOOTHILL DR. • 801 583 8331 • BLEUBISTROSLC.COM TUES-SAT | 4:30-10PM • SAT | 9AM -10PM • SUN | 9AM -3PM

3390 South State Street | www.Hotdynasty.com Party Room available for Reservation: 801-809-3229

JUNE 25, 2015 | 37

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • SMALL PLATES & DINNER ENTREES


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38 | JUNE 25, 2015

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net & chips, Philly cheesesteak, patty melt, chili and the Southwest chicken wrap. Drinks include sodas, coffee drinks and sweet-leaf bottled tea. There are also free Wi-Fi and pool tables. 259 W. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-4307, OffTraxSLC.com

Pho Cali

f res h . fast . fab u l o u s

6213 South highland drive | 801.635.8190

Indian restaurants may come and go, but this mainstay has been a favorite for years. The Shanthakumar family, who owns and operates Royal India, provides warm and inviting ambience and service along with outstanding dishes such as aromatic lamb biryani, spinach & cream shrimp saag, great curry, masalas, kormas and vindaloos, along with some of the greatest naan you’ll ever find: peshwari naan, tandoorbaked and stuffed with cashews, raisins and coconut. 55 N. Main, Bountiful, 801-292-1835; 10263 S. 1300 East, Sandy, 801-572-6123, RoyalIndiaUtah.com Main Street Deli in Park City is the perfect place to grab a quick, inexpensive breakfast, 1 lunch or light . 19a5simple dinner. Locals love to popeinSTfor bagel with cream cheese. Popular breakfast items include threeegg omelets, huevos rancheros and breakfast sandwiches. The lunch menu consists of a huge variety of sandwiches, from turkey & Swiss to the meatball sub. Conveniently located near the top of Main Street, this inviting little eatery begs you to grab a newspaper and

64 Y e a r s absdrivein.com

Royal India

Main Street Deli

Old Fashioned GOODNESS

West valley 4591 s. 5600 W. | 801.968.2130

Pho Cali has one of the best selections of Vietnamese noodles in West Valley City, serving pho, hu tieu, bun bo hue and more. Start off with egg rolls or pot stickers and then enjoy a big, steaming bowl of pho, seafood noodle soup, stir-fried flat noodles with beef, barbecued chicken or pork, or perhaps vermicelli with shrimp. For a different beverage, try the iced salty lemonade or iced salty plum drinks. 1631 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-972-2808

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A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews Powder

After several different restaurants have occupied the space at what is now the Park City Waldorf Astoria, the current one, Powder, with Chef Ryker Brown, is the best of them all. Start with an artisanal cheese board or charcuterie board sourced from local purveyors, or perhaps a refreshing summer salad like gold, purple and red baby beets served with watermelon, Feta cheese, hazelnuts and watercress, drizzled with white balsamic vinegar. The tasty ahi tuna tataki appetizer is sushi-grade ahi tuna peppered and seared just long enough to create a crisp outer crust, with the interior of the tuna left essentially uncooked, cut into squares and served with radish, micro cilantro leaves, serrano pepper and a ginger-soy-lime vinaigrette. Chef Brown has kicked the fried-chicken comeback up a few notches by preparing his organic chicken sous vide for at least 24 hours, then deep-frying it ever so briefly; the chicken is so tender and juicy that it’s astonishingly delicious. Finish up with hot, sugar-dusted beignets with raspberry coulis and vanilla cream. Reviewed June 18. Waldorf Astoria, 2100 Frostwood Drive, Park City, 435-6475566, ParkCityWaldorfAstoria.com

Red House

I’ve only seen two non-Asian customers during my visits, and I consider that an auspicious sign. All of the restaurant’s specials and much of the rest of the menu is written in Chinese; there is an English menu without prices, but those prices are ridiculously low. Start with a plate of a dozen made-from-scratch steamed dumplings—perfectly cooked, fresh-made pasta purses stuffed with juicy minced pork, cabbage and Chinese chives. I normally like to begin a Chinese meal with hot & sour soup, but was told by our friendly server that it was too big for two people. Generous portions are the norm; unless you come with a crowd, there will be leftovers. Often in restaurants, I leave thinking, “I could’ve made that at home.” But the fragrance, flavors and complexity of dishes such as cumin-spiced lamb and garlicky, fiery, slightly sweet pork ribs are another story altogether. My favorite dish so far is shredded, tender pork and soft, airy tofu tossed with peas, carrots and onion in a gorgeous, spicy sauce with anise and ginger notes. Red House is a wonderful secret I almost didn’t want to share. Reviewed June 11. 1465 S. State, Salt Lake City, rive-in RedHouseSLC.com D801-821-3622,

Kobe Japanese Restaurant

Hamburgers • Hand-C ut F • Thick S hakes & M ries alts

Beer Margaritas Molcajete Mondays tac o t u e s d ays

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1560 E 3300 S • 801.410.4696 Dittacaffe.com

Chef/owner Mike Fukumitsu has put Kobe on a very short list of my favorite Utah Japanese restaurants. The tonkotsu ramen is as good as any I’ve ever eaten, with bodacious house-made broth cooked down from pork pieces and bones for a minimum of 24 hours, plus crisped pork belly batons, slightly runny hardcooked egg, scallion, bean sprouts and perfectly cooked ramen noodles. Twice a week, Fukumitsu gets a “surprise package” delivery of fresh fish from central Tokyo’s renowned Tsukiji wholesale fish market. That keeps things interesting and fresh at Kobe; for example, during one recent visit, we enjoyed a sashimi platter featuring an 18-piece assortment of five different raw fish. We’ve also enjoyed melt-in-the-mouth hamachi belly nigiri, sea bream, escolar and a superb salad of mixed greens, tangerine wedges and fragrant citrus-ginger dressing topped with a flash-fried soft shell crab—all at very reasonable prices. Among the must-try specialty rolls are Kobe’s most popular: the Summer Breeze—a huge roll with yellowtail, jalapeño, mango, cilantro, avocado and spicy sauce, all topped with salmon, lemon, honey, habanero powder and tobiko. Reviewed May 28. 3947 Wasatch Blvd., Millcreek, 801-277-2928, Facebook.com/KobeJapaneseRestaurant


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40 | JUNE 25, 2015

ME & EARL AND THE DYING GIRL

‘Me’ Problem

CINEMA

How to read the emotional emergence from narcissism in Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

he arc of critical response to a festival film is … well, let’s understate things a whole lot, and say that it’s complicated. In the swarm of an environment where members of the press are watching four or five films a day, reactions can be distorted by everything from sleep deprivation to the desperate need to find something, anything great to champion. When some of the most lauded festival films make their way out into the wider world, however, the reaction from those catching up with them weeks or months later can be something akin to, “What the hell were you people thinking?” Such has it been with Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, director Alfonso Gómez-Rejon’s adaptation of Jesse Andrews’ young-adult novel, which pulled off the rare sweep of the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Response in Park City was almost universally rapturous from critics and general attendees. Then, prior to its New York City release earlier this month, critics elsewhere began seeing it. And the pendulum of enthusiasm seemed to swing radically in the opposite direction. There’s enough about the basic concept that could explain that post-Sundance shift. In some ways it’s a quintessentially Sundance-y hit, a quirky comedy-drama about a high school senior named Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann) who tries to move unobtrusively through his days as a fringe participant in a variety of social groups, his strongest connection being with a fellow student named Earl (RJ Cyler) with whom he makes slapdash parody/homages to their favorite classic films, while referring to him not as a friend but as a “co-worker.” Then Greg’s mother (Connie Britton) learns that his classmate, Rachel Kushner (Olivia Cooke), has been diagnosed with leukemia—and Greg is expected to spend some time being nice to her, whether he likes it or not.

Goméz-Rejon delivers a highly stylized look from the outset, squarely placing us in the point of view of a teenager who sees the world entirely through the lens of other movies. That approach includes a string of scenes from Greg and Earl’s various ultra-low-budget movies—which, admittedly, get wearying after a while in their nudging references— but also delivers some solid visual gags. Mann and Cooke develop a terrific chemistry, which Goméz-Rejon allows to unfold most effectively during a pair of extended takes later in the film that make that relationship both more intimate and more uncomfortable for Greg. That shift is a huge part of what Me and Earl is about, and why so many of the more blistering attacks on the film feel like misreadings. The strongest criticisms have focused on how every other character besides Greg exists to help the narcissistic white boy grow as a person and an artist, and the accompanying portrayal of the AfricanAmerican Earl in particular as a wrongside-of-the-tracks stereotype whose dialogue often seems to consist entirely of “dem titties.” But there’s a “depiction = endorsement” element to those gripes that doesn’t line up with Me and Earl’s pointed construction of Greg as an unreliable narrator. While that approach by the filmmakers doesn’t constitute a get-out-of-criticism-free card—yeah, it does become difficult to stomach Earl’s characterization in increasing doses—it’s

RJ Cyler and Thomas Mann in Me and Earl and the Dying Girl hard to look at all the supporting roles throughout the film, including the high school clique clichés, and not see them as the way Greg has of reducing them to stock characters in his life story. Because at its core, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is about growing out of the adolescent self-absorption that turns every narrative into one with “Me” at the beginning. The climactic emotional moment comes as Greg becomes aware of how little he has truly known Rachel despite the amount of time he has been spending with her, and that scene becomes an encapsulation of how much Greg has needed to grow up. So maybe you can’t tell a story about a narcissistic white boy widening his lens without showing a lot of that narcissism first—and it ain’t always pretty to watch. But Me and Earl is far from a celebration of missing out on the depth and complexity of the people around you. It’s a reminder that a life spent skimming the surface of those people is an opportunity missed. CW

ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL

BBB Thomas Mann Olivia Cooke RJ Cyler Rated PG-13

TRY THESE The Breakfast Club (1985) Judd Nelson Molly Ringwald Rated R

Fun Size (2012) Victoria Justice Thomas Mann Rated PG-13

The Fault in Our Stars (2014) Shailene Woodley Ansel Elgort Rated PG-13

The Town That Dreaded Sundown (2014) Addison Timlin Veronica Cartwright Rated R


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. A LITTLE CHAOS BBB.5 There are no dragons or magic here, but this delightful film is historical fantasy nevertheless, of a very welcome sort. In 1682 Paris, King Louis XIV is planning his palace at Versailles, and royal landscape architect André Le Notre must deliver something divine. So he takes a chance and dares to hire, for one section of the gardens, freelancer Sabine De Barra (Kate Winslet). This is no job for a woman, and indeed, there was no female garden designer at Versailles. But so what? Sabine may be a glorious dream, but her plight seems awfully familiar to women today; there are men here who scoff, who see her as encroaching on territory that is rightfully male. But this isn’t a political film. It’s pure entertainment: romantic, funny, smart, wise and just plain different. Alan Rickman’s second outing as director is a romp filled with actors who are a joy to spend time with: The always magnificent Winslet; Stanley Tucci, stealing the movie as the King’s brother, outrageously and hilariously; everybody’s new boyfriend Matthias Schoenaerts is Andre Le Notre; and Rickman himself an absolute treat as Louis XIV. Opens June 26 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

(DIS)HONESTY At Main Library, June 30, 7 p.m. (NR) POPEYE At Tower Theatre, June 26-27 @ 11 p.m. & June 28 @ noon. (PG) FILMQUEST FILM FESTIVAL At Megaplex Jordan Commons, through 27. (NR) GOD HELP THE GIRL At Red Butte Gardens, July 1, dusk. (NR) ZACK AND MIRI MAKE A PORNO At Brewvies, June 29, 10 p.m. (R)

INSIDE OUT BBBB Any adult basing their “should I see this” decision on commercials has no idea how much emotional complexity director Pete Docter has packed into this terrific adventure, which imagines the emotional “control room” inside an 11-year-old girl whose family has just moved to a new city. The fanciful scenario allows the animators to craft a fantastically detailed world that pops with its own perfect internal logic. Yet, as terrific a technical achievement as it might be, it’s even better at addressing how parents deal with the reality of children transitioning into the more complicated emotional life of adolescence. There’s plenty of fun to be found in the characters and voice performances, but whatever it offers to kids is nothing compared to what Pixar films continue to deliver for adults: storytelling that nails the defining lump-in-the-throat moments of human experience. (PG)—SR

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 25, 2015 | 41

THE STRONGEST MAN BB.5 It’s not easy to find the ideal dosage of cinematic eccentricity, and former Salt Laker Kenny Riches weaves back and forth over the line between just right and waaaaay too much. The story focuses on Beef (Robert Lorie), a Cuban-American construction worker in Miami who winds up on a quest for his stolen BMX bike. That echo of Pee-wee’s Big Adventure may actually be one of the more conventional elements Riches employs, in a story that also involves glowing-eyed creatures that appear in the middle of the road and meditations about spirit animals. Yet Riches also finds some solid bits of deadpan comedy in the Jared Hess vein, an intriguing sub-

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

DOPE BBB Drawing on 1980s Spike Lee, 1990s Quentin Tarantino and Risky Business is bound to result in something at least a little fragmented, but it’s a lot of fun watching those fragments find a shape. Shameik Moore plays Malcolm, a straight-A high-school senior from the rough streets of Inglewood, Calif., who discovers a load of drugs hidden in his backpack, making him first a target, then, by necessity, an entrepreneur. Rick Famuyiwa digs deep into the smart dialogue of his 1990s hip-hop obsessed protagonists, including a few classic exchanges pivoting around everything from drone strikes to the definition of a “slippery slope.” He also tries to keep a lot of plates spinning: African-American youth identity, a romantic subplot, poking at social-media culture, etc. The lively performances and funky comic energy keep it hopping, even while it’s hopping all over the place. (R)—SR

ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL BBB See review p. 40. Opens June 26 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

TED 2 [not yet reviewed] The sentient stuffed bear (Seth MacFarlane) and his best friend (Mark Wahlberg) fight for him to be recognized as a legal person. Opens June 26 at theaters valleywide. (R)

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MAX BB.5 There’s some deeply weird stuff going on around the edges of what is otherwise a standard coming-of-age/boy-and-his-dog story, about a Marine-trained German shepherd named Max, whose handler is killed in action in Kandahar, and who is brought back stateside to Texas to be taken in by the dead soldier’s family: his tough, wounded veteran dad (Thomas Haden Church), patient mom (Lauren Graham), and younger brother, Justin (Hellion’s talented Josh Wiggins). Director/co-writer Boaz Yakin offers up just enough flag-waving and God-talking to indicate he’s aiming squarely for the heartland, while also dropping into the middle of it a startlingly cynical perspective on the way nations use soldiers. And while there’s solid material here about troubled Justin learning responsibility even as he discovers romance and hard truths about the world, it’s also a movie that spends much of its running time on an illegal international arms deal, and shows Max as a dog who makes independent tactical decisions to gain strategic advantage over another dog. The solid construction of the suspense-thriller elements only make it feel stranger that, deep down, Max doesn’t want us to think of it as a suspense thriller. Opens June 26 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Scott Renshaw

plot involving the conflicts between Beef’s Korean-American best friend Conan (Paul Chamberlain) and his family, and occasional blissful moments like a fantasized conversation between Beef and his long-unrequited-love, Illi (Ashly Burch) that takes place over a tin-can-and-string telephone. It’s uneven, goofy and personal, in all the ways that independent comedy can be both delightful and occasionally befuddling. Opens June 26 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

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ESCOBAR: PARADISE LOST (not reviewed) A young Canadian (Josh Hutcherson) gets caught up in the dangerous world of drug kingpin Pablo Escobar (Benicio Del Toro). Opens June 26 at Megaplex St. George. (R)

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JURASSIC WORLD BB.5 The message in this latest visit with cloned dinosaurs seems to be: “We all loved Jurassic Park, too, so don’t pay too much attention to what’s actually here.” Director Colin Trevorrow posits a functioning dino-amusement park, where administrator Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard), raptor trainer Owen (Chris Pratt) and 20,000 park guests face the consequences of genetically engineering an even more badass Tyrannosaurus rex variant. The action is serviceable and lively enough when prehistoric creatures chow down, and there’s a cynically accurate view of the theme-park industry. But that same cynicism pervades the script, which provides constant reminders of the bottom-line reasons this movie exists at all. Loaded with half-explored subplots and gender politics that were retro in 1993, it shrugs its shoulders at trying to be anything but a nostalgia-pandering, still-occasionally-fun thing to put on T-shirts at Universal Studios. (PG-13)—SR

THE WOLFPACK BBB A great subject isn’t the same as a great story. Crystal Moselle’s subject is the six Angulo brothers, raised in a New York City apartment their controlling father almost never allows them to leave, with movies their primary exposure to the world. There’s so much fascinating material in simply observing the brothers— including their line-for-line re-enactments of their favorite movies—that the first hour is engrossing simply trying to understand their lives, and decode their mother’s references to “more rules for me than there were for [the kids].” But while the enigmatic father’s non-presence through much of the movie creates mystery, Moselle doesn’t find a clear narrative arc, since much of the brothers’ growing independence was in motion before she began filming. It’s a fascinating in-the-moment experience; it’s also hard not to wish for a bit more resonance. (R)—SR

42 | JUNE 25, 2015

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LOVE & MERCY AA.5 Director Bill Pohlad splits his story of founding Beach Boy Brian Wilson into intertwined parts: circa-1965 Brian (Paul Dano) exploring musical creativity while facing the first indications of mental illness; and circa-late-’80s Brian (John Cusack) under the domineering care of psychiatrist Eugene Landy (Paul Giamatti). Pohland and his screenwriters show some visual spark by opening with almost avant-garde layering of sound over a black screen, and the “good times” montage you’d expect to find in the second act. But despite Dano’s effective performance as the younger Brian, the film sags whenever it turns to the conventional rhythms of the conflicts between Landy and Brian’s girlfriend Melinda (Elizabeth Banks) over Brian’s well-being, and to efforts by Cusack that fall well outside his comfortable range. The events of Brian Wilson’s later life make for more obvious drama, but a lesser movie. (PG-13)—SR

SPY AAA.5 Writer/director Paul Feig crafts a sneakily subversive movie that confronts issues of women’s confidence and men’s arrogance— all while being funny as hell. At first, it looks like a simple spoof of secret-agent adventures, with Melissa McCarthy as Susan Cooper, a CIA desk-jockey who heads out into the field after the identities of field agents are compromised, to track a suitcase nuke that may end up in the hands of terrorists. The male characters here—including Jason Statham, hilariously sending up his onscreen persona—underestimate women to, ultimately, their own detriment, and the women end up overcoming the preconceptions about what they’re capable of in glorious ways. The few bits of gross-out humor are unnecessary, but they don’t overwhelm the rest of the genuinely clever humor, or Feig’s sympathetic, witty approach to the particular battles professional women fight. (R)—MAJ

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THEATER DIRECTORY SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

JUNE 25, 2015 | 43

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com

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Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com


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4 | JUNE 25, 2015

TRUE BY B I L L F R O S T @bill_frost

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Humans is creepy, Zoo is dumb and Extant might redeem itself yet. Under the Dome Thursday, June 25 (CBS)

Season Premiere: On a new night, opposite a better mystery series that’s actually providing answers and staying true to its one-season-and-done mission, Wayward Pines—dick move, Under the Dome. Season 3 finds the townsfolk of Chester’s Mill on both sides of the bubble, with new characters joining the mix, and maybe some more clues and … to quote Peter Griffin, “Oh my god, who the hell cares?!” Just watch Wayward Pines, instead.

Teen Beach 2 Friday, June 26 (Disney)

Movie: I know what you’re thinking: “Wait, I haven’t seen Teen Beach—how will I be able to follow Teen Beach 2?” Easy: In 2013’s Teen Beach, Brady (Ross Lynch) and Mack (Maia Mitchell) wiped out while surfing and were magically transported into the 1962 summer flick—wait for it—Wet Side Story; much singing and dancing ensued. Now, in Teen Beach 2, the gang from Wet Side Story have suddenly appeared in Brady and Mack’s modern real world (yes, they made it back at the end of Teen Beach—keep up) and your little sister is going to lose her damned mind. I know that you’re also thinking, “Hey, has there ever been an adult film called Wet Side Story?” and the answer is, surprisingly, no.

Humans Sunday, June 28 (AMC)

Series Debut: It’s not the future; it’s a “parallel present”(?). Whenever it is, Humans is a British production, which means a more subtle take on sci-fi than ’Merican fare: A busy suburban London couple (Tom Goodman-Hill and Katherine Parkinson) buy a refurbished “Synth” (a humanlike robot servant, Anita, played by Gemma Chan) who displays flashes of organic emotion and passive-aggressive tendencies (never, ever buy “refurbished”—that’s eBay 101). Anita’s not the only Synth developing feelings, and— shades of another Brit series, Black Mirror—the eight-episode Humans is chillingly effective at both pointing out the possibilities of technology and questioning our over reliance on it. It’s also creepy enough to hold you over until the premiere of Fear the Walking Dead (whenever that is).

Zoo Tuesday, June 30 (CBS)

Series Debut: Meanwhile, back in the U.S. of A., the best we can come up with is an “animal uprising”—based on a James Patterson book, no less. In Zoo, James Wolk plays … I can’t believe I’m about to type this … “renegade zoologist” Jackson Oz … the first to make the connection between an uptick in critter-on-people violence and his father’s “crazy” theories about human extinction at the paws of fed-up animals. What follows is more dumb, expensivelooking proof that CBS should stay well away from sci-fi (see also: Under the Dome, Extant), but you likely already made up your mind, one way or the other, back at the first mention of “James Patterson.”

Scream Tuesday, June 30 (MTV)

Series Debut: As a movie franchise, Scream slid hard from great idea (the 1996 original) to tired asterisk (2011’s Scream 4), so how’s MTV going to rehab it as a series? By adding a socialmedia angle and aiming it at the Teen Wolf crowd. Now, stoopid programming for tweens can still be entertaining (for example: I’m currently hooked on ABC Family’s new Stitchers, which could be the most ridiculous show the network has ever produced—and that’s saying something). But this Scream is more straight-up slasher-flick drama with, admittedly, genuine scares, but little of the humor and the self-aware winks that Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson introduced in ’96. Then again, the intended audience wasn’t even born then, so …

Humans (AMC) Extant Wednesday, July 1 (CBS)

Season Premiere: Yes, really. Last summer’s debut season of Extant was technically a hit, even if everyone was just tuning in to watch incredulously as Halle Berry slogged through her most WTF? role since Catwoman. Season 2 picks up six months after Not Without My Space Baby, with ex-astronaut Molly Woods (Berry) escaping a psychiatric hospital to investigate a series of murders seemingly carried out by the aliens she thought she’d stopped from invading Earth. In keeping with Extant’s promise of a “sexier, edgier” season, Molly’s boring husband (Goran Visnjic) has been sidelined in favor of a roguish bounty hunter (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) with a Fox Mulder-like taste for weird cases, and the new partnership actually produces some sparks. Ignoring remnants like Molly’s annoying robo-kid (seriously, just return him to SkyMall), Extant might just redeem itself this season. I can’t believe I just typed that, either. CW Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.


STEVE “DADDY-O” WILLIAMS

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“It’s a big loss,” he says, shaking his head. “I feel terrible about it, but there’s nothing I can do, because I’m done. I’ve got to move on.” So far, no Utah stations have proposed a replacement program. In the event that they do, Williams says he’s happy to help, but worries that such a development is a long way off. “If somebody comes along and tells me, ‘Hey Steve, we’re going to try and get a jazz program going again, are you available to help us organize this thing,’ then, yeah, I’m available,” he says. “But for crying out loud, we’ve got to have a station first.” However, Williams clarifies, he’s certainly not interested in hosting: “My wife would kill me.” In the meantime, Williams plans to stay quite busy, both in the world of jazz and the world at large. He and his wife, Vicki, will begin retirement next month on NPR host Diane Rehm’s Bordeaux River Cruise, courtesy of KUER. Upon returning, Williams plans to rejoin the staff of Excellence in the Community as an emcee and fundraiser. The goal is to provide free outdoor jazz concerts at least three times a week, he says. “I’ve still got work to do. I’m not giving up yet,” Williams says. “I want to be busy.” Williams will also continue emceeing the GAM Foundation’s regular concerts at the Capitol Theatre while pursuing personal jazz projects. Currently in the works is a four-disc collection of jazz tunes named after food and beverages, presented in order as a five-course meal, and a television pilot exploring jazz festivals around the world. At nearly 70, Williams is looking forward to being busy on his own schedule. Still, he says, leaving is bittersweet. “I’ve been lucky to be able to do this,” he says, “and now it’s time for me to do other stuff. But how could you not love this job? How could I not miss this?” CW

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here’s a light in the window of the Dolores Doré Eccles Broadcast Center. It’s nearly midnight, and KUER 90.1’s employees have been gone for hours. Custodial has come and gone; security is getting sleepy. Every door in the building is locked. But someone has to hold down the fort, right? For decades, public-radio veteran Steve “Daddy-O” Williams has kept KUER swinging late into the night. His Nighttime Jazz program, which runs from 8 p.m. until midnight, is one of the station’s most unique and celebrated offerings. But after 30 years in the studio, Williams is turning off the light—and this time, it’s for good. At the epicenter of Utah’s jazz community, Williams leaves behind a rich legacy of involvement, creation and collaboration. In addition to emceeing jazz concerts and festivals throughout Utah and beyond, Williams helped found and organize several festivals of his own, including the popular Salt Lake City International Jazz Festival and the now-defunct Snowbird Jazz and Blues Festival. The host is also a co-founder of Excellence in the Community, a local nonprofit organization dedicated to providing frequent and accessible public performances. But perhaps Williams’ most important work has taken place within the four walls of “Cell Block 101,” Williams’ affectionately (and aptly) nicknamed broadcasting studio. The solitary host manages his program in its entirety, working his own soundboard while spinning out an organic set list of tracks chosen on the spot. A self-professed old-timer, Williams eschews MP3 files in favor of physical CDs. Songs are chosen from the stacks of brightly colored jewel cases littering the studio and filling the station’s library. All told, Williams estimates 90.1 owns over 20,000 jazz CDs. “They’re all I know. I don’t know how to bring anything through this,” he says, waving vaguely at the colony of monitors populating his desk. “For me, it would be too hard to find the songs. I never know what I’m playing next. How am I going to find it looking through [the computer]? Are you kidding me?” Williams’ programming springs from varied inspirations, including musicians’ birthdays, anniversaries and upcoming stops in Salt Lake City. His set lists straddle the line between continuity and variety, segueing from cherished classics to zany deep cuts and back again. “I look at it as a piece of creative art,” Williams says of each show’s carefully selected content. “It’s a musical collage.” Throughout his three decades as jazz director, Williams has made a point of introducing audiences to lesser-known jazz iterations and subgenres. From big band to bebop to souped-up classical standards, the program’s expanse draws from nearly every corner of the jazz world. “I mix in a lot of stuff,” Williams says. “People say, ‘Is that jazz?’ But, hey, I say jazz is a big tent.” With Williams’ departure from the scene, the rickety tent that is jazz seems less stable than ever. Rather than hiring a new program host, KUER has elected to pull Nighttime Jazz from the airwaves after Williams’ final sign-off on June 30, leaving a significant void in the ever-shrinking field of quality jazz radio programming. While Williams stands by the station’s decision, he called the programming deficit “troubling.”


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Cosmic Wheels

With a new singer, L.A. funk/ soul/groove merchants Orgone emerge from the cosmic energy of decades past. BY MARC HANSON comments@cityweekly.net

I

f you’re part of the Generation X demographic and had hip older siblings, parents or the occasional stoner uncle, you likely had that sacred, transcendental experience of discovering a stash of old vinyl. Because they’re staples, you immediately accepted the Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin and Rush albums. If you grew up in Utah, you may have had to cast aside the records whose jackets featured the porcelain-toothed grin of the Osmonds (at least until discovering the cheese-rock goodness of Crazy Horses). If those relatives or friends were really hip, you’d be left with a slick stack of glitzy curiosities from Earth, Wind & Fire or Tower of Power where afros abound—even on some white dudes—and they looked, for the time, cool in platform shoes that peeked from wide silk cuffs tapering up to an impossibly tight constriction. And then there’s the titillating, ass-shaped “W” in the Average White Band’s logo. Innocently, you threw one of those funky platters on the turntable. When the needle dropped, a sonic lasso shot out of the speakers’ tattered grill-cloth, tightened around your hips, and the rhythms took over. You’d discovered groove—the domain of Los Angeles-based Orgone. Formed back in 2000 by Sergio Rios (guitar) and Dan Hastie (keys), the octet is rounded out by six additional soul-devoted musicians with impressive resumes. Members of Orgone have performed with Al Green, Gil Scott-Heron, Thievery Corporation and The Roots. Most of the band served as the backing band for Alicia Keys on her watershed album As I Am and on CeeLo Green’s Grammywinning song “Fool for You.” Orgone takes their name from the word meaning a hypothetical cosmic unit of energy. It’s an apt name for a band that seems to effortlessly invoke that gritty, humid funk that crackled from the stylus decades ago,

Orgone: Life force of the universe

but still manages to keep a fresh sparkle over the sound to hook the more modern ear. The band is touring behind their seventh release, Beyond the Sun—their first for esteemed indie label Shanachie Records, and the debut of new vocalist Adryon de León. Like the soul queens of the past, de León easily goes from delicate emotion to ferocious power with charismatic swagger. “My parents both sang,” says de León. “My mom had her own girl group … but it’s that same clichéd story of ‘keep your work or your group.’ She chose work and family.” Like any good, God-fearing mother, de León’s mama took her family to a Baptist church every Sunday. De León developed her vocal chops there during the raucous, spirited church services. “We’re talking full-on howling in the aisles—everyone has a tambourine in the choir. My cousin would be on the organ, my other cousin would be on drums.” Beyond the Sun is jammed with tracks that have a classic, organic quality—like the pumping disco beat of the first single, “Sweet Feet.” Orgone uses vintage instruments to achieve a sound that sits nicely alongside the classics from the late ’60s and early ’70s, but with a little more clarity from the advancement of modern technology. “[We] have very strong influences from the past,” says de León. “When we create the music, we want to keep the integrity of those influences while creating our own sound.” Orgone is known for their relentless touring, and their eighth stop on this current leg will be at The State Room in Salt Lake City, where they’ve performed a handful of times in the past. With a fresh album and a hard-touring work ethic, what lies ahead for Orgone, and the newest member of their traveling funk circus? “You’re always wanting to look forward,” says de León “Personally, for myself, I’m always writing lyrics down and other ideas trying to keep things going … nothing specific, just keeping those wheels going.” CW

ORGONE

w/ The Nth Power Friday, June 26 The State Room 638 S. State 9:00 p.m. $23 TheStateRoom.com


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Canadian electronic music duo Adventure Club started out like Skrillex—in the pop-punk/ emo/screamo/post-hardcore/whatever world. Then they packed up their guitars and became DJs and producers. They haven’t completely abandoned that world, however, as some of their more notable remixes include songs by Alexisonfire, Thrice and Brand New. Nor do they limit themselves; they’ve also made tracks by Metric and the Shangri-Las all dubsteppy and stuff. The latter is one of the coolest remixes you’ll ever hear. It strikes the same emotional tone as the original, only as though the heartbreak came from Chappie as opposed to Mary Weiss. Park City Live, 427 Main, 8 p.m., $30-60, ParkCityLive.net

FRIDAY 6.26

JESSICA HERNANDEZ & THE DELTAS

If Duffy, or maybe Amy Winehouse, ever fronted an indie folk band—and they had a thing for ’50s greaser culture—you’d have Jessica Hernandez and the Deltas. It’s an inspired combination. Hernandez has pipes that could shatter the thick safety glass at a payday loan establishment (from the force, not necessarily the pitch) and her brassy soul power pairs well with the bobby socks and hot rods. The indie folk part is subtler, and more of a vibe. It flares in the low-mixed brass on “Sorry I Stole Your Man” and flickers in “Caught Up” and “Tired Oak.” But it’s the electric piano and surf-guitar tones that really propel the tunes, which will have you dancing like you’re on the beach in a B-movie. Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15 in advance, $18 day of, TheUrbanLoungeSLC. com

SHOOTER JENNINGS & WAYMORE’S OUTLAWS

Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas

S h o o t e r ’s the son of one of country music’s greatest outlaws, Waylon Jennings. In fact, he’s Waylon, Jr., and he looks so much like his pop that he

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portrayed him in the 2005 film Walk the Line. Like his father, Shooter writes gritty, vivid tunes and has a whiskeydrenched drawl. Sometimes Shooter’s country gets a little more rockin’, but for the most part he’s a chip off the old block. It’s fitting, then, that on this show Shooter will be backed by daddy’s band: Waymore’s Outlaws. They’re playing covers—not just Waylon Sr. stuff, either. They throw in some Rodney Crowell, Billy Joe Shaver, Bob Dylan, Ramones and really obscure stuff. But Shooter’s a fine songwriter in his own right, as he’s been proving even since he started Puttin’ the “O” Back in Country (Lost Highway) in 2005. Locals Matthew & The Hope and Ghostowne open. The Royal, 4760 S. 900 East, 8 p.m., $25 in advance, $30 day of, TheRoyalSLC.com

SATURDAY 6.27

Check this out: The Royal Southern Brotherhood features a Neville (Cyril), a Vaughan (Trevor, son of Jimmie/nephew of Stevie Ray), a member of the Screamin’ Cheetah Wheelies (Bart Walker), a member of the Derek Trucks Band (Yonrico Scott)—and one Charlie Wooton (side/session guy). That doesn’t leave much guessing as to what sort of music this supergroup plays. Blues rock would and should be the first surmise, because every one of these cats comes from that background, despite also playing funk, soul, zydeco and blues in other parts of their careers. Which is great, because their second album, Don’t Look Back (Ruf)

Adventure Club isn’t just a bunch of sound-alike tracks like a lot of blues-rock albums tend to be. Zydeco pops up on “Bayou Baby,” slowjam soul on “Better Half,” and even “Don’t Look Back” starts out a downtempo blues boo-hoo, veers into bluegrass, then back to come-to-Jesus blues, then the blues and the ‘grass dovetail together. That’s why poet/ activist/MC5 manager John Sinclair said, “The music these men make together draws on their richly various experience … but it’s blended into a single tightly focused form of timeless Southern expression known as blues-rock, and they play the living hell out of it.” Utah Arts Festival (Amphitheater Stage), 200 E. 400 South, 9:45 p.m., » $12 (kids free), UAF.org

Shoooter Jennings

THE ROYAL SOUTHERN BROTHERHOOD

COURTESY PHOTO

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It’s hard to imagine there’s much crossover between the fandoms of the deep-but-geeky Toad the Wet Sprocket, cartoonish Smash Mouth and Tonic. Tonic’s debut album Lemon Parade was a musical bait-and-switch. Their hit, “If You Could Only See,” straddled Dishwalla alt-pop and Bush’s grunge lite, but the rest of the record presaged the current is-it-rock-orcountry balladry (Daughtry, et al.). And I swear, every Smash Mouth song sounds like a Sunny D commercial. No hate; just sayin’. Gotta admit, though, that I love me some Toad the Wet Sprocket—I give not one effwerd what anybody thinks. New Constellation (Abe’s Records, 2013) is their first album of new music since 1997, and shows songwriters Glen Phillips and Todd Nichols are still consummate tunesmiths— which fans believed all along. That’s why the album’s Kickstarter project sought a measly $50,000, and brought in over five times that amount. A brand-new EP, Architect of the Ruin, came out in early June, and represents a burst of creativity for the band, and includes “So Long Sunny,” one of the happiest songs they’ve ever put out. Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City, 7 p.m., $40-75, DeerValley.com

WEDNESDAY 7.1 ROSE’S PAWN SHOP

Wouldn’t it be hysterical to start a tradition at Rose’s Pawn Shop shows where everyone tosses some kind of pawn-shop owner’s worst nightmare onstage? Crappy old guitars, cubic zirconia rings, cheap cordless drills, a book of 360 CDs with no cover art? Maybe they wouldn’t appreciate that. Maybe we should talk about their sublime vocal harmonies and picking prowess—or singer-songwriter Paul Givant’s songs, which traipse into folk, country, bluegrass and rockabilly territory but stand firmly in the crowd-pleasing bar rock vibe. The band’s third album, Gravity Well (RosesPawnShop.com) is due Sept. 9. The Garage on Beck, 1199 Beck St., 9 p.m., $5, GarageOnBeck.com

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THURSDAY 6.25 LIVE MUSIC

Adventure Club, Gazzo (Park City Live, see p. 48) Claire Elise, Goldmyth, Carrie Myers (Kilby Court) Corey Christiansen Organ Trio (Gallivan Center, see p. 45) Jack Beats (Sky) Jelly Bread (Newpark Town Center) Legion, Kaustik (Metro Bar) Rob Thomas, Plain White T’s, Vinyl Station (Red Butte Garden) The Sindicate (The Woodshed) Tavaputs, Of Course Of Course (The Urban Lounge)

DJ

Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door)

FRIDAY 6.26 LIVE MUSIC

Chris Collins and Boulder Canyon (Egyptian Theatre)

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

SATURDAY 6.27 Tyler, The Creator

So maybe there are two Tyler, the Creators (Tylers, the Creator?): The one offending giant swaths of people with violent raps against … well, everyone. There is also the energetic, approachable and personable Tyler, who chats with fans at concerts and sends high school seniors quotes for their yearbooks. The guy is a wild performer, throwing his body around the stage with as much force as he throws his rhymes. He has gotten into some legal trouble for incitement—he was arrested for allegedly starting a riot at SXSW in 2014. His new album, Cherry Bomb (Odd Future), is fierce, jazzy and has an unholy sense of humor. He’s bringing fellow rapper Taco along with him to open the show. (Tiffany Frandsen) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $25, TheComplexSLC.com

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July 10: L’Anarchiste Album Release July 30: FREE SHOW After Twilight Party July 11: Rocky Votolato with Matty Mo July 12: Frontier Ruckus July 31: Max Pain & The Groovies July 14: Lissie Aug 1: A.A. Bondy July 15: The Appleseed Cast Aug 4: Your Meteor Tour Send Off July 16: FREE SHOW Slug Localized Aug 5: FREE SHOW Grand Banks July 17: The Adolescents Aug 6: Lee Gallagher July 21: Crook & The Bluff Aug 7: Dubwise with Metaphase July 22: Benefit Show: Homo Leviticus, Aug 8: Dusky Johnny Slaughter, the Bipolar Aug 13: Tinariwen Express Aug 18: KMFDM July 23: Slim Cessna’s Auto Club July 25: Torche + Melt Banana July 26: TBA July 27: Andrea Gibson July 28: Lower Dens July 29: Unknown Mortal Orchestra

Aug 31: Millencollin Sept 1: Babes In Toyland Sept 12: Bowling For Soup Sept 20: The Vibrators Sept 24: A Place To Bury Strangers Oct 7: Gardens & Villa Oct 14: Destroyer Oct 16: IAMX Oct 29: Albert Hammond Jr Nov 2: Heartless Bastards

JUNE 25, 2015 | 53

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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

FRIDAY 6.26

Sneaky Pete & the Secret Weapons

The mountain funk music of Jackson Hole’s Sneaky Pete & the Secret Weapons is electrifying, savagely jammy and groovily gritty. Eyes closed, you may feel transported to an urban sidewalk in the ‘70s, surrounded by psychedelic headbands and tight, flare pants. Eyes open, it’s still not far off, with vocalist and trumpeter Bobby Griffith’s curly afro and super trooper ‘stache. Their live show is steamy—with bass-slap on “Jackson Stomp” and afro-funk percussion on “Reckless Ways.” You’re going to have to leave the kids home this time (it’s a 21+ show), but teach those youngsters something about funk and play The Weapons’ crowdfunded debut album, Breakfast (on their own label, SPSW) for them at home. (Tiffany Frandsen) O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $5, OPRockwell.com

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Granger Smith, Earl Dibbles, Jr. (The Complex) Henry Wade (Garage on Beck) I The Mighty, Hail The Sun, Too Close To Touch (The Loading Dock) Radio Moscow, Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas (The Urban Lounge, see p. 48) June Brothers, Michelle Moonshine (Garage on Beck) The LACS (The Westerner) Low Roar, Little Barefoot (Kilby Court) Matt Borden (Flanagans) Orgone, The Nth Power (The State Room, see p. 46) The Royal Southern Brotherhood, Erin Harpe & the Delta Swingers (Utah Arts Festival) Sneaky Pete & The Secret Weapons (O.P. Rockwell) Soulville (Burt’s Tiki Lounge) Whistling Rufus (Sugarhouse Coffee) Zombie Cock (The Woodshed)

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54 | JUNE 25, 2015

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SATURDAY 6.27 LIVE MUSIC

Aaron Gillespie, Nathan Hussey (Music Garage) Allen Stone (Park City Live) Brynn Elliott & Allen Stone (Park City Live) “Fare Thee Well” Grateful Dead Simulcast (The State Room) Fictionist (Daybreak Music Festival) Flash & Flare, Mr. Vandal, Gravy.Tron (The Urban Lounge) Joy Spring Band (Sugarhouse Coffee) Juana Ghani (Utah Arts Festival) Paul Revere’s Raiders and Mitch Ryder (Ed Kenley Amphitheater) Phoenix Rising (Hog Wallow Pub) Thalgora (Murray Theater) Thunderdog, Color Animal, Strong Words (Garage on Beck) Trails and Ways, Waterstrider, RKDN (Kilby Court) Tyler, The Creator; Taco (The Complex, see p. 53)

DJ

Chaseone2 (Gracie’s) DJ E-Flexx (Sandy Station) DJ Marshall Aaron (Sky) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Elvis Freshly (Cisero’s)

SUNDAY 6.28 LIVE MUSIC

Mark Farina (Garage on Beck) Lil’ Ed, The Blues Imperials, Shaky Trade (Utah Arts Festival) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub)

KARAOKE

Entourage Karaoke (Piper Down) DJ Ducky & Mandrew (Jam) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed) KJ Sparetire (The Century Club) Sunday Funday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon)

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MONDAY 6.29 LIVE MUSIC

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TUESDAY 6.30 LIVE MUSIC

Candy’s River House (Hog Wallow Pub) Scott H Biram (The Urban Lounge) St. Regis Big Stars (Deer Valley)

6.27 Phoenix Rising

7.03 Riverhouse Band

DJ Stereo Sparks (Cisero’s)

WEDNESDAY 7.1 LIVE MUSIC

Breakers, Quiet Oaks, Strange Family (The Urban Lounge) John Davis (Hog Wallow Pub) Kayo Dot, Dust Moth (Kilby Court) Rose’s Pawn Shop (Garage on Beck, see p. 49)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

7.02 Rick Gerber

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6.26 Tony Holiday & the Velvetones

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ESCORTS


© 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. "Kapow!" 2. Title Inuit of a 1922 film classic 3. Lumber dimensions 4. President after Geo. and John 5. Exclamation at a lineup 6. Size up 7. End of an Aesop fable 8. Avaricious 9. Permit 10. Cream the final

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

11. 2000 comedy with the tagline "The greatest 58. Christmas tree college tradition of all time" 60. "Now is the winter of ____ discontent ..." 12. Letter before zeta 61. "America's Got Talent" network 13. Easter basket item 18. 6-ft. WNBA player's pos., perhaps 22. Monogram of 1964's Nobel Peace laureate 25. Get well 26. Not ____ many words 27. Makes flush 29. Go for 32. Hunk's pride 33. Light start? 35. Nod, perhaps 36. ID'd 37. "Argo" setting 38. Pixar title character 39. Coffeehouse server 40. Got nothing but net 44. Outpourings 45. "Boy, am ____ trouble!" 47. Loses, as by surgery 48. See 49-Down 49. Baseball's 48-Down Park at ____ Yards 51. 19th-century German poet Heinrich 52. Insurance giant 53. Word after sleeping or shopping 56. Small snack

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Vane dir. 4. Not us 8. Shone dazzlingly 14. Japanese "yes" 15. "____ Silver, away!" 16. Xerox a Xerox, say 17. Promising prospect 19. Sergeant's order 20. Big name in applesauce 21. Embassy VIP 23. "Look what ____!" 24. Comedian Jay 25. Difficult engagement 28. Lets go through 29. See 30-Across: Abbr. 30. Jon ____, former 29-Across from Arizona 31. Baseball's Maris, to pals 32. Wild thing 34. It might read “Happy Birthday!” 36. Getting in touch with again, say ... or how to write in the answers at 17-, 25-, 50- and 59-Across 39. Gloria Gaynor's "I Will Survive," originally 41. Memorable hurricane of 2011 42. Plant bristle 43. TV franchise since 2000 46. Wake-up times, for short 47. Ad ____ committee 50. Ragtime instrument 53. Actress Theda who played Cleopatra 54. "Interesting ..." 55. Hydrocarbon suffix 56. "SNL" alumna Pedrad 57. Short ____ 59. Like a troublemaker 62. Adjective for a bikini, in a 1960 song 63. Well-worn pencils 64. Suffix with glob 65. Venomous serpents 66. Eyebrow shape 67. Number of Canadian provinces

SUDOKU

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58 | JUNE 25, 2015

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industry. “We offer a consultative approach that aligns our clients’ needs, wants and preferences with the absolute best translation quality and language technology solutions available,” says Broderick. The company takes a proactive approach to its relationship with clients by advising best practices, keeping them up-to-date on global market trends and offering advice on how to best manage their international growth. “We truly focus on partnership,” says Broderick. “Their success is our success.” The inWhatLanguage staff shares Broderick’s enthusiasm for their work. “With technology bringing people all over the world together, the services we provide at inWhatLanguage are vital in helping bridge the communication gap,” says inWhatLanguage employee Brian Palmer. “I enjoy being part of that.” In addition to direct translation services, inWhatLanguage offers clients their own cloud-based translation management platform, Unify, as a way to manage the entire life cycle of a translation project. This platform gives clients control and transparency over the entire translating process. inWhatLanguage also sells the platform to allow any organization a way to better manage their global translation and international communication needs. Broderick credits the company’s success to its corporate culture. “We are committed to continual improvement, both internally and externally, as we engage with nonprofits to make our community and world better place[s],” explains Broderick. In addition to looking for ways to improve processes in sales, marketing, operations and software solutions, the teams at inWhatLanguage also give back to the Salt Lake City community by sponsoring coat drives, food drives and sponsoring needy families near Christmas and Thanksgiving. n

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

echnology is making the world a smaller place, especially the business world. inWhatLanguage, a Salt Lake City-based business, is helping entrepreneurs navigate that smaller world. inWhatLanguage is a language translation company that started as a way for the world’s top organizations to quickly, easily and accurately translate and adapt documents, websites, software, mobile apps and other types of content for international markets. With more than 5,000 linguists on staff in over 125 countries, inWhatLanguage has the ability to translate in over 160 languages. “Our primary objective is to help our clients improve their brand, product loyalty, customer engagement and overall return on investment in Europe, Asia and the Americas,” explains Chief Executive Officer Cody Broderick. Broderick founded the company nearly five years ago, but he has been in the language-translation industry for nearly 10 years. The team assembled by inWhatLanguage is similarly impressive—more than 40 years of experience in managing projects ranging in cost from $50 to more then $5 million. Some of inWhatLanguage’s clients include Xerox, Disney, Apple, FIFA, Pfizer, Harvard University and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. inWhatLangauge works with companies that are emerging, as well as Fortune 500 enterprises; no translation project is too big or too small. “There are only a handful of companies in the world that offer the technology solutions and expertise that we do,” says Broderick. “We have a very strong value proposition and ability to easily integrate and automate with the world’s most common website and technology platforms.” Broderick believes inWhatLanguage is a clear-cut leader in the language translation

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Say, You’ll Love Sayulita I

’m on vacation on the Right Coast, and my first stop is the Hamptons. This Long Island enclave is synonymous with New York City pretention a la Gwyneth Paltrow. From the first time I visited last year, I was hooked. Although I’m more of a Montauk kind of girl—I like the ruggedness of its beaches and the isolation of the community—I’ll take East Hampton for a day of shopping. In the Hamptons, you can see Beyoncé riding her bike down a beach lane, while eating a lobster roll with a retired Long Island firefighter at Duryea’s Lobster Deck. I’m sorry to report that I’m not going to be writing about a Salt Lake City shop today, but I want to leave you with some thoughts about travel to a shopping destination in Mexico called Sayulita. The beaches are tranquil, the vibe is authentic, and the shopping is hippie chic. Delta Airlines offers a direct flight to Puerto Vallarta, and it’s an easy 45-minute drive north to the sleepy but stylish jungle surf town of Sayulita. Ditch your car, put on some flip-flops and hop into your golf cart, because Sayulita is best seen at a slow pace. If you like high-rise resorts or condos, don’t bother going. (Better yet, forget I’m writing about this place: surfers and wanderlusters want to keep it their little secret). I’m not embarrassed to say that the main reason I come to Sayulita is for a singular store named Pachamama ( @pachamamasayulita). In my lifetime,

CHRISTA ZARO comments@cityweekly.net

I have been to only a handful of stores that make my heart swoon, and Pachamama is one of them. Owned by the famed French bohemian Mignot sisters, Nathalie and Marie, Pachamama is named after a goddess revered by the indigenous people of the Andes. She is Mother Earth. This store is the epitome of gypset (a portmanteau of jet set + gypsy, “gypset” is a term coined by New York Times columnist Julia Chaplin in her book Gypset Style). The Mignot family sailed the world for 10 years in a wooden boat and collected treasures along the way, finally settling with their children on the best surf beach in Sayulita. The children are surf legends who walk around looking effortlessly chic as if members of an exotic love tribe. Leading up to the store are vibrantly colored dreamcatchers strung with local shells and feathers. A tribal pattern is painted on the shop’s the wooden floor. There are Tahitian pearls strung on leather cord, leather fringed boho-chic satchels, sister-made tie-dye dresses and cover-ups, shirts and bags emblazoned with “Love What You Live” and “Be More Now.” The most important statement piece is an interpretation of a traditional, hand-embroidered Mexican wedding dress (pictured). You, too, can live like a gypsy and rent a room above the boutique at Pachamama Casa Love, or stroll around and enjoy the art gallery. n Follow Christa: @phillytoslc

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Nora Heilman models a hand-embroidered wedding gown at Pachamama


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) During my regular hikes along my favorite trails, I’ve gotten to know the local boulders quite intimately. It might sound daft, but I’ve come to love them. I’ve even given some of them names. They symbolize stability and constancy to me. When I gaze at them or sit on them, I feel my own resolve grow stronger. They teach me about how to be steadfast and unflappable in all kinds of weather. I draw inspiration from the way they are so purely themselves, forever true to their own nature. Now would be an excellent time for you to hang out with your own stony allies, Aries. You could use a boost in your ability to express the qualities they embody.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your symbolic object of the week is a magic wand. I recommend that you visualize yourself as the star of a fairy tale in which you do indeed have a wand at your disposal. See yourself wielding it to carry out a series of fantastic tricks, like materializing a pile of gold coins or giving yourself an extraordinary power to concentrate or creating an enchanted drink that allows you to heal your toughest wound. I think this playful imaginative exercise will subtly enhance your ability to perform actual magic in the real world.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) “I think if we didn’t contradict ourselves, it would be awfully boring,” says author Paul Auster. “It would be tedious to be alive.” But he goes even further in his defense of inconsistency, adding, “Changing your mind is probably one of the most beautiful things people can do.” This bold assertion may not apply to everyone all the time, but it does for you in the coming weeks, Gemini. You should feel free to explore and experiment with the high art of changing your mind. I dare you to use it to generate extravagant amounts of beauty.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The advanced lessons on tap in the coming days are not for the squeamish, the timid, the lazy or the stubborn. But then you’re not any of those things, right? So there shouldn’t be a major problem. The purpose of these subterranean adventures and divine interventions is to teach you to make nerve-wracking leaps of faith, whether or not you believe you’re ready. Here’s one piece of advice that I think will help: Don’t resist and resent the tests as they appear. Rather, welcome them as blessings you don’t understand yet. Be alert for the liberations they will offer.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) In its early days, the band Depeche Mode had the infinitely boring name Composition of Sound. Humphrey Bogart’s and Ingrid Bergman’s classic 1942 film Casablanca was dangerously close to being called Everybody Come to Rick’s. And before Charles Dickens published his novel Bleak House, a scathing critique of the 19th-century British judicial system, he considered 11 other possible titles, including the unfortunate Tom-all-Alone’s. The Solitary House That Was Always Shut Up and Never Lighted. I bring this to your attention, Cancerian, as the seeding phase of your personal cycle gets underway. The imprints you put on your budding creations will have a major impact on their future. Name them well. Give them a potent start.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “Man’s being is like a vast mansion,” observed philosopher Colin Wilson, “yet he seems to prefer to live in a single room in the basement.” Wilson wasn’t just referring to Capricorns. He meant everybody. Most of us commit the sin of self-limitation on a regular basis. That’s the bad news. The good news, Capricorn, is that you’re entering a time when you’re more likely to rebel against the unconscious restrictions you have placed on yourself. You will have extra motivation to question and overrule the rationales that you used in the past to inhibit your primal energy. Won’t it be fun to venture out of your basement nook and go explore the rest of your domain?

JUNE 25, 2015 | 61

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “An obscure moth from Latin America saved Australia’s pasture-land from the overgrowth of cactus,” writes biologist LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) One summer afternoon when I was seven years old, my friend Edward O. Wilson. “A Madagascar ‘weed,’ the rosy periwinkle, Billy and I grabbed an empty jar from my kitchen and went look- provided the cure for Hodgkin’s disease and childhood leuing for ants. Near the creek we found an anthill swarming with kemia,” he adds, while “a chemical from the saliva of leeches black ants, and scooped a bunch of them up in the jar. A little dissolves blood clots during surgery,” and a “Norwegian fungus later, we came upon a caravan of red ants, and shoved many made possible the organ transplant industry.” I think these are of them in with the black ants. Would they fight? Naturally. It all great metaphors for the kind of healing that will be available was mayhem. Looking back now, I’m sorry I participated in that for you in the coming weeks, Aquarius: humble, simple, seemstunt. Why stir up a pointless war? In that spirit, Leo, I urge ingly insignificant things whose power to bring transformation you to avoid unnecessary conflicts. Don’t do anything remotely has, up until now, been secret or unknown. comparable to putting red ants and black ants in the same jar. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “She is hard to tempt, as everything seems to please her equally,” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In order for everyone in your sphere to meet their appointed said artist Anne Raymo in describing a hedonistic acquaintance. destinies, you must cultivate your skills as a party animal. I’m only A similar statement may soon apply to you, Pisces. You will slightly joking. At least for now, it’s your destiny to be the catalyst have a talent for finding amusement in an unusually wide variety of conviviality, the ringleader of the festivities, the engineer of fun of phenomena. But more than that, you could become a conand games. To fulfill your assignment, you may have to instigate noisseur of feeling really good. You may even go so far as to events that encourage your allies to leave their comfort zones and break into a higher octave of pleasure, communing with exotic phenomena that we might call silken thrills and spicy bliss and follow you into the frontiers of collaborative amusement. succulent revelry.

| COMMUNITY |

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The taskmaster planet Saturn wove its way through the sign of Scorpio from October 2012 until the end of 2014. Now it has slipped back into your sign for a last hurrah. Between now and mid-September. I urge you to milk its rigorous help in every way you can imagine. For example, cut away any last residues of trivial desires and frivolous ambitions. Hone your focus and streamline your self-discipline. Once and for all, withdraw your precious energy from activities that waste your time and resist your full engagement. And if you’re serious about capitalizing on Saturn’s demanding gifts, try this ritual: Write either “I will never squander my riches,” or “I will make full use of my riches,” twenty times—whichever motivates you most.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “Everyone is a genius at least once a year,” wrote German aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg. “The real geniuses simply have their bright ideas closer together.” According to my astrological analysis, Taurus, your once-a-year explosion of genius is imminent. It’s even possible you will experience a series of eruptions that continue for weeks. The latter scenario is most likely if you unleash the dormant parts of your intelligence through activities like these: having long, rambling conversations with big thinkers; taking long, rambling walks all over creation; enjoying long, rambling sex while listening to provocative music.


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

62 | JUNE 25, 2015

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’m an animal lover. My bio-mother always had black Dachshunds—one after another for 15 years. They were always named ‘Tina,’ and every time I see a wiener, my Pavlovian training makes me call it ‘Tina.’ My first dog, Parker, was a golden lab mutt who climbed the stairs of playground slides and was the hit of the tall slide at Liberty Park for 12 years. When I had to put him down, I told myself I’d never get another animal. My heart was broken. Skip forward to four years ago, when my now-wife moved to Utah. Under the Gay Agenda Code, Section 27-3-61, we are required to get a dog or cat within two months of living together, or we lose our gay privileges for up to 12 months. We opted for cats and are now happily owned by two wonderful beasts who make sure we never leave home without the ‘lesbian pelt’ of animal hair all over us. Oy vey. We both love all animals. So imagine our delight when we started noticing that folks were taking their pets into stores, motels and on planes. Mind you, these were special pets, sporting special vests labeled “Service Animal.” How wonderful that we’ve moved past archaic laws in this country to allow for animals to accompany their less-than-well humans into public places. We were shocked when we started seeing every Tom, Dick and Jane carrying their microdogs in their purses—or murses—anywhere they liked. Certainly, there can’t be that many people in the world who must have service animals with them at all times. The reality is, anyone can register any dog as an official “service dog,” anytime. There are tons of websites offering “Service dog id kits for only $XYZ,” which give the entitled masses an instant legal right to do whatever they want, whenever they want, with their pets in public. Right now, Salt Lake City is all abuzz about allowing dogs on restaurant patios. A state law was passed in 2012 that dogs could sit on restaurant/bar patios but, until recently, no one here had taken the plunge. A random news team has just scratched behind some ear to discover that only one city establishment has applied for and received a pet permit ($350 up front, then $100 renewal fee each year) in Salt Lake City. Good on the Campfire Lounge, 837 E. 2100 South in Sugar House! All the local TV stations have picked up the story, and soon you’ll see Bowzer and Fifi on many more public patios, because dogs have rights too! The Salt Lake County Board of Health rules are strict and logical: Dogs may not sit on tables; they can’t eat off plates; if they defecate, the area must be cleaned and sanitized within five minutes; wait staff can’t pet pooches, neither can chefs; and you can’t bring a can of food from home to feed your dog.n [Editor’s note: Babs De Lay is a candidate for Salt Lake City Council District 4.] Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

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City Weekly June 25, 2015  

Art Work. Guide to the 2015 Utah Arts Festival

City Weekly June 25, 2015  

Art Work. Guide to the 2015 Utah Arts Festival