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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

APRIL 9, 2015 | VOL. 31

N0. 48

Food for the Soul

2015 Dining & Bar Guide


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY Food for the Soul

City Weekly’s 2015 Dining & Bar Guide Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

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CONTRIBUTOR

LETTERS opinion NEWS A&E CINEMA true tv MUSIC COMMUNITY

cityweekly

Ted Scheffler

Before becoming an awardwinning food, wine and travel writer, Ted toiled as a professional musician, anthropologist, university instructor and book editor. He lives in Utah with a cat, wife, kids, black Lab and a herd of guitars.

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Letters Lake Powell Is Good for Utah

I know that you are a left-leaning, liberal-biased “independent” newspaper, but your choice to highlight Deadbeat Dams in your Essentials entertainment picks [March 26, City Weekly] shows how far to the left you really lean. Are you really going to jump on the “drain Lake Powell” bandwagon? Is there no one among your granola-munching, tree-hugging, Obama-loving editorial staff and contributors who has taken a houseboat trip on Lake Powell? Your staff may conveniently forget that the Glen Canyon Dam is a completely renewable source of energy, generating millions upon millions of watts of electricity, with zero carbon emissions. Additionally, Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Powell have shown their true value in being a storage device in times of drought. Your liberal prophets in Hollywood and throughout California would not be able to fill their swimming pools without it right now. The Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance would love to close all of Southern Utah to everything but backpacking, but anyone with half a brain knows that without the recreation areas like Glen Canyon, the crowds would not come, the hotels and restaurants would close, and even the backpackers would lose a place to take their weekly showers. Lastly, because of Lake Powell, millions of people have been able to view one of the true Seven Wonders of the Natural World: Rainbow Bridge. Without convenient boat access to this majestic creation, it would remain a place of

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes. legend told by those lucky ones whom the Navajo Nation allowed to cross their land. I cannot say that I am against everything that Daniel Beard (author of Deadbeat Dams) stood for; his idea of smaller government and more local control is something that everyone needs to embrace.

Darin Birch Price

The Cycle of Greed Repeats Itself

City Weekly is definitely pounding the pavement, working on taking back the House and stopping petroleum. If you want to stop the Koch brothers, it is simple: Stop driving a car and flying. I began having all my goods shipped, and I bicycle to the grocery store. When it’s too hot for dairy, the grocery store sells ice bags I can use. In America, the only people who have a valid need to drive are the poor, because they lack time. I am a lifelong conservative, libertarian and Tea Party member since its founding. I agree on the importance of fighting discrimination and on health-care issues such as switching health carriers and mandating insurers cover existing conditions. At the same time, that is vastly different from mandatory coverage. Perhaps, instead of a simple “for or against” stance on the Affordable Care Act, various issues can be ironed out. It is my understanding that the redistribution of wealth

began under President Ronald Reagan, who decreased taxes on various investments such as capital gains. Although that made sense at the time, I see two issues: The first is that it has become incestuous­—the profit from capital gains is reinvested, resulting in additional profit, which in turn is reinvested, repeating the cycle. The second issue has to do with happiness. Money brings happiness to the needy and makes no difference to the middle class. However, with the wealthy, studies have shown they believe they can find happiness with more money. When the money is received, they’re not happy; instead, they desire more money. Similar to tax cuts, this cycle repeats itself. I propose some changes: Replace tax cuts on capital gains with tax cuts on spending—such as money spent on government handouts. This has several benefits, from a voluntary redistribution of wealth to the poor working instead of collecting alms. When people work, they feel better.

Daniel Barker Lakeland, Fla.

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ENERGY SOLUTIONS WANTS TO BRING DEPLETED URANIUM TO UTAH WE MUST STOP THEM!

Energy Solutions is licensed to bring in and dispose of only Class A radioactive waste, the least hot waste which reduces to relatively harmless background radiation levels within 100 years. Hotter waste – Classes B and C – is ILLEGAL in Utah since the Legislature enacted a state law in 2005 forbidding Energy Solutions to take it. Depleted uranium (DU) is hotter and more dangerous than even Class B or Class C radioactive waste, which are both illegal in Utah. DU is used primarily in nuclear reactors and to make bombs, and DU gets hotter and hotter and hotter - and therefore more dangerous - for billions of years. The US Department of Energy has more than 750,000 metric tons of this deadly poison, and Energy Solutions wants to dispose of it in Tooele County. Governor Herbert said “NO” to DU in 2010, when he stopped trains from South Carolina from bringing DU to the Energy Solutions’ shallow, near-surface landfill in Tooele County.

WE NEED YOUR VOICE AT PUBLIC HEARINGS TO BE HELD BY THE UTAH DIVISION OF RADIATION CONTROL:

HOW CAN YOU HELP? Call Governor Herbert at (801) 538-1000 or email him at www.utah.gov./governor/contact and tell him to “stop Energy Solutions from disposing of DU.” Call the Radiation Control Board at (801) 536-4250 or email them at rlundberg@utah.gov and tell them NOT to allow Energy Solutions to take DU.

6-8pm 5-7pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm

April 27 April 28 April 29 April 30 May 4 May 5 May 11 May 13

Tooele Library: 128 W Vine Street, Tooele 84074 S Jordan Library: 10673 S Redwood Rd, S. Jordan 84095 Millcreek Library: 2266 E Evergreen, SLC 84109 Taylorsville Library: 4870 S 2700 W, Taylorsville 84118 Tooele Library: 128 W Vine Street, Tooele 84074 Herriman Library: 13198 S 5600 W, Herriman 84096 Kearns Library: 5350 S 4220 W, Kearns UT 84118 Tooele Library: 128 W Vine Street, Tooele 84074

DEPLETED URANIUM: NOT HERE. NOT NOW. NOT EVER.

6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm 6-8pm

April 9, 2015 | 5

Herriman Library: 13198 S 5600 W, Herriman 84096 Magna Library: 2675 S 8950 W, Magna 84044 Tooele Library: 128 W Vine Street, Tooele 84074 West Valley Library: 2880 W 3650 S, West Valley 84119 Draper Library: 1136 Pioneer Rd (12400 S), Draper 84020 Taylorsville Library: 4870 S 2700 W, Taylorsville 84118 West Valley Library: 2880 W 3650 S, West Valley 84119 Riverton Library: 12877 S 1830 W, Riverton 84065

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April 8 April 9 April 13 April 15 April 16 April 20 April 22 April 23

Learn more at informational meetings below or go to our website at www.DEADLYDISPOSAL.ORG

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May 6 Tooele County Courthouse 47 South Main Street, Tooele 84074 May 7 SLC - Dept of Environmental Quality 195 N 1950 W, SLC 84114

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DU was bad then – and nothing has changed. Energy Solutions is not licensed to take DU and has not prepared its landfill site to safely dispose of DU. We don’t want DU in Utah!


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PRIVATE EY

Drawn & Catered

That was quite a deal these past couple of weeks in Indiana, eh? You know, that gaymarriage hullabaloo that was virgin birthed by Indiana Gov. Mike Pence when he signed a bill allowing legal discrimination against gay persons, I mean, uhh, that religious freedom bill that gave “freedom” to a previously nonprotected class of U.S. citizens: self-righteous bigots. In short order, hellfire and damnation (in the form of media scorn, high-profile distancing from his fellow Republicans, boycotts from major American businesses, etc.) fell upon Indiana as has seldom been seen in U.S. history, so much so that Pence later recanted—sort of—and he welcomed all of us back to visit and do business with him and his fellow, fun-loving Hoosiers. It was, he said, just a “great misunderstanding.” Yeah, like during his private signing of the original bill when he surrounded himself with a who’s who of gay-baiting hucksters, who verily outnumbered the persons of the cloth who mostly comprised those at the farthest extreme of religious conservatism. Thus, I am happily rolling and cavorting on the floor with my two dogs, Rosie and Ajax—a legitimate hetero dog couple, albeit of different ethnicities—she a German, he an Australian—because, for just about the first time in my life, one of these great United States has proven to be even crazier than Utah. Before I go on, I have to clarify something. I was merely rolling on the floor and cavorting with my dogs. “Cavorting” is a big word for insecure, bullying nitwits like Pence, and is easily construed to mean something it does not. So, for the record, I was not having sexual relations with Ajax and Rosie. Therefore, the three of us do not have to be put to death per Leviticus 20, that same portion of the Bible often cited as evidence gays needn’t bother breathing. I merely express my joy that Pence lives in Indiana, not Utah.

What was Pence thinking? That no one would notice? That no one would see through the façade of what his bill really intended to do—discriminate against a group of people he has disdain for? That God would lift him up into heaven to sit at the right hand of his throne? Social media being what it is, it wasn’t long before Pence was thoroughly skewered, his hypocrisy laid bare. This side-byside comparison of Pence with Jesus was my favorite: Jesus: “Whoever comes before me shall not hunger.” Pence: Eliminates food stamps to 65,000 residents. Jesus: “Sell your possessions and give to the needy.” Pence: Gives corporations the largest tax break in history. Jesus: “And Mary gave birth to her firstborn son in a manger, because they were homeless.” Pence: Provides zero state funding for homeless shelters. Jesus: “Love your neighbor as thyself.” Pence: Signs discrimination law that targets his LGBT neighbors. You get the point. His religion is of the type that picks and chooses the parts he likes, and he rubs people’s faces in it. It’s the common denominator of religious fanatics. On the bright side, a miracle occurred. After Pence first signed his bill, an otherwise obscure pizza joint in Walkerton, Ind., made a peculiar announcement. To express their love for gays, the owners said—drum roll—they don’t dislike gays, and gays are welcome at their establishment. They just wouldn’t cater a gay wedding. When the predictable threats of economic backlash hit, the owners said they were shutting down the place. Then, the miracle: Through crowdfunding, the owners received more than $800,000 from folks as blind and bigoted as themselves, and they proclaimed it was “God blessing them for what we believe, and not denying Him.” Then they

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quickly gave all that filthy lucre to charity, like the good Christians they are. Uhh, no. It went to rent, and right-wing media said that gays had forced the little shop to close. That was a lie. There was no miracle. Here’s my deal with all of my LGBT friends: If you marry, and if you order catered pizza for your reception, I ain’t coming. I have nothing against gays, mind you, I merely choose to discriminate against catered pizza, as is my God-given right, and by H-E-Double Hockey Sticks, when it comes to choosing to be a catered-pizza eater or not, I’m going with what the Big Man upstairs intended: Pizza fresh out of a smoke-fired oven, or not all. Sausage- and bacon-free, of course. I know the Big Man Upstairs intended pizza to be eaten that way, because he speaks to me regularly. Somet i mes, he speaks to my neighbors, and they tell me, but mostly he speaks to me. Well, other times, he speaks to me in other ways, you know, not directly, like through that old granny radio that’s in my basement. Heck, it’s not even plugged in, but he comes through loud and clear on the AM dial. And here’s what came through that old Philco this morning: “Hello, since the radio is unplugged, and yet you hear a voice, you know who this is. Now listen: If you have a business, pizza or otherwise, and you don’t like gays—be they black or Jew or Mormon—just say so on a sign on your front door. That way, they simply won’t come in. Neither will they ask you to cater that hypothetical wedding that you object to—Catered Pizza and Gays. Lands! Don’t take their money on Friday and deny them on Sunday. Just don’t. Here’s what you should do: Announce your bigotry and, yes, come out of that closet you hide within. The truth will set you free. Amen.” CW

If you marry, and if you order catered pizza for your reception, I ain’t coming.

Send feedback to jsaltas@cityweekly.net

Who was the dumbest politician ever? Jeremiah Smith: Rick Perry. I don’t know if the former governor of Texas wins hands-down, but he is definitely in the running. Jerre Wroble: “Stupidest ever” goes to our romantic heroes John Edwards, Gary Hart and Larry Craig—all former U.S. Senators—(and OK, Bill Clinton), because who would ever spill the beans that they’re screwing around on their spouses? No one cares about that, right?

Josh Scheuerman: Abraham Lincoln, without a doubt. He should have saved some coin and gone to the matinee. Too soon? Scott Renshaw: Kind of like with sports and pop-culture questions of this kind, people always gravitate to answers from their own lifetimes. Maybe Andrew Johnson was dumber than George W. Bush; I never got a chance to dissect Johnson’s stupid public comments online. Let’s just say that, in general, they’re often just as smart as the people who elected them.

Pete Saltas: When I was a wee lad, I remember watching the news one night and seeing Salt Lake County then-District Attorney Neal Gunnarson throwing our papers away. I thought of him as a horrible person for messing with my parents’ paper. That comical cover we made the following week is etched in my brain. And poor Neal was not re-elected. Don’t mess with City Weekly!

Tiffany Frandsen: I hate calling people dumb. I usually think people are generally smarter than they are given credit for. That said, I take to Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley’s somewhat unintelligible Twitter account every time I need a chuckle. I doubt he’s dumb, but tweet-wise, he’s definitely not the cleverest.


HITS&MISSES by Katharine Biele

random questions, surprising answers

Dry State In a stunning time-lapse video from NASA, you can watch how Lake Powell’s water level has dropped—and dropped— since 1999. Despite the climate-change naysayers, the West just keeps on drying up. Now we have the governor signing a bill to fund a pipeline to bring water from Lake Powell to Kane and Washington counties. Let’s start with $5 million from the state’s general fund for large projects that could cost billions. All this despite a slowing population growth in the area, notes Zach Frankel of the Utah Rivers Council. Meanwhile, dam projects are becoming less and less viable. An Envision Utah survey is asking people to weigh in on the kind of future they want. But Utah is unlikely to call for water rationing like California. Hell, we won’t even ban wood burning.

It’s Hereditary

IF YOU CAN’T READ, IT ALSO HAS LOTS OF PICTURES

After much talk, Utah has come out with its 10-year plan to reduce intergenerational poverty. That the state acknowledges the issue is good news. The plan contains some good goals, too, such as focusing on high school graduation. “One very positive thing about this plan is that it acknowledges the fact that the quickest way to move children out of intergenerational poverty is to help their parents to earn more money,” wrote Bill Tibbitts on the Utah Poverty News blog. But the big problem is what Tibbitts calls all the “fuzzy goals” of the plan, like increasing the number of children living in stable families in five years. Of course, there are no “hows” in the report, but acknowledgement is the first step. Then you get fuzzy goals. Now they need to get specific.

Footing the Bill

Utah‚s Longest-Running Entertainment Blog Not Written By A Stay-At-Home Mom, Only On Cityweekly.net CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

Reporters have funny ideas about what the public wants to know about President Obama’s recent visit to Utah. For instance, why did the president stay at the Sheraton instead of the Grand America? There was lots of conjecture in The Salt Lake Tribune, where we also got a front-page story about how cool it was for Thomas Burr to ride in Air Force One—because we want to know. We saw giddy photos of Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and others, all of whom laid claim to urging the president to come to Utah. But the big unanswered question remains: How much did Salt Lake City have to pay for presidential security? There were dump trucks surrounding the hotel and surely other arrangements in addition to his personal Secret Service detail. Yes, it’s a great honor to host the president in Utah—it’s probably an expensive one, too.

If you’ve ever experienced a coincidence, you likely felt inclined to draw some kind of meaningful conclusion from it. There’s an element of synchronicity in it, something which prominent philosophical scholar Richard Tarnas will cover in his talk to the Jung Society of Utah (JungUtah.com). For him, examining improbable coincidences grants us a new sense of orienting our lives, a new sense of belonging in the world. It won’t take a chance encounter for you to hear from Tarnas, a professor at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. Just direct your feet to the Olpin Union’s Saltair Room (200 Central Campus Drive) at the University of Utah on Thursday, April 9, at 7 p.m.

Courtesy Photo

@kathybiele

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8 | April 9, 2015

FIVE SPOT

What’s this notion of synchronicity all about? The concept of synchronicity was first formulated by psychologist C.G. Jung. It occurs when two or more independent events that have no apparent causal connection form a meaningful pattern. On occasion, this patterning can strike one as so extraordinary that it is difficult to believe the coincidence has been produced by chance alone. The events give the distinct impression of having been precisely arranged, invisibly orchestrated.

What are some examples of synchronicity?

These can range from everyday events like thinking of a person one hasn’t seen for a long time, then having that person call a few minutes later, to more profound: Uncanny events taking place after someone’s death, like one’s mother’s favorite bird tapping insistently at one’s window the day after she died. Or the book that falls open to the page that precisely answers the problem one has been struggling with.

If synchronicity were a religion, what would it be called? If synchronicity were approached within religious terms, it would be called something like divine providence and grace.

Is synchronicity proof, as some religious folk might argue, that there is a God?

Synchronicities do suggest the existence of a larger ordering principle at work in human life than can be fit into our conventional modern worldview. As Shakespeare said, “There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in our philosophy.” Many religious people would see them as indeed signs that there is a God. But I know highly skeptical modern academics who are also moved. One has said, “I’ve stopped believing in almost everything, but I do believe in synchronicity.”

Aren’t some events just random coincidences?

Yes, many are. In fact, one of the requirements for assessing synchronicities is having adequate self-awareness. One must remain alert for unconscious narcissistic tendencies by which random or peripheral events are continually transformed into signs that the universe is entirely revolving around oneself. Synchronicities require discernment, both inner and outer, to avoid succumbing to the mere projection of inner meaning onto external events. CW

By Sam Florence comments@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE Farm Fresh

BY CECIL ADAMS

I get the argument against the inhumane conditions of animals in factory farms. But, would it even be possible to feed all 320 million Americans (let alone the world) without them? —Kevin Schweitzer, Las Vegas Sanctimonious vegetarians cite sordid tales of factory farms as evidence of the wickedness of meat-eating, and I concede cutting out meat entirely makes a certain amount of sense. Compared to vegetables and grains, factory-farmed meat is an inefficient food-energy delivery system. Producing a pound of beef is dozens of times more resource-intensive than producing a pound of whole-grain bread, but the calorie payoff for the bread is somewhat greater. There’s plenty of evidence that as long as you get the right mix of nutrients, you’ll live longer if you limit yourself to veggies: Coronary heart risk is reduced by 20 percent, as are colon cancer and type 2 diabetes. So, theoretically, there’s no reason you couldn’t feed all Americans, plus the rest of the world, on things that didn’t used to have eyeballs. But all this has already been said, or rather shouted at you, by Greenpeace volunteers while you try desperately to get by them on the sidewalk without making eye contact. And it all misses the point. First, humans have been eating meat for roughly a bajillion years. As explained here some time back, we’ve spent eons evolving the teeth and the intestinal system needed to digest dead animals as well as celery. And experience suggests that as people attain the wherewithal to eat more meat, they take full advantage: In China, most notably, meat consumption has gone up 165 percent since 1990. All the yoga teachers in the world are unlikely to convince any significant chunk of the population to give it up. Second, while the cruelty of factory farming evokes a particularly visceral reaction— all that documentary footage of unnaturally buxom poultry crowded into tiny cages is tough to dismiss—serious negative environmental impact is characteristic of Big Agriculture overall. The question really isn’t the merits of factory-farmed meat, but industrialized agriculture generally. From a purely economic standpoint, there’s no disputing that both meat and vegetables have become exponentially more abundant in the developed world, thanks to technological advances. U.S. agriculture in particular has become the most productive in the world due to farm consolidation, mechanization and industrial techniques like factory farms. In 1960, the average American farmer fed 26 people; now it’s something more like 150. Consider our friend, the hog. In 1978, factory farms accounted for 34 percent of hog production; by 1997, this had increased to 89 percent. Over roughly the same period, wholesale pork prices decreased 39 percent (retail pork prices decreased only 15 percent—somebody took the opportunity to get fat here, but it wasn’t the farmers).

SLUG SIGNORINO

The same was true of other U.S. farm products. The wholesale price of beef decreased 53 percent, the retail price 39 percent. Fruit, vegetable, and cereal wholesale prices decreased between 4 percent (navel oranges) and 62 percent (corn). In contrast, according to the food price index maintained by the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization, world food prices overall have gone up. World Bank data suggests global food prices were essentially flat (in inflation-adjusted terms) from 1985 to 2005, but have risen sharply since then. Today, U.S. consumers spend a smaller percentage of their disposable income on food consumed at home than anyone else in the world. So, let’s be clear: From an economic standpoint, industrialized farming of meat and vegetables has been incredibly successful at feeding people. But there are also plenty of costs that aren’t factored into those prices. As the industry has shifted from family farms to large enterprises, livestock wastes have become more geographically concentrated and threaten air and water resources. Factory farms pump livestock with antibiotics to prevent the spread of disease among thousands of close-quartered animals, possibly contributing to increased pathogen resistance among animals and humans alike. Jumbo agriculture can lead to increased soil erosion, clogging waterways and contributing to flooding and contaminated water supplies. As anyone who skimmed through Silent Spring in college to impress a girl can tell you, runoff can also contain chemicals from pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers that are harmful to the environment and to us. But these are negative externalities we’ll have to reckon with later—they don’t factor into the price we pay now. In practical terms, it’s hard to see how we could sustain current American meat consumption (annual per-person estimates range from 175 to 260 pounds) without cramming the animals in cages. If 1955 beef production practices were used today, we’d need 165 million more acres of land to produce the same output. It may mean our grandchildren will succumb to antibiotic-resistant whooping cough, but the idea that we can feed a crowded world with a bunch of cows chewing cud on a hillside is juvenile romanticism. Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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NEWS

“It cannot be a data set of gossip. It should be verifiable, not innuendo and rumor.” L AW & O R D E R —Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill

Bad Cop Database

A hi-tech initiative by Utah’s defense lawyers seeks to improve police accountability in the legal system. Stephen Dark sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

F

or the past five years, criminaldefense attorneys in Utah have shared information about police officers’ misconduct. It’s been an ad-hoc approach, shooting an e-mail to a mailing list alerting attorneys of—and asking for anecdotal information about—a cop who, for instance, “was fudging on [testimony relating to] a DUI stop, or maybe he testified falsely in court,” says Kent Hart. Hart is the executive director of the Utah Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers [UACDL]. In less than a year’s time, he anticipates that his association’s members will have a far more effective tool for challenging the credibility of law enforcement officers in the courts: a database of police misconduct. The database is being developed using open-source software in the “cloud”— which will allow UACDL’s 450 members to access and share information they gather about potential “bad apples” among Utah’s law-enforcement ranks. That information could include police-discipline records, court filings and transcripts, and attorney’s commentaries. The initiative could be a significant game-changer in leveling the playing field between under-resourced defense counsel and law enforcement and prosecutors. While concerns over defamation, client confidentiality and privacy may make the database a complex project to steer to completion, gathering what local attorney Aaron Tarin calls “counter-intelligence” about law enforcement could bring greater accountability to police work, say advocates for the database initiative. Hart says what prompted the decision to create a collaborative database was because the state—in terms of both prosecutors and law enforcement—does not fulfill its constitutional obligations in a sufficiently systematic manner to provide defense attorneys with what’s known as Brady-Giglio material. Ian Adams, spokesman for the Fraternal Order of Police, which represents the interests of 2,500 Utah cops, defines BradyGiglio material as “information that is exculpatory in nature, or crimes of moral turpitude, thefts, perjury—something that calls into question an officer’s ability to give truthful testimony.”

Prosecutors are supposed to provide such material to defense counsel—assuming there are procedures in place for law enforcement to pass it to them—in order to address the honesty of a government witness before a judge or jury. Several defense attorneys whom City Weekly spoke to expressed frustration that some prosecutors routinely do not provide Brady-Giglio material. “The rule applies to everyone, but in terms of compliance, it’s variable depending on the prosecutor and the office,” says Utah Legal Clinic attorney Stewart Gollan. According to Hart, there has been no effort as yet by the state to consistently provide Brady-Giglio material to defense attorneys. “You would think because the state has a constitutional duty to do this, they would have set up some kind of formalized system in this electronic age—in essence, a central clearinghouse for cops who have committed misconduct, lied on the stand or have been disciplined,” Hart says. “But they haven’t.” With no mechanism in place to hold either law enforcement’s or prosecutors’ feet to the fire when it comes to communicating on Brady-Giglio issues, and since most cases are resolved in plea deals rather than going to trial, any information that might emerge about an officer during the discovery process often languishes in defense attorneys’ case files, unless they decide to alert the Utah State Bar Association. “We’re relying on word of mouth [among defense attorneys],” Hart says. “That’s all we have.” FOP spokesman Adams says his organization would love to work with the UACDL on the database. “We think it should be legislatively implemented [so] that all officers of the court, anybody who is sworn to uphold the legal system,” be they bai-

liffs, prosecutors, judges or defense lawyers, should be included in such a collection of data, he says. “If it’s frankly just trolling Google or Westlaw [an online fee-based legal research service] for all the times a person has been named as defendant, with criminal-defense attorneys as the sole proprietor and enterer of information, we think that just makes it a useless database,” he says. “Useful information comes from trying evidence put in front of a jury.” Davis County attorney Troy Rawlings says his office has an obligation to provide Brady-Giglio material to defense attorneys, and he hopes the UACDL will reciprocate and share the database with prosecutors: “It might impact our decisions as prosecutors in terms of how we go forward on cases,” he says. But, Rawlings says, policies and procedures will need to be in place to ensure private or protected records such as medical-treatment histories are not released. “In the execution, they will have to be very careful what information they put up,” he says. One veteran officer who spoke on condition of anonymity because he did not have permission from his superiors to talk to the media, felt such a database would not be an issue for law enforcement. “Ninety-nine percent of cops don’t have a problem with body-cams or this database at all.” However, he continues, “my concerns would be in this day and age of rumor and innuendo, of Internet trolls and chair-born rangers, it has to be proven that this cop is a screw-up.” Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill agrees, noting that information from the public domain of officers who perjured themselves is one thing. Suspicions, he says, are another. “It cannot be a data set

of gossip. It should be verifiable, not innuendo and rumor,” Gill says. New technology in the form of open source software allows UACDL to build the password-protected database very cheaply. “The open-source cloud software makes it available in a secure manner, so attorneys can contribute and shepherd the project on,” attorney Tarin says. Some aspects of the database may be made publicly available down the line, he says. Some attorneys argue databases such as this one will force law enforcement to put greater emphasis on discipline. However, the veteran cop says, “I see a lot of stuff in terms of punishment being done verbally instead of in writing if they build this kind of database.” The cop says that, in trials, defense attorneys try to bring up officers’ policy violations that have nothing to do with their credibility—infractions such as failure to wash their patrol cars once per week—and then try to use such information to impeach cops on the stand. “It has to be based on pertinent facts, something that goes to the cop’s veracity,” he says. Tarin sees the database as ultimately a response to the U.S. government’s technological might. “Not only will technology improve legal services by making them cheaper and more efficient, it will also be providing a critical balancing effect against the technological prowess of our government,” he says. Defense attorneys don’t have the resources to match the state: “We don’t have the money to build a $1.2 billion National Security Agency [Data Center] at the Point of the Mountain,” he says, “but we can by banding together.” CW This is the first of a series of articles on the impact of technology on the law and society.


NEWS

Curses, Foiled Again A burglar used the homeowner’s devices to log on to porn, YouTube and his Facebook account, but authorities in Monroe County, Fla., quickly identified him because he forgot to log off Facebook. Sheriff’s official Becky Herrin said the 16-yearold suspect also ate a Pop Tart and drank a soda. (Miami Herald)

QUIRKS

n Burglary suspect Christopher Wallace, 24, eluded sheriff’s deputies in Somerset County, Maine, for several weeks but then unwittingly alerted them to his whereabouts by revealing on Snapchat that he had just returned home. A second post followed that deputies were at his home and coming inside, but he was hiding in a cabinet. Social media-monitoring deputies then headed for the cabinet and found “a pair of feet,” the sheriff’s department’s Facebook page reported. “The feet just so happened to be attached to a person, and that person was Christopher Wallace.” (Kennebec Morning Sentinel)

BY ROL AND SWEET Paper Tiger The developer of Tiger Woods’s new restaurant in Jupiter, Fla., said it couldn’t be named after the golfer because Tiger Woods doesn’t own commercial rights to his name. Nike does. (CNN)

When Guns Are Outlawed Authorities accused Travis Lanning, 34, of beating a woman in her 50s with a weapon described as “a club with a spiked ball on the end”— known in medieval times as a mace. The Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department reported the woman wasn’t robbed but said her attacker threatened to kill her. (The Sacramento Bee)

No Believing Allowed After a group called the Satanic Temple asked the Orange County (Fla.) School Board for permission to distribute a Satanic coloring book to students, the board voted to ban not only Satanic materials, but also outside Bibles. The World Changers of Florida had previously been allowed to hand out Bibles. (Orlando Sentinel)

Thank You for Your Service Shortly after Will Swenson was named to receive the Medal of Honor for heroism in Afghanistan, the Army placed the outspoken critic of Army leadership under surveillance because his name appeared, along with others, in a one-paragraph book review on Amazon. com. Swenson, whom the book itself didn’t mention, said agents questioned him, pawed through his trash and rattled his girlfriend. Then-Secretary of the Army John McHugh agreed the Amazon review triggered the surveillance, which, he suggested, “was really about his award, his criticism of the Army and the hope that agents would find something to shut him up.” (The Daily Beast)

Slightest Provocation Eldridge Dukes, 58, told police in Baton Rouge, La., that he shot his 18-year-old son in the buttocks after the two argued because they were out of orange juice. (Baton Rouge’s The Advocate)

Double Trouble Arthur Mondella, 57, spent five hours with investigators answering complaints that his New York City factory, which makes Maraschino cherries, was dumping syrup and “cherry-related waste” in the waters around the warehouse. When agents noticed a flimsy shelving system attached to an office wall and asked Mondella about it, they said he excused himself, went into the bathroom and shot himself in the head. After the shooting, agents were surprised to uncover “a huge marijuana-growing operation” underneath the warehouse, including 80 pounds of pot, hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and several high-end vehicles. (New York Daily News)

Made in the Shade A London-based architectural firm announced it has developed a skyscraper that doesn’t cast a shadow. NBBJ explained the design involves a pair of precisely aligned towers with curved and angled facades that reflect sunlight to the street below and onto each other. “The ‘No-Shadow Tower’ redirects sunlight to visibly reduce shadows at the base of the towers by 60 percent over typical buildings,” a company official said. (Britain’s The Telegraph)

n Police who responded to reports of a disturbance involving 20 to 30 teenagers in Burbank, Ill., found that one 17-year-old girl had been stabbed several times in the back. Investigator Mike Dudio said the victim had gone to the “house of her adversary,” another 17-year-old girl, to confront her about “issues” the two were having on Twitter. (Chicago Tribune)

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If you thought it cool that President Barack Obama slept in a hotel surrounded by hulks of Utah Transit Authority steel during his stay in Salt Lake City, then you should commence a week of civic engagement by learning about the gender wage gap. Follow that up with a day of restoration on the Jordan River, one of Utah’s most neglected, but unbelievably beautiful, waterways. Then, check out a Draper City Council meeting, where a bunch of land will be rezoned and 200-square-foot tower signs will be mulled.

Gender Wage Gap Thursday, April 9

Stories abound about men who get paid more than their women counterparts for no other reason than gender. The Hinckley Institute of Politics is hosting a discussion called “Equal Pay: Debunking the Myths Behind the Gender Wage Gap,” with Dr. Gunseli Berik, an economics professor at the U. This is the Hinckley Institute’s latest Pizza and Politics installation. And, I’ve been assured, there will be plenty of both to go around. Hinckley Institute of Politics, Orson Spencer Hall, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, University of Utah, 12:30 p.m.1:30 p.m., Hinckley.Utah.edu

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14 | April 9, 2015

CITIZEN REVOLT

the

Jordan River Restoration Saturday, April 11

Eight local restaurants and bars that closed before we could review them:

8. The Sausage Trough 7. Beard, Barley & Beyond

Brewing Co.

6. The Great Salt Lake Salad Tossery

5. Creepy Geezerz Lounge 4. Mac+Cheese Artisan

Comfort Cuisine

3. [just a bar]® 2. The Rad Radish 1. NPR & Grill

The effort to restore the lower Jordan River as it f lows from Salt Lake County into Davis County continues Saturday morning, where volunteers will have a chance to plant shrubs and trees. These restoration events are held each quarter, so don’t miss the chance to get out and learn a little about what might well be the most important, and yet least appreciated, river along the Wasatch Front. Legacy Nature Preserve, 1113 W. Center St., North Salt Lake, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., JordanRiverCommission.com, 801-520-2505

Draper Land

Tuesday, April 14 Few places along the Wasatch Front showcase Utah’s rapidly changing face more than Draper, where it seems that efforts to rezone various parcels of land are a weekly engagement. See it firsthand this week when Draper officials will contemplate five different projects, all requiring some tweaks to existing zoning laws. One interesting item will involve “tower signs” along Interstate 15, which have 200-square-feet of sign space and are 20 feet tall. Draper City Hall, 1020 E. Pioneer Road, Draper, 7 p.m., Draper.UT.US


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Almost Tango, the title of Ballet West’s spring performance, is apropos. While it’s the name of one of the featured pieces, it also hints to a link between all three works on the playbill: ballet influenced by other dance forms. It’s fairly common for choreographers to find inspiration in other spheres of movement, but within traditional ballet, a little less so. Yet, all three ballets on the program do just that. George Balanchine’s classic Square Dance uses mostly traditional ballet movement and technique, while feeding off the repetition, form and social atmosphere of square dancing—going so far as to include a traditional caller, a role that will be played by Ballet West’s artistic director Adam Sklute. Second on the program is the title piece, re-choreographed for Ballet West by resident choreographer Nicolo Fonte. With its rich cultural roots and passionate style, tango is a favorite dance form from which to pilfer. Like Balanchine, Fonte focuses on the social aspects of the dance by setting his piece in a crowded tango hall (10 male dancers paired with four female ballerinas), as opposed to the fervent push-pull of a more intimate pas de deux. Anchoring the evening is a revival of William Forsythe’s In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated. Considered a masterpiece of contemporary ballet, it premiered in 1987 in Paris, and also pulls from other dance forms in a social setting—a dance club featuring a stark score by Thom Willems emulating the harsh sounds of early techno music. (Jacob Stringer) Ballet West: Almost Tango @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, April 10-11, April 15-18, 7:30 p.m.; April 18-19, matinee 2 p.m., $29. ArtTix.org, BalletWest.org

If the name of this show didn’t tip you off, the Friends of the Bob & Tom Show Comedy Tour is comprised of frequently returning standup guests (as well as longtime personalities) on the Indianapolis-based syndicated radio program that you can hear on KBER every weekday. Most of them are rising talents, and the two hosts constantly chuckle at their jokes throughout the morning. The tour itself constantly changes its lineup of headliners every week, so any given city might get a completely unique show. For Salt Lake City, we’re getting an interesting bunch who have been staples of the show at various points. Costaki Economopoulos (pictured), a 22-year standup veteran, used to be a B&T regular with his weekly “Economonologue” spot. Drew Hastings has starred in several one-man shows, and is one of the few comedians to get a standing ovation on The Tonight Show. Finally, the show features Tim Cavanagh, a parody musician who has made hundreds of songs over his career for various programs and features, and is sure to sing a jingle or two for his part of the evening. The final participant in the show’s hilarity is B&T’s announcer for nearly 30 years, Chuck McGee, serving as host throughout the festivities. Depending on his mood, you’ll either get fantastic jokes between sets or shameless promotion of the show and its merch—so come prepared. One dollar of your ticket purchase will benefit the American Red Cross. (Gavin Sheehan) Friends of the Bob & Tom Show Comedy Tour @ The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 801-456-2800, April 11, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. $28.50. DepotSLC.com

Friends of the Bob & Tom Show Comedy Tour

april 9, 2015 | 15

In large-scale, colorful abstract paintings that are contemplative, questioning, even surprising, artist Laura Hope Mason dares the audience to look with a fresh perspective. The paintings are an exciting play of hypnotic color and mesmerizing line, offering glimpses into worlds that are ethereal and often beautifully bizarre. Organic Elements is a series influenced by nature, both at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. Aside from the visual magic that Mason creates, a compelling part of the show is that Mason does not reveal which is which—from an organic painting based on lichen, to an aerial view of lines that naturally map landforms. The difference between the two is hardly distinguishable and, “The pieces evoke the calm and serenity of nature and invite the viewer to examine their own relationship with the environment,” Mason says. “Personal sensibilities determine whether extreme magnification or aerial views will be revealed to the viewer.” “On the Surface” (pictured) may be an overhead view of the linear tensions in the Great Salt Lake, or it might be ripples formed in a pond in Mason’s own back yard. “Traverse” may be the trails left by snails in moss on a misty morning, or it could be a flyover of tailings ponds near the airport. And “Petrified” may be a mapping of the red rocks of Moab, or it might be tracings left by tens of thousands of years in a stump of wood. These paintings are created to give viewers the freedom to determine what they represent. (Ehren Clark) Laura Hope Mason: Organic Elements @ Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, fourth floor, 801-524-8200, through May 1. SLCPL.org

Just what does it take to mount an art exhibition? It seems like a question reserved for those who undertake those projects, and the rest of us just enjoy and evaluate the results. But Number 04, a local design studio and micropublishing firm, set out to research and catalog this subject the way a reference librarian might. What kind of lighting is optimal? How do you preserve works of fine art from damage while on display? What effects do different typefaces have in marketing brochures? At 1,000 pages, the resulting book continued to be the subject of fresh imagery generated by the project itself. Indeed, so much data were amassed that Actual Source became unfeasible as a physical record of Number 04’s work. Instead, these data resulting from the artists’ research have been abstracted from their “actual source.” The results are presented in the form of works of art in a wide range of media, including graphic design, sculpture and textiles. It’s as though the activities involved in putting together an exhibition are not exactly separate from the impulse to create the art itself—but the two recombine, and ideas play themselves out, not unlike in an artist’s sketchbook. The opening reception on April 24 will also provide a look at three other new exhibitions: Adjunct, a collection by artists in various stages of their adjunct teaching careers; artist-inresidence Levi Jackson’s Bushwhacker; and Missileblower (and the Selected Good) by Brian Charles Patterson. (Brian Staker) Number 04: Actual Source @ Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, April 3-May 16, opening reception April 24, 7-9 p.m. UtahMOCA.org.

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SATURDAY 4.11

Ballet West: Almost Tango

FRIDAY 4.10

Number 04: Actual Source

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Laura Hope Mason: Organic Elements

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Portrait of a Revolutionary Joe Bauman’s The Daguerreotypist turns his discovery of a photo into the story of an early American hero. By Scott Renshaw scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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rtists come to their creative work in different ways and at their own pace. Some are prodigies who dive in young. Then there are those like Joe Bauman: It took more than 40 years for the seed of his particular fascination to germinate into his first novel. In The Daguerreotypist, Bauman—who spent a 36-year career as a journalist for the Deseret News before retiring in 2008— tells the story of 25-year-old Benjamin Mackintosh, a newcomer to the art of the primitive daguerreot y pe photography method in 1846. The fictional character Benjamin then travels with his grandfather, Peter Mackintosh, a man who actually did exist and was a Revolutionary War veteran. The journey that resulted in Bauman’s interest in Mackintosh dates back to 1969. At that time, Bauman was a young reporter working for a small newspaper in Ocean City, Md. “I went to cover a flea market,” Bauman recalls, “and came upon a couple of photographs that were very interesting to me. One was a daguerreotype … I bought it, and just became entranced with them, and began collecting them.” After some time collecting, Bauman— who had always been interested in the Revolutionar y War period—realized that these mid-19th-century daguerreotypes might include photos of individuals who were alive during the American Revolution. “I started keeping my eyes out for old people in daguerreot ypes, and researched where they could’ve been in the revolution. There were very few of them. If you were a soldier in the Revolutionary War, you were in your teens and 20s; you would have had to live into your 80s and 90s. … [But] I ended up with eight of them, the largest collection of identified Revolutionary War veterans.” Bauman researched the stories behind these men and, in 2012, self-published a non-fiction book titled Don’t Tread on Me featuring their biographies. Included among them was Peter Mackintosh, a blacksmith who went through a lengthy legal fight to prove that he had earned a pension as a Revolutionary War veteran. At the time, records were so sketchy, it

was difficult to prove he had been an enlisted man, rather than what would be referred to today as a civilian contractor. “His story was so outrageous,” Bauman said, “such a terrible lack of justice, that it was just natural fodder for a novel. “He didn’t really need to have a pension; it wasn’t that he was impoverished. He was a very successful blacksmith and was comfortable. … [But] he became, for me, a symbol of a very tenacious man who was very insistent on justice; he had given his work and time for this country, and he expected to be treated in the same way.” The f ictional character of Benjamin, then, became a way to further explore that idea of injustice, while also presenting a portrait of one side of mid-19th-century America that may be unfamiliar to most people. Specifically, young Benjamin is something of a libertine, making his way through a series of sexual encounters with various women. “People think that in the Victorian era, everyone was Victorian [in their morality],” Bauman said. “But that’s not true. There was a lot of pretty wild stuff going on, people who didn’t meet that stereotype.” In the novel, as Benjamin escorts his grandfather around New England in search of old friends and fellow soldiers who can testify to his status as a veteran, he becomes more aware of the injustices of his time. Bauman chose to set the story in 1846 because it was such a significant year, particularly in the country’s attitudes towards slavery in the wake of the Mexican War, which was perceived in the North as a way for the South to acquire territory for more slave states. As vividly as Bauman is able to paint the period details of The Daguerreotypist’s setting, he was clearly more driven to bring attention to the story of Peter Mackintosh. In part, it was because of the fascinating, documented facts of Mackintosh’s life, including the fact that his forge in Boston was among the places where those who

participated in the Boston Tea Party came to gather ashes to disguise themselves as “Indians,” and where Mackintosh himself once repaired a mortar for George Washington. But there was a personal side of this story for Bauman in the opportunity to celebrate a man who fought to be recognized for his contributions to American freedom, and whose family only received that recognition after Peter’s death. “I thought about the way those who did not have combat duty also were really important to our efforts, and we need to respect them,” Bauman said. “My father was a weatherman in World War II, and wasn’t in any war zone. But he was in Bermuda, away from his family, and did his part. In a way, it’s [a recognition] of people who served, but weren’t on the front lines. “I just thought his story was so much a teaching moment about what our country was supposed to be like, and how it really turned out.”

THE DAGUERREOTYPIST

By Joe Bauman Available on Kindle $9


moreESSENTIALS

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THURSDAY 4.9

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company: Spring Season Spring Season is upon us—and that doesn’t just mean the tulips are blooming. Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company will be bringing two world premieres to the stage for its Spring Season production. The first performance is a one-of-a-kind commission by renowned New York choreographer and 2012 Guggenheim Fellow Netta Yerushalmy. Best known for her provocative and imaginative movements, Yerushalmy creates a performance that is sure to be unlike anything you have seen. Follow that up with world premiere No. 2, 53 Rooms. Choreographed by Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company artistic director Daniel Charon, 53 Rooms is a collaboration with the Salt Lake Electric Ensemble (SLEE), along with guest dancers from the University of Utah. This performance combines contemporary music software with modernized movement, creating imagery that explores both a personal and communal side of dance. (Aimee L. Cook) Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company: Spring Season @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 9-11, 7:30 p.m., $20-$35. ArtTix.org

THURSDAY 4.9 Performing Arts

Performing Arts

SATURDAY 4.11 Performing Arts

Utah Symphony: Daphnis et Chloe, Abravanel Hall A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre Ballet West: Almost Tango, Capitol Theatre The Improvables, Clearfield Community Arts Center, 140 E. Center St., Clearfield, second Saturday of every month, 8 p.m. Mary Poppins, Draper Historic Theatre Mr. Marmalade, Good Company Theatre

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Utah Symphony: Daphnis et Chloe, Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801533-6683 A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre Ballet West: Almost Tango, Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 The Improvables, CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 North 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302

David Roberts: The Lost World of the Old Ones, Weller Book Works, 665 E. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-328-2586

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FRIDAY 4.10

Literary Arts

Friday, April 17 @ 10pm Saturday, April 18 @10pm A Bar Named Sue-Highland A Bar Named Sue-State

American Sign Language Storytime, Barnes & Noble Murray, 5429 S. State, Murray, 801-2614040 Banned Books Lecture, J. Willard Marriot Library, 295 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801581-8558

SPECIAL GUESTS: Toi Higgins & Utah Slim

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Literary Arts

STARRING: Jackson Cash, A Band Named Sue, Waymore Blues Band, June Carter Singers

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A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 Beer & Ballet, Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-869-6964 $5 Thursdays, ComedySportz Provo, 36 W. Center St., Provo, 801-377-9700 Mr. Marmalade, Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, 8 p.m. through May 3. Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-9849000 Once, Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 I am Comic: A Night of Stand Up, Movie Grille, 2293 Grant Ave., Ogden, 7 p.m. Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628 Ririe-Woodbury: Spring Season, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801355-2787 Pilot Program, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Mr. Perfect, Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-363-7522

Red vs. Blue, ComedySportz Provo, 36 W. Center St., Provo, 801-377-9700 Mary Poppins, Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144 Mr. Marmalade, Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, 8 p.m. through May 3. Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Once, Kingsbury Hall Laughing Stock, Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628 Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre Pilot Program, Rose Wagner Center Ririe-Woodbury: Spring Season, Rose Wagner Center Mr. Perfect, Salt Lake Acting Company One, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 130 S. 800 West, Salt Lake City 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche, Sugar Space, 616 E. Wilmington Ave (2190 South), Salt Lake City, 888-300-7898 Off the Wall Improv, The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd, Ogden, 855-944-2787 Les Misérables, The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd, Ogden, 855-944-2787 Friday Night Flicks, United Studios of Self Defense, 78 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-4844 Duo Sonidos, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-580-9881 Brandt Tobler, Wiseguys West Valley City, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909

A TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY & WAYLON CELEBRATING JACK QUIST’S 61ST B-DAY


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18 | april 9, 2015

moreESSENTIALS

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Once, Kingsbury Hall Gladsome Light, Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 Laughing Stock, Off Broadway Theatre Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre Ring Around The Rose, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Pilot Program, Rose Wagner Center Ririe-Woodbury: Spring Season, Rose Wagner Center Mr. Perfect, Salt Lake Acting Company One, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche, Sugar Space Friends of the Bob & Tom Show Comedy Tour, The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-355-5522 Les Misérables, The Ziegfeld Theater Brandt Tobler, Wiseguys West Valley City

Literary Arts

Eat. Read. Play., Trolley Square, 602 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, 10 a.m.

SUNDAY 4.12 Performing Arts A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre Mr. Marmalade, Good Company Theatre Once, Kingsbury Hall Pilot Program, Rose Wagner Center Mr. Perfect, Salt Lake Acting Company 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche, Sugar Space

MONDAY 4.13 Performing Arts Mary Poppins, Draper Historic Theatre Ashley Anderson Dances: Spring Mudson, Masonic Temple, 650 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 7:30 p.m. Les Misérables, The Ziegfeld Theater

TUESDAY 4.14 Literary Arts

Jonathan Ryan: Dark Bride, Weller Book Works, 665 E. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801328-2586

WEDNESDAY 4.15 Performing Arts

Ballet West: Almost Tango, Capitol Theatre Mr. Perfect, Salt Lake Acting Company

Visual Art New Thursday 4.9 Out Loud, Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-328-4201, April 1-June 27.

Continuing 4.9-4.15 Other Places, Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-236-7555, through May 8 Caryn Feeney: Fellow Earthlings, Art At The Main, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-3634088, April 1-30. David Wolske, Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, Salt Lake City, 801-596-5000, through April 17


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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

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Pho 33

If you are a pho-natic of the famous Vietnamese dish, come to Pho 33, where you can choose between rare beef, chicken, pork, or a combination of whatever you’re in the mood for. Meat lovers aren’t the only ones welcome here, though; the vegetarian menu items include tofu fried with eggplant, vegetarian stir-fry, Mongolian tofu and more. All the dishes here are reasonably priced, and there is an extensive list of lunch specials available, too, that come with soup and fried wontons. 7640 S. State, Midvale, 801-562-5888, Pho33Utah. com

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Argentine Corner

Argentine Corner treats customers like family, serving platters of authentic gnocchi, carne asada and pizza Boiled for several hours, then sliced wafer-thin and served with a garlic and parsley vinaigrette, the beef tongue is a culinary jewel. Clearfield’s Argentine Corner is one of the few proponents of this particular art. Served with crusty white bread while you wait for the chef to fire up his barbecue, it’s the perfect starter, melting like butter on your taste buds. 442 N. Main, Clearfield, 801-773-9909, ArgentineCorner.com

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Big Ed’s

2005 E. 2700 South, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM / OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

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2015 ANNIVERSARY DINNER CELEBRATING TWO YEARS OF BUSINESS WITH A BEER PAIRING DINNER. FEATURING HOUSE BREWED BEER AND A MENU BY CHEF JUSTIN SOELBERG. CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC U RESERVATIONS ONLY LIMITED SPOTS

This is the default breakfast joint for U of U students, faculty, staff and nearby civilians. And the default dish is the Gawd Awful: a cholesterol-buster consisting of two eggs on fried hashed browns with chili and cheese on top. It’s located at the edge of the U campus, but some have suggested that the wood-paneled Big Ed’s is closer to the edge of reality. Stick around until beer o’clock for a cold can of PBR and pretty good burgers, especially the chili burger. There’s also an excellent French dip sandwich on the menu. 210 University St., Salt Lake City, 801-582-9045, Facebook.com/ pages/Big-Eds-Restaurant

Log Haven

This popular special-event destination in Millcreek Canyon combines spectacular natural scenery and upscale-cabin charm with fabulous flavors and seasoned service. While consistently garnering “Most Romantic Restaurant” awards, Log Haven, which dates back to 1920 and is located in a national forest, combines timeless log-mansion ambiance with first-class contemporary cuisine. General manager Ian Campbell’s eclectic wine selection supplements Chef Dave Jones’ culinary creations, which are always changing, as they’re made with fresh, often local ingredients. Got marriage? Proposals happen here near-nightly. 6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-272-8255, Log-Haven.com

From Scratch 376 8TH AVE, STE. C, SALT LAKE CITY, UT 385.227.8628 | AVENUESPROPER.COM

From Scratch offers authentic Italian cuisine in a modern, downtown atmosphere. All of the restaurant’s pies and pastas are made—you guessed it—from scratch.

Start your meal off with the braised short rib, which comes with horseradish and seared carrots. As for pizza, try the fennel sausage, with green and red onions, or go with the Whiteout, which has three different cheeses and roasted garlic. If you’re not in the mood for pizza, the tasty Scratch burger is topped with shoestring onions and melted smoked cheddar cheese. And you can wash it all down with an Italian soda. 62 E. Gallivan Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-538-5090, FromScratchSLC.com

Talisker on Main

Talisker on Main is the Talisker Club’s first-ever nonmember dining establishment. The restaurant features award-winning executive chef John Murcko’s “New Cuisine,” a modern combination of classic flavors creating a unique stylized interpretation of America’s favorite foods, emphasizing purity and simplicity with the finest and freshest seasonal flavor sensations. In addition to Chef Murcko’s deliciously creative cuisine, Talisker on Main offers special amenities such as 66 private wine lockers, private library and chef’s table. 515 Main, Park City, 435-658-5479, TaliskerOnMain.com

Wild Mushroom Pizza

Wild Mushroom Pizza is a pizza restaurant offering a number of unique premium pizzas created by a talented staff to delight your appetite anytime. The pizzas and sub sandwiches are available for takeout or delivery from either of the two Wild Mushroom Pizza locations. Unique toppings include baby pink shrimp, black Kalamata olives, sun-dried tomatoes, Greek spinach, Spanish pine nuts, pesto sauce and more. Wild Mushroom also now serves burgers and a selection of Italian pasta dishes. 2711 S. State St., Salt Lake City, 801-484-6100, WildMushroomPizza.com

East Coast Subs

At East Coast Subs, you might just think you’ve landed in Philadelphia, New York or Boston. Submarine sandwiches here come in small or large sizes, with party subs up to six feet long. Among the East Coast specialties are an Italian sub, Philly cheesesteak, pepper steak, meatball sub, veal cutlet, tuna sub and the Malibu chicken. There’s also a pastrami burger and Spartan burger on the menu, named for the local high school football team. Cheese fries, onion rings, chips, corn dogs, potato salad, chef salad, cookies and scones round out the menu. Multiple locations, EastCoastSubsUtah.com

Valter’s Osteria

Valter’s offers elegance and high class across the board, from the ambience, tableside service and, of course, the quality of the food. Owner Valter Nassi is almost always milling about, greeting each party and elevating the life and enthusiasm of the restaurant. Though the menu frequently changes based on the season, you can’t lose if you start with the bruschetta, and there’s always a diversity of pasta dishes and sauces. End the night with a simple but sensational dessert of hot chocolate and biscotti. 173 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801521- 4563, ValtersOsteria.com

Faustina

When it comes to Faustina’s transcendent grilled salmon fillet, diners are likely to be less inclined to share it with


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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net others at their table. OK, there are other good things on the menu, too. Like sauteed scallops with applewoodsmoked bacon and garden tomato risotto. The executive chef has a way with pasta, and his seafood scampi with angel hair pasta is sensational. Also give the pappardelle alla salsiccia a go. 454 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-746-4441, FaustinaSLC.com

Epic Casual Dining

Start your meal at Epic with the three-olive tapenade & hummus before you move on to an appetizer of tender steamed clams in garlic, white wine, and butter with parsley. From there, perhaps choose the mushroomMarsala grilled chicken, grilled beef tenderloin with bluecheese butter and port reduction, or the crowd-favorite: sauteed pork medallions with caramelized onions and a sherry-sage demi-glace. The fact that almost nothing on the menu is priced over $20 means you can splurge a bit with a selection from the very appealing wine list. 707 E. Fort Union Blvd., Midvale, 801-748-1300, EpicCasualDining.com

501 on Main

A longtime classic dive in Salt Lake City, Virg’s Fish & Chips specializes in—natch—English-style fish & chips. In addition to fried cod and shrimp, there are also halibut and salmon on the menu, along with a variety of sandwiches, including an enormous 2-pound burger, the world’s largest club sandwich, gyros and even a shredded-beef burrito. 5770 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-968-7180

Café Madrid

Award Winning BBQ

This award-winning gem of a restaurant has been featured in Bon Appétit magazine. Owners Gabrielle McAfee and her brother J.C. Pino make diners feel like family. Pino instructs customers to “get messy,” encouraging the use of fresh rolls for sopping up Café Madrid’s luscious sauces and mixing and matching various croquettes with those accompanying sauces. Start with small, tender black mussels in a rich, roasted red pepper and tomato sauce or make an entire meal of classic Spanish tapas like croquetas, gambas con bacon, piquillo rellenos, butifarritas and tortilla Española. All that’s left is to order a glass or bottle of wine from the extensive Spanish wine list. 5244 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-273-0837, CafeMadrid.net

1844 E. Fort Union Blvd Cottonwood Heights, UT 801-938-9706 | HDBBQ.NET

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1405 E 2100 S SUGARHOUSE ❖ 801.906.0908 ❖ PATIO SEATING AVAILABLE LUNCH BUFFET: TUE-SUN 11-3PM ❖ DINNER: M-TH 5-9:30PM / F-S 5-10PM / SUN 5-9PM

KING BUFFET

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O Y U L C AN E L A A OVER 2 T 00 ITEMS

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The 501 menu combines elegance with accommodation, featuring dishes specially crafted to be vegan, vegetarian or gluten-free. Options are healthy yet satisfying, and special menus are available for private parties and events. Located on upper Main Street, the restaurant allows diners a great view of the liveliness of Park City. 501 Main, Park City, 435-645-0700, 501OnMain.com

From 11-2pm Tuesday- Friday

Virg’s Fish & Chips

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April 9, 2015 | 20

TEL: 801.969.6666 5668 S REDWOOD RD TAY L O R S V I L L E , U T

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CHINESE SEAFOOD | SUSHI | MONGOLIAN


While We’re young

Mid-Laugh Crisis

CINEMA

Noah Baumbach takes another funny look at finding a life direction in While We’re Young. By Scott Renshaw scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

O

Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts in While We’re Young documentary project, Baumbach confronts the role that being a parent often plays in an adult’s development: forcing you to surrender self-absorption and think about a bigger picture than your own desires. It’s a shame that Baumbach fumbles much of his momentum down the stretch, as While We’re Young takes a turn towards focusing on Josh’s jealousy regarding how much everyone seems to admire Jamie’s movie. The acerbic situational comedy—with funky moments like Jamie’s co-camera-operator dashing across the frame as they approach one documentary subject’s house, because a movie’s gotta move—gives way to plot twists that don’t seem worth whatever they’re doing to puncture idealized notions of affectation and authenticity. It’s a much more satisfying movie when it’s allowing room for Driver’s wonderfully loose portrait of ironicLionel-Richie-listening Millennial-ism, and a conclusion that suggests every generation now is destined for its own unique brand of narcissism. Baumbach knows we’re all wondering if we’re on the right life track, and While We’re Young once again shows that he understands how funny that wondering can be. CW

WHILE WE’RE YOUNG

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HHH Ben Stiller Naomi Watts Adam Driver Rated R

TRY THESE Greenberg (2010) Ben Stiller Greta Gerwig Rated R

Frances Ha (2012) Greta Gerwig Adam Driver Rated R

This Is 40 (2012) Paul Rudd Leslie Mann Rated R

april 9, 2015 | 21

Kicking and Screaming (1995) Josh Hamilton Olivia d’Abo Rated R

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friends’ creative spark. And as they begin to spend more time hanging out with Jamie and Darby, they feel less and less connected to their parenting peers. At first, it feels like Baumbach is mostly out for a slick—though very funny—skewering of a particular species of Brooklyn “hipster.” The fedora-wearing, tattooed Jamie and the avocado-and-almond-milk artisan-ice-cream-making Darby live in a loft filled with analog media, and invite Josh and Cornelia to a shamanic ritual that involves ingesting mescaline and mass vomiting. Yet, Baumbach also sets up a sly montage that juxtaposes the leisure activities of the two couples—one pair listening to vinyl and watching VHS tapes, the other surfing through their DVR listings and spending all their time on their smartphones. Rejecting modern technology may be something of a pose for Jamie and Darby, but While We’re Young doesn’t exactly suggest that the children of the ’80s are a model for right living, either. More significantly, While We’re Young takes on the notion of the mid-life crisis as a confrontation with the opportunities no longer open to you. Josh may pay lip service to the idea that, as far as choosing not to pursue having a child after failed attempts years earlier, “the point is we have the freedom,” but they’re not doing much with the freedom they have. Josh’s still-unfinished, nearly-a-decade-in-the-making second film becomes a kind of security blanket, allowing him to maintain the illusion that the work that will make his career a success might still be ahead of him. And as Josh begins to take on the role of mentor to Josh’s own new

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ver the course of Noah Baumbach’s 20-year career as a filmmaker, it’s been fascinating watching him wrestle with the idea of where you are in your life, and what you’re supposed to be doing with that time. In his charming 1995 debut Kicking and Screaming, he followed a group of post-collegiate Gen-X-ers doing everything in their power not to move on into “the real world.” By 2010’s Greenberg, he was dealing with the self-loathing of a 40-something guy whose youthful idealism probably cost him his one shot at success. And in 2012’s Frances Ha, he had circled back around to 20-somethings, following a would-be dancer approaching a moment when she’s already wondering whether to scale back her sense of what’s possible. While We’re Young finds Baumbach taking on generational differences with a satirical eye that feels trained more-or-less equally on both generations. He opens with a great lowkey gag: Forty-something New Yorkers Josh (Ben Stiller) and Cornelia (Naomi Watts) are fumbling an attempt to soothe an infant, all while a cradle music-maker plays a tinkling version of David Bowie’s “Golden Years.” But the baby isn’t theirs; the newborn belongs to their also-40-something friends, and the childless Josh and Cornelia seem completely baffled by being the peers of people who have suddenly become all about this other tiny person. But there’s a shift in perspective on the horizon when documentary filmmaker Josh teaches a continuing-education class in his craft, and meets 20-something couple Jamie (Adam Driver) and Darby (Amanda Seyfried). When Jamie and Darby join Josh and Cornelia for dinner, the older couple becomes energized by their new young


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22 | April 9, 2015

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. Danny Collins HHH.5 It’s become something of a snarky joke about emotionally manipulative entertainment, but when you can honestly say, “I laughed, I cried,” somebody’s doing something right. From a great opening caption about how it’s based loosely on a true story, Dan Fogelman’s drama follows Danny Collins (Al Pacino), a beloved 1970s singer-songwriter living as a wealthy but self-destructive nostalgia act when his manager (Christopher Plummer) discovers a never-delivered letter written to Danny in 1971 by John Lennon about avoiding the perils of fame; a shaken Danny abruptly decides to cancel his tour and track down Tom (Bobby Canavale), the son he’s never met. The arc of a tale like this is inevitably schematic; you could figure out when somebody’s going to walk in on Danny doing something awful pretty much down to the second. But it’s a beautifully acted piece all around—from a seemingly rejuvenated Pacino to lovely supporting turns by Plummer, Annette Bening

Movie times and locations at cityweekly.net

and Jennifer Garner—and the kind of writing touches that bring characters to detailed life. This kind of warm, funny redemption story is … well, I laughed, I cried. Opens April 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw Freetown HHH There are better and worse ways to approach the concept of “faith-based cinema.” This is one of the better ways. Director Garrett Batty (The Saratov Approach) and Utah playwright Melissa Leilani Larson adapt the fact-based story of a group of African LDS missionaries in Monrovia, Liberia, circa 1989. As that country is thrown into tribal civil war, local church member Philip Abubakar (Henry Adofo) packs the six missionaries into his Toyota Corolla for a treacherous attempt to reach safety across the border in Freetown, Sierra Leone. As in many such tales, deus ex machina miracles are part of the package, and plenty of time is spent musing over keeping the faith in the face of difficulties. But Batty’s also working with a genuinely tense life-or-death narrative, and shows the smarts to know when to subvert expectations. It’s a satisfying surprise indeed to find a

“Mormon movie” willing to confront the church’s legacy of racism head-on, and even make a joke out of the missionaries being able to escape threatening soldiers who would rather let them go than listen to someone attempting to proselytize them. Opens April 8 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR

Kill Me Three Times H Is anybody at all nostalgic for the Tarantino-knock-off crime thrillers of the mid-’90s? This mirthless nonsense follows several characters—a bar owner (Callan Mulvey), his wife (Alice Braga), a hit man (Simon Pegg), a femme fatale (Teresa Palmer), a corrupt cop (Bryan Brown), etc.—through backtracking chronology involving insurance fraud, stolen money and attempted murder. Director Kriv Stenders revels in the slow-mo blood spurts from the shooty-shooty and stabbystabby, leaving Pegg with the lines that are supposed to provide clever comic relief but are in fact as lacking in imagination as his all-black get-up and low-angle, stepping-out-of-a-car-door entrance shot. These terrible, avaricious people and their various violent, plot-twisty schemes are just thrown out there as though this movie invented the idea, instead of coming late to a 20-years-gone party that everyone was thrilled to see end. Opens April 10 at Brewvies (NR)—SR

The Longest Ride [not yet reviewed] The lives of a young couple and an older man trapped in a car crash become intertwined in this latest Nicholas Sparks adaptation. Opens April 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

A Tale of Winter HHH There’s an ocean of material to explore regarding the point at which it makes sense to “move on” from a lost love, and Eric Rohmer takes an intriguing voyage before bringing it to a perplexing halt in this 1992 feature previously unreleased in the U.S. It’s the story of Félicie (Charlotte Véry), whose summer fling with handsome Charles (Frédéric van den Driessche) leaves her pregnant yet with no way to find him after they part; five years later, single-mom Félicie’s other romantic relationships still leave her unfulfilled compared to Charles. Véry’s performance is appealingly ingenuous, giving Rohmer’s talky scenes a boost as she resists rational arguments by clinging to an almost religious faith in her long-ago true love. That metaphor carries through much of the film, but the resolution feels almost too pat in providing an answer to that faith. It’s unusual and perhaps even welcome to see a person who might be dismissed as flighty defended in her impulsive approach to life, but it’s hard to find this particular climax more than superficially satisfying. Opens April 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR

While We’re Young HHH See review p. 21. Opens April 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas and Megaplex Jordan Commons. (R)

Woman in Gold HH If you’re a filmmaker, here’s a helpful tip: Your movie’s flashback sub-plot shouldn’t draw attention to how dull your actual central plot is. The true story of Austrian Jewish refugee Maria Altmann (Helen Mirren) unfolds in two parts: in 1998, as she enlists attorney Randol Schoenberg (Ryan Reynolds) to help her recover art stolen from her family by the Nazis; and circa 1938, as young Maria (Tatiana Maslany) confronts the Nazi threat first-hand. Those flashbacks provide every ounce of urgency the story has going for it, particularly as Maria and her husband try to flee the country. And the rest is little more than a tedious paper chase across the months of legal wrangling, with Austrian officials merely propped up as sneering obstacles to the justice we clearly want to see done for Maria, and catalysts to Schoenberg’s growing sense of his own identity as a Jew. Mirren gives Maria all the blunt, pushy conviction she can muster, but the story can’t deliver any idea more complex than “Nazis were bad, and reparations are good.” Opens April 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR


Food for Your

Soul

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| DINING GUIDE |

APRIL 9, 2015 | 23

In City Weekly’s 2015 Dining & Bar Guide, the focus is on food for the soul. We ask local chefs where they go to feed their bellies and nourish their souls. We list some of Salt Lake City’s best food trucks, discover the best local pizza & beer pairings and, yes, we even indulge in some comforting bites (and a beverage or two) from some of our favorite bars. So please, enjoy reading our 2015 Dining & Bar Guide while snacking on some of the best comfort food Utah has to offer. Forget about your waistline for the moment—comfort food is good for the soul. CW

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A

s living creatures, we all have to consume nutrients in order to live. But, as humans, we eat for many other reasons beyond mere survival. We eat to celebrate, to socialize and to bring us together with our loved ones. Some folks eat compulsively to mask fears, or competitively to win prizes. But none of us, it seems, can resist succumbing at times to one of food’s greatest charms: its ability to calm our nerves, to make us forget our workday woes and to transport us back to happier times.


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24 | APRIL 9, 2015

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26 | APRIL 9, 2015

Contents 28 Soul Food 32

Soup’s On!

A dozen nourishing soups for the soul. By Ted Scheffler

Where restaurateurs feed their bellies & souls. By Ted Scheffler

36 Raising the Bar 40

Mobile App-etite The food-truck season is upon us. By Kathleen Curry & Geoff Griffin

Elevated eats at Utah’s bars, pubs & clubs. By Ted Scheffler

48

Fourth Estate Solace

Drinks and pub food to soothe the savage journalist. By City Weekly staff

56

High Flying Dough This is what happens when you give a fat guy $50 and tell him to go find the best pizza in Salt Lake City. By Randy Harward

62

Made for Each Other

Upping your pizza & beer game. By Amanda Rock

64

Heavenly Seven

These locally made confections will lift your spirits (and your blood sugar). By Amanda Rock


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3176 East 6200 South banditsbbq.com | 801.944.0505

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“Service at Bandits is about as good as it gets.”

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H A T U , S T H G I E H D COTTONWOO


Soup’s

On!

A dozen nourishing soups for the soul. By Ted Scheffler comments@cityweekly.net Photos by Derek Carlisle

Clam Chowder at Market Street Grill & Oyster Bar

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S

ure it’s a culinary cliché, but a piping hot bowl of soup really can soothe the soul, and is even purported to have healing powers. And yet, soups, chilis and stews seem to appear on fewer and fewer restaurant menus. So, where’s the soup? I’m sure City Weekly readers have their favorites; here are a dozen of mine. I’d walk a mile for a steaming bowl of French onion soup with lovingly rendered onions in a dark, rich broth with a gratin of Gruyere and toasted baguette slices. Or, I could just mosey over to The Paris Bistro (1500 S. 1500 East, 801-486-5585, TheParis.net) for a tureen of its deliciously satisfying gratinée à l’oignon, knowing that there’s also a plethora of French wines available to drink with it. I’ve been in mourning ever since Elvis Nixon’s Chili Parlor in Sandy closed well over a decade ago. That’s because a good bowl of housemade chili is hard to find. What a surprise, then, to find excellent chili con carne made from scratch at a deli—Boston Deli (9 Exchange Place, 801-355-2146, BostonDeli.com), to be precise. Its beefy chili with beans sticks to the ribs with just the right amount of spice, plus crackers and cornbread on the side. For clam chowder, I usually go to one of the places that has been doing it here the longest: Market Street Grill & Oyster Bar (various locations, MarketStreetGrill.com). Market Street chowder is brimming with chunky potatoes, celery, onion, leeks, green pepper and clams, lightly seasoned with thyme and bay, all served up with Market Street’s scrumptious sourdough bread.

Photo courtesy Market Street Grill & Oyster Bar

Chili Con Carne at Boston Deli

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French Onion Soup at The Paris Bistro


When I eat at Feldman’s Deli (2005 E. 2700 South, 801-906-0369, FeldmansDeli.com), I’m always in a quandary. The sandwiches like the Reuben and Sloppy Joe are so filling that there’s not really much room for extras. However, it’s also hard for me to ever pass up the homemade matzo ball soup, with airy matzo balls, scrumptious chicken broth and just the right amount of schmaltz.

I’m a lentil lover. I love black beluga lentils, green lentils, red and yellow lentils—if it’s a lentil, I love it. So, it’s no wonder I’m partial to the red-lentil soup at Layla Mediterranean Grill and Mezze (4751 S. Holladay Blvd., 801-272-9111, LaylaGrill.com). It’s a hearty mélange of onions and red lentils, cooked down and puréed with spices, and served with homemade pita chips.

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Thank goodness there’s at least one non-chain business in Salt Lake City that specializes in soup. Not surprisingly, The Soup Kitchen (various locations, SLCSoup.com) serves up an array of homemade soups, and I love the cream of tomato. The chicken noodle, has thick, dumpling-style noodles like my mom made. Still, it’s the timeless flavors of its split-pea with ham soup that serves as a nostalgic kick in the soul for me.

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There are plenty of places here to get good Vietnamese pho, and I frequent a number of them. My favorite—especially if I’m in the neighborhood—is the pho at Pho Tay Ho (1766 S. Main, 801-4663650, PhoTayHo.com). I usually start with fresh shrimp spring rolls before digging into the fragrant pho, made with a beautiful broth that simmers overnight and comes with a choice of brisket, flank, tendon, steak, tripe or meatballs, or even a combination of all of them.

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My Greek friends and colleagues would tan my hide if I didn’t mention my favorite avgolemono. It’s a Greek soup typically made with chicken broth that’s thickened with eggs, subtly spiked with lemon, and usually contains rice or orzo. For my money, it’s hard to beat Aristo’s (224 S. 1300 East, 801-581-0888, AristosSLC. com) for avgolemono—or any other Greek fare, for that matter.


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Ramen is the new “it girl� of soups. And, judging from the lines for tables at Tosh’s Ramen (1465 S. State, 801-466-7000, ToshsRamen.com), Chef Tosh doesn’t need my help. But I’d be lying if I didn’t say this was my favorite Salt Lake City ramen. Tosh makes his broth from scratch, simmering bones overnight, and I love the quality of the excellent wheat and egg noodles from Los Angeles’ Sun Noodle company. You can’t beat the tonkatsu at Tosh’s. Soup’s on! CW

With a recently updated interior, there’s even more reason to try the menudo at Taqueria El Rey de Oros (175 S. 900 West, 801-322-3176). Sure, the dollar tacos are hard to beat. But I love the big steaming bowl of menudo: breakfast of champions. The tripe stew with red chile broth here is homemade and soul-affirming, but don’t look for it on weekdays. It’s a Saturday-Sunday specialty.

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Having a best friend who lives in New Orleans, I’m exposed to gobs of gumbo. When I have a hankering for that Cajun-Creole soup/stew here, I always turn to The Bayou (645 S. State, 801-961-8400, UtahBayou. com). I normally order the standard chicken sausage gumbo with rice, but if you’re feeling flush, you can add crawfish or shrimp for a couple extra bucks. The only thing missing is the Abita beer. But, hey, you’ll have hundreds of other Bayou beer options to choose from.

Italy’s classic pasta e fagioli—a tomato and mirepoix-based broth with white beans and small pasta pieces such as ditalini—is one of my favorites, a hearty soup to enjoy yearround. When I’m looking for the real deal, I head to Per Noi Trattoria (1588 E. Stratford Ave., 801-486-3333, PerNoiTrattoria.com) for Chef Francesco’s excellent, authentic Italian fare.

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Ali Sabbah, owner of Mazza: My favorite go-to place is this little Vietnamese hole-in-thewall called South China House (428 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-9918). I Compiled by Ted Scheffler go there after a night of drinking, if I’m feeling a cold coming on, or if comments@cityweekly.net I’m simply looking for a hot, nourishing meal. I know that most people would order the pho, which is superb, but for me, it’s always the pho bo hue, a rich, spicy and funky soup served with shredded cabbage, bean sprouts, mint and, if you’re in luck, cilantro. Frederic Barbier, Snowbird food & beverage director: I really haven’t been out much since we had Aymeric, our son. So right now, there’s not much time to check new places, but I’ve been cooking at home a little bit more. Lately, it’s about making homemade semolina pasta, which is fun to do with Aymeric. I have a lot of fun making either pasta or ravioli with him. And you know kids: He loves simple and good pasta with tomato sauce, fresh basil and freshly grated Parmesan. Julie Wilson, Deer Valley Resort food & beverage director: Cooking paella around the backyard fire pit with my family and friends nourishes my soul and fills my belly. Ingredients tend to be shrimp, clams and last fall’s harvest of chukar partridge, pheasant and venison sausage. And, of course, the traditional Spanish bomba: rice, chorizo, saffron, smoked paprika and love. A white Côtes du Rhône wine or Jumilla from Spain for a red are our favorite pairings.

Margo Provost, owner of Log Haven: My favorite fill? Homemade Bolognese, using my own garden-grown tomatoes from last season and fenneled sausage. I add a good supply of chopped carrots, too, because I love the sweetness, the color and texture. Paired with a Montepulciano red wine and crispy arugula with lemon and fresh shaved pecorino, this combo seems to just heal my spirit, and I feel loved!

Peter Cole, owner/founder of Squatters: Tripe, with lashings of onions, potatoes and parsley from the garden, in a light, liberally seasoned white sauce, simmered slowly for hours. My mother often served it for lunch on Saturdays; my brother and I would consume vast amounts. Just the thought of it brings tears to my eyes. Next, Sunday roast of well-seasoned, herbed, succulent Canterbury lamb, a mountain of potatoes, parboiled then cooked around the lamb to produce a perfect crispy outside, flavored and painted with all the scrumptious lamb goodness, and a lovely soft, nurturing interior. Tom Woodbury, chef and author of Eat Fresh: Quick and Easy Meals: I’m a sucker for the corned-beef sandwich at Cinegrill (1000 S. Main, 801-328-4900). The garlic roll and big pile of corned beef are a guilty pleasure! Todd Gardiner, owner/chef of Taqueria 27: Dining at Log Haven (6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Road, 801-272-8255, Log-Haven.com)—and especially seeing Dave Jones, Ian Campbell and the crew—is always a treat. It’s where I learned how to do what I do. Preparing something at home that I have grown, caught or foraged and can share with friends and family is also satisfying. And, really, anytime someone cooks for me, it’s a treat to see the creativity and passion that home cooks can bring to the table.

Todd & Kristen Gardiner

Julie Wilson

COURTESY PHOTO

Where restaurateurs & chefs feed their bellies & souls.

Margo Provost

john taylor

Food

john taylor

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Soul

For this year’s Dining & Bar Guide, City Weekly food critic Ted Scheffler decided to reach out to local chefs and restaurateurs to ask the simple question: “Where do you go to feed your belly and nourish your soul?” The answers were much more thoughtful and complex than you might expect. Enjoy:


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Lavanya Mahate, owner of Saffron Valley: The food that nourishes my soul and fills my belly is the Sunday brunch that I cook for my family every week. The menu varies slightly from week to week, but I almost always make a frittata with loads of veggies; a sweet treat like pull-apart bread; French toast or pancakes with syrup, and savory potatoes or mushrooms. Mikel Trapp, owner of Fresco, Trio, Luna Blanca Taqueria and Current: If I’m dining out, my favorite spots to feed my soul and belly are Takashi and Provisions. I have enjoyed Takashi (18 W. Market St., 801-519-9595) for years and love the creativity and simplicity of how they prepare their menu. I was also a fan of Tyler Stokes when he had his restaurant, Dashi, in Sun Valley, and now Provisions (3364 S. 2300 East, 801-410-4046, SLCProvisions.com) in Holladay. The service and food are always exceptional. Bill White, owner/chef of Park City eateries Grappa, Chimayo, Wahso, Windy Ridge Cafe & Bakery, Ghidotti’s, Sushi Blue, Bill White Farms and Billy Blanco’s: Mom’s fried chicken on Sundays with family bantering around the table; Texas barbecue brisket in Austin during South by Southwest at 11:30 p.m. listening to awesome music with strangers who, after a few tequila shots, are now your new best friends; peas picked out of the garden in early summer, lightly blanched and tossed with toasted sesame seeds and dark sesame oil; fresh trout caught after the winter snow melts, cooked in an iron skillet over a campfire with lemon and almonds that you backpacked in for miles just to make this dish special. Tyler Stokes, owner/chef of Provisions: Pho is one of my favorites, and I love what they do at both Oh Mai (3425 S. State, 801-467-6882, 6093 S. Highland Drive, 801277-9888, OhMaiSandwich.com) and Pho Tay Ho (1766 S. Main, 801-466-3650, PhoTayHo.com). The simple, warm complexity from good pho, and the fresh garnishes combined with the long-simmered broth and meats is hard to beat. Another favorite is street tacos, and if I am not at a taco stand, it’s always Lone Star Taqueria (2265 Fort Union Blvd., 801-944-2300, LoneStarTaqueria.com) for me.

Lisa Clive Ward, owner of Park City’s Silver Star Cafe: When Jeff and I started dating 26 years ago, we spent most of our “dates” cooking and/or listening to music. We’d select recipes for marinades, sauces and such over coffee in the morning, go shopping for ingredients, head to the wine store to select a wine for the meal, then spend the afternoon and evening cooking together. Angel Manfredini, owner of Bountiful’s Mandarin Restaurant: Nothing beats my brother’s lamb on the spit for Easter. A doctor by profession, a hunter and chef by passion, he kills the lamb himself at a local farm. It is studded with garlic cloves, oregano and olive oil. He slowly cooks it on the rotisserie for three hours, basting it with lemon juice, olive oil and more oregano. The prep and cooking is part of the enjoyment, all while the family and friends are gathering and drinking wine. Before the lamb is taken off the spit, everyone gathers to pull off the sizzling skin and eat it. Briar Handly, owner/chef of Park City’s Handle: The food that nourishes my soul and fills my belly most would have to be my wife’s barbecue chicken and fresh tomatoes from the garden, with good balsamic, basil, arugula, sea salt and olive oil during the summer months. It’s Melissa’s go-to meal on our days off, and something she whips up twice a week so that I can have a break from cooking. Matt Caputo, CEO of Caputo’s Market & Deli: My favorite food in the world is nice bronze-cut, air-dried pasta. Whatever sauce it is, there should be far less of it than of the pasta. As one of my Italian friends always complains, “I can’t eat pasta in America. I feel like I need to bring a fishing pole to find my pasta in all that sauce.” Two local restaurants have pasta that I simply can’t live without. Copper Onion’s (111 E. Broadway, 801-355-3282, TheCopperOnion.com) hearty beef stroganoff satisfies just about every base craving man could have. I feel like growling and Matt Caputo grunting while I am eating it. Meanwhile, over at Pago (878 S. 900 East, 801532-0777, PagoSLC. com), the squid ink pasta makes me feel like singing and sharing; a thinking man’s pasta for sure. CW

austen diamond

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Lavanya Mahate


better burgers...

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FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

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13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS |

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ser ved 7:00 - 11:00 am M o n d ay - S a t u r d ay

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meet better breakfast!


App-etite

The food truck season is upon us. By Kathleen Curry & Geoff Griffin comments@cityweekly.net

S

ometimes, food for the soul is a movable feast. It’s served up hot and delicious from a truck that’s here today and gone tomorrow. And part of the fun is finding it. The best thing about food trucks is they can be anywhere at any time since they aren’t tied down with bricks and mortar. By the same token, the most challenging thing for food-truck fanatics is that food trucks can be anywhere at any time. There are certain places—such as Gallivan Plaza on Thursdays or the Downtown Farmers Market on Saturdays—where you can reliably find gatherings of food trucks on a regular basis. But tracking down a specific truck on a daily basis can require cloak & dagger-style sleuthing that can feel like tracing some illicit dealer to a park. You try something that gets you hooked, and then find yourself obsessing about where you can find your next fix. Where will they be tomorrow? When did they last tweet? Have they updated their website recently? Wait, what about their Facebook page? Part of the fun is that food trucks are always on the move. Some trucks use their websites to post a week in advance where they will be and when. Others post only on Facebook, while others will only use Twitter. Another reliable route is to check out the tweets from @utahfoodtrucks. However you find them, these eight food trucks are well worth the search:

Wilma’s Gourmet Food

Out of all the food-truck dishes we’ve tried, the one we can’t wait to try again is Wilma’s tri-tip steak sandwich with melted gouda on ciabatta. It just melts in your mouth. That’s our preference, but what they usually sell out of is the filet mignon with Asiago cheese on a rosemary-Parmesan bun. The Brazilian chef has a great sense of humor and keeps visitors entertained while he prepares the food. Facebook.com/WilmasGourmetFood @wilmasgourmet

Travel Brigade

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@olddutchstore

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Breakfast & Lunch Weekdays

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2014 62 E. Gallivan Ave. 801-961-9000 FromScratchSLC.com

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27 Years!

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136 E. 12300 S. | 801.571.3838

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CELEBRATING


Derek carlisle Travel Brigade

Chow Truck

Derek carlisle

Chow takes a number of different cuisines and mixes them together to be served in a variety of ways. Choose from a taco, slider or salad and load it with coconut-lemongrass chicken, pineapple-ginger pork, spicy beef with cilantro-chile pesto, panko-fried tofu or flash-fried calamari. Our favorite? The panko-fried shrimp tacos. There are also different monthly specials, such as the elk slider topped with chimichurri and Peruvian peppers. The Chow Truck is easy to find, since the website is updated weekly with days, times and locations. ChowTruck.com @chowtruck

There are all sorts of sandwiches and salads to choose from at Blake’s, but the most popular items are the sliders. Options include a schnitzel slider, barbecue jalapeño and other seasonal varieties. Try two or three different choices together along with a side of spiced fries ­—complete with fry sauce (this is Utah after all)—and fresh lemonade. BlakesGourmet.com @blakesgourmet

Fiore Pizza

What’s better than a wood-fired pizzeria? A mobile wood-fired pizzeria. Even better than that, how about a mobile wood-fired pizzeria that serves up not only traditional classics such as a margherita or white pizza stocked with ricotta and mozzarella, but also special recipes such as sweet corn with bacon or crushed pistachios with rosemary and red onions. FiorePizza.com @fiorepizza

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3 Brothers Tacos

Cupbop

Go to a gathering of food trucks, and you’ll find that Cupbop generally has the longest line. Fortunately, the line moves pretty quickly. Part of the reason is the fun vibe the Cupbop staff gives off with shouting at each other, loud music and occasionally exiting the truck to dance. However, the biggest reason for its popularity is that once you’ve tried “Korean BBQ in the cup” you’ll become a repeat customer. The cup comes loaded with rice, lettuce, noodles, and you pick from chicken, beef, pork or veggies or make your own combination. Don’t forget to add Korean pot stickers on top. Once you’ve placed your order at one window, you move over to the other window and tell the guy how hot you want it on a scale of 1 to 10, and he loads it up with the appropriate sauces. When he’s done, you’ve got a meal in a bowl. Facebook.com/Cupbop @cupboptruck

Derek carlisle

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Blake’s Gourmet Food Truck

The fact that their Facebook posts are in Spanish should tell you that 3 Brothers knows their tacos. You can find them everywhere from outside Beer Bar on a Friday night to the Downtown Farmers Market on a Saturday morning. Either way, they’ll be serving up not just tacos, but tortas, burritos and quesadillas.

Cherry’s Hot Chocolate and Artisan ‘Mallows

Cherry’s has you covered no matter what the weather is like. When it’s cold out, there’s nothing better than hot chocolate. When it’s hot out, there’s nothing better than frozen hot chocolate. Either way, you win. Also, if you’re not married, you’ll want to look into having Cherry’s bring their “s’mores bar” to the reception whenever you decide to tie the knot. If you’re already married, you might want to consider renewing your vows so you’ll have an excuse to get the s’mores bar. CherrysHotChocolate.com @cherryshotchoco

Rubadue’s Saucey Skillet

Saturday’s Waffle

Don’t be fooled by the name. On just about any day of the week, you can get delicious dishes such as chicken and waffles on a stick, lemon curd and raspberries on a liege waffle or “The Benny”­— a waffle topped with bacon, egg and hollandaise sauce. Waffles aren’t just for breakfast, either. At lunchtime or in the evenings, look for the vintage trailers and a waffle with a face on it, and you’ll know you’re in the right place. SaturdaysWaffle.com @saturdayswaffle Whether it’s breakfast on a weekend, lunch on a weekday or snack outside a club late at night, Salt Lake City has a food truck for every occasion. CW Kathleen Curry and Geoff Griffin trek around the globe near and far and host the Travel Brigade Radio Show and Podcast. You can find them at TravelBrigade.com and on Twitter @TravelBrigade. Enjoy the trip!

Besides catering and offering cooking lessons, Rubadue’s Saucey Skillet specializes in “high-quality comfort food,” such as four-cheese mac & cheese, cilantro-chicken-pesto sandwiches and a classic BLT on ciabatta. SauceySkillet.com @sauceyskillet


Best Coffee House

APRIL 9, 2015 | 39

2014

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2007 2008

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2005

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Thank you to our hard working staff & loyal patrons for voting Coffee Garden Best of Utah!


Whiskey Street’s corn dogs

Elevated eats at Utah’s bars, pubs & clubs. Ted Scheffler comments@cityweekly.net

Derek carlisle

Piper Down’s poutine

T

ime was that a bag of stale pretzels and who-knows-how-old pickled eggs were about the best we could expect to nosh on at our local watering hole. Not that there’s anything wrong with those tried & true classics. But today, when we hit our favorite clubs, pubs and bars, we’re accustomed to fare of a more elevated sort. Well, here are some foods from a handful of establishments that far exceed our traditional notions of pub fare and bar food. When is a corn dog not a corn dog? When it’s the corn dog at Whiskey Street (323 S. Main, 801-433-1371, WhiskeyStreet.com). These aren’t your daddy’s batterwrapped tubesteaks. At Whiskey Street, the hot dogs are made from braised pork belly, which is coated and fried in jalapeño-cornmeal batter and served with spicy-sweet mango mostarda. At the Irish-themed Piper Down Public House (1492 S. State, 801-468-1492, PiperDownPub.com), you’d naturally expect to find Emerald Isle staples like corned beef & cabbage, Irish stew, shepherd’s pie, fish & chips, bangers & mash and the like. And indeed, they’re to be found on the menu. But I’m happy to see that our neighbors from the Great White North are represented as well. The ultimate bar food might just be Piper Down’s Canadian-style poutine french fries with fresh mozzarella and brown gravy.

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Plenty of bars have burgers. But there’s only one I know of in Utah that considers foie gras a garnish. That’s the Lux Burger at Burgers and Bourbon in Deer Valley’s Montage Resort (9100 Marsac Ave., Park City, 435-604-1300, MontageHotels.com/DeerValley). It begins with a classic beef-burger blend and is elevated to the stratosphere with the addition of foie gras and truffles, plus bourbon-caramelized onions and arugula.

42 | APRIL 9, 2015

2014

www.fratelliutah.com 801.495.4550

Poplar Street Pub’s Scotch egg

Although Poplar Street Pub’s (242 S. 200 West, 801-532-2715, PoplarStreetPub.com) menu is loaded with excellent burgers, truffled handcut french fries, tasty tacos and more, I inevitably find myself leaning toward a true pub classic: the Scotch egg. It’s a hard-cooked egg wrapped in Poplar Street Pub’s housemade fennel-spiked sausage, then beer battered and deepfried. Is it part of my diet plan? Nope. But now and then, you just have to bow down to the power of the Scotch egg.

john taylor

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Brunch 10:30-2:00 on Weekends 3364 s 2300 e , S L C slcprovisions.com

Bambara’s crab-stuffed peppers

Guy Wheelwright

Whenever I’m bellied up to Bambara’s bar in the Hotel Monaco called The Vault (202 S. Main, 801-363-5454, BambaraSLC.com), I find it hard to resist the housemade potato chips smothered in blue cheese. Even so, my go-to bar bite is Chef Nathan Powers’ stupendously tasty red piquillo peppers stuffed with crab and served with scrumptious saffron sauce. This is truly bodacious bar food.


Cheese and wine have a fondness for one another. And I have a fondness for the extensive wine selection at BTG Wine Bar (63 W. 100 South, 801-359-2814, BTGWineBar.com), especially when I’ve paired a glass with owner/chef Fred Moesinger’s take on mac & cheese: al dente penne pasta with wild mushrooms, roasted garlic, herbs and three different cheeses, baked with fresh bread crumbs and drizzled with truffle oil.

Coming from owner/chef Ryan Lowder— who brought us The Copper Onion and Copper Kitchen restaurants—it’s not a surprise that his classic bar, Copper Common (111 E. 300 South, 801-355-0543, CopperCommon.com), would come equipped with the award-winning fare that his restaurants are known for. The most creative part of the bar menu are the booze & food “flights,” where libations such as French Grand Quinquina, Austrian Zirbenz liqueur and Ron Zacapa 23-year-old Solera rum are paired with foods like Stilton blue cheese, nutty Swiss Appenzeller cheese and Italian Guido Gobino Italian hazelnut chocolate, respectively.

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Josh Scheuerman

BTG Wine Bar’s mac & cheese

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Meditrina’s agrodolce

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JOHN taylor

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And, while we’re on the subject of wine bars, Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar (1394 S. West Temple, 801-4852055, MeditrinaSLC.com) not only has an eclectic menu filled with items like celery-root ravioli, Korean barbecued porkbelly, butternut-squash agrodolce, and beef carpaccio, but each week there’s also Endless Tapas Tuesday, when all-you-caneat tapas are only $25 per person.


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jeff chipian

Stacey Deittman

Porcupine Pub & Grill’s ahi rolls

Bleu Bisto’s Wagyu beef sliders

And speaking of burgers, the slider has taken its rightful place among our most iconic bar foods. Even so, you might not expect a venue that specializes in booking world-class live blues acts to think twice about food. But at Bleu Bistro (1615 Foothill Drive, 801-585-8331, BleuBistroSLC.com), owner/chef Carl Weyandt covers the culinary bases with dishes like seared bluefin tuna, chicken saltimbocca, grilled Caribbean shrimp, risotto cakes and my favorite: Wagyu beef sliders with Gorgonzola aioli and organic mixed greens.

It was one of the first Utah microbreweries around, so you know that the suds at Roosters (253 25th St., Ogden, 801-627-6171; 748 W. Heritage Park Blvd., Layton, 801-774-9330, RoostersBrewingCo.com) will be great. What you might not know is the greatness of their “What a Crock” appetizer. It’s an aptly named crock of eight different cheeses, blended and baked with crab, artichoke hearts, spinach and roasted garlic, served with baguette slices.

Sipping a locally brewed beer at Porcupine Pub & Grill (3698 Fort Union Blvd., 801-942-5555, PorcupinePub.com), I’m tempted by classic bar foods like hot wings and nachos. But when I want to class things up a bit, I order the ahi spring rolls. These are nori and rice-paper rolls stuffed with rare sushi-grade ahi tuna, shredded cabbage, mung bean sprouts, basil, cilantro, scallions and crunchy carrots on white rice with pineapple and pickled ginger. It’s simply awesome ahi.


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CITY WEEKLY’S INAUGURAL

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PLUS ONE PASS THROUGH THE SALAD BAR


The Annexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beef tartare

Heather L. King

FANCY TACOS & FINE TEQUILAS

The Wasatch Brewpubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beet salad

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Josh Scheuerman

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At The Annex (1048 E. 2100 South, 801742-5490, TheAnnexbyEpicBrewing.com), Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m inclined to chant, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raw! Raw! Raw!â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because they dish up one of my favorite foods on the planet: beef tartare. You certainly donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to mess around with inferior meats when serving beef tartare, and The Annex doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Chef Craig Gerome begins by mincing raw Niman Ranch Beef, spikes it with mint, and serves it with a raw egg yolk on top and crispy housemade lavash alongside.

Meanwhile, just around the corner from The Annex, The Wasatch Brewpub (2110 S. Highland Drive, 801-783-1127, WasatchBeers. com) offers pub fare that even vegans can love. To wit, the Super Food Beet Salad: a colorful mĂŠlange of raw kale, arugula and collard greens with roasted beets, mandarin orange slices and shaved almonds, drizzled with yuzu Champagne vinaigrette.


derek carlisle

Finally, my favorite bar snack might just be at J&G Grill in the St. Regis Deer Valley (2300 Deer Vallley Drive East, Park City, 435-940-5760, JGGrillDeerCrest. com). That’s where Chef Richard Samaniego executes Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s flawless Maine mussels mariniere dish, served in a cast-iron pot with grilled garlic toast for sopping up every last drop of the heavenly mariniere broth. CW

SEVENTH ANNUAL

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2015

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Live Music Food Fun!

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Evanston BrewFest

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APRIL 9, 2015 | 47

BUY TICKETS ONLINE EVANSTONBREWFEST7.EVENTBRITE.COM OR EMAIL JLAW@EVANSTONWY.ORG FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

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DOWNTOWN EVANSTON, WYOMING


48 | APRIL 9, 2015

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4

I

th

Estate Solace

f food is good for the soul, then a hefty booze-up is doubly so for the journalist’s soul. After a long day making inquiries, fielding calls from helpful tipsters and sweating press deadlines, nothing calms a newswriter’s nerves quite so much as some tasty pub food and a nice, quiet drink. Here are some City Weekly staff picks that help us shed the stress of a day in the ink mines.

Drinks and pub food to soothe the savage journalist.

By City Weekly staff comments@cityweekly.net Photos by Derek Carlisle

How music editor Kolbie Stonehocker gets in tune:

Brats & Fries at Beer Bar

There’s something pretty damned perfect about the combination of beer, brat and fries, and at Beer Bar, you can put all three in your face at practically the same time. The sausage selection is extensive and includes typical offerings as well as more adventurous choices like rattlesnake & rabbit, alligator and elk bratwurst, which is particularly juicy and flavorful and extra good with caramelized onions, sauerkraut and lots of mustard on top. But no Beer Bar meal is complete without a pile of skin-on Belgian fries, complete with fry sauce and ketchup—divinely crispy and salty, these fries are everything that’s magical and addicting about fried spuds. 161 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3618, BeerBarSLC.com

Angel’s Landing at Bar-X

Refreshing and sweet (but not too sweet), this cocktail from Bar-X would be sublime paired with a lazy summer afternoon spent on a sunny porch. It’s a light, delicate concoction of bourbon, Earl Grey syrup, lime, grapefruit twist and a surprising ingredient that gives the Angel’s Landing its slight sparkle: Wyld beer floated on top. And all the components play off one another nicely: Tart lime and grapefruit balance the sweetness of the syrup, and the carbonation of the beer lightens up the bourbon a bit. This baby couldn’t have a more fitting name: Angels would fall from heaven for this cocktail. 155 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2287, BarXSaltLake.com

How reporter Eric S. Peterson beats the blues:

The Wolven Burger at Murphy’s Bar & Grill

The Wolven Burger is one of those meals that makes me feel better about a skull-shattering hangover. Its ability to soak up the alcohol in my system gives me all the justification I need to eat this meaty masterpiece. Of course, this burger is a treat no matter my level of sobriety. It’s similar to a Reuben sandwich with Thousand Island dressing and buttery, delicious toasted rye bread, but the meat is a sumptuous hamburger patty topped with a hearty helping of corned beef and lathered in melted Swiss cheese and tangy sauerkraut. It comes with a mess of fries and dips well in fry sauce. 160 S. Main, 801-359-7271, MurphysBarAndGrillUT.com

How reporter Eric S. Peterson beats the blues:

Pickle Back at the Bourbon House

Who could have imagined the miraculous love story that is the pairing of good fiery Jameson Irish Whiskey, chased by a shot of briny pickle juice? In the world of mixed drinks, it’s like the improbable underdog high-schoolromance story of the outspoken art nerd and the football jock with the heart of gold under his too-cool-for-school exterior. Sorry, got a little carried away there … just believe me when I say the pickle back is a one-two punch of burning deliciousness ready to rock your gullet—to the max! 19 E. 200 South, 801-7461005, BourbonHouseSLC.com

How copy editor Tiffany Frandsen fact-checks herself:

Tacos at the Devil’s Daughter

Add Devil’s Daughter to the traditional Taco Tuesday itinerary. At $1.50 apiece (with a choice of either chicken or pork), they are made up of mostly basic taco building blocks: lettuce, cheddar cheese, chopped tomatoes, salsa and floppy (store-bought) flour tortillas. At first glance, they may be mistaken for standard. But the meat—oh, the meat—slathered in sweet and spicy sauce, are addicting morsels. The barbecue pulled pork is fiery and diabolically spiced but angelically tender, as is the barbecue chicken. But the real specialty at Devil’s Daughter is the pork. Since this meat is smokehouse-born, don’t neglect the barbecue sauce options for a tang or some sweetness. It’s worth the trip for the food alone, but the staff is friendly and wickedly welcoming. No one is putting on airs at this joint. 533 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-1610, DevilsDaughterSLC.com


©SCOTT SOMMERDORF | PLANET ZOE PHOTOS

2014

Open 10am to 2am daily KITCHEN OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TILL MIDNIGHT.

/

801.487.4418

/

135 W. 1300 S.

(next to Smith’s Ballpark and across the street from TRAX)

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CAVE #2

Now Open!

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Bloody Mary at Avenues Proper

Students (and all others with an eye out for drink specials), rejoice! There is a spicier-than-average bloody mary awaiting you at Avenues Proper for the weekend brunch special Saturday and Sunday: $3 for a concoction of vodka, tomato juice, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, housemade pickle brine and garlic powder (with olives and pickle beans as garnish). Treat yourself and add the thick-cut slice of glazed bacon to the breakfast beverage. From the first sip, all of the spices combined have enough jolt to wake you up, and then the alcohol gently cradles you back into a comforting, lazy weekend buzz while you take in the contemporary atmosphere. Since alcohol isn’t served until after 11:30 a.m., sleep in. Or, start with the beloved chicken & waffles. 376 Eighth Ave., Salt Lake City, 385-227-8628, AvenuesProper.com

How reporter Colby Frazier stays on the beat:

Coors Banquet at Swedetown Pub

Happy Spelunking

French Dip Sandwich at Desert Edge Brewery

I don’t particularly dig people, and they don’t particularly dig me. That’s why I try to find lonely places to drink. The best I’ve had in a long, long time was a pair of Banquet beers (Coors Original) at the Swedetown Pub on Beck Street. If I could drink at a bar every single day, this is where I’d go. The last time I entered the place, two men (one was the owner) sat at the bar. These men and the bartender were deeply interested in a movie they had just popped into the VCR. The movie was a bit distracting, but it was better than watching wasted hipsters get intimate with their iPhones. Hands down, the Swedetown Pub and the modest domestic lager products they specialize in pouring are the finest on Beck Street. It’s the place to go for your Coors. 1461 N. Beck St., Salt Lake City, 801-355-0534

Big fat disclosure: I used to brew beer at Desert Edge Brewery, and my wife waits tables there now. These facts should not deter you from believing me when I say that if you order the roast-beef dip sandwich with a side of clam chowder, chicken-corn chowder or one of the Pub’s daily pasta specials, you will not leave unsatisfied. The sandwich alone could fill the stomach of the hungriest human. And the spicy au jus dipping sauce will ensure that the baguette the beef is stuffed between is nice and soft as you bite into it. You can always get a salad on the side, but my crew and I prefer something more substantial. No french fries at the pub, so a handful of potato chips will have to do. Bottom line: If I could eat only one real meal per day, this would be it, and I bet top dollar that I wouldn’t starve. 581 S. 600 East, Trolley Square, Salt Lake City, 801-521-8917, DesertEdgeBrewery.com

How digital editor Bill Frost hits the “reset” switch:

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Cheese

How copy editor Tiffany Frandsen fact-checks herself:

Three Little Pigs at the Green Pig Pub

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

caputosdeli.com

Whenever I’m ordering food at a bar, I usually ask myself, “What can I do to properly piss off PETA today?” One of the the most effective offenders in downtown Salt Lake City is actually listed as an appetizer at the Green Pig Pub, a porktastic trio called the Three Little Pigs: Three sliders loaded with barbecue pork, grilled ham and maple bacon. They’re good alone or as a warm-up for the Cuban pork sandwich, one of my other favorite Green Pig menu items. Yes, my heart is fine—why do you ask? 31 E. 400 South, 801-532-7441, TheGreenPigPub.com

S’mores-tini at Campfire Lounge

It’s almost a crime that a s’mores-flavored vodka even exists, but the Campfire Lounge puts the Three Olives concoction to good use in their S’mores-tini by adding crème de cacao, toasted marshmallows and graham crackers, crafting a ridiculous sugar-bomb of a cocktail that would be highly impractical for actual camping. If ever there were a drink designed for an Instagram closeup, it’s this sweet thang. 837 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-467-3325, CampfireLounge.com


1624 South 1100 East Open from 7:30am to 2:30pm daily 7 days a week

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3390 South State Street | www.chinatownsupermarkets.com

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APRIL 9, 2015 | 51

3390 South State Street | www.Hotdynasty.com Party Room available for Reservation: 801-809-3229


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How intern Sam Florence goes on a coffee run:

Hog House Pizza at The Hog Wallow Pub

Tucked away in a quiet neighborhood near the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon, The Hog Wallow Pub is a perfect spot to relax with a beer and some pizza and unwind after a hard day’s work or play. I myself go for the signature Hog House pizza—featuring mushrooms, pepperoni, onions, sausage, peppers and olives, cooked to perfection. Go ahead, try it: It’ll have you wondering if you’re at an oldfashioned pizza joint in downtown Manhattan instead of a bar. 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-733-5567, TheHogWallow.com

Old-Fashioned at A Bar Named Sue

With so many colorful, wildly named, improbable cocktails to choose from, flipping through drink menus these days can be as disorienting as cruising around an IKEA. So it’s reassuring to be able to default to such staples as the Old-Fashioned. A Bar Named Sue whips up its tasty rendition of this classic at both locations, using Buffalo Trace bourbon, an orange wedge, a cherry, bitters, sugar and soda. It’s a simple, fuss-free creation for those who savor the simple things. 8136 S. State & 3928 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-274-5578, ABarNamedSue.net

How A&E editor Scott Renshaw gets his groove back:

Bacon Stinky Cheeseburger at Lucky 13

If I’m bellying up to a bar, I want a plate of food in front of me that says, “You will not walk out of here with any portion of your stomach unoccupied.” All of Lucky 13’s burger options are phenomenal—and more than a bit intimidating—but my hearty meal of choice is the Bacon Stinky Cheeseburger. It would be a crime not to partake of something featuring Lucky 13’s special house-smoked bacon, and that smoky, salty goodness gets a perfect complement in the tangy, melted blue cheese. The toppings and the juicy burger itself make it a feat of engineering, and a challenge to get every bite into your mouth. But there’s plenty of incentive to wrestle with this delicious beast, since it’s hard to imagine leaving a morsel of it on that plate. That there is some pure carnivorous satisfaction. 135 W. 1300 South, 801-487-4418, Lucky13SLC.com

Chasing Tail Golden Ale at Squatters

As a simple man with simple tastes, my bar choice is almost always something with hops and a head on it. Since my years covering theater have often found me at the Rose Wagner Center on 300 South, I’ve often grabbed a pre-show bite at Squatters. And few things on their wonderful menu don’t pair well with my favorite house brew, the Chasing Tail Golden Ale. It’s smooth but distinctive, and I’m not above admitting that I just love its glorious color in a tall glass. If not for the need to keep a clear head for professionalism’s sake, it would be hard to stop at one. 147 W. 300 South, 801-363-2739, Squatters.com

How senior staff writer Stephen Dark maintains his edge:

Flank Steak & Portobello sandwich at Fiddler’s Elbow

A mix of roadhouse and sports bar with a sophisticated yet down-home flavor to its menu, Fiddler’s Elbow is the place I go for a flank steak & Portobello sandwich when I’m yearning for a little home-style cooking but can’t face cleaning the grill. Flank steak, while delicious, is often a chewy cut. But Fiddler’s Elbow renders it a perfect pairing with the earthy richness of Portobello topped with horseradish mayo, making it a sandwich for the ages. 1063 E. 2100 South, 801-463-9393, FiddlersElbowSLC.com

Negroni at Whiskey Street

With its gorgeously long bar and equally long list of drinks, Whiskey Street enshrines like few others the pleasures of imbibing classic cocktails. The Negroni, a delectable mix of gin, sweet vermouth and Campari, topped with an orange slice, washes away the working day and, in the deepening shadows of the evening, leaves me with a mellow bonhomie that certainly deserves a second round. 323 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-433-1371, WhiskeyStreet.com


Authentic German Cuisine Market BEST SAUSAGES BEST SCHNITZEL with SPAETZLE BEST REUBEN

Siegfriedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deli Serving Imported Beers & Wine Open Mon-Wed 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm 73s   siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

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How managing editor Brandon Burt keeps His cool:

Delicious, healthy, fresh food, made to order! Gluten-free menu. Kids menu. Catering available.

5470 S 900 E Murray ¡ 801-938-8307

couscousgrill.com ¡ couscousgrill@yahoo.com

Gourmet Mexican Food

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BlackberryBasil Cocktail at Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Normally, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not one for these fancy, superfoodinfused fruity drinksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the classic gin martini is more my styleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but I was into that whole mojito thing back in the day, and I always trust the advice of Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bartenders. So when they told me I had to try the blackberry-basil cocktail, I complied without question. Tangy and slightly astringent, the vodka, ginger ale and bitters combine perfectly with lemon juice, fresh blackberries and muddled basil to achieve that refreshing alchemical balance all good cocktails have. Plus, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure it counts as a healthy serving of fruit. 326 S. West Temple, 801-819-7565, GraciesSLC.com

Buffalo Wings & Sweet-Potato Fries at The Bayou

It was years before I would touch a sweet potato. Unpleasant childhood memories of goopy, marshmallow-encrusted â&#x20AC;&#x153;yamsâ&#x20AC;? at family Thanksgiving feasts nearly scarred me for life. Fortunately, I was able to overcome my tuber trauma with the help of the fine therapists at The Bayou. Their sweet-potato fries opened up new vistas for me; now I eat them with alacrity and am a better person for it. With a half & half order of Buffalo and Cajun-dusted wings, they are transformed into a meal that restores my faith in humanity. 645 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-961-8400, UtahBayou.com

How editor Jerre Wroble avoids the raised pitchforks:

Beer & Wine WHY WAIT?

AND ASIAN GRILL M-ThĂ&#x203A;~~¤~Â&#x2021;Ă?FĂ&#x203A;~~¤~~Ă?SĂ&#x203A;~¤~~Ă?Su 12-9 NOW OPEN! 9000 S 109 W, SANDY & 3424 S STATE STREET Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;~Â?Â&#x201A;Â&#x192;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;~Ă?a[`aZYfkmk`amlÂ?[ge

Bahama Mama at Lumpyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sports Bar & Grill

I like a not-too-boisterous hideaway where a private conversation can be savored, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to shout. I like friendly bartenders and cordial wait staff, and reasonably priced drinks. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Lumpyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Highland works on so many levels. Check it out some weekend morning with an order of eggs sunny-side up, or biscuits & gravy. Sure, the cool kids will ask for a bloody maryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; but why be so predictable when you can unleash your inner pirate and order a Bahama Mama? Made with Bacardi and coconut rums, orange juice, pineapple juice and a splash of grenadine, this explosion of color insists that we not take life too seriously. While one Bahama Mama may not necessarily beget another,

just one puts the wind in my sails and an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arrr!â&#x20AC;? in my throat for the rest of the day. 3000 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-484-5597; 145 Pierpont Ave., Salt Lake City, 801883-8714, LumpysBar.com

Chi-Town Pizza at The Canyon Inn

There is no shortage of good pizza in this city, but pizzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not always a sure thing when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at a bar. I tend to worry that a microwaved Tombstone pizza will be coming my way. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I am always pleasantly surprisedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;make that, bowled overâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with the Chicagostyle thin-crust pizza at The Canyon Inn. From the meaty Chi-Town to the lip-smacking artichoke-chicken pies, the Canyon Inn uses housemade pizza dough and sauces to make my comfort carbs here the stuff of legend. 3700 Fort Union Blvd., Cottonwood Heights, 801-943-6969, TheCanyonInnBar.com CW


Join us April 10th from 6-9pm for a

COOKING DEMONSTRATION

Deli Done Right

part of the Sugarhouse Art Walk

W$ FEATURED ARTIST DAVID K. SHEPHERD

LIVE

DJ 1941 S 1100 E | smithcrown.com | 801.484.5259

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t’s early Friday evening at Rusted Sun Pizzeria. From our perch at the counter, we can see towheaded owner Wally Stephens working. Feet planted, he rocks left to right with metronomic rhythm, punching a ball of dough from side to side. When it’s thin enough, Stephens flings the dough high above his head, where it flattens into a wobbly plane before landing back in his ready hands. In between tosses, Stephens scurries up front to fiddle with the stereo, which isn’t playing Widespread Panic as loudly as it should. Then he runs back into the kitchen and keeps rocking. Stephens will craft around a dozen crusts before we leave, but his energy never flags. He loves making pizza. “A good crust,” he says during a quick break, “is the most important thing. And a good sauce.” On Sunday, but around the same time, Heath Koltenuk seconds that. The lanky owner/chef at Nuch’s Pizzeria & Restaurant says the secret to great pizza is “really easy.” Koltenuk pauses briefly to pivot between four different pies—two on the front counter, two on the back—then re-establishes eye contact and says, “All the base ingredients—your crust, the sauce and the cheese—they all have to be good.” Well, how do you know they’re good? If you’re going to a new pizzeria and want to size up the merchandise, both men say the same thing: “Get a plain cheese pizza.” If that’s not good, they say, no topping in the world will save it. City Weekly couldn’t show such restraint for this ol’ dining guide. From up north in Ogden to down south in Provo, there are so many great pizza choices, and so much variety, that plain cheese pizza seemed boring. Also, it was hard to decide where to start. Do you try to find the best of each discipline, from New York-style to Chicago to Neapolitan to American? Ultimately, we thought like a tourist and operated on word of mouth and impulse rather than variety. Consequently, we overspent our pizza expense budget by 130 percent trying some—but not nearly all—of Salt Lake City’s best pies. We started our adventure in Sugar House at Este Pizzeria (2148 S. 900 East, Salt Lake City, 801-485-3699; 156 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-363-2366, EstePizzaCo.com). Co-owner Anthony Stewart said via e-mail that good pizza also entails TLC. In the chef, you want “somebody

who cares over seei ng the process.” But dat crust, though. It should be “crispy but pliable,” says Stewart, with “not too much sauce and more emphasis on cheese, with an outer crust that is crispy but still breadlike.” The New York-style slices we tried—one each of cheese, pepperoni, veggie and meat from the slice menu—were just awesome. Especially the sliced meatballs on the meat pie [dabs drool from keyboard]. Earlier on Friday, we went to Maxwell’s East Coast Eatery (357 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-328-0304; 1456 Newpark Blvd., Park City, 435-647-0304, MaxwellsECE.com) in the Boston Building in downtown Salt Lake City. We’d heard tell of a pie called the Fat Kid and, well, could you pass that up? The name, Steven Maxwell writes, “was my Italian grandmother’s nickname for me when I was a baby [because] I was pretty chubby.” Fat Kid became a term of endearment among Maxwell and his friends, and the pizza—topped with pepperoni, ricotta cheese and spinach—is a popular choice at both Maxwell’s locations. For something so simple—spare toppings, cheese and sauce on a thin New York-style crust—it’s incredibly tasty. Maxwell, in case you’re wondering, also swears by crust: “The toppings all play off the crust.” At Rusted Sun Pizzeria (2010 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-483-2120), we’d missed the lunch special, so a consensus found us ordering a good old Hawaiian. Wally Stephens serves what’s, in essence, New York-style pizza—but he’s not precious about it. “I don’t care what you call it, as long as you like it,” he says with a laugh. The thin, crispy crust teemed with cheese, sauce, real Canadian bacon and pineapple to make the best Hawaiian pizza since our dear, departed Sugar House favorite, Der Ratskeller. On Saturday, we paid a quick visit to Settebello (260 S. 200 West, Salt Lake City, 801-322-3556; 895 W. East Promontory, Farmington, 801-

This is what happens when you give a fat guy $50 and tell him to go find the best pizza in Salt Lake City. By Randy Harward comments@cityweekly.net

Josh Scheuerman

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High

Wally Stephens, Rusted Sun Pizzeria


South Jordan 10500 S. 1086 W. Ste. 111 801.302.0777

2013

Provo -Est. 200798 W. Center Street 801.373.7200

2014

197 North Main St • Layton • 801-544-4344

Wine & Beer Available • Gift certificates available • www.IndiaPalaceUtah.com

IT TAKES A

village

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5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182

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john taylor

451-9100, Settebello.net). We popped in just after they opened at 11 a.m. and ordered the Margherita to go. It was ready in a flash, and the server included some red-pepper oil, saying it’s too good not to try. We almost didn’t, for fear it would spill on the ride home. Then we figured, what the hell? The pizza—with its chewy, charred Neapolitan crust and juicy crushed tomatoes—was good enough on its own. The pepper oil pushed it over the top, and we finished the last slice just before the on-ramp at 900 South and West Temple. Nuch’s (2819 S. 2300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-0448, Nuchs-Pizzeriaand-Restaurant.com) was the last stop. There’s a pizza there called the New Haven. In all his years of making pizza— Koltenuk, now in his 50s, started at age 5 in New York—it’s the weirdest he’s

Josh Scheuerman randy harward

randy harward

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seen. “When I first opened up, I asked my wife’s co-workers what they’d like [to see on the menu]. They said, ‘We want that mashed-potato pizza.’” They’d all gone to New Haven, Conn., and had it at some bar.” Koltenuk says the only other information they gave him was, “I think it had some garlic in it.” So he created his own version, topping his New York-style crust with Yukon Gold mashed potatoes, chunks of roasted garlic, bacon, cheese and asparagus. It’s now his signature pie. The way the Salt Lake City pizza scene is booming, this guide could have been twice the size. We could have spent even more money, and gained even more weight. But exploration is part of the fun. Get out and see what good pies you can find—and spread the word. CW

Rusted Sun Pizzeria

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Nuch's Pizzeria

Heath Koltenuk

Maxwell’s


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On the Side

Some people like their crust thin and crispy, others go big. ThePie (ThePie.com) is a Salt Lake City pizza institution. The XXL slices, beautifully burdened with toppings, are undeniably ‘Murrican style— and go great with a pitcher of beer. There are four locations (and a fifth, delivery-only store), but the real Pie experience is the original location, located underground across from the University of Utah. In Draper, there’s authentic Chicago-style pizza at Sweet Home Chicago Pizzeria (1442 Draper Parkway, 801-545-0455, SHCPizza. com). That means you wanna order it stuffed, with the sauce on top— and you should grab a fork. Lifting a slice from one of these bad boys will strain your back.

Cheesy garlic bread and salad are pizza’s most ubiquitous sidekicks, but who really eats the salad? Try The Pie’s (multiple locations, ThePie.com) Cheese Pull-a-Parts— essentially a pizza crust stuffed with cheese, brushed with oil and sprinkled with garlic, oregano, parmesan and romano cheese. Dip these in ranch or marinara and soon you’ll wonder how you’ll fit in even a slice of that plus-size pie. Good news for vegans and the gluten-free: There’s a version for both of you, and it’s even better than the original. Another must-try are The Famous Garlic Rolls at Free Wheeler Pizza (150 S. 400 East, 801-322-3733 FreeWheelerPizzaMenu.com) in all their chewy, greasy goodness. Get ’em by the dozen, and keep mints handy for a couple of days.

Keepin’ It Cheap

The advent of five-dollar pizza can be seen as a scourge or accepted with the adage that pizza is like sex; even when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good. The quality of Big Daddy’s Pizza (multiple locations, BigDaddysPizza.com) varies with the location. Sometimes you get a fresh, clean pie—sometimes you get pools of grease. But for $5.95 (12-inch pepperoni, takeout price only, usually hot and ready), it’s actually really good. Some locations serve chili verde pizzas (note: spicy!) and milkshakes. And speakin’ of giant pies, Big Daddy’s serves the 26-inch Grandaddy!

Derek Carlisle

COURTESY PHOTO

Slices That Eat Like a Meal

COURTESY PHOTO

COURTESY PHOTO

A P.S. on the Pie

By Randy Harward comments@cityweekly.net

Post-Pie Dessert

To hell with “dessert” pizzas and giant chocolate-chip cookies! (I’m sorry Mega-Tollhouse—I still love you.) But the Dream Cookies at Nuch’s Pizzeria & Restaurant (2819 S. 2300 East, 801-484-0448, Nuchs-Pizzeria-And-Restaurant. com) really live up to their name. These black-and-white cookie sandwiches come filled with your choice of sweetened mascarpone cheese, fresh vanilla bean, crushed caramelized walnuts, orange zest and fresh basil.


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Upping your pizza & beer game. By Amanda Rock comments@cityweekly.net

P

airing beer with pizza is a no-brainer. They go together like peanut butter & jelly or macaroni & cheese—a classic combination that is universally loved. Utah is home to many awardwinning breweries, with plenty of pizza-matching potential. When pairing the beer with pizza, a bit of knowledge is key. “A good rule of thumb is that the beer supports the crust, and needs to be similar in character” explains Matthew Allred, the communications director for Epic Brewing. “The carbonation cuts through the cheese and fat and refreshes the palate. The classic pepperoni pizza with a lager is hard to beat on a Friday night.” Allred is one of the state’s only certified cicerones, having passed a tasting and written exam to prove his beer knowledge. Pairing food with beer is a large component of the course. “I always make a Belgian pale in August just for garden-fresh Margherita pizzas,” Allred says. “I also love a sausage, fennel and mushroom pizza with a light garlic sauce on the grill. I try to get the crust a little charred in a few places to bring out some complexity with the mushrooms. I love this pizza with Saison,” he says. “Saison will never let you down at dinner because it’s such a complex beer and has the ability to pull out the most wonderful and unexpected flavors. In this case, the cellar quality of the beer harmonizes with the earthy mushrooms and gives them the backbone they need to stand up to the sausage. If you want a

Derek Carlisle

Derek Carlisle

Made for Each Other real kick of flavor, try this with the Utah Sage Saison. The sage really meshes with the fennel seeds and gives a stronger Italian spice note to everything.” One of Allred’s favorite wood-fired pairings is with a simple alfredo or similar white-sauce pizza with garlic and grilled chicken and bacon or pancetta. “I usually drink Smoked Porter with this pizza and it’s one of the most surprising pairings so far,” he says. “The key is to get plenty of the wood smoke and some char on the crust, bacon and chicken.” It is one of the most unique pairings, and one of the few times a dark beer works well with pizza. “The salt from the meat and roast in the beer really work together,” Allred says. Andy Fitzgerrell, an American Cheese Society certified cheese professional, definitely has opinions on the subject. Fitzgerrell has a special skill of pairing beer with cheese, so he seemed like a logical source. “Pale ales have a full flavor but doesn’t overpower the pizza,” Fitzgerrell says, “and they won’t leave you overly full when you eat a whole pizza by yourself.” My next inquiry was just as delicious. I turned to the oldest breweries in the state for some pairing suggestions. “My favorite pairing is Squatters Off Duty IPA, balanced and smooth, with a jalapeño, pineapple and pepperoni pizza,” says Dan Burick, the head brewmaster at Utah Brewers Cooperative, which includes both Squatter’s Craft Beers and Wasatch Brewery. Another delicious pairing suggested by Burick is Wasatch Brewery’s Polygamy Nitro Porter with a barbecue-chicken pizza topped with smoked gouda. “The easy-drinking beer doesn’t overpower the rich, decadent pizza,” Burick says. Or try a Margherita pizza, topped with fresh mozzarella, with a Provo Girl Pilsner for an easy and delicious meal. AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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Pilsners seem to go with everything from delivery to DiGiorno pizza. At home, that’s my beer of choice. My pizza & beer combinations are less sophisticated than the professionals I consulted, but I know what I like. Give me a pineapple and olive pizza and a pilsner to wash it down, and I’m happy. There are many to chose from, but here are a few of my local favorites: Uinta Brewing Company’s 801 is a drinkable, smooth, lightbodied and super-refreshing beer. Bohemian Brewery Czech Pilsener is also a great choice. It’s light and crisp, but it has more of a full body. The Frohlich Pils from Red Rock Brewery is another beer I enjoy with a slice or two. It’s crisp like the other Pilsners, but has a wonderful dry taste. Any of these beers are great with pizza. So what are you waiting for? Call up your favorite pizza joint, and stop by the liquor store to pick up some beer and try these suggested pairings or make some of your own. CW

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Seven These locally made confections will lift your spirits (and your blood sugar). By Amanda Rock comments@cityweekly.net

Granny B’s Cookies

The moment you spot the bright pink frosting and cheerful sprinkles, you can imagine the first bite. The story behind Granny B’s Cookies is almost as sweet as the cookie itself—there really was a Granny B, and she really did make cookies. The famous pink sugar cookies were born in a pizzeria in Provo and quickly started outselling the pizza. Distributing the popular cookies seemed like the next logical step, and now they’re everywhere, from gas stations to vending machines. Treat yourself the next time you see one, they’re just as good as you remember. Multiple locations, GrannyBs.com

2

1

Great Harvest Bread Co.

Great Harvest Bread Co. offers many made-from-scratch goodies include fresh-baked cookies, rich brownies and luscious lemon bars. They’re all tempting, but my favorite is the pumpkin chocolate-chip bread. Moist, melty chocolate chips and the heavenly aroma of pumpkin make my mouth water in anticipation of the first bite. Stop by for a free sample of bread (did I mention they make killer bread, too?) slathered with butter and jam, and a well-deserved dessert. Multiple locations, GreatHarvestUtah.com

Banbury Cross Donuts

Arctic Circle Hires Big H When my inner child

For a morning sugar rush, you can’t do better than Banbury Cross Donuts. The shop has a cult following here in Salt Lake City for its freshly baked doughnuts and doughnut holes. The secret is out: I’ve noticed Banbury mentioned in Food Network Magazine and a few “Best of” lists. Try the Cinnamon Crumb doughnut or a classic white cake doughnut covered in vivid, colorful sprinkles. The best thing about Banbury Cross Donuts is sharing a dozen with friends, but make sure to snag your favorite first! 705 S. 700 East, 801-537-1433

is having a meltdown, a visit to Arctic Circle is in order. The chain has been in Utah for 60 years, serving burgers and fries. Their invention of fry sauce gets all the attention, but the Brown Topper is where it’s at. It’s a simple vanilla soft-serve ice cream dipped in chocolate that hardens and creates a crisp chocolate shell. Or go the classic route: a tower of pristine vanilla ice cream. Multiple locations, ACBurger.com

During Utah’s scorching summer, only one thing provides relief: a root-beer float from Hires Big H served in a big, frosted mug. Vanilla ice cream and fizzy root beer are exquisite together. I love how the ice cream freezes a little when it hits the cold root beer. Leaving those first few fingerprints on the frozen glass is pure bliss. A familyfriendly restaurant that’s big on nostalgia (understandable, since they were founded in 1959), Hires Big H serves American comfort food like hamburgers, fries and onion rings. Eating here is a Utah tradition, and it’s easy to see why. Multiple locations, HiresBigH.com

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City Cakes & Cafe is a darling bakery, popular for gluten-free and vegan options, but don’t let that scare you. Everything tastes so good, you wouldn’t guess it’s kinda good for you. When you walk in, the first thing you notice is a case full of colorful sugar cookies, beautiful cupcakes and fruit tarts. My go-to is the blueberrylemon scone with a vibrant lemon flavor, studded with big, juicy blueberries and covered with the thinnest coat of icing. It’s heaven with a cup of coffee from the espresso bar. Also, you can buy vegan cookie dough that is safe eat right from the container! 1000 S. Main, 8 01- 3 5 9 - 2 2 3 9, CityCakesCafe.com

7

Hatch Family Chocolates

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From doughnut holes to gluten-free vegan sugar cookies, Salt Lake City has no shortage of sweet treats to comfort you and bring a smile to your face. And to hell with the calories! CW

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Hatch Family Chocolates is a popular chocolate shop located in the Avenues known for its delicious family tradition of gorgeous handdipped chocolates. With four generations of experience dipping chocolate, Hatch Family Chocolates is one of the most beloved confectioners in Utah. They also make a heavenly caramel from an old family recipe, and easily the best caramel apple you’ll find anywhere. Another favorite is the chocolate & peanutbutter truffle topped with sea salt: utterly delicious. 376 Eighth Ave., 801-532-4912, H a t c h Fa m i l y C h o c o l a t e s .c o m

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CINEMA

CLIPS

Movie times and locations at cityweekly.net

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 8 Mile At Brewvies, April 13, 10 p.m. (R)

Bill & Tedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Excellent Adventure At Salt Lake City Main Library, April 14, 7 p.m. (PG)

Timbuktu At Park City Film Series, April 10-11 @ 8 p.m. & April 12 @ 6 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES Furious 7 HHH This latestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and likely lastâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;franchise installment walks a delicate line between â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so stupidâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;why do I have such a goofy grin on my face.â&#x20AC;? The too-convoluted-to-attempt-summarizing plot machinations require Dom (Vin Diesel), Brian (Paul Walker) and company to drive fast and kick ass, and the action does what action in movies of this kind is supposed to do, focused around sequences that allow cars to freefall into Azerbaijan, blast between skyscrapers and fling themselves at helicopters. The hand-to-hand fights are still nowhere near as effective as the motorized craziness, and between action beats the characters still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mostly stand around and repeat the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;family.â&#x20AC;? But the combination of well-crafted set pieces and a touching send-off for the late Walker makes this a blockbuster with just enough of a light touch to match its muscle-car flexing. (PG-13)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;SR

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Real (Fake) Comedy

TV

Yay! Meh. Boo!

The Comedians delivers the laughs, but you only care about Game of Thrones. The Comedians Thursday, April 9 (FX) Series Debut: “Comedy is like heart surgery—it gets botched all the time,” says Josh Gad (as Josh Gad) in the pilot episode of The Comedians. “But, if you keep it loose and don’t overthink it … you can fix people’s hearts.” Gad is the other half of The Billy & Josh Show, a fictional FX variety series that was forced upon Billy Crystal (as Billy Crystal) after his one-man-show version was soundly rejected by test audiences, and The Comedians is the fictional behindthe-scenes doc—follow? Even funnier than the idea that FX would buy a dated trainwreck like Billy & Josh are Crystal and Gad’s clashing heightened-character comedic styles: Crystal plays “Billy” old-school and only mildly self-absorbed, whereas Gad goes all-in to make “Josh” a delusional man-child idiot (which he’s played before, but takes to a whole new, creepy level here). The Comedians may not fix hearts, but it could fix Crystal’s comedy cred after years of lazy hackery (take note, Steve Martin).

Louie Thursday, April 9 (FX) Season Premiere: After Season 4’s hard departure into the artsy (read: not always necessarily funny), Louie returns to more familiar comic waters with Season 5 opener “Potluck,” which re-establishes that no one can weave a wildly random series of situations into a satisfying storyline quite like Louis C.K.—with a tasty fried-chicken tutorial, no less. And yes, the “Brother Louie” theme song and opening montage are back.

Game of Thrones Sunday, April 12 (HBO) Season Premiere: Finally, GoT truthers (“I refuse to watch anything until Game of Thrones returns!”) have something to live for once again. You know, there are other worthwhile series on TV—I write about ’em here every week. But

I digress: With Tyrion’s (Peter Dinklage) none-too-dignified escape complete, Varys (Conleth Hill) provides him with a new mission beyond drinking himself to death in hiding (“Can I drink myself to death on the road?” he asks). Meanwhile, Daenerys’ (Emilia Clarke) rule in Meereen is being undermined—and don’t even ask about the dragons. Among the questions not answered in Game of Thrones’ Season 5 premiere: Which will crash first under massive demand, HBO Go or HBO Now?

Silicon Valley Sunday, April 12 (HBO) Season Premiere: Speaking of “Datageddon” (my new favorite tech-nonsense term, courtesy of Hooli CEO Gavin Belson), every venture-capitalist company in Silicon Valley is now courting Richard (Thomas Middleditch) and Erlich’s (T.J. Miller) startup Pied Piper and their compression platform, while thinly veiled Google standin Hooli is plotting to crush them before they can even begin. As he did with corporate culture in Office Space, Silicon Valley creator Mike Judge has painted a hilariously real picture of code monkeys as ill-equipped superstars, full of overly lavish (and overly awkward) parties and gone-in-a-nanosecond tech victories, and the stakes are even higher in Season 2—or, at least, the jargon is deeper.

The Comedians (FX) Veep Sunday, April 12 (HBO)

Season Premiere: If you thought the country was screwed with House of Cards’ Frank Underwood as the commander in chief, wait till you get a load of Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) and her SuperCut ascending-by-default to the office of president: She and her staff discover something they’re even more inept at than managing the vice presidency. Which leads to glorious excesses of profanity, trash-talking (Veep staples) and a scriptless Selina faking her way through her first speech as president (“I detest jazz, but this is impressive,” quips her strategist, played by the indispensible Gary Cole). Now, it’s up to this motley crew to get Selina elected for real; she’ll be campaigning and “building a roadmap to peace” simultaneously … all of which probably end in more frightening political truth than House of Cards, if not C-SPAN.

Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.


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After the Ringmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the incarnation of the circus,â&#x20AC;? Elliott says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have a soul to himselfâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;announces the nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show, the tentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spotlights shine down on performances by the circus troupe, in punk-fueled gypsy-tinged songs like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elephant Riderâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Illusionist.â&#x20AC;? But discontent and mutiny are lurking behind the scenes; the performers want to leave the circus, but the Ringmaster wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let them. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freak Show,â&#x20AC;? the lyrics â&#x20AC;&#x153;A thousand miles on the train, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re shackled in cages/ For your entertainment, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take center stageâ&#x20AC;? depict the plight of some of the troupeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s members. But a power shift begins to happen toward the middle of the album. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Show,â&#x20AC;? the Lion Tamer, the Ringmaster and the Illusionist discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;whether or not theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re essentially living a life of slavery, of indentured servitude, or if they are actually truly out there doing things for their own good,â&#x20AC;? McKinley says. The motives of the Ringmaster, however, are more complicated than the troupe realizes, as he himself is a prisoner to the circus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is the Ringmaster the villain? Yes, but at one point, he saved and gave a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;safeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home to everyone thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there,â&#x20AC;? Elliott says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, did he do it to help them, or to feed the insatiable thirst of the circus? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s both, really.â&#x20AC;? After the discussion, though, comes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reprise,â&#x20AC;? when everything â&#x20AC;&#x153;crashes and explodes,â&#x20AC;? Elliott says. The circus erupts in all-out violence as the Ringmaster attacks, culminating in a frenetic instrumental finale, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knife Fight in the Top Tentâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;which, musically, ties back to the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening song. From the personalities and backgrounds of the individual stories to the plotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twists and turns, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it was hard to do all of those things and still make [The Show] digestible,â&#x20AC;? McKinley says. But while the album is full of dense detail, at its core, the tale of the circus is a universal one, about individualism and freedom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a kid in school, then [The Show is] about your parents,â&#x20AC;? Elliott says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re late on your taxes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the government. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a human citizen, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about aliens ruling you. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about oppression, and wanting to get away from that and realizing that. To me, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grown intoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be that heavy, though, it can just be songs.â&#x20AC;? CW

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adies and gentlemen, boys and girls of all stages/ Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m presenting a show that was built through the ages/ Through all of the pain, the fear and the screams/ Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve collected this assortment of unusual things.â&#x20AC;? Thus, the character of the Ringmaster introduces not only a death-defying performance by his circus troupe, but also The Show, the circus-themed new album from Salt Lake City folk-punk band Folk Hogan. While Folk Hogan is well known for their bar-friendly drinking songs, on The Show, they shift their focus from the wonders of whiskey to fantasy, and tell a richly layered story in the form of an immersive concept album. Beginning with appearances by the Fire Breather, the Lion Tamer and other motley characters, and ending with a fatal knife fight, The Show tells the strange, romantic and sometimes violent tale of a group of circus performers in surreal, blood-splattered detail. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re certainly not minimalists when it comes to lyric-writing,â&#x20AC;? says mandolin player Moses McKinley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We like to tell stories.â&#x20AC;? The Showâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which Folk Hogan will play for the first and only time in its entirety at their release showâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;might be seeing the light of day now, but a lot of the material on it is far from new. Folk Hogan began writing it around the same time they were also creating their debut album, 2012â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loud, fast and rowdy Band of Mighty Souls. They released Band of Mighty Souls at that time â&#x20AC;&#x153;because we knew we needed to get out and pound the pavement,â&#x20AC;? says accordion player Canyon Elliott, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been carefully crafting the back story and music of The Show for years. Both albums have that Folk Hogan brand of storytelling, even though on Band of Mighty Souls, those stories are usually about the joys and perils of getting hammered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even cheesy songs like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Still Drunk,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; where the chorus is just chanted over and over, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a pretty specific timeline of an entire day of an alcoholic,â&#x20AC;? Elliott says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It turned out really well for him when he drives off a cliff.â&#x20AC;? But on The Show, recorded about a year ago, Folk Hogan expand their storytelling focus, as well as showcase more accomplished instrumentationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from Elliott and McKinley, as well as bassist Jared Hayes, guitarist Nick Passey, drummer Curtis Stahl and banjo player Kameron Anton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like [Band of Mighty Souls] is very happy and jaunty, and [The Show], in general, is a lot darker,â&#x20AC;? McKinley says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good example of simple, formulaic and happy songs versus somewhat more complicated, dark songs.â&#x20AC;? The Showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s circus concept was Elliottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creation, and he poured so much detail into the story that he likely has enough material to fill a book. A lot of the tracks are their own self-contained storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not necessarily only chapters in a wholeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but if the album is listened to from beginning to end, together, the songs tell a complete story. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you only want to listen to one song, hopefully they all sound like individual stories, but on the whole, all the meanings change if you listen to it at once,â&#x20AC;? Elliott says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ringmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; are very much in the storylineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pull it out and think that contextually makes sense. But songs like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fire Breatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to be in this circus album to make sense as a story, much less as a good song.â&#x20AC;?


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Raising Hell Metal/garage-rock purveyors Satan’s Satyrs dream big. By Reyan Ali comments@cityweekly.net ali_reyan

B

etween the weed consumed, the horror movies watched, the graveyard hangouts and—most importantly— the music heard, summer 2009 was a generous, joyful time for a 16-year-old Clayton Burgess. That season, Burgess and a buddy nicknamed “the Ghoul” spent their break from high school in Herndon, Va., killing time and combing through the works of metal and punk bands that quickly became new obsessions. The “two weird teenagers,” as Burgess once characterized themselves, soaked up and shared the fiendish sounds of acts like Black Sabbath, Black Flag, Electric Wizard, Saint Vitus, Witchfinder General and Pentagram. “It was a lot of, ‘Hey, man, check out this record,’ and the excitement of that,” Burgess, 21, recalls of the period. “There’s nothing like discovering a new band that turns out to be one of your favorites of all time. We were just riding that excitement and being, you know, good-for-nothing teenagers, hanging around and being up to no good.” Galvanized by their newfound heroes, Burgess and the Ghoul started plotting their own music, too. Among the results: a song called “Satan’s Satyrs” and a band of that same moniker that would endure beyond that summer. Today, the still-Herndonrooted Satyrs are a rising three-piece led by bassist/vocalist Burgess, albeit one that doesn’t involve the Ghoul. Aesthetically, Satan’s Satyrs’ loud, unkempt style is very much the offspring of that glorious summer soundtrack, with doom metal, heavy metal, punk rock and garage rock all stirred in. Armed with a palpable vitality, they specialize in gnarled guitar lines that expectorate fuzz. The punk elements they liked were “the speed and aggression of Black Flag, maybe some Stooges, too,” Burgess says. “I just wanted to wrap that aggression and that straight-for-the-throat attitude with the imagery and the aesthetic I liked. It was a heavy-metal execution the way we executed these punk-ish riffs.” On the metal end, Burgess has also cited “the heavy, down-tuned, psychedelic horror movie worship of Electric Wizard” as a most

All satyrs of Satan must rock the black.

pivotal influence. (Fittingly, Burgess also plays in Electric Wizard now, and Satyrs and Wizard are doing this tour together.) Sometime around 2011 or 2012, Burgess both wrote and recorded Satyrs’ debut full-length, Wild Beyond Belief!, by himself. The name Satan’s Satyrs is a play on the 1969 biker movie Satan’s Sadists, and in kind, Burgess aimed for the record to channel the fringe-friendly, monotony-escaping, enigmatic feel of 1960s and ’70s horror and biker-exploitation flicks, with lyrics concerning the occult, the devil, biker gangs and graveyards. Considering the band’s out-there and underground-heavy cultural role models, it’s a tad surprising that Burgess’ ambitions for his band are of the sprawling, brightlights sort. Burgess—who was raised on the Beatles, The Rolling Stones and the blues— grew up wanting to be a rock star. The germ of that dream still motivates his hopes for Satan’s Satyrs. He pointedly hasn’t wanted his group to be just “the hot band at the local bar,” but rather a group that’s targeting a global audience. He doesn’t particularly detail the success he wants to see, but is sure he wants something. “In a way, nowadays, people don’t want to be successful in the old-school sense, but we do. The example I always use is you look at Black Sabbath at the California Jam in 1974,” he says, referencing a massively successful festival that attracted hundreds of thousands, “and it’s like, ‘Yeah, man, heavy rock music was a thing at one time. It was real. We’re not just imagining this.’ ” With their 2014 album, Die Screaming, in tow, and a forthcoming, recently finished third record that Burgess describes as the moment Satan’s Satyrs are hitting their stride, he’s banking on big possibilities. “If I were to look back in five years, I would hope that I’m thinking, ‘This is where the band took off. This is where the band really got their engine running,’ because I have that feeling now,” he says. “I have the feeling that we’ve locked onto something really special here.” CW

Satan’s Satyrs

w/Electric Wizard The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East Saturday, April 11 9 p.m. Sold out SatansSatyrs.bandcamp.com TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com


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BY KO L BIE S TO N EH O CKER

@vonstonehocker

Thursday 4.9

Dead Winter Carpenters There’s not much about Dead Winter Carpenters’ style that’s particularly new or innovative, but that’s not a bad thing by any means. Like that worn-out recipe card for banana bread in your mama’s recipe box, the California alt-country/Americana five-piece’s sound is created with elements that are timetested and achingly familiar. Combining inviting male/female vocal harmonies with fiddle and twangy guitar, Dead Winter Carpenters evoke a simpler, homier time and place with humalong, toe-tappin’ tunes that would appeal to fans of Devil Makes Three, Gillian Welch, and other folk and country acts. Their latest release, 2014’s Dirt Nap EP, is a brief but potent collection of songs about life’s hard-luck times and other meat & potatoes-type subject matter. The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $13, TheStateRoom.com Twinsmith In the music video for Twinsmith’s new song “Alligator Years”—from their upcoming new album of the same name, out May 4—four plush alligator puppets (worn on the hands of the Omaha, Neb., synth-pop/indie-rock group) sing, dance and “play” their instruments in front of a colorful cardboard background. The video is cute, weird and kinda wonderful, and somehow perfectly fits with Twinsmith’s lighthearted synth-tastic sound, created with upbeat percussion, sun-dappled keyboard and poppy group choruses. “Seventeen,” the other single Twinsmith has released in anticipation of Alligator Years, is catchy but has a note of teenage longing, as implied in the track’s title. The Boxers and Violet Waves will open. Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), 8 p.m., $8 in advance, $10 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

Friday 4.10

Dengue Fever When Dengue Fever keyboardist Ethan Holtzman traveled to Cambodia in the ’90s, he probably didn’t think he’d return with the

Twinsmith

inspiration for a band name (his traveling companion contracted the mosquitoborne disease) as well as that band’s sound. But he came home to Los Angeles with a bunch of cassettes of ’60s Cambodian rock and, with those jukebox-friendly vintage sounds in mind, started psych/surf band Dengue Fever a few years later. Fronted by Cambodian female vocalist Chhom Nimol, Dengue Fever has a lot of disparate elements at work in their unique music, but it all works; think surf rhythms mixed with delicately sung Khmer/English vocals, Spaghetti Western guitar and more. Dengue Fever’s latest album, The Deepest Lake, released earlier this year, includes plenty of poppy jammers as well as band-member commentaries that explain the meaning and stories behind each song. Melle and NSPS will also perform. Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), 7 p.m., $12 in advance, $14 day of show, KilbyCourt.com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com Bands for Babes: Mañanero, Scary Uncle Steve, The Utah County Swillers, Baker Street Blues Band Being homeless is tough enough, but it can be especially tough for women when they get their period but don’t have access to femininehygiene products. Oftentimes, pads and tampons aren’t donated to shelters, and homeless women are left trying to make do with what they have—but you can help. Tonight at the UAA Community Art Garden, four local bands are performing at the Bands for Babes benefit concert, where donations for feminine-hygiene

Dead Winter Carpenters products as well as new bras will be accepted for The Road Home homeless shelter. On the bill are blues/rock band Baker Street Blues Band, punk act Scary Uncle Steve, trucker punks The Utah County Swillers and punk/ folk/metal solo act Mañanero. SLC Arts Hub: UAA Community Art Garden, 633 W. 100 South, 7:30 p.m., $5 or donation of feminine-hygiene products or new bras, UtahArts.org Quiet House Album Release ’Tis the season (it seems like) for great local bands to be releasing albums, and one of those bands is Provo folk-core/orchestral group Quiet House. Fronted by vocalist/guitarist Stuart Wheeler, Quiet House won Velour’s Winter Battle of the Bands in December, and for good reason: Their set was one of those magical events that seems to make time stop momentarily. Now, Quiet House—the lineup of which includes Provo stalwarts Alyssa Pyper, Jesse Quebbeman-Turley and more— are coming out with their debut full-length album, which, if their new song “Tetons” is any indicator, should be fantastic. In the “Tetons” music video, Wheeler performs solo and live at Provo’s Studio Studio Dada, and fills the space with his crystal-clear voice and emotive guitar-playing. Bat Manors and L’anarchiste will also perform. Velour, 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 8:30 p.m., $8, VelourLive.com »

Dengue Fever Lauren Dukoff

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Mario “Khalif” Butterfield

LIVE

Black Milk

Tuesday 4.14

Black Milk At a performance by influential Detroit hiphop producer/emcee Curtis Cross, aka Black Milk, it’s unlikely you’d see just a rapper with a DJ standing behind him onstage. Instead, Black Milk typically performs backed by a full live band, including on his current tour, which features live instrumentation by longtime collaborating band Nat Turner. The emcee/band setup allows for improvisational freedom during shows, which Black Milk designs to be stylistically diverse. From electronic sounds to soul and funk, he said in an interview with NPR, he likes to incorporate “all the things I love about music into one show,” but “the core is always gonna be hip-hop.” That diversity can also be heard on his latest album, 2014’s If There’s a Hell Below, a killer collection of songs that combine elements of jazz, soul and even Asian-influenced sounds, as well as Black Milk’s own hard-hitting delivery. DJ Street Jesus and Dine Krew are also on the bill. The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $10, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Coming Soon Heartless Breakers Tour Kickoff (April 16, Kilby Court), Mr. Gnome (April 17, Bar Deluxe), Soja (April 17, Park City Live), Apt Album Release (April 17, Velour, Provo), Triggers & Slips Album Release (April 18, The State Room), Flatbush Zombies (April 18, The Complex), Reptar (April 18, Kilby Court), Lord Huron (April 20, The Depot), Peelander-Z (April 20, The Urban Lounge), Two Gallants (April 20, The State Room), Twin Shadow (April 21, The Urban Lounge)


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APRIL 9, 2015 | 75

*6))433079213289)| 792(%=7/-4%7774)'-%07

FRIDAY, APRIL 10TH + SATURDAY, APRIL 11TH

| CITY WEEKLY |

EVERY THURSDAY 9PM-12PM

PATIO EVERY THURSDAY 12PM-3PM IS OPEN

6_XMR & 6S`O 7_]SM

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EVERY

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An Eclectic mix of olde world charm and fronteir saloon

SATURDAY, APRIL 11TH, 7PM

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PRESENTS


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76 | APRIL 9, 2015

CONCERTS & CLUBS

City Weekly’s Hot List for the Week

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

Infected Mushroom

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

❱ Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports ❰

LIVE MUSIC

FRI 4/10

thousands

songs to KARAOKE ofchoose from

Liv� Musi�

porch to porch, steel belts brett knickerbocker & young apollo

SAT 4/11

SON OF IAN

Saturday 4/11

TUES 4/14

PAINT NITE Coming Soon! FRI 4/17- MARINADE SAT 4/18- WHO KNOWS BAND

WEEKNIGHTS OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS WITH

TUE WED

wednesday 4/8

friday 4/10

LINDSEY BAND

MON

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

Liv� Musi�

joe rock show, dirt cheap & bd howes

THURSDAY 4.9

sunday 4/12

Salt Lake City

Sunda� Funda�

Live music on the patio from 2-4 w/ B side junkees $ Bloody Marys, bud tallboys,

3 Screwdrivers & Mimosas

Reggae at the royal starts @ 8p.m. w/One Drop, funk & gonzo, herban empire

every tuesday

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

COMING SOON

4/17 the 17th Anniversary of

LOCALS NIGHT OUT TRIVIA 7PM

OPEN

11AM-2AM

DAILY

5

$

LUNCH SPECIAL MON-FRI

saturday

$10 BRUNCH BUFFET FROM 11AM-2PM

sunday funday

THE ONLY $12 BREAKFAST BUFFET IN TOWN! 10AM-2PM

Twista (Area 51) Elizabeth Hareza (Bleu Bistro) Karaoke (Bourbon House) Live Band Karaoke With TIYB (Club 90) Ryan Coger Trio (The Garage) Karaoke (Habits) Twin Flames (The Hog Wallow Pub) Twinsmith, The Boxers, Violent Waves (Kilby Court) Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door) Faster Pussycat, Radiata (Sky) Dead Winter Carpenters, (The State Room) Stag Hare, Seven Feathers Rainwater, 90s Television, Angel Magic (The Urban Lounge) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Weekly Live Reggae Show (The Woodshed)

Ogden

4/18

039#(/34)+

4/20

0ARTY w/ Green Leefs

4/23

/2'9

& Afro Omega

5/6

Thirsty Thursday With DJ Battleship (The Century Club)

Park City Cowboy Karaoke (Cisero’s) Just Lumberjack Fabulous (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Utah County The May Reunion Album Release, Coin In the Sea, Emily Brown (Velour)

FRIDAY 4.10

$12 SUNDAY BRUNCH $3 BLOODY MARY / $3 MIMOSA 7PM ADULT TRIVIA EVERY SUNDAY

31 E 400 S, SLC (801) 532-7441 THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

The music of Infected Mushroom (DJs Amit “Duvdev” Duvdevani and Erez Eisen) is indeed infectious; the psychedelic, tranceelectric (and sometimes playful) melodies are played raw and exposed so they are familiar when they are brought back in variations throughout the songs. The Israeli duo (who now live in Los Angeles) have been producing industrial electronica since 1996. This year, they released their ninth full-length album, Friends on Mushrooms 5, which has hypnotic rhythms similar to ones heard on their previous albums, but also features new effects and instruments that increase the intensity of already complex tracks. Infected Mushroom’s live show incorporates animatronics for a visual punch; for a glimpse of the animatronic multi-mouthed monster you can expect at this show, check out the Animatronica Live Tour 2015 Teaser on YouTube. (Tiffany Frandsen) Friday, April 10 @ The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, $20, TheComplexSLC.com

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

Clawson Album Release, GeorgeLife Music, Icy Blu, Alien Landslide and More (5 Monkeys) DJ Caffeine, Lady Faith (Area 51) Troy Lennerd (Bleu Bistro) LOL (Club 90)

IAMSU!, Rome Fortune, Dave Steezy, DJ Juggy (The Complex, The Grand) Infected Mushroom (The Complex, Rockwell) Bronco (The Garage) Apres Ski With DJ Gawel, DJ Matty Mo (Gracie’s) Brand New, Desaparecidos (The Great Saltair) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Badfeather (The Hog Wallow Pub) The Used, Every Time I Die, Marmozets, The Eeries (In the Venue/Club Sound) Dengue Fever, Melle, NSPS (Kilby Court) Killer Dwarfs, Network, Loss of Existence, My Private Island (Liquid Joe’s) StoneBridge (The Moose Lounge) Raising Rockwell (Poplar Street Pub) DJ Choice (The Red Door) Porch to Porch, Steel Belts, Brett Knickerbocker, Young Apollo (The Royal) Bands for Babes: Mananero, Scary Uncle Steve, Baker Street Blues Band, Utah County Swillers (Salt Lake City Arts Hub) EL.84 (Sandy Station) Bronze Radio Return, Swear & Shake (The State Room) Folk Hogan, Six Feet in the Pine (The Urban Lounge, see p. 69) Night Train (The Westerner) The Family Gallows, Trod Upon, Dara (The Woodshed)

Layton Knight Hawk Karaoke (Do Drop Inn)

Ogden Satisfi (Brewskis) Caveman Blvd (Funk ‘N Dive Bar) Dirt Road Devils (Outlaw Saloon)


CONCERTS & CLUBS

City Weekly’s Hot List for the Week

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

Brand New, Desaparecidos

Brand New

It’s been five years since New York alt-rock/ emo band Brand New released its 2009 album, Daisy. But in a couple tweets in November, the band confirmed they’ve entered the studio to begin work on their fifth album, which they’re being typically tight-lipped about (the only text on their website reads: “Brand New is in the studio,” followed by the strange phrase “Procrastinate! Pogolith Earth Sound Alliance 2015”). Whatever that means. But in the meantime, fans can snag a Record Store Day exclusive re-pressing of Brand New’s sophomore album, Deja Entendu, on vinyl, which will be released as a limited-edition double LP. Also on the bill are Desaparecidos, a project of singer-songwriter Conor Oberst. (Kolbie Stonehocker) Friday, April 10 @ The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 7 p.m., $28.50 in advance, $33 day of show, TheSaltair.com

Park City Lavelle Dupree, DJ Kemosabe (Downstairs) Todd Rundgren (Egyptian Theatre) Donner Pass (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Utah County Bat

SATURDAY 4.11 Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City Funk & Soul Night With DJ Street Jesus (Bourbon House) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) The Steel Belts (Donkey Tails) Marmalade Chill (Gracie’s) Karaoke Church With DJ Ducky & Mandrew (Jam) One Drop, B Side Junkees, Funk & Gonzo, Herban Empire (The Royal) Sunday Funday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed) Karaoke Sundays With KJ Sparetire (The Century Club)

Park City

$1950 CASH PAYOUT PLUS PRIZES!!

ARRIVE EARLY FOR SEAT & CARDS

801.468.1492 · PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

APRIL 9, 2015 | 77

1492 S. STATE, SALT LAKE CITY

| CITY WEEKLY |

Coco Montoya (Bleu Bistro) The Last Southern Gentleman (Capitol Theatre) Cool Jazz Piano With Doc Miller (Dopo) Monday Night Jazz Session: David Halliday & the Jazz Vespers (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig Pub) Trevor Larsen, The Classic Crime, Psychosis, The Foreground (Kilby Court)

The Breakfast Klub (Canyons Resort) Red Cup Party: DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) Todd Rundgren (Egyptian Theatre) Open Mic (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Salt Lake City

Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) Hot Sardines (Eccles Center for the Performing Arts) Todd Rundgren (Egyptian Theatre)

JOIN US THURSDAYS @ 9PM

Ogden

Ogden

Park City

APRIL 18TH JOIN US AT 7PM FOR AN EVENING OF CIGARS, GOOD SPIRITS & PRIZES!

SUNDAY 4.12

MONDAY 4.13

Hear & Now (Funk ‘N Dive Bar) Davidian, Necropsy (Kamikazes) Dirt Road Devils (Outlaw Saloon)

SAT

The New Electric Sound, The Lovestrange, Ocean Commotion (Velour)

Knight Hawk Karaoke (Do Drop Inn)

Layton

KILT NIGHT

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Paul Boruff (Bleu Bistro) LOL (Club 90) Cool Jazz Piano Trio With Stan Seale (Dopo) Better Off With the Blues (Feldman’s Deli) Sister Wives (The Garage) The Used, Every Time I Die, Marmozets, The Eeries (In the Venue/Club Sound) The Anchorage, DesmondMar, Barbaloot Suitz (Kilby Court) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joes) Terence Hansen (Poplar Street Pub) Joe Rock Show, Dirt Cheap, BD Howes (The Royal) DJ E-Flexx (Sandy Station) DJ Marshall Aaron (Sky) Satan’s Satyrs, Electric Wizard (The Urban Lounge, see p. 70) Night Train (The Westerner)

Utah County

APRIL 11TH

| cityweekly.net |

The Shift (ABG’s) Quiet House Album Release, Manors, L’anarchiste (Velour)

Gold Standard, DJ Rob Bennion (O.P. Rockwell) Mudpuddle (The Spur Bar & Grill)

SAT


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

78 | APRIL 9, 2015

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

$2 PABST TUESDAYS $2.50 RAINIER WEDNESDAYS

NO

Draper’s First and Finest

COVER E VE R!

TUESDAYS 50¢ Tacos & $2.50 Tecate

WEDNESDAYS $3 Fried Burritos $5.50 Draft Beer & a Shot Karaoke w/ Krazy Karaoke

THURSDAYS $1 Sliders & Live Music

FRIDAYS

RYAN HYMAS SATURDAY

2750 SOUTH 30 0 WES T

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WED 4.8:

SILENCE PROTOCOL

INDEMENTIONS + SORROW OF VIRTUE

SAT 4.11:

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FRI 4.17:

MR. GNOME

GRAND BANKS + ALTO + RED BENNIES

SAT 4.18:

BOMBSHELL ACADEMY

BABY GHOSTS + OPSKAMATRISTS TUES 4.21:

SHY GIRLS

YOUNG EJECTA WED 4.22:

HE WHOSE OX IS GORED

THE DITCH AND THE DELTA + LA VERKIN + TEMPLES

$7.50 Domestic Pitchers

SUNDAYS $3.50 B-fast Burritos

136 E. 12300 S. | 801.571.8134

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Harsh Toke, Joy, Max Pain & the Groovies, Red Telephone (The Urban Lounge)

Salt Lake City

We are proud to be Draper’s first bar/social club. Come see why we are the best.

75¢ Wings Industry Night

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

TUESDAY 4.14

11:3 0 -1A M M O N -SAT · 11:3 0A M -10 PM SU N

MONDAYS

CONCERTS & CLUBS

COMING UP

APRIL 27TH: JMSN MAY 6TH: SOLSTAFIR MAY 7TH: THE SOFT WHITE SIXTIES MAY 9TH: GAYTHIEST JUNE 15TH: ELECTRIC SIX WWW.BARDELUXESLC.COM

OPEN MON-SAT 6PM-1AM 668 South State - 801.532.2914

Krazy Karaoke (5 Monkeys) Open Mic (Alchemy Coffee) Tyler Gilbert (Bleu Bistro) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Karaoke With KJ Sauce (Club 90) Hell Jam (Devil’s Daughter) Brazilian Jazz With Alan Sandomir and Ricardo Romero (Dopo) The Red Rock Club (Gracie’s) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Tigers Jaw, Lemuria, Somos (Kilby Court) Open Mic (The Royal) Taboo Tuesday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon) Black Milk, Street Jesus, Dine Krew (The Urban Lounge) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed)

Utah County Open Mic (Velour) Open Mic (The Wall)

WEDNESDAY 4.15 Salt Lake City Karaoke With Steve-O (5 Monkeys) Karaoke Wednesday (Devil’s Daughter) Nate Robinson Trio (Gracie’s) DJ Street Jesus (The Green Pig Pub) Luke Benson (The Hog Wallow Pub) Wednesduhh! Karaoke (Jam) Jack Ruby, Suburban Youth, Jupiter Suit (Kilby Court) Karaoke (The Royal) Ghost Logic, Strange Family, Vinyl Tapestries, Quiet Oaks (The Urban Lounge) DJ Matty Mo (Willie’s Lounge) Jam Night Featuring Dead Lake Trio (The Woodshed)

Ogden Karaoke (The Century Club) Karaoke (Funk ‘N Dive Bar) Karaoke (Outlaw Saloon)

Park City Open Mic (Cisero’s) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) Cowboy Karaoke (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Utah County The Naked Waiters, Cotton Bones, Up To Snuff, TerraQ (Velour) Karaoke (The Wall)

Bar exam

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net Explore the latest in Utah’s nightlife scene, from dives to dance clubs and sports bars to cocktail lounges. Send tips & updates to comments@cityweekly.net Gracie’s

This two-level sweetheart of a gastropub is a sophisticated but comfortable place to grab a beer and watch the game, appreciate a local band over a cocktail, or take in the spectacular view of downtown from the rooftop deck with a glass of wine. The food is top-notch, and the place stays busy. There is almost nightly entertainment, which ranges from classy jazz music to trivia, and the Sunday brunch makes locals regulars. 326 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-8197565, GraciesSLC.com The Hotel

Hello, swanky Salt Lake City nightlife. Located in a restored Salt Lake City 1910 landmark, this complex is really five bars in one. The Hotel Lobby Bar pays homage to a bygone era, complete with period bartenders. The Barrel Room has a speakeasy vibe, hosting live bands and serving craft beer. Need to cool your heels? Head upstairs to the Opium Lounge, where low, comfortable booths await. The third floor features hookahs and an above-it-all view of the lounge. Take a second to appreciate the décor, especially in the Ballroom, which is elegant and sensually mood-setting. Club Elevate features a high-energy dance floor. 155 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-4784310, TheHotelElevate.com Jupiter Bowl

Part of a complex near Kimball Junction, this upscale bowling alley understands that adults want toys to play with just as much as their kids do. With 16 lanes for bowling, a video-game arcade, pool tables, an intriguing cocktail list and a few local brews on tap, Jupiter is the perfect night out when you just want to play. Instead of the typical bowling-alley fare of gooey pizza and soft drinks, for example, Jupiter goes for fried green beans, fish tacos and cubanas. 1090 Center Drive, Park City, 435-658-2695, JupiterBowl.com Bongo Lounge

Perhaps you haven’t noticed Bongo nestled among the fancy furniture stores on Highland Drive. Venture inside, and you’ll fall in love with this tidy, surprisingly awesome spot. A row of semiprivate booths lines the north wall if you want to keep to yourself or your group, or there’s a three-sided bar centered on the east wall if you feel like socializing with the diverse crowd. Pool, video games, a dartboard and a jukebox are there for your pleasure. 2965 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-466-1577


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Thurs 9th Fri 10th Sat 11th

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Breakfast & $5 Lunch Specials Served All-Day .50¢ Wing Wednesdays


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#CITYFREEBIE 4/4

THANK YOU TO LEGENDS, BREWVIES, LUMPYS & JOHNNYS ON SECOND FOR HAVING US!

UPCOMING EVENTS: WINTER

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SATURDAY, APRIL 11 10AM-2PM

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live music & karaoke

5 MONKEYS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885, Karaoke, Free pool, Live music A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. BAR DELUXE 666 S. State, SLC, 801-5322914, Live music & DJs THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CANYON INN 3700 E. Fort Union, SLC, 801943-6969, DJs CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. The Century CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU Midvale 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-649-5044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB DJ’S 3849 W. 5400 South, Murray, 801964-8575, Karaoke Tues., Thurs. & Sun., Free pool Wed. & Sun., DJ Fri. & Sat. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. club x 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. Dopo 200 S. 400 West, 801-456-5299, Live jazz DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 The Fallout 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-8197565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music The HOTEL/Club ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801-9431696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. The Loading Dock 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-4874418, Trivia Wed.

LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 The Office 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages The penalty box 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 The Sun Trapp 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-5312107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music THE WOODSHED 60 E. 800 South, SLC, 801-364-0805, Karaoke Sun. & Tues., Open jam Wed., Reggae Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat. ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs


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Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Across

1. Emit 2. Make an agenda, say 3. Spent 4. Climber's handhold 5. Word on mail from Spain 6. Passed without notice 7. Sue Grafton's "____ for Innocent" 8. Knicks rivals across the East River 9. ____ bin Laden 10. Buddy Holly's "____ Be the Day" 11. Think Elton John is singing "Hold me closer, Tony Danza," e.g. 12. Not recognizable by 13. Make rough 21. Mexican pyramid builder 23. Euripides tragedy 26. Like mountain roads 29. Ply, as a dirty trick 31. Vichy vote 34. Yoga chants 36. Performed 39. Diamond org. 40. Sonora native 41. Power structure 42. They can create drafts 43. Knee cap? 46. Dancing defector

of 1961 47. Gullibility 48. Lack 50. Walks with no urgency 52. Buffalo skaters 55. "Making AIDS History" org. 57. Prefix with sexual 60. Alternatively 62. Wildcat with tufted ears 65. "____ be my pleasure!"

Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Down

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. No. between 0 and 4 4. The reformed gambling addict said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 10. Nickname for a seven-time NBA All-Star 14. Not well 15. Counts (on) 16. University of Hawaii campus locale 17. Kilmer of "Heat" 18. Label founded in 1975 by Clive Davis 19. "Four little letters, three billion little people": Stephen Colbert 20. The chronic bachelor said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 22. The independent teen said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 24. "The Wizard ____" 25. Baby docs 27. Film composer Harold and others 28. Microsoft Word menu picks 30. Yang's counterpart 32. Thrill 33. Permitted 35. Drops (off) 37. Pal of Harry and Hermione 38. The local activist said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 41. Crunches crunch them 44. "Hedda Gabler" setting 45. Mike's wife in the comic strip "For Better or for Worse" 49. Groom carefully 51. Clear tables 53. Young pigeon 54. It's a ball in Spain 56. Cooke of soul 58. "Exodus" novelist Leon 59. The egotist said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 61. The snake oil salesman said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 63. Surrealist Magritte 64. Making eyes, perhaps 66. Kobe cash 67. Pretentious 68. Rearward 69. And the like: Abbr. 70. Some reproaches 71. The Cincinnati sports fan who moved to Boston said "You can't spell this answer without spelling its circled letters" 72. Center of gravity?

SUDOKU

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UINTAH STANdARd STORE

s summer nears, many of us are looking to shed some winter pounds. Those of us who are motivated by new workout clothes should check out Uintah Standard, located at 680 E. 600 South in Salt Lake City. Since February 2014, Uintah Standard has carried Uintah Collection athletic wear as well as jewelry and other items made by local artisans. Owner Heather Carlos, a Salt Lake City native, started the Uintah Collection brand with her friend Janie Franks about five years ago in New York City. “I’ve always been athletic and outdoorsy,” Carlos says. “I was interested in fashion, which is why I went to New York. I noticed that sportswear was very bland—black and gray with maybe a pop of pink. I wanted to bring sportswear and fashion together.” Carlos is very proud of the product that she and Franks, also a Salt Lake City native, came up with. “It’s the most versatile garment in the market,” she says. Customers can hike in Uintah Collection clothes and then jump straight in a river to cool off. Made of swim fabric, Uintah Collections clothes can get fully wet, but they dry rapidly and the prints don’t fade. “I wear it running, to yoga, under tank tops, while I’m shopping,” says Carlos. “I literally live in it.” In addition to their unique fabric, Uintah Collection is special because Carlos and Franks design their own prints, all of which are inspired by the scenery and history of Utah. About half of Uintah Collection is made in Utah, the other half in Los Angeles. Carlos and Franks began selling their clothes to a few studios and stores before Carlos came up with the idea for a brick & mortar location. “I chose a historical home with a story,” says Carlos. “I wanted a store where people could hang out for a little bit, feel comfortable while they try on clothes, away from a busy shopping center.” So far, Uintah Standard has been a great success. “I love the connection with the customers who come in,” says Carlos. “It’s been so awesome to hear what customers are using the products for—climbing at Momentum or for triathlons. I don’t do those sports, so it’s great to get their stories and feedback firsthand.” That feedback is critical—Carlos and Franks design with the needs of athletic Utahns in mind. Uintah Standard is open Monday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-6:00 p.m.; Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. For more information on Uintah Standard, visit UintahStandard.com or phone 801554-1379. For more information on the Uintah Collection clothing line, check out @uintah_standard.


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If you think you don’t need coffee before you shop, think again. Since drinking cocktails isn’t legal while shopping, drinking coffee is the next best thing. Your liver will thank you but your adrenal glands will hate you. Oh well, put down your corporate Starbucks and try a local coffee joint like 3 Cups (4670 S. 2300 East, 385-237-3091, Instagram: 3_cups_coffee) Husband and wife owners Derek Belmap and Lisa Dickman have created a modern Scandinavian design influenced coffee shop. They use beans from Salt Lake City-based Blue Copper Roasters and offer standard-fare coffee drinks but they specialize in pour overs which highlight all of the notes in the coffee. When the coffee tastes so great already I could care less about origins and nuances and more about the presentation, the beauty and interior of the space. I guess I’m a little shallow but I can’t keep my eyes off the beauties behind the glass. Homemade baked goods

like spinach and Gruyere tarts, lemon sourcream sugar cookies, and vegan pumpkinapple muffins (I’ll have that one). If you like mid-mod furniture you will feel at home sitting at white Saarinen Tulip Tables and white Eames shell chairs. Or you can sip your drink at a giant 17-foot Douglas fir wood table made by local furniture and cabinet maker Jaren Harbertson of Modern Union (Instagram: @modernunion). When you walk into Amy Boutique, 4670 S. 2300 East—next to 3 Cups Coffee—you feel like you stepped into a Parisian boutique mixed with Utah originals. Every inch of Amy Boutique (Instagram: @amyboutiqueutah) is meticulously hand-decorated and each item is hand-selected by owner Amy Bennett. This is your one-stop shop for gifts for all occasions—weddings, new baby, holiday décor, home and bath goods, clothing and jewelry. If you’ve ever shopped at Jolley’s Corner you may recognize Amy Bennett’s style in her own store. They sell beautiful notecards and ribbon (from 50 cents to $3.50 per yard), and there is an adorable candy bar with old-fashioned glass jars which house gummi candies, caramels and gumballs. This is a flowery, lacey, girlie kind of store. Your male partner should probably not bother coming in (unless, of course, he is buying something for you) because this store embodies the female, and you want lots of time to take it all in. The highlight of the store is the clothes that are trendy and onpoint. Dresses, sweaters, skirts, blouses are in colors and patterns that are popular and in season. Lots of lace-overlay blouses, leather skirts, and Aztec prints. You can easily select an outfit for under $100. Don’t miss the dirty Diet Coke bar. What is that you ask? It’s a Utah original consisting of Diet Coke, fresh lime and coconut syrup. Tip: there’s lots of parking in the back. 

Remember to shop local and keep it in our community.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S NY

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Uitwaaien is a Dutch word that means to go out for a stroll in windy weather simply because it’s exhilarating. I don’t know any language that has parallel terms for running in the rain for the dizzy joy of it, or dancing through a meadow in the dark because it’s such nonsensical fun, or singing at full volume while riding alone in an elevator in the mad-happy quest to purge your tension. But in the coming weeks, you don’t need to describe or explain experiences like this; you just need to do them. Experiment with giving your instinctive need for exuberance lots of room to play. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your nasty, nagging little demon isn’t nasty or nagging any more. It’s not doing what demons are supposed to do. It’s confused, haggard, and ineffective. I almost feel sorry for the thing. It is barely even keeping you awake at night, and its ability to motivate you through fear is at an all-time low. Here’s what I suggest: Now, when the demon’s strength is waning and its hold on you is weak, you should break up with it for good. Perform an ultimate, non-reversible exorcism. Buy it a one-way bus ticket to the wasteland and say goodbye forever.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The English term “engine” refers primarily to a machine that transforms energy into mechanical power. But its roots are in the Old French word engin, which meant skill or wit, and in the Latin word ingenium, defined as “inborn talent.” I’d like to borrow the original meanings to devise your horoscope this week. According to my reading of the astrological omens, your “engine” is unusually strong right now, which means that your cultivated skills and innate talents are functioning at peak levels. I suggest you make intensive use of them to produce maximum amounts of energy and gather more of the clout you’d love to wield. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) What I’m about to say is not a hard scientific fact, but it is a rigorous poetic fable. You don’t need to go to the mountain, because the mountain is willing and able to come to you. But will it actually come to you? Yes, but only if you meet two conditions. The mountain will pick itself up and move all the way to where you are if you make a lot of room for it and if you are prepared to work with the changes its arrival will bring.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) If you were a four-year-old, cookies might be a valuable treasure to you. Given a choice between a bowl of stir-fried organic vegetables and a plate full of chocolate coconut macaroons, you’d probably choose the macaroons. For that matter, if you were four years old and were asked to decide between getting a pile of macaroons and a free vacation to Bali or an original painting by Matisse or a LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Do you ever feel reverence and awe, Leo? Are there times when personal horoscope reading from the world’s greatest astrologer, you spontaneously yearn to engage in acts of worship? Is there you’d also opt for the cookies. But since you’re a grownup, your anyone or anything that evokes your admiration, humility, list of priorities is screwed on straight, right? You would never and gratitude? The coming weeks will be a good time to seek get distracted by a sugary, transitory treat that would cause you out experiences like these. According to my reading of the to ignore a more nourishing and long-lasting pleasure. Right? astrological omens, you will get tender jolts of transformational inspiration if you blend yourself with a sublime force that you PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) On June 23, 1917, Babe Ruth was the starting pitcher for the trust and respect. Boston Red Sox in a Major League Baseball game against the Washington Senators. After the first batter drew a walk, Ruth VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) A lot has happened since you were ... uh ... indisposed. You’ve got upset with the home plate umpire and punched him in the missed out on several plot twists. The circle has been broken, head. Ejected! Banished! The Babe had to be dragged off the repaired, broken again, and partially repaired. Rumors have field by the cops. The new pitcher was Ernie Shore. He proceeded been flying, allegiances have been shifting, and riddles have been to pitch a perfect game, allowing no further Washington player deepening. So are you ready yet to return to the heated action? to reach base in all nine innings. In the coming weeks, Pisces, Have you learned as much as you can from the commotion that I see you as having the potential to duplicate Ernie Shore’s provoked your retreat? Don’t try to return too early. Make sure performance in your own sphere. Coming in as a replacement, you will excel. Chosen as a substitute, you will outdo the original. you are at least 70 percent healed.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) “Everything we do in life is based on fear, especially love,” said Cancerian comedian Mel Brooks. Although he was joking, he was also quite serious. More often than we like to admit, desperation infects our quest to be cared for. Our decisions about love may be motivated by a dread of loneliness. We worry about whether we are worthy of getting the help and support we need. It’s a fundamental human problem, so there’s no reason to be ashamed if you have this tendency yourself. Having said that, I’m happy to report that you now have the necessary power to overcome this tendency. You will be able to summon tremendous courage as you revise and refine your relationship with love. It’s time to disappear the fear.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The Guerrilla Girls are a group of prankster activists who use humor to expose sexism and racism in the art world. Every so often they take a “weenie count” at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. During their first survey in 1989, they found that five percent of the artists who had work hanging in the galleries were women, while 85 percent of the nudes depicted in the paintings were women. More recently, in 2012, their weenie count revealed that four percent of the artists were female, but 76 percent of the naked people in the paintings were female. The coming week would be a good time for you to take a weenie count in your own sphere, Scorpio. Conditions are more favorable than usual to call attention to gender disparities, and to initiate corrective action.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20) When he was in his 50s, French painter Claude Monet finally achieved financial success. He used his new riches to buy a house and land, then hired gardeners to help him make a pond full of water lilies. For the first time in his life, he began to paint water lilies. During the next 30 years, they were his obsession and his specialty. He made them a central feature of 250 canvases, which now serve as one of his signature contributions to art history. “I planted my water lilies for pleasure,” he said. “I cultivated them without thinking of painting them. And then suddenly, I had the revelation of the magic of my pond.” I regard the imminent future as a good time for you to do something similar, Gemini: Create or find a source of beauty that will stimulate your sense of wonder and fuel your passion to express yourself for a long time.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Rent, but don’t buy yet. That’s my $250-per-hour advice. Keep rehearsing, but don’t start performing the actual show. OK? Flirt, but don’t fall in love. Can you handle that much impulse control? Are you strong enough to explore the deeper mysteries of patience? I swear to you that your burning questions will ultimately be answered if you don’t try to force the answers to arrive according to a set timetable. I guarantee that you will make the necessary connections as long as you don’t insist that they satisfy every single one of your criteria.


The Mark

We missed the mark, on a tired evening When stars aligned, to steal our breath A mix of passion, and sunken feelings A cocktail of words, and quaint misgivings Leading our souls, toward their end Skipping blindly, on our merry Down the path, and round the bend Following on, our foolish errand To be at one, and peace again Can you feel it, moving forward? Can we taste it, on the wind? Rushing past, our strong position To open doors To shake the shutters And let us know, just where we stand

Jeremiah Smith Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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Its roller-derby time in Utah, when folks of all body types and ages put on skates to race around a track for team points. Teams are out recruiting players and volunteers and having fundraisers along the Wasatch Front. There are two kinds of tracks a team can skate on: flat tracks and banked tracks. Teams in the Wasatch Roller Derby league compete on a flat track at the Derby Depot, 1415 S. 700 West. There are eight teams in that league: Bonneville Bone Crushers, Black Diamond Divas, Hot Wheelers, Salt Flat Fall Outs, Midnight Terror, Minion Terror, Red Rockettes and Unita Madness. Boys and girls play in Wasatch Junior Rollers at the Derby Depot on Sundays, with children ages 6-11 rolling in the Mighty Minions, and older kids (12-17) in the Minion Terrors. Flat-trackers also play in Utah and Davis Counties, with a variety of teams with dangerous names like Daughters of Anarchy and the Molly Morbids. The only league in Utah that owns a banked track is the Salt City Derby Girls. They’ve been playing out of the Salt Palace and skating their hearts out in the capital city for the past decade but have had to put their track in storage until they find a new home. They hope that some hip angel will fund them, give them or lease them (for cheap) a permanent facility where the track can be set up and bleachers put in surrounding the track. The SLDG play on both kinds of tracks, but any derby fan knows that a banked track is far better for the player’s athletic feats and the spectator’s enjoyment. In the big picture, Salt Lake City is in need of a large, inexpensive venue for alternative sports and activities. The Utah Trapeze folks that set up during the summer at Pioneer Park would love an indoor venue during the winter. Maybe they could team up and fly people over the derby games? Bazinga! We need something like a hippodrome, an indoor arena for bike races, derby and other activities just like the one that used to be out at Saltair in the early 1900s. The derby teams play all over the U.S. but mainly against teams from closer states like Colorado, Idaho and California. They have a huge fan base but not enough highend ticket sales to warrant the Legislature agreeing to lease out part of the Utah State Fairpark to them. If you’ve got an idea, want to volunteer or have a chunk of cash to invest in Utah derby, visit SLCDerby. com.  Send comments to community@cityweekly.net. Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

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City Weekly April 9, 2015  

Food for the Soul- Dining Guide 2015

City Weekly April 9, 2015  

Food for the Soul- Dining Guide 2015