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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

APRIL 2, 2015 | VOL. 31

Rules of Engagement

N 0 . 47

A devout Mormon and an evangelical street preacher exchange words near Temple Square. Next thing you know, they’re dining together on roadkill. By Carolyn Campbell


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY Rules of Engagement

A devout Mormon and an evangelical street preacher exchange words near Temple Square. Next thing you know, they’re dining together on roadkill. Cover photo by Brett Colvin

14 4 6 8 18 24 32 35 36 51

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Carolyn Campbell

“Rules of Engagement,” p. 14 Carolyn Campbell has been writing for City Weekly since the 1980s. She has published more than 800 articles locally and nationally. Her City Weekly articles have won multiple awards from the Society of Professional Journalists chapters in Utah and Colorado.

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Letters Beware the Backlash

Since the wave of marriage-equality success across the nation, we have begun to see a backlash. A backlash occurs when a political bloc—in this case, religious conservatives, a large group of Republicans and homophobes—feel threatened by the successes of another political bloc, in this case, the LGBT community. This success, coupled with the spate of public-opinion polls showing widespread support for the LGBT community against every form of discrimination, has that group very worried that they are becoming dinosaurs. Every minority socio-economic group fighting for its rights has faced backlash. In our case, the current movement pushing back against us happens to have proposed 85 laws seeking to restrict LGBT rights in 26 states across the nation. Human Rights Campaign and Lambda Legal have done an incredible job of keeping track of recent anti-gay legislation and alerting the community on the bills’ progress. HRC has divided the legislation into four categories: Religious refusals, meaning a company or business may refuse LGBT people any rights if they object to our “lifestyle”; promoting conversion therapy, treatment that seeks to change sexual orientation—largely practiced on youth—which has been condemned by all leading medical and mental-health organizations, including the American Psychiatric Association; anti-transgender laws, where lawmakers are basically looking to throw the book at our

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. E-mail: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on e-mailed submissions, for verification purposes. transgender brothers and sisters; and, finally, canceling out LGBT nondiscrimination, where elected officials are looking to repeal LGBT nondiscrimination laws in cities and jurisdictions that have already adopted them. Only one state boasts proposed measures in all four categories. Can you guess which one? Texas. Oklahoma follows with three, South Carolina, West Virginia, Mississippi, Alabama, Missouri, South Dakota and Colorado each have two, and the remainder of the 26 states have seen only one of the four. Two presumptive presidential candidates are already on record for these forms of discrimination: Ted Cruz has consistently opposed the LGBT community’s rights and, at a campaign stop in Georgia just last week, Jeb Bush stated his support for religious discrimination against LGBT people. Scott Walker, who is quickly becoming the Mitt Romney of this race, as usual has not clearly stated his position. If Bush, who is seen as the moderate of all these candidates, is in support of anti-LGBT legislation, it is almost impossible for the rest of the Republican field to be elsewhere. So while we are waiting for that U.S. Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality this summer, maybe—just maybe—we should also prepare for a harsher backlash if the court rules our way.

Mark Segal Philadelphia, Pa.

Get Rid of Contrails

Getting rid of air pollution and getting rid of global warming are diametrically opposed. Don’t people get that? Air pollution, especially contrails, are blocking the sun. NASA admits it. You can have no warming, or no pollution, but you can’t have both. Which do you prefer? I’ve heard a decision has already been made. Scientists have a new hobby: Ridding the sky of artificial clouds, known as “cirrus aviaticus,” from aircraft. They have been testing it out a little in the Western states and just south of us. Maybe by next winter, they will give the information to the East Coast and Salt Lake City. Then we can all bask in the glory of 100 percent of the sunlight that should have been hitting us this whole time. Oh, and be able to breathe.

Engrid Shlee Salt lake

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OPINION

Teach Tolerance

It happens a few times every school year: a student sees me in the hall, and shouts, “Ms. Lauritzen! My mom showed me a clip of you on the news!” Other days, a student will casually mention seeing a recent article online, waiting to see if I’ll reveal my secret identity as a freelance writer. I’m usually busy trying to do other things—grade a paper, teach a class, confiscate a cellphone mid-Snapchat—so I respond to any mention of my “outside life” by changing the subject and redirecting the student’s attention back to whatever I’m trying to teach. I try to act natural, but mentally I’m freaking out, trying to remember if the last thing I wrote was potentially inflammatory. Sometimes I get the impression that a student is speaking in code, referencing an article in order to reassure me that I’m not the only feminist/Democrat/weird Mormon in the room. My online presence becomes a modern way to say “shibboleth” and identify common ground. Regardless of their intent, I try to stay in teacher mode. My job as a public servant depends on my ability to separate my role as Ms. Lauritzen, history teacher and stealer of phones, from Stephanie Lauritzen, writer of minority opinions and one-time activist. A few months ago, I wrote about teaching the new AP U.S. History curriculum, and why I disagree that the new curriculum represents a “hostile liberal takeover” of American history—a claim issued by many Republicans. A few people responded with outrage that I, as a teacher, do not maintain personal political neutrality. They worried that I would be unable to teach subjects portraying Democrats in a bad light. Others worried a student might inevitably read my piece and feel scared to express opinions counter to the views in my article.

By Stephanie Lauritzen

Concerns about my online presence resonate with me. I frequently worry that writing publicly will negatively impact my ability to create a safe and inclusive classroom for all of my students. I worry that my decision to publicly disagree with the LDS Church might make my LDS students feel I dislike them, or don’t value their contributions in class. I worry that conservative students might feel intimidated to share their opinions, or feel the need to constantly defend their position in order to be taken seriously. I don’t believe any student should feel afraid to speak up in class, nor do I believe my job is to coerce students into adopting my interpretations of history. I do believe that, as a teacher and authority figure, I’m granted a position of power, so it is my responsibility to let students know their opinions and ideas are valued, even if they differ from my own. I am not perfect at this, but there are a few things I work on each day in order to create the best possible environment for critical thinking, writing and discussion. First, I remember this quote by educator Eric Rothschild: “The more I say in class, the less my students learn.” Teachers are prone to god complexes, and I’m not immune to the siren call of my own voice. Sometimes it is necessary to talk a lot: to lecture on historical context or to model successful analysis strategies. But I try to remind myself that my students can’t truly learn unless they have the opportunity to explore ideas and concepts without my interference. Each day, I give students time to study ideas on their own, discuss what they learned with partners or in groups, and then talk together as a whole class. I mediate the conversations without trying to control the outcome, and I’m always impressed with how well my students tackle difficult subjects while respecting differences of opinion. Secondly, students appreciate honesty, so

when I do share an opinion-based idea, I let students know explicitly that they are hearing one side of the story. I make sure to counter my opinion with an opposing viewpoint, so that my view is never the only interpretation presented in class. In discussing different historical perspectives, including American exceptionalism and historical revisionism, I let my students know about the recent controversy concerning the new advancedplacement U.S. History curriculum. I shared my thoughts on the limits of exceptionalism, but also told my students that all historical models are flawed and incomplete when studied in isolation, so we will study all of them and use what we learn in class to create new interpretations and ideas. I think it is healthy and good for students to see that multiple viewpoints can exist in the same space, and that disagreements do not mean people can’t work or learn together effectively. As students graduate and enter the workforce, they will encounter countless people who disagree with them on fundamental issues. It is unrealistic to train students to remain silent on issues they care about in order to work effectively with others, just as it is unrealistic for me to pretend I am a nonexistent neutral party outside the classroom. If my students read something I write and disagree with me, I hope I’ve modeled sufficient tolerance and open-mindedness in the classroom to give them the skills necessary to navigate their thoughts productively and honestly. In the end, the only test I truly want my students to pass is one proposed by F. Scott Fitzgerald: “The test of a firstrate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.” CW Stephanie Lauritzen is a high school teacher who blogs at MormonChildBride. blogspot.com. Send feedback to comments@ cityweekly.net

Teachers are prone to god complexes, and I’m not immune to the siren call of my own voice.

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Did any teachers inspire you to think for yourself? Or did you just have to pick up that skill in the street? Scott Renshaw: I got a wake-up call in college from a writer/instructor named Arturo Islas, who spent one lecture on The Old Man and the Sea explaining how he had been completely wrong about the book for years. Nothing was as significant to me as realizing that one’s perspective on a work of art—and really, on anything in the world—can grow and evolve over time. And maybe even should. Alissa Dimick: I had two teachers who did that for me: Mrs. Sidesinger and Coach McGrath. Both taught me not to take anyone’s BS and to be myself, even when it’s not appropriate. Jeremiah Smith: My homeroom teacher in sixth grade was a great champion of thinking for yourself. I think that it ruined the rest of my school career, though, since it was definitely downhill from there. Mason Roderickc: Two things I owe my personalit y to: the teachers who rolled out the televisions instead of teaching and put on Bill Nye for the class to watch, and that blobbish but undeniably “radical” silver specter that shot out of children when they drank Capri Suns.

Nicole Enright: A teacher in second grade told us to make our art a certain way. It’s pretty ridiculous to tell anyone, especially children, how to express themselves through their artwork. It took me a really long time after that to get my imagination back. Luckily for me, it’s pretty wild. I bet there are kids who never found theirs again.


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HITS&MISSES by Katharine Biele

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The Mayoral Horde You have to feel sorry for Jackie Biskupski and, oh yeah, Luke Garrott, now that Jim Dabakis is talking about entering the mayor’s race. It’s hard enough to get name recognition against a two-term incumbent without another big name in the race. Dabakis, a state senator and former Democratic chair, is flamboyant and likable—and, as he has mentioned, he’s rich. Yes, he stepped down from the party chairmanship because of health problems, but that doesn’t seem to be a factor in the present hype. Of course, he hasn’t decided to run, and being mayor could mean a lot more work than the Senate. Will he or won’t he? The longer he waits, the more he hurts Biskupski and Garrott, running against someone a Utah Policy panelist calls “an aloof, technocratic two-term mayor who doesn’t seem to have a signature achievement attached to his tenure.”

A Source of Fiber Yay, gigabit! Sort of. Even XMission’s Pete Ashdown is going to buy Google Fiber’s gigabit service because, like everyone, he wants speedy Internet. But he’s not happy about it. Ashdown was a fan of UTOPIA, the struggling consortium of 16 cities offering fiber and all its benefits—except profitability. That’s partly because Salt Lake City didn’t buy into the concept. Now, though, the city gleefully took up Google’s offer to lay fiber—free—until it, you know, isn’t. Unlike CenturyLink, Google won’t be letting Internet service providers tap into the network. But here’s the thing: XMission is going to offer products that promise to retain your privacy, and that’s Google’s Achilles’ heel. Ashdown thinks fiber should be a city function, and maybe he’s right. But, for now, it’s Google’s baby.

Papers, Please Speaking of privacy, the State of Utah is really concerned. Really it is. So much so, that many taxpayers won’t be getting their refunds unless they can navigate the murk y depths of bureaucratic nonsense. This, from one hapless taxpayer: Verify identity before April 1. The quickest way is online, but you can’t do it online after April 1. You’ll need last year’s individual tax return, your 2014 tax return, your driver license—if you have one. You may only attempt the online verification once, and must complete it within 10 minutes. Blah blah. Then, if you “fail the quiz,” you have to verify with physical documents within 30 days. Send a copy of the letter with one item from two categories. Instructions go on, but hey, this is tougher than getting your driver license. CW

Aubrey Ixchel—aka Lady Rainbow, Faerie Godmother—is inviting women to join her and Wild Rose, Medicine Woman at Mystic Hot Springs in Monroe, on April 4-6, for a star-seeded retreat to soak in the hot pots and express themselves through dancing, singing, art and photography. At the gathering, Lady Rainbow, Faerie Godmother (who is married to Mystic Hot Springs owner Mystic Mike) will lead women in the exploration of light and shadows. She spoke with City Weekly about the full-moon ceremony. Check out AubreyIxchel.com/be-light-be-shadow for more info on the retreat.

What is the significance of light and shadow? When I feel like I’m shadow, I feel like I’m more hidden—and, when I’m dealing with my light side, I’m creative, more out there. I feel like everyone has these two sides all the time and what a beautiful thing to be able to celebrate that through dance, art and photography. I have a powerful place in both my shadow and my light. Neither of those places scares me because I feel comfortable. For me, the balance is where it’s perfect to be alive.

Is the retreat meant to empower women? “Empower” isn’t the right word. I’m not doing this because I think I know something better than anybody else. But maybe, if we’re all there together, we can all share in ways we haven’t shared before. Something can happen, and we can have a lot of fun. We are all made of the same stuff. We’re made of stardust. I can see that everything around me and everything in nature is the same as me. Everything I can see is only because that’s what I am. I want us to come together as sisters to reflect that.

How intimate of a gathering will this be? Bonnie Paine from Elephant Revival and Mackenzie Page of the Colorado-based band Gipsy Moon are going to be performing intimate, private performances and teaching a song. So this is a really unique and rare opportunity to see these ladies in such an intimate way.

Who should attend this event?

If this gathering sounds interesting to you, then it’s for you. We’re hoping that this will be a very customized, very personal experience, where each lady feels seen, each lady feels heard, each lady feels she can express herself, however that comes out. We decided to be open about who this calls to. We’re calling out, and we’ll see who responds.

This is the first year you have put together this gathering?

Yes, this is the first time, and we hope it becomes a regular thing. We’d like to hold our next one around the Harvest Moon in the fall. We’ll gather here at Mystic Hot Springs again, and we’re excited about how big a circle we can get that resonates with the starseeded message. CW

By Tiffany Frandsen comments@cityweekly.net


STRAIGHT DOPE The W-Word As far as I can tell, nations have stopped formally declaring war since the end of World War II. But can war only be declared between nations? With the rise in terrorist groups, could the U.S. or another country declare war against Al-Qaeda or Isis or some other group rather than another nation? Or is any declaration of war just plain irrelevant these days? —Steve Mirro, Cape Coral, Florida

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Congress, the only governmental branch technically empowered to declare war, never did so (though it did authorize military force). But the shocking visibility and scale of the 9/11 attack allowed the U.S. to justify belligerent military objectives that were both widespread and vague. In Bush’s words, the “war” wouldn’t end until “every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped, and defeated.” The combined facts that, 1. The United States in 2001 was the world’s undisputed leading power, 2. The attack scared our Western allies too, and 3. It marked a new era of warfare against organized yet transnational non-state actors meant that the U.S. government had more or less free rein to respond however it wished. International law hadn’t adapted to deal with new, post-Cold War circumstances (and arguably it still hasn’t). For instance, since the object of aggression wasn’t a state, the U.S. used the umbrella term “terror” to justify attacking any terrorist, in any country, without warning. CIA agents used a drone to kill six men in Yemen in 2002. But Yemen didn’t recognize this act as armed conflict on its land, nor did it or the U.S. consider themselves at war with one another. Another political benefit (and humanitarian nightmare) of waging quasi-war was made manifest in the November 2001 executive order titled “Detention, Treatment, & Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism”—also known as the catastrophe of Guantanamo Bay. The order authorized the Defense Department to detain potential enemies of the state, citing as justification the national emergency then in progress. What this meant in practice, administration lawyers would later explain, was that the detentions would continue until all the terrorists in the entire world were captured or eliminated—i.e., as long the U.S. government felt like it. The grim possibility here is that efforts to impose humanitarian law on the practice of war have been at least in part counterproductive: where once they might have played by at least some of the rules, states now have a greater incentive to avoid them entirely. One wants to believe in progress, but it’s hard not to suspect that war can be made only so civilized, and no more.

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How quaint, Steve. You’re talking about war like it’s a card game played by Boy Scouts, with rules enforced by creepy grown men wearing khaki shorts. Back here in reality, though, the U.S. isn’t going to forgo its milk and cookies because it launches a missile at someone it wasn’t supposed to. Because that’s how the international system works: laws are only as strong as the willingness of the most powerful country, or group of countries, to back them up. That said, you’re right: while formal declarations of war were never exactly required, they definitely used to be more common. Between 1800 and 1950, political scientist Tanisha Fazal has pointed out, approximately half of all interstate “wars”—protracted and intense armed violence involving two or more states—were declared. Since then, however, we’ve had about the same number of conflicts, but only three of them have been declared, and none of those by a so-called Great Power, like the U.S., the U.K., China, France, etc. So what accounts for the decline? At this point, declaring war is worse than irrelevant—it’s basically all downside and no upside. Even for powerful countries, international organizations like the UN can make it a pain in the ass to break the rules. This is especially true lately: in 1898 there were three codified laws of war; by 1998 there were 33. Certain strategies and weapons aren’t allowed, and the military must be trained to exacting specifications. Lack of compliance means the possibility of being tried for war crimes. (Under U.S. military law, declaring war also empowers the military to court-martial its private contractors; whether you see this as a benefit or a hindrance may depend on how cynical you are about things like the Abu Ghraib affair.) And a declared war affects countries not directly involved: neutral states must remain impartial in trade, commerce, and diplomatic relations; alliance obligations can be invoked. As a result, states now tend to avoid saying the W-word even when dispatching roving groups of armed personnel to foreign lands. Even though U.N. laws apply to “armed conflict,” which ought to override the declaration problem, the lack of labeling makes it harder to identify aggressive behavior and therefore trigger punitive action. In this context, then, George Bush’s decision (OK, we all know it wasn’t his decision) to declare a legally confusing “War on Terror” was a well-calculated move.

BY CECIL ADAMS


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10 | April 2, 2015

NEWS Mountain of Money

EN V IRONMENT

“I don’t think you can plan for a billion-dollar project on a nickel.” —Summit County Councilman Chris Robinson

The Mountain Accord planning process comes with a high price tag. By Colby Frazier cfrazier@cityweekly.net @cfrazierlp In the past year and a half, cities, counties, nonprofits and various government organizations have been busy hammering out a future for the central Wasatch Range through a well-publicized process called Mountain Accord. This process has birthed a proposed blueprint that outlines several scenarios for these jagged peaks, including a train through Little Cottonwood Canyon, tunnels that connect the Cottonwood canyons to the Park City area and protections of some land in exchange for more development at the bases of ski resorts. But as Utahns debate the blueprint, the costs of the Mountain Accord process itself have climbed, with expenditures estimated to reach $27 million by 2017. To help float the Mountain Accord’s financial needs, the Legislature in its recent session handed Mountain Accord $3 million—$2 million shy of what Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, asked for. Niederhauser also sits on Mountain Accord’s executive board. Mountain Accord also receives cash from participating cities and counties as well as donations from citizens and businesses, such as ski resorts based in the Cottonwood canyons. But it’s not clear how this money is being spent. The only budget information on Mountain Accord’s website appears as a link to the January 2015 executive board meeting, in which it is estimated that, by 2017, as much as $27 million will have been spent on Mountain Accord. While this “Phase II” budget shows that much of the money is being spent on consultants and legal review, the budget does not identify which consultants have received the $4 million that has already been spent. In September 2013, the Mountain Accord executive committee hired Laynee Jones and her firm, LJ Consulting LLC, to coordinate the Mountain Accord process. At the same meeting, it retained Parametrix, an environmental-consulting firm based in Washington state. Jones provided a more detailed account of Mountain Accord spending to City Weekly showing that she and her firm have received $578,000 over the past two years, while Parametrix has

Above: Laynee Jones, Mountain Accord program manager. Left: The blueprint would allow some development in exchange for protection of private land, shaded in blue. paid $3.2 million. These expenses, she says, were approved by the Mountain Accord executive board. Jones says a more detailed expense report will be added to the website. “We will explore posting this type of information more frequently on the website in the future,” she said. For her part, Jones says her duties have involved getting 200 different stakeholders to sit down and agree on a set of baselines for the central Wasatch, a process that required 30 meetings. Parametrix, Jones says, has provided all of the production work, including developing the Mountain Accord website, compiling reports and gathering information. Jones says the large undertaking of Mountain Accord is well worth the effort because it could, at long last, resolve some of the piecemeal development, planning and inevitable conflict that the stunning central Wasatch tends to breed. “It’s the right thing to do so that we can actually settle a plan for this asset that we have that’s a source for our drinking water and our recreation,” Jones says. “We need better information about what’s out there. So you’re gathering information on a huge area. We’ve spent a lot of time and effort getting the stakeholders to agree on a baseline list of information, which is kind of unprecedented, really.” Because Mountain Accord did not receive the $5 million that Niederhauser requested from the Legislature, Jones says the Phase II budget will have to be revised. This budget shows that Mountain Accord will cost taxpayers $23.1 million over the next three years. These figures have only recently begun to draw scrutiny from those who are attempting to follow along and participate in the Mountain Accord process. The most visible of these critics is Pat

Shea, a local attorney and University of Utah professor who is a former director of the Bureau of Land Management. Shea says the Mountain Accord process, and the future of the project, is being polluted by money. “What you’re seeing is what the consultants believe will be the best way to sustain their consultancy, as opposed to what’s the best process and the most sustainable result for the Wasatch,” Shea says. “When you allow professional consultants to say, ‘This is how the process should be run,’ they will run it that way, and they will be sensitive to the political and economic needs of the people who will then be renewing their contracts.” Indeed, it is possible to imagine that, just as in a political campaign, financial support from various corners could unduly influence the direction of Mountain Accord. Jones says she has received comments from residents concerned about the level of money flowing to Mountain Accord from the private sector. In 2014, the Phase II budget shows that Mountain Accord received $60,000 in private funds. Jones’ accounting provided to City Weekly shows that Snowbird and Alta resorts each gave $15,000, and the Snowpine Lodge at Alta gave $5,000. Save Our Canyons, a nonprofit that has publicly contemplated pulling out of the Mountain Accord process due to the emphasis paid to development projects, contributed a comprehensive canyons use-study valued at $60,000. Chris Robinson, a Summit County council member who is on the Mountain Accord executive board, says that, on one hand, he’s not surprised that this type of planning could be expensive. But, on the other, he’s unsure about where the money will come from. “I haven’t had a chance, nor has it been presented in detail, where this money is coming from and where it is

being spent,” Robinson says. Robinson notes that Summit County has contributed $25,000 the past two years, and will give $50,000 over the next couple of years. Salt Lake City is giving $200,000, as is the Utah Transit Authority, the Utah Department of Transportation and Salt Lake County. Robinson’s concern about Mountain Accord’s finances doesn’t negate the fact that lots of money might be needed. For a project like building a rail line and blasting tunnels through the mountains, the price tag would likely soar into the billions. “I don’t think you can plan for a billion-dollar project on a nickel,” he says. In February, four decision makers, Summit County Council members Kim Carson and Roger Armstrong, and Park City Council members Dick Peek and Liza Simpson, accompanied Jones on a trip to Switzerland, where they viewed firsthand the types of canyon transportation systems that could appear in the Wasatch. Jones paid for her trip, but Mountain Accord picked up the $15,865 tab for the politicians’ trip. Shea says an audit should be launched to track Mountain Accord’s funding and expenses, but he doubts it will happen. Carl Fisher, executive director of Save Our Canyons, says that he understands there could be sticker shock associated with the costs of Mountain Accord. But if a plan is reached that warring parties can agree upon, he says it could save vast sums of time and money in the future. “I think that the quality of work and the level of conversation that we’re having and the visioning exercise that we’re collectively going through—I think the thinking is that we’re going to save money in the long run, that we’re paying consultants up front as opposed to paying lawyers on the back end,” Fisher says. CW


NEWS

C ITY LI F E

All Nighter Salt Lake City Main Library hopes proposed 24-hour service will benefit more than just the homeless. By Eric S. Peterson epeterson@cityweekly.net @ericspeterson

Easter Services Saturday at 8 p.m. - The Great Vigil of Easter with choir

Sunday at 10:30 a.m. - Festival Easter Service

Brass and Timpani Loving and professional nursery

Cathedral Church of St. Mark

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Broadcast on the worldwide web (stmarkscathedralut.org)

Neighborhood Easter Egg Hunt for the kids following the service Bring your own basket!

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Sunday at 8 a.m. - Holy Communion

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An Episcopal Church

231 East 100 South, Downtown Salt Lake City 801-322-3400 | stmarkscathedralut.org Tours available daily - The Very Rev. Raymond Joe Wald0n, Dean

April 2, 2015 | 11

For years, Salt Lake City leaders have dreamed of the capital city buzzing with activity 24 hours a day, and for years the city’s night owls have been able to enjoy late-night attractions—questionable steak-and-egg specials at all-night diners and shopping at a handful of 24-hour grocery stores. Now, the Salt Lake City Main Library at 210 E. 400 South is moving closer to enacting a bold pilot program to expand library service 24 hours a day, beyond the library’s typical 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekday hours and its shorter weekend schedule. A plan is progressing for a two-year pilot that would be funded entirely through private donations—at a cost anticipated to be $600,000 a year—to create the first 24-hour library in the nation. While the big price tag comes with plans for all-night programming and community events, the idea has also drawn skepticism from those worried the proposal would transform the popular day hang-out for the city’s homeless into a new type of homeless shelter, complete with plenty of bedtime reading. A 24-hour library was originally seen as a potential resource for homeless youth, especially LGBT teens who often find themselves in dire straits after being kicked out of abusive homes or leaving over differences with family about their sexual orientation or gender identity. For all youth, the adult shelters often seem intimidating and dangerous, given the criminal element there that preys on the vulnerable. Jason Mathis, the director of the Downtown Alliance, says that 24-hour library concept came about through a unique collaboration between Bruce Bastian, entrepreneur, philanthropist and supporter of LGBT causes, and Bill Evans, a former spokesman for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Bill Tibbitts, a homeless-issues advocate with the Crossroads Urban Center, applauds the proposed expansion of

library hours, noting the way the homeless currently get along with day patrons and saying, “At a minimum, this would give homeless people in the downtown area a safe, legal and sanitary place to go to the bathroom at night,” Tibbitts says. When Alliance head Mathis brought the idea to library director John Spears, he says Spears was very receptive to the idea on the condition that the library be open to all residents—be they homeless youth, graveyard-shift workers, test-cramming college students or just your run-of-themill insomniacs. “There’s legitimate benefits to having a public space open 24 hours a day and bringing people together where you have a sense of community that’s not a 7-Eleven or Denny’s,” Mathis says. Mathis says the pilot could be implemented efficiently and economically. For example, instead of hiring more staff and security personnel, only two of the library’s levels would be left open all night. Mathis points out that the facility already runs heating, air conditioning and some of its lighting 24 hours a day. But he also admits the idea isn’t a “slam dunk” yet, and that the library was wise not to move too fast with the idea. Instead, the library has recently gathered around 3,000 public comments and is in the process of conducting a security audit that will evaluate security policies as well as how best to work with the Salt Lake City Police Department to ensure safety at Library Square. Spears says that the library board will weigh these factors when it votes on whether or not to implement the pilot program, likely by early summer. Already, though, he sees a lot of potential benefits. He can imagine nighttime computer and GED classes, more outreach for homeless patrons (who would still have to abide by library rules that prohibit sleeping or causing disturbances in the facility), movie marathons and stargazing activities. He likes the idea of giving space to organizations like the Utah Arts Festival to host 24-hour dances and performances. If he had his druthers, he’d like to see yoga classes held at sunrise. But, most importantly, he says the community at large could define the city’s nightlife. “I think it says so much about this city that our foray into becoming a New York or a Paris—someplace that has a vibrant urban core that functions 24 hours a day— is to say, ‘What if it was the public library?’ Spears says. “That’s a great testament to this city.” CW

Do you want to celebrate the Jesus story?


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12 | April 2, 2015

CITIZEN REVOLT

the

OCHO

by COLBY FRAZIER @colbyfrazierlp

the list of EIGHT

by bill frost

Sunning the President

@bill_frost

Utah’s never-ending warm weather is a shoe-in to keep giving up sunshine right into summer. So, in addition to rubbing a little sunscreen on your nose before a hike, think of giving a bottle to the homeless. On Friday, keep your eyes peeled for President Barack Obama, who is visiting Utah for the first time since being elected. And, just in time for college registration, don’t miss a speech at the University of Utah about tuition costs.

Sun Safety Drive April 1-30

Eight reasons President Obama is visiting Utah, according to local talk radio:

8. To check on progress of

chemtrails re: turning population into Muslims.

7. To confiscate your guns, gold and Twinkie rations.

M-Sat 8-7 Sun 10-5 • 9275 S 1300 W 877-213-3301 • glovernursery.com/city

Obama in Utah

Humane Society of Utah

6. To inspect secret

concentration camps that will house patriots and Mike Lee.

5. To destroy last remaining

genealogical records of his birth on Mars.

4. To film travel footage for his new reality show, Keeping Up With the Antichrist.

“Obama 2016: The Mandate of Fate.”

2. To declare everything west 1.

Had to see actual Mitt Romney voters for himself.

Friday, April 3

President Barack Obama hasn’t been to Utah since 2008, when he was on the campaign trail. When he visits Hill Air Force Base on Friday, he probably won’t be surprised to find the Beehive State buzzing over his arrival—some with stingers out. Since you’re probably not invited to see the president speak, stage a protest out in front of Hill Air Force Base. Who knows? Maybe he’ll hear you. And, although no details have been released, Obama might just travel to Salt Lake City, where he has a standing invitation from Mayor Ralph Becker. Time details are nonexistent, but make no mistake, powerful people say Obama will be here on Friday.

Tuition at the U of U

3. To announce his third term: of Magna a national park.

The Fourth Street Clinic is seeking donations of all manner of sun-safety gear, including sunglasses that offer protection from ultraviolet light, SPF 30 unscented, non-aerosol sunscreen, lip balm and hats—wide brims preferred. Donation boxes will be located at Salt Lake County Library branches, the county government center and the Huntsman Cancer Institute. FourthStreetClinic.org, SLCOHealth.org

No

Low Cost Vaccination Clinic Dog Packages Starting at $24 Cat Packages Starting at $23.50 Rabies $11 Pet Microchip $25

appointment needed

No

Offfiice Visit Fees

Call (801) 261-2919 ext. 230 UtahHumane.org/clinic

Tuesday, April 7

Since the University of Utah joined the Pacific 12 Athletic Conference, all kinds of buildings have been built, the football players got a new place to lift weights and run into each other and tuition has risen, and, will most likely keep on risin’. Ruth V. Watkins, senior vice president for academic affairs, might explain why this is the case in a presentation titled “Tuition at the University of Utah.” Hinckley Institute of Politics, Hinckley Caucus Room, Orson Spencer Hall, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, University of Utah, 4:30 p.m.5:30 p.m., Hinckley.Utah.edu


NEWS

Curses, Foiled Again Brian J. Byers crashed his car while driving drunk and then poured water on the road so it would look like black ice caused the crash, according to police in Sparta, N.J. Byers drove the car home and had a friend drive him back to the scene, where an officer spotted Byers carrying two 5-gallon buckets back to his friend’s car after emptying them. It’s not clear how many trips back and forth Byers made with the buckets, but the town’s public works department needed to apply half a ton of salt to make the road safe for driving. The officer charged the friend, Alexander Zambenedetti, 20, with drunken driving, too. (NJ.com)

QUIRKS

n David Fanuelsen, 39, and Dean Brown, 22, stole construction equipment worth $8,000 from their employer, according to police in Key West, Fla. The boss, Stace Valenzuela, identified the workers as the thieves because he had overheard them planning the theft after Fanuelsen unintentionally butt-dialed him. “Talk about bumbling idiots,” Valenzuela said. (Reuters)

Bowling for Hollers Two people in east Ukraine were injured while bowling after a player rolled a grenade instead of a ball. The blast occurred at a restaurant that also offers duckpin bowling, which uses a small ball without holes. Emergency services official Sergei Ivanushkin cited the incident as the latest in a rash of accidents in the rebel-controlled area caused by careless use of explosives. (Associated Press)

to avoid expending effort when problem-solving, and it seems likely that people will increasingly use their smartphones as an extended mind,” said study coauthor Nathaniel Barr of the University of Waterloo. (United Press International)

n Sheena Keynna Miller, 27, was injured after she walked in front of a freight train while texting on her cellphone. Miller told police in Lakeland, Fla., that she didn’t hear the train horn or see the crossing arms down when she stepped onto the tracks. Police Sgt. Gary Gross said the locomotive tossed Miller into the air, fracturing her arm. (Orlando Sentinel)

Homeland Insecurity A traveler was allowed to use expedited airport security lines, even after a security officer at the airport recognized the person as a convicted felon and former member of a domestic terrorist group, according to the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General’s Office. The official report said the security officer alerted his supervisor but was told to “take no action” and let the passenger through. (NBC News) Post-Posting Facebook announced that U.S. users can designate a “legacy contact,” who is authorized to continue posting on their page after they die, respond to new friend requests, and update their profile picture and cover photo. Users can also ask to have their accounts deleted after their death, a previously unavailable option. (Associated Press) When Guns Are Outlawed Police charged three suspects with assaulting and robbing a 30-year-old man in Winston-Salem, N.C., by threatening him with a hypodermic needle. (Winston-Salem Journal) Compiled by Roland Sweet. Authentication on demand.

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Smartphones, Dumb People Ontario researchers announced they’ve found a link between heavy smartphone use and lowered intelligence. The reason, their survey suggests, is that the devices encourage lazy thinking by allowing users to solve problems with computers rather than exercise their brains. “Decades of research has revealed that humans are eager

BY ROLAND SWEET

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April 2, 2015 | 13


Rules of Engagement A devout Mormon and an evangelical street preacher exchange words near Temple Square. Next thing you know, they’re dining together on roadkill. By Carolyn Campbell comments@cityweekly.net

14 | April 2, 2015

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Brett Colvin

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I

n 2007, Bryan Hall was almost finished filming his documentary, Us and Them: Religious Rivalry in America. He still didn’t know how to end the film. A devout member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the now-42-yearold from Orem, thought about the protesters on Temple Square. He finally said, “Let’s go talk to those crazy street preachers.” There he met the outspoken leader of the street preachers, Ruben Israel, a 53-year-old Whittier, Calif., native who travels around the country to preach the Bible to whomever will listen. Looking back, Hall recalls, “I imagined two scenarios: One would be a huge argument, which would still work for the ending of the film. But in my heart, I knew it wouldn’t be that way. I thought the best ending is one where we can resolve this ridiculousness.”

Bryan Hall

What it took for filmmaker

Bryan Hall to cross over

Are you and have you always been active LDS?

Always, and still am. Returned missionary, married in the temple, the works.

What made you cross the line and talk to Ruben Israel?

I had misinterpreted the direction from the pulpit as “Don’t ever talk to them,” when actually it was “Don’t engage in an argument with them.” Nevertheless, most Mormons receive that message, which is more heavily weighted, as “Don’t talk to them at all.” I would be lying if I said I was overly concerned about what was preached from the pulpit the day I went and talked to him. I didn’t feel good about my own despising of the conference protesters and having this constant feeling [of contempt] every time I thought of them. Something was wrong with that outlook, and I thought the only way forward was to confront it. I felt nervous, but also had a certain resolve in that I recognized a tough solution that might bring me peace. When you anticipate the peace, it fuels your courage to go on. I deeply desired to fix this problem, particularly with Ruben. He, in particular, made me the most angry, and therefore I just knew I had to talk to him. I went up to him and said, “You don’t know me, but I’ve hated you and your people for a long time. I have come to try to fix that today and try to get to know you. I wondered if I could buy you lunch, so we can just talk. He said, “Of course.”

What was that first lunch like?

It was fantastic. It was that moment in life when you are in high school or junior high and that one boy or girl who you swear is your mortal enemy becomes your best friend. Only I was 34 years old. Ruben was staying in town with half a dozen other people. One of the other street preachers was on a list to get roadkill, and he said, “God has blessed us with a huge elk that was hit on the freeway.” They had skinned it and carved it and were going to have a big feast [later that night]. So, my film crew and I met with everyone, and they were feeding us this roadkill elk that was hit earlier in the morning in Parley’s Canyon. It was so unlike anything I do in my normal life that it broke the ice between us 100 times over. They got a kick out of us eating the elk, and we really began to humanize each other. We talked long into the night. We left their place at 1:30 in the morning, talking about how much we had enjoyed hanging out with them, especially Ruben. There were a few moments when it could have gone south, because some of them had bad feelings toward Mormons, and it took a little courage to not engage and not worry about that. For Ruben, street preaching was trying to preach Jesus in his way, and he didn’t seem to have any baggage with that. As a group of people, they were extremely kind. I got to understand them better as fringe members of society, not just as religious people. One of them lived in a rundown place, and we were eating roadkill, and I went from hating them to feeling sorry for them.

Do you find any overlap between your beliefs?

Absolutely. One message that struck me was when he said these words: “If Joseph Smith were alive today, he would be out on the street preaching with me. His entire life embodied the rejection of traditional religion for the sake of a message that was extremely controversial. I disagree with his doctrine, but love that he was willing to take a bullet for his beliefs.” I’d never thought of it that way. The current leadership is very safe. They send messages from behind their desks, from behind a pulpit. They are liked in the world and in the community. With [LDS Church founder] Joseph Smith, it was different. From a very young age, he was completely at odds with established religion. Street preaching is what the prophets of the Bible did, and that is what Ruben and other street preachers are trying to do. It was so disruptive in my mind that he was revering Joseph Smith. It made me wonder, then, who am I to say that Ruben is doing something wrong?

Have you ever got him to go to church with you?

Oh, yes. I’ve invited him, but he lives in California and is only here on conference weekend. One funny story happened regarding Proposition 8 [banning same-sex marriage]. I get a call from Ruben saying he woke up that morning and saw on the news that a group of people was gathering at the Los Angeles Temple in the fall of 2008. This was immediately following the election where Prop 8 was supported in California prior to the courts overturning it. So with the street preachers being very in favor of traditional marriage, about 30 of them thought they owed the Mormons one and placed themselves between the gates and the crowds at the temple. He said, “I need you to call whoever you need to call, because all of the people who are in the temple today must be afraid to come out. You need to let them know that we are here and they can drive their cars and come out.” (The street preachers didn’t know that the temple wasn’t open on Sunday.) (Continued on p. 16)


How street preacher Ruben Israel came to break bread with an adversary

Most Mormons are obedient, and when they are told to leave the conference, they don’t look at us or talk to us. It turned out that Bryan stepped out in faith. He made the initial contact. I’m sure he was a little bit nervous. He looked a bit intimidated. He asked a handful of questions, and then lots of things were happening around us, so he asked me to come out for lunch. I know that Mormons are told not to make any contact, so it was rare for someone to approach me like that. Because it was rare, I decided to spend some quality time with him. That night, I invited him to dinner at a place where we were staying. He brought drinks or something—I know he didn’t come empty-handed. We forgot about the camera and the sound system and just talked to each other. Now, I see him every time I am in Salt Lake City. One of the interesting things about his film is that he showed a different side of me. Some of the Mormons at his church gave him a hard time because it humanized me instead of making me look like a monster. He took it on a leap of faith. We talk regularly. I’m a Lakers fan, and he’s a Jazz fan. He’ll call me and talk about how the Jazz beat the Lakers. We do more than just argue about religion and politics.

What props do you use when you preach?

Have you met other Mormons at Hall’s house?

All they would have to do is look at my website, let me know what city or state they are in, and I would recommend them to a group or an individual in that location.

What it is like when you come to Salt Lake City and visit Bryan?

I’ll stay at his house and have breakfast. On the days I preach, I’m gone by 5:30 or 6 in the morning, and I don’t get back until 8:30 at night. He brings food to me. He’ll even bring me coffee. Can you believe a Mormon bringing caffeine? I might see him at conference, and we might say a few things to each other. We’re almost like Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner. We sometimes go at each other, then we clock out and are friends again. At his house, I’m like any other guest. He would give me the keys to his house, and the key to his car. When I’m done, I’ll play pool.

One thing you did align with the Mormon church on was your support of California’s Prop 8?

I went to Conference at the time of Proposition 8 and thanked the church for promoting Proposition 8. I give credit where credit is due. I’m in favor of traditional marriage.

Have you also come to Utah to preach during the Utah Pride Festival? Yes, I have, as a matter of fact, I go back to when they had a permit to walk from a local park on a residential street, to now when the parade route goes all the way up to Brigham Young’s home and then they make a U-turn and then finish their route at the City & County Building. (Continued on p. 17)

What about Mormons and street preaching?

I own a business, and so that’s primarily how I do most of my travel. However on my website, OfficialStreetPreacher.com, there is a donation window. We are not a 501(c)(3), so I’m not married to the state, because I do partake in preaching against politics.

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Speaking of funding, how are you supported? How does your ministry receive offerings?

Ruben Israel

What we’ve done is very biblical. I told Bryan, do you know that you have a street preacher in the Book of Mormon? There is a picture of a person standing on a wall with a light. That is a man who was preaching. It caught him off guard. Street preaching is a way that God has used to communicate. If you have a newspaper or a radio station, you have to buy it. If you have a church, people have to go inside. I raise the voice to stir up conversation. I just simply read the Bible and was inspired at age 18. I’ve been doing it for 35 years. Away from this, I live a regular life, have a normal family, take the trash out and walk my dog. Then, when it comes time, I convey God’s message.

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We try to work out times when Bryan is home, and put aside one day for Q & A. Mormons can come there and pick my brain. They ask me questions like, “Who supports you?” and a gazillion other questions they might be ashamed to ask on the street. It’s not a problem for me. I go to college campuses and preach and take question after question. I have nothing to hide. I’m not going to plead the Fifth and not answer. My whole purpose is to talk. Since Bryan’s film, you will be surprised how many Mormons come up and talk to me. They give me prayer requests, and ask me to pray for certain people. Much of that was the foundation of a man [Hall] who stepped out in faith, in what might be termed disobedience, but was actually something much better than that.

Where would someone go if they feel called to be a street preacher?

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One year, I drilled a hole through a Book of Mormon and dragged it on the floor for the three days I was there. Only one little old lady had the courage to say, “Please don’t drag my holy book.” I’m one of those guys who waves the Mormon underwear. I believe that the underwear that Mormons consider sacred—according to Mormon founders, it was supposed to be all the way to your wrists and ankles and neck—and that was considered sacred. With Mormons today, it’s like most stuff: They’ve modified it. I want to say, if you’re angry with me for waving it, your church has mangled it. Some things that took place in the temple used to take several hours, and now they take about an hour and a half. They’ve mangled a lot of things. The founders believed in having multiple wives. Why don’t Mormons have multiple wives now? I don’t think Mormons believe in the Book of Mormon. The Mormon church has become a business.

Church is good, but having faith in Jesus Christ and staying with the Bible is what God wants. We have home churches and home Bible studies. We network across the United States.

Brett Colvin

What was it like when Bryan Hall approached you for the first time?

What congregation are you affiliated with?

April 2, 2015 | 15

It is a nondenominational group called Bible Believers. That is the actual church started in the Bible, so we are just going back to the roots of Christianity. That is why meeting in homes is paramount to us. At home churches, we pick up a lot of people who, over the years, have been spiritually and physically abused by churches. We are like their last resort before they throw in the towel on Christianity. They feel more comfortable in a living room than on a pew. We’ll also even welcome Mormons.


(Bryan Hall continued from p. 14)

Your enemies might not always be your enemies. A few different times, when Ruben has come to Salt Lake City on a Friday night [before conference weekend], he has arrived early enough for me to have dinner with him. I have held small gatherings to have people from my ward meet him. I have talked to his wife on the phone. He does have a congregation in Los Angeles, but his church really is on the street. My film company helped make music for his website. We have become friends.

Jack Donaldson

Do you feel that there are two people—the person who is your friend and the person who protests?

How do people react to him when he’s preaching? “Street preaching is a way that God has used to communicate.” —Ruben Israel

He’s been spit upon, had urine thrown on him. He’s a big guy in a big group. But they have pretty sophisticated tactics for protecting themselves. They make sure to have someone filming all the time to protect themselves. They are much more organized and sophisticated than you think. They are intentionally presenting themselves as a ragtag group of chaotic idiots, but they leave with a number of contacts to send Bibles to. In their minds, they feel like they are getting through. They joke that they are part of the body of Christ, and they just might be the armpit.

Has anything he said to you changed you?

I grew up believing that these people were inherently evil and part of Satan’s host. I know now that it is definitely not the case. My friendship with him has liberated me from a false idea that they were evil, or that they were fighting against God’s will. I know that this not the case. I know they are preaching their message. Having that belief is a lot healthier than believing they are part of Satan’s army. He doesn’t make a lot of money. Every ounce of money he makes, he puts into his ministry. He and his wife have lived a very modest life. He graduated a kid from UCLA. He has raised a family and spends all of his extra money on this message. He believes that when he dies, he will be rewarded for his sacrifice.

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Jack Donaldson

Do you respect his convictions?

“Away from this, I have a normal life, have a normal family.” —Ruben Israel

I do respect his convictions. I only think that his actions are not effective. When you consider the cost of the bad blood that it tends to brew between him and opposing religions, I don’t think it’s effective. I actually do respect his beliefs as much as I respect my own. I think Jesus calls me to do that.

Has there ever been a falling-out in your friendship?

Once we got through the first part, nothing else was shocking. I do believe I have had an effect in one area: Ruben has these gimmicks. He drilled a hole through a Book of Mormon and dragged it around. I told him we are not like Muslims in this regard. It’s just a piece of paper. Also, through some backchannel means, he got some garments from an ex-Mormon. He tied them on a stick and was waving them around. Unfortunately for him, it just looked like a white cloth, and people didn’t notice. It looked like a surrender flag. It would stir so much hate. He said, “That is just your crazy underwear.” I told him the garments are something very sacred, and we don’t reveal the oath and covenant. Mormons are a very conservative, modest people. It’s like asking an Amish person to buy an iPhone. I have noticed that he always shares the banners and stuff that they create for each event, but since we had that conversation, he’s never brought up the garments.

What happens when you get together? Jack Donaldson

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16 | April 2, 2015

No. This is the most important thing. We view them as protesters. They are street preachers. They don’t want to be called protesters. They view themselves as street preachers, and this is their entire ministry. They view themselves as speaking God’s word and they go where the crowds are. They aren’t here to protest Mormons; they are here to preach to Mormons. I disagree with their tactics. I think they are ineffective. I’ve told Ruben this. It’s a challenge even for the people they do get to stop and listen. The negativity and feeling like they are being yelled at causes such a deep divide and negative experience. I told him that from a marketing standpoint. I love him and am not offended by it.

“We talked long into the night. We left their place at 1:30 in the morning.” —Bryan Hall

During conference time, Ruben and I regularly meet, and then each go in our own directions. [Israel goes to street preach or protest, and Hall goes to conference.] Because my father-in-law is a stake president, we usually have some kind of tickets. We usually have time to spend with the family or Ruben, then we go our separate ways and meet up afterwards. He usually arrives on Friday and leaves on Monday morning. He’ll stay at our house and get up very early to meet up with other friends who have traveled in. They’ll go and stake out the ground at about 5 a.m. Especially when the weather is bad, we do try to organize to bring them breakfast or lunch, so they can keep their place. We’ll coordinate efforts to drop off hot chocolate or donuts or lunch to them. Sometimes we just shower them with a bunch of food. He has definitely had more conversations since the movie came out. It’s more effective to have a movie that shows you as a lovable, big teddy bear. In New York, on my mission, I did street preaching, and you would make contacts and get way more traction that way. I can’t deny that method works. I still think he could do his preaching and just not be as abrasive and be way more effective.


(Ruben Israel continued from p. 15)

How often do you preach?

Several times a month. I fly out of Los Angeles to Phoenix, to Washington, DC. I travel all over the nation to different events where I meet with very active Christians and we preach a standard against whatever event is happening. If somebody wishes to give a message to the Mormon church, conference would be the time to do it, which is why I come. In Los Angeles, there is a lot of Hollywood type stuff, movie awards, Hollywood Boulevard, Beverly Hills, college campuses, beaches and book signings—just to name a few

Do you have a day job?

For over 25 years, I have been a contractor.

How large is your family? How many mouths do you have to feed?

Right now, it is just my wife and me because our son and daughter have grown up and are now productive citizens.

Oftentimes, we don’t see the conversion. Somebody else gets the conversion. That’s the way Christianity works. My job is just being faithful to my job, to plant seed, water seed and hope that somebody else gets that harvest.

What do you believe yourself? That the Bible is the word of God.

How do Mormons respond to your message?

Most have been very nice. During conference, when we go to lunch and dinner, there are Mormons who approach us and say they would like to buy our meal and sit down and talk. The worst beatings I’ve ever got have been from Jews and Muslims. Catholics have been known to whip us with the rosary beads when we speak against the Vatican and the Pope. There are lots of police around us. I’ve been punched more times than I can remember, jailed more times than I can remember. It’s just part of the deal. If they did it to Jesus, it’s not going to be any different for me. People are not going to like you for what you have to say. The day I start doing this so people will like me is the day I hang up my megaphone.

What would you say to Mormons and others who read this story?

Learn a lesson from Bryan and come on out and spend some time. CW

“Oftentimes, we don’t see the conversion. Somebody else gets the conversion.” —Ruben Israel, right

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Does your family understand your need to travel?

Do you hope to convert people?

Brett Colvin

It’s a lifestyle that God considers an abomination and reprobate. It’s a sin that has crept into Christianity and has now invaded Mormonism. I just hope to preach God’s standard to homosexuals. If Salt Lake City hosted an adultery pride parade or a fornication pride parade or a masturbation pride parade, we would be there, too. Those are only an invitation for someone like me to be there.

Brett Colvin

“During conference time, Ruben and I regularly meet, and then each go in our own directions.” —Bryan Hall

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Yes, they do. They would have to be understanding, being married to me. That would be like Obama’s daughters not being active in being an American. This is the way of life, and personally, we don’t know of Christianity any other way. After 35 years, it is like breathing. They know if they don’t see me in person, they can watch me on the local news somewhere in America.

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April 2, 2015 | 17


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ESSENTIALS

the

Entertainment Picks april 2-8

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

THURSDAY 4.2

FRIDAY 4.3

SATURDAY 4.4

According to Utah Museum of Fine Arts curator Whitney Tassie, “When artist Duane Linklater first told me he wanted to engage with the UMFA’s American Indian collection to create his salt 11 exhibit, I was a little apprehensive”—in part, due to a perceived trend of artists appropriating Native American objects for their own sake. Linklater has a degree in native studies in addition to a master of fine art degree and, according to Tassie, “repeatedly addresses the ongoing legacy of colonialism in his work.” The customary methods of securing these antique objects are under criticism by artists such as Linklater. Additionally, such objects are often presented simply as ethnic artifacts in museum collections. Without authorship, they’re treated less as works of art than as something “other,” to be looked at simply for their different-ness, and not for the sake of any historical artistic quality. The process through which Linklater approaches these objects from the UMFA collection—recreating them with a 3-D scanner to be produced in off-white plastic resin—is a process that evokes the Western objectification of Native American art. Taking an object such as Raven Mask (pictured above, right), and looking at it purely for the sake of its structural qualities, without authorship or historical context, and because it belongs to the UMFA, is akin to looking at Linklater’s own “UMFA1981.016.002” (pictured above, left) simply for the sake of its formal qualities. It is an object made like any other, and its Native American context should neither be glorified nor subverted. (Ehren Clark) salt 11: Duane Linklater @ Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, University of Utah, 801-581-7332, through Aug. 2, included with $9 museum admission. UMFA.Utah.edu

It seems like every professional ballet company worth its salt has produced its own creative rendition of Aladdin. In 2013, Ballet West’s principle ballet mistress, Pamela Robinson-Harris, along with former company soloist Peggy Dolkas, choreographed their version of the ballet for the company’s popular family series. This spring, that original piece of choreography returns to the Capitol Theatre. Many are familiar with Aladdin from the popular 1992 Disney animated film, but the epic One Thousand and One Nights (also known as Arabian Nights) story of Aladdin—a young orphan living on the streets, who wins the love of a princess with help from a magic lamp, a genie and three wishes—has been told since the third century. French scholar Antoine Galland translated and introduced the tale to Western audiences in the early 18th century, and it soon found its way into books and onto the stage. The cast for this family series production comes from the ranks of Ballet West II, Ballet West’s professional training division, and includes students from the Ballet West Academy. But, according to Peter Christie, director of education, it’s not a children’s ballet. “It is a charming ballet, very appealing to families,” Christie says, “with the same professional quality as any of our other performances.” And, with a running time of only 80 minutes, it’s a great introduction to dance for all ages. (Katherine Pioli) Ballet West II: Aladdin @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, April 3, 7 p.m.; April 4, 10 a.m., 2 p.m. & 7 p.m.; April 5, 2 p.m.; $15-35. ArtTix.org

Pantomime is similar to mime, in that both art forms eschew dialogue in favor of bodily expression. Mime, though, relies heavily on facial expression to convey emotions and tell stories, whereas straight pantomime typically involves masks that hide those natural expressions, forcing performers to utilize their entire bodies. The beloved Mummenschanz performing-arts company is classically neither, while simultaneously being both. Mostly considered, though, to be more on the “panto” side of the equation, this Swiss company performs without any musical accompaniment. They also use surreal shapes and forms—nondescript blobs and tubes—to mostly hide the performers, while imbuing those inanimate objects with human emotions and feelings. At first it feels a bit odd when, say, a giant Slinky-shaped being appears behind the raised curtain and begins to simply move around the stage. There are no huge crescendos, nothing big and bold besides the surreal image of this noncreature. But that surreal sensibility has defined Mummenschanz as a theatrical performance that feels both retro and modern. Which is fitting, because the company has been performing regularly since its inception in the 1970s. Back then, the art form was unique enough to inspire a long-running and celebrated stint on Broadway. Today, it still feels surprisingly fresh. Yes, they’ve updated certain routines, and newly engineered materials for the blob-like costumes have certainly helped the illusion. But ultimately, it’s that original odd aesthetic (e.g., two human forms with electrical outlets for heads—one a socket, the other a plug—involved in an intricate dance) that keeps the company relevant. (Jacob Stringer) Mummenschanz @ Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, April 4, 7:30 p.m., $20-$69. EcclesCenter.org

salt 11: Duane Linklater

Ballet West II: Aladdin

Mummenschanz

TUESDAY 4.7

Broadway Across America: Once

Once upon a time, in a long-ago year called 2007, a little movie became an unexpected arthouse hit. Written and directed by John Carney, it was a simple musical love story about a guy and a girl—he a busker and musician in Dublin, she an immigrant with her own musical talents— who meet at a time when they need each other creatively and emotionally. The result—Once—was uniquely stirring, and its beautiful anthem “Falling Slowly” went on to win the Academy Award for Best Original Song. But the little movie that could didn’t stop there. In 2011, a stage musical version of Once was developed from Carney’s film, and featured several new songs by the film’s stars and songwriters, Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová. It’s still the same story of a Guy and a Girl and employs a minimalist production style with the musicians, who are characters in the show, also serving as the “orchestra” while remaining on stage. In addition to the film’s wonderful songs like “Falling Slowly,” “When Your Mind’s Made Up” and “Sleeping,” additional tunes fill out the plot, including “The North Strand,” “The Hill” and “It Cannot Be About That.” The result is a show that won eight 2012 Tony Awards, including Best Musical and Best Book. If you adore the movie, you might fall in love all over again as the story plays out live, and those magnificent songs fill Kingsbury Hall. (Scott Renshaw) Broadway Across America: Once @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; April 10, 8 p.m.; April 11, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.; April 12, 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.; $35-$75. Kingsbury.Utah.edu


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Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks (ZAP)

Now accepting grant applications from qualifying organizations.

Tier II = nonprofit or municipal arts, cultural and botanical organizations with budgets less than $330,900, or new to ZAP, or currently not in Tier I

Application Deadline: APRIL 30, 2015 BY 5 P.M. Tier I & Zoological = large nonprofit arts, cultural, or zoological organizations with budgets greater than $330,900

Application Deadline: MAY 15, 2015 BY 5 P.M. To access the applications and for more information:

www.zapisyou.org 385-468-7058

VISUAL ART

A&E

Painted From Memory What’s My Name? explores the experience of Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers. By Brian Staker comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

W

ho are you? It’s a question framed in a mirror: the reflecting pool of language. The phrase “I think, therefore I am” is, in a sense, accurate, and conveys the mental images and linguistic descriptions we give to ourselves. You can’t detach “self” from “self-image,” and when that image starts to become fractured, every element of our day-to-day existence is disrupted. The exhibit What’s My Name? at Art Access Gallery looks at Alzheimer’s disease and dementia—degenerative diseases that decrease mental functioning—through works by artists who’ve either been caregivers to Alzheimer’s patients, or patients themselves. In 2014, Sue Martin was caring for her father who had Parkinson’s as well as dementia, and she found that art helped her cope with the emotional difficulties. She had been blogging about her experiences and started making paintings. “I was struck by how something creative every day saved my sanity,” she says. Martin noticed that Jerry Hardesty, another Salt Lake City painter, had started posting on Facebook a series he was working on about his mother’s battle with Alzheimer’s. The two put together a proposal to the nonprofit gallery, but they felt that their own works didn’t tell a complete story. They took submissions, and the show—curated by Martin—also includes works by other artists whose lives have been touched by the disease. Margaret Hill’s paintings—which represent work created both before and after she was diagnosed, as well as later works she produced in collaboration with her partner Hardin—illustrate a mind in decline and become gradually more abstract but still possess a definite aesthetic sensibility. Even when Hill was in a care facility and losing her verbal ability, she still clung fiercely to the desire to create. Leonard and Kathryn Romney’s watercolors depict the fragmented nature of Kathryn’s experience with the disease and her perception of beauty in the world, as well as Leonard’s perspective as a caregiver. Still in the relatively early stages of her illness, Kathryn was able to attend the March 20 opening of the show. There’s a certain amount of pain inher-

ent in this subject, and Hardesty’s work channeled his emotional turmoil from experiences of visiting his mother, culminating in her not recognizing him and saying, “I don’t have a son.” The fear of being genetically predisposed to the malady prompted him to research it, resulting in the Seven Stages of Alzheimer’s abstract series on panels. It’s a stark delineation of the inevitability of decline and its ravages. Two of his other works illustrate questions from the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Exam, about identifying basic shapes and making change, and how such fundamental functions are impaired by the disease. According to the A lzheimer’s Association, one-third of deaths among people over 65 are due to Alzheimer’s or other dementia, and the disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. One of the most startling things about the disease is that, unlike cancer— which can often be sent into remission with treatment—there’s no known cure. But art has been shown to improve quality of life, and even help maintain some mental acuity. “Anything can happen to anyone at any time,” notes Art Access executive director Sheryl Gillilan. “This show is a reminder of that, but maybe it’s not as hopeless as you think.” As Alzheimer’s has entered mainstream awareness, there’s been less tendency to hide away. Leonard Romney recognized the value of humor in dealing with the disease. In an artist statement, he notes, “If my motive, rather, is to bring clarity, induce compassion and understanding or to have or create a smile or a tender remembrance, the gates spring open wide

Detail from “Dreams in Lala Land” by Sue Martin so the story may enlighten, enliven or even encourage.” Humor is also evidenced in Sue Martin’s Lala Land series—which isn’t made up of portraits of her father, but depictions of circumstances of the disease in a playful, whimsical manner. They show that patients can still enjoy pleasures as fundamental as ice cream or singing. Irene Rampton’s portraits of her father include a collage about his mother, who had been a passenger on the Titanic, and it’s a reminder that personal history lives on. “The exhibit fits perfectly with our mission to tell untold stories,” explains Gillilan. “If we can open up an avenue for people to cope with hardship and let them be heard, that’s the power of art. The creative aspects of the brain are among the last to be affected, and it’s a way to stay engaged with the world.” If we have learned anything from Alzheimer’s, perhaps it’s that we relate to the world through linguistic, symbolic interactions, and when we lose our connections to those symbols, we start to lose ourselves. This exhibit demonstrates the many ways art can keep us connected. CW

What’s My Name?

Art Access Gallery 230 S. 500 West, No. 125 801-328-0703 Through April 10 AccessArt.org


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SLC Public Library Main Branch, Auditorium Join us for music and conversation as we explore the political and educational significance of hip-hop with award-winning artist and activist �eorge �ithm �artinez, Pace University professor �hristopher �alone, �� Street �esus, �ig �urna, and more!

april 2, 2015 | 21

Sponsored by the Tanner Humanities Center, the College of Humanities, the Department of Communication, and the College of Fine arts at the University of Utah. It has also received funding from Utah Humanities (UH). UH empowers Utahns to improve their communities through active engagement in the humanities.

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FRIDAY 4.3 Out Loud

22 | april 2, 2015

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Navigating the emotions and experiences of adolescence is rough, but LGBTQ teens face an additional layer of challenges, including harassment, bullying and abuse. At a time when queer students are attempting to refine the focus of their identity, they have more difficulties hurled in their paths. Out Loud was a six-week workshop in which LGBTQ students and allies worked with community artists and art professionals to investigate contemporary art through projects and presentations. It was a welcoming space for them to express their unique experiences and perspectives. The works in this exhibition are the result, and they are a testament to the artists’ courage, their creative responses to cultural expectations and stereotypes and the ways in which art helps heal some of the trauma they’ve experienced along their journeys. The opening-night events on April 3 will include a panel discussion. (Brian Staker) Out Loud Youth Workshop Exhibition @ Utah Museum of Contemporary Art street-level corridor, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, opening reception April 3, exhibit through June 27. UtahMOCA.org.

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Thursday 4.2

Friday 4.3

Performing Arts

Performing Arts

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, University of Utah, 801-581-7100 $5 Thursdays, ComedySportz Provo, 36 W. Center St., Provo, 801-377-9700 Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-9849000 I Am Comic, Movie Grille, 2293 Grant Ave., Ogden, 7 p.m., 801-621-4738 Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628 I Hate Hamlet, Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, University of Utah, 801-581-6961 Fogo Divino (Divine Fire), Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Jackie Kashian, Wiseguys West Valley City, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-4632909

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre Ballet West: Aladdin, Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 (see Essentials, p. 18) The Improvables, CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302 Red vs. Blue, ComedySportz Provo, 36 W. Center St., Provo, 801-377-9700 Josh Nasar & Kevin Bozeman, Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371 Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Utah Ballet: Cinderella, Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 Laughing Stock, Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628 Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre I Hate Hamlet, Pioneer Memorial Theatre Fogo Divino (Divine Fire), Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Off the Wall Improv, The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787 Steve Soelberg, Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588 Jackie Kashian, Wiseguys West Valley City

Saturday 4.4 Performing Arts A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Babcock Theatre

Ballet West: Aladdin, Capitol Theatre Red vs. Blue, ComedySportz Provo Mummenschanz, Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114 (see Essentials, p. 18) Josh Nasar & Kevin Bozeman, Egyptian Theatre Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Utah Ballet: Cinderella, Kingsbury Hall Quick Wits Comedy Improv, Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St. (7720 South), Midvale, 801-824-0523 Laughing Stock, Off Broadway Theatre Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre I Hate Hamlet, Pioneer Memorial Theatre Fogo Divino (Divine Fire), Rose Wagner Center Steve Soelberg, Wiseguys Ogden Jackie Kashian, Wiseguys West Valley City

Sunday 4.5 Performing Arts Ballet West: Aladdin, Capitol Theatre Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre

Monday 4.6 Performing Arts Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre

Tuesday 4.7 Performing Arts Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Once, Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 (see Essentials, p. 18) Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre

Literary Arts Rumi Poetry Club, Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8611

Wednesday 4.8 Performing Arts Ghost: The Musical, Hale Centre Theatre Once, Kingsbury Hall Indianapolis Jones, Off Broadway Theatre Mr. Perfect, Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-363-7522 Open Mic Night, Wiseguys West Valley City, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-4632909


moreESSENTIALS Literary Arts

Lit Knit Weller Book Works, 665 E. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-328-2586, second Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m.

Visual Arts New Thursday 4.2

Caryn Feeney: Fellow Earthlings Art At The Main, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-3634088, April 1-30.

Continuing 4.2-4.8 Other Places, Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-236-7555, through May 8 David Wolske, Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, Salt Lake City, 801-596-5000, through April 17 Human Landscapes, Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, Salt Lake City, 801-5965000, through April 17 Kevin Marcoux, City & County Building, 451 S.

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

State, Salt Lake City, 801-535-6333, through April 3 No Fixed Address, The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, 801-531-9800, through May 15 Collective Experience, Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St. (455 West), Salt Lake City, 801-2457272, through April 29 What’s My Name, UAF Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, (801) 322-2428, through April 8 (see p. 20) [con]text, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, University of Utah, 801581-7332, through July 26 salt 11: Duane Linklater, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, University of Utah, 801-581-7332, through Aug. 2 Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah, 410 Campus Center Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7332, through May 17 Senior Student Art Exhibition, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801448-4660, through April 29

A TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY & WAYLON CELEBRATING JACK QUIST’S 61ST B-DAY

Friday, April 17 @ 10pm Saturday, April 18 @10pm A Bar Named Sue-Highland A Bar Named Sue-State

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24 | April 2, 2015

CAVE #2 Bone Broth Now Open!

DINE Ari LeVaux

Cheese

THE BROTHERIAN

Bullishness The pleasures—and potential perils—of making your own broth.

By Ari LeVaux comments@cityweekly.net

F

Happy Spelunking

Caputo’s Downtown 314 West 300 South 801.531.8669 Caputo’s On 15th 1516 South 1500 East 801.486.6615 Caputo’s Holladay 4670 S. 2300 E. 801.272.0821 Caputo’s U of U 215 S. Central Campus Drive 801.583.8801

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or longer than there have been kitchens, people have found ways to boil bones. From rural villages to urban restaurants to Grandma’s house, the virtues of bone stock—and its salted cousin, broth—are hardly a secret. But lately, bone broth has boomed into a trendy end in itself. You can pay nearly $10 for ginger grass-fed beef broth at Brodo in New York City. You can drink it at the Jola Cafe in Portland, Ore. It’s available online, shipped fresh to your doorstep. If you’ve ever been lifted from the depths of exhaustion, hunger, illness or chills by a sip of warm broth, you might be inclined to believe in such restorative powers. Indeed, bone broth is a wonderful thing. Nonetheless, there are some potential downsides to broth, as well as some misconceptions, that are worth keeping in mind. If bones from the wrong animal are used, broth can be a source of lead exposure. Lead can accumulate in plants and animals that are exposed to it via food, water or a contaminated environment. As a self-defense mechanism, exposed animals store lead in their bones, where it does less harm. Broth made from such bones can be high in lead. One prominent 2013 study made waves in the broth community by demonstrating higher lead content in organic chicken bone broth than from the tap water used to make it. This raised fears that bone broth should be avoided. Sally Fallon and Kaayla Daniel, authors of the book Nourishing Broth, addressed this study in an extensive blog post for the Weston A. Price Foundation. They have issues with many aspects of how the study was conducted, including suspicions that the chickens used were exceptionally contaminated. Still, they acknowledge, bones should be chosen with care, because contaminated bones do exist. Using organic bones wouldn’t help one avoid this problem, as evidenced by the fact that organic bones were used in the study. In fact, organic products could contain more heavy metals than conventionally grown food, because of the use of manure in many organic agriculture practices. Manure can be a concentrated source of heavy-metal contamination, and if it’s used to grow animal feed, that lead will end up in the animals that eat it. Amazingly, while lead will leave the

bones for the broth, calcium does not, Fallon and Daniel write. According to Daniel, they’ve examined data from numerous batches of tested broth, and “every batch tested has shown low levels [of calcium], so it stays in the bone, most likely.” I don’t know what to make of this, personally, having made and eaten stock in which the bones had become so soft I could eat them like soggy crackers. Given how long stock bones spend dissolving in hot water, it makes no sense to me that particles of calcium-rich material wouldn’t be consumed along with broth. But, assuming it’s true, Daniel pointed out a simple fix: Add veggies, which do contribute calcium. However, calcium is hardly the only reason to consume bone broth, she wrote. “Bone broth builds bones, and the likely reason is, it’s high in gelatin—collagen. And collagen is what provides the framework for good bones. That’s what’s needed to lay on calcium and other minerals. It’s like rebar and concrete.” There are many variations on bone broth, with a diversity of finished outcomes attached to each. Vietnamese pho, made from cow bones, is very different from Japanese tonkatsu ramen broth made from pork bones, or veal-bone-based demi-glace in a fancy French restaurant, or Mom-style chicken-bone soup. Thus, I’ll leave you with, not a recipe, but “BoneMan the Brotharian’s Bone Broth Basics”: At its essence, making bone broth entails little more than cooking bones in hot water for 12 to 36 hours. A slow cooker is great for many reasons. Using one isn’t as dangerous as leaving a stove burner on for days at a time, and the broth cooks slowly enough that you don’t need to keep adding water. It’s very convenient to have a crock pot going at all times with broth that’s at

Marrow escape: For flavorful broth, cut the bones and roast them before simmering the perfect sipping temperature, and available to be used in whatever’s cooking. The bones should be cut, which releases the marrow and other inner bone materials, and allows more surface area to contact the broth. When I make stock with the bones of a store-roasted chicken (lead alert!), I use a scissors to snip the soft bones to bits. With mammalian long bones, ideally the butcher will cut them; otherwise, cut them at home or whack them with a hammer. If whacking the bones, make sure that the resulting bone splinters don’t enter anyone’s mouth, unless cooked to absolute softness. Some people simmer their bones in a fine mesh bag to keep them out of the broth, or pour the finished broth through a sieve. In my case, the broth just sits in warm mode in the crock pot. The bones settle, and as long as I use a ladle to serve it, there’s no danger of bone fragments. For best flavor, begin by roasting the bones in the broiler, turning them as necessary, aiming to brown but not burn. Add the bones to the stock pot, making sure to deglaze and scrape roasted bone drippings into the pot as well. Cook on the lowest setting you’ve got. After about 12 hours, consider adding carrots, onions and celery. Don’t get too fancy with your veggies; broccoli and cabbage will backfire if cooked too long, so use these and other calcium-rich veggies to make soup with after the broth is done. Leave the broth unsalted in the pot until it’s time to use it. Then season appropriately. If sipping, I like a splash of soy and a sprinkle of garlic powder. CW Ari LeVaux writes the syndicated weekly food column Flash in the Pan.


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26 | April 2, 2015

FOOD MATTERS

NINTH & NINTH & 254 SOUTH MAIN

by TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

2014

Ogden Eats

April 10 through 19, Ogden’s downtown restaurant communit y celebrates Ogden Restaurant Week (OgdenRestaurantWeek.com), during which diners can enjoy a prix-fixe three-course dinner for $15 or a twocourse lunch for $8. Dining options run the gamut from pizza and burgers to Mexican, Thai, Italian and Japanese cuisines, with each participating restaurant offering different choices of appetizers, entrees and desserts. “These prices are typically seen in the realm of national chains and franchises located on ‘restaurant row’ or in suburban strip malls,” said Steve Ballard, owner of Sonora Grill and Thai Curry Kitchen. “Our goal is to let people know that locally grown and prepared food is available in locally owned restaurants with unique history, architecture and décor.” Other participating restaurants include Bangkok Garden, Bistro 258, Brixton’s, Harley & Bucks, Hearth on 25th, Lucky Slice, MacCool’s Public House, Prairie Schooner, Rooster’s Brewing Company, Rovali’s Italian Ristorante, Slackwater Pizzeria, Scrud’s Gourmet Burgers, Tona Sushi, Tokyo Station, Union Grill, Warren’s Craft Burger and the Lighthouse Lounge.

Distinctive Diner

I’m not sure when Scott Evans—owner of Pago, the recently relocated Finca and the recently opened Liberty Tap House—ever sleeps. Maybe he doesn’t. In any case, he’s just launched another eatery—a distinctive, modern diner—in the space that was home to the original Finca restaurant (1291 S. 1100 East, 801-487-0698). It’s called Hub & Spoke Diner (HubAndSpokeDiner.com), and Evans promises to deliver a casual dining experience using “fresh, top-quality” ingredients. “Just because it’s a diner doesn’t mean it has to be a greasy spoon, old dingy décor or frozen, pre-packaged ingredients,” Evans said. Hub & Spoke Diner will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week, and you can even enjoy a glass of wine, cold beer or a “boozy shake” with your meal. There’s also a full espresso bar and coffee shop inside the diner; foods include house-baked bread, pastries, scones and pies; house-smoked bacon; housemade sausage and more. Quote of the week: Every morning must start from scratch, with nothing on the stoves—that is cuisine. —Fernand Point Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

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28 | April 2, 2015

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Beer News Three breweries have surprises in store for Utah. By Mike Riedel comments@cityweekly.net

T

he renewed interest in craft beers means not a day goes by without some new innovation in suds. Here’s a look at what’s new in Utah’s beer scene: Epic Brewing Company’s Brainless line of beers has been a proven success for Utah’s so-called “maverick brewery.” The Brainless line started out with a Belgian Style Golden Ale, then morphed into various fruity/barrelaged incarnations including Brainless on Peaches and Brainless on Cherries. A Brainless IPA came, too, along with a non-barrel-aged Brainless on Raspberries. The raspberry version from this series has become quite popular, but its 22-ounce bottle and high alcohol content (9.7 percent) limited the audience that fruit beers normally can reach. This got the kids at Epic thinking that a less boozy, more portable version of Brainless on Raspberries would be even more popular and approachable. The result is the new Lil’ Brainless Raspberries. Like all of the other Brainless beers, it has that rich, spicy Belgian yeast funk backing it up. The raspberry is subtle and tart, with some dry and puckering tannin notes. You get some floral bitterness on the back of the tongue. With a finish that is semi-tart and dry, this beer has a nice complex character

DRINK

that is very pleasing and drinkable. The alcohol by volume is a pleasant 5.2 percent, and the packaging for “Lil’ B-Razz” is a handy and portable 12-ounce can. Look for it at state liquor stores in early April. San Diego’s Ballast Point Brewing Company has become one of the most popular craft breweries in the country due to its innovative take on American IPAs. Its beers are highly sought after and praised around the country—and now, due in part to a special trend in low-alcohol “session beers,” Ballast Point is looking to satisfy Salt Lake City’s beer drinkers. Even Keel, Ballast Point’s newest IPA, will hit the market in the coming weeks. It’s described as having a silky malt backbone, with herbal and citrus hops. It has a whopping by-volume alcohol content of 3.8 percent, and will be available in cans and on draft. Ballast Point also announced that other beers in its portfolio will be coming as well, including the brewery’s flagship Sculpin IPA. Another San Diego brewery is bringing its suds to the Beehive State as well. Originally conceived in Mexico during Prohibition, the Aztec Brewing Company flourished by bootlegging beer to the Southwestern United States. After Prohibition ended, the brewery was moved to San Diego, where it operated for decades before being bought out and shut down by a competitor. In 2008, the brand was resurrected and relocated in Vista, Calif., where it has thrived in San Diego’s competitive craft-beer scene.

Aztec’s unique take on South of the Border beers should be a refreshing change to Utah’s market of standard and lighter beers. Look for Noche de los Muertos Imperial Stout, with a hint of cinnamon spice. In the Chipotle India Pale Ale, the chipotles add a smoky kick without excessive heat, giving this beer a complex, lingering, slightly spicy finish. The Hop Serpent Imperial IPA is a deliciously drinkable brew with plenty of hop aroma and flavor. Hibiscus Wheat Beer is inspired by the Mexican hibiscus tea “Jamaic,” brewed with hibiscus petals, ginger and allspice. CW

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves! Les Madeleines

Trained as a classic French-pastry chef at the French Culinary Institute, Romina Rasmussen, the owner of Les Madeleines, prepares everything at her patisserie and cafe from scratch. Interestingly, she says her food need meet only two requirements: be pretty and delicious. Well, check and check. The classics take on new life at Les Madeleines, where a croissant might be spiked with Valrhona chocolate; an éclair with Meyer lemon, coffee, pistachio and cardamom; or a cupcake with green tea and jasmine. At lunch, try the sesame chicken wrap, prepared with chicken, sesame mayo, cilantro, scallions, sesame seeds wrapped in butter lettuce and a rice wrapper served with edamame and miso dressing. 216 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2294, LesMadeleines.com

Paradox Pizza

677 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City 801.355.3598

whylegends.com

Royal Eatery

A longtime staple for downtown dining, the casual Royal Eatery features an extensive American and Greek menu and a particularly popular breakfast. The terrifically thin and crispy fried potatoes are a Royal Eatery breakfast crowd favorite, and the made-toorder omelets are popular as well. But take time to peruse the extensive menu before defaulting to the delicious pastrami-topped Royal Burger for lunch. 379 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-532-4301

The Farm

Located at Canyons Resort, The Farm features a menu that focuses on modern American cuisine made with locally sourced meats, cheeses, vegetables and more. Dishes are innovative, refined takes on familiar classics, and change depending on which fresh ingredients are in season. Tasty menu items include a decadent buttermilk-fried chicken sandwich with housemade bread & butter pickles, applewood smoked bacon, shredded romaine, tomato and roasted-garlic aioli. There’s also a cozy lounge where you can enjoy a glass of wine from the extensive wine list. 4000 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, 435-615-8080, CanyonsResort.com

Communal

From the same talented team who brought us Orem’s Pizzeria 712—Joseph McRae and Colton Solberg— comes Communal, an eclectic restaurant featuring farm-fresh local produce and ingredients, all prepared to highlight fresh, bold flavors. Dishes like roasted chicken, Utah trout and grilled hangar steak are prepared in a no-nonsense, simple but sensational style. Dishes change frequently based on what’s fresh, local and available. You might just think you’re in San Francisco, Seattle or New York City. But no: You’re in Provo! 100 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-373-8000, CommunalRestaurant.com

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Cisero’s

In addition to being one of Park City’s most lively and longstanding nightclubs since 1985, Cisero’s also doubles as an excellent restaurant, that serves classic Italian-American cuisine. Along with pizzas, salads and sandwiches, there are dishes such as veal picatta, chicken parmigiana, fettuccini Alfredo, spaghetti with meatballs, and chicken piccata or Marsala. There’s also an interesting wine list to tempt wine drinkers. In the club portion of Cisero’s, enjoy live music and dancing, as well as drinks and a bar menu. 306 Main, Park City, 435-649-5044, Ciseros.com

Award Winning BBQ

1844 E. Fort Union Blvd Cottonwood Heights, UT 801-938-9706 | HDBBQ.NET

April 2, 2015 | 29

You’ll definitely want more than one slice of this restaurant’s unique pizzas. The potato pesto pie— with creamy pesto, roasted potato, garlic, sun-dried tomato, caramelized onion and mozzarella—is a comforting choice. The Dub All Star provides a flavor explosion with pesto, mozzarella, roasted chicken, spinach, tomato, caramelized onion and a barbecue drizzle. Offerings are rotated daily, but you can also order an entire pie for consuming at home or on Lucky Slice’s outdoor patio. Round out your meal with a side salad or an order of wings along with a glass of beer or wine. Lucky Slice is open till 2 a.m. on Fridays

Breakfast & $5 Lunch Specials Served All-Day .50¢ Wing Wednesdays

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Lucky Slice Pizza

Come by this food-oriented sports bar for Sunday brunch and sip on a bacon-filled bloody mary while watching the morning game, or order one of Lucky 13’s famous flavorful garlic burgers or bacon burgers. Everything’s made slowly and with care, so there might be a wait for your food to arrive at the table— but it’s definitely worth it. 1300 S. 135 West, Salt Lake City, 801-487-4418, Lucky13SLC.com

For a light breakfast, lunch or snack, visit Zermatt’s quaint European bakery and gelateria. Enjoy a superb ham and Gruyere croissant there, right from the oven, along with freshly squeezed orange juice. The bakery/gelateria/tea room has a circus-tent-like ceiling, and the cozy eating area is decorated with collectable Swiss teapots and clocks. It’s really a nifty little spot for a sandwich, housemade confection or freshly made gelato. And, it’s located in the überSwiss environment of the posh Zermatt Resort. 784 W. Resort Drive, Midway, 866-643-2015, ZermattResort.com

Lucky 13

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Bäckerei & Eis

and Saturdays, so it’s the perfect spot for a quick lunch or a late-night meal. Multiple locations, TheLuckySlice.com

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Located on the south end of Moab’s Main Street between the Chile Pepper Bike Shop and Moab Brewery, Paradox Pizza strives to satisfy Moab’s pizza needs. Paradox uses natural, humanely raised meats and regional and organic products whenever possible, and also use packaging made from renewable, biodegradable materials. Unique pizza offerings include the Greek pizza, the Extra-Vegan-Za, Caprese pizza and the Hawaiian Italian pizza. Or, just build your own pizza with a wide selection of toppings, including Kalamata olives, feta, pesto and ricotta. Wash down your pizza with housemade lemonade, iced tea or a cold brew. 702 S. Main, Moab, 435-259-9999, ParadoxPizza.com

WHERE THE “LOCALS” HANG OUT!


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30 | April 2, 2015

HOP ON IN TO FILL YOUR EASTER BASKETS

A sampler of Ted Schefflerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reviews

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REVIEW BITES Chabaar Beyond Thai

2696 Highland Dr. 801-467-5052 olddutchstore.com @olddutchstore

1/2 OFF APPETIZERS Everyday 5-7pm why limit happy to an hour? (Appetizer & Dine-in only / Sugarhouse location only)

Like Tea Rose Dinerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;also the creation of Anny Sooksriâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chabaar goes way beyond Thai. American breakfast items like omelets, pancakes, waffles, eggs and hash browns mingle in the spirit of multicultural detente with Thai breakfast soups like kow tom kai and a Thai vegan omelet. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Midvale melting pot, right down to the lunchtime Reuben and tuna sandwiches. But as good as the American staples are, I come for the flavors of Thailand, like an appetizer of fresh spring rolls. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d heard others sing the praises of the drunken noodles (pad kee mao) at Chabaar, and I can see why. The pad thai is excellent as well: a hefty serving of thin rice noodles tossed with a tangy, citrusy and slightly sweet pad-thai sauce; scrambled egg; green onion; and a half-dozen medium-size shrimp, all topped with shredded carrot, bean sprouts and crushed peanuts, plus lime wedges on the side. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nearly as good heated up as leftovers for lunch as it is fresh from the kitchen. For those who prefer their Thai food on the mild, lighter side, I recommend Chabaarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jungle Curry with tofu. Reviewed March 26. 87 W. 7200 South, Midvale, 801-566-5100, AnnysTakeOnThai.com

Thai Curry Kitchen

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In Ogden, restaurateur Steve Ballard (of Sonora Grill) is providing a low-cost introduction to Thai flavors with a cool concept: a Chipotle-style walk up & order eatery with a small but tantalizing menu that tops out at $8.95. There are three Thai salads and six curry-bowl optionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;three of which are vegetarianâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and each includes a choice of brown or white rice. I loved the flavors of the coconut-milk-based red panang beef curry, but unfortunately, the meat was of poor quality. A much better option is the green chicken curry with carrots, mushrooms, chicken, bean sprouts and fresh basil. Kale lovers will enjoy the Papuan yellow curry, while the more adventurous might try the tangy, slightly bitter sour-orange curry with cashews, long beans, tamarind and jackfruit. Impressively, everything at Thai Curry Kitchen is made from scratch, right down to the deep-fried crispy shallots that are just one of many garnishes available. It might not be the most authentic Thai food in town, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good and inexpensive place to start. Reviewed

March 26. 582 E. 25th St., Ogden, 385-333-7100, ThaiCurryKitchen.com

Riverhorse on Main

Not only is Riverhorse on Main relevant again under chef/ owner Seth Adams, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offering up some of the best fare in Park City. The Ahi Tuna Duo appetizer offers a generous plate with sliced sashimi-grade tuna raw on one side and minced poke-style tuna tartare on the other, served with shredded green papaya, yuzu and crispy fried wonton wedges, and sprinkled with sesame seeds. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often get excited by salad, but the poached pear & burrata salad at Riverhorse on Main is outstanding. For as long as I can recall, The Riverhorseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature dish has been macadamia-nut-crusted Alaskan halibut ($38.50), and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not surprising that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great. However, the Utah red trout is also as tasty as it is colorful, and the veal chops are grilled perfectly. For dessert, the Dutch apple cake is irresistible, served in a cast-iron pot with vanilla ice cream, hot caramelized butterscotch and pecans. With Riverhorse on Main firing on all cylinders, it might just be around for another three decades of meaningful dining experiences. Reviewed March 19. 540 Main, Park City, 435-649-3536, RiverhorseParkCity.com

Taco Taco

Adjacent to Cannellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Restaurant, this new eatery is a joint venture by Cannellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and its longtime chef, Alberto Higuera Calderon. The menu isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t extensiveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;about the range of items youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d expect from a taco cartâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but it packs a punch. Tuesday is a particularly good day to drop in; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when all tacos are $2 each. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d enjoy the tacos here any day, especially the chicken mole negro taco, and the excellent zucchiniblossom tacos are a good choice for vegetarians. However, my favorite item is the carne asada burrito. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a large flour tortilla stuffedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and I mean stuffedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with heaping amounts of tender, flavorful, slightly salty morsels of grilled beef along with white rice, corn and black beans. I love the simplicity of the tacos and burritos, all of which can be adorned with a variety of garnishes and sauces from the salsa bar. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go so far as to say it is Salt Lake Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best burrito. Reviewed March 5. 208 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, 801-428-2704, TacoTacoSLC. com

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REVIEW BITES

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews Tamales Tita

You might know Tamales Tita from various farmers markets, and now they’ve finally opened their first restaurant, which features not-so-typical Mexican fare. There are no burritos, for example, and the tacos aren’t standard, but rolled tacos dorados. As the name suggests, tamales are the big draw—housemade from scratch, and in a wide assortment of flavors, including chicken, pork, jalapeño & cheese, chicken with mole, bean & cheese and vegan. There’s also a selection of sweet tamales, plus a breakfast tamale with bacon, sausage, egg and cheese. Reviewed March 5. 7760 S. 3200 West, West Jordan, 801-282-0722, TamalesTita.com

Copper Kitchen

Avenues Proper Restaurant & Publick House

Provisions

Occupying the old Lugano space, the brainchild of chef/ owner Tyler Stokes makes a bold design statement with its emphasis on the color orange. The cuisine is just as bold: comfort food with an edge. Steak tartare incorporates soy sauce and mint, not to mention Meyer lemon and sunflower seeds—and it was a revelation. There’s a small section of the menu devoted to “raw” fare like the aforementioned steak tartare, plus a dozen small-plates options, a halfdozen or so large plates, and a dessert quartet. Our favorite small-plate choice, by far, was the pig’s head torchons: Niman Ranch pork formed into hockey-puck-like torchons, deep-fried and served crispy with a cherry-ginger compote, pickled mustard seeds and butter-leaf lettuce for assembling pig’s head wraps. That’s what I like about Provisions: The food is complex, but not contrived or convoluted. Reviewed Jan. 29. 3364 S. 2300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-410-4046, SLCProvisions.com

The Mariposa

At Deer Valley Resort’s main fine-dining venue, settle in beside a toasty fireplace for delicious appetizers like Kumamoto oysters on the half-shell with housemade seafood sauce and mignonette, or delightful sashimistyle diver scallop drizzled with lime & aji-chile-pepper vinaigrette and cilantro emulsion. I appreciate that The

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-Cincinnati Enquirer

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“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

Breakfast until 4pm, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week

Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

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Despite its contemporary décor, Avenues Proper somehow manages to feel comfy and cozy—an inviting neighborhood space. The amazing “Prop-corn” appetizer features popcorn tossed in seasoned duck fat with sea salt and fennel pollen, while the “small” side of the menu includes appetizers like a cheese plate and roasted beet salad. Avenues Proper’s poutine offers deeply flavored braised short-rib beef and dark roasted-chicken gravy smothering homemade pommes frites, garnished with truffled cheddar and minced scallions—and the fries at Avenues Proper are so good that it’s almost tragic to see them soaked in gravy. Of course, there are the craft beers, adding to a terrific spot that’s perfect for proper food, proper drinks and proper service. Reviewed Feb. 19. 376 Eighth Ave., Salt Lake City, 385-227-8628, AvenuesProper.com

The original Bandits was created in the greater Los Angeles area in 1990 and, while the menus are similar at each location, the décor and ambience of each Bandits is unique. A cup of tri-tip chili was easily the best chili I’ve had in ages, and tri-tip—a specialty at Bandits—finds its way into many other dishes. The main sections of the menu are barbecue-heavy. Barbecue items come with a choice of house-made barbecue sauce or jerk sauce; I recommend requesting both, on the side. I opted for a BBQ combo with ribs and half-chicken; the chicken was tender and juicy, but the ribs were tough and chewy. The cedar-plank salmon was lightly spiced, juicy and flavorful—not an easy feat to achieve on a blast-furnace temperature wood-fired grill. The sides of rice and a veggie medley were also enjoyable and perfectly cooked. Service is about as good as it gets— not something I was expecting from a place self-identified as a “family” restaurant. Reviewed Feb. 12. 3176 E. 6200 South, 801-994-0505; 440 Main, Park City, 435649-7337, BanditsBBQ.com

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With its large, airy, open space and high, copper-colored ceilings, the latest venture by Ryan and Colleen Lowder is sort of an American brasserie, with a bustling vibe. I’d expected Copper Onion 2.0, but the Copper Kitchen menu is far from a photocopy of its predecessor’s. A duo of duck croquettes is simple but exceptional—finger food at its finest. Even better is grilled porkbelly, pressed, grilled and served on a bed of frisee with carrot-ginger vinaigrette and apple-cider reduction. Copper Kitchen now offers lunch service—with menu items like tuna Niçoise, Philly cheesesteak, fried-egg sandwich and pasta dishes—plus, there’s an outstanding weekend brunch including a delicious chicken hash. Reviewed Feb. 26. 4640 S. 2300 East, 385-237-3159, CopperKitchenSLC.com

Bandits’ American Grill & Bar

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32 | April 2, 2015

FUrious 7

Furious Debate Two critics go head-to-head over their differing perspectives on the Fast & Furious series. By Scott Renshaw & Danny Bowes comments@cityweekly.net

S

cott Renshaw: As we approach what may or may not be the finale of this particular incarnation of the Fast & Furious series (review not available at press time), I wanted to try to wrap my head around why it’s such a big deal to so many people. Because, while vroom-vroom and boom-boom is always going to have a certain hard-core fanbase, I struggle to understand how people think that this series has done those things particularly well. Danny Bowes: I can’t speak for all properly sophisticated cinephiles, obviously, but for me, the appeal begins with the tone, which has the heightened, aggressive and sincere quality of about three shots of tequila. Rob Cohen and John Singleton both instinctively “got” that tone, but Justin Lin embraced its totality and refined it by essentially swallowing the worm. Also, the cast has fantastic chemistry and, to the last, shares the ability to maintain a hair’s distance from bursting out laughing at all times. S.R.: The cast-dynamic thing makes sense to me, and there was an inspired quality to pulling all the characters togeth-

CINEMA er so relatively late in the series. My problem has been that, as action movies, I think they’ve often been terribly made. Lin, in particular, had no idea how to edit an action sequence so that it made a lick of sense. As they got more over the top—“Hey, let’s drag a safe around Brazil, or chase a tank!”—these movies were all about fun concepts with nobody in charge who could execute them. D.B.: This is where I struggle to say anything other than, “I disagree,” and where in so struggling, I say stuff like, “the way Lin constructs action sequences may not make perfect linear or geographic sense, but it makes total emotional sense,” and point back to the sublime sequence in Tokyo Drift where Lucas Black has at long last learned how to drift, and he and the rest of Sung Kang’s gang drift down the mountain. That sequence is the Rosetta Stone for the entire series in terms of both the previously mentioned tone and the way that the whole of a given action sequence in these movies may be more than the sum of its component parts. S.R.: I’d need to do some research to see whether this is the first time ever that the word “sublime” has been used with regard to this series. I certainly recognize that it’s filling a gap in contemporary moviemaking—the souped-up action franchise built more on practical effects/stunts than CGI—that only the occasional James Bond film otherwise occupies. I’ve just longed to see a more gifted action director actually try to click those pieces in place. D.B.: Then, I guess this is a referendum on Justin Lin, in which case I’m the antiSabermetrics old person touting his intangibles (“I don’t care what his Wins Above Replacement Director are, all I know is he swings from his ankles and hits those car chases outta the park!”). Also, I’m glad that

The Fast & Furious franchise: sublime or sub-par? this is coming into focus, because “I don’t get why people like the Fast & Furious movies” is actually answered by “I don’t think Justin Lin directs action well,” because while the action isn’t the whole appeal, it’s inextricably connected to the remainder of the whole. The adrenaline inebriation pervades all aspects of these movies. S.R.: Forgive me if I’ve suggested this is all about my issues with Lin, since I bow to no one in my disdain for le cinema du Rob Cohen [director of the original Fast and the Furious]. Lacking a connection with the intangibles you see, I’m left with two possible ways into these movies: their effectiveness as old-school action movie­ making (which I contend is minimal) and the unique appeal of this multicultural makeshift family. And maybe the latter would work better for me if they didn’t keep hammering the word “family” (though I have a sneaking suspicion it’s gonna get a little dusty in theaters at the end of Furious 7 as a result of real-world events). D.B.: As someone for whom the word “family” conjures images of lawyers, passive aggression and wordless decades-long feuds over literally nothing, I actually like how corny and heavy-handed the “family” thing is in the F&F movies. It’s of a piece with every other element. They’re big, loud movies that regard subtlety as a forgotten successor to the Model T. Obviously, their appeal isn’t universal (just their studio), and shouldn’t have to be. But those of us onboard the proverbial 12,000-horsepower Dodge Charger driving through the top floor of the figurative office building can attest: It may be an acquired taste, but once acquired, it’s one you’ll never let go of. CW


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. Furious 7 [not yet reviewed] See feature p. 32. Opens April 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

Broken Blossoms At Tower Theatre, April 6, 7 p.m. (NR) The Fighter At Brewvies, April 6, 10 p.m. (R) Food Chains At Main Library, April 7, 7 p.m. (NR) The Games Maker At Main Library, April 4, 11 a.m. (NR) The Maltese Falcon At Main Library, April 8, 2 p.m. (NR) The Search for General Tso At Park City Film Series, April 3-4 @ 8 p.m. & April 5 @ 6 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES ’71 HH.5 Somewhere on the continuum between “spells everything out” and “bordering on incomprehensible”—nearer to the latter than to the former—is this tale of Pvt. Gary Hook (Jack O’Connell),

Get Hard HH On paper, the central joke is that a white-collar criminal (Will Ferrell) hires someone he believes to be a tough felon (Kevin Hart) to help him prepare for a stint in San Quentin. In practice, the central joke is, “Did you know that in prison, there is a lot of RAPE?” Not that a comedy about a scared rich dude heading for prison shouldn’t address prison rape, but there are funnier ways to do it than merely repeating “You’re going to get raped.” It’s a shame, too, because when the movie isn’t obsessing over forcible sex, it has some solid laughs. Hart’s motor-mouthed energy and Ferrell’s patented cluelessness often work in beautiful harmony, and the film addresses race and class issues with broad but incisive satire. But it gets bogged down with that other subject—mentioned frequently, but seldom humorously. (R)—Eric D. Snider Cinderella HH In theory, it’s not a terrible notion that director Kenneth Branagh might attempt an earnest re-telling of Charles Perrault’s fairy tale via the Disney animated classic about

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

april 2, 2015 | 33

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Seymour: An Introduction HHH.5 It’s a compliment to first-time documentary director Ethan Hawke that while his subject—pianist/piano teacher Seymour Bernstein—is likely completely unknown to you when it begins, it’s obvious by the end why he belongs in a movie. Hawke does only a little table-setting, diving right into observing Bernstein working with students and preparing for a recital that will be his first performance for an audience in 35 years. And Bernstein’s approach to his life and art is instantly engaging—in part because he’s so deeply philosophical about the hard work required to hone an artistic craft, and in part because he clearly sees no dividing line between his approach to his life and his approach to his art. The conversations with fellow artists and spiritual gurus gets a bit New Age-y at times, which is bound to be as appealing to some

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

a British soldier circa 1971 who finds himself left behind and trapped with the “enemy” in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Director Yann Demange keeps up a propulsive pace as Hook tries to stay alive, but while trying to portray a place where even theoretical allies are at one another’s throats, screenwriter Gregory Burke tangles his story such that it’s often hard to understand who’s trying to kill whom, and why. And Hook himself is little more than an enigmatic cipher of innocence. When he throws away his dog tags, as though symbolically starting a new life, it would have helped to really understand much of anything about his old one. (R)—SR

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The Hunting Ground HHH.5 Kirby Dick continues to perfect the art of making document­ aries with the power to infuriate you at abuses of institutional power. He follows his exposé of sexual assault in the military (The Invisible War) with an exposé of sexual assault on America’s college and university campuses, and the structures in place— largely economic—that lead administrators at those institutions to try to sweep any reports of such crimes under the rug. As is often the case in such documentaries, the sheer number and presentation of certain types of stories can, through repetition, have a numbing rather than a reinforcing effect, as horrifying as the individual reported cases may be. Yet Dick makes a powerful case against the value these institutions place on preserving their own reputations—and their relationships with sports- and/or fraternity-affiliated alumni—over justice and safety for their students. And he’s wise to focus on the work of survivors/advocates Annie Clark and Andrea Pino, who have begun to build a nationwide network telling survivors’ stories and holding administrations accountable. There’s nothing better a movie like this can do than to make you want to join their fight. Opens April 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR

viewers as it is distracting to others. Yet Hawke nails his approach to Bernstein’s “comeback” concert by intercutting between the performance and the preparation for it, emphasizing that the creation of beautiful art is about the deep work of practicing with it and connecting to it. Opens April 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR

Theater Directory

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A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night HHH In one stunning shot from writer/director Ana Lily Amirpour’s debut feature, a young Iranian man named Arash (Arash Marandi) has become fascinated with a mysterious, unnamed woman (Sheila Vand), unaware that she is, in fact, an honestto-fangs vampire. In her apartment, she stands to the right of the frame, a disco ball spinning sparkles of light as the music pounds and Arash approaches her. Will she kiss him? Will she kill him? The arc of that single shot is masterful, and Amirpour finds plenty of other arresting images on the way to an effective allegory for a patriarchal society confronted with a powerful female force. What’s missing is a tighter, more controlled script, one that wrangles its various threads—drug abuse and organized crime, modernism vs. conservatism in contemporary Iran—into something genuinely powerful, or gives even slightly more clarity to the interior lives of both Arash and the vampire. But it’s hard to complain too much about something this visually striking in its black & white compositions, and one that concludes with a young man making a choice between the past and the future in another amazingly crafted single shot. Opens April 3 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

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CINEMA

CLIPS

Movie times and locations at cityweekly.net

a plucky young girl (Lily James), an evil stepmother (Cate Blanchett), a romantic ball and a glass slipper. The problem is that this version is just about the humansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;almost entirely a nice, slow-build romance between nice people. It is, therefore, almost entirely a huge bore, abandoning the animal characters and songs that gave the animated version all of its charm. When Helena Bonham Carter shows up as Cinderellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fairy godmother, goofing her way through prosthetic teeth, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a brief glimpse of the spark thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lacking during the rest of the film. As Disney continues exploiting its own intellectual property, maybe next time theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll wind up with something more than sappily ever after. (PG)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;SR

Home HH Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a satirical edge to the source-material book, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect any such depth in this shapeless animated silliness, in which the alien Boov take over Earth after being chased from their homeworld, and an outcast Boov named Oh (Jim Parsons) winds up accompanying tween-age human girl Tip (Rihanna) on a journey to find her mother. Home, perhaps predictably, has no interest in dealing with the tricky moral material of colonialism. But all that remains is a tired mismatched buddy comedy about friendship and family and other easily digestible notions, predicated on finding Parsonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perpetual malapropisms hilarious. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some effective visual humor, and fine voice work by Steve Martin as the narcissistic Boov leader. In general, though, limp family movies like this take everything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potentially interesting about the material and make it feel like assembly-line product. (PG)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;SR

It Follows HHH.5 Appearing at first glance to be just a well-executed exercise in style, this tale of teenagers terrorized by a supernatural curse transferred through sex has a lot going on beneath the surface. Writer-director David Robert Mitchellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach screams â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Carpenterâ&#x20AC;? in mile-high neon, although Mitchell seasons it with an additional, more postmodern streak. Calling it â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ring with sexâ&#x20AC;? isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t inaccurate, but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sufficiently grasp how Mitchell plays with horror film traditions, approaching the storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;threatâ&#x20AC;? in a way that runs counter to how less confident filmmakers treat the genre, and taking advantage of the fact that 1. few things are as scary as the unknown, and 2. few things are less scary than a fully explained horror-movie villain. The visceral power dissipates by the concluding act, when it shifts into â&#x20AC;&#x153;movie about horror moviesâ&#x20AC;? mode, but overall itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still terrific work. (R)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Danny Bowes

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Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter HHHH â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a true story,â&#x20AC;? reads the introduction to the Coen brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1996 film Fargoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and 29-year-old Tokyo â&#x20AC;&#x153;office girlâ&#x20AC;? Kumiko (Rinko Kikuchi) takes the Coens at their word. Loosely based on a real-world urban legend, Nathan and David Zellnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lovely, heartbreaking drama explores how Kumiko finds her only passion in life in imagining that the stolen money from Fargo is actually still buried somewhere in the Midwestern snow. The Zellners turn her quest into a kind of feminist road-trip fable, built on Kumikoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desperate need to be understood, and have her own desires taken seriously. Kikuchiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terrific performance walks a tricky line between tenacity and what could be perceived as mental illness, as her story explores something deeper about what might inspire someone to look at a fictional movie as her only chance for salvation. (NR)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;SR

34 | April 2, 2015

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Fooled Again

TV

Sure Maybe Nope

Outlander returns, Bacon House Nation debuts, and State Fair Terror! terrorizes. Bacon House Nation Wednesday, April 1 (FYI)

Series Debut: The producers of Tiny House Nation, the reality series in which families scale down their living spaces from McMansions to custom 500-square-foot mini homes, have fried up the next logical step: houses fashioned entirely out of bacon. Host Padma Lakshmi (Top Chef ) and a team of “meat-construction specialists” (imagine that casting call) travel the country making bacon-house dreams come true; first up is a West Valley City family who want to simplify their domestic sprawl, move into a cozy Dutch Colonial made of locally produced pork loin and “wake up to the smell of bacon every dang morning.” Fun factoid: Bacon House Nation was rushed into production to get on the air before the Food Network’s sizzlingly similar Home Sweet Ham.

Bar Rescue Friday, April 3 (Spike) Local Alert: Jon Taffer has made-over many a dive, but few as mismanaged as Ballz N ’Hos, a South Salt Lake pool hall with a limited beer selection (“We got Coors and Coors Light!”), billiards tables in various states of disrepair (some players are forced to shoot around knives

pegged into the felt) and waitresses ordered by management to dress like prostitutes (as discovered halfway through the episode, a couple of them really are prostitutes who perform services on the premises). Heated exchanges with the bar’s DJ over his musical selections (“Why would I play anything but Lil Wayne?! Man is a genius, yo!”) and the bartender who’s never cleaned a glass (“I meant to, but I kinda zone out around the 60th Lil Wayne track”) lead to a trademark Taffer meltdown and new branding for the club: Sips+Strips, Utah’s first craft beer and artisan bacon bar.

Outlander Saturday, April 4 (Starz) Spring Premiere: When last we left Claire six months ago (talk about time travel, Starz), she’d caught a glimpse of a chance to return to the 1940s, only to be pulled back into the 1740s by Black Jack Randall, the dastardly ancestor of her 1940s husband, Frank, and then seemingly rescued by her 1740s husband, Jamie—following all of this? The second half of Outlander’s first season picks up with— spoiler alert—Claire making her way back to the stones

Outlander (Starz) of Craigh na Dun and being transported to the future. Unfortunately, she goes too far and winds up in the 21st century as a bacon hostess at Sips+Strips.

Mad Men Sunday, April 5 (AMC) Spring Premiere: Speaking of spoilers, Mad Men show­ runner Matthew Weiner has placed so many “don’t talk about ______!” demands on TV critics about the second half of the final season’s opener, “Severance,” that there’s little point in bothering. But maybe there’s something about the series’ ultimate end to be read into Don Draper’s (Jon Hamm) pitch to a restaurant chain: “The BLT. We all know what the ‘B’ stands for, but what about ‘L’ and ‘T’? I say they stand for ‘Longing,’ for a simpler ‘Time.’ That’s what America wants, and you’re selling it. With bacon.” Bravo, Mr. Weiner, bravo. CW Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.

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Movie: It’s no Sharknado, or even Sharknado 2, but Syfy’s latest disaster-cheese epic State Fair Terror! at least features some oddly specific casting: Michael Bacon (musical brother of Kevin) as the mayor, Meat Loaf as the town sheriff, Carrot Top as a shady tilt-a-whirl operator, John Oates (mustachioed half of Hall & Oates) as an Army general and, most impressive of all, Jon Hamm (late of Mad Men) as a local TV weatherman with a dark past. The setup: It’s just another pleasant day at the Utah State Fair—until patrons begin mysteriously turning into flesh-hungry zombie-vampires (“zompires” for short) and attacking the still-human. Blink and you’ll miss state-fair grandstand musical acts like the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Fiona Apple and Korn being mauled in the chaos.

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State Fair Terror! Thursday, April 2 (Syfy)

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April 2, 2015 | 35


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36 | APRIL 2, 2015

MUSIC

YONATAN GAT

Free Music Yonatan Gat’s wanderlustfueled music is inspired by the present moment. BRYAN PARKER

By Kolbie Stonehocker kstonehocker@cityweekly.net @vonstonehocker

Y

onatan Gat’s days in Israeli garagerock band Monotonix were numbered from the beginning. When a band makes a habit of performing live shows that are so off-the-hook chaotic that they’re actually dangerous—frontman Ami Shalev broke his leg in the middle of a 2010 concert—it can be expected to reach a critical burnout point eventually. “Monotonix is a band that’s played a thousand shows in its five years of existence, and I think we always knew that this project doesn’t have a long time to continue,” says guitarist Gat, who was born in Tel Aviv but is now based in New York City. “That’s the nature of the project itself; it was very, very demanding and very physical.” In addition to pushing themselves to the point of exhaustion and injury, Gat’s former bandmates also began having family obligations that conflicted with Monotonix’s touring schedule. So they decided that instead of performing less and less, slowly diminishing before sputtering out, they’d go out in a blaze of glory. In 2011, the members of Monotonix abruptly went their separate ways. “We figured that we’re either going to do it completely like we did … up until that day, or we’re just gonna stop completely,” Gat says. The split freed Gat up to more intensely explore his role as a guitarist, a calling he’d found with Monotonix, which was the first band in which the former bassist had played guitar full time. For Gat, guitar was a key that could not only unlock infinite improvisational avenues in a song—as evidenced by his masterful world-influenced style that combines psychedelia and punk—but also his creativity as a solo musician and, later, with his current band. “After playing a thousand shows with Monotonix, I noticed that I’m actually a guitarist, and I can do a lot with that instrument—a lot more than I thought before,” Gat says. “And [I] let go of the idea of what kind of guitarist I am. ‘Am I a rock & roll guitarist? Am I a punk guitarist?’—whatever. Once I let go of those ideas, I just discovered that I could go in a lot of unexpected directions—some of them surprise me, too.” Gat’s band in its current incarnation (with Israeli drummer Gal Lazer and Brazilian bassist Sergio Sayeg) is relatively new; after Gat left Monotonix, he honed his improvisational chops by performing solo shows. But when he met drummer Igor Domingues in Portugal, Gat says he was so inspired by Domingues’ innovative “beats that were very rock & roll and punk on one end” and also incorporated African and Middle Eastern influences, that Gat collaborated with Domingues for one album: 2014’s intoxicating Iberian Passage. When Gat founded his trio about a year ago, he kept the world influences he explored on Iberian Passage, as well as his focus on

Yonatan Gat’s fiery shows are about the here & now.

improvisation. So despite the fact that Gat was again playing with two other bandmates, the project retained a sense of unfettered creative freedom. “Now that I’m doing this project, it’s much easier to take much more unpredictable paths, and just by the fact that it’s still a very, very collective effort, the whole premise of the thing is improvisation,” Gat says. “So we basically go into a show or go into the studio and see where that leads us.” Most recently, the place Gat, Lazer and Sayeg have been led in the studio is technically many places. Their first release as a trio, Director—released in March—is a colorful, evocative journey “between different parts of the world, different styles of music,” Gat says. Through prismatic instrumentation and contagious energy, songs like the intensely kinetic “Gibraltar” and the restless guitar-driven “Gold Rush” transport listeners to faraway unfamiliar locales, and all are tinted with the band members’ own experiences of traveling the world. “Our music comes from us,” Gat says. “It comes from where we are, it comes from where we live, where we lived, the people that we are.” Gat and company are already working on their as-yet-untitled next album, set for release sometime in the fall, but whatever plans the band has for it could easily change. Because, like Gat’s fingers as he lays down an intricate guitar riff, the direction their music takes is dictated only by the present moment. “We definitely try to not confine ourselves to any limited ideas or concepts that we walk into the studio with and try to keep things open, so the music will be the true expression of what we are,” Gat says. “Because that’s the idea: to express who you are, where you’re from, where you are at the moment, what you’ve seen, your thoughts, your being through playing. And that’s what the guitar enables me to do.” CW

Yonatan Gat

w/Blue Jay Boogie, Wild Apples Kilby Court 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West) Sunday, April 5 8 p.m. $6 in advance, $8 day of show KilbyCourt.com

TRY THESE Bombino Nomad 2013

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Thursday 4.2

Moonalice, Taarka Making Tracks Home, the title of the new album released in March by Colorado folkrock duo Taarka, becomes all the more meaningful once you learn that it was inspired by their home being destroyed in a flood in 2013. When the river came in their back door, David Tiller and Enion Pelter-Tiller packed up and headed to high ground with their child and instruments and were homeless for a time. As a reflection of having to start over, Making Tracks Home is wistful but hopeful, created with mandolin, violin and the beautifully combined voices of the Tillers, and is filled with the same variety of influences (Celtic, jazz, gypsy and more) heard on Taarka’s debut album, 2012’s Adventures in Vagabondia. Check out standout tracks “Moon Song” and “River’s Eddy Blues.” Co-headlining is California psychedelic/roots-rock band Moonalice, whose popular song “It’s 4:20 Somewhere” has been downloaded by stoners more than 5 million times. The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $12, TheStateRoom.com

Friday 4.3

Yes Means Yes Benefit Concert: Genre Zero, Records on the Wall, Strong Words, Night Wings Every year around Valentine’s Day, Westminster College holds various activities in honor of V-Day, a worldwide movement to stop violence against women. But recently, Westminster’s V-Day Club has begun putting on events throughout the year to raise awareness of the ongoing problems of rape and violence, including its annual Yes Means Yes concert, which benefits the Rape Recovery Center. At the second-annual benefit concert, a lineup of four local bands will hit the stage at Bar Deluxe, including pop-rock act Genre Zero, new alternative band Records on the Wall, dream-pop band

Monophonics

LIVE

Strong Words and Night Wings, which is the solo project of violinist/vocalist Alyssa Pyper. The night will also feature a silent auction sponsored by local music shops, venues and recording studios, including Diabolical Records, Albatross Recordings & Ephemera, Exigent Records, Onion Street Studio, Raunch Records and The Urban Lounge. Bar Deluxe, 666 S. State, 8 p.m., $10, $5 with student ID, BarDeluxeSLC.com

Monday 4.6

Monophonics When a band doesn’t release anything for three years, you hope they’re using that time to put together something really juicy, and that’s definitely the case for Bay Area psychedelicsoul group Monophonics. On Monophonics’ mostly instrumental 2012 album, In Your Brain, they put the “psychedelic” part of their music in the backseat and played up a horns-heavy nothin’-but-soul sound that echoed influences of classic acts like Sly & the Family Stone and The Temptations, as well as contemporary groups like Orgone. But for Monophonics’ new album, Sound of Sinning—out April 14—they branched out into a more BRANTLEY GUTTIERREZ

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE

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BY KO L B IE S TO N EH O CK ER

@vonstonehocker

Taarka diverse selection of influences from ‘60s and ‘70s psychedelia, including Pink Floyd, The Beatles, The Zombies and more. For a taste of the new material, check out Monophonics’ killer track “Promises”—save the psych-psychpsychedelic music video for a moment when you’re bored at work. Coyote Vision and Sweet Jesus are also on the bill. The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $13 in advance, $15 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC. com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com Punch Brothers It’s a paradox of our modern age that as we become more digitally connected, we also seem to become more socially isolated. That phenomenon is a central theme on The Phosphorescent Blues, the new album from New York folk/bluegrass group Punch Brothers. Opening with the fittingly titled “Familiarity,” The Phosphorescent Blues explores how we can build real relationships with people when it seems like life is all »

Punch Brothers


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about scrolling mindlessly on a phone. And the sound of the album effectively supports that idea; delicate, spare songs—made with various acoustic stringed instruments and warm vocal harmonies—like “Mint Julep” are invitations to slow down for a minute and take in the music. All that stuff about connecting with people wasn’t just talk, either; closing song “Little Lights” features a choir of Punch Brothers’ own fans, who submitted recordings of their singing after the band put out a call through social media. Gabriel Kahane will open. The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $27 in advance, $31 day of show, DepotSLC. com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com

Wednesday 4.8

The Medusa Collective: Saliva Plath, Strong Words, Officer Jenny Named for Medusa of Greek mythology, The Medusa Collective is a new local group whose mission is to improve gender representation in the music scene as well as to support female and non-binary—those whose gender identities aren’t strictly female or male—musicians. This will be the

first Salt Lake City show the group has put on since forming in Provo in January, and the lineup features a mix of musicians from both valleys: Saliva Plath (of Provo punk band The Ladells), Salt Lake City dreampop band Strong Words (which includes members of Foster Body and The Circulars) and Officer Jenny, which is the project of non-binary musician Stephen Cope, who’s also the owner of Studio Studio Dada in Provo. Before the show, listen to a sampler of Medusa Collective artists—Baby Ghosts, Big Baby, Violettas and some of the folks playing at tonight’s concert—by streaming or purchasing their first compilation album at TheMedusaCollective.bandcamp.com. The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 9 p.m., $3, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Coming Soon

Dead Winter Carpenters (April 9, The State Room), Folk Hogan Album Release (April 10, The Urban Lounge), Dengue Fever (April 10, Kilby Court), Quiet House Album Release (April 10, Velour, Provo), The Used (April 10-11, In the Venue), Bronze Radio Return (April 10, The State Room), Electric Wizard (April 11, The Urban Lounge), Black Milk (April 14, The Urban Lounge) A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

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Experimental rocktronic group Ratatat (appropriately named— the word sounds like an homage to the intricate rhythms they champion) are promoting their upcoming release, Abuela. It’s their fifth studio album, and fans have been waiting for it since the duo teased its release with two singles in early 2014. The new singles, “True Colors” and “Sapa,” feature more of Ratatat’s trademark competing and complementing countermelodies, but are slower and dreamier (and in the case of “Sapa,” more ethnic-sounding) than the danceable electronic rock and remixes from past albums. On Facebook, Ratatat said Abuela is “all of [the genres] at once,” so there could be more of Ratatat’s classic synthesizer-guitar jamming to be heard. Rapper Despot opens. (Tiffany Frandsen) Monday, April 6 @ The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $21, TheComplexSLC.com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com

Thursday 4.2

Friday 4.3

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City

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Marcus Schossow, Victor Niglio (Area 51) Yes Means Yes Benefit Concert: Genre Zero, Records on the Wall, Strong Words, Night Wings (Bar Deluxe) George Ezra, Ruen Brothers (The Depot) Koffin Kats (Devil’s Daughter) Cool Jazz Piano Trio With Fred McCray (Dopo) Lorin Walker Madsen (The Garage) Apres Ski With DJ Gawel, DJ Matty Mo (Gracie’s) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Tony Holiday & the Velvetones (Hog Wallow Pub) Hawthorne Heights, Courage My Love, Mark Rose, Shane Henderson, Dayseeker (Kilby Court) River City Extension, Cold Fronts (The Loading Dock) The Bastard Suns, Bumpin Uglies, Wasnatch, HiFi Murder, Anything That Moves (Metro Bar) Evil Twin (The Moose Lounge) From Ashes to New, Judicator, Shadowseer, Visigoth, Deathblow, Demented Asylum (Murray Theater) DJ Choice (The Red Door) Poon Hammer, Colonel Lingus, LSDO (The Royal) Dubwise: Pleasure, Motto, Illoom (The Urban Lounge) Ledd Foot (The Westerner) Ladies That Rock: Minx (The Woodshed)

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APRIL 2, 2015 | 45

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2014

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APR 6:

| cityweekly.net |

Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com


CONCERTS & CLUBS

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

Kiesza, Betty Who

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With its sleek synths and beats, the pop music created by Canadian songstress Kiesza seems to be made for one thing: dancing. And dancing itself is often the focus of Kieszaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music videos, in which sheâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a trained ballerinaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;often shows off inventive moves. In the video for her popular earworm â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hideawayâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;from her debut album, 2014â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sound of a Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for example, she walks toward the camera between a variety of dance breaks, either solo, in a group or with a single dance partner. Add Kieszaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful vocals to all those moves, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got the perfect club-ready combination. Australian pop artist Betty Who is also on the bill. (Kolbie Stonehocker) Tuesday, April 7 @ The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $21 in advance, $25 day of show, DepotSLC.com

Park City Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) Badfeather (The Spur Bar & Grill)

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Utah County TUE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FRI 11AM TO 7PM â&#x20AC;˘ SAT 10AM TO 6PM â&#x20AC;˘ CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM â&#x20AC;˘ 801.532.4413

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46 | APRIL 2, 2015

City Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hot List for the Week

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DJ Scooter (Downstairs) Stafford Brothers (Park City Live) Bonanza Town (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Utah County

Westward the Tide, Brumby, Forest Eyes (Velour)

Mad Max & the Wild Ones, Jack Pines, City of Salt, The Bectics (Velour)

Saturday 4.4

Sunday 4.5

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City

Atomic 45 Album Release, Monorchist, Magda-Vega, Lost in Bourbon (5 Monkeys) Vincent Draper & the Dirty Thirty, Wildcat Strike, Electric Cathedral, Steel Born Buffalo (Bar Deluxe) Pierce Fulton, TeeJay, Ross K, Plan Andres (The Depot) Cool Jazz Piano Trio With Stan Seale (Dopo) Black Cadillac (The Garage) Chaseone2 (Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Marinade (Hog Wallow Pub) Weedeater, King Parrot (In the Venue/ Club Sound) Batty Blue, Creature Double Feature, Giants in the Oak Tree (Kilby Court) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) DJ E-Flexx (Sandy Station) DJ Marshall Aaron (Sky) Mokie (The State Room) Max Pain & the Groovies, Season of the Witch, Koala Temple (The Urban Lounge) Ledd Foot (The Westerner)

Ogden

Ogden Alicia Stockman (The Century Club) Gamma Rays (Funk â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N Dive Bar) Rail Town (The Outlaw Saloon)

Park City Canyons Spring Concert Series: Dirty Revival (Canyons Resort)

Funk & Soul Night With DJ Street Jesus (Bourbon House) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) The Steel Belts (Donkey Tails) Garage Artist Showcase (The Garage) Dave Bowman Trio (Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Karaoke Church With DJ Ducky & Mandrew (Jam) Yonatan Gat, Blue Jay Boogie, Wild Apples (Kilby Court, see p. 36) Karaoke That Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Suck (The Woodshed) Karaoke Sundays With KJ Sparetire (The Century Club)

Park City Red Cup Party: DJ Matty (Downstairs) Open Mic (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Mo

Monday 4.6 Salt Lake City

Covenant (Area 51) Ratatat, Despot (The Complex) Punch Brothers, Gabriel Kahane (The Depot) Cool Jazz Piano With Doc Miller (Dopo) Monday Night Jazz Session: David Halliday & the Jazz Vespers (Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig Pub) Bane, Backtrack, Malfunction, PSO (The Loading Dock)


CONCERTS & CLUBS Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net Outline in Color, She’s an Animal, Take in the Distance, Charlatan, Away at Lakeside, Beneath Red Skies, Of Ivy & Ashes (Murray Theater) Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Monophonics, Coyote Vision Group, Street Jesus (The Urban Lounge)

Tuesday 4.7 Salt Lake City Krazy Karaoke (5 Monkeys) Open Mic (Alchemy Coffee) Black Pussy (Area 51) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Kiesza, Betty Who (The Depot) Hell Jam (Devil’s Daughter)

Brazilian Jazz With Alan Sandomir & Ricardo Romero (Dopo) The Red Rock Club (Gracie’s) The Color Morale, Slaves, Vanna, Favorite Weapon (In the Venue/Club Sound) Karaoke (Keys on Main) The Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers (Piper Down) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (The Woodshed)

Ogden Karaoke (Brewskis)

Utah County Open Mic (Velour) Open Mic (The Wall)

Wednesday 4.8

The Medusa Collective: Salvia Plath, Officer Jenny, Strong Words (The Urban Lounge) Jam Night Featuring Dead Lake Trio (The Woodshed)

Salt Lake City Karaoke With Steve-O (5 Monkeys) North Mississippi Allstars, Anders Osborne (The Depot) Marmalade Chill (Gracie’s) John Davis (Hog Wallow Pub) Blood on the Dance Floor, Master of Death, Cold Black (In the Venue/Club Sound) Wednesduhh! Karaoke (Jam) SomeKindaWonderful, Marc Scibilia (Kilby Court) Mikey Wax, Alexis Keegan (The Loading Dock)

Ogden Karaoke (The Century Club) Karaoke (Funk ‘N Dive Bar)

Park City Open Mic (Cisero’s) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs)

Utah County Kings Heir, Sky Tides, Geneva Conflict (Velour) Karaoke (The Wall)

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| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

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| cityweekly.net |

PRESENTS


CHECK OUT PHOTOS FROM...

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

SLC TATTOO CONVENTION 3/27-3/29

Explore the latest in Utah’s nightlife scene, from dives to dance clubs and sports bars to cocktail lounges. Send tips & updates to comments@cityweekly.net Poplar Street Pub

Natural light comes into this casual pub in the afternoon (yes, light in a pub!), making Poplar Street Pub a good Sunday brunch spot. Friday and Saturday nights feature live music (mostly acoustic singersongwriter, but with some blues and reggae thrown in), and champion-size burgers are available any night. To top it all off, there are lots of places to sit and socialize with pals. 242 S. 200 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-2715, PoplarStreetPub.com Metro Bar

Metro earned its reputation for fun by serving up refreshing beverages and throwing great dance parties and special events. Home of one of the longestrunning all-request nights (Thursday) and the LGBTfriendly Fusion Saturdays, Metro Bar caters to the varied tastes of Salt Lake City’s diverse party crowds. 615 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City. 801-6526543, MetroSLC.com

| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

48 | APRIL 2, 2015

Bar exam

The Bar In Sugar House

UPCOMING EVENTS:

FIND US FOR YOUR #CITYFREEBIE

SATURDAY NIGHT 4/4

Blink as you’re driving by, and you might miss this place—not just because it’s so small, but because it looks like one of those temporary Santa shacks constructed during the holidays. That very charm is what has long made this cozy, off-the-radar place a staple of Sugar House. Settle in, throw a couple of quarters in the jukebox and rub elbows with any number of locals who think of The Bar as home. 2168 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-485-1232 The Huddle

The Huddle stands out as one of Utah’s best sports bars, with unobstructed views of its 24 monitors equipped with big-ticket games: NBA, MLB, NASCAR, NFL, PGA, etc. And, as if that weren’t enough, friendly servers keep the food and drinks coming, which is much better than hopping up and down all afternoon to grab a cold one from your fridge. Try the manager’s favorite steak sandwich or chow down on a chile verde burrito. 2400 E. Fort Union Blvd. (7200 South), Cottonwood Heights, 801438-8300, TheHuddleSportsBar.com

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

❱ Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports ❰

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

wednesday 4/1 thousands

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Free POol & 1/2 off nachos every thursday Saturday 4/3

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50¢ Wings for Brunc� $ Bloody Marys, bud tallboys,

3 Screwdrivers & Mimosas

every tuesday

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

COMING SOON

4/12

One drop w/funk & Gonzo Herban Empire

4/17

w/ Kettlefish

Salsa Chocolate

Located around the corner from the Marriott Hotel, Salsa Chocolate adds some spice to Utah County’s nightlife with free dance lessons (after the cover charge, of course) of salsa, merengue and bachata every Thursday from 9 to 10 p.m.—no partner necessary. For those interested in shimmying beyond the basics, the alcohol-free club also offers private and group lessons throughout the rest of the week for a moderate fee. Advanced students might even make the SalsaSouls Performing Team. Hot, hot, hot! 116 W. Center St., Provo, 801-810-5886, SalsaChocolate.com

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anonymously Confess your

i slept with my best friend’s husband

seCrets

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april 2, 2015 | 49

CityWeekly

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(801) 307-8199

@

OF THE WEEK


Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Across

47. Boss 49. Money in the bank: Abbr. 50. Base in "A Few Good Men," familiarly 51. 1997-2006 U.N. chief 53. "Kapow!" 54. 1950s-'80s Chevy utility vehicle 57. FedExCup org. 58. Grp. with the platinum album "Out of the Blue" 59. City on the Rio Grande 60. ____-mo

Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

12. Get furious 13. He quipped "I respect a man who knows how to spell a word more than one way" 18. Calc prerequisite 22. Noted Yosemite Valley peak 23. Fabled New World city 24. Youngest 600-homer man, informally 25. ____ in "elephant" 26. Napkin's place 28. "The Best Man" actress Lathan 29. Four Corners st. 32. Pulitzer-winning columnist Herb 34. Kind of wave or pool 37. Basic math course 38. Las Vegas Strip feature 39. Muscle problem Down 40. Opposite of avec 1. Weather phenomenon named for the infant Jesus 42. Grumpy ____ 2. Ranch addition? 43. Capitalized letters that 3. Halved have 90-degree bends (and 4. Substantially (in) the starts of seven answers 5. Texter's "If you ask me ..." in this grid) 6. Runners in the cold? 45. Only Central American 7. "View of Toledo" artist country that uses the U.S. 8. Home to the Ibsen Museum dollar as its sole form of 9. Rapper/actor Mos ____ currency 10. Fictional writer of "The World According to 46. What "I love" in a 1915 Bensenhaver" Irving Berlin song 11. Go by

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. V-____ 5. How some trust 10. It may be standardized 14. 2009 Lady Antebellum #1 hit "____ to You" 15. ____ code 16. Boatload 17. Personal reminder 19. Wife of Uranus 20. Suffix with cash 21. "The Name of the Rose" author 22. Bay of Naples isle 23. Fops 26. Only World Series perfect game pitcher 27. Taco sauce brand 28. Lost it 30. "Dirty Jobs" host Mike 31. Red Lobster offering 33. Take in 35. Suffix with meth- or prop36. Utterly fails 41. Sherpa's tool 44. "Girls" creator Dunham 45. Zoe of "Avatar" 48. Snorkeling locale 50. Watch with astonishment 51. Climbs 52. Of a pelvic bone 53. Airport code in Spain NE of MAD 55. "The Price Is Right" network 56. ESPN pitch, say 57. Flights 61. Flowing hair 62. Egyptian president Nasser 63. 1942 hit "(I've Got ____ in) Kalamazoo" 64. It stinks 65. Essential ____ acid 66. ____ many words

SUDOKU

| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | April 2, 2015

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


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| COMMUNITY |

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years of experience working at her family’s store. Her son, Michael, along with Wallace, has been working in the family business for the past 28 years. With such deep roots in Salt Lake City, it should come as no surprise that SmithCrown is also heavily involved in the Sugar House community. Smith-Crown frequently sponsors the Art Walk, which occurs the second Friday of each month. In December 2014, the company also helped put on the Sugar House Chamber winter carnival. Smith-Crown also frequently offers cooking demonstrations to exhibit the amazing features of their products in action. Monthly events and promotions are advertised on the company’s Facebook page at Facebook.com/ SmithCrownCo. Smith-Crown offers free shipping throughout the continental United States, with some restrictions. Most new, unopened items are returnable within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Smith-Crown is open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Sunday. SmithCrown Co., 1941 S. 1100 East, 801-484-5259, SmithCrown.net n

| cityweekly.net |

In the market for a new appliance or a repair on an old one, but intimidated by large, impersonal retailers? Look no further than Smith-Crown Co., a locally owned business located in Sugarhouse. Smith-Crown sells vacuum cleaners, bags, belts, filters and parts for all makes and models. “If we don’t have it, we can get it—for the best prices in town,” office manager Alisyn Wallace says. Smith-Crown also sells Miele home appliances, including refrigerators, washers & dryers, dishwashers and more. What makes Smith-Crown truly special is its expertise. “We only sell products that we have tried and tested, and proven to be long-lasting and exceptional products. Our service technicians have between eight and 30 years of hands-on experience,” Wallace says. “After we sell [an] appliance, we install them and educate the buyer on how to use and take care of [his or her] investment.” Smith-Crown also does warranty and repair work. “My favorite part about working at SmithCrown is bringing the best products we can find to our customers,” Wallace says. Bryon Longhurst, master technician at Smith-Crown, is equally enthusiastic. He loves his job and his favorite part of working at Smith-Crown is fixing vacuums. In addition to vacuums and parts and other home appliances, Smith-Crown sells air purifiers, candles from Salt City Candle Company and candy from Fernwood. “We care about our customers and their shopping experience,” Wallace says. “We stand behind all the products we sell.” Smith-Crown has been in business since 1947. A third-generation, family-owned & operated business, Smith-Crown began when Blair Smith started selling Filter Queen vacuums door-to-door. Soon, Blair and his wife Maurine opened a storefront location. What started as a single-line doorto-door business changed over the years to a multi-line business that sells and repairs all brands of vacuums and Miele appliances. “Maurine passed away in 2011,” says Wallace, who is also Maurine and Blair’s granddaughter. “Her daughter Barbara Green took over.” Green, who has been a teacher and school principal, had over 40

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| cityweekly.net |

| COMMUNITY |

52 | APRIL 2, 2015

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in yoUr

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CityWeekly

SHOP girl

I Shop. Therefore, I Am

L

et me start by saying I am not a writer. I did not major in journalism or English at the University of Delaware. However, I did major in drinking beer from a beer bong with a minor in how to get the maximum amount of free drinks at the bar (usually the Stone Balloon, Bruce Springsteen’s venue of choice). Let’s just say I started honing my eagle eye in men and drinks, which naturally got me working in sales (sorry feminists). After college, I moved to Utah in 1993 and the coolest restaurant opening at the time was the Olive Garden in downtown Salt Lake City. I kid you not, there was a line out the door the entire opening weekend. I loved the mountains, but the shopping was dreadful. Goodbye, King of Prussia mall outside my native Philadelphia. Hello, Gart Bros. I longed for my Philly stores such as Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, and Eagle’s Eye, which morphed into the Tory Burch empire. All I could find was Kokopelli trivets and Timberland boots. I am a shopper. I like material objects. I like beautiful things from 50 cent art cards to $400 La Botte Gardiane boots, which I just purchased (but don’t tell my husband) from Hathenbruck in Park City. Yes, I just wrote that. It’s permanent now. All of the yoga and meditation about nonattachment clearly isn’t working. I used to sell, or “schlepp,” ads, as the sales department calls it, for City Weekly for 12 years. I got around a lot during that time to an incredible amount of restaurants and retail shops. A lot has changed on the retail front in the past two decades, and that brings me back to City Weekly.

Look sharp: The Shop Girl is afoot.

Publisher John Saltas called me and asked if I would be open to writing a feature about shopping. I thought, “What experience do I have, and why not hire a ‘real’ writer?” But then I thought, “I am a consumer. I am a shop girl with lots of time and rich husband. OK, I think I can do this. Who doesn’t love to get paid to shop?” This is actually a pretty dreamy job. Instead of telling my family that I’ve been shopping all day, I can say I’ve been out doing research. Maybe they will stop calling me a brat if they know this is “real” research. I’m all over town, but if you happen to see some cool local shops or products please email me. I want the scoop on what’s local and what’s exciting to you. ◆ Follow Christa on Twitter @ChristaZaro and on Instagram @cityweeklyshopgirl.

Christa Zaro czaro@cityweekly.net

I Slept wIth my beSt frIend’S huSband

anonymously Confess your seCrets


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S NY

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) “Choconiverous” is an English slang word that’s defined as having the tendency, when eating a chocolate Easter Bunny, to bite the head off first. I recommend that you adopt this direct approach in everything you do in the coming weeks. Don’t get bogged down with preliminaries. Don’t get sidetracked by minor details, trivial distractions or peripheral concerns. It’s your duty to swoop straight into the center of the action. Be clear about what you want and unapologetic about getting it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The American snack cake known as a Twinkie contains 68 percent air. Among its 37 other mostly worthless ingredients are sugar, water, cornstarch, the emulsifier polysorbate 60, the filler sodium stearoyl lactylate, and food coloring. You can’t get a lot of nutritious value by eating it. Now let’s consider the fruit known as the watermelon. It’s 91 percent water and six percent sugar. And yet it also contains a good amount of Vitamin C, lycopene, and antioxidants, all of which are healthy for you. So if you are going to eat a whole lot of nothing, watermelon is a far better nothing than a Twinkie. Let that serve as an apt metaphor for you in the coming week. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You may be as close as you have ever gotten to finding the longlost Holy Grail—or Captain Kidd’s pirate treasure, for that matter, or Marie Antoinette’s jewels, or Tinkerbell’s magical fairy dust, or the smoking-gun evidence that Shakespeare’s plays were written by Francis Bacon. At the very least, I suspect you are ever-so-near to your personal equivalent of those precious goods. Is there anything you can do to increase your chances of actually getting it? Here’s one tip: Visualize in detail how acquiring the prize would inspire you to become even more generous and magnanimous than you already are.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In Cole Porter’s song “I Get a Kick Out of You,” he testifies that he gets no kick from champagne. In fact, “Mere alcohol doesn’t thrill me at all,” he sings. The same is true about cocaine. “I’m sure that if I took even one sniff that would bore me terrifically, too,” Porter declares. With this as your nudge, Scorpio, and in accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to identify the titillations that no longer provide you with the pleasurable jolt they once did. Acknowledge the joys that have grown stale and the adventures whose rewards have waned. It’s time for you to go in search of a new array of provocative fun and games. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The English writer William Wordsworth (1770-1830) wrote hundreds of poems. Among his most famous was “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” which is also known as “Daffodils.” The poem sprung from him after a walk he took with his sister around Lake Ullswater in the English Lake District. There they were delighted to find a long, thick belt of daffodils growing close to the water. In his poem, Wordsworth praises the “ten thousand” flowers that were “Continuous as the stars that shine / And twinkle on the milky way.” If you are ever going to have your own version of a daffodil explosion that inspires a burst of creativity, Sagittarius, it will come in the coming weeks.

| COMMUNITY |

APRIL 2, 2015 | 53

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your subconscious desires and your conscious desires seem to be at odds. What you say you want is not in precise alignment with what your deep self wants. That’s why I’m worried that “Don’t! Stop!” might be close to morphing into “Don’t stop!”—or vice versa. It’s all pretty confusing. Who’s in charge here? Your false self or your true self? Your wounded, conditioned, habit-bound personality or your wise, eternal, ever-growing soul? I’d say it’s a good time to retreat into your sanctuary and get back in touch LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Some people believe unquestioningly in the truth and power of with your primal purpose. astrology. They imagine it’s an exact science that can unfailingly discern character and predict the future. Other people believe AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) all astrology is nonsense. They think that everyone who uses it is Sometimes you’re cool, but other times you’re hot. You veer deluded or stupid. I say that both of these groups are wrong. Both from acting aloof and distracted to being friendly and attentive. have a simplistic, uninformed perspective. The more correct view is You careen from bouts of laziness to bursts of disciplined that some astrology is nonsense and some is a potent psychological efficiency. It seems that you’re always either building bridges tool. Some of it’s based on superstition and some is rooted in a or burning them, and on occasion you are building and burning robust mythopoetic understanding of archetypes. I encourage them at the same time. In short, Aquarius, you are a master of you to employ a similar appreciation for paradox as you evaluate a vacillation and a slippery lover of the in-between. When you’re certain influence that is currently making a big splash in your life. In not completely off-target and out of touch, you’ve got a knack one sense, this influence is like snake oil, and you should be skeptical for wild-guessing the future and seeing through the false about it. But in another sense it’s good medicine that can truly heal. appearances that everyone else regards as the gospel truth. I, for one, am thoroughly entertained! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) According to the Biblical stories, Peter was Christ’s closest PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) disciple, but acted like a traitor when trouble came. After Christ How can you ripen the initiatives you have set in motion in recent was arrested, in the hours before the trial, Peter denied knowing weeks? Of the good new trends you have launched, which can you his cherished teacher three different times. His fear trumped his now install as permanent enhancements in your daily rhythm? Is love, leading him to violate his sacred commitment. Is there there anything you might do to cash in on the quantum leaps anything remotely comparable to that scenario developing that have occurred, maybe even figure out a way to make money in your own sphere, Virgo? If you recognize any tendencies in from them? It’s time for you to shift from being lyrically dreamy yourself to shrink from your devotion or violate your highest to fiercely practical. You’re ready to convert lucky breaks into principles, I urge you to root them out. Be brave. Stay strong and enduring opportunities. true in your duty to a person or place or cause that you love.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) People are paying attention to you in new ways. That’s what you wanted, right? You’ve been emanating subliminal signals that convey messages like “Gaze into my eternal eyes” and “Bask in the cozy glow of my crafty empathy.” So now what? Here’s one possibility: Go to the next level. Show the evenmore-interesting beauty that you’re hiding below the surface. You may not think you’re ready to offer the gifts you have been “saving for later.” But you always think that. I dare you to reveal more of your deep secret power.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Marketing experts say consumers need persistent prodding before they will open their minds to possibilities that are outside their entrenched habits. The average person has to be exposed to a new product at least eight times before it fully registers on his or her awareness. Remember this rule of thumb as you seek attention and support for your brainstorms. Make use of the art of repetition. Not just any old boring, tedious kind of repetition, though. You’ve got to be as sincere and fresh about presenting your goodies the eighth time as you were the first.


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If you don’t golf, then turn the page and read the Backstop ads. I’m a golfer because my dad was a golfer, and when we moved from New York to Arizona, we lived with the new Tucson Country Club in the back yard. The course was a never ending source of play during the day, and discovery as darkness fell and the wildlife came out. Golf is a patience game and a great way to socialize with old friends and meet new ones. And, when you play golf, you never have to produce anything to prove how great you did, like a fisherman does! Utah has around 140 golf courses to play on, and they are relatively cheap for 18 holes with a cart. Generally, it’s about $50 for five hours of fun. If you compare our prices to, say, Arizona or California, our fees are generally about half. Sadly, though, Salt Lake City can’t figure out how to make golf profitable on its public courses. The sprinkler and wastewater infrastructures are ancient, and several courses are in need of better design. Frisbee golfers and foot golfers want to use the courses, as well as dog owners for walkies after hours and during the cold months. Instead of creative-future mixed-use possibilities for thousands of acres of green-space golf courses, Salt Lake City is thinking of closing Nibley Park, the airport course and Glendale. The bad news will be announced soon. Golf is like sex: You don’t have to play well to enjoy it, and it’s just as addicting. For us players, Midvale has just announced “Topgolf” is coming. You’ve seen this golfrange style in movies: Two or more tiers of driving greens where golfers hit buckets of balls at their own speeds in heated and cooled comfort, at targets many yards away from the platform. Topgolf will open at Bingham Junction and Jordan River Blvd., and will have 102 hitting bays, 230 hi-def TV’s, music and dining. The really, really cool part of Topgolf is that it makes the experience a game of competition (if you want to play that way). The range offers special golf balls with microchips that log where you hit the ball to complete a game, and the chip reader will post your score based on your accuracy and distance and send it to the TV screen in your bay. You don’t have to play that game and just practice your own shots. Like bowling, you can practice in your own lane or play on the overhead screen with another person next to you or down the alley. You don’t have to have your own clubs or balls, and their courses allow golfers to drink beer and eat food in the individual bays, served by “Bay Hosts.” Whoot! I can’t wait to try Topgolf. n Send comments to community@cityweekly.net. Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

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| COMMUNITY |

Poets Corner Distant Echo

Beyond the blackened hills I heard the knell, above the haunting whisper of her lyre– the distant echo of a single bell. I washed her face with water from the well and lay her broken body on the pyre; beyond the blackened hills I heard the knell. I swear I still can hear the music swell, although the belfry perished in the fire– the distant echo of a single bell. Above the ruined chapel in the dell, the broken bell yet haunts the tallest spire. Beyond the blackened hills I hear the knell; the distant echo of a single bell.

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APRIL 2, 2015 | 55

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.


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| CITY WEEKLY • Backstop |

56 | April 2, 2015

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City Weekly April 2, 2015  

Rules of Engagement

City Weekly April 2, 2015  

Rules of Engagement