Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T F E B R U A R Y 1 9 , 2 0 1 5 | V O L . 3 1 N 0 . 4 1

A funding dispute puts Utah's inmate horse-gentling program out to pasture. By Robyn Van Valkenburg


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | february 19, 2015

Staff Business/Office

Publisher

JOHN SALTAS

Accounting Manager CODY WINGET Associate Business Manager Paula saltas Office Administrator CELESTE NELSON Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

General Manager ANDY SUTCLIFFE Interim Editor JERRE WROBLE

Senior Editors

News Editor STEPHEN DARK Arts &Entertainment Editor scott renshaw

Marketing

Editorial

Marketing Manager Jackie Briggs Marketing/Events Coordinator Nicole Enright The Word ERIN COLVIN, LAUREN TAGGE, JANE LYON, LAUREN ROSE SPENCER, LILY WETTERLIN, GARY ABBREDERIS, TINA TRUONG, ELLEN YAKISH, THOMAS TOGISALA

Digital Editor bill frost Music Editor KOLBIE STONEHOCKER Copy Editor Brandon burt Staff Writers COLBY FRAZIER, ERIC S. PETERSON Interns Tiffany Frandsen, Sam Florence Columnists KATHARINE BIELE, TED SCHEFFLER

Circulation

Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

Sales

Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, kathy mueller Retail Account Executives Jeff Chipian, Andrea Moore, Pete Saltas, JEREMIAH SMITH City Weekly Store Assistant Manager ALISSA DIMICK Senior Account Director Jennifer van grevenhof

Contributors Cecil ADAms, Reyan Ali,

Deann Armes, Rene Barrett, Danny Bowes, Rob Brezsny, KATHERINE PIOLI, brian staker, Roland Sweet, John Taylor, Robyn Van Valkenburg

Production

Production Manager/Art Director SUSAN KRUITHOF Assistant Production Manager dEREK “sugar” CARLISLE, nick clark Graphic Artists Summer Montgomery, mason rodrickc, BJ VIEHL

National Advertising

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866 www.vmgadvertising.com

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 55,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

All Contents © 2015

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. John Saltas City Weekly founder

printed on recycled paper


AM/FM/USB/AUX DIGITAL RECEIVER

progressive

USB INPUT

lease / purchase 70% approval rate

AUX INPUT

www.SoundWarehouseUtah.com/financing

UÊ 1 /""/Ê6 -Ê9"1Ê ,9-/Ê  ,Ê -Ê, Ê  ÊÊ AND AUDIO STREAMING IN YOUR VEHICLE! UÊ/-Ê, 6 ,Ê-ÊÊ /Ê* ]Ê/Ê-Ê "Ê

Ê*9 ,Ê NO BUT GIVES YOU CONTROL OF A MP3 PLAYER SUCH AS AN ANDROID OR APPLE PRODUCT THROUGH THE USB INPUT! UÊ/-Ê, 6 ,Ê-Ê£Ê, Ê*, ‡"1/Ê/"Ê6 Ê9"1Ê, ,ÊÊ Ê SPEAKER OR SUBWOOFER AMPLIFIER CONTROL. UÊ /   Ê Ê*/

CD PLAYER

.00

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

UÊ/-Ê, 6 ,Ê-ÊÎÊ, Ê*, ‡"1/-Ê/"Ê""Ê1*ÊÊ MULTIPLE AMPLIFIERS FOR BETTER SOUND QUALITY AND CONTROL. UÊ 1 /""/Ê6 -Ê9"1Ê ,9-/Ê  ,Ê -ÊÊ FREE CALLING IN YOUR VEHICLE! UÊ9"1Ê  Ê""Ê1*Ê-/ , Ê7 Ê " /,"-ÊÊ TO THIS RECEIVER. UÊ/-Ê, 6 ,Ê-Ê6,  Ê "",Ê1 /" ÊÊ ALLOWING YOU TO CUSTOMIZE YOUR RECEIVER TO MATCH YOUR CARS INSTRUMENT PANEL. UÊ

Ê "",É "6 ,ÊÊÊU /   Ê Ê*/

EXTERNAL MIC

i79

$

.99

OFF ANY PURCHASE FROM OUR 3 LOCATIONS ON OUR HUGE SELECTION OF BIG SCREEN IN-DASH NAVIGATION ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEMS. STARTING AT $499.99

After $100 rebate

After $100 rebate

After $100 rebate

649.99

$

399.99

$

699.99

$

*See stores for price

After $100 rebate

999.99

$

After $100 rebate

724

$

.99

After $100 rebate

899

$

.99

AFTER REBATE

PURCHASE ANY OF THESE NAVIGATION MODELS AND INSTANTLY GET:

$i00off

.00

W W W.S O U N D WA R E H O U S E U TA H.C O M 10AM TO 7PM

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY–SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

PAYMENT 90 DAY OPTION

Habla Habla s/'$%.7!,,!6%  SeEspañol s/2%-.34!4%  SeEspañol

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 02/25/15

february 19, 2015 | 3

HOURS

| CITY WEEKLY |

599.99

$

*See stores for price

399

.99

$

After $100 rebate

$100 OFF

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

i00

$

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

USB INPUT AUX INPUT

| cityweekly.net |

99

.99

$

AM/FM/CD/USB/ BLUETOOTH RECEIVER


WORLD BAZAAR OUTLET Salt Lake City furniture event

Last Days! Amazing Furniture!

Sculptures & Architectural Decor

SALE ! SALE! SALE! 2080 S. Industrial Rd Suite C SLC

888-776-2292 *HWY 201 WEST VALLEY AND I-215 FREEWAY 1 BLOCK WEST OF ASSOCIATED FOOD STORES

Modern

For detailed directions to our showroom go to

worldbazaaroutlet.com

OPEN TO PUBLIC - 10AM- 5PM - MON/SAT FIRST MILE BUILDING - FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK

One of a Kind &

Industrial Furniture Reclaimed Furniture

Weather... or not

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| cityweekly.net |

Tables, Free Form Aracia Slabs

4 | february 19, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

2015 Forester

SALT LAKE CITY • 3535 S. STATE • 801-553-5299 SOUTH TOWNE • 10920 S. STATE CW.MMSUBARU.COM

Leather Seating


CWCONTENTS COVER STORY Broken Bad

A funding dispute puts Utah’s inmate horse-gentling program out to pasture. Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

13

CONTRIBUTOR

opinion NEWS A&E DINE CINEMA true tv MUSIC COMMUNITY

Robyn Van Valkenburg is a mustang trainer from Salt Lake City who has aided in the adoption of more than two-dozen wild mustangs since 2012. She studied journalism at Utah State University.

.net

Your online guide to more than 1,750 bars and restaurant • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at CityWeekly.net/Daily

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

cityweekly

Robyn Van Valkenburg

| cityweekly.net |

6 8 17 20 27 30 31 44

Mary Catherine Gebhard on her book You Own Me

The non-mainstream news from around the alt-universe

Twitter: @CityWeekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com

B ty

w

Y

L Y WEEK h ta

kl y .n

ic

IT

ee

us

ci

Full lineup at CityWeekly.net/bestofutahmusic

2015 C

Best of Utah Music Showcases

T OF UTA ES Music

H

the First Round of

et/best of

u

february 19, 2015 | 5

Join us this weekend for

m

Facebook.com/SLCWeekly

Alternative Realities

| CITY WEEKLY |

Gavin’s Underground


| cityweekly.net |

I first became entangled in David Carr’s Irish eyes and impish grin about 20 years ago from the short distance between my shoulder and my fingertips holding a match to his unlit cigarette. Or, maybe it was the other way around. We were smoking, though—bad boys skipping out on a session during a convention of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies (A AN). In which city that was, I don’t recall. Could’ve been Boston. Or Nashville. Or maybe it was Austin where I met Carr. Smokers are moths, attracted to other smokers. Twenty years ago, there were lots of us blowing smoke, literally and figuratively, as we young lions and lionesses shared our successes and failures in this thing called “alternative journalism” to which we were all wed. Editors, publishers, production artists, sales reps, it didn’t matter. So long as you smoked, you were welcome to join in any such spontaneous “board meeting” where you might enter with a new idea for compensating distribution drivers and leave with a coverstory idea that worked in Cleveland. A good number of us began to value those informal gatherings more than the formal sessions themselves. Smokers, by definition, are delusional. Gradually, fewer and fewer persons attended the impromptu board meetings. Clif Garboden, the editor of The Boston Phoenix, died of oral cancer. Tom Yoder, an owner of the Chicago Reader and the Washington City Paper, for which David Carr worked, survived throat cancer. He told me Monday he’s doing well and counting his blessings—for beating cancer and for selling his papers at the best possible time. On Tuesday, he will find his way to St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church on Park Avenue in Manhattan to bid goodbye to perhaps his greatest employee ever, David Carr, who died last week of everything, including lung cancer. As the cliché goes, David was “only”

6 | february 19, 2015

58 years old. I swear he was older than me, but he was not. He was simply a wiser soul, a deeper thinker, a more generous human being, a quicker wit, an abhorrer of pretense, a friend and mentor to scores of journalists, a thrill to share a meal with and, as hard as this is to take, a much better skier than I ever was. Before he became a journalistic meme at The New York Times, where he worked as a media critic from 2002 until his passing, David and family spent a winter vacation at my home. Each day, David rose early, grabbed his rented parabolic skis and made short work of Utah’s famous snow, including one full day at Alta—the David Carr of American ski resorts—with our then editor, Christopher Smart. Chris, an expert skier, was agog that pudgy and smoking David skied so well and so fiercely. Despite David leaving our industry around the year 2000, the puff-filled board meetings continued. Missing him, in those first years we asked, “What’s David up to?” Of late, the query became, “How’s David?” We had seen the pictures and videos. David hadn’t merely moved past us, he was painfully moving beyond us all—he evidently, like us, was frail and vulnerable after all. During his Utah visit, I cooked a Dutch oven meal. David had never tasted Dutch oven cooking (hard to believe, given his PHOTO COURTESY OF CARR’S @CARR2N TWITTER ACCOUNT

Matchless

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

PRIVATE EY

B Y J O H N S A LTA S @johnsaltas

dining proclivities) and his compliments were lavish. No one could pay a compliment like David. I once saw him compliment an Excel spreadsheet. I was so taken that I later sent him a Lodge Dutch Oven, which cost more to ship than to buy. He gave the oven a name—Dutch— and assured me that Dutch kept him company in a cabin in upstate New York where he was writing his autobiography. I never knew the David Carr of The Night of The Gun. Not long after its release, we had dinner in Park City during the Sundance Film Festival which he, as The Ca r petba g ger, was now covering for the Times. I had recently lost t wo brothers in the span of 24 hours— one f r om t he sa me sma l l-cel l lu n g cancer that would claim David—and we both opened up. It was easier for him despite my incredulity and questions: Which David Carr are you tonight? “The one who thinks you can’t trust a Greek to choose Chinese food.” And so it was. He told me things he said he never told anyone else. Perhaps, but everyone who knew David felt he shared something with them only they were privy to. All of us were his best friend. He was all of ours. That night, he told me he had once yearned to be a comedian, a stand-up comic. That would explain his impecca-

Everyone who knew david felt he shared something with them only they were privy to. All of us were his best friend.

ble timing, his witty phrasing, his perfect pauses and use of the air that blew between him and whomever was in front of him. In another year, I was at a Sundance party and bumped into the comedian and actor Tom Arnold. Following one disengaged, “Oh, thank you, uh-huh, oh, you’re so nice” after another, he took my hand and began his proscribed mantra, when I said, “David Carr’s staying at my house, and he says hello.” The look on Arnold’s face—that look a Midwestern boy might get when he finds a Flexible Flyer under the Christmas tree or a perch on the end of his ice-fishing line—said it all: David Carr had entered his troubled soul, too. A couple of days later, David told me he and Tom Arnold met up and skied together. There’s a joke in there somewhere. I learned David had died thanks to The New York Times alerts that he introduced me to. A few hours later, #DavidCarr was trending on Facebook and Twitter. Some trend. It’s barely ironic that charactercount-challenged Twitter owes some small debt to such a fantastically funny and prolific storyteller. But that’s about right. Stories are the coca plant of today’s storytelling ecosystem. Stories are picked by media outlets (the growers) then passed to aggregators and curators (the mules and the dealers) and cut into the intoxicating lines of text that are so addicting—and profitable—to the owners of the new social media. “Miss you, brother #DavidCarr” passes for prayer. “RIP #DavidCarr” passes for a eulogy. A new crop of stories will come tomorrow to feed the social beast. The road goes on forever, but the story never ends. Everyone with a keyboard is blistering their pinkies since his passing, but none can match how David might have said it about himself. David’s legacy will be that the countless persons he inspired will continue to write great stories. His evangelism for this craft is unsullied, and his acolytes will keep his candle lit. In the end—as in the beginning of our friendship—he was matchless. CW

new year, new you PRESENT THIS AD TO RECEIVE YOUR FREE GIFT SALONS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SUGARHOUSE

LANDISSALON.COM

1298 S. 900 E. Salt Lake City 801.485.5506

CITY CREEK

51 S. Main Street Salt Lake City 801.746.0349

MARMALADE 569 N. 300 W. Salt Lake City 801.364.3354

Send comments to john@cityweekly.net.


The Science of Brewing...

WEDNESDAYFEBRUARY@PM WILDWEDNESDAY $2 Soft Drinks, $2 Draft Beers $5 Student Tickets

SATURDAYFEBRUARY@PM

MONDAYMARCH@PM

MONDAY

Pink Jerseys Auctioned Off Live After Game

1200 S State St.

Buy One Ticket Get One Free With Maverik Adventure Card

Beer & Wine brewing supplies

Hours: Sun 10-5pm M-Sat 10am-6:30pm

| cityweekly.net |

FOLLOW US ON OR BUY TICKETS NOW AT UTAHGRIZZLIES.COM

801-531-8182 / beernut.com www.facebook.com/thebeernut

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 7


HITS&MISSES by Katharine Biele

random questions, surprising answers

@kathybiele

Beware of Overreach Apparently, Salt Lake City isn’t the only municipality at loggerheads with the Legislature. But certainly, Utah lawmakers do like to lord over their liberal underlings. The latest dustup is over whether to let cyclists wheel through drive-thru windows. Oh, no—Salt Lake City has “overreached,” according to Rep. Johnny Anderson, R-Taylorsville. Business owners, not the city, should be in charge of their services. Not that long ago, Sen. Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, imposed a moratorium on creating historic districts, which now exist under a legislative threat. Other cities, such as West Lake Hills, Texas, have hired lobbying firms to keep abreast of these ongoing battles with the state, where Governor Greg Abbot’s vision doesn’t mesh with the city’s tree-cutting laws, according to the Austin-American Statesman. It’s that old property-rights struggle over whose rights are most important. Evidently, local control is great—except when it isn’t.

| cityweekly.net |

Up, Up & Away You have to wonder what Salt Lake City’s plan is, with all the high-end high-rises being built. The Salt Lake Tribune asked the question, “Where is affordable housing in Salt Lake City?” The answer wasn’t forthcoming. Developers are giddy over all the construction, and planners like the idea of high-density development near public transit. The problem is that rents are going up, and the low- to moderate-income renters are being left out. That’s not to mention those who live away from transit or can’t access it. If we’re building for the big boom, has anyone thought about water? Or whether or not the city can sustain this kind of growth? Parking continues to be a problem on many levels, and we all know Salt Lake City doesn’t like cars.

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | february 19, 2015

FIVE SPOT

Rethink Prison

RENT ONE GET ONE FREE! Expires 3.5.15

50% OFF TUNE-UPS! SKI TUNE-UP $15 REG $30 SNOWBOARD TUNE-UP $20 REG $40 Expires 3.5.15

698 Park Avenue U Park City Townlift U 435-649-3020 134 West 600 South U Salt Lake U 801-355-9088 2432 East Ft. Union U South Valley U 801-942-1522

Focus on treatment. That was the message during a Capitol rally at which advocates called for prison reform. Rep. Eric Hutchings, R-Kearns, is proposing legislation favoring mental-health and substance-abuse treatment over incarceration. That could mean lesser penalties for some crimes. The approach was recommended in a report from the Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice, noting that treatment can reduce recidivism. The Utah Supreme Court’s Chief Justice Matthew Durrant stressed that this kind of reform is necessary, if not the most “important action legislators can take” to prevent recidivism. Reports say some 80 percent of crimes involve drug or alcohol issues, and these are not necessarily prison-worthy. And, with fewer prisoners, the need for bigger prisons could be reduced.

One of City Weekly’s many unsung heroes, Susan Kruithof is our beloved and soon-to-bedeparting art director/production manager. Susan is pictured above with her parents, Joyce and the late Harold Thomas. For the past 14 years, Susan’s more than 600 covers of City Weekly each have helped tell our stories and served as the first impression of the paper.

What do you take into consideration when you design a cover?

The thing I think about most is our street boxes, and people viewing that cover from afar. The message needs to grab the reader. The image needs to be clear. Many of our cover meetings start with elaborate ideas for covers, but ultimately, they just won’t work if the idea isn’t singular, if the image is muddied with too many elements.

What are some of the surprising tasks of art director/production manager?

One of the biggest parts of the job is working with the other departments to complete a project from start to finish. There are a lot of moving parts to produce a paper or a magazine. The writers, photographers, sales people and designers are all zeroing in on a deadline, and it is my job to make sure all those pieces come together. It can be like herding cats at times, but ultimately I have to meet that deadline. I often refer to the production department as a shit funnel. And what comes out on the other end needs to be roses.

You are the sweet spot between the advertising and editorial departments. Who comes out the winner when we fight over space in the paper?

Ha ha ha. I run a tight ship. I want a strong ad-to-edit ratio. My ideal is 65 percent ads to 35 percent editorial content. But there is a certain amount of editorial content that just must be in the paper. City Weekly has award-winning writers; we bring something to this community that you cannot find anywhere else. I don’t think our readers understand what depths we go to provide them with quality hard-hitting features. It’s an expensive proposition, and we are a free publication. Our advertisers support our endeavors and ultimately, their ads get to be surrounded by amazing content and that is worth something to them. And I believe that our readers do want to know about local businesses, and City Weekly provides them with that information. If our content is 65 percent ads, then, of course, our readers are picking up the paper to read the ads as well.

What advice do you have for your replacement?

Deep breaths, Derek, deep breaths. I have been fortunate to work with my assistant production manager, Derek Carlisle, for over six years. He is an amazingly talented person. I am so happy that City Weekly gets Derek as their next art director/production manager. He’s already created a number of amazing covers and honestly has a greater skill set than I do. He can do absolutely anything in that department and has done everything. So, my only advice? Enjoy, take risks, push yourself in those times you are not overwhelmed.

So, why on earth are you leaving us? I am leaving this amazing city and job to move back to my hometown of Bloomington, Ind. Love has come knocking at my door, and I am following my heart. I also get to live near my mom and oldest son, which is a true blessing. I am excited for this next chapter, but, of course, sad to leave a place I have called home for over 14 years. I hope to come back often.

By Jerre Wroble jwroble@cityweekly.net


STRAIGHT DOPE Legal Love

BY CECIL ADAMS

Prostitution has been legal in Las Vegas for some time. What’s the verdict on legal prostitution? Gay marriage and marijuana use have become accepted. Will legal prostitution always just be a Vegas thing? —Silent John

SLUG SIGNORINO

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 9

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

dom use, and neither country requires STD testing. It’s frequently argued that legalization promotes human trafficking, but it’s very tricky getting solid numbers on a highly illicit activity. The trafficking rate in the Netherlands increased after legalization, but the definition was widely expanded at the same time, making comparison difficult. A controversial solution that’s rapidly gaining traction is the Swedish model, under which selling sex is legal but buying it isn’t. Already in effect in Norway and Iceland and recently approved by Canada, Northern Ireland and the European parliament, its advocates argue it discourages prostitution and thus minimizes trafficking while sparing prostitutes shame and legal trouble. Critics counter that it’s no substitute for decriminalization, saying it denies women their autonomy and makes prostitution more dangerous by making it more furtive. Yearly, Swedish arrest totals have varied wildly—the apparent number of prostitutes may have gone down, but many have likely moved online. Which brings us to the biggest recent development: the growth of the Internet escort industry. In the U.S., Germany, the Netherlands—anyplace with decent broadband, basically—prostitutes are leaving even legalized brothels for the online marketplace, where websites list services, connect clients with workers, and provide ratings for both. While this is undoubtedly less safe than the better-run brothels, it does allow prostitutes to work independently without pimps. Escorts report far higher self-esteem and job satisfaction than street prostitutes and brothel workers—on the whole, it seems to be a very different job. Internet-based prostitution will undoubtedly be difficult for governments to keep track of, but it may mean the work can occur more on the workers’ own terms. 
Is prostitution a great life? Clearly not for many. Would I want my daughter doing it? Hell, no—and I’d rather nobody else’s daughter did it either. But the idea that we’re going to abolish or even seriously control this ancient practice is a harmful illusion. We need to protect the women involved to the extent we can and not just drive them underground. If that means decriminalization plus inspections, licensing and other bureaucratic accoutrements, spare me the moralizing—that’s what we should do.


| cityweekly.net |

You need to do your homework, john. First of all, if you bought the services of a prostitute in the city of Las Vegas, you committed a crime. Second, legal prostitution is more widely accepted than we provincial Americans may understand: 50-plus nations, including most of the industrialized West, have adopted it to some degree. The growing realization worldwide is that the practice is never going away, and that those selling their services are at far greater risk than their clients. Consequently, instead of trying to stamp out prostitution, lawmakers are increasingly focused on safety. The modern case against legalizing prostitution is essentially: 1. Legalization would make it more difficult for police to identify and stop pimps and traffickers; and 2. It’s such an inherently violent and degrading profession that ethically it can’t be condoned. In one survey of prostitutes in nine countries, 60 to 90 percent said they’d been physically assaulted on the job. No one claims prostitution is the career one dreams of as a child. But police action makes an already hard life even harder: British and American police still target prostitutes much more often than their clients, without any measurable deterrent effect. Raids on brothels (where 85 percent of workers say they feel safe) push more prostitutes onto the streets, where they are more vulnerable to their clients, drugs and disease. U.S. police and prosecutors regularly use possession of condoms as evidence of prostitution, making prostitutes less likely to carry them. And, it’s not like the cops are getting women off the street and driving them to job-training classes—sex workers make up a third of all female inmates in U.S. prisons, and a criminal record makes finding alternate work even tougher. 
Countries that choose to legalize prostitution generally enforce health and safety regulations (including STD testing); they often provide unemployment, disability and pension benefits for prostitutes, as well as channels through which prostitutes can report violence, enforce contractual rights of payment, and transition out of the industry if they wish. Sixty percent of sex workers in the Netherlands and New Zealand said they felt safer refusing clients after legalization. In Nevada, where it’s permitted only in licensed brothels in the sleepier counties (so not Vegas or Reno), there are intercoms, panic buttons and constant monitoring of safety and cleanliness.  That said, legalization isn’t easy; plenty of countries have neglected major opportunities for regulation. The Netherlands provides work permits only to EU citizens, forcing immigrants to work illegally and rely heavily on pimps. Germany doesn’t mandate con-


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | february 19, 2015

NEWS

M o n e y M at t e r s

“If you work 40 hours a week, you shouldn’t have to live in poverty. That’s my philosophy.”—Rep. Justin Miller, D-Salt Lake City

Economic Shell Game

Utah’s economy may be growing, but not all are seeing it in their paychecks. By Eric S. Peterson epeterson@cityweekly.net @ericspeterson Utah’s elected leaders have long prided themselves on the state’s supercharged economic engine. If Utah’s economy were an automobile, it would be a dragstrip-worthy muscle car, running on free-market principles compared to the more eco-friendly engines of liberal coast economies. But new research released by the advocacy group Voices for Utah Children, in partnership with the University of Utah Department of Economics, shows that while Utah’s economy is cruising full-throttle not everyone in the state is enjoying the ride. New rankings, as of Jan. 30, 2015, have Utah claiming the fourth lowest unemployment rate and third highest job-growth rate in the nation. While state leaders are busy patting themselves on the back over these numbers, the Voices for Utah Children’s report titled “Utah Jobs: Quantity vs. Quality” released Feb. 6 paints a different economic picture for Utah. Utah may be bouncing back from the recession of 2008, but the bounce is better for the have-mores than it is for the have-less citizens. According to the report, occupations in the top 60 percent saw their median wages decline by about 1 to 1.5 percent. Folks in the bottom 40 percent, however, saw their median wages decline by 4 to 6 percent, with Utah’s inequality growth outpacing the nation. The report even calls into question Utah’s meteoric job growth, pointing out that the average wage of jobs gained between 2010 and 2014 was 22 percent less than the average wage of the jobs lost to the recession between 2008 and 2010. Utah’s poverty rate also has not recovered fully from the gut punch of the 2008 recession. According to the report, as recently as 2013, Utah’s poverty rate was 12.7 percent compared to the start of 2008 before the recession, when the poverty rate was at 9.6 percent. Matthew Weinstein, the priorities partnership director for Voices for Utah Children, notes that the study links Utah’s explosive job growth to Utah’s

equally explosive population growth increases. Allowing for population, the report argues Utah’s job growth is slightly behind that of the nation. Between 2011 and 2014, Utah saw 148,958 new jobs compared to 168,556 in new population, which shows an 88 percent ratio of jobs to population. Nationally, for the same period, there were roughly 8.7 million new jobs created compared to 9.5 million in new population growth, which equates to a ratio of 91 percent. “Utah’s job growth has to boom in order to keep up because our population growth is one of the fastest in the nation,” Weinstein says. His organization advocates for policies that help address poverty in Utah, but such progressive policies get little love from conservative lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Medicaid expansion could help close the gap by preventing low-income populations from falling victim to medical bankruptcies. Gov. Gary Herbert has been pushing his Healthy Utah initiative that would expand Medicaid. His plan faces opposition from legislators who would rather offer coverage only for the medically frail, or only about 16,000 Utahns. By comparison, under Healthy Utah, more than 140,000 lower and middleclass Utahns would be covered. In Herbert’s first press conference of 2015 addressing the Legislature, he cast the issue in a way that would be more

palatable to conservatives by lamenting that the state is missing out on federal matching funds by not expanding Medicaid. “In Utah’s case, we’re going to be sending back [in federal income taxes] about $800 million a year,” Herbert said. “Obama took it from us. I want it back; it’s that simple.” A bill that would raise the minimum wage could give a boost to low-income Utahns, but such bills are typically D.O.A. on the Hill. This year, Rep. Justin Miller, D-Salt Lake City, is focusing his efforts on House Bill 236 to raise the minimum wage for “tipped” employees such as restaurant servers from $2.13 up to the regular minimum wage of $7.25. Miller says 20,000 Utahns live on tipped minimum wages, twothirds of whom are women. Miller says states that have raised the wage for tipped workers have reduced poverty rates by as much as 34 percent. By providing more wage stability with an increased minimum wage, Miller says tipped employees will be less likely to need multiple jobs and can avoid public assistance to get by. “If you work 40 hours a week, you shouldn’t have to live in poverty,” Miller says. “That’s my philosophy.” Melva Sine, head of the Utah Restaurant Association, has read Miller’s bill language and challenges the need for increased costs to be passed onto consumers, especially since she says many tipped employees in the restaurant industry make well

above minimum wage. She says the average tipped wage in casual-dining restaurants is $12 to $17 an hour, and in fine-dining restaurants, it can exceed $20 an hour. “The restaurant industry would have to increase the cost to consumers, and that’s why the Utah Restaurant Association feels the legislation is not well thought out,” Sine says. Miller says the research he’s seen, however, would only result in a likely 4 percent increase for meals served. “If I have the luxury of going out to eat, I should be able to pay that extra 4 percent, especially knowing that that will allow the person busing my table or taking my order to get closer to a liveable wage,” Miller says. Weinstein with Voices for Utah Children points out that policies that help lower-income Utahns help the economy as a whole, given that those just getting by are more likely to spend their extra green—not save or invest it—which in turn helps local businesses. “A lot of people think these [measures] either are taking from the rich to give to the poor, or taking from businesses to give to workers,” Weinstein says. In fact, these measures help “grow the economy. If we have a dynamic where lower-economic Utahns get a boost to their families—that boosts the entire economy.” CW


Curses, Foiled Again

NEWS

Police looking for a bank robber in New Kensington, Pa., found suspect Shane Lindsey, 32, two blocks away at a restaurant where he stopped for chicken & biscuits. Officers entered the restaurant hoping its surveillance video might show the suspect passing by, only to spot Lindsey eating at a booth. (Tarentum’s Valley News Dispatch)

BY ROLAND SWEET

n A few days later, members of Germany’s far-right National Democratic Party boarded a train to attend a neo-Nazi protest in Freiburg. They missed the rally because they went 200 km. in the opposite direction before realizing their mistake. “We don’t feel their absence here,” Freiburg Mayor Otto Neideck said after organizers canceled the rally due to low turnout. (Turkey’s Hurriyet Daily News)

QUIRKS

n Sheriff’s deputies suspected drugs when they stopped a car outside Daytona Beach, Fla., but found none. Passenger Candyce Harden was getting back in the car to leave when an 11-monthold boy with her reached into her blouse and pulled out a bag of cocaine. She was arrested. (The Daytona Beach News-Journal)

Tax Dollars at Work The National Institutes of Health gave Daniel Resnic $2.4 million to develop an “origami condom,” described as a non-rolled, siliconebased condom designed to “increase pleasure,” but then canceled the project after a former employee accused Resnic of spending the funding on trips to Costa Rica, lavish parties at the Playboy mansion, fullbody plastic surgery, a condo in Provincetown, Mass., and patents for numerous “get-rich-quick” schemes. (The Washington Free Beacon)

n Alaska taxpayers are funding a two-year, $400,000 University of Alaska study aimed at combating fetal-alcohol syndrome that involves making free pregnancy tests available in bar bathrooms. (Alaska Dispatch News)

Nein on the Rhine Some 500 German right-wing protesters arriving for an antiimmigration rally in Schwerin were handed banners and stickers reading “mvgida.de,” which they assumed was the website for Mvgida, their xenophobic, anti-Islam organization. The site actually opposes right-wing extremism and urges tolerance. The duped protesters, many of them professed neo-Nazis, learned hours later that they had been demonstrating on behalf of immigrants instead of against them. (The Washington Post)

Thou Shalt Not Spare the Rod Pope Francis said spanking children is permissible, as long as their dignity is maintained. The pope made his remarks while outlining the role of fathers, noting that a good father forgives but is able “to correct with firmness.” (Associated Press) Compiled from press reports by Roland Sweet. Authentication on demand.

$5

OFF

service $35 or more May not be combined with other offers or promotions. Not valid towards gift cards. 1 coupon per person/visit. Present at time of service. Expires 2/28/15

Gift cards available

464 S 600 | Suite B • 801-363-0659 • facebook.com/SLCfourseasons

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 11

801-363-0565 | 580 E 300 S w w w. t h e a r t f l o r a l . c o m

When Washington, D.C., officials announced an unanticipated $38 million shortfall in projected revenue from traffic cameras, they explained the drop was evidence that motorists were obeying the law. A subsequent probe, however, found that many of the 338 speed and red-light cameras were broken. Police Assistant Chief Lamar Greene said last winter’s extreme cold kept workers from changing burned-out batteries, but since then police “have taken additional steps to enhance internal temperature controls.” Indeed, automated traffic enforcement revenues for the first quarter of the new fiscal year jumped $13.1 million. (The Washington Times)

50 �hades of �ed, On� �pecial bud

Revenue Stream

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

n The U.S. government spent $500,000 to build a police-training facility in Afghanistan that disintegrated within four months of completion, according to the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. Its report said the contractor used substandard materials, including bricks made only of sand, that caused water to become trapped between the walls, making the building look like it was “melting.” Inspector General John Sopko called the project “an utter failure and embarrassment.” (Fox News)

Allan Johnston, 40, received four years in prison for robbing a woman in Stirling, Scotland, authorities there said, by using “a can of Red Bull to mimic a gun.” (BBC News)

| cityweekly.net |

n Kentucky spends $2 million a year to pay 41 elected county jailers who have no jails to run. According to the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting, the figure includes nearly 100 fulland part-time deputies the jailers employ, many of whom are family members. Several jailers also work other jobs, a few of which are full-time. (Lexington Herald-Leader)

When Guns Are Outlawed


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | february 19, 2015

CITIZEN REVOLT

the

OCHO

by COLBY FRAZIER @colbyfrazierlp

the list of EIGHT

by bill frost

Of Annexation & Vapor

@bill_frost

Devour Out now! Eight reasons to keep Salt Lake City’s struggling public golf courses open:

8. Scruffy caddies and upper-

crust golfers have to battle hilariously somewhere.

7.

Same goes for psychotic groundskeepers, mischievous gophers and Kenny Loggins.

6. Face it: Golf courses are the

only place where electric cars are worth a damn.

5. The only other sport the

“athletes” of golf are in shape for is watching golf on TV.

4. You try closing a multi-

million-dollar deal on a miniature golf course.

3. Without golf courses, it

would be impossible to tell sportsmen apart from lesbians.

2.

Water-sucking golf courses are a natural ecological element of the desert. It’s science.

1. Without golf, Bud Lime-

drinking white dudes in khaki shorts can convene only once a year at a 311 concert.

Pick yours up for free

devourutah.com

for articles, recipes and weekly blogs

On Thursday, the Sandy City Planning Commission will mull the pros and cons of roping into the city’s borders tens of millions of dollars in real estate near the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon currently on Salt Lake County’s tax rolls. Then, catch a panel at the University of Utah on media and terrorism. Meanwhile, the Salt Lake County Health Department is considering new regulations for the electronic-cigarette industry.

Sandy City Planning Commission Thursday, Feb. 19

Sandy could soon see its tax base grow if it decides to annex 92.5 acres on which sit 146 private residences near the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The assessed value of the properties, some of which are owned by limitedliability companies with names like Cottonwood Rocks LLC and Rusty Dusty LLC, was too significant for a cell-phone calculator to tabulate. But it numbers in the tens of millions. Sandy City Hall, City Council Chambers, 10000 S. Centennial Parkway, Feb. 19, 6:15 p.m., Sandy.Utah.gov

Hinckley Institute of Politics Thursday, Feb. 19

Lofty questions examining media coverage of terrorism and the changing role of the media are the subject of a panel discussion at the University of Utah’s Hinckley Institute of Politics. Law professor Amos Guiora, U of U marketing and communications officer Bill Warren, and Hinckley director Kirk Jowers will discuss the media’s role and responsibilities while reporting on war and terror. Hinckley Institute of Politics Caucus Room, Orson Spencer Hall, 260 Central Campus Drive, Room 253, University of Utah, Feb. 19, 1 p.m., Hinckley.Utah.edu

Salt Lake County Health Department Wednesday, Feb. 25 As the popularity of e-cigarettes has spiked, so, too, have conversations among government types to regulate this industry. The Salt Lake County Health Department is having a public meeting to discuss roughly 17 new pages of regulations, known as Health Regulation No. 34, which has its sights set on regulating sales of e-cigarettes and the manufacture of the e-liquid used to fuel the vape. Salt Lake County Environmental Health Division, 788 E. Woodoak Lane, Murray, Feb. 25, 5 p.m., SLCOHealth.org


A FUNDING DISPUTE putS UTAH’S INMATE HORSEGENTLING PROGRAM out to pasture. By Robyn Van Valkenburg

| cityweekly.net |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ach morning, as the sun rose over the Wasatch Plateau in central Utah, Adam Wilson and 14 other men would pile into a rusted gray van that took them past a razor-wire fence and up a hill to corrals brimming with wild mustangs, steam rising from the steeds’ proud heads. Until the van returned at 4 p.m. each day, Wilson and the others would take care of the 1,400 mustangs at the Hard Time Corral. They’d shovel manure and mend fences. They’d file hooves and give vaccinations. They’d rope and ride a few of the horses and try—sometimes unsuccessfully—not to get hurt in the process. They were cowboys. And when they were cowboys, they could forget—for a spell, at least—that they were also prisoners. Wilson’s arms and face appear just a few shades lighter than his prison-issued maroon T-shirt as he stands near the corrals outside the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison, Utah. As the ranch’s head inmate, Wilson had learned a thing or two about working with the horses when they first came off the range. Working with the slender 3-year-old bay mare he called Cinnamon, for example, he’d have to remind himself that, “even as calm as she seems, she’s still wild.” His preferred method was to rub a long bamboo pole over a horse’s body and legs to acclimate it to being touched. “If the pole gets broken, that’s OK,” Wilson said last summer, as he worked with Cinnamon. “If my arm gets broken, it’s not.” But Wilson’s focus on “gentling” wild horses came to an abrupt end shortly before the prison shut down the program in fall 2014. Two weeks before the facility was closed, a guard came to Wilson’s cell and told him, “Roll up your stuff. You’re leaving.” Now, he’s finishing his one- to 15-year stretch for drug-related convictions in the Daggett County Jail where—instead of caring for Cinnamon—he works as a plumber. While he is happy to have one of the few jobs available at the jail, he misses the animals. “This new job teaches me patience with myself, but the horses taught me to be patient with others,” he said. Wilson feels badly that he never said goodbye to Cinnamon and worries about where the mustang may have ended up. Similar concerns likely are shared by the other 175 Gunnison inmates who worked at Hard Time and grew comments@cityweekly.net close to their equine charges. Since 2007, the Hard Time Corral gave inmates Photos by Rene Barrett at the Central Utah Correctional Facility a unique and often life-changing experience. The Wild Horse Inmate Program—WHIP, if you prefer a snappy acronym—was originally set up under a cooperative agreement between the Bureau of Land Management and Utah Correctional Industries, a standalone division of the Department of Corrections, which currently manages more than 20 work programs under the UCI umbrella. The programs, ostensibly, are intended to reduce inmate recidivism and train inmates in work skills that can increase their chances of employment post-incarceration. Since UCI doesn’t get funding from the Legislature, the programs it runs must be self-supporting, generating enough revenue to cover all operating expenses. When the contract for the program was being renegotiated in 2012 following the first five years of operation, the BLM disagreed with more than $1 million of the expenses and costs for which the prison sought reimbursement. Not only that, a federal audit found more than $900,000 of unsupported expenses charged by the prison. The funding disagreement reached an impasse in September 2014, after which the state gave the BLM 30 days to relocate 1,400 mustangs. The loss of the program was a blow to the BLM, the wild horses and the inmates who worked them. “The horses teach the men patience. They’ve never had to work for something to be happy. Most of them just turn to drugs or alcohol and get an instant pleasure,” said Donna Bastian, who managed the facility. “With the horses, they have to work to develop a personal relationship with an animal, but the happiness they feel with the horses lasts much longer than the drugs do.” Wilson still has hope that he will get back to working with horses once he is released in August. That’s no small ambition for a man who didn’t even know he liked horses until he worked at the Hard Time Corral.

| CITY WEEKLY |

The Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison, Utah

february 19, 2015 | 13


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | february 19, 2015

CAGING AN ICON

Inmate Adam Wilson gentles a wild horse

The iconic horses the prisoners worked with were from herds of mustangs and wild burros that ran wild across open plains and deserts and have long been a symbol for the American West. Some are the descendants of the horses of Spanish conquistadors. Others are the progeny of draft horses and thoroughbreds—escapees who left the service of cattle ranchers, miners and even the U.S. military. For generations, their names and likenesses have been used by marketers seeking to tap into the spirit of freedom and power they’ve come to represent. Even for an icon, though, freedom has its limits. Since 1971, the BLM has been charged with maintaining an ecological balance among wild horses, which number near 50,000 across the United States, including 4,300 in Utah. When the herds get too large, or drought or fire conditions put strain on the ecosystem, thousands of horses are pulled from the range and sent to holding corrals such as the 34-acre facility just north of the prison in Gunnison, about 125 miles south of Salt Lake City. Ranchers in Southern Utah have filed lawsuits demanding the BLM remove even more horses from the land in order to preserve scarce resources for their cattle. The ranchers worry about the health of the range and their own cattle when wild-horse populations are left to grow out of control. The BLM’s job is to do just that. However, due to overcrowded holding facilities and the agency’s deflated budget, many of the herd populations are allowed to rise to double or triple recommended animal-management levels before the BLM deploys helicopters to round up the horses. Nearly as many are now in holding corrals as are roaming free in the West, and managing the overcrowding remains a challenge. Many of the horses have been passed around between states, loaded into trucks and herded into corrals hundreds of miles from their home ranges and family herds. They wander the enclosures—lost in a sea of strangers—their survival instincts no longer serving any purpose. Untamed, they are offered up for adoption to the public for only $125, but even the most experienced horse trainers are often skeptical of the trainability of wild mustangs. Potential adopters who do go to the corrals can be overwhelmed by the presence of hundreds of animals in the vast paddocks—many cowering in corners at the sight of humans or fighting with each other to establish dominance around the feeding troughs. Some of these animals will spend the rest of their lives in corrals or various long-term holding facilities, never to roam the range again, nor to be gentled for adoption into a human family. They’ll be prisoners.

HARD KNOCKS, GOOD WORK

The Hard Time Corral—built by the same men who worked it—was a top-notch facility designed by the BLM to train a couple dozen horses at a time. There were two buildings—an office where paperwork was handled and a tack room where the prisoners stored training equipment, including expensive saddles and bridles, all generously donated by members of the public who were supportive of the program and its mission. A hitching area allowed the men to groom the animals, care for any wounds and trim their hooves. The prisoners had three round corrals

where they could practice natural horsemanship techniques, lunging the horses in circles while controlling their speed and direction with precise movements of their bodies. They also had an arena that was large enough to teach the horses to walk over obstacles and gallop over jumps. It was here that the inmates at the ranch would work each day with the goal of ensuring at least some of their charges were transformed from wild horses to adoptable partners. That’s a tough job for anyone—let alone for men with little, if any, experience with horses. At the corral, though, the prisoners were expected to handle proud, snorting, wild-eyed mustangs that had never been touched by human hands. Learning from one another, a small library of training videos and from the horses themselves, the inmates developed their own training techniques. Working with animals weighing up to 1,200 pounds—almost all of it muscle—they did their best never to make the same mistake twice. One horse became infamously known as Nose Breaker after bashing in an inmate’s face with her strong, powerful neck. Since then, the inmate has healed, and the horse has successfully been broken of her head-thrashing habit and adopted out to a family. For their efforts, the inmates made $1.25 an hour. It was good pay, as prison work goes. The job was among the most sought-after in the prison; between 11 and 17 inmates were selected through a system that takes into consideration the nature of their crimes, the amount of time left on their sentences and their behavior inside the prison. And it brought out the best in men imprisoned for things they did at their worst.

A GIFT AND A CHALLENGE

Jody Brown, a real-life cowboy, had secured his dream job as one of the heads of the corral. He had previously worked inside the prison as a guard. Brown said the program was “like riding with children.” “But some of our best hands started out with no clue,” he said. Brown would always ensure that the men and horses were on their best behavior with two simple rules. The first was for the horses: no kicking or biting. Rule No. 2 was for the inmates: no swearing. The rules helped the horses and men control their tempers even when a situation got out of control. Wilson’s mare, Cinnamon, was far from the greatest challenge the inmates faced that summer. Rather, that distinction might belong to Jameson, who stood 16 hands high with round and mighty dappled-gray hindquarters that powered his graceful trot and thundering canter. His feet were the size of dinner plates and, when the men first started working with him, he threw about his enormous, muscular body with fearful rage. The trainers couldn’t get near Jameson for a week and a half. Even then, he could only be approached by a trainer on horseback. Six months later, though, Jameson was obeying every command given by his trainer, Ryan Evans, who called the horse “a gift and a challenge.” “They don’t listen; you got to earn it,” said Evans, who is nearing a decade behind bars following a conviction of homicide by assault. “It was an accident,” he said softly. He got into a fight with a friend, and things got out of hand. He tried to call for help, but it was too late. Ranch rules permitted the inmates to train at a pace at which each man felt comfortable. Some of the prisoners, too intimidated by the stubborn, older wild


Inmate Ryan Evans working with a mustang

horses, were put in charge of gentling the younger mustangs that couldn’t be ridden yet. Brown said it was OK for the men to be afraid. Fear kept them from doing anything stupid. Outnumbered and completely outmuscled, the experience also helped them recognize the importance of working together. As they gentled the wild horses, the Hard Time inmates formed bonds and became partners with the powerful animals. They even shared lunch with their new friends; the horses always looked for the little plastic bag that contained a few carrots or sticks of celery after the lunch break. The men used the veggies as rewards for good behavior, or bribes to get the horses to lead better around a corral. Sometimes, though, the snacks were simply tokens of respect freely given from one imprisoned friend to another.

LESSONS IN POWER AND PATIENCE

DISPUTED COSTS

Under the cooperative agreement with the BLM—editable or retractable at any time—UCI wasn’t making enough money to consider the program sustainable in the long term. That’s despite the fact that the funding source for the program—the bureau’s Wild Horse & Burro Program—is

| cityweekly.net |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

When he first went to prison for burglary, firearms and theft convictions, James Duncombe was the kind of guy who wouldn’t let anyone push him around. As he began working at the corral, though, he had to adjust to the fact that he couldn’t always be in control. The sassy chestnut mare he’d been training, named Randi, was feisty and intemperate at first. She even threw Duncombe to the ground a few times. “She used to want to test you,” he said. But anger, irritation and intolerance had no place in the corral. They only got in the way. It was patience that won Randi over. And in the last weeks in which he got to work with

her, Duncombe said, she just wanted “to look pretty.” “You definitely get attached to them,” he said. “I really didn’t expect to become best friends with an animal when I came to prison.” Michael Patterson, who has two years left on a sentence for drugs and vehicle theft, had been working with a horse named Storm. Storm and the other horses there, he said, taught him to be more adaptable. “You gotta have understanding,” Patterson said. “They get just as nervous as you are.” Outside of prison, Patterson has a family—a son, daughter and grandchild. As he worked in the corral, he’d sometimes fantasize that his daughter might adopt one of the horses he was working with. His grandchild could ride it. In that moment, he would dream, they would be connected. Now those dreams are over. There are other prisons with inmate-trained horses for adoption, but they won’t be his horses.

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 15

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY DEREK CARLISLE

The first rule was for the horses: no kicking or biting. Rule No. 2 was for the inmates: no swearing. The rules helped the horses and men control their tempers even when a situation got out of control.


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | february 19, 2015

guaranteed under federal law. The BLM—which spent $77.4 million managing its Wild Horse & Burro Program in 2014—has long praised prison programs like the Hard Time Corral for the value they provide to taxpayers. But when UCI asked for an amendment that would guarantee a long-term relationship and more favorable compensation for the program, the BLM declined. These programs appear to work just fine in other places. The Colorado Wild Horse Inmate Program and the Nevada Silver State Industries Comstock Wild Horse Gentling Program are just two programs like the one at Gunnison that are still successfully adopting out horses that have been transformed by incarcerated men. What makes those programs succeed where Gunnison failed is hard to identify, according to Gus Warr, who directs the wildhorse program in Utah for the BLM. The program seemed to be functioning perfectly, Warr said. But the disagreement over how it should continue financially prompted the BLM and UCI to take fighting stances. UCI felt it would benefit from being reimbursed for expenses instead of being paid per animal, as was the case when the program started. This would mean UCI could run the program as a small business and not operate in the red. Warr said he understands why UCI would want to run the program as a business, but he worried that it might give an outside organization too much power over the horses that are protected under the 1971

Wild Free-Roaming Horse & Burro Act. If those concerns could have been addressed, though, Warr acknowledged that such a contract may have benefited the BLM, too. The problem, he said, was timing. The audit found that out of $5.34 million in costs from the horse-gentling program submitted by the prison for reimbursement, the feds either questioned or found “unsupported� more than $2 million. Among those unsupported costs was close to $140,000 in hay “that was paid for but not used,� according to the audit. The prison also did not report to the feds revenue it earned from the inmates’ work breaking some of the horses. The auditors “determined that UCI received $18,691 from horse adoptions that exceeded the base fees that were paid to BLM,� according to the audit report. Both the BLM and UCI will be conducting additional audits into the financial issues that arose from the audit. The BLM is looking at resolving the questioned and unsupported costs revealed by the audit. Warr estimates that the financial dispute will take more than a year to resolve.

UNCLEAR DESTINATIONS

It was UCI that ultimately pulled back the reins. “As a state agency that depends on tax dollars, we cannot operate programs at a loss,� said Rollin Cook, department executive director in a press release. BLM officials say they were caught off guard when the UCI abruptly halted the

OPEN ALL WINTER Gift certificates available for your scooterist! 5 58 E ast 2100 S ou t h | blueplanetscooters.com

program in September 2014. “It was a challenge to redistribute the 1,400 animals in only 30 days,� said Lisa Reid, the publicaffairs specialist for the BLM. Some of the inmates who worked on the program—and still had their privileges intact—helped load the horses into trailers, giving them “an opportunity to say goodbye to horses they had trained,� said prison spokeswoman Brooke Adams. The horses were hauled to different holding facilities around the western United States. Reid said the horses were strategically placed in facilities that could hopefully spotlight them and use them in their programs. Many young geldings were sent to new WHIP initiatives like the Florence Correctional Center in Arizona and the Rio Cosumnes Correctional Center in California. The hope was that prisoners there could give the mustangs another opportunity for successful adoption. And as for Utah? “We would love to set up another training program here,� Warr said. But at this point, he said, he is unsure if working with the Utah Department of Corrections would be possible again—and the program won’t be reinstated at Gunnison. For their part, prison officials say they are already planning to establish new programs on the 40 acres of property in hopes of finding more financially stable means to provide work for the inmates and goods for the public. But it’s doubtful it will ever find a niche quite like the Hard Time Corral. The ranch is being torn down, and the BLM is gathering its equipment. Fencing, chutes, water troughs and feeders have been loaded onto trucks and relocated to facilities that could use them.

part of the process. “When the horses get adopted out,� Brown said, “we tell them, ‘You’d better be good out there—you’re paroling.’ � But giving up the horses to loving owners was one thing; giving them up over a contract dispute was another. Even as he looks ahead at his own upcoming parole in summer 2015, Wilson can’t help but look back with sadness and frustration over the chain of events that brought an end to one of the most profound experiences of his life. He has no idea where his horses ended up, but he hopes that they weren’t turned back out into the corrals with the wild horses. If so, it would most certainly be a lesson in futility—the very sort of negative notion about work the program was designed to disprove. “Those horses were hand-picked,� Wilson said. “We thought they were good horses. It would be a waste of our time and energy to turn them out.� But at least, for a time, he was a cowboy. When he gets out, he thinks, he might like to be one again. CW

Robyn Van Valkenburg is a mustang trainer from Salt Lake City who has aided in the adoption of more than two-dozen wild mustangs since 2012. She studied journalism at Utah State University.

THE LESSONS LEARNED

Adoption day was always an emotional and exciting time for the inmates. After all the sweat, frustration and love that the trainers had experienced along the way, giving away a beloved horse could be a heartbreaking experience. But Brown said it is was a crucial

TURN YOUR CAR INTO A

MOVING ADVERTISEMENT And Get Paid For It. DR `RRX _RTbYN_ PVaVgR[` a\ Q_VcR  ZVYR` N Z\[aU dVaU \b_ `]RPVNYYf QR`VT[RQ .1 \[ f\b_ cRUVPYR a\ Q_Nd NaaR[aV\[ a\ f\b_ PN_ N[Q TRa =.61 3<? 6A 6[aR_R`aRQ ]N_aVPV]N[a` `U\bYQ RZNVY 7NZR` 3VYYR[d\_aU \[ 7NZR`Ă&#x20AC;YYR[d\_aU-TZNVYP\Z S\_ Z\_R QRaNVY`


ESSENTIALS

the

Entertainment Picks Feb. 19-25

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

Have you ever judged a person by their books? Main character A.J. Fikry, in Gabrielle Zevin’s best-selling novel The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, has a fine way of doing so. Readers who have fallen in love with the flailing Fikry—for more than just his books—can meet the gifted author of the charmingly witty, bookish love story, this week. On Feb. 24, The King’s English is turning into Island Books—Fikry’s singular local bookstore— for a fun day and night of food and drinks, reading and book signing by Zevin. The King’s English anticipates “the largest book club ever” for the event where customers will have a chance to meet the talented author. Zevin’s career started at the age of 14 as a music critic for a local magazine after she sent it a heated letter concerning a Guns ‘n’ Roses concert. Not many writers can boast having eight published novels under their belts at the age of 37, with an English & American Literature degree from Harvard, to boot. All accolades are wellearned, as her writing—starting with the awardwinning first novel Elsewhere—is fresh and funny, and delightful in its color and originality. The Storied Life can cheer up anyone in as dreary a funk as Mr. Fikry, and it may quite possibly send readers through vicarious transformations of their own. For anyone walking the tightrope of recovery from tragedy, experiencing a midlife crisis or embarking upon some other kind of fresh start in life: This book is for you. (Deann Armes) Gabrielle Zevin: The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry @ The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Feb. 24, reading 7 p.m., free, KingsEnglish.Indiebound.com

It’s tempting to look at legendary documentarian Frederick Wiseman’s three-hour exploration of London’s National Gallery in elegiac terms—an 80-plus-year-old filmmaker exploring an institution dedicated to preserving and teaching people about art, continuing vital conversations about centuries-old works and granting their creators a kind of immortality. And, I suppose, it’s even quite effective on that level. But the scope here is utterly transfixing, moving from the gallery spaces themselves and the gaze of laypeople to the educational efforts of docents and scholars and to the behind-thescenes work on budgets or how to light an installation. As a result, National Gallery somehow manages to be one of the most extraordinary cinematic portrayals ever about the full range of art within the human experience: as a commodity; as a transcendent view of genius; as something that requires nuts & bolts architecture to function properly; as craft passed from one generation to the next. It’s about the act of creation and the subsequent act of critical engagement. It addresses what you want to know about a work and how that desire can collide with what you can never know. It conveys how many people whose names we will never know or remember play a crucial role in allowing miraculous art to appear before us. Wiseman paints on a breathtakingly large canvas and manages to give us three hours where, if you wanted the most concise way possible to answer the question, “What is art?”, you’d show them this movie. (Scott Renshaw) National Gallery @ Utah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, Feb. 25, 7 p.m., free. UMFA.Utah.edu

National Gallery

february 19, 2015 | 17

Plan-B Theatre says its production of Mama has the distinction of being the first world premiere by an African-American playwright in Utah history. It also has the further distinction of being an excellent play. It’s shocking that this is Carleton Bluford’s first full-length play, as it displays a structural dexterity and textual intricacy rare in veteran playwrights; for a first time out, Mama is a resounding success. Bluford seamlessly weaves monologues, found text and vignettes about the nature of motherhood under a variety of circumstances and its intersection in various ways with blackness. The deceptively loose structure is tied together mainly by the meta-theatrical device of Bluford reaching out to Facebook for stories about mothers (aided by projections). Director Jerry Rapier stages it in such a way as to put the focus squarely on the text with crisp, precise blocking and almost no set—other than chairs—with the actors costumed in neutral (but textually appropriate) black. This confidence in the material pays off, and the ensemble is well up to the task of flowing from one character to the next. Dee-Dee DarbyDuffin, William Cooper Howell, Latoya Rhodes and Elizabeth Summerhays all do terrific jobs with the text, embodying a variety of markedly different characters, and each shifting deftly between sympathetic and not-so-sympathetic characterizations without missing a beat. Their work is, in short, everything ensemble theatrical acting should be. Mama is a wonderful debut for Bluford (a talent to watch), and a thoroughly satisfying production that should not be missed. (Danny Bowes) Plan-B Theatre Company: Mama @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, through Feb. 22, Thursday-Saturday 8 p.m. & Sunday 2 p.m., $20. ArtTix.org

The Great Salt Lake is the largest saltwater lake in the Western Hemisphere. As the state’s central geographical feature, as well as this city’s namesake, it feels omnipresent yet not immediately present—slightly removed, unless you make the trek to see it. But, this tension has influenced those who live around it in numerous ways, and the exhibition A Measure of Salt at the Granary Art Center in Ephraim (former home of CUAC) assembles 20 artists from Salt Lake City, Los Angeles and New York City who have created works on that theme. The salt itself is a vital substance, both chemically and symbolically—a transformative and emotionally potent subject for works in photography, video, printmaking, craft, mixed media, installation and performance. Participating artists include Kimberly Anderson, Christine Baczek, David Baddley, Phyllis Baldino, Shonti Breisch, Sandy Brunvand, Virginia Catherall, The Center for Land Use Interpretation, Erin Coleman Cruz, Stefanie Dykes, Matt Kruback, Colour Maisch, Frank McEntire, Amanda Moore, Alan Nakagawa, Chauncey Secrist, Holly Simonsen, Brian Snapp, Diane Tuft and Ashley Wilson. Works ranging from Baczek’s ethereal, experimental photographic prints (pictured) and Frank McEntire’s mixed-media works that touch on spiritual elements to The Center for Land Use Interpretation’s documentation of the uses to which we have put the land provide widely divergent ways to look at the Great Salt Lake anew. Showing concurrently at the Granary is the exhibition #Blessed: User-Generated Content and Indexing Spirituality, based on the Instagram hashtag #BlessedGAC. (Brian Staker) A Measure of Salt: Contemporary Artists Engaging Great Salt Lake @ Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through May 23, Wednesday-Friday 3-6 p.m. & Saturday 12-3 p.m. GranaryArtCenter.org

| CITY WEEKLY |

WEDNESDAY 2.25

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry

TUESDAY 2.24

A Measure of Salt

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FRIDAY 2.20

Plan-B Theatre Company: Mama

| cityweekly.net |

THURSDAY 2.19


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | february 19, 2015

DANCE Pointe Men

The ballet works of Les Ballets Trockadero are kind of a drag—intentionally. By Katherine Pioli comments@cityweekly.net

W

hen it comes to classical ballet, it may seem that there’s little room for variation or radical interpretation. Yet, shortly after Ballet West concludes a run of its version of Swan Lake, the New York-based Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo company will take the stage at Kingsbury Hall and show just how differently Swan Lake can be done. If this difference isn’t apparent during the first few moments of the opening act, it certainly will be when the swans enter from the wings. Nina Immobilashvili performs as one of those swans alongside Helen, Nina, Sonia, Maria, Moussia, Eugenia and Doris. All together, in perfect white crowns and tulle, they float across the stage. But what’s amiss? Those broad shoulders, those square jaws: Are they all men? In a world where dance struggles to remain relevant, the professional all-male company Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo has, since 1974, used talent, tutus

A&E and alter-egos to create a lasting artistic niche in an unusual intersection between ballet and comedy, and between virtuosic performance and drag show. Forty-one years ago, the company gave their first late-night performance at a second-story loft theater in the Meatpacking District of Manhattan. There, the male dancers did an unthinkable thing: They performed female ballet roles. They wore tutus and danced en pointe. It was a time, recalls T r ock ader o A r t ist ic Director Tory Dobrin, when men dancing en pointe was a careerwrecker. “There were only two ballet teachers I knew of who would teach pointe to men,” Dobrin said during a phone interview from New York City. “When I joined the company [in 1980], it was definitely something you did later in life after a ‘serious’ career.” But, mid-1970s’ New York was increasingly defined by liberation movements, including the gay rights and women’s movements. It was also a place filled with drag theater. On their opening night, the Trocks (as they are affectionately known) performed to a standing-room-only audience. Within a year of that performance, bolstered by outstanding critical reviews and funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, they hired a full-time teacher and a ballet

mistress, and made their first North Tutu much: The men of Les Ballets Trockadero American tour. Les Ballets Trockadero might have Lake—the opening act full of Russian glamserious, socio-political roots but, if they our, dying swans and large men—is the comdon’t make you laugh, they’re not doing their pany’s signature work. “It’s pretty campy,” job. Since the beginning, says Dobrin, the says Dobrin, “definitely one of our funnier company has tried to find a balance between ballets, with lots of slapstick humor.” comedy and ballet. While still taking their The second act, Go for Barocco, by art form seriously—Trockadero’s dancers choreographer Peter Anastos, parodies all come with stunning ballet credentials, the mannerisms and devices used by the and the company is known for its faithful beloved contemporary ballet choreogrenditions of the classics—amusement and rapher George Balanchine. “The comedelight is their goal. dy in this piece,” says Dobrin, “comes Certainly, some of the performance’s naturally with the choreography and not most amusing qualities come through the as much through the characterization.” dancers’ alter-egos, an homage to balMastering the strict choreographic timing let history. “There was a time,” explains that Balanchine employed, set to music Dobrin, “when, in order to be considby Bach, the Trocks turn the complicated ered a dancer of quality, you had to be steps into a child’s game. Russian.” The renowned Paris-based comFinally, the company dips back into the pany Ballets Russes, under the direction classics with a rendition of Paquita, staged of artistic director Sergei Diaghilev, often by Elena Kunikova—who also, Dobrin mendrew inspiration for music and design tions, staged the same work for Ballet West. from Russian folklore. The dancers, who One of the company’s more serious pieces, came from all across Europe, took Russian it allows the dancers to showcase their athnames as an extension of the company’s letic and artistic virtuosity. aesthetic and identity. Though their performances mingle Similarly, Trockadero dancers can find high art and camp, Les Ballets Trockadero both humor and inspiration through the de Monte Carlo doesn’t mock dance as an alter-egos they inhabit. In an interview art. Blended with ample amounts of skill, with Dr. Selby Schwartz in the University style and beauty, the slapstick and drag of Edinburgh Journal of Culture and the are creative interpretations. So, don’t be Arts, dancer Robert Carter explained his afraid to laugh. CW transformation when he puts on makeup to become Olga Supphozova: “I begin to Les Ballets Trockadero de enter a different world. … I see Olga as Monte Carlo being fastidiously delicate and pretty. I am a forceful dancer. Putting on my makeup Kingsbury Hall starts to change my energy and prepares 1395 E. Presidents Circle me to become Olga onstage.” 801-581-7100 Just as important as the dancer getting Feb. 24, 7:30 p.m. into the right frame of mind is the audience $29.50-$49.50; students $5-$10 getting there, too. The Trocks do that by immediately going off the deep end. Swan Kingtix.com


moreESSENTIALS

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

Thursday 2-19

Monday 2-23

Performing Arts

Performing Arts

Ballet Showcase II, Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 The Crucible, Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6961 Mama, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Two Stories, Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-363-7522

Literary Arts

Connie Voisine and Kara Candito, Finch Lane & Park Galleries, 1340 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-596-5000 Many Lamps, One Light: Rumi on Sufi Spirituality, Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8611 Religion of a Different Color, The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100

Friday 2-20 Performing Arts

The Crucible, Pioneer Memorial Theatre Balinese Music & Dance for Children, Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6762

Literary Arts Salt City Slam, Weller Book Works, 665 E. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-328-2586

Tuesday 2-24 Performing Arts Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 Jazz Ensembles, Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 Two Stories, Salt Lake Acting Company

Literary Arts The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100

Wednesday 2-25

Saturday 2-21

New Friday 2-20

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, Utah Symphony Jay Owenhouse: The Authentic Illusionist, Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Ballet Showcase II, Marriott Center for Dance The Crucible, Pioneer Memorial Theatre Mama, Rose Wagner Center Two Stories, Salt Lake Acting Company Dwayne Perkins, Wiseguys Ogden

Mama, Rose Wagner Center Two Stories, Salt Lake Acting Company

Ransom Riggs With Tahereh Mafi, King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100

Visual Art New Thursday 2-19 RAW Salt Lake Showcase, The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-528-9197

Waldo Midgley & Francis Zimbeaux, Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801364-8284

Continuing 2-19-25

february 19, 2015 | 19

The Power of Three, A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-583-4800 Black North, Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-596-5000 Remapping the Natural World in Black & White, Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-596-5000 Block Plan Series: Provo, Brigham Young University Museum of Art, 500 Campus Drive, Provo, 801-422-8287 No Fixed Address, The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, 801-531-9800 Don’t Read This, Library Square, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-524-8200 Hikmet Sidney Loe: Drawing From the Lake, Salt Lake City Library Chapman branch, 577 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8623 Inaugural Opening of UMOCA’s A.I.R Space Gallery Featuring Jonathan Frioux, Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-328-4201 [con]text, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7332

| CITY WEEKLY |

Performing Arts

Literary Arts

Sunday 2-22

Two Stories, Salt Lake Acting Company

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Performing Arts

Performing Arts

| cityweekly.net |

Godfrey, Wiseguys West Valley City, 2194 W. 3500 South, West Valley City, 801-463-2909 Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, Utah Symphony, Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787 Perpetual Horror: Ritualism and Sonic Cosmography in Black Metal Music, Dumke Recital Hall, 1375 E. President’s Circle, Salt Lake City, 800-433-3243 Ballet Showcase II, Marriott Center for Dance The Crucible, Pioneer Memorial Theatre Mama, Rose Wagner Center Two Stories, Salt Lake Acting Company Dwayne Perkins, Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

20 | february 19, 2015

Take your passion FOR FOOD TO ANOTHER LEVEL

with COOKING

& TASTING

CLASSES

AVENUES PROPER

A Proper Celebration

DINE

Turning 21 at Avenues Proper. By Ted Scheffler comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

SIGN UP ON

CAPUTOSDELI.COM

1O^cb]¸a2]e\b]e\ !"ESab!A]cbV &#!&$$' 1O^cb]¸a=\#bV #$A]cbV#3Oab &"&$$$# 1O^cb]¸a6]ZZOROg "$%A !3 & % &  1O^cb]¸aC]TC #A1S\b`OZ1O[^ca 2`WdS &#&!&&

QO^cb]aRSZWQ][

JOHN TAYLOR

W

hen my stepson, C.J., turned 21 last month, he understandably wanted to celebrate this milestone birthday in a place where he could order his first legit and legal beer. So he chose Avenues Properâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a very solid, adult choice, as far as I was concerned. As well as being a neighborhood eatery, the Avenues Proper Restaurant & Publick House is also a microbreweryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Utahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smallest craft breweryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;offering exceptional small-batch beers brewed in-house. And so, we gathered at Avenues Proper, where I was first impressed by the dĂŠcor. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite contemporary, with exposed ceiling air ducts and vents, polished cement floors, low-slung leather banquettes lining the walls, bare wooden tables and chairsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; in a nutshell, hard surfaces abound. And yet, Avenues Proper somehow manages to feel comfy and cozyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an inviting neighborhood space that, contrary to logic, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t noisy despite all those reflective surfaces. Superfriendly service just adds to the appeal. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m always amazed at how much food college kids can put away, and so we plowed through a number of Avenues Proper apps. Properly IDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d as an adult, C.J. ordered a smooth and creamy Oatmeal Red, an Irish-style red ale from the nitro tapâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an impressive choice for his first legal beer. My first brew was probably cheap Old Milwaukee. We had to order the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Propcornâ&#x20AC;? ($3), which is popcorn tossed in seasoned duck fat with sea salt and fennel pollen. Amazing. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d expected something heavy, but the glistening coating of duck fat was actually quite light, and the fennel pollen brought a slight sweetness to the popcorn. I could easily see myself bellying up to the Avenues Proper bar, ordering a fresh brew, and being quite satisfied with nothing more than a bowl of Prop-corn. But then, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d miss out on other appealing appetizers and nibbles from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;smallâ&#x20AC;? side of the menu, like the cheese plate ($9) of Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Peak cheese washed in Avenues Proper house-brewed Leipziger Gose with cherry mostarda and an herbed Pierreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery baguette. Or, the not-so-â&#x20AC;&#x153;smallâ&#x20AC;? enchiladas ($11)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a pair of them, stuffed with carnitas-style shredded roast pork, topped with spicy ghost pepper cheese, queso fresco, pickled red onion and a tangy tomatillo-chile sauce. And, although Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not a huge fan of beets, the roasted beet salad ($10) was, well ... unbeetable. It featured both roasted and

pickled beets with local greens and fresh cheese, sprinkled with homemade granola to give the salad a nutty, crunchy texture and taste. Avenues Proper serves up a number of comfort-food classics, including rarebit, fish & chips, burgers, and chicken & waffles. The latter is an interesting spin on traditional chicken & waffles: two pieces of chicken sausage (made in-house) and a duo of sunny-side-up eggs atop two toasted waffles with thyme-infused maple syrup on the side ($13). The chicken sausage is easier to eat than the standard pieces of bone-in chickenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not to mention delicious. Another classic, albeit a north-of-theborder one, is poutine. If you like poutine, you will love Avenues Properâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deeply flavored braised short-rib beef and dark roastedchicken gravy smothering homemade pommes frites, garnished with truffled cheddar and minced scallions ($13). Unfortunately, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to the realization that I like the idea of poutine more than I actually like poutine. The first few bites are heaven, but I quickly tire of eating soggy spuds. As a friend of mine said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what mashed potatoes are for.â&#x20AC;? The truth is that the french fries at Avenues Proper are so goodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;easily the best Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve eaten in a Utah restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragic to see them soaked with gravy. But, as I said, if you enjoy poutine, then Avenues Properâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is a slam-dunk. Otherwise, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d order up the 8-ounce Niman Ranch top sirloin steak ($25), which comes with those fantastic frites alongside. Or, the excellent fish & chips: two pieces of buttermilk-breaded cod with pommes frites and killer house-made tartar sauce ($15). Other impressive dishes included a skin-on roasted chicken breast and braised chicken thigh ($21) with parsnip purĂŠe, sauteed squash and kale, and topped with pickled cherry tomatoes and chimichurri. It might sound like thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an awful lot going on in that dish, but it was simply delightful. Ditto the sweet potato gnoc-

Prop art: (clockwise from top left) duck-fatseasoned â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prop-corn,â&#x20AC;? carnitas-style enchiladas and roasted chicken chi ($18): large, plump gnocchi morsels pan-fried with a nice crunchy crust, along with Brussels sprouts leaves, parsnip purĂŠe, wild mushrooms, caramelized onions, cherry tomato, candied walnuts and shredded Caputoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market Grotte Caputo cheese. The cheese is sweet and nutty, a delectable punctuation to an outstanding dish. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be remiss not to mention the beverage selection at Avenues Proper. Like the food, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very well conceived and executed. Of course, there are the craft beersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;usually 11 brewed in-houseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as SkittleBrau peach Saison, Bluegrass Brown Kentucky Common ale, Fever Pitch dry-hopped Saison, plus â&#x20AC;&#x153;guestâ&#x20AC;? beers on tap such as Uintaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brighton IPA. And then, there are beer cocktails, as well as an extensive collection of beers in bottles and cans, all locally brewed. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a full bar offering signature cocktails, spirits and liqueursâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, to my surprise (given the establishmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emphasis on beer), a very appealing wine list which includes local Ruth Lewandowski wines and Utahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hive Winery ciders, in addition to other domestic and foreign producers. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m certain my stepson will always remember his 21st birthday at Avenues Proper. For the rest of usâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;adults and otherwiseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;this terrific neighborhood gathering spot beckons for any occasion, big or small, including its newly launched Saturday and Sunday brunch. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect place for proper food, proper drinks and proper service. CW

Avenues Proper Restaurant & Publick House

376 Eighth Ave. 385-227-8628 AvenuesProper.com


Das ist gut en s s e t lica nt e D n a a Germ Restaur &

FOOD MATTERS by TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Pig Out

Lovers of Pig & a Jelly Jar (401 E. 900 South, 385-202-7366, PigAndAJellyJar. com) and owner/chef Amy Britt’s fresh, hearty, from-scratch, stick-to-the-ribs cooking will soon have more Pig to love. Before you can say, “fried green tomatoes,” you’ll be able to load up in Ogden on tasty specialties like chicken & waffles, biscuits with sausage gravy, fried pickles, ham hash, pulled-pork salad and such. This spring, Britt will be opening a new Pig & a Jelly Jar restaurant on Ogden’s historic 25th Street, featuring classic American food and drink. Stay tuned to Food Matters for details.

Wong in the New Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

20 W. 200 S.s(801) 355-3891

@ FE LDMANSDE LI

OLD JEWS TELLING JOKES FEB 21ST AT 7PM

FELDMANSDELI.COM / OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

Food Matters 411: teds@xmission.com

F R E S H . FA S T . FAB U LO U S

POKE | Poh-Keh : a Hawaiian raw fish delicacy

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190

february 19, 2015 | 21

2005 E. 2700 South, SLC

Quote of the week: Seize the moment. Remember all those women on the Titanic who waved off the dessert cart. —Erma Bombeck

M-ThÛ~~¤~‡ÝFÛ~~¤~~ÝSÛ~¤~~ÝSu 12-9 NOW OPEN! 9000 S 109 W, SANDY & 3424 S STATE STREET …‡~‚ƒƒ‡„~Ýa[`aZYfkmk`aml[ge

| CITY WEEKLY |

Moochie’s Meatballs & More! continues its culinary conquest of Utah with the grand opening on Monday, Feb. 23, at 10:30 a.m. of a new Moochie’s shop in Lehi. As with the original Salt Lake City (232 E. 800 South, 801-596-1350) and newer Midvale (7725 S. State, 801-5621500) locations, Moochie’s in Lehi features authentic, City of Brotherly Love-style Philly cheesesteaks along with excellent meatball subs, pasta dishes, grinders, hoagies, salads, chicken & eggplant parmigiana, and much more. The Lehi Moochie’s Meatballs and More! is located at 380 N. 850 East (801-766-8855). Visit their website at MoochiesMeatballs.com.

AND ASIAN GRILL

Deli Done Right

More Moochie’s

WHY WAIT?

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

COME JOIN US FOR

ALL D

Beer & Wine

| cityweekly.net |

Catering Catering Available available

On Chinese New Year’s Day, families typically share a feast rich in tradition that seeks to bring balance, luck and wealth in the New Year. The Wong family—owners of J. Wong’s Thai & Chinese Bistro (163 W. 200 South, 801-350-0888, JWongUtah.com)—invites the community to celebrate the Year of the Sheep and Chinese New Year at their restaurant on Saturday, Feb. 21 and again on Friday, Feb. 27, as they host a traditional lion dance performed by Sil Lum Kung Fu Kwoon. The performances will begin at 7 p.m., and J. Wong’s will also offer special Chinese New Year dishes such as whole red snapper in Chinese garlic sauce and slow-roasted pork with longevity lo mein noodles. Fun fact: Feb. 19, 2015 on the Gregorian calendar marks the beginning of the 4713th Chinese lunar year.

F F O 50% I H S U ALL S LS OLR Y D AY ! &R AY E V E


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | february 19, 2015

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

French Wine Winners Yes, you can drink French wine on a budget. By Ted Scheffler comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

’ll bet that if you played a wordassociation game with most people and asked for their first thought to describe French wines, “expensive” and “quality” would be two of the most common descriptions. It’s not that the French are incapable of making bad wine; I’ve had a few such bottles. But, they are rare. The French have a proven, proud history of quality wine-making. Unfortunately, most of the best French wines are beyond my budget, and maybe beyond yours. As much as I lust after wines like Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Château Pétrus, Salon, Château Cheval Blanc, Château Lafite Rothschild and such, I can’t afford to drink them except on lucky occasions when some wealthy

wine aficionado pours me a sip. Still, I drink French w ine regularly. That’s because, thankfully, there are a lot of really good French w ines available here in Utah that do fit my budget. I might not mistake any of them for Pétrus, but they ’re great everyday French wines that won’t break the bank. Here are a few of my favorites: If you look beyond the Champagne region of France for French bubbly, you’ll find bargains. One is Lucien Albrecht Crémant d’Alsace Brut ($19.99). The Albrecht family has been making wine in Alsace since 1425, and this light, delicate Brut is made just like sparkling wine from Champagne—by the méthode traditionnelle—but utilizing Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and Riesling grapes. It makes for a terrific aperitif or partner for light fare.

DRINK While we’re in Alsace, we should a lso pick up a bottle of good Pinot Gris, one of the region’s wine specialties. I love Domaines Schlumberger Pinot Gris Les Princes Abbés ($21.99), a wellbalanced Pinot Gris with apricot, white peach and honey notes, combined with a hint of smoke. It’s an ideal accompaniment for Alsatian choucroute garni. And, although it costs a little more than I usually spend on everyday wine, there’s nothing “everyday” about Domaine ZindHumbrecht Gewürztraminer ($28.76), which is about as good as Gewürztraminer gets. Beautiful floral rose aromas accompany elegant spice tones and flavors of lychee, apricot and ginger. It’s a match made in heaven for foie gras. One of my go-to house white wines is Le Cirque Grenache Gris ($13.99). It’s

aged in stainless steel, with no malolactic fermentation—but is quite aromatic with notes of honeysuckle. On the palate are ripe melon f lavors as well as white peach and pineapple. I drink this wine often with sushi. Maybe it’s not Puligny-Montrachet, but at least I can afford to reach for a bottle of white Burgundy when it’s Albert Bichot Mâcon-Villages ($14.99). It’s 100-percent Chardonnay from the Mâconnais region of southern Burgundy and is an excellent match for cream sauces, shellfish, seafood, white meats and Gruyere cheese. I served it on Valentine’s Day with lobster risotto. If you’re in the market for a red Bordeaux wine with much better than average priceto-quality ratio, Château Les Verriers Bordeaux ($10.75) is a wine that delivers. Seriously? Ten-buck Bordeaux? Yup. This wine was a slam-dunk with a hearty la daube de boeuf a l’Avignonnais that I cooked up recently. For about a dollar more, Château du Juge Bordeaux ($11.99) from the right bank of the Garonne River Valley is another hard bargain to beat. Finally, from one of the oldest vineyards in France—dating back more than 2,000 years—comes M. Chapoutier Belleruche Côtes-du-Rhône ($12.99). It’s a wine with firm, silky tannins, flavors of morello cherries, anise and pepper. It’s a can’tmiss match for steak au poivre. CW

O Y U L C AN E L A OVER 2 AT 00 ITEMS KING BUFFET CHINESE SEAFOOD | SUSHI | MONGOLIAN

L U N C H B U F F E T s D I N N E R B U F F E T s S U N D AY A L L D AY B U F F E T TEL: 801.969.6666 5668 S REDWOOD RD TAY L O R S V I L L E , U T


/ORTH.AIN4TÈ&#x201E;-AYTONÈ&#x201E;

HOUSE OF TIBET

Contemporary Japanese Dining

Tibetan Restaurant

, 5 . # ( s $ ) . . % 2 s # / # + 4! ) ,3

|145 E. 1300 S. Ste. 409 | (801) 364-1376 |

7%34-!2+%4342%%4s

beer · wine · sake

SELECT MENU AFTER 5PM RAMEN ICHIRO (MT. FUJI RESTAURANT) 8650 S 1300 E â&#x20AC;¢ 801.432.8962 LUNCH (RAMEN ONLY) M-SAT 11:30-2PM DINNER 5-9:30PM MTFUJISLC.COM/RAMEN-LUNCH/

C

300 W 2100 S, South Salt Lake

801.467.2890 s sun - thu 11-8pm s fri & sat 11-10pm

february 19, 2015 | 23

310 BUGATTI DRIVE

| CITY WEEKLY |

k r a P

Taste Freshness!

C

new on r ou cati t u o o eh ck ity L

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

SUSHI HAPPY HOUR 50% OFF

| cityweekly.net |

SYO-YU â&#x20AC;¢ MISO â&#x20AC;¢ TONKOTSU â&#x20AC;¢ CHYA-SYU â&#x20AC;¢ ICHIRO â&#x20AC;¢ CURRY â&#x20AC;¢ HIYASHI SALAD


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 | february 19, 2015

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom & pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves!

ÝÛ:I<<BJ@;<ÛG8K@FJ ÝÛ9<JKÛ9I<8B=8JKÛ‡‡…Û¬Û‡~‡ ÝۅÛP<8IJÛ8E;Û>F@E>ÛJKIFE> ÝÛ;<C@:@FLJÛD@DFJ8JÛ¬Û9CFF;PÛD8IP¿J “In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

Cedars of Lebanon Coming Soon

-Cincinnati Enquirer

RUTH’S CREEKSIDE www.ruthscreekside.com

CF:8K<;ÛALJKÛÛD@C<JÛ<8JKÛF=Û?F>C<ÛQFFÛÝہ~ƒ‡Û<D@>I8K@FEÛ:8EPFEÛIF8;ÛJC:•ÛLKۅ~‡…

…‡~ۂ…¤‚…‡„ÛÝÛWWW.ILK?J;@E<I:FD

Breakfast until 4pm, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week

At the Cedars of Lebanon, cuisine from Lebanon, Morocco and Armenia is complemented by super service and even a private Moroccan room with floor seating for those seeking an exotic dining experience. At lunchtime, the meza appetizer combos are popular, as are the falafel, kebabs and yogurt laban salad. In the evening, Moroccan specialties like luscious and savory pastilla, lamb tangine, Berber couscous and moussaka appear, along with the chef’s tantalizing beef or chicken shawarma. Try the imported Egyptian hookah, and the Mediterranean go-to, baklava, for dessert. Bonus: Belly dancers make their moves on the weekends. 152 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-4096, CedarsOfLebanonRestaurant.com

Two Bit Street Cafe

DAILY SOUP SPECIALS Dutch Tomato Meatball, Potato Gouda, Butternut Squash Bisque, Garlic Lentil Soup, Norwegian Cauliflower with Meatball & Dutch Split Pea

BUY ONE SANDWICH,

GET THE 2ND ONE

HALF PRICE Coupon must be present. Limit one per customer. Offer from 2/19/15 - 2/28/15

Dutch, German & Scandinavian Market

M-F 9am-6pm · Sat 9am-5pm · Closed Sunday 2696 Highland Dr. | 801-467-5052 | olddutchstore.com

At Ogden’s Two Bit Street Cafe & Penny’s Pantry on Historic 25th Street (two-bit street, get it?), you’ll dine in a beautifully restored 1920s bar, where hypnotist James Dayley performs tricks and illusions tableside, making eating here a magical dining experience. The menu includes breakfast (all day on weekends) soups, salads, burgers, paninis, pastas and entrees like citrus-glazed chicken and wild-halibut fillet. 126 25th St., Ogden, 801-393-1225, TwoBitStreet.com

Firehouse Pizzeria

At Firehouse Pizzeria, the pizza is stone-fired, with interesting selections like artichoke chicken, the cowboy (Texas barbecue chicken with bacon), the ratatouille (veggies and feta cheese) and the Honolulu. Non-pizza options include sandwiches (cordon bleu, rustic Italian and others), wings, pastas (down-South Cajun, eight-cheese, or design-your-own) and salads. Multiple locations, FirehousePizzeria.com

Canton Village—Salt Lake City

At Canton Village, you’ll find a vast array of Chinese dishes: egg foo yong and fried rice, chop suey, chow mein and potstickers, and all at affordable prices. Popular menu items include cashew chicken, mu shu pork, spicy Szechwan beef, kung pao chicken, char sil snowpeas, shrimp with lobster sauce and lo-mein dishes with beef, chicken or pork. For soup lovers, there’s a delicious house special noodle soup. There are vegetarian options for the meatless, either veggies with black bean sauce or tofu—both your Szechwan and your General Tsao. Most menu items are in the $10 range, and the restaurant offers meals for 2-6 people. 368 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801531-1111, CantonVillageSaltLakeCity.com

Feel Good Getting

Bleu

SMALL PLATES AND DINNER ENTREES TUES-SAT | 4:30-10PM SATURDAY | 9AM -10PM SUNDAY | 9AM -4PM

SERVING BREAKFAST SAT & SUN | 9AM-1PM Specializing in housemade bacon, pasta’s, soups, sauces and much more.

HAPPY HOUR TUE-FRI | 4:30-6PM 1/2 off special small plates menu.

THE STEEPWATER BAND FEB 23 & 24TH 7PM

$25 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

CWSTORE.CITYWEEKLY.NET FOLLOW OUR EVENTS & MENU @ BLEUBISTROSLC.COM

Snider Bros. Meats

This classic butcher shop and deli has all the standard cuts you would expect: pork, chicken, beef, lamb and veal—and then added house-made sausages and specialty items such as pre-sliced Greek

1615 SOUTH FOOTHILL DR. 801 583 8331


NOW SERVING

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net gyro. It’s a Shangri-la for carnivores. Sausages made in-house include Polish, Swedish potato, Andouille, Cajun and Italian sausages, as well as a turkey German bratwurst. And, by the way, if you’re too hungry to wait until you get home to cook your meat, you can always pick up a fresh, custom-made sandwich from the deli for the drive or walk home. There is an entire gluten-free menu, with Applewood-smoked bacon, potatoes and multiple types of chili. 6245 Highland Drive, Cottonwood Heights, 801-272-6469, SniderBrosMeats.com

TwentyFive Main Cafe and Cupcakes in St. George is an eclectic place, offering cupcakes, trinkets, a cafe, portraits and more. For the kids, there’s a grilled cheese panino, pizza, PB&J, linguini and more. And for the grown-ups, there’s green pesto pizza, daily soups, fruit smoothies, paninis, pasta dishes, hand-tossed salads, omelets and deli sandwiches. The cupcake selection differs from day to day. 25 N. Main, St. George, 435-628-7110, 25Main.com

Szechuan Garden

Judge Café

The Judge Café and Grill is a bustling neighborhood eatery in Salt Lake City’s downtown district, found on the ground floor of the stoic, vintage Judge Building. The cafe features a diverse menu of carefully prepared classics with just enough unexpected twists to keep the meal and the dining experience interesting. Specials include great sandwiches, Maui chicken wrap, grilled salmon on a BLT, chicken-parmesan salad and a turkey sandwich with cranberry relish and Swiss cheese. 8 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-531-0917, JudgeCafe.com

Cannella’s

For over 35 years, Chef Meng has been cooking Szechuan cuisine in prestigious venues around the world, and he’s a lifetime judge of the National Ranking chef test in the Szechuan Province. Orders of camphor-tea-smoked duck, sha cha beef, Da Ching chicken, and hot & spicy eel are all dishes to get the party started. And, true, it’s difficult to choose between intestines hot & spicy in chili broth, or with pickles, but the authentic dish is worth a try, and not found in any other Salt Lake-area restaurants. Order the salt & pepper pigs’ feet and thank the gods Chef Meng found his way to Utah. 1275 E. 8600 South, Sandy, 801-233-0027, The-Szechuan-Garden.com

Saturday & Sunday 10am-2pm

3 Bloodies & Mimosas

$

ELDER BRETT VERTICAL TASTING DINNER · FEB. 25TH

$55

Per person. Includes food & beer. Extremely limited seating. Reservations are a must.

376 8TH AVE, STE. C, SALT LAKE CITY, UT 385.227.8628 | AVENUESPROPER.COM

"4*"/(30$&3:4503&

| cityweekly.net |

R&R Barbeque

Few are as loyal to the art of barbecue as the owners of R&R. Barbecue-competition veterans Rod and Roger Livingston pride themselves on their smoke, fire and patience. R&R offers pork spare ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket and chopped brisket, as well as burgers, smoked and deep-fried wings, and traditional barbecue sides like baked beans, fried okra, hush puppies and coleslaw. Order an ice-cold beer, pull up a chair and prepare for authentic, cooked-slow, cooked-low, fingerlicking barbecue. 307 W. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-0443, RAndRBBQ.net

"TJBO4OBDLTŭ4BVDFTŭ4QJDFTŭ7FHFUBCMFTŭ4FBGPPEŭ5FBNPSF

3390 South State Street | www.chinatownsupermarkets.com NIN T H & NIN TH & 2 54 SOUTH M AI N

2014

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

At Cannella’s, you’ll find a lunchtime crowd typically filled with lawyers and other legal types from the nearby courthouse, enjoying classic Italian fare and friendly service. Step up to the counter to place your order and a server will bring your meal to your indoor or sidewalk table. The soups and salads are terrific, but you’ll really want to savor dishes like the spaghetti and meatballs, Grandma’s five-layer lasagna, chicken (or sausage, shrimp or salmon) Alfredo, scampi with house-made gnocchi or squash pizza pie. The beer, cocktails, spirits and wine lists nicely round out a meal. 204 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-8518, CannellasRestaurant.com

Weekend Brunch

TwentyFive Main

| CITY WEEKLY |

2005

2007 2008

VOTED BEST COFFEE HOUSE

3390 South State Street | www.Hotdynasty.com Party Room available for Reservation: 801-809-3229

february 19, 2015 | 25

/PPEMFTŭ)PU1PUŭ%SZ1PUŭ%JN4VNŭ#PCB5FBŭ'SVJUTMVTIŭ.JML4IBLFT


| cityweekly.net |

26 | february 19, 2015

REVIEW BITES

A sampler of Ted Schefflerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reviews

Banditsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; American Grill & Bar

1844 E. Fort Union Blvd Cottonwood Heights, UT 801-938-9706 | HDBBQ.NET

MENTION THIS ADD

TO GET 20% OFF

YOUR FIRST CATERING

1/2 OFF APPETIZERS Everyday 5-7pm why limit happy to an hour? (Appetizer & Dine-in only / Sugarhouse location only)

1405 E 2100 S SUGARHOUSE â?&#x2013; 801.906.0908 â?&#x2013; PATIO SEATING AVAILABLE LUNCH BUFFET: TUE-SUN 11-3PM â?&#x2013; DINNER: M-TH 5-9:30PM / F-S 5-10PM / SUN 5-9PM

Gourmet Mexican Food

The original Bandits was created in the greater Los Angeles area in 1990 and, while the menus are similar at each location, the dĂŠcor and ambience of each Bandits is unique. A cup of tri-tip chili was easily the best chili Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had in ages, and tritipâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a specialty at Banditsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;finds its way into many other dishes. The main sections of the menu are barbecue-heavy. Barbecue items come with a choice of house-made barbecue sauce or jerk sauce; I recommend requesting both, on the side. I opted for a BBQ combo with ribs and half-chicken; the chicken was tender and juicy, but the ribs were tough and chewy. The cedar-plank salmon was lightly spiced, juicy and flavorfulâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not an easy feat to achieve on a blast-furnace temperature wood-fired grill. The sides of rice and a veggie medley were also enjoyable and perfectly cooked. Service is about as good as it getsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not something I was expecting from a place self-identified as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;familyâ&#x20AC;? restaurant. Reviewed Feb. 12. 3176 E. 6200 South, 801-994-0505; 440 Main, Park City, 435-649-7337, BanditsBBQ.com

Provisions

Occupying the old Lugano space, the brainchild of chef/ owner Tyler Stokes makes a bold design statement with its emphasis on the color orange. The cuisine is just as bold: comfort food with an edge. Steak tartare incorporates soy sauce and mint, not to mention Meyer lemon and sunflower seedsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and it was a revelation. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small section of the menu devoted to â&#x20AC;&#x153;rawâ&#x20AC;? fare like the aforementioned steak tartare, plus a dozen small-plates options, a halfdozen or so large plates, and a dessert quartet. Our favorite small-plate choice, by far, was the pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head torchons: Niman Ranch pork formed into hockey-puck-like torchons, deep-fried and served crispy with a cherry-ginger compote, pickled mustard seeds and butter-leaf lettuce for assembling pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head wraps. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I like about Provisions: The food is complex, but not contrived or convoluted. Reviewed Jan. 29. 3364 S. 2300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-410-4046, SLCProvisions.com

The Mariposa

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Iguana Expires: 03/10/15

37EST4EMPLEs3,# 801-533-8900

"LUE)GUANA2ESTAURANTNET

Love It!

-AIN3Ts0ARK#ITY 435-649-3097 (top of main)

the BLUE BACON BURGER

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

Award Winning BBQ

At Deer Valley Resortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main fine-dining venue, settle in beside a toasty fireplace for delicious appetizers like Kumamoto oysters on the half-shell with housemade seafood sauce and mignonette, or delightful sashimistyle diver scallop drizzled with lime & aji-chile-pepper vinaigrette and cilantro emulsion. I appreciate that The Mariposa menu is mostly small-plate-oriented, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to try a lot of tasty dishes rather than just one or two big ones. More divine dishes came and went: pan-roasted boneless quail saltimbocca and miso-braised kale and mushrooms in a Cabernet reduction; Niman Ranch beef short rib with Pontack sauce and salsify-parsnip puree; and my favorite dish, housemade lemon-thyme gnocchi with beurre blanc, Rockhill Creamery aged Edam cheese and slow-poached wild Gulf shrimp. Table and wine service were, as always, up to Deer Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ultra-high standards, where guest-pampering is taken to extreme levels. Reviewed Jan. 15. 7600 Royal St., Park City, 435645-6715, DeerValley.com/dining

The Goldener Hirsch Inn Restaurant 11 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS |

FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

Classic European staples like fondue and wiener schnitzel are on the menus, and probably always will be, but Executive Chef Ryan Burnham also offers up more delicate and creative dishes like his â&#x20AC;&#x153;mushroom tastingâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a mĂŠlange of fresh, wild

mushrooms with sunchokes, cranberries, crispy prosciutto and sweet Pedro Ximenez balsamic vinegarâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a roastedbeet salad that looks as beautiful as it tastes. But the entree section of the menu is where things really get interesting. Potato gnocchi, made with organic spuds, is paired with duck confit, caramelized pear, arugula, lemon and a big dollop of housemade burrata. The service, beverage selection and ambiance are terrific: friendly when called for, crisp and professional when necessary. A citrus-olive-oil torte dessert with lemon mousse, pistachio and blood-orange sherbet sent us back to our cozy upstairs room grinning like idiots. Reviewed Jan. 15. 7570 Royal St. East, Park City, 435649-7770, GoldenerHirschInn.com

Karma Indian Cuisine

Walking through this Indian eateryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front doors brings you into a fashionable and beautiful space. However, as appealing as Karma is to the eye, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the cuisine that will keep you coming back. The kormaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we ordered korma paneerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is divine. The paneer, a housemade South Asian-style cheese curd with a tofu-like consistency and texture, is bathed in a stupendously delicious and silky korma sauce made with coconut milk, curry spices, ground cashews and golden raisins. I can never resist vindaloo, the traditional curry dish of Goa, when I see it on a menu. Like the korma, the vindaloo at Karma was superb. The tanginess in vindaloo comes from vinegar, which is blended with curry spices and made into a fiery (I ordered mine hot) sauce ladled over tender boneless chicken pieces and potato. Reviewed Jan. 8. 863 E. 9400 South, Sandy, 801-566-1134, EatGoodKarma.com

Mellow Mushroom

I really do like the pizza at Mellow Mushroom, an Atlantabased pizza chain with a hippie vibe (which perhaps explains why my pizza took 25 minutes to make). The red sauce tastes of bright, ripe tomatoesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not the bitter tomato paste that mars so many commercial pizzas. And the toppings are plentiful and of good quality. The crust is of medium thickness, slightly crisp on the bottom with a nice crunchy and lightly blistered outer crust. And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wine, cocktails and a formidable beer selection, to boot, with two-dozen local craft beers on tap and more than 70 bottled brews, including ones from Deschutes, Big Sky and Rogue. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help you remain mellow while awaiting your pie. Reviewed Dec. 25, 2014. 1080 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-844-1444, MellowMushroom.com

The Annex by Epic Brewing

The Annex got a revamp recently, and it knocked my socks off. A newly acquired club license allows patrons to drink alcohol without ordering food. And a new chef, Craig Gerome, is firing on all cylinders in the kitchen. A killer appetizer is a half-dozen Bouchot mussels steamed in Berliner Weiss beer with garlic confit and crisp, crunchy shoestring potatoes. Some of the startersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the pasta, for exampleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;could suffice as small entrees, like the housemade tagliatelle pasta with beef-cheek ragout and the generously portioned housemade ricotta. The pasta was some of the best Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever eaten, and perfectly cooked al dente. Exceptional entrees of steelhead trout with Beluga lentils and herb-fried chicken with fried green tomatoes and heavenly buttermilk risotto firmed up my notion that The Annex is one of the best dining options in Sugar House. Reviewed Dec. 25, 2014. 1048 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-742-5490, TheAnnexByEpicBrewing.com


McFarland, USAA

The White Stuff

CINEMA

An inspirational true story finds the wrong focus in McFarland, USA. By Danny Bowes comments@cityweekly.net

I

Carlos Pratts and Kevin Costner in McFarland, USA off-putting enough to nearly derail the whole movie before it even properly starts— only for them to fully adopt the customs of their neighbors and be forgiven for their initial transgressions. Even this is less awkward than the way the script attempts to portray the poverty in McFarland; the brutal toll of fruit/vegetable/nut-picking is limited to a couple of members of the cross-country team missing practice a couple of times, and—when Costner joins them at work in an act of solidarity—he is shown as unable to keep pace. Most offensively, poverty is portrayed as a frame of mind one can conquer simply by choice. It’s not as though the gritty Ken Loach version of this film is anything that would realistically exist in this world. And, again, it’s not as though this version is without its pleasures, especially the performances of the runners and their families. But those pleasures are sadly outweighed by the queasiness imposed by the need to make everything cute, nonthreatening and neat. The real world, for better or worse, is not Disney. CW

MCFARLAND, USA

| CITY WEEKLY |

H.5 Kevin Costner Maria Bello Carlos Pratts Rated PG-13

TRY THESE Cool Runnings (1993) John Candy Leon Rated PG

Whale Rider (2002) Keisha CastleHughes Rawiri Paratene Rated PG-13

North Country (2005) Charlize Theron Jeremy Renner Rated R

february 19, 2015 | 27

Dances With Wolves (1990) Kevin Costner Mary McDonnell Rated PG-13

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

story from the perspective of a white man who just happened to be there. Jim White (Kevin Costner) certainly deserves a degree of credit for coaching his runners to success. But the runners were the ones who won those titles. And if there’s one thing American cinema is not lacking, it is stories about the nobility and spiritual growth of white people, especially when it lights the way for nonwhite people. If the White Savior were the panacea movies would have audiences believe, no one on earth would still need to be saved. The White Savior is nothing more than a lie intended to make white people feel better about themselves, and there needn’t be another frame of film wasted on pretending it is a worthwhile narrative framing device. However, in terms of pure craft, if such a movie must exist, it could be a lot worse than McFarland, USA. Director Niki Caro (Whale Rider, North Country) does a visually effective, if merely serviceable, job. Although it may seem that simply pointing a camera at Kevin Costner, Maria Bello and Californian landscapes is sufficient, there’s more to cinematography than that. Still, in spite of the business the script forces the characters through, Caro gets solid performances out of the cast. But about that script business: There’s the manner, recalling Costner’s own Dances With Wolves, whereby he and his family experience initial revulsion toward their Hispanic neighbors—which is pungent and

| cityweekly.net |

n recent years—particularly in regard to the transformation of New York City’s Times Square from a locus of iniquity into a tourist-friendly hub of consumerism— people tend to wield the word “Disneyfication” in a negative context. This is, at times, unfair to the Walt Disney Corporation, whose properties include some of the finest achievements in cinema. At its best, Disney represents a kind of sanctuary where innocence and happiness prevail over all, a projection of the worlds created in their finest animated films. The distinction of “animated films” is deliberate, as Disney’s track record with live action is shakier, and its appropriation—the literal process of Disneyfication— of true stories for “inspirational” fictional films is its shakiest subgenre. In the quest for uplift, McFarland, USA stumbles rather badly in places, squandering the considerable goodwill generated by an appealing cast and somehow ending up both overlong and insubstantial. The true story from which McFarland, USA is drawn is one of the more impressive, albeit obscure, sporting achievements in recent memory: Starting in 1987, McFarland High School’s cross-country running team won nine out of 14 California state championships. This was in spite of McFarland being one of the poorest towns in the country and cross-country running being a sport dominated by those who can afford the best equipment and conditioning. It’s a great story, in which triumphant underdogs conquer not only the sport, but issues of classism and racism (the team members were all of Hispanic descent)—and they (mostly) lived happily ever after. Where the movie makes its fatal error— although the blame for this error lies not with the filmmakers, but the film industry at large—is by telling this fascinating, rich


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

28 | february 19, 2015

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. The DUFF [not yet reviewed] A high-school student (Mae Whitman) learns a hard truth about the way others see her. Opens Feb. 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) Hot Tub Time Machine 2 [not yet reviewed] Most of the old gang reunites for another trip into the past. Opens Feb. 20 at theaters valleywide. (R) Match HHH Patrick Stewart finds a brilliant pitch for a difficult character in writer/director Stephen Belber’s sometimes overly stagey threehander. He plays Toby Powell, a veteran ex-professional dancer/ now teacher in Manhattan who has agreed to an interview with Lisa (Carla Gugino) and her husband, Mike (Matthew Lillard), for thesis research—but it soon becomes clear that their interest in Toby is more than merely academic. The story gets shaky when it’s at its most dramatically confrontational, and Lillard—who’s surprisingly effective as a man dealing with unresolved anger issues—isn’t quite as comfortable when he’s asked to play more subtle notes. It is, however, a phenomenal showcase for Stewart, playing a bisexual man with a big personality—bawdy, ingratiating, somewhat selfinfatuated—in a register that’s flamboyant yet never movie-flamboyant. His one-on-one scenes with Gugino are particularly lovely, bringing out the emotion of two characters wrestling with their regrets. Even if Belber ultimately goes exactly where you expect he’s going to go, it’s delightful watching Stewart lead us there. Opens Feb. 20 at Tower Theatre. (R)—Scott Renshaw McFarland, USA H.5 See review p. 27. Opens Feb. 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG) Mr. Turner HHH.5 Writer-director Mike Leigh’s biography of British painter J.M.W. Turner is one of the most rigorously holistic artist biopics ever made, one that transcends the increasingly pejorative term “biopic” and approaches something like critical study. Leigh and cinematographer Dick Pope, working in digital for the first time, employ compositional and lighting techniques intended to echo Turner’s style. The result is a film that’s as beautiful as Turner’s art, and he is—no big deal—just one of the greatest painters in the history of his country. The living axis of Mr. Turner, though, is in Timothy Spall’s performance. Assigned by Leigh to spend two years prior to filming learning to paint, Spall doesn’t romanticize Turner in the slightest, making him every inch a

Movie times and locations at cityweekly.net

man of this earth. But rather than that being, as it sometimes unfortunately is, a means of cutting a genius down to size, the interpretation renders Turner’s work all the more moving; his paintings seem like things made by a person, rather than conjured from thin air by magic. That’s a far better way to celebrate art, and to inspire its creation: to regard it as a thing that people do. Opens Feb. 6 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Danny Bowes

SPECIAL SCREENINGS Dirty Dancing At Brewvies, Feb. 23, 10 p.m. (R) It’s All So Quiet At Brewvies, Feb. 19, 7 p.m. (NR) National Gallery See Essentials, p. 17. At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Feb. 25, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES Fifty Shades of Grey HH I think I get it, to the extent that a guy can get it: E.L. James’ erotica phenomenon is actually a potent empowerment fantasy. Strip away the purple prose, and you’ve got the tale of innocent, young Anastasia (Dakota Johnson) opening herself up to new experiences offered by billionaire BDSM enthusiast Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan), yet also deciding whether she can “fix” a tormented bad boy. Johnson’s performance is often terrific at capturing Anastasia’s self-discovery, but while Grey as written is merely a brooding dream hunk, that doesn’t entirely excuse Dornan’s bland performance or the lumbering plot progression. And the sex scenes themselves feel softened and aestheticized for multiplex acceptability. The subversive exploration of female sexual power is something pop culture could use more of—but maybe in a movie less afraid of really playing rough. (R)—SR Kingsman: The Secret Service HHH Matthew Vaughn doesn’t make it easy to embrace the old-school vibe of Roger Moore-era James Bond movies—including their attendant sexism and occasional sadism. Colin Firth plays Harry Hart, who tries to make good on a personal debt by recruiting wrong-side-of-the-tracks kid Eggsy (Taron Egerton) into the team of death-defying international do-gooders of which he’s a part, eventually battling Internet billionaire/lisping megalomaniac Valentine (Samuel L. Jackson). Vaughn gets the most out of both his energetic cast and the undeniable genre pleasures of stuff like a henchwoman with swords in her prosthetic legs. But there’s something terribly misjudged tonally in Kingsman’s most over-the-top action set pieces, and the off-handed approach

to its only female characters. If Vaughn is trying to be subversive about those subjects—as he is far more successfully about classism—he’s being awfully subtle about it. (R)—SR

Old Fashioned HH.5 Writer/director Rik Swartzwelder comes as close as any recent faith-based filmmaker to making something endearing beyond its appeal to the like-minded. Restless wanderer Amber (Elizabeth Ann Roberts) arrives in a small Ohio town and meets Clay (Swartzwelder), who has developed strict old-school relationship rules as penance for his unsavory past. Swartzwelder wears his corniness on his sleeve—he has Frank Capra’s Meet John Doe playing in the background—and he’s pretty stiff, even for a character who has locked himself in an emotional chastity belt. He also lets his characters wrestle with forgiving themselves for mistakes and even misunderstanding the lessons of their faith, in honest ways. It drags through clunky moments on the way to its conclusion, but it’s also refreshing in finding genuine romanticism in two people bringing out the best possible changes in each other. (PG-13)—SR

Song of the Sea HHH Director Tomm Moore’s surprise Best Animated Feature nominee—it bumped The LEGO Movie—is based in Celtic mythology, like his previous surprise nominee, 2009’s The Secret of Kells. This one brings the legend of the selkie into the story of a boy named Ben living in Ireland with his widowed dad and young sister, Saoirse. Moore’s visual style—evoking illuminations from a medieval manuscript—is certainly distinctive in the CGI-dominated contemporary animation landscape, and here’s a potential for strong emotional content in Ben’s conflicted relationship with Saoirse. Yet, Song of the Sea never quite achieves that emotional power, from its muted vocal performances to limitations in the expressiveness of the characters. While it might seem unfair to stand this delicate tale head to head against The LEGO Movie, its uniqueness isn’t quite the same as everything being awesome. (PG)—SR

Still Alice HH.5 It explores a tragic subject sensitively, but also in the least interesting way imaginable. Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland adopt Lisa Genova’s novel about Alice Howland (Julianne Moore), a 50-year-old Columbia University professor who discovers that she has rare hereditary early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Moore beautifully captures the frustration of an intellectual woman facing the disintegration of her intellect, yet the arc of the narrative focuses almost entirely on the progressive diminishing of her capabilities, pushing aside potentially compelling angles like Alice’s guilt at passing the disease on to her own children, or her contentious relationship with her aspiring actor youngest daughter (Kristen Stewart). A story that needed to be about something more than the disease’s relentless onslaught ends up feeling like little more than the second half of Flowers for Algernon, without the benefit of the first half. (PG-13)—SR

Two Days, One Night HHHH Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne continue their career-long exploration of moral choices in this story of Sandra (Marion Cotillard), a married mother struggling with clinical depression who has to spend a weekend pleading with co-workers to give up a bonus so she can keep her job. The Dardennes make each individual response distinctive and understandable; there are no villains, even among those who can’t bring themselves to surrender their extra salary. The centerpiece, however, is Cotillard’s stunning Oscar-nominated performance, which captures the despair of mental illness with wrenching honesty; she conveys the effort involved in simply moving through a regular day, let alone one requiring her to plead for charity. The final moral choice she makes is a unique kind of triumph—yet also perfectly characteristic of the drama the Dardennes always wring out of human frailty. (NR)—SR


SHOWING: FEBRUARY 20 TH - FEBRUARY 26 TH MONDAY 2/23

LUNCH SPECIALS

MENU

FREE POOL til 5pm

OUR NEW

FREE!

DIRTY DANCING AMERICAN SNIPER (1987)

50 SHADES OF GREY

KILLER $5

CHECK OUT

over 40 BEERS

AVAILABLE!

373,#s"2%76)%3#/-s s#!,,&/23#/44933(/74)-%330)%, 

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FILMĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;FOOD U NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

| cityweekly.net |

more than just movies at brewvies

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 29


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

0 | february 19, 2015

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

TV

Can’t Miss Can’t Not Wait Can’t Even

Retread Lightly The Odd Couple and Vikings return from history; The Jack & Triumph Show is a (literal) dog. The Odd Couple Thursday, Feb. 19 (CBS) Series Debut: Like CBS’ recently canceled The Millers, The Odd Couple (a remake of a ’70s sitcom, kids) is a case of a killer comedic cast (Matthew Perry, Thomas Lennon, Lindsay Sloane, Wendell Pearce and Yvette Nicole Brown) saddled with an annoyingly laugh-tracked, numbingly beige network sitcom. The song remains the same: Oscar (Perry) and Felix (Lennon) are old friends who move in together after their respective marriages fall apart; Oscar’s a slob of a sports-radio host (updated from sports columnist because, as you know, print is dead), while Felix is a borderline-OCD clean freak. Wackiness, etc. Despite his many post-Friends flops, Perry can still bring the funny, and Lennon (who will always be Reno 911’s Lt. Jim Dangle) is an underrated master of cuttingly subtle humor. Even if they don’t eventually overcome the show’s lazy writing, The Odd Couple will still be CBS’ least-terrible comedy. So that’s … something.

Two & a Half Men Thursday, Feb. 19 (CBS) Series Finale: The question isn’t so much “Will Charlie Sheen return for the finale?” as it is “Who cares anymore?” The end of Two & a Half Men should have been Season 8, Sheen’s last, when show creator/hack Chuck Lorre and Warner Bros. Television had 177 episodes in the can so the sitcom could easily live on in $yndication perpetuity. But no, here we are in Season 12(!), still printing money with Ashton Kutcher, the Ghost of Jon Cryer and no Half Man. So, tease Charlie “Harper” Sheen’s possible comeback all you want, CBS—just get this over with.

Vikings Thursday, Feb. 19 (History) Season Premiere: In Season 3 of Vikings—aka Game of Thrones Lite, Sons of Anarchy With Swords or The Last

Somewhat Historical Show on the History Channel—Ragnar (Travis Fimmel) is now the King of Denmark, having dispatched Horik to a better place (well, to Gotham, where Donal Logue now resides). His first move? Attack Paris! Sounds accurate—didn’t a Dark Ages baguette turn up on Pawn Stars recently?

The Jack & Triumph Show Friday, Feb. 20 (Adult Swim) Series Debut: Jack McBrayer ( 30 Rock) and Triumph (the Insult Comic Dog with Robert Smigel’s hand up his ass) star as Jack and Triumph, the former child stars of a Lassie-esque TV series from the ’80s; nice-guy Jack wants nothing to do with show business anymore, whereas decadent Triumph will do anything to get back in—even pander to “the adolescent stoners watching Adult Swim.” Hey, we’re not all adolescents, Triumph. …

The 87th Annual Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 22 (ABC) Special: What’s on tonight besides the fashion show that calls itself the Oscars: new episodes of The Walking Dead, Talking Dead and Comic Book Men on AMC; Jinx: The Life

The Odd Couple (CBS)

and Deaths of Robert Durst, Girls, Togetherness, Looking and Last Week With John Oliver on HBO; Downton Abbey and Grantchester on PBS; Bar Rescue on Spike; Total Divas on E!; and, if you must, Sister Wives on TLC. I’d also recommend the recent stand-up comedy specials of Iliza Shlesinger (Freezing Hot), Bill Burr (I’m Sorry You Feel That Way) and Chelsea Peretti (One of the Greats) on Netflix. We good?

Parks & Recreation Tuesday, Feb. 24 (NBC)

Series Finale: So nevermind what I said in January about the seventh season of Parks & Recreation being unnecessary; as series finales go, it’s been a wonderfully weird trip for NBC’s Last Great Comedy (trust me, there’s nothing funny coming in the pipeline from The Peacock anytime soon). So long, Leslie, Ron, Ben, April, Andy, Donna, Jerry/ Garry, Ann, Chris—hell, maybe even Tom. CW Listen to Bill on Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell; weekly on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes and Stitcher.


Hanni El Khatib

Picture Perfect

MUSIC

For Hanni El Khatib’s reckless, disheveled rock & roll, imagery is everything.

Live Today By Kolbie Stonehocker kstonehocker@cityweekly.net @vonstonehocker

By Reyan Ali comments@cityweekly.net

“Y

T

Within an arm’s length of danger: Hanni El Khatib

HANNI EL KHATIB

| CITY WEEKLY |

TRY THESE

w/Dr. Dog The Depot, 400 W. South Temple Friday, Feb. 20, 9 p.m. $20 in advance, $23 day of show HanniElKhatib.com, DepotSLC.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

going with his career, playing to tiny bar crowds, when Nike asked to use his song “I Got a Thing” in a commercial. “The choice was, say ‘yes’ to that, and then you can quit your job and go tour,” El Khatib says. “That was the clearcut decision.” Around the same time, he was also asked to join Florence + the Machine on tour—a chance to work in large venues—which was an exciting but financially risky prospect he wouldn’t have taken if he hadn’t had the Nike money in the bag. In those days, El Khatib revealed an affection for squealing high-energy rock shaded by 1950s and ’60s blues and garage rock—he crooned, but creepily—but Moonlight pushes him forward a couple of decades. “It wasn’t [inspired by] anything other than the idea of psychedelia,” he says. “I really wanted it to be dreamy, and trippy and headphone music.” The results are guitar riffs and blasts of fuzz that ring bright and big, with the danger chic never dissipating. But even though El Khatib has a knack for guitar and caught some unmissable music-related opportunities, why is he primarily a musician now rather than a visual artist, given his natural inclinations? “I’ve always used art as a trade. It’s a profession,” he says. “I wanted to be a graphic designer, but in practice, I’d be working for people or brands, selling some sort of a product. Now, the product I’m trying to sell or do work for is my own—music that we love and bands that we love [at Innovative Leisure], and it’s not like I have to answer to anybody, which is cool.” CW

ou gotta think about death,” says Cedar Hills-based folk singer-songwriter and musician Timmy the Teeth. Not so much that you focus too much on that inevitable big sleep, but just enough to remind you to live in the present. That’s an idea Timmy explores on his new fulllength album, Just Another Day. “When you look too much in the future or you live too much in the past, you neglect the current state and the now that we have right here,” Timmy says. Instead, all you can do is take life “one day at a time.” To record Just Another Day, Timmy collaborated with local singer-songwriter Joshua James, with whom Timmy has toured as a drummer in his band. Produced by James at his home studio, Willamette Mountain, Just Another Day features contributions from James and other “brothers” brought together through past tours and musical collaborations, including singer-songwriter Isaac Russell, aka RuRu, who’s also releasing a new record at the same show at Velour on Feb. 20. Compared to Timmy’s often solemn 2012 debut album, White Horse—also produced by James—Just Another Day has a more accessible, human-scale scope. While on White Horse, Timmy often sang symbolism-rich, Bible-inf luenced lyrics about apocalyptic natural disasters, the lyrics on Just Another Day—such as the halcyon, achingly familiar scenes depicted in upbeat opener “Oh, How the Times Have Changed”—are poetically mundane. Timmy chalks up his new album’s lighter tone to a shift in his mental outlook. “[White Horse] was a little more dark and had a lot of minor notes in it,” he says, but recently, “I’ve noticed myself listening less and less to that type of music, with just the emotional state that it kind of put me in.” That better mental state, he continues, “comes across as my music being a little more lighthearted, and not so serious or cryptic in my expression.” That’s not to say Just Another Day isn’t sometimes serious—albeit created with more major chords than White Horse—but “it’s easy to listen to, and it’s honest” about topics that are universally applicable to the human experience, Timmy says. And the focus is definitely on living in the present. “Live what you want to see,” Timmy says. “If you like things about the past or you wanna see things changed about your future, just make it happen. Today’s another day to do it, just live your day, day by day.” CW

| cityweekly.net |

here has long been more to music than music. As long as music-related illustrations, photography and film will be distributable en masse, visual music culture will remain intertwined with the aural. Images shape sound, and vice versa. It’s why Taylor Swift can comfortably reference assorted musical genres/eras in her “Shake It Off” music video using fashion alone, and why Abbey Road and mop-tops are as fundamental to Beatles lore as “Come Together” and “Let It Be.” It’s also why the feelings of menace and retrotinted cool coursing through Hanni El Khatib’s devilish garage rock & roll easily feel greater once experienced alongside his record art. As he once told Interview magazine, “I want to give you the sensation of bringing you back into the past—but minus the kitsch.” The covers of Will the Guns Come Out—the 2011 debut from the Los Angeles-based singer/guitarist/bandleader— and his early EPs alike all feature vintage-flavored photos of car wrecks. 2013’s Head in the Dirt spotlights a leather jacket’s flash-tattoo-style back patch depicting the Grim Reaper clutching a brunette in a romantic embrace. Most recently, January’s Moonlight shows a snake wrapped around someone’s arm, with a hand holding the irate reptile at a distance. “In a broad sense, [the cover’s about] the idea of being within an arm’s length of danger or in some sort of situation where you need to protect yourself and seemingly having it in control—but not really,” says El Khatib, 33, who cooked up the image’s concept while Nathan Cabrera executed the idea. In interview after interview, El Khatib has reiterated his love for the image and its importance to his career and output. As a kid who was into music, he had several visual favorites: the Nervous Records logo and the Wu-Tang sigil, and cover artists like Hipgnosis, Roger Dean and Peter Saville. In his hometown of San Francisco, El Khatib attended the Academy of Art for two years, specializing in art direction and graphic design. He’s also worked as a creative director for streetwear brand HUF, and designed artwork for other musicians, like indie rocker Her Space Holiday and DJ friends. Nowadays, El Khatib doesn’t just release music as part of Los Angeles label Innovative Leisure; he’s also a co-owner and its art director. “I’m more inherently a visual artist than a musician, per se,” he says. “I just happen to make music as well. I tend to be more visual in that sense with everything that I do.” El Khatib mentions still doing projects with brands outside of his music career. Fittingly, a brand was crucial to his move to professional musician. In 2011, El Khatib was just getting

Timmy the Teeth & RuRu Album Release

Johnny Burnette The Train Kept A-Rollin’: Memphis to Hollywood 2003

Band of Skulls Baby Darling Doll Face Honey 2009

w/Marcus Bently Velour 135 N. University Ave., Provo Friday, Feb. 20 8:30 p.m. $10 TimmyTheTeeth.bandcamp.com, VelourLive.com

february 19, 2015 | 31

Cream Disraeli Gears 1967


THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS Thursday 2.19 4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

❱ Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports ❰

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

wednesday 2/18 thousands

songs to KARAOKE ofchoose from

thursday 2/19

Free POol & 1/2 off nachos every thursday

32 | february 19, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| cityweekly.net |

friday 2/20

w/ betty hates everything, my private island & Bury the wolf saturday 2/21

Liv� Musi�

Opal hill drive, kettlefish & transit cast every sunday

3

$

Great Brunch

Bloody Marys, Screwdrivers & Mimosas

Open at 11

every tuesday

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

COMING SOON 2/27

reggae at the

royal

sarah b Band lady omega & vocal reasoning

COMING SOON 3/17

ST. patty's day party w/ hectic hobo ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

White Arrows If talent were measured by the rate of an artist’s improvement, The White Arrows have proven themselves gifted. The Los Angeles-based pop outfit got their start in New York in 2011, where they gained immediate attention from indie music blogs. While White Arrows’ debut album was an interesting start, their 2014 album, In Bardo, is slower and cleaner, and ditches the band’s previously chaotic sound for palatable grooves and relatable lyrics about common human themes. With funky bass lines, punchy beats and tasty riffs, White Arrows’ sound is a tough one to shake out of your mind. (Sam Florence) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), 8 p.m., $10, KilbyCourt.com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com Lily & Madeleine If you’re a fan of Secret Sisters, Lucius or any project that features two crystalclear voices winding around each other in heart-swelling melodies, you’ll love Lily & Madeleine. On their sophomore album, Fumes, Indiana indie-rock/folk duo Lily & Madeleine showcase more of the flawless vocal harmonies that made their debut full-length so dreamy, perhaps made even flawless-er due to the fact that they’re siblings. Throughout lullaby-like songs like “The Wolf Is Free” and “Can’t Admit It,” Lily & Madeleine’s voices are impeccable, and those beautiful harmonies are elevated all the more, thanks to the duo’s thoughtful

Lily & Madeleine

LIVE

songwriting, which discusses thorny topics such as the ending of romantic relationships. But upbeat indie-rock tracks like “Peppermint Candy” and “Cabin Fever” are sprinkled throughout the more delicate stuff, displaying the musical versatility that Lily & Madeleine have up their sleeves. Shannon Hayden will open. Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), 8 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 day of show, KilbyCourt.com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com

Friday 2.20

Grieves Seattle’s Benjamin Laub, aka Grieves, is a storytelling rapper who tackles heavy, realworld themes like depression and heartbreak, and then throws in some unexpectedly witty self-deprecation. Two years after he came out with his album Together/Apart in 2011, Grieves switched producers from Budo (who produced some of Macklemore’s older tracks) to B. Lewis (who is new to the hip-hop producing scene) and released his fourth album, Winter & the Wolves. Some elements of Together/Apart, such as that record’s jazzy piano melodies and occasional satire, have carried over to the new album, but Grieves’ wordplay has gotten even sharper, and B. Lewis’ beats are catchier and more energetic. Grieves tours with Connr Fynchan on guitar and Jacob Shaw on keyboard. Mouse Powell, Better Taste Bureau and Burnell Washburn make up the rest of the hip-hop lineup. (Tiffany Frandsen)  The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $16, TheComplexSLC.com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com 

Wednesday 2.25

Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe As a member of Lenny Kravitz’s band, a cofounder of The Greyboy Allstars and, currently, frontman of San Diego jam/funk band the

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE

CITYWEEKLY.NET

BY KO L B IE S TO N EH O CK ER

@vonstonehocker

White Arrows Tiny Universe, saxophone/flautist Karl Denson is a musician whose creativity and skill seem to be boundless. In 2014, Denson and the band released full-length album New Ammo, their first together since 2009’s Brother’s Keeper. Ridiculously funky and dance-friendly, New Ammo features plenty of tasty original tunes as well as some entertaining funk-ified covers, such as The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army” and The Beastie Boys’ “Sure Shot”—which is killer, by the way; just imagine that little flute part at the beginning of the original expanded into a full song. But fun covers aside, New Ammo also captures the pure jolt of energy that’s a live Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe performance. With the new album, “we’ve finally figured out how to capture in the studio what the Tiny Universe does »

Grieves


| cityweekly.net |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 33


LIVE EVERY THRUSDAY @ 7PM APPY HOUR EVERYDAY

1/2 OFF SELECT APPS 4PM-7PM

WED 02/18 FRI 02/20 SAT 02/21 WED 02/25 FRI 02/27

CHRISTIAN COLEMAN ACOUSTIC

THE TIM DANIELS BAND STONEFED RYLEE MCDONALD ACOUSTIC LORIN MADSEN & THE HUSTLERS W/ DARIN CAINE & THE HELLHOUND EXPRESS.

2182 SOUTH HIGHLAND DRIVE FATSGRILLSLC.COM

34 | february 19, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| cityweekly.net |

(801) 484-9467

Same Great Club. Same Amazing Vibe.

-ALL NEW MANAGEMENT-

An Eclectic mix of olde world charm and fronteir saloon

8362%838a7&&5-7&%'/ .NHMTRENQKHUDLTRHB /DUXM(DQM 8@KH@/DXR+DLHMH1HMC 7SNMDEDC '@MCXaR6HUDQ,NTRD  1HBG@DK(@KKHM  1@QBTR&DMSKDX  1@QHM@CD  8QHFFDQR 7KHOR

THE PLACE FOR APRES-SKI

$3 PBR TALL BOYS 792(%=7/-4%7774)'-%07 *6))433079213289)

3200 Big Cottonwood Rd. 801.733.5567 | theHogWallow.com

The 4OnTheFloor live,â&#x20AC;? Denson says in the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online bio. Pedal-steel legend Roosevelt Collier will open. The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, TheStateRoom.com; limited no-fee tickets available at CityWeeklyStore.com The 4OnTheFloor If one kick drum equals rock, four kick drums equal four times the rockâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at least thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the philosophy of Minneapolis foursome The 4OnTheFloor. Begun as a side project of occasional bandmates Gabriel Douglas and James Gould, The 4OnTheFloor took on a gritty, Delta-blues-influenced rock sound partly as a reaction to the metal and emo that was popular in their home scene. And as their name implies, all four members of the band stomp a kick-drum pedal as they also play their respective instrumentsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or, in the case of lead vocalist Douglas, sing/ yell into the micâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;making for truly foundation-shaking live shows. The 4OnTheFloorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest album, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spirit of Minneapolis, is unadulterated rock & roll, as heard on bluesy barnburners like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Engine No. 4â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Off the Cuff.â&#x20AC;? Also on the bill are local bands Candyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s River House and Matthew & the Hope. Bar Deluxe, 666 S. State, 9 p.m., $5 in advance, $8 day of show, BarDeluxeSLC.com

Coming Soon Les Femmes de Velour: Luna Lune, The Blue Aces, Stephanie Mabey (Feb. 26-28, Velour, Provo), Night Wings, Night Riots (Feb. 26, Kilby Court), Milo Greene (Feb. 26, The State Room), The K-Bone Kevy Metal Benefit Weekend Warrior Concert (Feb. 27, Bar Deluxe), Rob Delaney (Feb. 27, The Depot), The Districts (Feb. 28, Kilby Court), Iration (Feb. 28, Park City Live), Portland Cello Project (Feb. 28, The State Room), B. Dolan (March 1, The Urban Lounge), Penny & Sparrow (March 3, Kilby Court), Taking Back Sunday, The Menzingers (March 3, The Complex), PRhyme (March 4, The Urban Lounge), Joshua Radin (March 4, The Depot)


| cityweekly.net |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

february 19, 2015 | 35


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | february 19, 2015

CONCERTS & CLUBS

City Weekly’s Hot List for the Week

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

Thursday 2.19 Salt Lake City

LIVE MUSIC

FRI 2/20

TERENCE HANSEN SAT 2/21

JACK & JILL COMING SOON

FEB 27 - NEON CRUIZERS FEB 28 - CAVEMAN BOULEVARD

WEEKNIGHTS MON

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS WITH

TUE WED

LOCALS NIGHT OUT TRIVIA 7PM

OPEN

11AM-2AM

DAILY

5

$

LUNCH SPECIAL MON-FRI

saturday

$10 BRUNCH BUFFET FROM 11AM-2PM

sunday funday

THE ONLY $12 BREAKFAST BUFFET IN TOWN! 10AM-2PM $12 SUNDAY BRUNCH / $3 BLOODY MARY / $3 MIMOSA 7PM ADULT TRIVIA EVERY SUNDAY

31 E 400 S, SLC (801) 532-7441 THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

Mic Masters: Syncronice (5 Monkeys) Heroes X Villains (Area 51) Karaoke (Bourbon House) Live Band Karaoke With TIYB (Club 90) Crooks, Smoke in the Tavern, Bird in the Trees (Club X) Jazz Joint Thursday: Alan Michael (The Garage) Jake Dreier Blues Band (Gracie’s) Karaoke (Habits) Gemini Mind (Hog Wallow Pub) White Arrows, Shady Elders, Beachmen (Kilby Court) Sounds Like Teen Spirit (Liquid Joe’s) Catharsus, Winter Burial, Thalgora, Silent Sorcerer, Yeti Warlord (The Loading Dock) Antidote: Hot Noise (The Red Door) Jorma Kaukonen, Larry Campbell, Teresa Williams (The State Room) 90s Television, Selma, Ghost Logic, James Allen Spirit (The Urban Lounge) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Weekly Live Reggae Show (The Woodshed)

Park City Cowboy Karaoke (Cisero’s) Local Vibes With Kemosabe and The Planetaries (Downstairs) Gary Puckett & the Union Gap (Egyptian Theatre) Billy Manzik (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Utah County Battle of the Bands (The Stereo Room) Brumby, Grizzly Goat, Daniel Hanks, Paul Clonts (Velour)

Friday 2.20 Salt Lake City Best of Utah Music First Rap Showcase: Jay Citrus; Illwinded P; Dine Krew; Lost, the Artist; Q1 (50 West Club) Herban Empire (A Bar Named Sue) Caveman Blvd (A Bar Named Sue on State) Hyper Crush (Area 51) Trouble With Trixie (Club 90) Grieves, Mouse Powell, Better Taste Bureau, Burnell Washburn (The Complex, The Grand) Motion City Soundtrack, William Beckett, Brick & Mortar (The Complex, Rockwell) Hanni El Khatib, Dr. Dog (The Depot, see p. 31) Meth Dad, SIAK, Michael Parallax,

Conquer Monster (Diabolical Records) Tim Daniels Band (Fats Grill & Pool) Ghostowne (The Garage) Apres Ski With DJ Gawel and DJ Matty Mo (Gracie’s) DJ Scotty B (Habits) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Lily & Madeleine, Shannon Hayden (Kilby Court) Poonhammer, Par for the Curse, Perish Lane, 7 Second Memory (Liquid Joe’s) Will Roney Band (Poplar Street Pub) Choice (The Red Door) American Hitmen, Betty Hates Everything, My Private Island, Bury the Wolf (The Royal) The Growlers, Max Pain & the Groovies, Dark Seas (The Urban Lounge) Bullet Proof (The Westerner)

VOTED BEST CABARET ENTERTAINMENT IN UTAH 2014 C H EAP E ST D R I N KS , CO L D E ST B E E R

&

H OT TE ST WO M E N

BEACH PARTY FEB 21ST SATURDAY FEB 28TH: STRIPPER FIGHTS

MONDAY NIGHT’S SERVICE INDUSTRY NIGHT

$2 DRINKS & CHEAP FOOD WE HAVE

FAT TIRE BEER! ONLY $4

4141 S. State · 261-3463 Open Daily 11:30-1am A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

NO

C OV E R EVER!

Ogden Q-Dot (Brewskis) Hearts of Steele (The Outlaw Saloon)

Park City Shields (Cisero’s) DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) Gary Puckett & the Union Gap (Egyptian Theatre) Bonanza Town (The Spur Bar & Grill)

2750 SOUTH 300 WEST (801) 467- 4600 11:30-1AM MON-SAT · 11:30AM-10PM SUN

Utah County Crook & the Bluff, Matthew Skaggs (ABG’s) Battle of the Bands (The Stereo Room) Timmy the Teeth, Isaac Russell, Marcus Bently (Velour, see p. 31)

Saturday 2.21 Salt Lake City Best of Utah Music First Band Showcase: Minx, Big Wild Wings, VanLadyLove, Fictionist, Bat Manors (50 West Club) Rage Against the Supremes (A Bar Named Sue) Salt Shakers (A Bar Named Sue on State) Tom Bennett Welcome Home Show, Blackkiss, Jim Fish, Mountain Country (Bar Deluxe) Snowboard Utah Official Launch Party: The Astroknots, New Truth, Malev da Shinobi, Genie Index, The Outsiders, Swell Merchants (Canyon Inn) Canyons Spring Concert Series: Cure for the Common (Canyons Resort) Trouble With Trixie (Club 90) Nocturnal Trauma (Do Drop Inn) Stonefed (Fats Grill & Pool) Ugly Valley Boys (The Garage) Chaseone2 (Gracie’s) Candy’s River House (Hog Wallow Pub) »

SAT 2.21:

SWEET SALT RECORDS PRESENTS:

TOM BENNETT

JIM FISH + HENRY WADE + MOUNTAIN COUNTRY BLACKKISS

WED 2.25:

THE4ONTHEFLOOR

CANDY’S RIVER HOUSE + MATTHEW AND THE HOPE

THURS 2.26:

ENABLER

CALL OF THE VOID + DITCH AND THE DELTA + HULDRA

FRI 2.27: THE K-BONE KEVY-METAL BENEFIT WEEKEND WARRIOR CONCERT!!! W/ THUNDERFIST OLDTIMER + DWELLERS SAT 2.28:

FAUXGAUZI

MAGDA VEGA + RED BENNIES THURS 3.5:

RETOX

WHORES + BABY GURL + EXES COMING UP

MARCH 12TH: HEY MARSEILLIES MARCH 13TH: ENSLAVED MARCH 14TH: SLAMROCK UTAH 2015 MARCH 28TH: STURGEON GENERAL WWW.BARDELUXESLC.COM

OPEN MON-SAT 6PM-1AM 668 South State - 801.532.2914


LIVE!

JACKSON

THURSDAYS

MONDAYS 75¢ Wings Industry Night

1 Sliders & Live Music

TUESDAYS

FRIDAYS

50¢ Tacos $ 2.5 Tecate Beer Pong Tournament

$

RYAN HYMAS SATURDAY

by SLC Pong Cash Prizes & $7.5 Domestic Pitchers

WEDNESDAYS

3 Fried Burritos 5 Tall Boy & Whiskey shot Karaoke w/ Krazy Karaoke $ $

ANNUAL JOHNNY CASH BIRTHDAY BASH! JACKSON CASH AND THE MOUNTAIN PACIFIC BAND PLAYING ALL OF YOUR MAN IN BLACK FAVORITES WITH SPECIAL GUESTS KATHY CARTER AND THE JUNE CARTER SINGERS. CELEBRATE WITH US FRI. FEB. 27 ON HIGHLAND & SAT. FEB 28 ON STATE

CASH &

HIGHLAND live music

The Mountain Pacific Band

FRI HERBAN EMPIRE AGAINST SAT RAGE THE SUPREMES

With Special Guests June Carter Singers

SUNDAYS 3.5 B-fast Burritos

$

SUN &

Thursday 2/26 Starts at 8PM

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

THUR

136 E. 12300 S. | 801.571.8134

STARTS @ 7PM

MON &

THUR

• OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR •

KARAOKE NOW QUALIFYING FOR SING ‘O’ FIRE

ST. PATRICK’S EDITION THURSDAY MARCH 12 FT MEMBERS OF THE GEEK SHOW PODCAST AS GUEST JUDGES.

$500 IN CASH PRIZES

WED

BEER PONG TOURNEY CASH PRIZES 9PM SIGN IN | 10PM START

801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

2013 SAVE THE DATE: GRACIE’S 3RD ANNUAL UNOFFICIAL ST. PATRICKS TENT PARTY SATURDAY MARCH 14TH.

SUN &

KARAOKE NOW QUALIFYING FOR SING ‘O’ FIRE

TUE

ST. PATRICK’S EDITION

$500 IN CASH PRIZES

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

THU

BEER PONG TOURNEY

WED

STARTS @ 7PM

CASH PRIZES 8PM SIGN IN | 9PM START

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

NEW! TO SUES ON STATE!

| CITY WEEKLY |

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSIONS. FIND OUR FULL LINE UP ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE.

CAVEMAN BOULEVARD SALT SHAKERS

ENJOY DINNER & A SHOW NIGHTLY.

2014

FRI SAT

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

STATE live music

| cityweekly.net |

3928 HIGHLAND DR

FRIDAY POKER GAMES | STARTS @ 3:30PM

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ★ 11AM-1AM

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET ★ FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE ★ FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

february 19, 2015 | 37

2014

` EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!


| cityweekly.net |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | february 19, 2015

075@322>@=;=B7=<A>@3A3<BA

LET'S ROCK OUT FOR SYNZ BIRTHDAY 430@C/@G AB&>; >3@4=@;/<13A0G(

<C3<2= 1@=AA47@3 B=B/:@31/::

#2==@;CAB03  GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE at

GREAT

4242 S. STATE

FOOD & DRINK

SPECIALS

801-265-9889

CONCERTS & CLUBS Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net Social Saturdays (The Hotel/Club Elevate) Battle of the Bands (In the Venue/Club Sound) Bad Feather (Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Second) Utah Supports Utah Festival: Gray Mckenzie, J-One, AJ Sargent, Decarl, HighLyfe, Melody Pulsipher (Kilby Court) Rosanne Cash (Kingsbury Hall) Kate Voegele, Leroy Sanchez, Jeff 9@G>B32 Dillon (The Loading Dock) 6/:3GšAA=:3 The Glass House, Ten Plagues, Cries of the Captive, Fatal Curse, Forget the Sunset, Beneath Red Skies, Aether, Among the Ashes (Murray Theater) Bill & Diane Glover (Poplar Street Pub) Opal Hill Drive, Kettlefish, Transit Cast (The Royal) DJ Juggy, Grimblee, Gravytron, Mr. Vandal (The Urban Lounge) Candy Lee (Vertical Diner) Bullet Proof (The Westerner)

:7D30/<2A7<1:C23(

Ogden Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com FEB 18:

9 PM DOORS

FEB 19:

8 PM DOORS FREE SHOW

FEB 20:

8 PM DOORS

FEB 21:

9 PM DOORS

CITY WEEKLY PRESENTS BEST OF UTAH MUSIC

FIRST 5 DJ SPIN-OFF 90S TELEVISION SELMA GHOST LOGIC JAMES ALLEN SPIRIT

8 PM DOORS

OCEANIDS UINTA TURTLEBOY

FEB 25:

CITY WEEKLY PRESENTS BEST OF UTAH MUSIC

THE GROWLERS DIRT FIRST TAKEOVER:

GRIMBLEE

FEB 26:

8 PM DOORS FREE SHOW

REGGAE RISE & AUDIO SAGE PRESENTS

GROUNDATION

AFRO OMEGA TRIBE OF I

Feb 28: FREE SHOW Flash & Flare Monthly Beat Buffet Mar 1: B. Dolan with Live Band Mar 2: FREE SHOW Dark Seas Mar 4: PRHYME featuring DJ Premier and Royce Da 5â&#x20AC;?9 Mar 5: David Cook Mar 6: DUBWISE Mar 7: Doomtree Mar 8: Dirt Monkey x Mark Instinct Mar 10: Cheap Girls Mar 11: Archnemesis Mar 12: Heaps & Heaps Mar 13: SLUG Localized Mar 14: Space Versions Mar 15: The Dodos Mar 17: FREE SHOW Magda Veda

FEB 27:

8 PM DOORS

COMING SOON

NO

WEDNESDAY

Salt Lake City Live Bluegrass (Club 90) The Steel Belts (Donkey Tails) The Last Honkytonk Music Series (The Garage) Preston Creed (Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Karaoke Church With DJ Ducky & Mandrew (Jam) Entourage Karaoke (Piper Down) Sunday Funday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon) Groundation, Afro Omega, The Tribe of I, (The Urban Lounge) Karaoke That Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Suck (The Woodshed)

Âť

$ COV ER

4 sHhOoME OF

EVE R

!

t&

T A bHE eer

BAD FEATHER feb 21 STARTS AT

9PM

SUNDAY & THURSDAY

ZION I

Mar 30: Rubblebucket & Vacationer Mar 31: Stars Apr 1: Rev Peytonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Damn Band Apr 2: Quantic Apr 3: DUBWISE Apr 4: Max Pain & The Groovies Apr 6: Monophonics Apr 10: Folk Hogan Album Release Apr 11: Electric Wizard Apr 13: Harsh Toke Apr 14: Black Milk

Sunday 2.22

SATURDAY

BIG BLUE OX, BIG WILD WINGS NIGHT BANKS

Mar 18: Pete Rock & Slum Village Mar 19: Beardyman Mar 20: Hip Hop Roots Mar 21: U92 Presents 88 Back Mar 22: That 1 Guy Mar 24: Geographer Mar 25: The Velvet Teen Mar 26: Public Service Broadcasting Mar 27: This Will Destroy You Mar 29: of Montreal

Snogard, Ragged Insomnia (Velour)

Karaoke Sundays With KJ Sparetire (The Century Club)

ELECTRIC CATHEDRAL

LOS RAKAS LOCKSMITH KEV CHOICE J. LATELY

Utah County

Ogden

Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) Lucia Micarelli (Eccles Center for the Performing Arts)

LAST 5 DJ SPIN-OFF DJ FERAL CAT DJ BENTLEY DJ LUVA LUVA SHIELDS J GODINA

MAX PAIN & THE GROOVIES DARK SEAS

Park City

ROBOCLIP

8 PM DOORS FREE SHOW

9 PM DOORS

GRAVYTRON MR. VANDAL FEB 22:

FEB 24:

Breakfast Klub (Brewskis) Hearts of Steele (The Outlaw Saloon)

Gary Puckett & the Union Gap (Egyptian Theatre) Apres Ski With Bonanza Town (Park City Mountain Resort) Sin City Soul (The Spur Bar & Grill)

REGGAE NIGHT FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY DJ MARL COLOGNE WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

WASATCH POKER TOUR 8PM

GROOVE TUESDAYS

THE BEST IN EDM COMING SOON

tuES ST. PATTYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY CANDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIVER HOUSE march WITH HIGHWAY THIEVES

17

ENJOY YOUR COCKTAILS & CIGARETTES ON OUR HEATED PATIO JOH N NYSON S ECON D.COM | 165 E 200 S S LC | 801.746.3334


 



BEST OF UTAH

ee





kl y .n

et/bestof

us

ty

w

MUSIC

m

ci





ic

 ah ut

2015

 





TWO W E E KS O F L I V E LO C A L M U S I C C E L E B RAT I N G : EACH S HOW

$6

$ 5 A DV

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR YOUR FAVORITE MUSICIANS AND VOT E AT TH E LI VE SH OWCASES

ONE RAPPER, ONE BAND AND ONE DJ WILL BE NAMED THE B EST OF U TAH! WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18 THE URBAN LOU N G E 21+ 241 S. 5 0 0 EAST DO ORS

@9

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20 5 0 W EST C LU B A L L AGES 50 W. 30 0 SOUTH D O O RS

DJs

@8

rap

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21 5 0 W EST CLUB A L L AG ES 50 W. 300 SO UTH DOORS

@8

bands

Minx Big Wild Wings VanLadyLove Fictionist Bat Manors

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 THE URBAN LOU N G E 2 1+ 241 S. 5 0 0 EAST

FRIDAY, FEBRAURY 27 5 0 W EST C LU B A L L AGES 50 W. 30 0 SOUTH

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28 5 0 W EST CLUB A L L AG ES 50 W. 300 SO UTH

DOORS

@9

DJ

s

D O O RS

DOORS

@8

@8

bands

The Ladells Secret Abilities Dark Seas Static Waves The Strike

BELL cho mr v grim Dj d

february 19, 2015 | 39

#BESTOFUTAHMUSIC

Zigga House of Lewis Umang Yze New Truth

| CITY WEEKLY |

DJ Feral Cat DJ Bentley Dj Luva Luva Shields J Godina

rap

BELL cho mr v grim Dj d

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Jay Citrus Illwinded P Dine Krew Lost,the Artist Q1

| cityweekly.net |

BELLO choice mr. vandal grimblee Dj delmaggio


RANDY'S RECORD SHOP CONCERTS & CLUBS VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net $2 LP Sale February 20th and 21st Most LP's valued $2-$7, some $8-$10

â&#x20AC;&#x153;UTAHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STOREâ&#x20AC;? SINCE 1978

TUE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FRI 11AM TO 7PM â&#x20AC;˘ SAT 10AM TO 6PM â&#x20AC;˘ CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM

Park City Latin Night: Henrique Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Agostini & FunkeeBoss (Ciseroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Red Cup Party: DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) Gary Puckett & the Union Gap (Egyptian Theatre) The Brothers Comatose, Bullets & Belles (O.P. Rockwell) Open Mic (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Monday 2.23 Salt Lake City The Steepwater Band (Bleu Bistro) Stacey Kent (Capitol Theatre) Cool Jazz Piano With Doc Miller (Dopo) Mark Chaney Trio (Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig Pub) Revivalist, Household, Hearts Like Lions, Fetis (The Loading Dock) Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) DJ Babylon Down, Roots Rawka (The Woodshed)

| cityweekly.net |

Park City Galactic, Kung Fu (Park City Live) Shannon Runyon (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Tuesday 2.24 Salt Lake City The Steepwater Band (Bleu Bistro) Karaoke With KJ Sauce (Club 90) Steve Aoki, Headhunterz, Caked Up, Dirtyphonics, Reid Stefan (The Complex) Hell Jam (Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daughter) Brazilian Jazz With Alan Sandomir & Ricardo Romero (Dopo) Controlled Burn (Gracieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Never Shout Never, Hayley Kiyoko, Me Like Bees (In the Venue/Club Sound) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Capsize, To the Wind, Exalt (Kilby Court) Open Mic (The Royal) Taboo Tuesday Karaoke (Three Alarm Saloon) Roboclip, Oceanids, Uinta, Turtleboy (The Urban Lounge) Karaoke That Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Suck (The Woodshed)

Park City DJ Stereo Sparks (Ciseroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Talia Keys (The Spur Bar & Grill)

Utah County Open Mic (Velour) Open Mic (The Wall)

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

The Basement Whiskey Series 1/3oz Irish Whiskey Tasting

Wednesday March 4th at 6:30pm TULLAMORE DEW â&#x20AC;˘ BUSHMILLS 10YR â&#x20AC;˘ JAMESON BLACK â&#x20AC;˘ JAMESON GOLD JAMESON 18YR â&#x20AC;˘ KNAPPOGUE CASTLE 12YR â&#x20AC;˘ KNAPPOGUE CASTLE 16YR SHERRY FINISH REDBREAST 12YR â&#x20AC;˘ REDBREAST 21YR

$70/Person, Includes Light Apps & Gratuity RSVP to:

info@bourbonhouseslc.com

40 | february 19, 2015

| CITY WEEKLY |

FULL FEATURE ALARM W/

$%0%.$).'/.6%()#,%!.$&5.#4)/.3 %842!0!243 +%93 -/$5,%3/2,!"/2-!9"%.%%$%$

w w w.S o u n d 7a r e h o u s e U t a h. c o m HOURS 10:00 TO 7:00

FREE LAYAWAY NO

MON-SAT CLOSED SUNDAY

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla

PAYMENT 90 DAY OPTION

Se Habla

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070 EspaĂąol s/'$%.7!,,!6%  EspaĂąol s/2%-.34!4%  MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 02/25/15

19 east 200 south | bourbonhouseslc.com


CONCERTS & CLUBS Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

This is NOT A Lounge Act! os Our Dueling Pian T are Smoking HO

"2).'4()3!$).&/2

&2%%#/6%2 "%&/2% 201 East 300 South, Salt Lake City

WWW.TAVERNACLE.COM

Wednesday 2.25 Salt Lake City The4OnTheFloor, Candyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s River House, Matthew & the Hope (Bar Deluxe) In Flames, All That Remains (The Complex) Martin Sexton, Brothers McCann (The Depot) Karl Densonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tiny Universe, Roosevelt Collier (The State Room) Best of Utah Music Second DJ Showcase: DJ Feral Cat, DJ Bentley, DJ Luva Luva, Shields, J Godina (The Urban Lounge)

Utah County

Sunday

DAYTONA 500 PARTY!

Great Food and Fabulous Prizes | One of the Biggest Parties in the Valley

WEST COAST SWING DANCE LESSONS FIRST LESSON FREE 5:30PM-6:30PM

Michael Barrow, Eric Danielson, Tommy Gunn, Carlos Viitanen (Velour)

monday GEEKS WHO DRINK

The

Westerner

7pm -FREE- Play for prizes

Tuesday

KARAOKE W/ KJ SAUCE 8PM

COUNTRY DANCE HALL, BAR & GRILL

Wednesday

COMEDY OPEN MIC FREE TEXAS HOLD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;EM W/ CASH PRIZE 8PM!

ST. PARTYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY

Thursday LUNCH & LIVE MUSIC THURSDAYS 12-2PM

GREEN BEER & GIVEAWAYS LIVE MUSIC WITH KALEB AUSTIN PATTYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;O FIRE PITS NO COVER BEFORE 8 P.M.

7PM - NO COVER

FREE MECHANICAL BULL RIDES &2%%0//,s&2%%+!2!/+%

friday

FEB 20TH - LIVE MUSIC W/ TROUBLE WITH TRIXIE 9PM

Fashion show 5pm-6pm FREE APPETIZERS FREE Line Dance Lessons 7PM-8:30PM

saturday

LADIESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; NIGHT

NO COVER FOR LADIES FREE BEGINNER LINE DANCING LESSONS NO COVER BEFORE 8PM

saturdays

LIVE MUSIC NO COVER BEFORE 8PM

www.we ste r n e r s lc .c om

3360 S. REDWOOD RD. s801-972-5447 s WED-SAT 6PM-2AM

MARDI GRAS MASQUERADE BALL King & Queen of the Court Prizes Awarded

LIVE MUSIC W/ TROUBLE WITH TRIXIE

PAINTNITE 5-7PM REGISTER ONLINE AT PAINTNITE.COM PRIVATE AND SEMI-PRIVATE SPACE FOR MEETINGS AND PARTIES

CALL TO BOOK YOUR SPACE TODAY.

FREE WI-FI

FREE POOL EVERYDAY

follow us on facebook & twitter @club90slc

150 WEST 9065 SOUTH CLUB90SLC.COM s 801.566.3254

february 19, 2015 | 41

7PM - NO COVER

W/ THIS ISYOUR BAND

9PM-12PM You are the lead singer! Check out their set list at: thisisyourband.com

fridays

thursdays

FREE COUPLES DANCE LESSONS

LIVE BAND KARAOKE

| CITY WEEKLY |

FREE LINE DANCING LESSONS

$8.95 Buffet and Live Music

wednesdays

STEIN WEDNESDAY

7PM $5 Cover

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Saturday, March 14

| cityweekly.net |

Sing for Progressive $ Jackpot

TACO TUESDAY- TWO FOR $2


PHOTO

42 | february 19, 2015

OF THE WEEK

WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY ING ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOM TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY

Adult Call to place your ad

801-575-7028

Treat Yourself and

We’ll Treat

You

ESCORTS Visit afyescorts.com to view our models

(801) 307-8199

| CITY WEEKLY • ADULT |

| cityweekly.net |

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

anonymously Confess your

i slept with my best friend’s husband

seCrets

Cityweekly.net/Confess

Jobs Rentals ll e S / y u B Trade

post your free online classified ads at

@

CityWeekly


CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2015

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Across

Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answers

february 19, 2015 | 43

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

SUDOKU

1. Bits of harmless mischief 2. Central Florida city 3. More judicious 4. "____ a Thousand Times" (1955 Jack Palance film) 5. "Henry & June" role

52. Cara of "Fame" 53. "Give me a break!" 54. Novelist Zora ____ Hurston 55. Boardroom execs 57. "It's ____ country!" 58. Grammy winner Adams 59. Hype 60. Feverish fits 63. Yale School of Drama degs. 67. Like Advil or Aleve: Abbr.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Down

6. Nuts (over) 7. Tahrir Square's locale 8. Like a parquet floor 9. Good way to defuse a bomb 10. Dean's list, e.g. 11. "West Side Story" role 12. ____-frutti 13. Xerox competitor 18. Air rifle ammo 24. "East" on a grandfather clock 26. Start of many a countdown 28. AARP focus: Abbr. 30. Word before or after "down" 31. Itemized bill: Abbr. 32. "Snooki and Jwoww" airer 33. Deli container 34. Rapper with the #1 album "Hip Hop Is Dead" 36. "Rock and Roll, Hoochie ____" (1974 hit) 37. Company name ending 38. Inquire 41. "Guns" 42. ____-Caps (movie candy) 45. Artist Lichtenstein 47. Lad 49. "Friends" friend 50. Some plasma TVs

| cityweekly.net |

1. Behind 7. #1 on Air Force One 10. Can't stand 14. First national park east of the Mississippi 15. Palindromic woman's name 16. "Movin' ____" (TV theme song) 17. What Hillary sees when her husband's irate? 19. Trivial objections 20. "Twittering Machine" artist Paul 21. Hussein : Obama :: ____ : Garfield 22. Palindromic man's name 23. Famed New York restaurateur 25. What gardeners eagerly wait for at the depot? 27. ABC comedy "Black-____" 29. Salon employee 30. Tell a chemist who pulls up in his car that you've got some Fe he might like for a price? 35. Telecommunications giant that becomes a carmaker when its first two letters are removed 39. Start to matter? 40. Wild guesses 43. Hollywood's Chaney Jr. and Sr. 44. '80s-'90s den combo unit 46. Function of the Ten Commandments? 48. "Keystone" bunch of film 51. Bird call 52. With 66-Across, 1959 hit by the Flamingos (and a homophonic hint to solving 17-, 25-, 30- and 46-Across) 56. Start of a Fred Flintstone cry 61. Syngman of South Korea 62. Early aft. hour 64. Croaker 65. Key with four sharps: Abbr. 66. See 52-Across 68. Simba's best friend in "The Lion King" 69. Jazz style 70. Military command 71. Cabinet dept. 72. Alternative to -enne 73. Dogs often pick them up


| cityweekly.net |

| COMMUNITY |

44 | february 19, 2015

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

Kayla O’ Connor​ community

beat

#CWCOMMUNITY send leads to

community@cityweekly.net

Get your fix

COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 44 SLC CONFESSIONS PG. 45 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 45 URBAN LIVING PG. 46

L

ooking for a twist on regular soda and a sweet treat to go with it? Head out to the suburbs of Draper to The Fix, a new business offering mocktails, dirty sodas, and homemade sugar cookies to the thirsty residents of Salt Lake County. The Fix opened on February 8, 2014 and so far the reviews have been glowing. Located inside the Chevron at 1302 East Draper Parkway, The Fix has a drive up window so people can order their favorite drink and sugar cookie to go. “If soda and/or cookies aren’t your thing, you can always get anything that is available at the convenience store through the drive up window while the rest of your friends are ordering cookies and soda,” says Karissa Beckman, Draper resident and owner of The Fix. “Fixed” drinks range in price from $1.49 to $2.19 and are all named after cartoon characters, like Darkwing Duck (Dr. Pepper, coconut, vanilla cream), Aquaman (Sprite, blue coconut, strawberry), and Princess Peach (lemonade, peach, pineapple, pomegranate, and fresh limes). “My favorite is the Papa Smurf,” explains Beckman. That’s Mountain Dew with coconut and raspberry puree. “I get it diet so I can still have a cookie!” The cookies are $1.79 each or a dozen for $14.99. And if Salt Lake City residents are wondering if they’re worth the trip down the freeway, the answer is absolutely. Beckman bakes and decorates all the cookies herself from scratch and her customers are obsessed. “My three year old and I loved The Fix cookies!” says Kristen Rockwood of Sandy. “One of the best I’ve had and I love its convenient location.” Allison Rasmussen of Bountiful agrees. “It’s seriously the best sugar cookie I’ve ever had.” Part of the reason the cookies are so good is that they come from an old family recipe. “My mom grew up in a town of 200 people [Antimony, Utah] with 10 siblings, so needless to say they all had to learn to bake,” explains Beckman. “My grandparents owned a cattle auction where my grandma would make sugar cookies and pies to sell. People

INSIDE /

Feeling Stuck? Short Term Counseling Inexpensive & Effective

came from all over for her cooking. The recipes have been passed down and with a tweak here and there, I created a really good sugar cookie. Not to mention they are pretty cute, too.” In addition to soda and cookies, The Fix offers mugs ($9.99) and growlers ($10.99) for sale. Customers who return with their mugs or growlers can get refills for a reduced price. The Fix is open from 6:00 AM to midnight, seven days a week. Addicted to the cookies and don’t have time to drive to Draper? Don’t worry, The Fix’s sugar cookies are also in the countertop bakery cases at three other Chevron locations along the Wasatch Front: Sugarhouse at 2110 South 1300 East, Park City at 6500 North Highway 226, and Spanish Fork at 1085 Chappel Drive. For more information about The Fix, check them out on Facebook at https:// www.facebook.com/thefixutah, Twitter at @thefixutah and on Instagram at @thefixutah. n

CALL 801.913.1732

NEW WINDSHIELDS Installed starting at $107.77 in shop. They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

We Waive $100 of your

insurance deductible.

801-414-4103

awI Nd S hI e l dr e p l ac e me NT.co m

certificates available in

Lead Software Engineer @ Dealertrack Systems, Inc. (South Jordan, UT) F/T Lead software development team, analyze business requirements, & design, develop & maintain software systems & data architecture. Integrate disparate technologies, troubleshoot problems, scope & estimate projects, & write technical documentation. Coordinate on- and off-shore engineering teams. Communicate w/ technical management & report risks. Reqts: Bachelor’s degree (or foreign equivalent) in Computer Science, Information Systems or rltd & 5 years of experience in job off’d or as Project Manager/ Leader, Assistant Manager, or rltd. The employer will accept three (3) years of university-level studies & two (2) years of experience to meet the bachelor’s degree requirement. Experience must include three (3) years of experience in the automobile industry & five (5) years of experience w/ the following: IBM iSeries platform; RPG programming language; managing an offshore engineering team; managing multiple software development projects; working on all phases of software development lifecycle. Any suitable combination of education, training or experience is acceptable. To apply, send res & cvr ltr to J. Williams, Dealertrack Systems, Inc., 10757 S. River Front Parkway, South Jordan, UT 84095. Indicate job title & specify ref code: TM-U. “EOE”

APPLY NOW

JOIN SLC’s most FUN AND EXCITING WORK ENVIRONMENT. Earn more than

$30,000 /yr at entry level -Daily Cash bonuses and spiffs-Part Time positions Available-Paid TrainingNo Experience Needed

elIte Pay GlOBal

57 west 200 south in the heart of Downtown SLC please send resumes to: SLCJOBS@elitepayglobal.com


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY R O B

BRE Z S NY

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Edward III, a medieval English king, had a favorite poet: Geoffrey Chaucer. In 1374, the king promised Chaucer a big gift in appreciation for his talents: a gallon of wine every day for the rest of his life. That’s not the endowment I would have wanted if I had been Chaucer. I’d never get any work done if I were quaffing 16 glasses of wine every 24 hours. Couldn’t I instead be provided with a regular stipend? Keep this story in mind, Libra, as you contemplate the benefits or rewards that might become available to you. Ask for what you really need, not necessarily what the giver initially offers.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) What is the proper blend for you these days? Is it something like 51 percent pleasure and 49 percent business? Or would you be wiser to shoot for 49 percent pleasure and 51 percent business? I will leave that decision up to you, Taurus. Whichever way you go, I suggest that you try to interweave business and pleasure as often as possible. You are in one of those action-packed phases when fun dovetails really well with ambition. I’m guessing that you can make productive connections at parties. I’m betting that you can spice up your social life by taking advantage of what comes to you through your work.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) To make the cocktail known as Sex on the Beach, you mix together cranberry juice, orange juice, pineapple juice, peach schnapps, and vodka. There is also an alternative “mocktail” called Safe Sex on the Beach. It has the same fruit juices, but no alcohol. Given the likelihood that your inner teenager will be playing an important role in your upcoming adventures, Scorpio, I recommend that you favor the Safe-Sex-on-the-Beach metaphor rather than the Sex-on-the-Beach approach. At least temporarily, it’s best to show a bit of protective restraint toward the wild and sometimes erratic juvenile energy that’s pushing to be expressed.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) In 1900, the world’s most renowned mathematicians met at a conference in Paris. There the German whiz David Hilbert introduced his master list of 23 unsolved mathematical problems. At the time, no one had done such an exhaustive inventory. His well-defined challenge set the agenda for math research throughout the 20th century. Today he’s regarded as an influential visionary. I’d love to see you come up with a list of your own top unsolved problems, Gemini. You now have extra insight about the catalytic projects you will be smart to work on and play with during the coming years.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) In Herman Melville’s short story “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” a lawyer hires a man named Bartleby to work in his office. At first Bartleby is a model employee, carrying out his assignments with dogged skill. But one day everything begins to change. Whenever his boss instructs him to do a specific task, Bartleby says, “I would prefer not to.” As the days go by, he does less and less, until finally he stops altogether. I’d like to propose, Sagittarius, that you take inspiration from his slowdown. Haven’t you done enough for now? Haven’t you been exemplary in your commitment to the daily struggle? Don’t you deserve a break in the action so you can recharge your psychospiritual batteries? I say, yes. Maybe you will consider making this your battle cry: “I would prefer not to.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “It isn’t normal to know what we want,” said pioneering psychologist Abraham Maslow. “It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.” That’s the bad news, Pisces. The good news is that you may be on the verge of rendering that theory irrelevant. In the coming weeks, you will be better primed to discover what you really want than you have been in a long time. I suggest you do a ritual in which you vow to unmask this treasured secret. Write a formal statement in which you declare your intention to achieve full understanding of the reasons you are alive on this planet.

february 19, 2015 | 45

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In 1962, Edward Albee published his play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? It won numerous awards and is still performed by modern theater groups. Albee says the title came to him as he was having a beer at a bar in New York City. When he went to the restroom, he spied the words “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” scrawled in soap on the mirror. I urge you to be alert for that kind of inspiration in the coming days, Virgo: unexpected, provocative, and out of context. You never know when or where you may be furnished with clues about the next plot twist of your life story.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) The art of the French Aquarian painter Armand Guillaumin (18411927) appears in prestigious museums. He isn’t as famous as his fellow Impressionists Paul Cézanne and Camille Pissarro, but he wielded a big influence on them both. His career developed slowly because he had to work a day job to earn a living. When he was 50 years old, he won a wad of free money in the national lottery, and thereafter devoted himself full-time to painting. I’m not saying you will enjoy a windfall like that anytime soon, Aquarius, but such an event is possible. At the very least, your income could rise. Your odds of experiencing financial luck will increase to the degree that you work to improve the best gifts you have to offer your fellow humans.

| COMMUNITY |

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) When faced with a big decision, you might say you want to “sleep on it.” In other words, you postpone your final determination until you gather more information and ripen your understanding of the pressing issues. And that could indeed involve getting a good night’s sleep. What happens in your dreams may reveal nuances you can’t pry loose with your waking consciousness alone. And even if you don’t recall your dreams, your sleeping mind is busy processing and reworking the possibilities. I recommend that you make liberal use of the “sleep on it” approach in the coming weeks, Leo. Revel in the wisdom that wells up in you as you’re lying down in the dark.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” That’s what American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson advised. Even if you’re not naturally inclined to see the potential wisdom of that approach, I invite you to play around with it for the next three weeks. You don’t need to do it forever. It doesn’t have to become a permanent fixture in your philosophy. Just for now, experiment with the possibility that trying lots of experiments will lead you not just to new truths, but to new truths that are fun, interesting and useful.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) “Spanipelagic” is an adjective scientists use to describe creatures that typically hang out in deep water but float up to the surface on rare occasions. The term is not a perfect metaphorical fit for you, since you come up for air more often than that. But you do go through phases when you’re inclined to linger for a long time in the abyss, enjoying the dark mysteries and fathomless emotions. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s what you’ve been doing lately. Any day now, however, I expect you’ll be rising up from the Great Down Below and headed topside for an extended stay.

| cityweekly.net |

ARIES (March 21-April 19) There are many different facets to your intelligence, and each matures at a different rate. So, for example, your ability to think symbolically may evolve more slowly than your ability to think abstractly. Your wisdom about why humans act the way they do may ripen more rapidly than your insight into your own emotions. In the coming weeks, I expect one particular aspect of your intelligence to be undergoing a growth spurt: your knowledge of what your body needs and how to give it what it needs.


| cityweekly.net |

46 | february 19, 2015

Jobs Rentals ll Buy/Se Trade post your free online classified ads

at:

801-808-0411

LMT #5275911-1109

@

DON’T BE SHEEPISH! Rent From Partlow!

2 bed/1 bath home. Great neiGhborhood & schools. holiday/millcreek area. pets ok.

$1250 a month utilities included

801-870-6071

ROOM for RENT

layton

U of U

lovely 2 bdrm. 1.5 bath townhome! large bedrooms, swamp cooler, dishwasher, hookups! $745

awesome 1 bdrm. four-plex, Month to Month lease! pet Friendly, right off traX! $575

Salt lake

9th and 9th

sweet 1 bdrm quiet six plex! Just north of slcc (south city campus)! Hook-ups, cat oK! $635

charming 1 bdrm. divided Victorian, Vintage details, clawfoot tub, so cutE! $725

U of U

Salt lake

steal of a deal MassiVE 4 bdrm. 3 bath single family home! Month to month lease! Fireplace! a Must sEE! $1200

King sized 2 bdrm four-plex! central Heat and air! Washer dryer hook-ups, covered parking! $795-$845

For a FrEE listing oF all oF our rEntals, plEasE drop by our nEW oFFicE locatEd at 440 s. 700 E. stE #203

partloW rEnts 801-484-4446

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Chair, Downtown Merchants Association

Master Planning

home for rent

CityWeekly

URBAN L I V IN

• • • • • • • • • •

Save $ Rent Negotiable High Standards Furnished Male Only Kitchen Washer/Dryer Home Gym • Cable TV High Speed Internet $100 to Move In

801-809-6172

NEAR TRAX

MOVE IN TODAY

Y

ou’d never want to build a home next door to the Sriracha sauce plant – too stinky. The maker of Sriracha (David Tran) also doesn’t want you living there because he knows you’ll bitch and moan about the odors that waft from his manufacturing plant. It used to be no big deal to have homeowners living by the hot sauce company but now Sriracha appears to be more popular than ketsup. The plant in Irwindale, CA is working overtime to keep up with demand and neighbors have been complaining for over a year that the smell of chilies is too much and they want the plant moved. We have zoning laws to restrict certain types of use for certain types of land. Changes in use can happen quickly or slowly. Mr. Tran’s company wasn’t a problem until his product became popular, but he can’t just pick up and move to a cozy residential neighborhood a few miles down the road. Local planning and zoning officials watch this sort of thing and make rules to protect and guide us all no matter where we live and work. Right now Salt Lake City is working to update the entire ‘Master Plan’ of zoning/uses for Downtown SLC. Twenty five years ago when the Downtown Master Plan was created, there was no ‘Intermodal Hub’ or Gateway area. The zoning within the master plan of a Central Business District (CBD) was created in 1982 and overlays most of downtown and it is a huge source of income for the tax base of economic development in the capitol city. The CBD has never been changed or expanded, yet the city has grown to the west and plans for even more construction around the HUB and Gateway. The Redman Building and old Club Axis have been torn down on 500 West and 100 South to make way for a huge apartment complex. The stables for the carriage horses next to the Salt Lake Hardware building will be bulldozed soon for another apartment. By not expanding its map, the CBD ignores future growth and income on the west side. SLC has spent millions on creating a transportation HUB west of the shelters and RDA Director D. J. Baxter is trolling for new developers to build on two blocks just south of the Road Home. Want to know what a Master Plan looks like? Even better, want to comment on the Master Plan draft? Molly Robinson of Planning and Zoning has been working like a fiend, meeting with shareholders and the public for a year trying to get feedback from you. Her deadline before submitting to the City Council is February 25th. Go on line and see what you think and put in your two cents worth: www.slcgov.com/planning/planning-master-plans​n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

Scholarships*

Massage - Waxing - Facials

| COMMUNITY |

Rejuvenation Day Spa

For adults (YOU) Not based on high school grades 801-392-9534

Stevens-Henager College scholarshipshc.com *Scholarship awards are limited & only available to those who qualify.

Man to Man Massage & Hair reMoval

MASSAGE BY PAUL You need it I’ve got it. Best damn massage and hair removal in town.

Call Paul at

801-554-1790 lmt#4736254-4701

Tom’s massage

Massage & hair removal for men... LET’S BE CREATIVE...

Call Tom at 801-574-6062

FANTASTIC MASSAGE Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

WAITSTAFF/SERVERS: $9.25 p/h. Awesome hours, off by 5pm! Conveniently located on major bus and Trax lines, right by the University of Utah. Part Time positions include paid leave benefits and a complimentary meal during shifts worked. Email resume to: rudy@friendship-manor.com or call 801-582-3100

FREE GED CLASSES 877.466.0881


We Bring The

Art

Drivers: Class A

Newest

EquipmEnt oN the RoAD

to Your Next Get Together or Private Party

Use This Code at Checkout For

% Your

50

off

registration: CitYWeeklY15

expires 2.28.15

801.824.5228 mobileartparties.com

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

LIBRARIANS

100 Plus Trucks Coming in the Next 4 months.

we ARe Now hiRiNg: Entry Level & Experienced Drivers $5,000 Sign-ON Bonus, Tuition Reimbursement, Pet on Your Truck, Paid Orientation, Up to $.44 CPM, Guaranteed Pay Packages & the respect you deserve!

CAll toDAy 1-800-547-9169 (Dial 1) or Check us out Online at: maytrucking.com

Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com Selling homes for 30 years in the Land of Zion

Julie A. Brizzée Loan Officer 801-747-1206 julie@brizzee.net www.brizzee.net

Granting loans for 27 years in Happy Valley- NMLS#243253

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

NMLS #67180

Real Estate That’s what we do.

J.R. Howa Agent jr@iproperties.com Office: 801.355.0600 Mobile: 801.870.8536

Contact me for all of your commercial needs.

| cityweekly.net |

| COMMUNITY |

february 19, 2015 | 47

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today. SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM


| cityweekly.net |

| CITY WEEKLY • Backstop |

48 | february 19, 2015

Top Dollar paiD

For your car, truck or van. running or not, lost title

WORDS

The BacksTop For Rates Call: 801.413.0947

i Can help!

@ CityWeekly

LOVEs ME? LOVEs ME NOT?? Find out with a reading :~) 801-577-2248 EnchantedEye.com Your Psychic Valentine Connection

CReDiT TROUBLe? NeeD A CAR?

801-895-3947

Mark Miller Loan Center will get you in a car you deserve today. 801-506-1215 mmsloancenter.com

CarSoldForCash.com

DUB NUTRiTiON

LOOKING FOR TRUE LEADERS PART-TIME JOB = FULL-TIME PAY CALL 385-321-6203 FOR MORE INFO

801-359-7788

sALsA LeeDOs CATeRs!

download our new

Authentic Mexican Food Call today! 801-565-8818

phone app

NAiLs BY sARAH

Acrylics/Shellac/Mani/Pedi Licensed Nail Tech 10+ Years 801-599-7302

LOW COsT BANkRUPTCY

Dreaming about

Experienced Attorney Scott Mitchell 801-942-7048

home sweet home?

PsYCHiC iNsiGHTs ANsWeRs 801 560-3761 www.windsweptcenter.net

CALL ME

FANTAsY MAiDs TO YOU Call 801-738-6526 for Rates americanfantasymaids.com ALWAYS HIRING!!!

Sylvia Metos 801-631-6250

Windermere Real Estate

LeT Me sCULPT YOUR BODY Massage by Angela 801-953-5771 LMT#4952038

LOOK GOOD & BE STRONG

MAssAGe BY CHAD

Swedish/Deep tissue sport massage. All Cc accpt 801-259-9661 LMT 114944-4701

Mike’s BBQ

Catering & To-Go (385) 259-6164 | 826 E. 9400 S.

JOiN OUR sTReeT TeAM Email Resume to nenright@cityweekly.net

PLeAsURe seekeRs!

Do it within your schedule

Find the ultimate gift The Dahlia Room 247 E. 300 S. SLC | 801-953-0088

Join our online community today!

www.leanbody6.com

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • No TITLE NEEDED!

THe BLeU BisTRO Call us now To Cater your Event 801-583-8331

CiTY WeekLY sTORe SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

We PAY CASH

Ogden

W. 12th St We’ll even pick it up 763 801-564-6960 tearapart.com

Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

GOT WORDs?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

City Weekly Feb 19, 2015  

Broken Bad

City Weekly Feb 19, 2015  

Broken Bad