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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 9 NEWS 30 A&E 32 DINE 36 MUSIC 44 CINEMA 45 COMMUNITY

MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR.

Opinion, p. 6 Our most opinionated contributor wears many hats—Vietnam-era Army veteran, poet, husband, dog dad, real dad and novelist. One reviewer calls his Four Corners, One Square a “hilarious satire of Mormonism.” You can purchase the book now on Amazon.

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Cover story, Sept. 12, “Elimination Round”

Thanks for doing this. FWIW: Super easy to read on a wide-screen monitor. DENNIS READ HANKS Via Twitter Trump 2020, the sequel: Make the liberals cry again. JOSH RUSSELL Via Facebook

Opinion, Sept. 12, “A Single-Use, ThrowAway World

I couldn’t agree more with this opinion. It’s spot on. Glad to know I’m not the only one who sees it this way. This Michael S. Robinson Sr. has penned a few great ones. He should tweet. I’d love to hear more from him. @VALENTINE4USA Via Twitter Utahns are amazingly undereducated. Consistently. MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook

This state was founded on a doctrine of a matchstick man who evaded the law every chance he got and conflated his own ego and instituted rampant paranoia of authority and xenophobia in the “church” that has lead us to be dragged, kicking and screaming, through the century of progress. CARLIAL SLONGSTOFSKY Via Twitter

Hits & Misses, Sept. 12, “Religious Pushback”

I dunno about Luz Escamilla. I’m Jewish and I don’t answer to Israel. Did Jackie Biskupski answer to the LGBTQ community? Or is this only a valid question if one is in the majority? SHERYL HUSSEIN GINSBERG Via cityweekly.net

News, Sept. 12, “Building a Democracy: Local War on Terror vet weighs in on Syria’s decentralized government model”

Well done interviewing a vet who’s been there, but the title implies that the PYD/SDF’s system governs all of Syria, as opposed to just the northeast of the country referred to as either Rojava (“the west”, as in western Kurdistan), or the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria. RITCHIE PAGE Via cityweekly.net We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


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OPINION

Utahns Perpetuating the Myth: The Christian Right

Like a litter of puppies whose young eyes have not yet learned to focus, Utahns, at least politically, are still in the La-La Land of sucklings. The sad reality is that, as long as they rely on a religion and a party to tell them what’s OK, they can never emerge from the ignorant-innocence of neonatal bliss. Safely bedded down in its kennel, Utah’s population somehow misses a critical challenge: to make individual choices on the basis of right and wrong, rather than holding to the fragile, flawed belief that religious and political labels make the candidate. What’s happening to Utah’s electorate is symptomatic of a cancer eating away at our country. I realize that I’m just one, small voice, but I am screaming, “Utah, wake up!” In a recent Deseret News article, Kelsey Dallas, its national religion editor, asked the question, “Faith and Grace: Where was religion during the Democratic debate?” Really, now! I gasped when I saw it—not that I should be at all surprised by the sophomoric stupidity of the article’s title. It simply wasn’t the work of a mature adult, nor is Dallas’ question one that an incisive American would ever ask. Fortunately, there were

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. quite a few reader comments regarding the article, and almost all of them flatly denounced Dallas’ shallow assertion, that, somehow, religion should have been center-stage. In a direct response to Dallas’ question, one reader wrote, “Where was religion? ... Where it was supposed to be.” Another noted, “The environment, education, immigration, gun violence, health care—let’s bow our heads and pray for answers.” There were a bunch of comments that chastised the writer, particularly over the blurring of church and state, noting that the question of a candidate’s religiosity is a taboo subject, and that the Constitution itself prohibits the application of religious affiliations or standards to candidate qualification. Frankly, I have to shake my head—not just because of the low quality of the journalism, but because printing such garbage is an abject waste of trees. The sad thing is that the Dallas article is a symptom of Utah’s sickness— not that such rabid misuse of religion doesn’t infect other states and regions. Many have similar problems, but journalism in Utah is a glaring failure in its post as “watchdog of society” and bears at least some of the blame for masking some of the most important issues. There was a time when there was some semblance of balance in Utah’s print media, but that disappeared after The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became the effective owner of Salt Lake’s two daily newspapers. For years, The Salt Lake Tribune had been the voice of mostly-nonpartisan reason and provided a place for ideas that were not part of Utah’s religious mainstream. Whatever independence the Trib had in taking on the matters of minorities was lost when investor greed effectively made it just another Dereset News, and, more importantly, an additional voice for Mormonism. The two newspapers might have different names, but they are now mostly the same, carefully refraining from saying anything negative about

the LDS church. Utahns should have held a solemn funeral, because, when the independence of the Trib was lost, a good friend was buried and gone. That’s the sad truth. Getting back to Dallas’ article, castigating the Democrat candidates for not talking about religion, Utahns need to start asking the more relevant questions, rather than accusing the Democrats of being ungodly. The absurd nonsense of equating a political party with some informal alliance with the forces of evil needs to end. Instead of requiring the specious use of God as a campaign prop, Utahns should instead be asking: 1. Does the married candidate frolic with hookers and grab crotches on a whim and then spend hundreds of thousands of dollars buying their silence? 2. Can this candidate be trusted to be truthful? 3. Will this candidate work to unite our country? 4. Is this person capable of admitting mistakes and taking responsibility? 5. Will this candidate use care in making decisions that impact the future of our country? 6. Will this candidate respect the voice of the press and its importance in our society? As a journalist, Dallas has failed to take a balanced approach to the news, making it clear she is merely a pawn for the myth of the “Christian right.” (Remember, it was the waving of that banner that put us in our current Trump-predicament.) If what we’re looking for is a candidate who breaks virtually every one of the Ten Commandments on a daily basis and still claims to be a Christian, we have plenty of them. Wearing religion on one’s sleeve is no indication of goodness or quality. I’d much rather have irreligious, good men running for office than a bunch of morally depraved Bible-toters telling voters how important God is in their lives. CW

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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Every year, activists step out to oppose the culture of rape, sexual harassment and sexual assault. And this year, the Walk of No Shame focuses on justice, which can only be defined through the lenses of survivors themselves. “For some, this means using the justice system with results,” the event’s Facebook page says. “For others, justice may be much more personal. We will address how justice is not one size fits all, with personal stories and educational speakers.” Make a poster and bring a sign to walk from Washington Square to the Utah Capitol and send a message to legislators. Washington Square, 451 S. State, Saturday, Sept. 28, noon-2 p.m., free, bit.ly/2m6bYN6.

NO SNOW?

As part of Climate Week, the Healthy Environment Alliance of Utah (HEAL Utah), Torrey House Press and Black Diamond are sponsoring an interactive climate change discussion—titled Where Will the Snow Go?—that you won’t want to miss, especially if you’re an outdoor enthusiast. “From altering how we access activities to morphing our relationship with the outdoors and each other, our climate will—and already is—drastically altering what it’s like to live in Utah,” the event’s Facebook page says. Panelists, including winter sports athlete Angel Collinson, tell attendees how they can make a difference in the fight against climate change. A state legislator will also be present to answer questions. Black Diamond headquarters, 2084 E. 3900 South, Monday, Sept. 30, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2lZrSsU.

MAYORS’ TOWN HALL

If you live in Millcreek, Cottonwood Heights or Sandy, you won’t want to miss this chance to hear about the challenges we face to clean the air. And, hey, it’s not just a problem for the residents of these cities. Air quality issues span the county—and the country. At Mayors’ Town Hall—For Stewardship of the Air and Climate, mayors are joined by professors of atmospheric science and environmental law, so you know you can hear facts as well as opinions. You get some of both from the student activists who are participating, too. The discussion is followed by a Q&A. Albion Middle School, 2755 E. 8890 South, Sandy, Thursday, Oct. 3, 6:30-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2ks4WC1.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Perilous Privacy

When someone says they value their privacy, the joke has been that the Russians do, too. Let’s take voting, for instance. “One of every eight Utah voters now uses a new law to prevent public release of voter registration data,” wrote The Salt Lake Tribune’s Lee Davidson. In other words, there’s no way for a political party to know your party affiliation. The Republican National Committee worries that voter fraud will be harder to discern and candidates won’t be able to contact their voters. A new state audit says, oops, they found weaknesses in the driver license security system. And there’s another funny thing. Apparently, citizens overseas could vote electronically, and they’re doing it by a (maybe secure) app. “Utah is the third state in which overseas voting with the platform has been piloted,” according to governing.com, which profiled an app that validates overseas votes. We’ll see how that translates into privacy.

Land of Abatement

We’ve said it before: Utah likes nothing better than empty land, a magnet for development, no matter how inappropriate. The Trib recently ran a story about Salt Lake City’s Mosquito Abatement District and the woeful tale of the quixotic mosquito abaters. The district was created in 1923 to stem the tide of the annoying insects. That’s hardly possible now, and the annoying part is becoming the dangerous part, what with West Nile Virus and the latest equine encephalitis. Still, the nowdeluxe state prison is exempt from taxes that pay for abatement. Who knows what will happen as the inland port proceeds? Quite simply, development disrupts mosquito habitats. And yet, Utah thirsts for that open land, even if we have to raise taxes to get those skeeters.

The Bags, My Friend

There’s nothing like a plastic ban to spark furor in the environmental world. Most recently, the Summit County Council took up the toxic issue, according to KPCW 91.9 FM, and got an earful of everyone’s perspective— it’s not science; it’s emotional; paper bags are toxic, too; and what about the low-income folks? Still, 23 states looked at some 77 legislative proposals to ban plastic bags from 2015-16, the assistant county manager says. In Utah, Park City and Moab forged ahead, only to be greeted by Rep. Mike McKell, R-Spanish Fork, and his continuing attempts to ban the bans. You know, it’s because of business, he says. That’s not the businesses that recycle—they won’t. But McKell thinks businesses will thrive or continue to if they can still use plastic bags. “They blow away. They cause problems that we then have to clean up,” the Summit County manager says. Like the plastic bag itself, the debate is still blowing in the wind.


NEWS Nine-Hole Hustle

Inside the murky underworld of secondhand golf ball sales. BY PETER HOLSLIN pholslin@cityweekly.net @peterholslin

PETER HOLSLIN

I

Dennis Reese cleans off golf balls with an automatic ball washer. He and his brother, David, dive for lost balls at golf courses across Utah and in neighboring states. “Creating something out of nothing is pretty good,” he says.

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Dustin Volk, the PGA golf pro who heads up Layton’s Valley View Golf Course, says he sells the Reeses’ balls in the pro shop but only makes modest returns, moving about $2,000 worth of used balls per year. Kammeyer says well below 10% of the Salt Lake City Golf Division’s annual revenue comes from retail sales, which includes golf balls, clubs and other merchandise. “We try to break even in the end. Some things we make money on, other things we lose it,” Kammeyer says of the retail sales. Green fees and cart rentals serve as a bigger and more reliable revenue stream, he adds. Even so, the Reese twins take pride in their product. At the family garage, Dennis tosses his scuba gear into a silver GMC pickup to go diving for more balls. His destination that day is a muddy-green pond at the Forest Dale Golf Course a couple miles away. Before climbing into his wetsuit, he drops by the course’s shop to say hi. Most of the balls on sale are new, but there’s also a bowl of used balls, sitting next to the cash register like a candy bowl in an office waiting room. Dennis fishes through the bowl and shakes his head. He suspects a rival diver has been in recently, selling the shop inferior product. “We wouldn’t give you a Nitro ball,” he tells the clerk as he inspects a lowergrade ball. “We wouldn’t put a Pinnacle in there either that was scuffed.” That’s just how it goes in the used golf ball game. There might be rules out on the course, but under the water it’s wide open, and anyone with an air tank and a canvas bag can come sweeping in with a hustle of their own. CW

and greatest available for sale,” he adds. One of the municipal courses, Glendale, sells pre-packed golf ball baggies from the Reeses. Operating under the business name DLR, LLC, the brothers have a contract with the city to dive for balls at the municipal courses; they’re free to resell what they find in exchange for handing over a percentage of their bounty back to the golf course after each diving expedition. Often, they end up finding good-quality, mint-condition balls that were lost only weeks, days, possibly even hours earlier. In the green-carpeted garage where they run their operation, they’ve packaged dozens of 12-packs of 2019 Titleist Pro V1s. They sell them for $16 a bag, a steep discount from the $47.95 that 12pack boxes of new balls go for on Amazon. The way the Reeses see it, all these balls are a potential gold mine. Acushnet, the Massachusetts-based company that owns Titleist, reported that it made $524 million in net sales of golf balls in 2018, a 2.3% increase from the year before. During that same period, Callaway drew in $195.6 million in total golf ball sales. David and Dennis, who also pay the bills by running a limousine service and selling steel pipe wholesale, insist that retailers at places like the golf division could be making big bucks of their own. “They make more on a used ball than they do on a brand new ball—by far!” Dennis says of the pro shops they do business with. “The smart guys hire us, we package up balls, they resell the balls basically at no cost to them and then they have a 100% markup.” Other experts, however, seem perplexed at City Weekly’s questions about golf balls.

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courses across the city. According to the records, golf division officials made well over 31,000 wholesale purchases for single golf balls and golf ball packets to sell in pro shops at city-owned courses in 2019. In fiscal year 2018-19, the division spent $21,860 on range balls alone— flight-restricted balls rented out for $10 a bucket at city-run driving ranges. Since the new fiscal year began in July, division officials have spent another $7,885 on yet more range balls, replacing ones that were damaged or lost. Matt Kammeyer, division director, says these whopping figures account for the way golfers burn through balls as a matter of course. “Obviously, it’s the primary component of the game. You need to hit a ball and balls get lost. People rarely hit them straight. They end up in ravines and trees and lakes,” he says. “Typically, I’ll go through three to four, sometimes as much as six balls in a round of golf. If you’re not losing them, they still get worn out.” Kammeyer keeps up with the demand by making sure the courses’ shops are stocked with a steady supply of balls. On the shelves, players can choose from popular models like the top-selling Titleist Pro V1 to more budget-friendly options from Volvik and Bridgestone. New balls sell for anywhere from $2 to $5 each; while used balls go for $1 apiece. “It makes the most sense for us to have a good selection, because when somebody needs them, they’re at the course,” Kammeyer says, noting that shop buyers follow national sales reports to keep track of what’s selling the most. “It’s all demand driven.” By year’s end, they put the balls on clearance. “But next year, we try to have the latest

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n their mom’s garage on a tree-lined street in Sugar House, 64-year-old twins David and Dennis Reese work the angles of Salt Lake City’s underground golf ball trade. On a recent Wednesday afternoon, David is fighting a cold, dressed down in striped pajama pants and a tuckedin blue T-shirt. But he’s still ready for business, taking calls on a Bluetooth earpiece as he swabs, sorts and bags thousands of used balls that he and Dennis—in wetsuits and scuba gear— recently retrieved from golf course ponds and lakes. Dennis works at his brother’s side, feeding hundreds of more balls through a $2,800 automatic ball washer. The machine has a black chassis the size of a deluxe barbecue grill, and it hums along as the balls tumble around inside, soaking in the suds of Dawn dish soap. Dennis runs the balls through several wash cycles, and tosses others aside to get a deeper clean in a top-secret solution. “We’re pretty meticulous on what we do here,” Dennis says. Balls are a central and yet essentially disposable item in golf. Every year, major brands like Titleist and Callaway rake in hundreds of millions of dollars on their most popular balls. Demand is freshly renewed every time a golfer knocks another one of these precious, USGA-approved items into a water hazard during a round, and David and Dennis Reese are among a handful of local divers who see profit potential in this limitless supply of secondhand product. But business ain’t easy, with demand rising and falling depending on the seasons and the whims of local golfers and retailers. “Let’s be honest—you couldn’t make a living doing this,” David shrugs as he sorts balls by color and brand, stuffing them into Ziploc bags to make his own three-packs, six-packs and 12-packs for sale at pro shops around the city. To get a sampling of just how many golf balls are in circulation locally, City Weekly filed a public-records request with the Salt Lake City Golf Division, which operates six full-service municipal golf


10 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | 11

Scott Renshaw, Arts & Entertainment Editor

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of Abravanel Hall to the shut-down-by-the DABC daring of Madazon Can-Can, from the complexities of building a theater season to the unique missions of local art galleries, there’s never a shortage of stories to discover in Utah’s arts scene. You can use our performing arts calendar to help plan your year, but maybe also give yourself permission to explore something you’ve never seen before. Dig in and look around, and let yourself be surprised by what you might find. Because if art is anything, it’s a little bit of everything.

T

here is only one simple thing you can say about art, namely: There is no one simple thing you can say about art. The word is too expansive, and its practitioners too varied, to have it mean only one thing. Sometimes it’s the classical dignity of an operatic or symphonic performance; sometimes it’s the taboo-busting euphoria of a drag performance. It can make you cry, it can make you laugh, it can make you angry. And all of those things are real, all of them legitimate, all of them necessary. This year, our overview of local arts is as wide-ranging as the word “art” itself. From the story behind the creation

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ARTS ISSUE 2019


12 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

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BY KARA D. RHODES

M

adazon Can-Can has a clear mission: To push the envelope and challenge Utah’s stodgy laws—one pasties-clad performance at a time. Case in point: Genit-Hell Yeah, their one-person show birthed from a master’s thesis. After being shooed away from The Gateway (the DABC and even hinted nudity don’t mix, kids), it has found a home at Salt Lake Community College—along with the rest of Wasatch Theatre Co.’s Solo series. “When the going gets tough, apparently academia gets going,” Can-Can jokes. In a frank chat with City Weekly, Can-Can talked about walking the line between censorship and artistic expression, the need for community and their unwavering mission to “change things with tits.”

How was Genit-Hell Yeah born?

It was an experiment. I remember writing up my proposal—I’ve written my master’s proposal at least six times and it has changed immensely—I took all the pieces that I have been working on in the past few years and I strung them into a show and called it Genit-Hell Yeah. I had a moment in my life where I was just, like, I cannot be defined by my body any longer. I cannot be defined by how tall I am; how short I am; how long or short my hair is; whether I have tits or I have a dick or whatever I have on my body. I cannot be defined by that, because I am so much more than that. And those things have influenced how I experience the world naturally, because your casing is what people reflect back to you. ... I cannot exist as just a body any longer and I have to teach people that the body is more like a vehicle: It doesn’t actually tell you a lot about the person. So [that’s how] GentiHell Yeah came around.

Were you surprised by the DABC’s involvement?

It’s all of it. I don’t say much. It’s not like abortion is in there—though I do birth myself on stage—and it’s not like, hey, I can fuck who I want, when I want and how I want. All of those are sub-messages to the actual story line that is very cotton candy, very simplistic, very easily digestible. And, obviously, I am a naked female body, so all of those things are put onto me but, I play as a man. I come out as a naked person and then I put audience members into drag. I put the girl into the ‘pink zone,’ I put the boy into the ‘blue zone’ and then I’m, like, ‘that doesn’t look right,’ and then I switch them. So, it’s more identity-based. But I also have uterus pasties and I have a giant vulva and these giant labia that come out. So there’s not directly a birth conversation, but the idea that I have autonomy over my body is linked to that. So it’s identity, sexuality, autonomy, play.

Finally, what advice would you give little queerdos and outside-the-box thinkers out there who are reading this and are waiting to break out of their shell?

This is a hard one for me, because I’m thinking about what I would say to my younger self, right? I would say, because I’ve been there, lean on your community. The biggest thing you can do is lean on those people who really see you and give you the chances you need to shine. Because, as much as we can get validated and we can connect with things that are occuring outside of our physical sphere, there is a distinct need to stay connected physically in this city. And that’s the only way you’re going to see your desires, your dreams, your visions—whatever it is you have that you want—the only way that is going to happen is having community support behind you. You don’t exist in a vacuum. You are no longer the lone artist alone in a room in the middle of nowhere; success relies on the success of all. So that’s what I would say to the queerdos: Just really lean into your community and don’t be afraid of connection. At the end of the day, you need to lean on the support that supports you. This interview was edited for clarity and length.

Genit-Hell Yeah

SLCC’s Blackbox Theatre 1575 S. State Thursday, Sept. 26, 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 28, 3:30 p.m., $10, 18+ madazoncancan.com

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No. Absolutely not, and that was one of my platforms, right? I cannot be filtered. I spent most of my life being filtered. I am not going to soften anything I say or anything I do, because it’s like asking don’t be who you are.

What is the running theme of Genit-Hell Yeah? Body positivity? Sexuality?

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Knowing Genit-Hell Yeah would be performed in front of local audiences, were you ever tempted to soften its content?

The biggest hurdle is to make sure the audience knows they’re safe. I know that sexuality in this state is taboo, I know it’s hard and that people don’t know exactly what to do with nudity and with sexuality. ... Because of the nature of the state of affairs, you have to encase it in a way that they can consume it without feeling dirty … So the biggest hurdle is to not only create a safety net but to create the understanding and education that not only is this stripping—and that’s OK—but this is also theater; this is also education; this is also political; this is expression; this is freedom; this is everything that you don’t have that you want. The reason it’s exploded in the past few years is because Utah has seen it and they crave it. Another hurdle is the costuming aspect. Any performer from out of state has to buy a whole new costume for underneath, because we aren’t allowed to use pasties or g-strings ... How much ass, how much tit [is exposed] is highly regulated [and that’s hard for] them to understand why.

I was, yeah. Here is the terrible thing about the world we live in: Everyone knows this isn’t right; we shouldn’t be censoring art. It’s in the First Amendment, and all the laws to protect the arts, and all the laws to protect the theater and all the laws that protect freedom of speech. And yet, even with this knowledge [we still] censor artists ... censor any theater [and] censor a body. I ain’t that hot. It’s not like I am going to turn a million people on. It’s just the very nature of censoring a human body that’s in service of an art—and not only art, but an education for social change.

What’s the biggest hurdle burlesque performers must jump through in Utah?

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Expectations are funny. I truly am like a clown. Once I figured it out, I went backwards and I realized that is what I have been my entire life. An audience sees that [points to the ground] but the clown doesn’t. It trips and falls, and we laugh because we relate to that inner fool that knows better and should be able to perform better, but doesn’t, right? So expectations for backlash was never a thing for me. I mean, obviously I should have—I am in SLC and I’m getting naked. When the backlash did happen, my posters were taken down, Wasatch Theatre Co. brought me in and the DABC said, ‘You cannot get naked around liquor.’ That was a shock. I think that’s where the immediacy of my anger came from. Because not only was I not expecting it, I was, like, ‘No, this is a violation of everything the arts stand for … you’re just trying to control things with alcohol, and I’m just trying to change things with tits.’

Laughter—which I love—and shock. But shock and laughter are the same thing, especially because I am so safe. They know what they are getting into—my posters are overtly obvious, which is why they got taken down, and anybody who knows me or has seen me perform elsewhere knows there is this sense of safety. I am not threatening, and I think that not every performer has that.

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Did you expect any backlash?

What was your first audience’s reaction?

JAKE PENROSE

Yes They Can!

Burlesque performer Madazon Can-Can’s one-person show explores deep themes—and ruffles feathers along the way.


BY SCOTT RENSHAW

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1966: While the Utah Symphony used the Tabernacle at Temple Square as its home, a new symphony hall was originally considered as part of a very different project: The new Salt Palace Convention Center. Designs for the new facility initially included plans for a symphony hall. After construction began, costs increased to the point where it became necessary to axe the hall entirely from the project. O.C. Tanner—who compiled an in-depth record of his involvement in the long history of developing a symphony hall, and at that time a member of the Utah Symphony board— made a motion to delay plans to construct a symphony hall until a later point when funds might be available, and reserved the plot of land north of the Salt Palace for such a facility. Then-Utah Symphony conductor Maurice Abravanel was reportedly deeply disappointed in the decision, saying “My board has betrayed me!” April 1972: Then-Utah Gov. Calvin Rampton initiates a plan for a Bicentennial Center for the Arts, part of a nationwide project that was planned to include federal funding. Tanner agreed to chair the committee overseeing the efforts, but in 1973, that expected federal funding was withdrawn. The Legislature approved $6.5 million for the project, on the condition that the committee could match that amount in additional public fundraising. 1975: This pivotal year became the critical moment for whether funding would be available. The Legislature set a deadline of Dec. 31, 1975, for securing the matching funds, and a state Supreme Court ruling on how bonds could be valued required taking the measure to a general election bond measure. Tanner reached out to political consultant Richard Eyre—who had worked on Jake Garn’s successful campaign for the U.S. Senate—to guide the efforts to win public opinion for the bond measure. It won, and

funding was in place to begin the project. The plans take another turn when the construction committee, headed by Jack Gallivan, approached Dr. Cyril Harris—a respected Columbia University acoustical engineer whose other projects included the Kennedy Center for the Arts and Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall—to serve as the acoustical consultant for what was initially planned as a multi-purpose performing arts center. Harris declined, arguing that multi-purpose facilities were inadequate to the acoustics required for a first-rate symphony hall. He said that he would work on a facility that was intended exclusively as a symphony hall, and recommended considering another facility to serve as home for other performing arts organizations. As a result, the project came to encompass renovations to the Capitol Theatre, which still serves as home to several of those organizations’ performances today. In fall 1975, Gallivan’s committee reaches out to John Price of John Price Associates to serve as an architectural consultant. Price explores building material alternatives to reduce costs, and agrees both to donate his consulting fee back to the project, and to bring in the three projects—Symphony Hall, renovations of the Capitol Theatre and what would become the Salt Lake Art Center (now Utah Museum of Contemporary Art)—in under the $20 million budget. Price—who also served as U.S. ambassador to Mauritius and the Seychelles—wrote in his 2011 memoir When the White House Calls, “To my knowledge, this was the first civic project of this size in the country to be built under the construction management concept. Initially, there were mixed feelings about this approach: as noted, the architects were not too happy under this arrangement, and neither were some of the arts groups, who wanted more embellishments than could be provided with the available funds.” 1977: Groundbreaking ceremonies in March are

ABRAVANEL HALL ARCHIVAL

his month, Salt Lake City’s Abravanel Hall celebrates its 40th birthday. Dedicated on Sept. 13, 1979, as Symphony Hall, the new home of the Utah Symphony immediately became a beloved part of the city’s growing arts infrastructure, renowned for its acoustics. But like many things that become landmarks, it easily could have been a very different thing—or, indeed, never happened at all. Here’s a historical timeline of how Abravanel Hall came to be, based on documents from the Utah Symphony archives and the histories recorded by several of the key players. Forty years later, their efforts continue to be appreciated by Utahns who love beautiful music.

ABRAVANEL HALL ARCHIVAL

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Abravanel Hall at 40

The history behind a Salt Lake City arts landmark.

Above: O.C. Tanner, center, at the 1979 dedication of Symphony Hall. Below: Construction of Symphony Hall. moved indoors to the Salt Palace as a result of snow, and include former Gov. Rampton, current Gov. Scott Matheson, Mayor Ted Wilson and members of Tanner’s Bicentennial Commission and Gallivan’s Planning Committee. Weather is more cooperative for the laying of the cornerstone in October of that year, which also included a performance by the symphony. 1979: On advice of his physicians, Maurice Abravanel—who had undergone open-heart surgery in 1976—retires as conductor of Utah Symphony after 32 years, making him unable to take the baton for the dedication of the new

Symphony Hall. It will eventually be renamed in his honor in May 1993.

September 1979: Symphony Hall is dedicated with a program under conductor Stanislaw Skrowaczewski that includes the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra and Brahms Symphony No. 4 in E Minor. Dr. Cyril Harris, upon hearing the results of his efforts during the Utah Symphony’s first rehearsal in the hall, says, “I already knew it was a hall of excellence. I just didn’t know how excellent … I think it would be safe to say the hall is second to none in acoustical quality.”


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SCOTT JARVIE/UTAH SYMPHONY

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The Sound from the Stage A veteran Utah Symphony musician considers performing before and after the new hall.

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BY SCOTT RENSHAW

fter more than 40 years with the Utah Symphony, Jamie Allyn, pictured, has a unique perspective on playing in Abravanel Hall. He’s one of the few musicians whose tenure allows them the ability to compare what it’s like to play in Abravanel to the Symphony’s previous home in the Tabernacle at Temple Square. Allyn, who plays double bass, joined the symphony in 1978, during its final season playing in the Tabernacle. His recollection of that space centers on how long sound would resonate throughout the space. “It’s a very live hall; the echo just goes on forever,” Allyn says. “It bounces off all kinds of surfaces. It made ensemble really difficult. Bass are on the periphery, so it made hearing across the orchestra challenging. Am I really hearing the violin, or the echo?” He recalls that there was excitement among his colleagues regarding the soon-to-open Symphony Hall during that 1978-79 season, but not just because of the potential for improved acoustics. Logistically, it was difficult for the musicians to be using a performance space that wasn’t completely their “home.” “They were just so excited to be moving into a place where we could rehearse and give concerts,” Allyn says. “We used to have to rehearse at places around town. So with the new facility, we could keep instruments in the hall, and not have to lug instruments back and forth.” Once the Symphony Hall opened in 1979, it was clear that the custom-designed symphony

hall had different acoustics. Yet for Allyn, those acoustics were designed less for the musicians themselves than for those in the audience. “It was clear that it was much easier to hear colleagues on the other side of the orchestra,” he says. “But for me, the sound on the stage, the sound that I make, is not particularly gratifying. It sounds better far away. I’ve been in halls where the sound under your ear is much deeper and warmer—Carnegie Hall, or the Symphony Hall in Boston. Here, you go out in the audience, and it’s a totally different story. … If I put a tape recorder out in the hall, and play on stage, I like the sound I hear on the recorder.” He also notes that there, as with any building, there are acoustical quirks in different onstage locations. “There are little ‘hot spots,’” Allyn says. “If I sit my stool right up against the side walls, on the east side of the stage, you get enveloped in that. It’s a really nice warm sound. I wish it sounded like that when I’m 15 feet away.” While Allyn acknowledges that every musician’s experience and perspective can be different, he remembers an anecdote from one of the first seasons at the Symphony Hall involving the celebrated violinist Yehudi Menuhin, who was visiting to play with the Utah Symphony. At the end of the performance, Allyn recalls, “when the applause died down, [Menuhin] said, ‘The sound of halls is sometimes much nicer if you go to the back of the hall.’ So he went to the back wall and did his encore. At that point I thought, ‘Well, I’m not crazy.’”


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How to Build a Season

Before shows get on stage, there’s the work of deciding what those shows will be. BY SCOTT RENSHAW

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very spring, local theater companies begin teasing their audiences with news about the new season that will commence the following fall. Those audiences are left with a few months of anticipation before getting a chance to see any of those shows—but they probably haven’t considered the many months of planning and logistical challenges involved in making those season slates possible. Every company’s story behind building a season is slightly different, based on factors including the mission of the company, and the limitations of budget and physical theater space. In every case, however, there’s a dedication to finding the best available stories to tell, and navigating the potential challenges of acquiring rights and figuring out how best to keep audiences challenged and buying tickets.

Karen Azenberg, Pioneer Theatre Co.

As a large Equity company with a 932-seat proscenium theater, Pioneer Theatre Co. would seem to have an advantage over many smaller local companies when it comes to putting together a season. Yet there are still very specific challenges faced by artistic director Karen Azenberg as she begins the process of considering shows for a season of seven full productions and one staged concert production. For Azenberg, the back-schedule for planning seasons might go back a year or two before locking down the titles in late January or early February for the upcoming season, from a short list of 12-14 plays and musicals. Availability of titles is always a consideration—a planned national tour or Broadway revival of a specific show might mean that its rights are not available for regional companies—as well as the goal of balancing the schedule and avoiding titles that might overlap too much. “Some of it is, ‘Wait, if I do that Shakespeare play, I might not want to do Something Rotten!,” Azenberg says. While PTC’s size gives it certain advantages, Azenberg still has to consider a wide range of logistical factors. At times, that means the technical requirements indicated for a show—everything from the special effects to the number of cast members—can remove it from consideration. “There are strange things like, I really love this musical, but it’s only orchestrated for 26 musicians, and we can only fit 16 musicians in our pit,” Azenberg says. “Or, we really want to do the show, but we can’t have 17 flying rigs.” Even once the specific titles are identified and confirmed, there’s the matter of which titles go in what slot during the calendar. During a season, one show generally already has begun rehearsals before the previous show has completed its run on the PTC stage. That means two groups of actors are in town at the same time—and even for a company that has the resources and facilities to cast nationally, there are limitations in what can be done. “We have 20 apartments,” Azenberg says; “how many people can we bring into town at one time? Doing two big shows one after the other can be very difficult for us, for our [costume and set design] shops and the logistics of our housing capabilities. … Our shows don’t run back-to-back, but we’re running back-to-back.” It’s even worth considering how the slotting of a specific production could be impacted by the way other local arts organiza-

DAVID DANIELS

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Fun Home

tions schedule. For many years, PTC planned a big musical production for the holiday season, but Azenberg considered a different approach. “The last couple of years, you may have noticed a rejiggering slightly, doing a musical in February,” she says. “With all the holiday offerings in this area, maybe we can do better than normal, because now we can capitalize on a time when there isn’t as much musical family entertainment in the community. So some of it is a game.” Bringing in ticket-buyers is indeed an inevitable factor for scheduling a season, and for many years, PTC has specifically offered audience members an opportunity to weigh in with a survey that is included in programs during one production each year. Azenberg says that these surveys rarely offer surprises—“At this point, 90% of the time, I can tell you which shows will do well on the survey,” she says—yet they can offer guidance in some grey areas. “They’re more helpful in, ‘Do more people know this title than I think, or vice-versa,” she says. “Or if there’s a title that’s like, maybe that one can work, but it does really poorly on the survey.” While audience input and the perspectives of a few other select PTC staff members might be part of the process, when push comes to shove, Azenberg is where the buck stops with making the season selections. “That’s the top line of my job description— season programming,” she says. “It’s my responsibility, and if you don’t like it, you can come to me. … If I make the circle too big, I can find somebody who’s going to say what I want to hear—or what I don’t want to hear—about any title.”

Cynthia Fleming, Salt Lake Acting Co.

In finalizing a season in January for the upcoming year, Salt Lake Acting Co. faces some challenges now that it didn’t used to, according to managing director Cynthia Fleming. But some of those challenges are self-imposed, and with socially-responsible goals in mind. “It used to be, ‘the best plays, period,’” Fleming says. “But now, equity, diversity and inclusion have to be considered: female playwrights, playwrights of color. … Partnerships are very important to me, so sometimes I’m thinking that this play would be a great partnership with this organization. So there are a lot of new variables.”

In creating SLAC’s short list, Fleming says she’s reading plays all year long for consideration for the next season. Sometimes, she might know that a specific title isn’t going to be available for the next season, but that doesn’t mean you can’t begin the process of lobbying to get the rights down the road, as was the case for the Tony Award-winning musical Fun Home a few years ago. “I first heard the CD, and I was like, I want SLAC to produce it, I love it so much,” Fleming recalls. “We started asking for the rights before they were even available. When they did become available, we kept going, ‘Hello, hello, we’re here.’ … And we got the rights.” Salt Lake Acting Co.’s physical theater space is smaller than that of Pioneer Theatre Co., and inevitably those physical limitations have some impact on choices. Yet Fleming says that she’s tried to stay open to the possibility of shows that might have seemed impractical in years past. “Years and years ago, SLAC was turning down some great plays because they had too large of a cast,” she says. “When I came, I thought, I don’t want to do that. Let’s figure out a way. Ten to 12 cast members is about the limit for our space, and last season was a season of large casts. I can be swayed to take the risk to present a play that has a larger cast, or is technically difficult, if it’s such a great play.” She also acknowledges that the current political climate might have some impact on decision-making. “I have to say, since Trump has been in office, I’ve really looked for new contemporary work that leaves us enlightened,” she says. “Sometimes, [those plays] can be really dark. Until our culture changes a little bit, I’ll try to choose plays that will bring light, and leave aside the darkness.” Once the finalists for a season have been identified, Fleming encourages members of the SLAC staff to read them all, and to provide feedback. Yet one of the things Fleming doesn’t worry about is the notion of whether a work will be “commercial” enough to draw an audience—a luxury she attributes to the company’s loyal, open-minded subscribers. “A third of them don’t even know what the season is” when they re-subscribe, she says. “They’re coming for the adventure. I just have to make sure the artistic excellence is enough for them, and that the work is smart. Those are the only considerations I have.”


Fran Pruyn, Pygmalion Theater Co.

general audience doesn’t,” Pruyn says. “Then sometimes it’s just the tone of the show. There are times when you read a script and go, ‘Yeah, that show is really, really good, but it’s also really, really depressing, and I don’t think people want to go to see depressing shows right now. There’s so much opportunity for entertainment in so many different places, and disposable income is so limited. You really need to provide something that people want to see.” While programming new plays can present a challenge in marketability, it can also come with unique opportunities—and specific questions beyond the quality of the work. Pruyn notes that when staging new work, often with the involvement of the playwright, it’s worth considering the reputation of the writer in terms of being easy or hard to work with, and how receptive they are to suggested changes. “With Sweetheart Come, we spent a whole year workshopping it,” Pruyn recalls. “I said [to playwright Melissa Leilani Larsen], ‘I love this script, but this set is impossible. Can you workshop this so we can figure out how to make the set work?’ She had a tree in the middle of the stage. She was really thinking cinematically.” And while there are more obvious logistical considerations—like the cost of hiring musicians—that factor into programming decisions for a company on a limited budget, it’s the things you’d never even consider that might be the difference between a company saying “yes” and saying “no.” “One play I looked at, the playwright had salad dropping from the sky,” Pruyn says. “I don’t want to have to clean up salad.”

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Thinking about the next season is a year-round proposition, according to Pygmalion Theater Co.’s Fran Pruyn. As part of the National New Play Network, Pygmalion gets solicitations from playwrights all over the country all year. “If I don’t have a play in front of me for consideration, I go looking for one,” Pruyn says. “There’s always something on my dining room table I’m looking at.” Pruyn describes a three-part checklist for consideration that she always has at the forefront of her mind when looking at scripts for a season that generally includes only three full productions: “Does it drive the mission statement [to present work ‘through the eyes of women’]? Can it fit in the [Rose Wagner Black Box]? And can we afford it? … We tend not to look for shows that have been done to death, even if they do fit the mission statement. A lot of it is, do we have the passion for this play?” As a small theater company, Pygmalion also faces the reality that they can be competing for certain plays with other local companies, and that those companies might have an advantage. “Full Equity houses will get first crack,” Pruyn says. “Just because it’s perfect for us, it might be perfect for them, too.” Also an important consideration for a small company is the matter of selling tickets. Without the buffer of a large season-subscriber base enjoyed by PTC and SLAC, each individual show needs to be able to draw patrons. “There’s a reality about the fact that just because the theater community knows a script really well, the

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Stroll Call A look at just a few of the hubs for SLC’s vibrant visual arts scene. BY KYLEE EHMANN, COLETTE A. FINNEY AND CASEY KOLDEWYN

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alt Lake City offers a wide range of places to experience exciting showcases for classic and contemporary work by local, national and international artists. This introduction is only the tip of the Utah artistic iceberg; visit gallerystroll.org, parkcitygalleryassociation.com and ogdencity.com/707/arts for many more places to expand your horizons.

For 35 years, Art Access has been working to create a space where looking at and creating art is, well, accessible to everyone who is interested. Joy Davidson, gallery coordinator, says diversity and inclusion are at the core of their mission. “We tend to think outside of the box—this helps us to remain nimble and excited about a gallery and exhibit space where we can share provocative art made by a wide variety of artists,” Davidson says. “Our gallery, in turn, feeds back into our distinctive programming. It’s a synergy that seems to have powered us through the decades and continues to inspire our supporters.” Art Access is Utah’s only arts organization that focuses primarily on serving individuals with disabilities, featuring disabled artist’s works and reaching out with programming such as the Epilepsy Art Project and the Open Studio for Artists with Disabilities. Other programming, like Resilience: Art by Survivors of Sexual Assault, are designed to elevate other minority communities. Art Access participates in the monthly SLC Gallery Stroll. Their current main exhibit, Poiesis, showcases artists who create three-dimensional print-based artworks. (KE) 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, accessart.org

Finch Lane Gallery

In 1933, the Finch Lane Art Gallery was called the Art Barn. Located at 54 Finch Lane, the gallery is managed by the governmental nonprofit Salt Lake City Arts Council to “promote, present, and support artists, arts organizations, and arts activities in order to further the development of the arts community and to benefit the public by expanding awareness, access, and participation.” Across Salt Lake, SLCAC makes possible annual events like the Holiday Craft Market or Living Traditions Festival. Within the Finch Lane Gallery itself, traditional landscaping, abstract sculpture and digital media, from emerging and established artists, all have access to display in its space. “We really fit this great role … having a more traditional gallery space, supporting artists with activities in our space but also fostering art that’s happening in SLC outside of our gallery,” Sarah Hobin, visual arts and community outreach manager for SLCAC, says. Speaking on the art scene in Salt Lake City, specifically the underground art scene Hobin has noticed, she adds, “I think Salt Lake is at this really awesome place for the art just exploding here. It’s figuring out how to keep that momentum going forward.” Upcoming calls for entries to the gallery include one for the Holiday Craft Market, closing Oct. 15, the Finch Lane Short-Term Projects closing Oct. 21, and for the Block 70 Vinyl Wrap Murals opening Sept. 27 and closing Nov. 1. (CK) 54 Finch Lane, 801596-5000, saltlakearts.org

Modern West Fine Art

A downtown destination since 2014, the Modern West Fine Art gallery is a popular stop on Salt Lake City’s monthly gallery strolls.

Finch Lane Gallery Created by owner Diane Stewart, the contemporary gallery strives to educate and inspire the community through thoughtful events which illuminate bodies of work that are relevant and meaningful for today’s audiences. Expanding into a much larger location last spring, this mission is a lot easier to fulfill with a new canvas of 10,000 square feet. “With our expansion, we have integrated a curated selection of books by arts publisher Taschen and an outdoor sculpture courtyard, along with a co-working creative space upstairs,” Stewart says. “And the gallery is focusing on expanding our reach by including local guest artists in curatorial driven shows.” Situated in a growing arts complex, Modern West carefully selects artwork from emerging and established artists. A supportive hub for all creatives and community members, the gallery also offers engaging artist’s workshops and lecture series, and provides rental spaces such as the photography studio or areas for private functions. “The vibrancy of the gallery is really important to me,” Stewart says. “Every time a patron or collector comes into the gallery, I want them to see something different.” (CAF) 412 S. 700 West, 801-355-3383, modernwestfineart.com

Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

Urban Arts Gallery

Utah Museum of Fine Arts

Fostering the arts in Salt Lake City since 2013, the award winning Urban Arts Gallery has evolved into an eclectic space showcasing art through a variety of exhibits and events. “The gallery is uniquely situated to feature a very diverse spread of local artists working in a wide variety of styles,” gallery manager Scott Tuckfield says. “We serve as a launching pad for artists on the early stages of their journey, while still offering top-quality work from more mature artists.” Founded by executive director Derek Dyer, the gallery is a venue for the nonprofit Utah Arts Alliance, which broadens exposure for the more than 200 artists who exhibit their work within its walls. With a mission to create a connected community, Urban Arts hosts a free monthly gathering inviting local artists to bring up to two pieces to display that evening. All in attendance vote on their favorites, and the top five works are hung the following month. “There’s really a ton of talent here in Salt Lake City, and the arts scene is getting more and more vibrant,” Tuckfield adds. “I believe our gallery offers people a chance to engage with art in a way that’s accessible, interesting and fun.” (CAF) 116 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, urbanartsgallery.org

STEPHEN KEEN

Art Access Gallery

Although the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has gone through multiple names and locations since its founding in 1931—most recently in 2011, when it rebranded from Salt Lake Art Center to the current name—the mission has always been to showcase contemporary, innovative and avant-garde art. But the museum doesn’t just want people to be able to see the artwork of local and national contemporary artists, they want them to be able to understand it, too. Visitors can participate in a variety of workshops, tours and lectures at every ability and education level to learn to appreciate, comprehend and even create contemporary art. Their most unique outreach program that brings weird and exciting contemporary art to the masses is the Art Truck. This roaming vehicle brings community-made art and an educator to places throughout Utah for free. This year, the Art Truck features Work: An Audio-Visual Exploration of Effortful Lives, a collective and participatory project generated by the students and families living on the west side of Salt Lake City that analyzes the concept of “work” and represents it through sound and images. Admission is free, and there is a suggested $5 donation at the door. (KE) 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, utahmoca.org Housed in the Marcia and John Price Building, the gallery known officially as the Utah Museum of Fine Arts and colloquially as UMFA, has grown from its small 1914 origins as an art gallery on the University of Utah’s campus. Now, it’s an accredited art museum containing 20,000 objects and traveling exhibitions of national and international renown. Mindy Wilson, director of marketing and communications for UMFA, says the museum is known for its collection’s expansiveness. She adds, “the UMFA’s mission goes much deeper. Our goal is to inspire critical dialogue and illuminate the role of art in our lives.” “The [Salt Lake City] scene has grown so much over the past several years, with greater appreciation for more diverse artists, and a growing scene of artist-activists coming together to use visual art to support important causes,” Wilson says. UMFA’s efforts to inspire dialogue are part of its yearlong partnership with SLC-based nonprofit Artes de México en Utah. A Día de los Muertos Celebration takes place Nov. 2 at UMFA in connection with the art piece “La ofrenda” by Diego Rivera, on display for the next year. Other exhibits include “DE | MARCATION” and works by Georgia O’Keeffe, Thomas Moran and Alma Thomas. (CK) 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, umfa.utah.edu


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art classes, DRAW also operates a top-notch online store. 752 Sixth Ave., 801-893-2404, drawinc.org Evergreen Framing Co. & Gallery A platform for unique artist exhibitions, providing a comprehensive catalog of collectible gifts. 3295 S. 2000 East, 801-467-8770, evergreengallery.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Modern West Fine Art

Gallery & Museum Directory SALT LAKE VALLEY GALLERIES 15th Street Gallery Specializes in showcasing award-winning and emerging Utah artists. 1519 S. 1500 East, 801-468-1515, 15thstreetgallery.com “A” Gallery This gorgeous gallery and courtyard combo also offers custom art consultations, installations and space rentals. 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, agalleryonline.com Alice Gallery Located within the historic Glendinning Mansion, hosting collaborative exhibitions for Utah artists and their communities. 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, heritage.utah.gov Alpine Art This well-lit, spacious fine art gallery doubles as a framing workshop to accommodate local business and designer needs. 430 E. South Temple, 801-355-1155, alpineartinc.com Anthony’s Fine Art and Antiques Housed in a 100-year-old church, this eclectic collection of museum-quality art and antique decor is staffed by a multi-generational team of specialists. 401 E. 200 South, 801-328-2231, anthonysfineart.com Art Access See p. 20. 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 328-0703, accessart.org Art at the Main In partnership with the Salt Lake City Public Library, this cooperative gallery supports and fea-

tures members of the local art community. 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, artatthemain.com Arts of the World Gallery Offers a distinct selection of international and hand-crafted treasures. 802 S. 600 East, 801-532-8035, artsoftheworldgallery.com Brushworks Gallery Features a variety of Utah artists specializing in oils and watercolors, plus custom framing. 160 E. 800 South, 801-363-0600, brushworksgallery.com Commerce & Craft This original small-production art house promises each piece was handmade and lovingly procured. 1950 S. 1100 East, 801-207-1030, commerceandcraft.com David Dee Fine Arts Art collector and connector David Dee mainly features work of the early American West, plus other art services. 1709 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, 801-583-8143, daviddeefinearts.com David Ericson Fine Art Featuring high quality works, David Ericson builds his galleries with care while offering consulting and art appraisals. 418 S. 200 West, 801-533-8245, davidericson-fineart.com

Gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options prepared daily

Flow Art Space Presenting local and national, emerging and established artists working in a variety of media. 363 S. 500 East, Ste. 208, 612-242-8796, flowartspace.com Fringe Gallery True to its name, Fringe exhibits unconventional and contemporary-focused art pieces. 345 W. Pierpont Ave., 385-202-7511, thefringegallery.com God Hates Robots SLC’s premier experimental art gallery. 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, 801-596-3370, godhatesrobots.com

Phillips Gallery A gallery space for Utah-based artists that offers other consultation services. 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, phillips-gallery.com Relics Framemakers & Gallery Relics is known for its quality craftsmanship, expertise and regional artist support. 4685 S. Holladay Blvd., 801-272-8312, relicsgallery.com Rio Gallery Historic and collaborative gallery nestled in the lobby of the Rio Grand Depot. 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, visualart.utah.gov Sego 3 Fine Art A procurer of high-quality American Great Basin artwork. 661 S. 200 East, 801-328-9848, sego3.com The Stockist This lifestyle boutique hosts a variety of unique vendors and products. 875 E. 900 South, 801-535-3458, thestockistshop.com Urban Arts Gallery See p. 20. 116 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, urbanartsgallery.org Utah Cultural Celebration Center Preserves a permanent collection of cultural art installations and artifacts. 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-965-5100, culturalcelebration.org

Hope Gallery This gallery displays a classy collection of European works and reproductions. 151 S. Main, 801-532-1336, hopegallery.com

Williams Fine Art Buying and selling the finest works by both living and deceased Utah and Western artists. 132 E St., 801-712-7577, williamsfineart.com

Horne Fine Art Tall ceilings and open skylights make this a sharp exhibition space and working studio. 142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, hornefineart.com

Winderemere Real Estate’s Redman Gallery Enjoy breathtaking views from this elevated gallery on the upper floors of the Redman Building. 1240 E. 2100 South, Ste. 600, 801-485-3151, redmangallery.com

Lanny Barnard Gallery This gallery offers a mix of styles, art mediums, as well as a varied selection of gifts. 110 Trolley Square, 801-364-4482, lannybarnardgalleryslc.com Mestizo Gallery This gallery brings together artists, activists and educators to create social change through art. 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, 801-596-0500

DRAW Inc. Gallery Serving marginalized communities with youth

Modern West Fine Art See p. 20. 412 S. 700 West, 801-355-3383, modernwestfineart.com

Moab’s only natural foods store!

Hot Breakfast & Lunch Served Daily Grab & Go Sandwiches, Salads, Snacks, and Desserts Pastries & Breads Baked Fresh Daily

Finch Lane Gallery See p. 20. 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, saltlakearts.org

Downtown Artist Collective Locally funded and staffed, DAC regularly spotlights new artists. 258 E. 100 South, 801-234-0679, downtownartistcollective.org

39 East 100 North, Moab, UT | (435) 259-5712 | Open daily 8 AM to 8 PM www.moon�ower.coop

Your Local Food Source

Evolutionary Healthcare An unexpected gallery on the walls of a private health care facility, open during regular business hours. 461 E. 200 South, Ste. 100, 801-519-2461, evolutionaryhealthcare.com

Nox Contemporary Nox champions challenging works that shy away from the conventional. 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, 801-289-6269, bit.ly/2J1Xo0a

MUSEUMS Chase Home Museum The only museum in the country dedicated to displaying a state-owned collection of contemporary folk art. Liberty Park (600 S. 900 East), artsandmuseums.utah.gov Church History Museum Discover the story of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints through educational exhibits and programs. 45 N. West Temple, 801-240-3310, history.lds.org


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SUN 5-8:30 PM.

SERVING DINNER (801) 466-9827 | HARBORSLC.COM | 2302 E PARLEY’S WAY SLC, UT

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FRI & SAT 5PM-10PM.

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MON-THURS 5-9:30PM.


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PRESENTS

RENDEZVOUS MOUNTAIN CULTURE FESTIVAL MOVIE PREMIERES SPEAKER SERIES

POW CLIMATE CHANGE PANEL DISCUSSION

SATURDAY, SEPT. 28 THE GATEWAY • 2PM-10PM NORTH RIO GRANDE ST. RAIN OR SHINE

IMAGE TAKEN BY BOB PLUMB AND WAS SHOT ON LOCATION OF THE FILMING OF "OFFLINE" BY NITRO SNOWBOARDS. "OFFLINE" WILL PREMIERE AT RENDEZVOUS AT 8PM.


PRESENTATIONS AND PREMIERES SCHEDULE +

2:00 PM

3:30 PM

6:30 PM

5:00 PM

8:00 PM

9:00 PM

“Know Before You Go” is a free avalanche awareness program. Not much science, no warnings to stay out of the mountains, no formulas to memorize. In 1 hour, you will see the destructive power of avalanches, understand when and why they happen, and how you can have fun in the mountains and avoid avalanches.

The Bootpack show’s host and pro snowboarder Griffin siebert will mediate a Protect our Winters panel discussion on climate change. The Panel will be made up of Olympic Gold Medalist Sage Kotsenberg, U of U professor Mckenzie Skiles, and Director of Sustainability at POWDR Corp Laura Schafer. This discussion will cover entry level questions and higher level issues. Q&A will happen at the end of the discussion.

Salt Lake based photographer, Bob Plumb, will walk you through his adventure to Annapurna. Annapurna is a mountain range in the Himalayas in North Central Nepal. with peaks reaching over 26,000 ft. Austin Smith and Bryan Fox were in front of the lense on this amazing adventure that Bob will share. Q&A will follow presentation.

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The collaborative vision of “CONTRAST” is to pair progressive riding with a point of view and aesthetic that will not only provoke the stoke but also take the viewer on a more visual journey. By juxtopozing the experience of daytime riding with the darker hues inherent with after-hours exploits, “Contrast” creates an ethereal viewing experience. “Contrast” will feature Desiree Melancon, Erik Leon, Justin Keniston, and Bode Merrill.

Nitro Snowboards proudly presents an escape from today’s hectic online world that we live in through good old fashioned good times snowboarding. The film showcases Nitro team riders Sam Taxwood, Austin Smith, Bryan Fox, Sven Thorgren, Benny Urban, Griffin Siebert, Jared Elston, Zeb Powell, Torgeir Bergrem, Marcus Kleveland, Knut Eliassen, and friends snowboarding around the world with one objective to have as much fun as possible in the moment no matter the conditions.

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Absinthe Films 22nd full length Release “Isle of Snow” will feature some amazing riding from all over the world and in our backyard at Brighton and Snowbird. Featuring Nicolas Müller, Frank Bourgeois, Wolfgang Nyvelt, Severin Van Der Meer, Chris Rasman, Dylan Alito, Matt Wainhouse, Demetri Bales, Aspen Weaver, and Hans Mindnich.

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Gallery & Museum Directory Clark Planetarium Hands-on, interactive exhibits to help understand our world, space, the solar system and beyond. 110 S. 400 West, 385-468-7827, clarkplanetarium.org Discovery Gateway Hands-on exhibits, both permanent and touring, with a family-friendly focus on imagination, science, art and exploration. 444 W. 100 South, 801-456-5437, discoverygateway.org Fort Douglas Military Museum Exhibits and educational programming to engage and inform the public about Utah’s rich military history. 32 Potter St., fortdouglas.org

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TOM SMART

Natural History Museum

Hill Aerospace Museum Featuring nearly 100 aircraft and thousands of artifacts depicting the history of aviation. 7961 Wardleigh Road, Hill Air Force Base, aerospaceutah.org The Leonardo Combines science, technology and art in activities that inspire creativity and innovation. 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, theleonardo.org

Japanese Cuisine

BEST OF STATE

20162018

423 Broadway (By Homewood Suites) 801.363.0895 | samesushi.com

Museum of Ancient Life One of the world’s largest displays of mounted dinosaurs, with 60 complete skeletons, plus hands-on exhibits. 2929 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-768-2300, thanksgivingpoint.org Natural History Museum of Utah Illuminating the natural world of Utah and the place of human cultures within it. 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-4303, nhmu.utah.edu Pioneer Memorial Museum An extensive collection of authentic 19th-century artifacts from early Mormon settlers. 300 N. Main, dupinternational.org Utah Museum of Contemporary Art See p. 20. 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, utahmoca.org Utah Museum of Fine Arts See p. 20. 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, umfa.utah.edu

PARK CITY GALLERIES Bret Webster Images This gallery honors and exhibits the photography of American artist Bret Webster. 312 Main, 435-200-8258, bretwebsterimages.com Gallery MAR Gallery MAR always keeps their collections fresh while providing a comprehensive list of art services including installations. 436 Main, 435-649-3001, gallerymar.com

J GO Gallery J GO charms guests with its American Western aesthetic and conversational atmosphere. 268 Main, 435-649-1006, jgogallery.com Julie Nester Gallery This diverse collection offers event rentals and an original selection of art. 1280 Iron Horse Drive, 435-649-7855, julienestergallery.com

Kimball Art Center This center uses education, exhibitions and events to connect the community. 1401 Kearns Blvd., 435-649-8882, kimballartcenter.org

Lund’s Fine Art Gallery Nature and landscape paintings are the focus at Allen Lund’s refreshing studio-gallery. 591 Main, 435-655-4349, lundsfineart.gallery Mangelsen Images of Nature Gallery This gallery observes the beauty of nature through the captivating photography of Thomas Mangelsen. 364 Main, 435-649-7598, mangelsen.com

Meyer Gallery Located in Park City’s Historic District, this gallery puts guests first with its customer service and striking artwork. 305 Main, 435-649-8160, meyergallery.com Montgomery-Lee Fine Art This clean multi-level gallery features the fine art of both internationally acclaimed artists and new faces. 608 Main, 435-655-3264, montgomeryleefineart.com Mountain Trails Gallery Featuring Western and contemporary artists; also offers commissions and bronze-monument installations. 301 Main, 435-615-8748, mountaintrailsgallery.com Prothro Gallery This Park City boutique encourages a friendly atmosphere and specializes in modern works. 314 Main, 435-200-8866, prothrogallery.com Susan Swartz Studios Susan Swartz’ dramatic and colorful paintings of the natural world are commemorated in this studio. 260 Main, 435-655-1201, susanswartz.com Terzian Galleries This gallery’s well-rounded staff is known for making meaningful connections with artists and clients. 625 Main, 435-649-4927, terziangalleries.com Trove Gallery This cozy local favorite represents a variety of talented Utah artists. 804 Main, 435-655-3803, troveparkcity.com Compiled by Samantha Herzog and Scott Renshaw


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2019 Performing Arts Calendar COMEDY Kingsbury Hall (tickets.utah.edu) Nov. 22: Chelsea Handler Live at the Eccles (live-at-the-eccles.com) Oct. 11: George Lopez Oct. 24-25: Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me Live Feb. 7: Jeanne Robertson Feb. 8: Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live Wiseguys SLC(wiseguyscomedy.com) Oct. 4-5: Deon Cole Oct. 11-12: Joe Machi Oct. 18-19: Gary Gulman Oct. 25-26: Adam Carolla Nov. 1-2: Esther Povitsky Nov. 8-9: Chad Daniels Nov. 9: Doug Loves Movies podcast Nov. 15-16: Matteo Lane Nov. 21-23: Brendan Schaub Nov. 29-30: Steve Simone Dec. 5-7: Sinbad Dec. 20-21: Dusty Slay Dec. 27-28: Steve Rannazzisi Jan. 3-4: Ian Bagg Wiseguys West Jordan (wiseguyscomedy.com Sept. 27-28: Jacob Leigh Oct. 4-5: Drew Lynch Oct. 11-13: Preacher Lawson Oct. 18-19: Eddie Ifft Nov. 8-9: Felipe Esparza Nov. 15-16: Pump and Dump Nov. 22-23: Pablo Francisco Nov. 29: Xazmin Garza

DANCE Ballet West (balletwest.org) Oct. 25: Ballanchine’s Ballets Russes Nov. 8-9: Snow White Dec. 7-24: The Nutcracker Feb. 7-15: Giselle Feb. 22: Night of Shining Stars April 17: Bolero & The Dream May 14: Choreographic Festival 2020 Kingsbury Hall (tickets.utah.edu) Oct. 3-19: Performing Dance Co. Nov. 8: Axis Dance Co. Nov. 21-23: Ballet Showcase Dec. 5-7: School of Dance Graduate Thesis Concert Feb. 4: Guangdong Modern Dance Co. Feb. 6-15: Utah Ballet II Feb. 13: Blizzard: Flip Fabrique March 5-21: School of Dance Gala March 14: Air Play Odyssey Dance (odysseydance.com) Through Nov. 2: Thriller Dec. 17-23: Redux Nut-Cracker Spring TBD: Shut Up & Dance Repertory Dance Theatre (rdtutah.org) Oct. 3-5: Inside Outside Nov. 21-23: Sounds Familiar Jan. 3-4: Emerge March 7: Regalia April 16-18: Earth Tone Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. (ririewoodbury.com) Sept. 26-28: Traces Jan. 31-Feb. 1: Allegory April 9-11: Catalyst

SB Dance (sbdance.com) Jan. 31-Feb. 1: Sleeping Beauty June 2020: New work TBD SYMPHONY Utah Symphony (usuo.org) Sept. 27-28: Respighi’s Pines of Rome Oct. 25-26: Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini Nov. 1-2: Disney/Pixar’s Coco Live in Concert Nov. 8-9: Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3 Nov. 15-16: Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue Nov. 19: America’s Wonders in 3D Nov. 22-23: The Rite of Spring Nov. 30-Dec. 1: Messiah Sing-In Dec. 6-7: A Broadway Christmas with Ashley Brown Dec. 7: Here Comes Santa Claus Dec. 10: Celtic Woman Dec. 13-14: A Celebration of Christmas Dec. 20-21: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Live in Concert Jan. 3-4: Debussy’s La Mer Jan. 10-11: Isabel Leonard Sings Mozart Jan. 31-Feb. 1: Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto Feb. 7-8: Fischer Conducts Gershwin & Dvorák Feb. 14-15: Women Rock Feb. 28-29: Singin’ in the Rain Live in Concert March 6-7: Sketches of Spain March 19: All-Star Youth Pro-Am March 27-28: Carmina Burana April 10-11: Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 April 14: How to Train Your Dragon Live in Concert

April 17-18: The Temptations April 24-25: Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony May 1-2: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 May 16: Gala with Joshua Bell May 22-23: Beethoven’s Eroica June 19-20: Harry Potter and the HalfBlood Prince Live in Concert THEATER Broadway at the Eccles (broadwayattheeccles.com) Oct. 15-20: Miss Saigon Dec. 3-8: A Christmas Story: The Musical Jan. 21-26: Fiddler on the Roof March 4-14: Dear Evan Hansen April 15-May 3: Frozen June 9-14: Anastasia Grand Theatre Co. (grandtheatrecompany.com) Oct. 3-26: Curtains Feb. 13-March 7: Musical of Musicals: The Musical March 16-April 11: To Kill a Mockingbird May 14-June 6: The Producers

March 20-April 11: Trifles and A Number May 15-June 6: Good People July 10-Aug. 1: The Normal Heart Pioneer Theatre Co. (pioneertheatre.org) Sept. 20-Oct. 5: Cagney Nov. 1-16: The Lifespan of a Fact Dec. 6-21: The Play That Goes Wrong Jan. 10-25: Mary Stuart Feb. 21-March 6: Once On This Island March 27-April 11: Ass May 8-23: Something Rotten! Plan-B Theatre Co. (planbtheatre.org) Nov. 7-17: Oda Might Feb. 13-23: Singing to the Brine Shrimp March 26-April 5: The Audacity Pygmalion Theater Co. (pygmalionproductions.org) Nov. 8-23: Two-Headed Feb. 14-29: Flying May 1-16: Body Awareness

Hale Center Theater (hct.org) Sept. 9-Nov. 16: The Addams Family Sept. 23-Nov. 9: Phantom Nov. 25-Jan. 18: Seussical Nov. 30-Dec. 26: A Christmas Carol Jan. 20-May 2: Bright Star Feb. 5-April 11: Strictly Ballroom April 29-July 11: Mary Poppins

Salt Lake Acting Co. (saltlakeactingcompany.org) Sept. 11-Oct. 20: Death of a Driver Oct. 16-Nov. 17: Form of a Girl Unknown Dec. 6-30: Pete the Cat Feb. 5-March 8: A Doll’s House, Part 2 April 8-May 10: How to Transcend a Happy Marriage June 17-Aug. 23: Saturday’s Voyeur 2020

An Other Theater Co. (anothertheatercompany.com) Nov. 1-23: Doubt Dec. 6-21: The Santaland Diaries Jan. 24-Feb. 15: Safe

Utah Opera (usuo.org) Oct. 12-20: La Traviata Jan. 18-26: Silent Night March 14-22: The Barber of Seville May 9-17: Thaïs


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Moab Pride Festival

Like the struggle for racial justice beginning in the 1960s, the efforts to promote equality based on sexual orientation continues to demand courage and sacrifice from people who have been oppressed. Sparked by the 1969 Stonewall uprising that erupted in New York City to protest continuing police harassment, the modern gay rights movement brought overdue attention to the suffering and stereotypes that forced LGBTQ people to live in the shadows because of an oppressive, intolerant and ignorant society. That’s the point of the Moab Pride Festival, a celebration of all that’s been achieved in terms of bringing people out of the closet and into the American mainstream. Sponsored by Moab Pride, a nonprofit organization currently celebrating its ninth year of promoting LGBTQ rights in southeastern Utah, the festival offers four days of fun and festivities along with educational outreach. It’s an opportunity to enjoy a wealth of activities, from all-ages workshops, an array of musical performances and a poetry slam to the weekend’s highlights, including the Orange Party and a Saturday afternoon Visibility March and Gay-La at Swanny Park. “Moab Pride is an opportunity to celebrate, acknowledge and empower the LGBTQ community,” Marcy Till, one of the event’s organizers, says via email. “Moab Pride focuses on services and programs for queer youth, embracing and supporting each adolescent for the person they exactly are. Equality, diversity, acceptance and empowerment are the values we strive to achieve” Then again, that’s part of the Moab mantra— “exist, resist and persist.” After all, what other choice is there? (Lee Zimmerman) Moab Pride Festival @ Moab, various locations and times, through Sept. 28, free, $7 for Orange Party, moabpride.com

FRIDAY 9/27

FRIDAY 9/27

The Utah Symphony closes out September with a trip to Italy when it showcases Pines of Rome by Bolognese composer and master violinist Ottorino Respighi. The tone poem is inspired by scenes of pine trees in four different settings around the city at four different times of day. The evening also features Mozart’s “Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola,” featuring Viviane Hagner (pictured) and Brant Bayless. Celebrated violinist Hagner returns to Abravanel Hall amid her international touring schedule. Bayless, a violist in the Utah Symphony since 2001, has been highlighted in prior concerto and concertante performances with his home orchestra. Just as people sometimes forget that Babe Ruth was also a premiere pitcher in his younger days before becoming a slugger, Mozart first made his name as a child-prodigy violinist before becoming famous as a composer. His knowledge of the instrument can be heard in this piece. The symphony, under the baton of Thierry Fischer, also performs another Respighi piece, The Birds, which is paired with Olivier Messiaen’s The Orioles. Both strive to evoke the sounds of nature and the songs of birds. Messiaen’s piece is from his 12-movement masterwork, Das Canyons Aux Etoiles, which brought the composer to Utah to experience Bryce Canyon. The Friday, Sept. 27, program is also part of the “Back to School” series of arts in events in September being offered through the Utah Cultural Alliance, Utah Symphony, Utah Opera and University of Utah Fine Arts College. The organizations have aligned to provide a way for students to attend events with special low ticket prices. (Geoff Griffin) Utah Symphony: Respighi’s Pines of Rome @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 28, 5:30 p.m., $10-$92, utahsymphony.org

Kicking off with a “plein air” contest the week prior, the Escalante Canyons Art Festival features plenty of activities and entertainment for all ages. In its 16th year, the festival showcases working artists providing interesting demos and hands-on art projects. Programming has also been expanded to include a speaker series, two evenings of film, live music, exhibits, guided hikes and much more. Located along state Highway 12 in the southcentral part of the state, the annual festival honors the memory of American artist Everett Ruess. Traveling the deserts and canyons of the Southwest, Escalante was his last stop in 1934 before he mysteriously disappeared. Moved by the scenery, Ruess left indelible memories of his experiences through a body of art that includes poetry, drawings and woodcuts. “We are a working art festival celebrating this region in southern Utah,” festival co-director Allysia Angus says. “We hope this festival fosters a sense of importance in creativity and building community.” Accentuating the festival is the Plein Air exhibit, which displays artwork submitted by registered artists of all levels of experience completed during the competition. Typically including more than 200 entries in a variety of mediums, this year’s theme is “Paint the Town” which depicts artistic interpretations of the region’s natural landscapes. In addition, an arts-and-crafts fair showcases other handcrafts such as jewelry, ceramics and photography for sale. “There is also an array of cool stuff for the kids,” Angus adds. “Utah State University is bringing a mobile art truck for hands-on art action and the Mobile Planetarium Projection Dome for STEM-based educational activities.” (Colette A. Finney) Escalante Canyons Art Festival @ Escalante, Utah, various locations and times, Sept. 27-29, free, fee for hands-on art projects, escalantecanyonsartfestival.org

Utah Symphony: Respighi’s Pines of Rome

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

TIMM KOELLN

JENNA TALBOTT

THURSDAY 9/26

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

ALLYSIA ANGUS

ESSENTIALS

the

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 26-OCT. 2, 2019

Escalante Canyons Art Festival

SATURDAY 9/28

Vamoose Rendezvous When the Outdoor Retailer show snubbed Utah in 2018, outdoor enthusiasts were left wondering whether there would be a similar place to serve as a hub for celebrating this state’s love of all things wild. But maybe there was an option that was even more inclusive than a trade convention—a free event that could offer outdoorsy Utahns of all ages a place to get their gear on, and even bring the family. In April of this year, City Weekly’s sister publication Vamoose presented its first-ever Rendezvous, an outdoor festival that seeks to make becoming part of this state’s go-out-andget-moving culture less intimidating. Sponsored by Woodward Park City, the event includes many of the things you might expect from a free outdoor festival in Utah: vendors presenting a wide variety of gear, family-friendly activities, food trucks to calm an empty stomach, art exhibits (a photo from Bob Plumb’s Annapurna is pictured) and giveaways for attendees. But there’s even more to Rendezvous than a party. Those concerned about climate change— and in particular its potential effects on the Utah ski and snowboard industry—are invited to a “Protect Our Winters” panel discussion addressing related issues. The Utah Avalanche Center plans a snow safety presentation, with crucial information for anyone considering venturing into our beautiful backcountry. And to help get you in the spirit of winter sports activities, there will be seasonal snowboard film premieres after-hours. There’s no reason for anyone to feel like there isn’t at least a part of Utah’s great outdoors that can’t be right for them—and you can start in the great outdoors of The Gateway this weekend. (Scott Renshaw) Vamoose Rendezvous @ The Gateway, 400 W. 100 South, Sept. 28, 2-8 p.m., film premieres 7:30-10 p.m., free, shopthegateway.com


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Sept. 27-29, escalantecanyonsartfestival.org (see p. 30) Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, through Oct. 20, snowbird.com Vamoose Rendezvous: A Mountain Culture Festival The Gateway, 400 W. 100 South, Sept. 28, 2-8 p.m., shopthegateway.com (see p. 30)

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

LGBTQ

On Saturday, Sept. 28, at 11 a.m., story hour gets a little bit more fabulous thanks to Drag Queen Storytime at The King’s English Bookshop (1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, kingsenglish.com).

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1000 S. 900 West, Sundays through Oct. 13, 10 a.m.2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 19, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Fleet Nights, Little City, 855 S. 400 West, every Saturday, 4 p.m., littlecityinc.com New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Park City Farmers Market Silver King Resort, 1845 Empire Ave., Park City, Wednesdays through Oct. 30, noon-5 p.m., parkcityfarmersmarket.com Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., slco.org/wheeler-farm

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Escalante Canyons Art Festival Escalante, Utah,

Mountain Towns 2030 Net Zero Summit Keynote: Jane Goodall Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, Oct. 2, 6:30 p.m., mt2030.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Abstraction Is Just a Word, But I Use It UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 4, utahmoca.org Amidst: Kathy Puzey, Amanda Lee and Holland Larsen Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 1, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Anne Fudyma: Synchronistic Space UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Oct. 12, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., utahmoca.org Children’s Expression Through Painting Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 25, events.slcpl.org Concerning Craft & The Power of Print Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, through Oct. 11, downtownartistcollective.org

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019| 31

BYU Instrumental Showcase Brigham Young University de Jong Concert Hall, 1 University Hill, Provo, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m., byu.edu Night Star Jazz Orchestra Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m., thegallivancenter.com

FARMERS MARKETS

TALKS & LECTURES

| CITY WEEKLY |

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

SPECIAL EVENTS

Anthony McCann: Shadowlands The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 27, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Christopher Nelson and Betsy Sholl Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Sept. 26, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Ellen Meloy & the Next Generation of Nature Writers Ken Sanders Rare Books, 286 S. 200 East, Oct. 1, 7 p.m., kensandersrarebooks.com James V. D’Arc The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 26, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Ken Babbs Ken Sanders Rare Books 268 S. 200 East, Sept. 28, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org M.E. Evans: Naked (in Italy) Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 28, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Nicole Walker and Julia Corbett Ogden Nature Center, 966 W. 12th St., Sept. 27, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Paisley Rekdal Union Station, 2501 Wall Ave., Ogden, Sept. 26, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Rosemary Wells: Max & Ruby and Twin Trouble The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 30, 6 p.m., kingsenglish.com

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Traces Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 26-28, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Odyssey Dance: Thriller Egyptian Theater, 328 Main, Park City, through Oct. 5, dates and times vary, odysseydance.com

Craig Bielik Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Sept. 27-28, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Danny Gonzalez and Drew Gooden: We Are Two Different People The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, Oct. 1, 7 p.m., thecomplexslc.com Jacob Leigh Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Sept. 27-28, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Laughing Stock Improv Comedy The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Oct. 12, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., theobt.org Nick Di Paolo Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Nick Swardson Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept 27-28, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Open Mic Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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DANCE

COMEDY & IMPROV

LITERATURE

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The Adams Family Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 16, showtimes vary, hct.org Addams Family Reunion Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, through Nov. 9, desertstar.biz Aerial Arts of Utah: Flight of Fancy / Mystique Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 28, 5 & 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Cagney Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, through Oct. 5, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org Death of a Driver Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 20, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Fly More Than You Fall Noorda Theater, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, through Sept. 28, uvu.universitytickets.com The Moors An Other Theater Co., 1200 Towne Centre Blvd., Provo, through Sept. 28, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., anothertheatercompany.com Utah Shakespeare Festival Southern Utah University, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 12, times and prices vary, bard.org Ripped Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, through Oct. 6, Friday & Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., goodcotheatre.com Solo: One Actor, One Hour Wasatch Theatre Co., 124 S. 400 West, Sept. 26-28, times vary, wasatchtheatre.org

Utah Symphony: Respighi’s Pines of Rome Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 28, 5:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org (see p. 30)

Beyond a Night of Music Encircle Salt Lake, 331 S. 600 East, Thursdays, 6:30-8 p.m., encircletogether.org Drag Queen Story Time The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 28, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Men’s Sack Lunch Group Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Wednesdays, noon-1:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Moab Pride Festival Various locations, Moab, through Sept. 28, moabpride.com (see p. 30) TransAction Weekly Meeting Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Sundays, 2-3:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org

Colors of the Wild Art Exhibit Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Nov. 6, culturalcelebration.org De | Marcation Granary Arts, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through Sept. 27, granaryarts.org DesignArts Utah ’19 Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 18, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Emily Robison: Collections A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Oct. 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., agalleryonline.com Eric Fairclough: Isolation Rituals Bountiful Davis Arts Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, Sept. 27-Nov. 2, bdac.org Following in the Footprints of Chinese Railroad Workers Marriott Library, 295 S. 1500 East, through Sept. 27, goldenspike150.org Gerald Purdy & Hadley Rampton Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Oct. 11, phillips-gallery.com Greater Merit: The Temple and Image in South Asia Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, ongoing, umfa.utah.edu Get Forty-fied! Utah Calligraphic Artists Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Oct. 22, culturalcelebration.org In Good Company: Works by Saltgrass Printmakers’ Member Artists Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through Oct. 5, pioneertheatre.org Jim Jacobs: The Imperfections That Render Us Visible Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Nov. 3, kimballartcenter.org League of Reluctant Bicyclists UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org The Medium is the Message Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, through Oct. 4, events.slcpl.org Myth Modern West Galley, 412 S. 700 West, through Oct.31, modernwestfineart.com Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 13, utahmoca.org Power Couples Utah Museum of Fine Art, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 8, umfa.utah.edu Role Call: Fearless Females in Utah History Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 21, events.slcpl.org Ryan Lauderdale: Glazed Atrium UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Susan Cramer Stein: Cowboys and Horses: A Western Romance Local Colors of Utah Fine Art Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Oct. 15, localcolorsart.com Susan Krueger-Barber: Big-Hearted People Need Sharp Teeth Bountiful-Davis Arts Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, Sept. 27-Nov. 2, bdac.org Spencer Finch: Great Salt Lake and Vicinity Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, through Nov. 28, umfa.utah.edu Skate Deck Challenge Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Sept. 29, urbanartsgallery.org Ummah Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 15, umma.utah.edu Utah Watercolor Society: Our Best Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Oct. 16, culturalcelebration.org Van Chu: Photographic Brushstroke Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Nov. 3, kimballartcenter.org


The Roof is one of downtown’s most venerated restaurants … but is it more than just a buffet? BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

A

s I’ve spent the last few years securing my reputation as a scourge of greater Salt Lake’s buffet tables and dessert bars, it was only a matter of time before I set my sights on The Roof (15 E. South Temple, 10th Floor, 801-539-1911, templesquare.com). It remains a constant, living paradox between the worlds of fine dining and all-you-can-eat buffets—and I’ve done enough buffet legwork to figure out what makes this Utah institution tick. I, like many adults who went to local high schools along the Wasatch Front, was first introduced to The Roof thanks to parental advice. When we asked our moms and dads for fancy places to take our dates, they’d suggest The Roof without skipping a beat. We didn’t know it at the time, but the reason our parents were so quick to suggest this place was so they could rely on the golden glare of Moroni high atop the Salt Lake Temple to burn the thoughts of premarital sex from our minds. Even so, we sure thought we were hot shit when we used the cash we earned from Taco Bell and Sam Goody to buy an expensive dinner for two before dancing the night away in a glittering high school gymnasium. I suppose one could make the argument that I never found my way back to The Roof because I like to save moments of nostalgia from getting crapped on by the adult in me, who’s already pissed off because I spent more than 12 bucks on a buffet. Regardless, my internal buffet completionist urged me

ALEX SPRINGER

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32 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | CITY WEEKLY |

Higher Calling

forward into this hazy trove of adolescent memories and post-religious angst, so forward I did go. The place still gets busy enough to necessitate booking a reservation a few days in advance, even if you’re planning on visiting during the week. I asked my wife to be my date, and she obliged—even though I dispensed with the sloppy bedroom decorations and half-assed riddles that typically precede a visit to The Roof. We strolled through the old-fashioned gaudiness of the Joseph Smith Memorial Building and headed to the top floor, which is one of The Roof’s primary amenities. The view diners get of Temple Square and the downtown skyline is absolutely gorgeous, especially just around sunset. Our servers were pleasantly chatty and were happy to outline the current buffet lineup, sparing us the plateless reconnaissance mission that most buffets require. For $46 per person, diners get access to a carving station with thick slabs of prime rib, sliced chicken breast with lemon butter and sun-dried tomatoes, grilled steak with mushroom demi-glace, buttermilk mashed potatoes, apple bacon cauliflower and sautéed asparagus. The carving station is flanked by a copiously stocked dessert bar and a side bar with gouda mac and cheese, soy-glazed salmon and housemade meatballs along with a charcuterie bar of cured meats and cheeses. The spread is a cut above traditional buffet fare, and the snappy service when it comes to removing used plates and empty glasses is worth the extra coinage, but the menu does feel rather inhibited. Prime rib, hallowed be its name, is the patron saint of any buffet, so we can leave that alone. The chicken, steak and salmon were all very good—each item tends to get dried out in a buffet setting, though these entrées got all kinds of help from their respective sauces— but they continue to evoke Sunday dinner menus that have been feeding nuclear families since the 1970s. It’s a clear case of knowing their audience—serving dressed up versions of American classics is what keeps The Roof’s clientele happy—but imagine the culinary ripples that would appear if the chefs start-

ed to experiment with the menu. Bridging the cultural gap between Swedish meatballs and Mexican albóndigas or even adding Southern staples like shrimp and grits or étouffée could do wonders for the palates of locals who see The Roof as a paragon of fine dining. Although The Roof will always be a culinary paradox, it’s managed to maintain its shaky balance between fine dining establishment and gluttonous feedbag with confidence over the years. I will heartily recom-

mend a visit simply for that perfect view, but I can’t help but make that recommendation without a small hint of irony. I love buffets with all my doughy heart but trying to class them up erodes the spirit and charm that make them lovable in the first place. CW

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Thursday, 5-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday, 5-10:30 p.m. Best bet: Anything allowed to simmer Can’t miss: Getting creative with the dessert bar

NOW OPEN SO GRILL KOREAN BBQ AND SUSHI 111 W. 9000 S. Sandy, Ut | 801.566.0721


Pasta-da!

the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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DUTCH OVEN AND OUTLAW GRILL

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Rock ’N’ Ribs Festival

italianvillageslc.com

801.266.4182 HOURS MON-THU 11a-11p • FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

Daley’s Wood Fire and Dutch Oven Catering

FIND US IN

@daleywoodfire 1050 W. Shepard Ln. Suite #5 Farmington (385) 988-3429 | daleyswoodfire.com

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5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT

Live music and freshly barbecued ribs have shared a long-standing relationship throughout the years, and the Gallivan Center’s third annual Rock ’N’ Ribs Festival aims to celebrate that relationship. The event hosts some of Utah’s finest purveyors of pork butt at the Gallivan Center (239 S. Main, thegallivancenter.com) in order to serve up $3 sample plates of their signature barbecue ribs, along with some other smoked eats. While getting a good deal on barbecue is enough reason to attend, the festival has also booked a lineup of local musicians to fill the autumn air with the sounds of live music and the scent of hickory-smoked goodness. The event takes place on Saturday, Sept. 28, from noon to 7 p.m. and admission is free.

Six Sick Sips

year

s!

Momi Donuts

20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891

siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | 33

Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

DOWNTOWN

| CITY WEEKLY |

ninth & ninth

Quote of the Week: “Barbecue may not be the road to world peace, but it’s a start.” —Anthony Bourdain

Oktoberfest

The Gateway (400 W. 100 South, shopthegateway.com) is having a bit of a culinary renaissance as of late, and it doesn’t look like it will be stopping any time soon. I recently got wind of an eatery called Momi Donuts (momidonuts.com) that calls the downtown shopping center home this fall. Their morsel of choice is the mochi doughnut, or pon de ring as it’s known in Japan, which takes the slightly sweet and glutinous treat known as mochi and turns it into a doughnut. Each is made from small orbs of dough that get fused together in the frying process, making them look a bit like blooming flowers. Keep an eye on their website to see when they’re scheduled to officially open.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

26

ng

Celebrat i

Bambara (202 S. Main St., 801-363-5454, bambara-slc.com) teams up with Toasted Barrel Brewery (toastedbarrelbrewery.com) on Friday, Sept. 27, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. for a six-course meal designed to pair with some of the local brewery’s current offerings. Those who are familiar with Bambara’s ability to seize upon culinary trends and adapt them to our local flavors can enjoy the creative way that the menu complements each featured beer. The meal starts with some medjool dates, brie, pecans and prosciutto paired with a barrelaged quad and ends with currant clafoutis and vanilla ice cream paired with a black currant sour—not to mention the four other courses and beers in between. Interested parties should reserve their seats by calling Bambara directly.


Two examples of beers with a distinctive malt kick. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

his week’s beers offer up a nice exercise in the use of malts. By utilizing sugars, enzymes and yeasts in different ways, you can get a good idea of how this diverse beverage became such an integral part of cultures from around the world. Wasatch Brewing/Level Crossing Brewing Co. Collaboration IPA: This new “buddy beer” pours an apricot/orange hue with a moderate amount of haze. I don’t think this beer is necessarily a “hazy” beer; it’s likely just unfiltered. Two fingers worth of pocky white head forms, becoming meringue-like as it settles, and chunky lacing drapes the sides of the glass, making it an attractive-looking beer for sure. Apricot jumps out at me as my sniffer hovers over the foam. It’s more of the dried

MIKE RIEDEL

Malternative Lifestyles

variety, pleasant and aromatic. Tangerine, mango and pineapple follow suit in that order of intensity, while a honey-drizzled biscuit maltiness sets the base. Another deep whiff brings a mild pine hop note that is reminiscent of a mild boozy hit, reminding me of hop-produced pine. It really gets the tongue watering. The nose keeps its promises. The flavor profile is hop forward, and is based around that citric and tropical profile. Tangerines and underripe peppery mango make up the majority of the profile, but that dried apricot sneaks back in there toward the finish. The honey and biscuity malts are substantial enough to keep this IPA from being dominated by the citric hoppiness. Sluggish carbonation and a moderate, silky body make this one a slow mover over the tongue. The dryness builds with each swig, but the bitterness never steps past moderate. There’s a good balance between malt sweetness, fruitiness and bitterness. Overall: This collaboration is an allaround solid IPA from Wasatch and Level Crossing. The 7% alcohol is approachable, and though it comes across as more of a West Coast style IPA, it leaves some wiggle room for those who might skew more toward the less bitter end of the IPA spectrum. Templin Family Brewing Luckenbach: This beer pours a clear, fairly dark chestnut color with some exquisite ruby highlights. If you look at the accompanying

photo, you can really get a sense of what I’m talking about. The foam produces an eggshell color that stands two fingers tall. It retains its puffiness, due in part to the tiny etchings in the bottom of the glass, specifically designed to encourage foam retention. All of this foam leaves some decent gnarled tree-looking lace around the glass as the ale slowly drops away. It smells of gritty, crackery caramel malt, oily beer nuts and weak bittersweet cocoa. A bit of cold coffee and a plain earthy, mineral-like dryness linger in the nose. The taste starts with bready caramel malt, toffee and a bit of black tea. The sweetness is more subdued than is typical for the style. In the end, I get an earthy pine-driven hop dryness. It’s generally smooth, with

a small stab at a nutty creaminess. It finishes on the dry side with caramel, toffee, chocolate and nuttiness all carrying on in the background. The carbonation is quite understated, with a body that is adequate for a 4% beer. Overall: This beer offers high drinkability, disappearing from my pint glass in six swigs. Being an American-style brown, this leans toward the drier side, which adds more nuttiness than sweetness. Draft beers from T.F. Brewing are rarely available outside of the brewery, so you’ll have to look for Luckenbach there. Collaboration IPA is at most Wasatch locations and should be popping up at Level Crossing’s bar soon, if it’s not there already. As always, cheers! CW

34 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | CITY WEEKLY |

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BEER NERD

Contemporary Japanese Dining L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S 18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595


REVIEW BITES

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

JOHN TAYLOR

A sample of our critic’s reviews

Kyoto

While sushi remains an important part of Japan’s culinary identity, it’s so ubiquitous here in the states that it often eclipses the wider spectrum of what Japan has to offer. Restaurants like Kyoto are rare finds because they’re places where you can get your sushi fix while opening your eyes to other traditional delights. When you’re after something quick, filling and tasty for lunch, Kyoto’s donburi rice bowls are ideal. The unagi donburi (pictured) takes the rice bowl formula and adds tender, melt-in-your-mouth slices of broiled freshwater eel. The recently added lunch box ($15) is a bento-style roundup that includes chicken teriyaki, ebi tempura, gyoza, tuna sashimi and a California roll—perfect for indecisive diners. Kyoto’s combination dinners ($23) let you choose two items from a wide variety of house specialties. I went with the beef sukiyaki—a rich and unexpectedly sweet stew of sliced beef, onions, mushrooms and soba noodles—and an order of nigiri that was fresh, subtle and simple. Whether you visit for lunch or dinner, rest assured that you’ll be getting a fresh and unique taste of Japan—with or without sushi. Reviewed July 25. 1080 E. 1300 South, 801-487-3525, kyotoslc.com

cHINESE & jAPANeSE CUISINE

20

entire % off order

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Award Winning Donuts

4150 S, REDWOOD ROAD TAYLORSVILLE 801.878.7849

1 COUPON PER TABLE | NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER OFFERS OR DISCOUNTS | DINE- IN ONLY EXPIRES 10/31/19

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705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Award Winning Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 Donuts AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | 35

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“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

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MUSIC

Crucialfest 9 returns to a focus on heavy Utah bands. BY PARKER S. MORTENSEN comments@cityweekly.net @_coldbloom

T

his year, Crucialfest 9 marks a departure from Crucialfest 8’s emphasis on big headliners, instead exclusively featuring local bands, including some reunion acts. Pilot This Plane Down—whose last album was released in 2008—opens the festival on Thursday, Sept. 26. The ticket price is also more reasonable: $6 per day compared to the $50 per day prices of Crucialfest 8. “We’re going for simplicity this year,” Jarom Bischoff, the festival’s founder, says. “People are more responsive to the ticket price than they are to what bands are playing. Fans of Crucialfest are more fans of just seeing great live music, and so if you get these big headliners in there and have a fat ticket price, a lot of people just don’t go to that because they don’t know who those bands are.” In fact, Crucialfest 9 is intentionally a full pendulum swing from last year’s installment. “I almost wanted to take a year off,” Bischoff says. “Give it a break, come back to it fresh.” The stress of managing Crucialfest 8, which was hosted at the Utah State Fairpark, took its toll. Outdoor festivals, Bischoff says, carry considerably more production requirements. The year prior, Crucialfest 7 was hosted at The Gateway, again outdoors, and the ambition of each festival had almost led to a burnout. “Doing events in SLC is very different from doing events in a bigger city,” Bischoff says. “We have a lot of artists and music fans per capita, but we’re a very small city.” Enter the decision to make Crucialfest 9 a locals-only festival. The shift harkens back to Crucialfest’s roots, but it also speaks to the moment the heavy music scene is having in Salt Lake City. While it might vary by scene, for the heavy music Crucialfest traffics in—metal, hardcore, hip-hop, synthwave, punk, basically any high-energy genre—Bischoff argues that Salt Lake’s geographic isolation is both a blessing and a curse. The physical distance creates a community that is genuinely talented and novel but always late to the zeitgeist. And when it comes to hosting a festival? We can’t rely on neighbors. “The next closest city is Boise ... and that’s a six-and-a-half-hour drive,” Bischoff says. “Next closest is nine hours to Denver, 10 hours to Portland. There’s just nothing close. It’s not like doing a festival in California where you have not only your city but 10 other cities within two hours you can draw from.” The pressure on local talent to come through is high, but that’s also the blessing: Local talent is brimming and in some ways incredibly vibrant. For any given genre, there’s a scene of people trying to make it thrive and supporting each other, even if it’s small. And yet, it’s difficult to argue this isn’t another effect of living in a state with consolidated religious and cultural power. The argument that Utahns can uniquely point to the ways in which The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints not only shapes daily life, but created the foundation for many (if not most) of our looming cultural norms, is still compelling in 2019. “Having a weird, different major culture makes the subculture all the more important and special,” the Crucialfest founder says. “I think people here feel that, and I think it comes out in people’s creativity.” Our origins are inescapable, but with time, the tension has become the tool of the minority.

JAROM BISCHOFF

9PM - NO COVER

George Nelson

Sat: Sept. 28

Wed: Sun:

Locals Only

7 DAYS • 7 REASONS

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36 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | CITY WEEKLY |

CONCERT PREVIEW

Fans enjoy the 2018 Crucialfest The persistent problem, Bischoff argues, is local acts often labor in obscurity longer than they deserve: “People are picky about what they like and what they’ll go to.” According to Bischoff, there exists a herd mentality where groups will become big fans of particular bands, but that energy won’t translate into a love of live music in general, so the music scene as a whole doesn’t benefit from that concentrated fervor. “I wouldn’t describe the overall state of heavy music [in Salt Lake] as a thriving or healthy scene,” Bischoff says. “It’s a struggling scene with talented artists putting out great music, but bands are struggling to find a fanbase that may or may not exist here.” In other words, if you’re a Utah band and you’ve got something really special going on, you’ve got to leave the state—at least for a while. You tour, you make a name for yourself outside of the Beehive, and then locals will pay attention to you. Bands like Cult Leader, Subrosa and Needle Twin are examples of bands Bischoff has personally seen struggle on the local circuit, but who gained recognition only once music communities in other states validated them. “They go out of state, get a little more recognition from scenes that are a little more dialed in taste-wise to what the band is doing, then all of the sudden, once they have this notoriety—all of a sudden the following comes in Salt Lake,” he says. “We’re always late.” As for a potential Crucialfest 10, ideally it will be a balance between 8 and 9, Bischoff says. He wants the pendulum between large and local to rest at center, but that balance has proven hard for Bischoff and his team to achieve. “It’s been an intense couple years, so you’ll have to forgive me—I don’t mean to sound negative at all,” Bischoff says. “I’m gonna remember this year for a long time.” CW

CRUCIALFEST 9

Sept. 26-29 Times vary Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South $30 for four-day wristband $6 Thursday & Friday; $9 Saturday & Sunday 21+ metromusichall.com


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BY NICK McGREGOR, ERIN MOORE, PARKER S. MORTENSEN & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 9/26 Noah Gundersen, Lemolo

Artists who share their introspection and even their insecurity nowadays have no reason to offer any apologies, even when those sentiments are filtered through dimly-lit melodies and shoegazing conceits. Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell and Nick Drake opened the door for artists with songs of hushed reflection, sadness and sobriety to follow in their footsteps. Indeed, any number of artists have effectively emulated that approach— Devendra Banhart, Bon Iver and Iron & Wine immediately come to mind—but it takes a particularly astute individual, one with an irrepressible poetic sensibility, to convey their commitment and conviction without alienating an audience that might want to be cheered up instead. Credit Noah Gundersen for effectively balancing pathos and perspective. He confirms that ability on his striking new album Lover, an incisive offering that looks deep into the abyss of human frailty and despair. A song centered on the late Robin Williams (“When I think of Robin Williams at the end of his rope/ It makes no difference what you’re making, the reaper makes the final joke”) is both telling and tragic, but it confirms Gundersen’s ability to offer some astute insights that put things in perspective. Granted, sobering circumstance requires an especially articulate interpreter, but Gundersen measures up to that challenge and delivers these deliberations with uncommon allure. (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $23, 21+, thestateroompresents.com

SATURDAY 9/28 Babymetal, Avatar

The phrase “big in Japan” is often used to describe Western acts that are über-popular in the pop-culture obsessed country, but Japan isn’t just obsessed with foreigners who can fill stadiums. Their foundational passion for big-time, bombastic entertainment can be seen in Japanese rock acts like L’arc en Ciel, X and Guitar Wolf, who push the

Babymetal

MICHAEL PORTER

Exotic Burgers

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outrageousness of rock to its performative edge. A more contemporary—and extreme— example of this phenomenon is the Japanese metal outfit Babymetal, whose original members Suzuka Nakamoto, Moa Kikuchi and Yui Mizuno brought forth the genre Kawaii Metal in the early 2010s with their fusion of traditional metal and J-pop. Nakamoto, who was a member of Japanese Idol group Sakura Gakuin, began collaborating with metal-influenced producer Kobametal, who’d worked long with visual-shock kei (“kei” means style) artists like Japanese stadium-rock pioneers X. Although the three members were unfamiliar with metal at the beginning of their project, what came of their foray into it was purely radical. Combining high-power metal with J-pop melodies and vocal stylings, Babymetal has been turning the world on its head since the release of their first single, “Ijime, Dame, Zettai,” (“No More Bullying”) in 2011, and their subsequent release of two full-length albums. With titles like “HeadBangeeeeerrrrr!!!!!,” they’re clearly self-aware in their genreblending, and the songs themselves are filled with undeniable charisma and high drama, with J-pop styled choreography to bring the house down at every show. Their SLC stop is also an opportunity to see like-minded Swedish clown-metallers Avatar, and snag a complimentary CD copy of their upcoming album Metal Galaxy, due out on Oct. 11. (Erin Moore) The Union Event Center, 235 N. 500 West, 8 p.m., $45–$300, all ages, theunioneventcenter.com

Noah Gundersen deities—at least of the human variety. Robert Plant also belongs in their hallowed company; he helped define the criteria by which we measure legendary lead singers. With his long flowing mane, riveting vocals and barechested bravado, he still typifies what every rock wannabe aspires to become. Granted, Plant has mellowed somewhat since leaving Led Zep, having gone through his Americana phase with Alison Krauss and former amour Patty Griffin. But now, with his current band The Sensational Space Shifters in tow, he’s come a long way toward reasserting his ferocity and rekindling his cosmic cred. Expect a fair share of Zeppelin classics in their set list, and though it’s an older Plant at the helm, the passion and power are still essential elements in his wailing delivery. His fondness for music of a vintage category also finds him sharing his admiration for Moby Grape and other influential forebears. It’s little wonder then that a post-Zeppelin band, The Honeydrippers, featuring Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck, scored a hit single with a remake of the classic chestnut “Sea of Love” in the mid-’80s. Since the chances of a Zeppelin reunion remain elusive at best, a performance by Plant becomes the ideal alternative. (LZ) Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., all ages, sold out at press time, liveattheeccles.com

Robert Plant

TUESDAY 10/1

Robert Plant and The Sensational Space Shifters, Lillie Mae

There’s a distinct difference between an iconic frontman and an actual rock god. Mick Jagger might be the quintessential singer, but Roger Daltrey, Freddy Mercury and Jim Morrison are in that elite status of microphone-slinging

PHIL KING

NFL Sunday Ticket

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LEON NEAL

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YANI CLARKE

EVERYONE NEEDS TO BELIEVE IN SOMETHING WEDNESDAY 10/2

Half Moon Run

Half Moon Run, Tim Baker

I BELIEVE I’LL HAVE ANOTHER BEER SPIRITS . FOOD . LOCAL BEER 9.25 LORIN WALKER MADSEN

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In August, Half Moon Run released two new singles: “Then Again” and “Flesh and Blood.” While these aren’t a complete departure from their alt-pop sound, they do point toward the band’s range outside of pop, something Half Moon Run played with in their 2015 album Sun Leads Me On. That album sat comfortably among 2015’s Alt-J domination, where most songs emulated a more rollicking thrum of the summer’s indie rock. So what separates a band like Half Moon Run from its more popular counterparts? The band certainly has a talent for the kind of music you turn on in the background, only to eventually find yourself listening attentively as an unexpected stride emerges. “Turn Your Love” from Sun Leads Me On builds into a satisfying crash of momentum that suddenly snaps you into attention. “Throes” is a 54-second piano song that’s out of tune with the rest of the album, and “Devil May Care” is so much sweeter and breezier, “The Debt” more sentimental. Perhaps what separates Half Moon Run is this refusal to play completely into the alt-pop sound. It’s a more textured discography than the band’s popular contemporaries. Opener Tim Baker’s Forever Overhead comes two years after the 2017 hiatus of his band Hey Rosetta!, in which he was lead vocalist and lead songwriter. The album shares a fair amount in

Sinkane

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common with Hey Rosetta!’s indie rock, but it pleasantly severs the baggage of a decade’s discography. Forever Overhead siphons Baker’s vocal talent into familiar rock that hasn’t worn out its welcome. (Parker S. Mortensen) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m. $20, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Sinkane, Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show

Although Sudan’s popular uprising of late 2018 and 2019 arrived a full eight years after the “Arab Spring,” all signs point to the wartorn country successfully transitioning to a civilian democracy. And no musician is better prepared to transmit this story to a wider Western audience than Ahmed Gallab, the Sudanese-American who records as Sinkane. On 2019’s Dépaysé, Gallab fleshed out his own biography: the son of a Sudanese immigrant forced to flee the African continent and apply for asylum in 1989 when now-deposed military leader Omar al-Bashir came to power. Wrestling with this identity in the era of Trump, whose travel ban specifically targeted Sudan and several other predominantly-Muslim countries, Gallab manages to channel anger into optimism, sounding downright triumphant on songs like “Ya Sudan.” Global multiculturalism gets a much-needed boost on “Everyone” and “Everybody,” while “The Searching” outlines Gallab’s crisis of personal conviction. “Dépaysé is a French word that means ‘removed from one’s habitual surroundings,’” Gallab told NPR in May. “Growing up, I always wanted to be like everyone else … But as I learned about myself more, and connected with other people like me, I realized how beautiful my experience is.” On upcoming EP Gettin’ Weird (Alive at Spacebomb Studios), Sinkane fleshes out the narrative underpinnings of five songs from Dépaysé, lending extra oomph to the explorations of cultural duality that run through every Sinkane album from 2012’s Mars to 2017’s Life & Livin’ It. Salt Lake City is blessed by an accompanying visit from the Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show, whose immersive visuals back Sinkane at The State Room. (Nick McGregor) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroompresents.com


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SATURDAY 9/28

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ADAM FRESE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Bob Seger and The Silver Bullet Band, The Wild Feathers

Before Bruce Springsteen galvanized the masses, Tom Petty rallied the faithful or John Mellencamp ascended to the ranks of a populist pundit, Bob Seger established himself as rock ’n’ roll’s true champion of the Everyman, an artist whose core connection with his audiences and admirers made him a relentless road warrior, flush with anthemic exhilaration, energy and inspiration. Songs such as “Rock ’n’ Roll Never Forgets,” “Old Time Rock ’n’ Roll,” “Hollywood Nights” and “Against the Wind,” typified the usagainst-them attitude at the center of the great divide, separating the air guitar-wielding rock ’n’ roll insurgents from the establishment that vilified the longhaired youth and their lack of reverence and respect for middle class mores. “We’ve Got Tonight” and “Turn the Page” in particular detailed the road-weary wisdom, lethargy and loneliness that accompanied the endless miles and obscure outposts which paved the way toward often elusive glories. Seger’s older and established now, but his passion hasn’t diminished, and if indeed this is his final farewell, he and his ever steady Silver Bullet Band—the same outfit that’s accompanied him for nearly five decades—leave a powerful legacy in their wake. Nashville-based band The Wild Feathers share that drive and determination and are poised to benefit from those lessons learned and trails shared on the road to stardom and redemption. Indeed, rock ’n’ roll never forgets, but instead creates indelible memories precious to all that crave it. (Lee Zimmerman) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $75-$350, 801-325-2000, vivintarena.com

THURSDAY 9/26

FRIDAY 9/27

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Crucialfest 9 (Metro Music Hall) see p. 36 Hectic Hobo (Rye) Kamelot + Sonata Arctica + Battle Beast (The Complex) Moonchild + Rachel Mazer (Urban Lounge) Nick Welch + Joshy Soul & the Cool + Pixie & The Partygrass Duo (Lake Effect) Night Star Jazz Orchestra (Gallivan Center) Noah Gundersen + Lemolo (The State Room) see p. 38 Perfectamundo (Gracie’s) Robert Loud + Noble Bodies + Kambree (Velour) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Venom Prison + Homewrecker + Great American Ghost + Tomb Of Belial (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dueling Pianos: Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Herobust (Sky)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Night (Tinwell) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck w/ Mikey Danger (Chakra Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

Alternator Live (Ice Haüs) Andy Farnsworth (The State Room) Ashberry Jam (HandleBar) Brother + Mmend + Nate Hardyman (Velour) Carrie Myers (Harp and Hound) Colt. 46 (Outlaw Saloon) Columbia Jones Trio (Gracie’s) Crucialfest 9 (Metro Music Hall) see p. 36 Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) John-Allison “A.W.” Weiss (Kilby Court) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Mike Watt & The Missingmen + Minty Favereaux (Urban Lounge) Moonlite (Garage on Beck) Mountain West Entertainment (The Spur) Natural Causes (Club 90) Of Mice & Men + For The Fallen Dreams + Blood Bather (The Complex) Rancid + Pennywise (Union Event Center) Rezz + Peekaboo + BlackGummy (The Great Saltair) Stabbing Westward (The Depot) Super Bubble (Hog Wallow Pub) Sydnie Keddington (Lake Effect) Talia Keys (The Yes Hell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Funky Friday w/ DJ Godina (Gracie’s) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Miss DJ Lux (The Spur)

New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 9/28 LIVE MUSIC

BabyMetal + Avatar (Union Event Center) see p. 38 Band of Skulls + Demob Happy + Mortigi Tempo (Urban Lounge) Beyond Creation + Fallujah + Arkaik + Equipoise + Dethrone the Sovereign (The Complex) Bob Seger and The Silver Bullet Band (Vivint Smart Home Arena) see above The Backseat Lovers + Harpers + Over Under (Velour) The Bluff (Ice Haüs) Cinders (Kilby Court) Crucialfest 9 (Metro Music Hall) see p. 36 Coco Montoya + Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio (Commonwealth Room) Colt. 46 (Outlaw Saloon) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) Jim Fish + Mountain Country (Garage on Beck) Kenz Waldo (HandleBar) Live Bands (Johnny’s on Second) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Trio (The Red Door) Matt Calder + Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Mat Wennergren (The Yes Hell) Morrissey + Interpol (The Great Saltair) Mythic Valley (Harp and Hound) Natural Causes (Club 90) Rage Against The Supremes (Hog Wallow Pub) Shuffle (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Three Dog Night (Dejoria Center)


COPPER COMMON

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

SUNDAY 9/29 LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Industry Night Mondays w/ DJ Juggy (Trails) Monday Night Blues & More Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 10/1 LIVE MUSIC

Arko + Alyxandri Jupiter + Nadia Gold + Alexa Bird (Urban Lounge) Face To Face + Lagwagon (The Depot) Lysergic Ashes + The Burning Hell (Diabolical Records) Marina + Broods (Union Event Center) Robert Plant and The Sensational Space Shifters + Lillie Mae (Eccles Theater) see p. 38 Superet (Kilby Court) Sydnie Keddington (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Groove Tuesdays (Johnny’s on Second) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House)

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wednesday 9/25

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Reggae thursDAY 9/26 at the Royal

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Liquid Joe’s) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Entertainment (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 10/2 LIVE MUSIC

Carver Louis (The Spur) Half Moon Run + Tim Baker (Urban Lounge) see p. 40 The Hu + Al Lover (The Complex) Live Jazz (Club 90) Nate Robinson (Hog Wallow Pub) Robert Earl Keen (Commonwealth Room) Sinkane + Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show (The State Room) see p. 40 Slenderbodies + Hazey Eyes (Kilby Court) The Simon & Garfunkel Story (Eccles) The Waterboys (The Depot) Wilder Woods (Metro Music Hall)

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

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friday 9/27

Live Music

colonel lingus, signal sound, ghost of a giant, james cooper saturday 9/28

Live Music

bias, natas lived, always 2 late, jesus rides a riksha, 7 second memory TUESDAY 10/1

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

FRIday 10/4

Live Music

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) VJ Birdman on the Big Screen (Twist)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90) Karaoke (The Wall at BYU) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second)

coming soon

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10/18 10/23 10/25 10/28 12/10

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | 43

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Sunday Night Sinners Club (Quarters Arcade Bar)

Dodie, Dodie (The Depot) Lynn Jones (The Spur) Periphery + Veil Of Maya + Covet (The Complex) Plague Vendor + No Parents + Hibernator (Kilby Court)

www.theroyalslc.com

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

Ashe + Charlie Burg + Gavin Haley (Kilby Court) Crucialfest 9 (Metro Music Hall) see p. 36 deelanZ + Cera Gibson + First Daze + Cherry Thomas + Marny Proudfit (Urban Lounge) The Native Howl + Scam of the Century + Tayler Lacey (Metro Music Hall) The Proper Way (Garage on Beck) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

MONDAY 9/30

4760 S 900 E, SLC

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KARAOKE

In my experience, Copper Common is the type of bar where you can dependably encounter a lot of people you know … who don’t also all know each other already. It’s a rotating type of crowd, mostly, and the rare kind of “nice” bar that has, over the years, succeeded in avoiding that halo of trendiness that other slick and shiny spots tend to get stuck with. With the easy-going atmosphere of Beer Hive in its wheelhouse, as well as the cocktail finesse of Bar X, the bar is easy to exist in. Its outdoor patio—which hugs the curve of the sidewalk that curls out onto 300 South from narrow Edison Street—is the perfect place to let hours dwindle by on warm summer nights, like you’re sitting on your own porch. Maybe I only feel that way because I’ve been frequenting it lately, with the company of a regular who maybe trumps all the other regulars—bartenders set a cup of fizzy soda water down for him each time he comes in before he can even ask for it. His only competition for the title of “Most Regular Regular” is a local bitters-maker and retired barista extraordinaire, who also happens to be his pal. Measuring which of them is there more often would be difficult, since they’re so often there together. My own history with Copper Common mostly involves the few years I spent rounding that corner on my way to Pie Hole from a show in the alley at Diabolical Records, waving at friends like these two as I passed their places on the patio. Lately, it’s been nice to be on their side of the fence, hanging out. (Erin Moore) 111 E. 300 South, 801-335-0543, coppercommon.com

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Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ E-flexx (Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Jskee (The Spur) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Scandalous Saturdays w/ DJ Logik (Lumpy’s Highland) Sky Saturdays w/ Bangarang (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

ERIN MOORE

BAR FLY


Diva Destruction

Like too many biopics, Judy provides a performance showcase and little more. BY ERIC D. SNIDER comments@cityweekly.net @ericdsnider

C

onsidering how good America is at producing icons worthy of biopic treatment, it’s ironic how bad we are at making biopics. The usual formula is for someone to give a career-best performance as some tortured artist or other, but for the movie itself to be a by-the-numbers recitation of events from the person’s history. This formula is effective— Bohemian Rhapsody was a smash and won four Oscars—but it sure is dispiriting, especially for fans of the icon in question who were hoping for a definitive biography. Judy, starring Renée Zellweger as Ms. Garland during the last year of her life, is just this sort of biopic, and the disparity between the quality of her performance and the quality of the movie is particularly stark. Zellweger, who hasn’t done much onscreen lately apart from the 2016 Bridget Jones sequel, doesn’t need a comeback quite as badly as Garland did in 1969, but she swings for the fences, adopting a voice and mannerisms that recall Garland without being a straight-up impersonation so that she can make the character her own. The film is centered around Garland’s fiveweek run of shows at London’s Talk of the Town cabaret, and the scenes of Zellweger onstage belting out Garland’s signature tunes are enough to make you think someday there’ll be a subpar biopic about Zellweger herself. (It will star Taylor Swift.) When we meet her, Judy is still a legend, but a broke one. Her addiction to pills and alcohol have made her “unreliable and uninsurable” in the movie business, so she’s grateful for the chance to work in London, even though it means being away from her teenage children, Lorna and Joey Luft, whose father, Sidney (Rufus Sewell), will use Judy’s absence as pretense for seeking custody. In London, Judy refuses to rehearse. On opening night, her handler, Rosalyn (Jessie Buckley), finds her a jittery, fidgety mess—whether from nerves or pills or both, it’s not clear. Zellweger excels at showing Garland’s extremes: a demanding, confident diva one minute, an anxious wreck the next. This ability to turn on a dime is used to marvelous effect when Rosalyn drags Judy to the night spot, sends her stumbling out onto the stage—and Judy pulls it together and knocks ’em dead, giving her audience no indication

SLC

ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

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CINEMA

FILM REVIEW

that she was only semi-coherent 10 minutes earlier. Who doesn’t feel roused by a good old-fashioned “the show must go on” moment in a showbiz movie? But then there’s the rest of it. Nothing in Tom Edge’s screenplay (adapted from Peter Quilter’s play End of the Rainbow) is bad per se, and Rupert Goold (True Story) is competent enough as a director. There’s just no oomph to it. The plot follows Judy’s ups and downs, the victories and the setbacks, but the recounting of them is rote. Apart from Zellweger’s performance, nothing about the film is noteworthy. Goold is clearly passionate about his subject, but passion is not the same thing as vision. Actually, there is one other noteworthy element: Darci Shaw’s work as Wizard of Oz-era Judy, seen in flashbacks establishing that Judy has been abused by the system ever since childhood. Shaw does a sharp impersonation of young Garland, but the gist of these scenes is always the same: A studio boss tells Judy to do something (or, more often, not to do something), and Judy defies him. Michael Gambon is also on board as the promoter who books Judy for the London gig, an old friend and supporter who wants to help her but can only do so much. Faithful adherents to Judyism will recall that she got married to

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husband No. 5 around this time; that’s Mickey Deans, played by Finn Wittrock as a dashing younger man who briefly helps Judy feel good about herself again. As is so often the case, we’re left with a terrific, endearing, pitch-perfect performance trapped in a movie that isn’t nearly worthy of it. You can see how this was probably better as a stage play, with only three characters (Judy, Mickey and her pianist) and a limited focus. Expanding it to encompass more of Garland’s life adds clutter, not value. Still, when it wins all those Oscars, at least we’ll feel good about the one for Best Actress. CW

JUDY BB.5

Renée Zellweger Jessie Buckley Rufus Sewell PG-13


LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I just cut my bangs in a gas station bathroom,” confesses a Libran blogger who calls herself MagicLipstick. “An hour ago I shocked myself by making an impulse buy of a perfect cashmere trench coat from a stranger loitering in a parking lot,” testifies another Libran blogger who refers to himself as MaybeMaybeNot. “Today I had the sudden realization that I needed to become a watercolor painter, then signed up for a watercolor class that starts tomorrow,” writes a Libran blogger named UsuallyPrettyCareful. In normal times, I wouldn’t recommend that you Libras engage in actions that are so heedlessly and delightfully spontaneous. But I do now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You could call the assignment I have for you as “taking a moral inventory” or you could refer to it as “going to confession.” I think of it as “flushing out your worn-out problems so as to clear a space for better, bigger, more interesting problems.” Ready? Take a pen and piece of paper or open a file on your computer and write about your raw remorse, festering secrets, unspeakable apologies, inconsolable guilt and desperate mortifications. Deliver the mess to me at truthrooster@gmail.com. I’ll print out your testimony and conduct a ritual of purgation. As I burn your confessions in my bonfire at the beach, I’ll call on the Goddess to purify your heart and release you from your angst. (P.S.: I’ll keep everything confidential.)

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Comedian John Cleese speaks of two different modes toward which we humans gravitate. The closed style is tight, guarded, rigid, controlling, hierarchical and tunnel-visioned. The open is more relaxed, receptive, exploratory, democratic, playful and humorous. I’m pleased to inform you that you’re in a phase when spending luxurious amounts of time in the open mode would be dramatically healing to your mental health. Luckily, you’re more predisposed than usual to operate in that mode. I encourage you to experiment with the possibilities. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Upcoming adventures could test your poise and wit. They might activate your uncertainties and stir you to ask provocative questions. That’s cause for celebration, in my opinion. I think you’ll benefit from having your poise and wit tested. You’ll generate good fortune for yourself by exploring your uncertainties and asking provocative questions. You might even thrive and exult and glow like a miniature sun. Why? Because you need life to kick your ass in just the right gentle way so you will become alert to possibilities you have ignored or been blind to.

1. Cesar ____, five-time Gold Glove winner, 1972-76 7. Rig at a rest stop 11. Like the Grinch 15. Where Excalibur was forged 16. Jobs announcement of 2010 17. Second word of many fairy tales 18. What a self-effacing Utah landmark calls itself? 21. Long shot 22. Brunch, e.g. 23. Dump 24. Jiffy 26. Show set at the firm McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney and Kuzak 30. What a self-effacing Asian landmark calls itself? 36. “Wait ... what?” 37. Clickable address 38. Captain Kirk kept one 39. What a self-effacing European nation calls itself? 45. “There ____ God!” 46. Sample 47. Spot for a stud 48. What a self-effacing Australian natural wonder calls itself? 55. Sleep ____ 56. Ernie with two U.S. Open wins 57. “Back to the Future” actress Thompson 59. T. rex, e.g. 62. Work force 66. What 18-, 30-, 39- and 48-Across exhibit 70. Lowdown 71. Big name in snow blowers 72. Reach 73. Persuade gently 74. Padded bicycle part 75. Burl and Charles

DOWN

54. Vocalist for the Black Eyed Peas 58. Orgs. 60. Keepsakes for March Madness victors 61. Its “reeds are a pain / And the fingering’s insane,” per Ogden Nash 63. ____ B’rith 64. Airing 65. Baptism or marriage 66. Hawaiian Punch competitor 67. It’s #1 among card games 68. CalArts degree 69. Memorable span

Last week’s answers

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1. “The Stranger” author 2. Some are blessed 3. Cool cat 4. Peace Nobelist Wiesel 5. American-born Jordanian queen 6. How a lot of music got sold in the 1990s and early 2000s 7. Film critic Joel 8. Mini albums, for short 9. “Just the facts, ____” 10. At a red light, perhaps

11. Islamic teacher 12. “Learn about the UV Index” org. 13. Fine and dandy 14. Fla.-to-Me. direction 19. Parks who said “The only tired I was, was tired of giving in” 20. After-bath powder 25. Caddie’s selection 27. Actress Taylor of “Mystic Pizza” 28. Shortly 29. What dogs’ tails do 31. “Thar ____ blows!” 32. Belonging to us 33. “Oh, ____ Beautiful Mornin’” (“Oklahoma!” song) 34. 1967 NHL Rookie of the Year 35. One may be frequent 39. “Make it fast!” 40. Like Narcissus 41. [That makes me mad!] 42. Jane created by Charlotte 43. Steamrolled stuff 44. Were present? 45. “____ tree falls ... “ 49. DVD kiosk name 50. Help (out) 51. Like a pirate’s treasure 52. Morales of “NYPD Blue” 53. Tennis players Dementieva and Makarova

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 | 45

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Novelist John irving asked, “Who can distinguish between falling in love and imagining falling in love? Even genuinely falling in love is an act of the imagination.” That will be a helpful idea SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Two hundred years ago, Sagittarian genius Ludwig Beethoven for you to contemplate in the coming weeks. Why? Because created stirring music that’s often played today. He’s regarded you’re more likely than usual to fall in love or imagine falling in as one of history’s greatest classical composers. And yet he love—or both. And even if you don’t literally develop a crush on couldn’t multiply or divide numbers. That inability made it hard an attractive person or deepen your intimacy with a person you for him to organize his finances. He once wrote about himself already care for, I suspect you will be inflamed with an elevated that he was “an incompetent business man who is bad at arith- lust for life that will enhance the attractiveness of everything metic.” Personally, I’m willing to forgive those flaws and focus and everyone you behold. on praising him for his soul-inspiring music. I encourage you to practice a similar approach with yourself in the next two weeks. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Be extra lenient and merciful and magnanimous as you evaluate You know your body is made of atoms, but you might not realthe current state of your life. In this phase of your cycle, you need ize that every one of your atoms is mostly empty space. Each to concentrate on what works instead of on what doesn’t work. nucleus contains 99% of the atom’s mass, but is as small in comparison to the rest of the atom as a pea is to a cathedral. The tiny electrons, which comprise the rest of the basic unit, fly CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “When you hit a wall—of your own imagined limitations—just around in a vast, deserted area. So we can rightfully conclude kick it in,” wrote playwright Sam Shepard. That seems like a faulty that you are mostly made of nothing. That’s a good meditation metaphor to me. Have you ever tried to literally kick in a wall? I right now. The coming weeks will be a fine time to enjoy the just tried it, and it didn’t work. I put on a steel-toe work boot and refreshing pleasures of emptiness. The less frenzy you stir up, launched it at a closet door in my basement, and it didn’t make a the healthier you’ll be. The more spacious you allow your mind dent. Plus now my foot hurts. So what might be a better symbol to be, the smarter you’ll become. “Roomy” and “capacious” will for breaking through your imagined limitations? How about this: be your words of power. use a metaphorical sledgehammer or medieval battering ram or LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): backhoe. (P.S. Now is a great time to attend to this matter.) “We don’t always have a choice about how we get to know one another,” wrote novelist John Irving. “Sometimes, people fall AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1965, Chinese archaeologists found an untarnished into our lives cleanly—as if out of the sky, or as if there were 2,400-year-old royal bronze sword that was still sharp and a direct flight from Heaven to Earth.” This principle could be shiny. It was intricately accessorized with turquoise and blue in full play for you during the coming weeks. For best results, crystals, precision designs, and a silk-wrapped grip. I propose be alert for the arrival of new allies, future colleagues, unlikely we make the Sword of Goujian one of your symbolic power matches and surprise helpers. objects for the coming months. May it inspire you to build your power and authority by calling on the spirits of your ancestors VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): and your best memories. May it remind you that the past has In North America, people call the phone number 911 to report gifts to offer your future. May it mobilize you to invoke beauty an emergency. In much of the EU, the equivalent is 112. As you might imagine, worry-warts sometimes use these numbers and grace as you fight for what’s good and true and just. even though they’re not experiencing a legitimate crisis. For example, a Florida woman sought urgent aid when her local PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “All human beings have three lives: public, private, and secret,” McDonald’s ran out of chicken McNuggets. In another case, wrote Piscean novelist Gabriel García Márquez. I will add that a man walking outdoors just after dawn spied a blaze of dry during different phases of our lives, one or the other of these vegetation in the distance and notified authorities. But it turned three lives might take precedence; might need more care than out to be the rising sun. I’m wondering if you and yours might usual. According to my analysis, your life in the coming weeks be prone to false alarms like these in the coming days, Virgo. will offer an abundance of vitality and blessings in the third area: Be aware of that possibility. You’ll have substantial power if your secret life. For best results, give devoted attention to your you marshal your energy for real dilemmas and worthy riddles, which will probably be subtle. hidden depths. Be a brave explorer of your mysterious riddles.

ACROSS

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

HUMBLE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

B R E Z S N Y

© 2017

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46 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

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LATAM Market Development Executive to develop & oversee software products and services for existing opportunities within the Contact Center market in LATAM. Mon-Fri, 40 hrs/ wk. 12 months’ exp. or an Associate’s degree in Business Entrepreneurship/ Marketing req’d. Mail Resume to Nuxiba Technologies 5802 S Cove Creek Ln Murray, UT 84107.

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Holy Bulldozers!

Holy bulldozers, Batman! Downtown Salt Lake is going to feel nearly closed due to construction soon. I mean it—there’s so many massive projects about to or that have broken ground, we will all need to find new ways around orange cones. My friend Bill Knowles at the Downtown Alliance is my go-to guy for what’s what and what’s where. He is a one-man library of factoids about our capital city. And he’s who I’ll call if I’ve got a question or a problem with anything from who is moving into X space or why are all the parking spaces on 200 South and 200 to 400 West backwards? Here’s what building projects Knowles will warn you about coming in our near future: n  Liberty Sky: A 24-story residential skyscraper going in at 151 S. State, by Cowboy Partners and the Boyer Co. This will cost $90 million, have 300 units and will butt up against Liberty Crest (another Cowboy project). n  95 S. State: 24 stories of office space which has already broken ground. The developer is Property Reserve, the private real estate arm of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. n  The convention center hotel at 200 S. West Temple: This place will add 700 hotel rooms to our downtown inventory, plus 62,000 square feet of meeting space and probably a few restaurants and bars. They haven’t revealed which hotel chain will operate the project, but that should be announced when they break ground in the next month or two. n  The West Quarter at 100 South and 300 West: This is going to be two 11-story buildings of mixed-use hotel and apartments being developed by the Ritchie Group on Block 67. The developers have asked for an extension from the Planning and Zoning Commission to secure all the permits necessary and we won’t see any action on that land till next year. Don’t forget that our airport (which sees 23 million passengers a year) is being completely rebuilt. Phase I will open with great fanfare in 2020 and the Airport Authority is slowly getting us used to the big changes there by starting to re-route the traffic to drive by the new buildings and parking structures. They have already renamed the terminals and announced local vendors and restaurants. Check out the proposed artwork by Gordon Huether to be installed at slcairport.com. It will span 362 feet and is made up of seven miles of aluminum tubing. It’s hard to describe until you see the renderings, but stunning!  n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Redneck Chronicles Melinda Frye Toney, 44, of Oak Hill, W.V., was charged with wanton endangerment on Aug. 22 for brandishing a pistol in the parking lot of the New Life Apostolic Church on May 11. It seems Melinda, wife of Pastor Earl Toney, and Lori Haywood, 29, wife of Youth Pastor David Haywood, had an ongoing conflict, according to a police spokesman. Fayette County Sheriff’s Detective Kevin Willis told the Register-Herald of Beckley, W.V., that the “straw that broke the camel’s back” was an argument over a T-shirt Lori Haywood wore to a church event. The two couples met at the church that day to try to hash out the wives’ differences, but, said Willis, “[I]t just made it worse, I think.” Melinda Toney left the meeting and went to her car, where she retrieved her firearm. When Pastor Earl moved to stop his wife, the gun discharged. Det. Willis confirmed that Melinda Toney had a concealed weapon permit.

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Service easier on Aug. 23 when he allegedly made a photocopy of his face during a breakin at a commercial property there. Police said the suspect “ate some food items” and created the picture of his face—which he left behind. Fox News reported that police eventually arrested Lambe, who was already in custody for an unrelated incident, and charged him with breaking and entering and failing to comply with probation.

WEIRD

Serving the Public The Sharonville, Ohio, police department found a way to turn a resident’s misconceptions about marijuana laws in Hamilton County into a teaching moment on Sept. 3. The department posted on its Facebook page a recording of a call received on Aug. 25 from “Mr. Marilyn Manson,” who complained that “two Sharonville cops ... stole my fucking weed last night.” The angry man insisted that anything “under 100 grams is cool, right?” but was, in fact, wrong. (It’s legal to possess up to 100 grams of marijuana in the city of Cincinnati, but that law does not cover the entire county— including Sharonville.) The officers who confiscated the weed were arresting the man’s wife, whom he identified as Marilyn Manson during the call, when they found the contraband in her purse. In a second call to police, the caller also complained that the officers had taken his carryout order from Red Lobster. “It was a fresh meal of Cajun fucking pasta!” he ranted. Fox19 reported that a police supervisor later met with the man to clarify the laws about marijuana and explain what had happened to his dinner.

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Weird Science In the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, 74-year-old Mangayamma Yaramati gave birth to twin girls on Sept. 5. Yaramati and her 82-year-old husband had wanted children for years, but they had been unable to conceive. “We tried many times and saw numerous doctors,” Yaramati said. “So this is the happiest time of my life.” The Washington Post reported that Yaramati had already gone through menopause, so a donor’s egg was fertilized with her husband’s sperm, then implanted in her uterus. Her doctors, who claimed she is the oldest person in the world to give birth, delivered the twins via cesarean section. n  Residents of Kaysville, Utah, have reported two incidents when a drone has approached them, identified itself as belonging to the Kaysville Police Department and issued directions to them. On Sept. 8, a drone told people walking on the campus of Davis Technical College to evacuate, though it didn’t specify why. Earlier, a couple walking their dog were followed by a drone that told them to take their dog inside, Kaysville police officer Alexis Benson told Fox 13. Benson said even if the department owned a drone (which it doesn’t), it wouldn’t use it to issue evacuations or make commands. She also warned that impersonating the police is a crime.

Wait, What? New for 2019, Mattel is releasing a Dia de los Muertos Barbie. That’s right, Day of the Dead Barbie, celebrating the traditional Mexican holiday honoring ancestors. She arrives wearing a full-length embroidered dress and traditional skull-like facepainting representing the dead. Dia de los Muertos is celebrated from Oct. 31 through Nov. 2, and the doll’s designer told ABC7 he wants to expand awareness about the holiday. The Continuing Crisis The SC-Club, a nightclub in Nantes, France, is celebrating its fifth anniversary with a new attraction—robot pole dancers. The bots will wear high heels and sport a CCTV camera for a head, along with mannequin parts overlaid on their robot bodies, reported Sky News on Sept. 1. The camera/head is designed to “play with the notion of voyeurism,” designer Giles Walker explained. Club owner Laurent Roue assured patrons the robots won’t replace his 10 human dancers. Bright Idea The town of Porthcawl, Wales, is fighting back against the misuse of its public toilets by installing high-tech loos with water jets that will spray users who are smoking or taking drugs—or having sex. Sky News reported on Aug. 17 that the new stalls will have weight-sensitive floors to make sure only one person is using the facilities at a time, and the walls will be graffiti-resistant. There will also be a time limit to discourage overnight campers. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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What’s in a Name? Rep. Raul Ruiz, 47, a California Democrat representing the 36th Congressional District, might face an unusual opponent in the November 2020 election: GOP candidate Raul Ruiz, 57, a construction contractor. “I want to give the citizens another option,” challenger Ruiz told Politico. “I’ll say this. I had the name first.”

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Police Report A Texas motorcyclist with the memorable nickname “Baby Jesus” taunted Blue Mound police on Aug. 10 as they tried to pull him over. Police posted dashcam video of Jesus Sebastian Gomez doing wheelies and standing on his motorcycle while weaving in and out of traffic, eventually getting away from officers. Fox News reported that witnesses viewing the video helped identify the rider, and police issued a statement urging Gomez to turn himself in. “[Y]ou need to come speak with us regarding this incident or we can come to you. [We could have a come to ‘Baby Jesus’ meeting],” they offered. Gomez surrendered to the Tarrant County Sheriff’s Office on Sept. 4 and was charged with evading arrest.

TEACHERS!

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Repeat Offender Police in Wilton, Conn., told WVIT they scored a two-fer on Sept. 7, thanks to 64-year-old Ellen Needleman-O’Neill. The woman was arrested that afternoon after a caller alerted police of a driver who hit a parked car in a parking lot. Officers conducted field sobriety tests, which they said Needleman-O’Neill failed, and she was charged with operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/ or drugs, along with possession of a controlled substance (for the Tylenol 3 found in her bag). Police released her, but hours later she was seen driving away from a liquor store in her car. Officers stopped her again and found her to still be under the influence, they said. Police also said they learned Needleman-O’Neill didn’t have a valid driver’s license, hadn’t registered her vehicle and had lost her right to drive after the first offense earlier in the day. She was charged with additional crimes and was scheduled for two court appearances.

Most Competent Criminal Yusuke Taniguchi, 34, a shopping mall clerk in Koto City, Japan, was arrested earlier this year for using his superpower—a photographic memory—for apparent evil. According to police, Taniguchi was able to memorize more than 1,300 numbers from credit cards as people used them at his shop register, SoraNews reported. He admitted to investigators that he would remember the name, card number, expiration date and security code, then write the information down as the customer walked away, later using the accounts to make online purchases of items he would then sell. Police, who tracked him to his address by using orders for two expensive handbags, found a notebook with hundreds of accounts listed.


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48 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

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Profile for Copperfield Publishing

City Weekly September 26, 2019  

The Arts Issue 2019

City Weekly September 26, 2019  

The Arts Issue 2019