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Road Out the

How religious organizations, nonprofits and people on the streets are adapting to historic change in Salt Lake’s homeless services. By Peter Holslin


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY END OF THE ROAD?

Seismic changes in homeless care are coming—and many fear falling by the wayside. Cover photograph by Peter Holslin

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Opinion, Sept. 5, “Aaron Shamo: Young Man with No Future”

Excellent Mr. Robinson. Great things come out of your pen when you are not obsessed with Trump! MANNIE LUGO Via cityweekly.net I don’t believe that one chooses to be an addict. We are living in a society where a simple surgery can turn you to the streets for heroin if you’re unlucky enough to have the genetic makeup that spins you into that path. Shamo stated he thought he was helping patients whose physician cut them off. Bullshit, he was in it for the cash, enough cash that he was too stupid to wash. This adult man didn’t simply make a mistake. He manufactured a product using a widely known deadly synthetic drug and peddled it as something else ... that is not an action that begs he is helping people. States are beginning to hold pharmaceutical companies liable, as they should. Perhaps those who feel that Shamos’ life sentence is too harsh aren’t woke enough to the realities of addiction. DEBRA MILLER ROSS Via cityweekly.net

News, Sept. 5, “Roadless Rule Rollback”

Who needs a livable planet to live on anyway ... pilfer the sumbitch for all she got! Woo Trump! BLAINE LAFRENIERE Via Facebook Bernie Sanders is 78 years old and had donations up to $15 million for his campaign … Mitt Romney is 72 … John McCain died as a Senator of Arizona … Ruth Ginsburg (cancer) is 86 and in the Supreme Court … our political leaders have Alzheimer’s … crazy grandparents film. CHRISTINE COHEN Via Facebook I agree, why do people keep voting for these old

geezers … BLAINE LAFRENIERE Via Facebook Despite their hostility to our public land, the Utaliban will never resurrect Deseret. MIKE CORONELLA Via Facebook Inland port is on sustainable landscapes. CHRISTINE COHEN Via Facebook [Gov. Gary Herbert] is known for selling out to the highest bidder. ALBERT GARCIA Via Facebook We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.

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OPINION The Real Measure of a Man Some actually believe that the measure of a man is in phallic centimeters. Others might think it’s in metric tons of political gravity. Still, more believe that greatness is calculated only from one’s net worth ... the decibels of a voice ... or the number of foes a conqueror has vanquished. Our president needs not ask on which of those bases he is great. With the possible exception of sheer tonnage, there are no criteria that would suggest he measures up in any way at all. One of the world’s greatest scientists—indeed, the father of one of the most essential theories of modern physics— had a totally different explanation. Every one knows who Albert Einstein was. The simplified equation, E=MC2, is one that we can never forget. It is the most famous equation in history, though most people can’t even tell you what it means. But Einstein was also a faithful student of humanity, and left us with a bit of his wisdom as well. One of those precious little tidbits sums up the glaring failure of Donald Trump, the man, and punctuates why he cannot function as our president or be taken seriously by the rest of the world. Einstein’s words were so astute; they should be inscribed on the desk of every world leader: “The true measure of a man is the degree to which he has managed to subjugate his ego.” In a world of runaway-ego autocracies,

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. this truth highlights the many failures of world leadership. Simply stated, Trump doesn’t measure up, and the reason is clear; his ego is totally out of control. Just when we’re thinking that, perhaps, the worst of it is over (Just how many lies is one man capable of?), and that the last of his 12,000-plus deceptions has been launched, he pulls yet another stunt that shows exactly who he is. Trump seems incapable of stemming the flow, which, like the anguished rush of diarrhea, leaves a little trail wherever he goes. The latest deception is the claim that he canceled a scheduled Camp David meeting with the Taliban, and that he did so because of a Kabul suicide bomber attack in which 12 people were killed, including one U.S. serviceman. The news of a “meeting” stunned Americans, who stammered “WTF” and scratched their heads over Trump’s assertion that the planned meeting had not been shared with anyone but, perhaps, Mike Pompeo. In some of his customary birdbrained tweets, Trump made his revelation to the world on Sept. 7. “Unbeknownst to almost everyone, the major Taliban leaders and, separately, the president of Afghanistan, were going to secretly meet with me at Camp David on Sunday. They were coming to the United States tonight. Unfortunately, in order to build false leverage, they admitted to an attack in Kabul that killed one of our great great soldiers, and 11 other people. I immediately cancelled the meeting and called off peace negotiations.” Even worse, when Trump’s new claim hit the news, Taliban leadership denied that it had planned to meet on U.S. soil, asserting that it would have not agreed unless a preliminary accord had already been reached and signed. Not surprisingly, the U.S. has refused to provide even a draft

copy of the supposed agreement to anyone, including Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. In review, the matter is just another piece of evidence that grandstanding and illusion is the modus operandi of our president. (It had to be a closely-held secret, suspiciously timed to take place just before the anniversary of 9/11.) There’s something so tragic about having to consider the statements of two bitter enemies—POTUS and the Taliban—and actually having to question which is true. While political figures often mess with our minds, and clever spins leave our brains feeling like frogs in a blender, Trump has stretched American confusion to its outermost limits. First, it was Trump and the fake news and the challenge of trying to ferret out which had the most likely veracity. Now, it’s the word of Trump against America’s avowed destroyer. Who’s telling the truth? Sadly, my bet is on the Taliban. Obviously I don’t like them and I certainly abhor their support of al-Qaeda in its ongoing, cowardly terrorist activities. Yet, there’s simply too much history that’s gone into the elongation of our president’s nose. The Taliban is fanatical, religiously-driven pure evil, but we have no reason to call them liars. Conversely, we have no reason to ever suspect Trump of telling the truth. Americans wake up every morning with a feeling much like the COPD sufferers on prime-time television pharmaceutical ads—there are some things you simply can’t ignore, and one of them is an orange-haired, intellectuallyand-morally-challenged elephant sitting on your chest. CW

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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You can never get enough of hearing from the two contenders for Salt Lake City mayor. Check out the Arts & Humanities Debate, sponsored by the Utah Cultural Alliance, where Utah Sen. Luz Escamilla and Salt Lake City Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall share their view on supporting the underfunded arts community. This is another chance to meet the candidates and tell them your concerns. Moderated by KSL Channel 5’s Amanda Dickson. Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 5:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2kMhkgn.

ENERGY SUMMIT

There’s just too much at stake to sit back and take it. The People’s Energy Summit attempts to bring together diverse voices “to create a just transition toward a renewable and regenerative future,” according to the event’s website. This daylong forum includes keynote speakers as well as workshops designed to be participatory and educational. “We will get our hands dirty, using art and landbased solutions to connect with one another and our environment. While dreaming of a thriving future, we will address systemic injustices that place disproportionate risk on indigenous people, immigrants, refugees, and rural communities in a changing climate and economy,” the website says. Forums include youth activism and faith-based community perspectives on stewardship. Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Saturday, Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., free, bit.ly/PeoplesEnergySummit.

EMPOWERING INDIGENOUS VOTERS

You know how the president is always giving marching orders to immigrants. Well, our Native Americans are ready to stand up to the abuse. At First Nations Voting Rights: Planting for the Future in Salt Lake City, they compare strategies for equal representation, preparation for the 2020 census, redistricting and rural addressing projects “to ensure that every vote on native nations across the U.S. is counted,” according to the event’s website. The conference is sponsored by the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission and Rural Utah Project to address national and state issues. Common Cause President Karen Hobert Flynn, National Redistricting Manager Dan Vicuna and other experts speak. University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law, 383 S. University St., Wednesday, Sept. 25, 10 a.m.-Friday, Sept. 27, 3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2lPxKF3.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

What a Luxury

Imagine this: a truly walkable community for the high and mighty, right here in Salt Lake City. It’s walkable only if you never leave your one of 380 units among the 39 floors of luxury apartments. If you don’t want to walk, take one of the high-speed elevators. You can avoid the two levels of “exclusive penthouse” and ride down to what designers say “create a unique vertical urban community,” according to the Deseret News. There will be 24-hour concierge, package delivery, dry-cleaning services, a pet spa and other services “that will make the urban living experience convenient and uniquely luxurious,” the project’s designers say. We’re sure you can’t wait for the arrival of the tallest building in the state at 75 E. 200 South, even if you can afford it only in your dreams. Something will be going up because for sure there won’t be a groundswell from the “Save Carl’s Jr.” protesters.

Drink a Beer!

Utahns can’t get fair boundaries, Medicaid expansion or medical cannabis, but they might be able to get stronger beer. The thing is that there might be a little shortage for awhile as the dust settles, a Fox 13 report warns. And KSL Channel 5 says the transition by Oct. 31 is going to be a “logistical nightmare.” It’s enough to drive you to drink—just not beer. You’ll remember it used to be 3.2 beer unless you ventured into the liquor store. Now we’re moving up in the world to 4%. That’s 4, not 4.8 like everywhere else in the country. One report said local brewers wanted 4% because apparently that’s so special. And of course, the LDS church objected to 4.8, which just makes you wonder if anyone in the church really knows the difference between 4% and 4.8% alcohol.

Missing Lawmakers

Remember how “the people” passed a redistricting law to set up an independent advisory commission to the Legislature? Gerrymandering is not so much about favoring a certain political party as it is maintaining the status quo. In Utah, even Republicans don’t get a good shot at challenging incumbents. But the real reason stems from legislators’ disdain of the public they serve. Enter Park City where Action Utah hosted an event to bring Summit County’s five state legislators together to talk about gerrymandering and ballot initiatives. But two legislators from the county—Sen. Allen Christensen, R-North Ogden, and Rep. Logan Wilde, R-Croydon—just couldn’t be bothered to go. The Park Record specifically called out Christensen because absence is his M.O. He’s been around since 2005, safe in a gerrymandered district where he doesn’t have to answer to those troublesome constituents.


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Changing the System

At the Salt Lake City mayor’s office, Fatima Dirie helps refugees make the city their own. BY PETER HOLSLIN pholslin@cityweekly.net @peterholslin

PETER HOLSLIN

E

Fatima Dirie, Salt Lake City’s refugee liaison, fled Somalia with her family after a civil war broke out in the 1990s before settling in Utah.

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she has been a very strong partner with outside organizations,” Biskupski tells City Weekly. The number of refugees coming into the state has dropped drastically under President Donald Trump, who has downsized the federal government’s refugee resettlement program. The state usually can take in as many as 1,200 refugees annually, but only 420 arrived in 2018, according to Asha Parekh, division director of Utah’s Refugee Services Office. But Utah’s political support for refugees remains steady. As Biskupski’s term winds to a close, the two candidates running to replace her both support the idea of keeping a refugee liaison position on staff. In a brief interview, City Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall says a refugee liaison would play a crucial role in helping coordinate the 2020 census and maintaining initiatives focused on community building and economic access. In a separate phone chat, Sen. Luz Escamilla says she would like to see an official like Dirie working on policy, helping integrate the needs of refugees into how city government operates. Dirie’s biggest impact so far seems to be in the communities she serves. In the months since he joined the Future Scholars of Africa, Kamungu has been working with Dirie regularly. He appreciates the way she builds up young people like him, her own efforts offering a model for success. “It gives you a little hope,” Kamungu says. “We know that we have someone in the system who’s going to be looking over us, who has almost the same story as us, someone who understands us. You don’t have to explain yourself anymore because she’s already going to know how it was and how it is.” CW

“A lot of times with the refugee community, it’s about relationship more than about what you have to offer,” she says. “If you have resources, they might not come for it. But if they have a relationship with you, or they have someone that they are comfortable with, they’re more likely to come access it.” In the early ’90s, her family fled to Kenya when a civil war broke out after the fall of Somali President Siad Barre. Dirie was just 9 years old when she arrived in Utah—after five years of waiting and undergoing an extensive vetting process, her family finally got a spot to come to the U.S. They chose Salt Lake to join Dirie’s aunt, who had just arrived a month earlier. Dirie started volunteering at the Asian Association of Utah’s Refugee & Immigrant Center when she was still attending West High School, and began a career in social work after graduating. She earned her master’s in social work at the University of Utah in 2014, and served as a community organizer and case manager for 15 years. She ended up at the mayor’s office in 2016, after approaching the newlyelected Biskupski about a possible opening for the city’s refugee liaison position. The refugee liaison is a full-time post originally created by former Mayor Ralph Becker as an outgrowth of an AmeriCorps volunteer program run by the mayor’s Office of Diversity and Human Rights, according to Chelsea Eddy, who served as Becker’s first liaison. When Dirie took over, she soon made crucial contributions to programs like Know Your Neighbor, in which local volunteers offer friendship and guidance to refugees they’re paired with. “[Dirie] is somebody that is very wellrespected amongst many different cultures in the refugee community, and

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a café in the City and County Building. “My vision is to change the city and make it reflect the community,” she adds. “In order to make that happen, the community has to trust the systems.” The Beehive State has welcomed refugees for decades. Each year, hundreds of new arrivals from conflict-torn countries like Syria, Somalia, South Sudan and Myanmar settle here. A robust network of case managers, educators and volunteers helps them along as they get apartments, learn English and adapt to their new surroundings. Still, many agree that these efforts wouldn’t be as effective if it weren’t for people like Dirie. Born in Somalia and raised in Utah, she navigates social and political spheres that in some cases would seem, quite literally, worlds apart. “If there is an issue and you call her and talk to her about it, she will step up until she finds a solution. She will work hard for it,” says Adhal Awan, a close friend of Dirie’s who works as a case manager at Catholic Community Services, one of two international agencies with offices here that resettle refugees. “That’s why a lot of people now really rely on talking to her. She is our No. 1 contact.” Dirie was born in Mogadishu, Somalia’s capital. Her family comes from Baraawe, a port city on Somalia’s southern coast that’s historically been a center for trade and Islamic scholarship and is also famous for its specialty breads and regal hats worn by tribal elders. Today, Dirie still speaks the Baraawe dialect, Chimwiini. She’s also fluent in Somali and Swahili, and she reads the Quran in classical Arabic—language skills that become crucial as she keeps an eye on forgetful schoolkids and connects families with city resources.

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lie Kamungu, a Salt Lake-based refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo, was passing the time on his phone one day this summer when he received a notification from a local education support group called the Future Scholars of Africa. “I got a message on Facebook—bam!” Kamungu says. The young soccer player, known among his peers for his larger-than-life personality and bright sense of humor, has lived in Utah for five years. But he’d never before heard of the FSA. Now, all of a sudden, they were adding him to their Facebook group, reaching out to explain that he was their newest recruit. “It was weird,” the 22-year-old recalls. “I’m, like, ‘I’m not even in this system, what is going on? Maybe they put the wrong person by accident!’” And that’s how Kamungu came under the wing of Fatime Dirie. The Future Scholars of Africa is one of a seemingly endless array of initiatives championed by Dirie, the official refugee community liaison of Salt Lake City. A senior advisor to Mayor Jackie Biskupski, this cheerfully unstoppable city official has spent the past 15 years working to build links between local institutions and refugee communities across Salt Lake. Dirie is a fixture at every local refugee-related cultural event, plying state lawmakers, law enforcement officials, schoolchildren and volunteers with food and dance to help them better understand the diverse cultures that have found their way, through strife and circumstance, to Utah. She also works behind the scenes, lobbying for greater support and representation for refugee populations in public schools, governance boards and public safety departments. “Most people have this assumption that refugees are just coming to live on welfare. But really, a lot of them are starting businesses. They’re paying taxes. They’re becoming citizens. They’re becoming first-time home-buyers … They’re also constituents of these elected officials,” Dirie says in an interview at


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Road Out the

How religious organizations, nonprofits and people on the streets are adapting to historic change in Salt Lake’s homeless services. Story and photos by Peter Holslin pholslin@cityweekly.net @peterholslin

F

or 32 years, the Good Samaritan Program has operated out of a three-story house with an expanse of green lawn on South Temple, offering bagged lunches to hundreds of hungry people every day. The program, run by the Cathedral of the Madeleine, has become such a reliable resource for the homeless and working poor over the years, that volunteer coordinators developed a DIY mass-production process to keep everything running smoothly. Every morning, a team of volunteers lay out slices of bread on a giant table, adding cold cuts and cheese, slathering on a mix of mayo and mustard, slapping together sandwiches 250 at a time. Then they pass them off to another crew in an adjoining room, who drop chips, granola bars, fruit or cookies into the bulging plastic sacks. “It’s like a holiday rush in a movie. It’s just crazy,” Scott Helferty, a 72-year-old retiree, said as he described his experience as a volunteer over the past three years. The program is meant to be a source of stability for those who have otherwise been left behind. The house runs from morning till night, 365 days a year, with no interruptions on weekends or holidays. But those days are over. Last month, Helferty said he and other staff and volunteers panicked over rumors that the Good Samaritan Program was shutting down. Days later, signs appeared on the front windows announcing that, beginning in October, the program will cease operations at the house

Michael and Erica Duran pictured outside the Good Samaritan House. and move to the St. Vincent de Paul soup kitchen, run by Catholic Community Services in the Rio Grande neighborhood. After all these years, the Rev. Martin Diaz of the Cathedral of the Madeleine tells City Weekly, the program suddenly started facing problems it could no longer handle in its current space. Amid rising rents, an opioid epidemic and the fallout from Operation Rio Grande, Diaz and others have seen a change in the kinds of individuals coming to the house. Some have been camping outside overnight, relieving themselves in public because they have no access to bathrooms. People have used drugs, leaving behind hypodermic needles and other paraphernalia. “There’s an opioid crisis, and the result of that is just more and more illegal drug use. We’re seeing kind of a different clientele,” Diaz says, delicately summing up some recent issues. “Each year, there’s just more and more need.”

‘A COMPLETELY HISTORIC RESET’ The Good Samaritan program is just one of many resources forced to adapt as the city and county implement major changes in dealing with the homeless population. Over the past few years, officials have been gradually pushing the homeless out of the downtown area, where services and support networks have been based for decades. The process began with Operation Rio Grande, the crackdown launched in August 2017 against drug dealing and violence in the neighborhood surrounding downtown’s The Road Home shelter. Now, these efforts continue with the opening of three new homeless service centers, dispersed across Salt Lake City and South Salt Lake. As soon as clients settle into the new centers, The Road Home—Utah’s largest shelter, outfitted with 1,100 beds—is expected to permanently close. And while many welcome this new change, there are also concerns about its effect on the long-running systems of support for some of the city’s most vulnerable people. “This is a completely historic reset on how we’re providing homeless resources in our community,” Preston Cochrane, executive director of SLC-based nonprofit Shelter the Homeless—which owns the three new resource centers as well as The Road Home—says in an interview. “For folks that have been chronically homeless

and in and out of the shelter system, this is a complete change from what they’re used to.” The Road Home has been the main destination for homeless people in Utah since it opened in 1988. The space was originally run by a group called the Travelers Aid Society, part of an international movement dedicated to providing support for itinerant families and migrants with no other place to lay their heads for the night. In 2001, the group changed its name to The Road Home, reflecting an updated mission to help people move out of shelters and into permanent housing. In recent years, real estate and business owners around The Road Home and Pioneer Park have pushed to close the downtown shelter—an effort that some advocates suspect has to do more with development opportunities than with actually solving homelessness. “Our position is that primarily it’s been about the retail value of downtown. The city is being gentrified, and so our homeless folks put a damper on selling land,” says Jessica Roadman, community outreach coordinator at Crossroads Urban Center, a Salt Lake-based food pantry and advocacy group. Naturally, this leaves lingering questions about how to address more deep-rooted causes of homelessness, like drug addiction, mental health and fast-rising rents. “What happens with transportation? What happens when people come into the shelter and they’re maxed out, because the housing market isn’t changing and we’re not putting any money into affordable housing?” Roadman says. “The city has been doing some good work—forward-moving work—in terms of affordable housing. But we need a lot, and we need a lot fast.”

NO TIME FOR ANYTHING

Some people who’ve stayed at The Road Home and hung out in the Rio Grande neighborhood say they welcome change. They say police often hassle people for loitering and other minor infractions, while inside, the infrastructure is old and drug use is still common. “When you walk in there, man, it’s a mess,” Brian Cruz said. He recently arrived in Salt Lake City from San Diego—he said he ended up here by mistake after drinking too much, passing out in the back seat of his Utah friends’ car and waking up in Las Vegas. He’s been homeless before, and since arriving in Utah he’s been trying to pick himself back up again, making friends with others on


Dozens service providers and homeless advocates attended August’s Poverty Summit.

The Road Home was supposed to close on June 30, but the deadline has been extended multiple times. According to Cochrane of Shelter the Homeless, the plan now is to shutter the shelter once everyone staying there has been relocated to a new service center. The Gail Miller Resource Center at 242 W. Paramount Ave., built for men

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 11

THE FUTURE IS MOBILE

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According to Utah’s 2019 report on homelessness, a comprehensive statewide head-count one evening in January found 2,798 individuals spending the night without a proper home across the state. Eighteen percent of them were considered “chronically homeless”— a category that describes someone who’s living in shelters or on the streets long-term, usually because of severe disabilities or drug problems. However, many more of the people in the count were in situations like the Durans, cycling in and out of homelessness or experiencing it only transitionally as they struggle to get back on their feet. Homeless advocates seemed to have people like the Durans in mind at the 16th annual Poverty Summit, a symposium organized by the Crossroads Urban Center held on a Saturday morning late last month. Homeless advocates, service providers and elected officials spent the morning discussing gaps between housing and homelessness at the Cathedral Church of St. Mark. “What I see in our community are red flags everywhere,” Sen. Derek Kitchen, D-Salt Lake City, told the audience. “In many ways, we are a victim of our own success—this longstanding effort that the state of Utah has put on economic development is generally a good thing. But look at what it’s doing. We have rising rents. Residents are being priced out of their neighborhoods, where they’ve lived for their whole lives … We are seeing the cost of living skyrocket in our community, and that

On a recent weekday morning outside the Good Samaritan house, Michael Duran was dressed for work in a blue polo shirt and khaki pants. Erica, his wife, also looked crisp in her button-up shirt and earrings. They’ve chosen to hunker down in the shelters and service centers lately as they build up enough money to become financially stable. Married for seven years, they used to be fully employed, Michael supervising workers on a production line at a meat-packing plant. He quit to look for a better-paying job, but ended up stuck doing low-wage gigs, struggling to find a position because he had a criminal record and most employers only wanted him for entry-level work. The couple say they’re now in an odd position: They’re not solvent enough to afford all the basics like a car, apartment and groceries, but they’re also not poor enough to where they’re confident they’ll qualify for public assistance. “If we ever make any more money, then we’re kicked off,” Erica said of programs like SNAP (the Supplemental

‘FIGHTING TOOTH AND NAIL’

itself makes escaping poverty that much more difficult, especially for people who are living on the edge day to day.” State lawmakers once promoted a “Housing First” policy to prioritize getting homeless people into affordable living arrangements. In a much-publicized story, Reuters reported in January these efforts led to a muchtouted 91-percent drop in chronic homelessness in Utah by 2015, yet the funding has dried up in recent years and the number of people camping on the streets has nearly doubled since 2016. During the past legislative session, lawmakers pledged to set aside $24 million to support affordable housing, only to axe the funding at the last minute. As TV cameras rolled for a debate at the poverty summit, Salt Lake City mayoral candidates Sen. Luz Escamilla and City Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall stressed the need for more affordable housing, talking specifics about redevelopment plans and single-room occupancy hotels. But not all the discussions were so cordial. On a panel with City Councilman Chris Wharton and Salt Lake County Councilwoman Shireen Ghorbani, veteran Crossroads advocate Tim Funk vented about the Legislature’s sudden turnaround on affordable housing. At one point, he suggested that lawmakers dedicated to the issue blew it at a key moment. “The opportunity has been lost,” he sighed. Sitting in the audience, Rep. Angela Romero, D-Salt Lake City, an outspoken advocate of affordable housing, suddenly got up and walked out in frustration. Ghorbani got on the mic to defend her. “We have representatives who are fighting tooth and nail for these dollars—one of them being Angela Romero,” Ghorbani said. “And we need to support those candidates. If you have seen somebody here today, that means that they care about this issue and we need to be out there working for them and supporting them.”

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GETTING ON TOP

Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps) and subsidized housing. “We’d rather just kind of struggle for a while until we get up there where we don’t need that.” Erica had been trying to get a spot in the Geraldine E. King Women’s Resource Center at 131 E. 700 South just off State Street. But she kept missing her chance because she was away from The Road Home during the day—the same time when service providers were stopping by the downtown shelter to relocate women to the new facility. “We go out and we do things. We don’t want to sit there all day,” she said. “All these struggles on top of each other, just everything adds up and builds up. It’s hard doing all of this,” Michael added. “But we’re pushing through. We’ll get on top.”

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the streets and visiting the Social Security office to get his paperwork together. But he hasn’t slept at The Road Home because the conditions were intolerable. “As soon as I walked in there, dude, I walked out with a bunch of bedbugs.” Leo, an artist who has lived on the streets and in shelters across the United States and is now in Salt Lake, said he likes the idea behind the new service centers. Although they’re spread out, each facility is built to serve as a one-stop shop where people can access food, health care, case management and other resources, cutting down on the need to schlep around all day on the bus. “It was a pain in the ass before—go all over town to get all your different things that you need. Then you miss out on the meals, you know?” he said, sitting on a patch of pavement outside a café on 100 South with a pack of pens and drawing paper by his side. “It’s hard to leave and try to do anything to better your life outside of the shelter. You’re standing there all day long just to get breakfast, a shower and lunch, and by that time it’s 3 in the afternoon and you have no time to go look for a job or anything.” Still, some advocates wonder if the new service centers are enough.

Salt Lake County Councilwoman Shireen Ghorbani (left), City Councilman Chris Wharton and the Crossroads Urban Center’s Tim Funk.


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Tai Chi with the homeless at Pioneer Park. and women, opens this month. The 300-bed men’s facility at 3380 S. 1000 West in South Salt Lake is expected to open some time in October. To change with the times, some providers have been branching out. Fourth Street Clinic, a community health center located across from Pioneer Park, recently invested in a custom-built mobile clinic that can provide checkups, hepatitis C treatments and other health care services for the clinic’s homeless client base. The mobile unit is 45 feet long, with five-inch-thick walls, a checkup room and a colorful exterior paint job of the Salt Lake skyline. It’s basically the rock ’n’ roll tour bus of mobile clinics. According to Laura Michalski, Fourth Street Clinic CEO, the mobile unit will cost half a million dollars per year to operate, with the first year covered by the state. But this doesn’t mean the facility is moving out of downtown for good. The clinic has invested heavily in its downtown property, including building a four-chair dental clinic on site that opened in 2014. The clinic owns the property and about 50% of its budget comes from a branch of the U.S. Deptartment of Health and Human Services—federal backing that Michalski says will give the clinic leverage to resist any potential efforts to push it out of downtown, like what happened with The Road Home. Still, as a community health center specifically designed to serve the homeless, Michalski says they’ll be watching closely to see how they can best serve clients. “We do an annual needs assessment to look at, ‘Do we have the patient numbers that would warrant us staying here?’ We’re required by the federal government to do this,” she says. “If we see a drop in numbers, we need to be able to discuss that and explain why. What are we doing to do outreach? Is this the best location? … The reality is, we really need to look at the community that we’re serving.”

FULFILLING A NEED Down the street from Fourth Street Clinic, at the St. Vincent de Paul soup kitchen, power drills wheeze and the smell of fresh paint hangs in the air as contractors hustle to finish a remodel. CCS, sponsored by the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City, has a big presence among vulnerable communities in Utah: It’s one of two organizations responsible for resettling refugees into new

The future site of Catholic Community Services’ culinary arts training program.

homes around the state, and it also provides homeless services in the Rio Grande neighborhood. According to Randy Chappell, the organization’s associate director of homeless services, CCS currently serves more than 700 hot meals a day to people who stop by the dining hall for lunch and dinner. That number is about to double, with CCS now operating the Gail Miller Resource Center and gearing up to make daily deliveries of spaghetti and meatballs, cheeseburgers and other dishes to all three new service centers. Staff has spent the past four months overseeing construction to expand its kitchen, allowing them to cook the meals they’ll deliver, and also making room for the Good Samaritan program to operate out of the space. But that’s not all. CCS is also making plans to launch the St. Vincent’s Kitchen Academy, a 12-week culinary arts training program for homeless individuals to help them develop useful skills and find employment. Developed in partnership with the Catalyst Kitchen, a national program based in Seattle, CCS’ cooking school will include 10 weeks studying in the kitchen and two more weeks doing a residency at local restaurants, with a case manager following up with each student for a year. “They’ll have chef outfits,” Chappell boasts. Chappell expects to see fewer homeless folks around Rio Grande with the new service centers, but he and CCS spokesperson Danielle Stamos still see a need for a dining hall where anyone—from a man camping out on the street to a low-income family hoping to save some cash—can get a free meal, no questions asked. “I think we know our numbers will drop, but I think there will still be enough around that it’ll make it worth it,” Chappell says.

HELP YOURSELF The American Dream is a story of hard work and winning; but what about the ones who end up at the bottom? Jia Tolentino, a staff writer at The New Yorker, argues in her new book, Trick Mirror, that the parameters for economic survival in America are getting more and more extreme in this age of rapid expansion, rising prices and relentless tech reinvention. She’s just one of many critics of a system that to many seems less dreamy by the day. At the Crossroads Urban Center, Jessica Roadman sees economic instability as a slippery

slope, with the rock-bottom struggles of homelessness just one symptom of a systemic problem. “We have this narrative that’s like, ‘Pull yourself up by your bootstraps!’ We’re such an individualistic culture that we forget that there’s so much else at play,” Roadman says. “One thing that I think is hopeful—it’s sort of a dark hope—but as more and more people feel that that narrative doesn’t make sense anymore, change is going to be forced. We’re losing the middle class. There are fewer and fewer people who are in their life experiencing home ownership … There’s a point where people are getting fed up with having to work four or five jobs and barely get by.” Brian Jones, a Road Home resident who grew up in Utah, says it’s a bit nerve-wracking to think about how the system will change as he gets ready to leave the downtown shelter and move to one of the new service centers. If he can’t get in a steady-enough financial position in time to move into affordable housing, he’s expecting to relocate to the as-yet-unopened new facility in South Salt Lake. He wonders what kind of impact this will have on his day-to-day schedule: He currently works concessions part-time at the Vivint Smart Home Arena, just up the street from The Road Home. The South Salt Lake center, on the other hand, is 45 minutes away on public transportation. The closest “amenity” down there is the Salt Lake County Metro Jail, a half-mile walk from the new service center. “That’ll make it easier on the police, I guess,” Jones jokes, as he rests up on a recent afternoon at the Weigand Homeless Resource Center—a gated community space run by Catholic Community Services near The Road Home. Despite those concerns, Jones was feeling good about the services he’s been able to access locally. He looks forward to seeing some of the same staff at The Road Home working at the new centers, and he has a positive outlook, even in his tenuous position. If he were living back on the streets, everything could fall apart. But he knows that help is out there if he needs it. “It’s all about helping yourself, too. You gotta understand that they can only offer you stuff—you have to actually ask for it,” he says. “There’s people here who are willing to help you. You just need to be willing to be helped.” CW


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Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

SCOTT POLLEI

KIRSTEN PARK

COTTAGE STREET BOOKS

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 19-25, 2019

FARRIS GERARD

ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 9/19

FRIDAY 9/20

SATURDAY 9/21

SATURDAY 9/21

Nadene LeCheminant might now live in Oregon, but her Utah ties are second to none. A Utah State University grad with degrees in history and art, LeCheminant traces her lineage by plural marriage back to Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. She even describes on her website an experience walking several hundred miles through the Southern Utah desert without a sleeping bag or tent, connecting her to the gruelling experience of her pioneer ancestors. LeCheminant draws from that history in her debut novel The Gates of Eden, inspired in part by the story of her own great-great-grandmother, Mary Ann Barton Allen. Her story begins in 1856, with a girl named Josephine Bell living in the slums of Victorian England. Desperate to change her circumstances, she connects with a group of converts to a strange new religion, who have plans to journey to their “promised land” in the United States. Once there, however, she discovers that this Latter-day Saint paradise might force her into marriage with an older polygamist. This deeply-researched work draws from a wide range of historical sources to convey not just the experience in Utah of newly-arrived Mormons and their often life-threatening travels within this country, but the journeys that many of them faced from distant countries, with all the accompanying homesickness and sense of dislocation. Join the author for a reading and discussion about this unique mix of coming-ofage story and historical fiction this week at The King’s English Bookshop. (Scott Renshaw) Nadene LeCheminant: The Gates of Eden @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 19, 7 p.m., free, kingsenglish.com

During the heyday of Hollywood’s “Golden Age,” no screen star figured more prominently than Jimmy Cagney. Yes, Gable and Bogart graced movie marquees as leading men, but in terms of versatility, talent and tenacity, Cagney was king. A new musical, simply titled Cagney, tells the story of this so-called “tough guy in tap shoes,” an actor able to play a merciless gangster so remarkably in one role while singing and dancing fluidly as a Yankee Doodle Dandy in another. “Cagney started for me as an idea and then became a passion in acting school,” Robert Creighton (pictured), the award-winning actor who stars in the title role and co-wrote the music and lyrics, explains via email. “Not only because of my obsession over how talented and versatile James Cagney was on screen, but because his story was a compelling one—a love story, a story about the American dream, one that resonates more today than ever.” Cagney originated as a four-person production 12 years ago, then became a hit off-Broadway before being further expanded by Pioneer Theatre Co. prior to an upcoming run on Broadway. “Mr. Cagney’s story warranted a more expansive, deeper telling,” Creighton continues. “We are thrilled and grateful to share that with Salt Lake City!” While Brando was the ultimate Godfather and Pacino the perfect Scarface, no one brought malevolence and menace to the screen like Cagney, or managed to radiate such energy and enthusiasm. As the man himself so famously said, “Made it, Ma! Top of the world!” (Lee Zimmerman) Cagney @ Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Sept. 20–Oct. 5, dates and times vary, $45-$73, pioneertheatre.org

Technology. Entertainment. Design. Groundbreaking TED talks are delivered all over the world, and often brought to independently organized local venues. For eight years, the University of Utah has hosted Salt Lake City’s TEDx event, and has created lineups that have included physicists, activists, comedians and musicians. The tagline “ideas worth spreading” has been the TED mantra since the ’80s and a considerable effort goes into making sure that community events are held to the same standard. Video and live speakers combine to promote deep discussion and community connection for the conference attendees. This year, guests include: Joey Wilson, an engineer and entrepreneur focused on sensing people using radio waves; Ruby Chou (pictured), classical pianist and educator and executive director of the nonprofit Mundi Project, who advocates for open access to music education; and the Utah band Foreign Figures, who break down the culture of choosing sides. “Dynamic Harmony” is the theme for each of the 20 presentations, a term that offers an intriguing paradox. To be in a state of constant change but content in one’s life is just one way the words might be interpreted. Seating and ticket packages for the all-day event are available. TEDx Salt Lake City is looking for volunteers, partners and community ambassadors to help keep the annual event growing. In addition, this year is the first to provide live entertainment during the lunch portion of the event. (Erick Graham Wood) TEDx Salt Lake City @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Sept. 21, 9 a.m., $5 for U students; $35-$75 for entire event; $100 for VIP packages, tickets.utah.edu

The days might be getting shorter and the nights might be getting cooler, but that doesn’t mean that the Urban Arts Festival can’t give one last burst of summer to downtown Salt Lake City. The two-day festival features past favorites such as urban dance performances, live painting and mural-making, the Urbeez Kids Zone, a basketball tournament, more than 150 local artisans and local and touring musicians. The headlining music act this year is Slick Rick, the legendary English rapper. Derek Dyer, executive director of Utah Arts Alliance and event founder, says the festival is dedicated to being something for everyone. “Art can change lives,” Dyer says, “and the Urban Arts Festival is an equal playing ground for the community to experience the art.” This year, the festival spills over to the nearby Regent Street and McCarthy Plaza on Sunday. And it’s in these expanded locations that the new Lowrider Exhibit debuts, which features 20 hand-painted custom cars from around the state, many of which include artwork painted on their undercarriages. After showing off their vehicles, the owners compete to see which car can bounce the highest during the Hop Off on Sunday at 5:30 p.m. Dyer says including lowriders was a natural fit to the festival because the Utah Arts Alliance strives to create a culture of keeping an open mind and inclusive attitude toward art and embracing all aspects of Salt Lake City’s artistic and cultural diversity. (Kylee Ehmann) Urban Arts Festival @ Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 801-363-2787, Sept. 21, noon-10 p.m.; Sept. 22, noon-8 p.m., free, utaharts.org

Nadene LeCheminant: The Gates of Eden

Pioneer Theatre Co.: Cagney

TEDx Salt Lake City

Urban Arts Festival


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Support Systems

Brine Dance and RDT work together to give showcase opportunities to dancers and choreographers. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

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ike many young dancers, Lauren Broadbent began her artistic path before she’d even started kindergarten. At the age of 4, she was enrolled in dance classes. By the time she moved to Utah from New York City, at the beginning of high school, she was talented enough to immediately earn a spot on the Olympus High School dance team. She even represented her new school as the Sterling Scholar for dance. No dancer thinks that it will be easy to establish a professional career, but Broadbent was dedicated and continued pursuing dance into college, declaring her major in modern dance at the University of Utah. Now entering her junior year, Broadbent will soon have to find a new way to sustain her passion—a tricky proposition with so few professional dance companies in the state. But she might be set up better than most. Earlier this year, Broadbent—along with many other young up-and-coming dancers and choreographers—submitted a performance proposal to Brine Dance, vying to be one of the few chosen to participate in the collective’s annual choreographer’s showcase. She made the cut. This week, Broadbent, along with four other choreographers—Rebecca Aneloski, Daniel Do, Mar Undag, Trevor Wilde—present her original work at Brine-5, part of the Repertory Dance Theatre Link Series. Brine Dance Collective came together in 2015 under the direction of Utah natives Symmer Andrews, Ashley Creek and Sara Pickett, who found themselves loosely connected through the local dance scene. Each woman was facing the same daunting reality that dancers like Broadbent still face today: Their professional careers would not likely include a spot in a company line-up, and had little other direction. Still, they wouldn’t give up. With a dash of ingenuity and lots of selfdetermination, Andrews, Creek and Pickett decided to create their own opportunities for performance. Along the way, they’d also make space for their friends. “We wanted to create space for artists to come together, make work and perform really professionally produced concerts,” Creek says. “We also knew that the venues we wanted, these professional stages, would be

PAUL MONTANO

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DANCE

costly,” Pickett adds. “That’s when I spoke with Linda Smith [executive and artistic director of RDT].” Pickett had previously worked with RDT as a guest performer and as a teacher for the RDT adult school (she is also currently setting a piece on the company for their November concert). Through these connections, Pickett became familiar with the company’s Link Series, a sponsorship series that supports local independent dance projects. Pickett and her Brine colleagues created a proposal and submitted it for funding. They were accepted and, since then, every Brine performance has been supported through the series. That support means that Brine (and other small local companies and choreographers supported through the same fund) are able to benefit from discounted rental space. They can afford designers, videographers and costumer support. And, in the case of Brine, they can opt to put money toward hiring William Peterson, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.’s technical director and stage manager. Peterson brings to each of Brine’s performances professional lighting design and stage direction. “William believes in our mission,” Andrews explains, praising Peterson’s contributions. “Working with Brine fuels his creative spirit, and in turn he brings professionalism to our show. He works closely with our choreographers and helps them in realizing their vision.” Getting professional guidance and mentorship from people like Peterson, Pickett, Andrews and Creek is a big part of what makes choreographing for Brine such an important experience for young would-be

Brine 5

dance professionals like Broadbent. Through this last summer, she worked closely with her group of seven dancers. Expanding on a trio she had created for the University of Utah spring dancers’ concert, Broadbent further developed her story, and movement, exploring ideas of trauma and loss. “I wanted to get a lot done before Symmer, Sara and Ashley came to watch,” Broadbent says. “I had a two-week intensive with the dancers, and then everyone came to observe and give feedback. Even after the changes I had already made, having other people looking at it helped me to see how I could better communicate my ideas. Not only was it helpful for this piece, but it will also be going forward and applying it to the next piece. I never want to choreograph without feedback.” In the last few weeks leading up to the show, this team of dancers, choreographers and directors has been putting in extra hours—on top of full time jobs—rehearsing, hanging lights and working on final sound design touches. It’s all hands on deck to ensure that Brine 5 is a professional product in every way. CW

BRINE DANCE COLLECTIVE: BRINE 5

Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center 138 W. 300 South 801-355-2787 Sept. 19-21, 7:30 p.m. $18 brinedance.com


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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Modern West Fine Art (412 S. 700 West, 801-355-3383, modernwestfineart.com) presents artists Fidalis Buehler, Mitch Matle and Wren Ross (Ross’ “Be Still, Be Silent, Do Nothing” is pictured) in Myth, Sept. 20-Oct. 31, with an artist reception Friday, Sept. 20, 7-9 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

The Adams Family Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 16, showtimes vary, hct.org Cagney Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, Sept. 20-Oct. 5, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 14) Dracula: The Musical Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, through Sept. 22, dates and times vary, tickets.utah.edu Death of a Driver Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 20, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Fly More Than You Fall Noorda Theater, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Sept. 12-28, uvu.universitytickets.com Happy Days Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Sept. 21, times vary, artsaltlake.org A Midsummer Night’s Dream Utah Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State, through Sept. 28, Saturdays, 10:30 a.m., uctheatre.org The Moors An Other Theater Co., 1200 Towne Centre Blvd., Provo, through Sept. 28, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., anothertheatercompany.com Prometheus Bound Harman Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., harmantheatre.org Ripped Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, Sept. 20-Oct. 6, dates and times vary, goodcotheatre.com

DANCE

Repertory Dance Theatre: Brine 5 Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 19-21, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 16) Odyssey Dance: Thriller Egyptian Theater, 328 Main, Park City, Sept. 20-Oct. 5, dates and times vary, odysseydance.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Chamber Orchestra Ogden: Ahoj, Ni Hau and Privet from the Czech Republic, China and Russia Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m., egyptiantheaterogden.com Utah Symphony: The Music of John Williams

Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Sept. 20-21, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Quodlibet 2019: Cinq Percussion Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m., saltycricket.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

And That’s Why We Drink Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 19, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Franco Escamilla Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Sept. 19, 8:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Margaret Cho Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 20-21, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Steve Soelberg Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Sept. 20-21, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Todd Johnson Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Sept. 20-21, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1000 S. 900 West, Sundays through Oct. 13, 10 a.m.2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 19, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Park Silly Sunday Market Main Street, Park City, Sundays through Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., parksillysundaymarket.com Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., slco.org/wheeler-farm

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Hispanic Heritage Festival & Parade The Gateway, 18 N. Rio Grande St., Sept. 21, 11 a.m.9 p.m., shothegateway.com Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, through Oct. 20, snowbird.com Rumi Poetry Festival Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, events.slcpl.org


moreESSENTIALS Urban Arts Festival Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Sept. 21, noon-10 p.m., utaharts.org (see p. 14) Witchfest Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, West Jordan, through Oct. 31, gardnervillage.com

LGBTQ

1 to 5 Club: Fluidly Speaking Discussion Group Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, fourth Mondays, 7:30-9 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Beyond a Night of Music Encircle Salt Lake, 331 S. 600 East, Thursdays, 6:30-8 p.m., encircletogether.org Men’s Sack Lunch Group Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Wednesdays, noon-1:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org TransAction Weekly Meeting Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Sundays, 2-3:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Utah LGBTQ+ Chamber of Commerce Breakfast Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, third Thursdays, 7:30-9 a.m., utahgaychamber.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Abstraction Is Just a Word, But I Use It UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 4, utahmoca.org

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 19

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

| CITY WEEKLY |

VISUAL ART

Dr. Richard White Utah State University Library, 50 N. Main, Logan, Sept. 19, 7 p.m., nowplayingutah.com Emmanuel Jal: Story of a War Child Gore School of Business Auditorium, 1840 S. 1300 East, Sept. 24, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org Peter Walker: The Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Occupation and Combatting Violent Extremism University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, 383 S. University St., Sept. 19, 12:15 p.m., law.utah.edu TEDx Salt Lake City Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, Sept. 21, 9 a.m., tedxsaltlakecity.com (see p. 14)

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TALKS & LECTURES

Amidst: Kathy Puzey, Amanda Lee and Holland Larsen Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 1, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Anne Fudyma: Synchronistic Space UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Oct. 12, 11 a.m.6 p.m., utahmoca.org Concerning Craft & The Power of Print Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, Sept. 20-Oct. 11, downtownartistcollective.org Emily Robison: Collections A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Oct. 4, agalleryonline.com Gerald Purdy & Hadley Rampton Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, Sept. 20-Oct. 11, phillips-gallery.com I, your glass Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Sept. 20, saltlakearts.org League of Reluctant Bicyclists UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Myth Modern West Galley, 412 S. 700 West, Sept. 20-Oct.31, modernwestfineart.com (see p. 18) Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, Sept. 21-Jan. 13, utahmoca.org Power Couples Utah Museum of Fine Art, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 8, umfa.utah.edu Portraits of Courage: Shane Sato Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 20, utahhumanities.org Ryan Lauderdale: Glazed Atrium UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Susan Cramer Stein: Cowboys and Horses: A Western Romance Local Colors of Utah Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Oct. 15, localcolorsart.com Spencer Finch: Great Salt Lake and Vicinity Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, through Nov. 28, umfa.utah.edu Skate Deck Challenge Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Sept. 29, urbanartsgallery.org Ummah Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 15, umma.utah.edu Untold Aftermath Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Sept. 20, saltlakearts.org Utah Watercolor Society: Our Best Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Oct. 16, culturalcelebration.org

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Brandon Mull Orem City Library, 58 N. State, Orem, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Guest Writer Series: Alan Shapiro and Tom Sleigh Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, Sept. 19, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Katharine Coles & Francesca Bell The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 E. 1500 South, Sept. 25, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Mario Chard Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 25, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Michael G. Snarr: Long Shots and Layups Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 19, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Nadene LeCheminant: The Gates of Eden The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 19, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 14) Orson Scott Card: Lost and Found Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 20, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com; University Crossings Plaza, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Sept. 21, 6 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Sam Ricks The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 21, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Sofiya Pasternack Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

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JOHN TAYLOR

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Lobster Rollin’

A classic New England favorite is alive and well along the Wasatch Front. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

T

racing its origins to a restaurant named Perry’s in Milford, Conn., back in the 1920s, the lobster roll is the definition of summer cool. Until recently, the closest I’d ever come to a genuine one was the seafood sensation at my local Subway. While I will always retain a nostalgic, self-loathing kind of love for the Subway creation, I’m glad that we’ve got a few places that are flying lobster into Utah to be piled high on one of New England’s finest dishes. Not only have I come to appreciate the complementary flavors of butter, lemon and freshly prepared chunks of lobster meat, but there’s also something delightfully anarchic about taking this A-list ingredient, slathering it in mayo and serving it up on a bun with a side of fries or crinkle-cut potato chips. While this beach bum presentation is only

slightly more cost-effective than ordering steamed lobster at a steakhouse, I can’t help but think that each roll I eat helps stick it to those stuffy steakand-chop houses and their lobster-with-a-bib agenda. Currently, we have two lobster roll powerhouses within state boundaries, both of which started their rise to local prominence roughly three years ago.

Slapfish (slapfishrestaurant.com) is a franchise based in Huntington Beach, Calif., which turned to Lehi as the site of its first out-of-state venture in 2017. Founded by Andrew Gruel, it made a name for itself by sourcing seafood from Golden State docks and ensuring freshness regardless of travel time. Gruel said it best when he told Forbes that he wanted Slapfish to be the “Chipotle of seafood.” Freshie’s (freshieslobsterco.com), meanwhile, is a local restaurant that has been making lobster rolls for the Park City crowd via their food truck since 2013. Three years into it, owners Lorin and Ben Smaha opened their first brick-and-mortar store, and this growth soon expanded to downtown SLC with the opening of their second location last year. Where Slapfish gets its seafood from California, Freshie’s gets theirs from Maine—the Smahas are originally from New England, which is where their seafood loyalties lie. The honor of who got here first belongs to Freshie’s. Long before the Smahas started their food truck, they made a name for themselves serving up fresh lobster rolls at local farmers markets. “We started selling them because we couldn’t

find any lobster rolls out here,” Lorin says during a recent phone interview. “It’s a very common sandwich back East, and very uncommon here.” In 2017, Freshie’s took home the prize of World’s Best Lobster Roll at the Down East Lobster Roll Festival in Portland, Maine. With Freshie’s earning national accolades and Slapfish opening its first non-California location, it was a big year for Utah lobster fans. Now that some time has passed, however, it’s time to dig deep and get a sense of which place is worth your money. Lobster rolls aren’t cheap, after all. From the traditionalist standpoint, Freshie’s should take this prize, since they’re using genuine Maine lobster. As the sandwich was invented on the East Coast, the lobster rolls at Slapfish should be immediately disqualified. But we aren’t on the East Coast, are we? Since I’m a born and bred Utahn, I’ve got no decapod in this fight, so let’s break it down by the numbers. Freshie’s XL lobster roll (pictured) and Slapfish’s traditional are roughly 6 inches long, and though Slapfish sells their roll at market price, the last one I got ran me $25,

which is a buck less than Freshie’s flat rate. Freshie’s does have the option of smaller sandwiches that are a little less spendy—the Real Mainah ($21) and the Tourist ($12) are good options for those in need of a smaller but more economical dose of lobster roll goodness. So size and price are pretty much neck and neck, but Freshie’s does offer some variety in this department. I was intrigued to see that Freshie’s uses lobster tail meat in addition to claw meat, which is the exception, not the rule. “A lot of places just use claw and knuckle, but we like the texture of tail in ours,” Smaha says. “It’s just one of those things that has every element you want when you bite into it.” While there’s nothing wrong with lobster claw and knuckle meat, Slapfish does lack the lobster tail meat in their roll which takes it down a peg—the more tail the better, I say. Overall, it’s tough to go wrong with either place, but Freshie’s ends up walking away with my vote. They’ve made lobster rolls the focal point of their whole operation, and it’s paid off. It’s easy to taste all that effort and wicked love with each bite of those tasty gobs of lobster goodness. CW


international food festival

and craft beverage experience

tickets include multi-cultural cuisine and craft beverages from Utah’s best ethnic restaurants, distilleries and breweries

thursday, October 17

7 pm - 10 pm at La Caille 9565 Wasatch Blvd. Sandy, UT

Japanese Cuisine

VENDORS INCLUDE:

BEST OF STATE

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For tickets and a full list of vendors go to

devourutah.com/promotions

20162018

423 Broadway (By Homewood Suites) 801.363.0895 | samesushi.com

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 23

L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S 18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-89 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

Pasta-da! Happy kids make happy moms and dads.

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

Celebrate the Bounty 4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

As we start to wind down from another year in which Local First Utah (localfirst.org) has helped spotlight so many local businesses doing great things around town, it’s once again time to open our hearts, wallets and mouths to Celebrate the Bounty. Over the years, Celebrate the Bounty has made a name for itself as one of the state’s most expansive local food events, and its vendor list never fails to raise a few eyebrows. This year, the event features food and drink from The Rest, SLC Eatery, Vida Tequila and Waterpocket Distillery. Festivites take place on Thursday, Sept. 26, at Caffe Molise (404 S. West Temple) from 7 to 10 p.m., and tickets can be purchased via Local First Utah’s website.

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5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT 801.266.4182 HOURS MON-THU 11a-11p • FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

Gluten Free World Expo

The Gluten Free World Expo (myglutenfreeworldexpo.com) is in town on Saturday, Sept. 21, to showcase another year’s worth of gluten-free cooking and restaurant options. This touring expo combines national and local products to help gluten-free eaters find more variety and options for their diet. In addition to helping locals find tasty stuff to eat, the expo hosts a variety of programming that features everyday tips and tricks for those adhering to gluten-free diets. The Gluten Free World Expo takes place at the Mountain America Expo Center (9575 S. State) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and tickets are available online.

Chickqueen Opens

Utah’s quest into just how deep the fried chicken niche can go continues with the opening of South Salt Lake’s Chickqueen (3390 S. State). It’s a restaurant that specializes in the Korean variety of fried chicken, which consists of either boneless or bone-in chicken, deep fried in a light and crispy batter and served with a variety of dipping sauces. Those after a plant-based experience can try their fried tofu or fried cauliflower, along with some Korean specialties like tteokbokki, a spicy stir-fried rice cake, or jjolmyeon, which are chewy noodles served cold. It’s one of the many reasons to pay the Chinatown Supermarket complex a visit as often as possible.

Celebrat i

26

ng

24 | SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

year

s!

Quote of the Week: “Next time you’re eating Korean food, just realize it’s so much more than barbecue and kimchi. You’re only scratching the surface.” —David Chang Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

ninth & ninth


The X-Factor Exploring the qualities that make for unique beers. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

used provide a bit of spicy melon and citrus peel, but no real fruit or melon. Mildly sweet and toasty malt comes next—not really sweet, just enough to prop up the hops. Eventually, the hops in this 5.3% beer get a little citrusy, with a touch of fruity, mild clementine. The finish is again grassy, herbal and floral. Overall: I love Pilsners, but I especially love it when brewers get away from the traditional hop selections and utilize some of the newer, more unique hop varieties out there. I should point out that all of the hops

used in this beer are German in origin, but it hardly comes off as a true German Pilsner. Squatters moved through quite a bit of those gin barrel doppelbocks during their party last week, but there should still be some available to purchase at Squatters and at the Beer Store at 1763 S. 300 West packaged in 750 milliliter bottles. Jazz Loon hit last weekend, and is packaged in 16-ounce cans. You can find this one in Level Crossing’s cold case to go, or to enjoy at the brewery’s pub. As always, cheers! CW

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4150 S, REDWOOD ROAD TAYLORSVILLE 801.878.7849

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f you’re looking for some real “outside the box” beers, this week’s selections exhibit just enough craziness to make them stand out from the rest. It doesn’t take much to turn a simple beer into a style bending work of art. However, these two beers managed to find an odd tweak that morphed them into something completely new. Let’s see if you can spot the individual X-factors here. Squatters 30th Anniversary Rum Barrel Doppelbock: This special doppelbock was aged in barrels that had previously housed gin, and was specifically created to celebrate Squatters 30th Anniversary. It pours a dark amber, almost brown color, with a smallish fluffy, khaki-colored head. The aroma begins with a decent amount of boozy juniper character, including berries, dates and figs. Then you get the dark toffee and caramelized sugar, typical of this style of lager. As it warms, you get some lighter, boozier gin-soaked raisins.

The flavors follow the nose, beginning with dark caramel, toffee and gin-soaked dark fruits. The barrel blends well with the toffee and vanilla base of the beer, and adds complexity to the assertive alcohol character. It was readily noticeable at the time of this sampling; though the beer is relatively fresh, it does have a cellared or aged feel to it. After the 12.3% brew came up to almost room temperature, there was a bit of a twang about it that had me thinking it was juniper berries. Perhaps it was just another of the somewhat strange vinous contributions from the barrels. Overall: Squatters doesn’t do a whole lot of barrel-aged beers, though I should point out that when they do produce them, they are top-notch. This is a very high quality barrel-aged doppelbock that shows Squatters’ more adventurous side. Level Crossing Brewing Co. Jazz Loon: This new lager is named for the infamous NorthSound jazz album of the early 1990s. It pours a light, hazy honey-orange color with a bubbly half finger of head. The nose is quite unique and interesting: There’s an unusual grassiness to it that is mildly earthy, with a nice, fresh hop character. Mild melon and clementine become prominent as it warms. The taste starts with a grassy hop character, almost noble-like and full of floral and spicy herbal hops. Those are the old-school German hop flavors; the new German hops

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

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705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 25

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26 | SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

DUTCH OVEN AND OUTLAW GRILL

DINE IN • TAKE OUT • CATERING

FIND US IN

ALEX SPRINGER

Daley’s Wood Fire and Dutch Oven Catering @daleywoodfire 1050 W. Shepard Ln. Suite #5 Farmington (385) 988-3429 | daleyswoodfire.com

Oktoberfest DOWNTOWN

Tushar Brazilian Express

Here’s a fast-casual riff on Brazilian churrasco cuisine, with an emphasis on the fire-grilled protein that makes it so delectable. Meat skewers can be ordered a la carte or in a meal with three different sides, and there’s really no wrong direction to take. I’m a fan of the glazed pork loin ($3.45) with its slightly sweet caramelization on the outside of the tender meat, and the beef skewer ($3.75), cooked medium rare—yes, they’ll ask you how you like your beef cooked. The full meal will set you back about $9 depending on your skewer of choice, and side dish options offer a few hits and misses. Their mashed potatoes are prepared skins and all, and fried bananas should be a side dish everywhere. I always get the steamed vegetables in an attempt to make my meal a bit more balanced, but they’re rarely satisfying; if you want to add greenery to your plate, salad is a better choice. For dessert, the vanilla flan ($4.50) is a sweet and silky way to end a meal. If you’re a fan of meats grilled to perfection, Tushar definitely delivers. Reviewed July 18. 1078 W. South Jordan Parkway, 801-446-6644, tusharexpress.com

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Living (In) the Dream

MUSIC

Peasantries and Pleasantries is more than a music store to Parker Yates—it’s a home. BY ERIN MOORE music@cityweekly.net @errrands_

Inside Peasantries and Pleasantries

| CITY WEEKLY |

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 27

804 S. 800 East By appointment: 801-706-9187 @peasantriesandpleasantries

PEASANTRIES AND PLEASANTRIES

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eventually went under,” he says. “I only worked there for a year. But it was the coolest job I ever had—it didn’t feel like work.” After spending eight years working at a stable pharmaceutical job, he decided to get back to vinyl—albeit after three years of building up a collection worth selling: “The majority of the stock right now has been purchased online, but I’ve been slowly peppering my own collection into it as I’ve gotten more and more comfortable with parting ways with records.” Although it’s hard to let some stuff go, he says, “I try to listen to new music every single day, so having the same records kind of defeats the purpose.” So with the knowledge that he’s selling some of his favorite records—a bunch are tiled up on shelves on the wall, with one gap missing where his favorite Judee Sill record was before being bought—record lovers should feel comfortable contacting him and stop in. It’s also small and low-key enough to feel accessible to new collectors, with familiar records and weirdo ones mixed equally into his well-organized crates. Record aficionados can also find comfort in Yates’ commitment to the best quality records; he’s angling to one day have 80% vintage, deadstock or used records populating the shop, and fewer reissues. He’s vigilant about the apparently common problem of record labels noodling around the rights of foreign or old, little-known records by taking CD masters and laying the files down on vinyl pressings. “I try to avoid [those labels] when I can,” he says. “I want the records to be the best possible version they can be. But if it has to be a reissue, I’m OK with it.” At the end of the day, Yates just cares about getting good music out for people to find and hear, regardless of format. Looking to his spread of cassettes and CDs on his pale yellow wooden table, he says, “If something was only put on CD and that’s the only way I can get it, then I’ll get it.” CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ERIN MOORE

P

easantries and Pleasantries is just the name for a boutique record shop in the seemingly ever-burgeoning 9th & 9th neighborhood. Owner Parker Yates actually calls his little spot on the corner of (in fact) 8th and 8th “9th Heights,” despite it actually being west of 900 East. But names are just things to pull you in, piquing your interest— and the well-curated titles Yates has stocked in his little corner of the world are no different than those you might find elsewhere. Yet, the shop itself is different. Having just opened in June, it’s part of a little core of retailers on that corner—including local vintage-clothing pushers Vantage—most of which are zoned as residential, including Yates’ own shop. Being residentially zoned comes with some limitations. “The zoning requires that it isn’t just an open store, and it’s been a little hard to get people to grasp onto it,” Yates says. “It’s like, ‘Oh, I can’t go because I have to make an appointment,’ but it’s pretty simple. Just shoot me a text.” Although he’s working toward getting the zoning changed to commercial, the fact that the shop is in a residential neighborhood means there are restrictions on things like noise levels. But Yates is unfazed. Even with those very specific rules—one appointment at a time, two appointments in an hour, only 16 per day—business has been working out for him. Of course, there are also benefits to a residential shop: He’s always available to meet customers who text or DM him, since he lives there, too. Behind a low shelf is a bed, covered in a bright pink blanket, gently tucked. The rest of the space is furnished impeccably with pale mid-century modern pieces. As long as he’s in this home, he’s available for sales, sometimes taking in customers as late as 10 p.m. Besides visitors coming to peruse his tight collection of übercurated vinyl, tapes and even some CDs, the space also played host to a house party earlier this summer, which featured 80-year-old jazz musician Lloyd Miller. “There were like 40 people crammed inside here,” Yates says excitedly. “The windows were open, people brought their own lounge and camper chairs and were sitting out on the porch.” But more than just the fun of it, the event was in line with his goals for the shop and himself. “It was this really intense experience of me putting a show on. It was something that we curated and brought to the space,” he says. “It was just insanely inspiring ultimately to like, finally cultivate something that I wanted.” This urge to curate and share music he loves and wants people to hear extends to other projects, like a service he operates for restaurants and DJs, “anyone who can purchase music physically.” He even offers personal shopper service for some of his regulars. His curatorial personality was honed over the years he spent hanging out in his father’s local chain of record shops, Pegasus Records (now out of business), which had locations in St. George, Bountiful and Salt Lake City. After high school, he got his first job at Modified Records by the University of Utah. “Competing with Graywhale, it


Ostrich Elk Buffalo Wild Boar Venison Wagyu

Lofte’s Bar and Grill

2106 W. North Temple. Salt Lake City, Utah 801-741-1188

10% off for military, firefighters and law enforcement

BY NICK McGREGOR, PARKER S. MORTENSEN, NIC RENSHAW & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 9/19

Brian Wilson, The Zombies, Al Jardine, Blondie Chaplin

There’s an old saying that suggests if you remember the ’60s, you really weren’t there. That lapse in memory generally wasn’t due to absent-mindedness, but that’s another tale entirely. Fortunately, for those that were there and can’t recall, as well as those that weren’t there at all, the music that was such an essential part of that decade lives on in performers like this show’s co-headliners, both of whom are members of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Brian Wilson needs no introduction, but we’ll offer one anyway: As the chief architect of the Beach Boys, his legacy lingers nearly six decades later. Joined by Al Jardine, who helped shape the band’s seminal sound, and Blondie Chaplin, a later recruit for the revival that resulted in another prosperous and prolific period, Wilson performs music from the classic albums Friends and Surf’s Up, along with the usual plethora of hits. British Rockers The Zombies had early chart toppers of their own—“Tell Her No,” “She’s Not There” and “Time of the Season” among them—but it was their classic album Odessey and Oracle which guaranteed their immortality. Sadly, the album—which many liken to Sgt. Pepper and Pet Sounds—never got the kudos it deserved at the time, but with both the original band and its current incarnation holding up its triumphant sound, belated recognition is theirs at last. (Lee Zimmerman) Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, Sandy, 7 p.m., $60–$95, all ages, sandyamp.com

Explosions in the Sky, Sessa

How do diehard fans of instrumental rock bands express their love? When you can’t shout in unison to a rowdy chorus or wait with bated breath for that favorite one-liner, your affection for an artist has to run deeper. Texas quartet Explosions in the Sky grabs most listeners in the emotional jugular at the first peal of their textured electric guitars. With soaring melodies and slowly building climaxes that mix redemption, melancholia, tragedy and celebration, all of the band’s songs feel singularly triumphant. Perhaps that’s why the creators of NBC’s 2000s drama Friday Night Lights tapped Explosions in the Sky to supply the iconic soundtrack. It’s hard not to feel overcome with catharsis listening to debut full-length How Strange, Innocence (2000) and All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone (2007), which both pack a particularly therapeutic punch. As powerful film scores (Lone Survivor, Manglehorn) took up more of the band’s time, Chris Hrasky, Michael James, Munaf Rayani and Mark Smith responded by embracing their experimental side on 2011’s Take Care, Take Care, Take Care and 2016’s The Wilderness. But Explosions in the Sky

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unsophisticated critiThe Zombies cal classifications like “post-rock” or “ambient music” don’t apply to Explosions in the Sky. This is a band whose heart-wrenching tunes represent their internal pulse writ large—an entire emotional spectrum encapsulated in the chiming bursts of sound of a song like “First Breath After Coma,” from 2003’s The Earth Is Not a Cold, Dead Place. If ever we needed a reminder of that adage, it’s in today’s frazzled, bifurcated, thoroughly fucked-up world, one that Explosions in the Sky have explored in sonic form for 20 years. (Nick McGregor) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $30 presale; $35 day of show, all ages, depotslc.com

FRIDAY 9/20

Branson Anderson, Timmy the Teeth, Lovely Noughts

Comparing Branson Anderson to Bob Dylan almost seems too easy. From his curly brown mop of hair and piercing blue eyes to his drawling, nasal singing voice and sardonic lyrical sensibility, Anderson is clearly cut from the same cloth as Dylan and, more broadly, other ’60s folk pioneers like Dave Van Ronk and Tom Paxton. But to write Anderson off as a copycat or just another Dylan soundalike would be to ignore his distinctly modern take on American folk—an adventurous yet unassuming sound that distinctly captures the space between his hometown of Logandale, Nev., and his current residence in Ogden. Anderson is also a magnetic presence onstage, bantering with audience members and blowing through solo acoustic arrangements of his songs with a breezy charisma that should make any coffee-shop troubadour envious. Anderson is currently gearing up for the release of his second studio album, Applecore, Baltimore, and is celebrating the album’s release with a show at Kilby Court, joined by fellow Utah folk singer Timmy the Teeth and local blues-rock outfit Lovely Noughts. (Nic Renshaw) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $7 presale; $9 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com

Branson Anderson

MAKENZIE BUSH

NFL Sunday Ticket

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

NICK S.

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Every Sunday Chili Burgers or Wings $9.99


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SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 29


TIM MOSENFELDER

EVERYONE NEEDS TO BELIEVE IN SOMETHING FRIDAY 9/20 Modest Mouse

I BELIEVE I’LL HAVE ANOTHER BEER SPIRITS . FOOD . LOCAL BEER 9.18 -SIMPLY B

9.19 CHIP JENKINS

9.20 THE PRANKSTERS

9.21 MATTHEW AND THE HOPE

Modest Mouse is a group that, to anyone familiar with indie music, needs no introduction. Since their breakthrough in the mid’90s, frontman Isaac Brock has been one of the most talented and unique voices in rock, whether he’s painting unflinching, poetic portraits of post-industrial America on The Lonesome Crowded West, delving deeper into philosophy and psychedelia on The Moon & Antarctica or turning his focus inward to tales of addiction, death and crumbling relationships on the platinum-selling Good News for People Who Love Bad News. Bassist Eric Judy, drummer Jeremiah Green and a rotating cast of guest collaborators have brought Brock’s artistic vision to vibrant life at every juncture, incorporating post-punk aggression, pop bombast and warm Americana overtones into an eclectic yet cohesive whole. Earlier this year, Modest Mouse finally broke a four-year studio silence with the single “Poison the Well,” which shows Brock’s caustic wit fully intact and the rest of the band scuzzier and looser than they’ve been in years. (NR) Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre, 2280 E. Red Butte Canyon Road, 7 p.m., sold out at press time, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

SATURDAY 9/21

Jay Som, Boy Scouts, Affectionately

Although Jay Som can easily slot into the DIY indie-pop sound, when you take her

Modest Mouse

work in pieces, it’s harder to say where anything truly belongs. The 2017 album Everybody Works had some instant classics like “The Bus Song,” a nostalgic ballad for time in transit spent figuring life out. The album’s title track shares the posi-pop sound, but swells and builds toward a tender ending. On her newest album, Anak Ho, it’s striking how much more varied Melina Mae Duterte (aka Jay Som herself) sounds. Some songs, like “Nighttime Drive,” have a very sentimentally mundane tone to them, like you’re grocery shopping in a rom-com. Meanwhile, tracks like “Crown” wind into a ’90s guitar solo out of nowhere, and “Get Well” is a slow, twangy country tune. Duterte has a talent for finding opportunity for surprise in her work this way, probably afforded by her DIY approach. Since her first full album in 2016, Turn Into, it’s been clear that Jay Som had standout talent, but Anak Ho maintains the deftness you really love to hear out of a third album. You want that sense of magic you had from hearing your favorite song the first time, the track that will fit perfectly on a new playlist, a part of a song you know you’ll rewind just to hear dozens of times. Folky Oakland-based outfit Boy Scouts open, alongside the similarlyminded-to-Jay Som’s-surfy-ness and fellow Californian, Affectionately. (Parker S. Mortensen) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15 presale; $17 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Jay Som 9.23 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

9.25 LORIN WALKER MADSEN

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

LINDSEY BYRNES

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DAILY ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

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THURSDAY: 9021YO (weather permitting) DJ Gabriel’s LUSH Goth Night @9:00

MONDAY : $3 pints local micro-brews Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00pm TUESDAY:

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Friday September, 20th-22nd

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7 E. 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-953-0588 • ICEHAUSBAR.COM

Saturday September, 21th

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 31

PAPER ELEPHANT W/ PICK POCKET & CATALOGUE

Colten Hood

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FRIDAY 9/20

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Glen Hansard, Diana DeMuth

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TUESDAYS

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE AT 8PM

THURSDAY 9/19 LIVE MUSIC

Brian Wilson + The Zombies + Al Jardine + Blondie Chaplin (Sandy Amphitheater) see p. 28 Chip Jenkins (Hog Wallow Pub) Emmalie Arntz + Little Moon + Mia Hicken + Jonas Swanson (Velour) Explosions In The Sky + Sessa (The Depot) see p. 28 Greg Laswell + Sarah Slaton (The State Room) Jazz Jags + Durian Durian + Picnics At Soap Rock (Urban Lounge) Michelle Moonshine (Rye) Reggae at the Royal feat. Indubious + Project 432 + Something Like Seduction (The Royal) Self Provoked + Kap Kallous (Kilby Court) Street Jesus (Garage on Beck) Sydnie Keddington + Pepper Rose + Pixie & the Party Grass Duo (Lake Effect) Yynot (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos: Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Gabriel & Dresden (Sky) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s)

KARAOKE

165 E 200 S SLC 801.746.3334

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Night (Tinwell)

Although it took some time to bring him the success he deserved, Glen Hansard has always excelled. An Academy Award winner for the song “Falling Slowly”—one of his contributions as star/songwriter of the acclaimed feature film Once—and a Grammy winner for Best Musical Theater Album for the original cast album of the stage musical version of Once, Hansard garnered his first claim to fame with the Irish band The Frames, an utterly inventive outfit that never gained the attention it was due. He ventured out on his own with half of the duo dubbed The Swell Season, which found him paired with Czech singer and multi-talented musician Markéta Irglová. The partnership had a limited run, but they did achieve some significant standing with the release of Once, in which they both starred. Hansard had been in front of the cameras before—he played a part in another celebrated film, The Commitments—but it was the accolades accorded Once that seemed to secure his stardom. Even so, Hansard’s solo career has elevated his stature as a singer, songwriter and musician. To date he’s released four albums on his own, including his latest, This Wild Willing, from April of this year. All of his efforts have made their mark on the international charts, but it’s his live performances—a blend of his dryeyed delivery and mesmerizing melodies—where he often excels. Indeed, Once isn’t nearly enough. (Lee Zimmerman) Delta Performance Hall, Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 8 p.m., $36–$46, all ages, arttix.artsaltlake.org

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck w/ Mikey Danger (Chakra Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 9/20 LIVE MUSIC

9021YO: ’90s Dance Party feat. Flash & Flare + Bo York (Urban Lounge) Branson Anderson + Lovely Noughts + Timmy The Teeth (Kilby Court) see p. 28 Channel Z (Club 90) Entwood (Ice Haüs) Farmboy (The Westerner) Fruit Bats + Sun June (The State Room) Glen Hansard + Diana DeMuth (Eccles Theater) see above Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Lynyrd Skynyrd + Bad Company + The Steel Woods (Usana Amphitheatre) Marco Antonio Solis (Maverick Center) Modest Mouse (Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre) see p. 30 The Pranksters (Hog Wallow Pub) Ryan Innes + Los Hellcaminos (Lake Effect) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Simply B (The Yes Hell) Sin City Soul (The Spur) The Swinging Lights (Garage on Beck) Sunset Strip + Machine Gun Rerun (The Royal) Tara Shupe (Harp and Hound) Zara Larsson (The Depot)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Funky Friday w/ DJ Godina (Gracie’s)

Hot Noise (The Red Door) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs) Mi Cielo feat. DJ Refresh (Sky) New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 9/21 LIVE MUSIC

Boris + Uniform (Metro Music Hall) Catch Fish (HandleBar) Channel Z (Club 90) Farmboy (The Westerner) Jay Som + Boy Scouts + Affectionately (Urban Lounge) see p. 30 John Sherrill + The Cool (Lake Effect) Kansas (Eccles Theater) Lantern By Sea (Velour) Live Band (Johnny’s on Second) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Trio (The Red Door) The Lovely Naughts (Garage on Beck) Matthew and the Hope (Hog Wallow Pub) NB Ridaz (The Depot) Paper Elephant + Pick Pocket + Catalogue (Ice Haüs) Patio Fires + Facekiss + Picnics At Soap Rock (Underground) Pinetop Inferno (The Yes Hell) Rage Against The Supremes (The Spur) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stomp Area 51 feat. Krossbreed + Agustist King + Raiden + Shy (The Complex) Surf Curse + Dirt Buyer (Kilby Court) Vaudeville Nouveau (Harp and Hound) Yungblud + Missio (The Complex)


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POST OFFICE PLACE

BAR FLY 4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

ERIN MOORE

nfl football NFL JERSEY GIVEAWAYS EVERY SUNDAY MONDAY AND THURSDAY

GREAT FOOD AND DRINK SPECIALS

First and foremost, Post Office Place is meant to be a place to start drinking while you wait in line for dinner at the ever-popular SLC staple, Takashi. Yep, it’s the same owners, but I really do not care much about that aspect of the bar. I’m just excited by the premise of a bar in an old post office. When I cruise in solo one night, it’s quiet, so much so that I double check that just because the chairs are turned up at Takashi next door, that doesn’t mean its adjacent bar is closed. Nothing against the bar; I’m the one who is out on, like, a Tuesday. It’s a refreshingly low-key space, featuring decorations that are modern in a way that my friend later opines remind him of the early 2000s—and, reflecting back, I totally see it. I can absolutely see Carrie Bradshaw ordering whatever the 2019 equivalent of a Cosmopolitan is, with the shadow of a cherry blossom branch stretching out behind her on the back wall. Although I do consider myself to be a “Carrie” (millennial women and their mothers will get it), I opt for their special “Farm-to-Glass” cocktail, their submission to a local contest bars and restaurants around the city are participating in. I choose it the minute I see the word “ume,” which is Japanese pickled plum and one of the best foods ever, in my opinion. It also includes Waterpocket’s Overproof Rum, Waterpocket Minthe Liqueur (delicious) and rhubarb syrup. It’s sweet, spicy and altogether delicious, and well worth the fancy cocktail price tag. Make your way over to Post Office Place for some of SLC’s newest fancy cocktails. Sushi after is optional. (Erin Moore) Post Office Place, 16 W. Market St., facebook.com/postbarslc

WATCH ALL THE GAMES HERE

wednesday 9/18

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Reggae thursDAY 9/19 at the Royal

indubious, project 432, something like seduction $ amfs & long islands

5

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friday 9/20

Live Music

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) DJ Spryte (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Scandalous Saturdays w/ DJ Logik (Lumpy’s Highland) Sky Saturdays w/DJ Ikon (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

SUNDAY 9/22 saturday 9/21

Live Music

LIVE MUSIC

TUESDAY 9/24

Brewfish (The Royal) The California Honeydrops + Daniel Rodriguez (The State Room) The Fall Kick-Off feat. Mome Wrath + Become Ethereal + Eric Heideman + Stable Ren +Owl In Us + Decent Animals (Kilby Court) Lauren Walker Madsen (Garage on Beck) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) PROF + Cashinova + Taylor J. & Willie Wonka (Urban Lounge)

coming soon

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

booyah moon, the chuds, the church keys sunday 9/22

Live Music

open mic night YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM retro riot dance party the iron maidens mushroomhead the lacs static x  Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

10/4 10/18 10/23 10/28 12/10

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

MONDAY 9/23 LIVE MUSIC

Drusky + Secret Nudist Friends + Walking Opinion + The Floorboreds (Underground)

Elder Island + Dirty Nice + Bobo (Urban Lounge) Grayscale + Belmont + Bearings + Rich People (Kilby Court) Like A Villain + DOHM + Sis Missi + Ew The Dancer + Dassive Dourist (Diabolical Records) Lynn Jones (The Spur)

Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic Night (The Royal) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Gracie’s) Tuesday Night Jazz (Alibi)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Karaoke (Liquid Joe’s) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

Industry Night Mondays w/ DJ Juggy (Trails) Monday Night Blues & More Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Taildraggers (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 9/24 LIVE MUSIC

Das Ich + BirthVoid + Knuckle Bones (Metro Music Hall) Erin Kelly + Benz + Ava Stone + Raavyn and Reeves (Velour) Kid Quill + MoonLander (Kilby Court) Peter Bradley Adams (The State Room) Radio Roulette (The Spur) Red Checker + The Most + Old Face Magenta + gastonmustdie (Underground) Spo + Janey Lyon + Keyvin VanDyke (Urban Lounge) Toto (Eccles Theater)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Groove Tuesdays (Johnny’s on Second)

KARAOKE

WEDNESDAY 9/25 LIVE MUSIC

Adrian Belew + Saul Zonana (The State Room) Angels & Airwaves (Union Event Center) Breaking Benjamin (Usana Amphitheatre) Christian French + ASTN (Kilby Court) Crumb + Divino Niño + Shormey (The Complex) Decent Criminal + Problem Daughter + The Avenues + Rade (Underground) Dee Dee Darby Duffin Quintet (Gallivan Center) Live Jazz (Club 90) Loren Walker Madsen (Hog Wallow Pub) Pink Turns Blue (Metro Music Hall) Rosen Thorn (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) The Freakout w/ DJ Nix Beat (Twist)


NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU

KARAOKE THAT DOESN’T SUCK EVERY THURSDAY W/ MIKEY DANGER

DANCE MUSIC ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY

TUESDAYS 9PM BREAKING BINGO

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET OPEN NIGHTLY 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY 5 PM - 1 AM

WEDNESDAYS OPEN JAM NIGHT @8 W/ KATE LEDEUCE

$4 JAME $5 SHOT & SON BEER DAILY

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

DAILY DINNER & A SHOW

OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR • NO COVER EVER SEPTEMBER 18

PLAY GEEKS WHO DRINK PUB TRIVIA AT 6:30 FOLLOWED BY BREAKING BINGO AT 8:30 80S’ NIGHT OUT w/ NOTHING BUT A GOOD TIME

SEPTEMBER 19

SEPTEMBER 20

UTAH FOOTBALL VS SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 7PM DJ FELL SWOOP 10PM

POLARIS RZR STEREO PACKAGE

PMX-2 STEREO AND FRONT SPEAKER KIT FOR SELECT POLARIS® RZR® MODELS. KIT INCLUDES: SEE STORES FOR PRICING

SEPTEMBER 21

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION 7PM PATIO-INSIDE AFTER FOOTBALL IF POOR WEATHER MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL CHICAGO @ WASHINGTON

SEPTEMBER 24

TUESDAY NIGHT BLUEGRASS JAM WITH PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM

SEPTEMBER 25

THE NATE ROBINSON TRIO 7PM PATIO SHOW-10PM INSIDE IF POOR WEATHER

UNHEARD OF:

CLOSE OUT PRICES ON FIRST GENERATION KITS

IN STOCK NOW!

W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

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MODEL MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED DISCONTINUED ITEMS ITEMS AND AND SOME SOME SPECIALS SPECIALS ARE ARE LIMITED LIMITED TO TO STOCK STOCK ON ON HAND HAND AND AND MAY MAY INCLUDE INCLUDE DEMOS. DEMOS. PRICES PRICES GUARANTEED GUARANTEED THRU THRU 9/25/19 7/24/19

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 35

SELECT UTV AUDIO KITS

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TOURING ARTISTS LANEY LOU AND THE BIRD DOGS 6PM DJ CHASEONE2 10PM

SEPTEMBER 23

NO DRILLING OR CUTTING REQUIRED DIRECT CONNECT WIRING HARNESSES FOR RZR MODELS STEREO KITS BOLT TO FACTORY ATTACHMENT POINTS SYSTEM IS ELEMENT READY TO WITHSTAND HARSH OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENT SPEAKER & SUB ENCLOSURES INTEGRATE WITHOUT LOSING PASSENGER/CARGO SPACE PMX-2: COMPACT DIGITAL MEDIA RECEIVER W/ 2.7” COLOR DISPLAY RFRZ-PMX2DK: INSTALLATION KIT FOR DASH RFRZ-FSE: RZR 6.5” FRONT SPEAKER ENCLOSURE (PAIR) RM1652B: 6.5” SPEAKER BLACK (PAIR) RFRZ-PMXWH1: RZR PMX POWER & SPEAKER HARNESS CONSUMER SAVINGS ON KIT PRICE $79.96 1 YEAR STANDARD WARRANTY

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 NFL GAMES ALL DAY

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THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL WENDY AND THE LOST BOYS 7PM PATIO SHOW-INSIDE AT 10PM IF POOR WEATHER

SEPTEMBER 22

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TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

CATCH ALL FOOTBALL GAMES @ GRACIE’S


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Moon Crazy

Ad Astra offers an odd mix of awestruck human drama and moon pirates. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw 20th CENTURY FOX

W

hat kind of movie is Ad Astra, anyway? On some level, worrying about labels shouldn’t be the job of film criticism; it’s the marketing department’s problem if they’ve got something on their hands that might be a tough sell if it’s neither fish nor fowl. But director James Gray’s heady mix of science-fiction thriller, psychological drama and social commentary feels almost genetically engineered so that it’s hard to figure out what he’s trying to do. It’s like a smart, talented director who has spent 20 years getting not nearly the recognition he deserves decided to go, “OK, fine: Here’s what I think an attempt at a ‘commercial’ movie looks like.” The premise provides an easy hook, as Maj. Roy McBride (Brad Pitt), a career astronaut, is recruited as part of a highlyclassified mission. A strange energy surge originating from space has caused disruption around the planet, and Space Command believes that the surge originated from a spacecraft lost on the edge of the solar system decades earlier while on a mission to discover extraterrestrial life. And the commander of that lost mission was Clifford McBride (Tommy Lee Jones), Roy’s father, who might actually still be alive and threatening life on earth with bursts of anti-matter. So Roy is tasked with heading from earth to the moon, from the moon to Mars, and potentially beyond, to end the threat of a once-great man. If you’re getting a Heart of Darkness vibe from that synopsis, it’s no accident. Gray loads Ad Astra with Roy’s voice-over internal monologue as he wrestles with his feelings about his long-absent father, making it

feel a lot like A Papa-less Now. Cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema (Interstellar) provides a foundation of stunning images, both in the majesty of space and in claustrophobic spacecraft, offering the closest thing imaginable to a genre spin on a late-period Terrence Malick film. Pitt’s performance is profoundly restrained as he plays a man who deliberately shuts himself off from his feelings—exemplified in fragmented flashbacks to a failed marriage (to Liv Tyler, still playing romantic interest to guys who go out into space to save the world, 20 years after Armageddon)—but if a movie is going to spend a lot of time fixed on an impassive human face, it might as well be Brad Pitt’s. Yet this is also a narrative that peppers its meditations on emotional and physical isolation with showy set pieces and fascinating visions of its “near future.” The first surge sends Pitt and several co-workers on a massive stratosphere-piercing space antenna tumbling toward earth; a ride through the

Apocalypse Now (1979) Marlon Brando Martin Sheen R

Armageddon (1998) Bruce Willis Ben Affleck PG-13

OGDEN

SHOWING: SEPTEMBER 20TH - 26TH AD ASTRA IT - CHAPTER TWO

AD ASTRA HUSTLERS IT - CHAPTER TWO

H NC BRU00 AM 11: 9/22

SPACEBALLS

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WEEKEND AT BERNIES

• BREWVIES.COM •

uncontrolled frontier outside a lunar base finds Pitt and his military escort attacked by—and I can’t possibly even think of this concept without smiling—moon pirates. Gray repeatedly emphasizes a culture of trying to keep people calm and placid, from “comfort rooms” full of soothing nature scenes to the mandated mood stabilizers distributed to flight crews. And there’s a wry dark humor to the notion that humanity’s great achievement of establishing a permanent base on the moon involves making it as comfortably earth-like as possible, including tourist photo-ops and an Applebee’s. Then, as Roy draws closer and closer to a possible reunion with his father, Gray hones in on a notion that should feel timely and relevant: that the ideas and philosophies people dedicate themselves to can ultimately distance them from other human beings. Yet Ad Astra struggles to give that thesis the emotional punch Gray clearly wants to deliver, as the movie proves more

Brad Pitt in Ad Astra

successful at giving you stuff to look at and think about than at giving you stuff to feel. There’s so much going on here, on a weird variety of tonal levels—I don’t dare spoil the most startlingly unexpected focal point of one action beat—that some of it is bound to fall short. Ad Astra is gorgeous, ethereal, occasionally wise, sometimes overly literal, sometimes flat-out silly. You just don’t get too many haunting big-budget odysseys about the essence of what it means to be human that also include moon pirates. CW

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1959, scandal erupted among Americans who loved to eat peanut butter. Studies revealed that manufacturers had added so much hydrogenated vegetable oil and glycerin to their product that only 75% of it could truly be called peanut butter. So began a long legal process to restore high standards. Finally there was a new law specifying that no company could sell a product called “peanut butter” unless it contained at least 90% peanuts. I hope this fight for purity inspires you to conduct a metaphorically comparable campaign. It’s time to ensure that all the important resources and influences in your life are at peak intensity and efficiency. Say no to dilution and adulteration. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1936, the city of Cleveland, Ohio staged the Great Lakes Exposition, a 135-acre fair with thrill rides, art galleries, gardens and sideshows. One of its fun features was The Golden Book of Cleveland, a 2.5-ton, 6,000-page text the size of a mattress. After the expo closed down, the “biggest book in the world” went missing. If it still exists today, no one knows where it is. I’m going to speculate that there’s a metaphorical version of The Golden Book of Cleveland in your life. You, too, have lost track of a major Something that would seem hard to misplace. Here’s the good news: If you intensify your search now, I bet you’ll find it before the end of 2019.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Before comedian Jack Benny died in 1974, he arranged to have a florist deliver a single red rose to his wife every day for the rest of her life. She lived another nine years, and received more than 3,000 of these gifts. Even though you’ll be around on this earth for a long time, I think the coming weeks would be an excellent time to establish a comparable custom: a commitment to providing regular blessings to a person or persons for whom you care deeply. This bold decision would be in alignment with astrological omens, which suggest that you can generate substantial benefits for yourself by being creative with your generosity.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I tell you what freedom is to me: no fear.” So said singer and activist Nina Simone. But it’s doubtful there ever came a time when she reached the perfect embodiment of that idyllic state. How can any of us empty out our anxiety so completely as to be utterly emancipated? It’s not possible. That’s the bad news, Taurus. The good news is that in the coming weeks you will have the potential to be as unafraid as you have ever been. For best results, try to ensure that love is your primary motivation in everything you do and say and think. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some things don’t change much. The beautiful marine animal species known as the pearly nautilus, which lives in the South Pacific, is mostly the same as it was 150 million years ago. Then there’s Fuggerei, a walled enclave within the German city of Augsburg. The rent is cheap, about one U.S. dollar per year, and that fee hasn’t increased in almost 500 years. While I am in awe of these bastions of stability, and wish we had more such symbolic anchors, I advise you to head in a different direction. During the coming weeks, you’ll be wise to be a maestro of mutability, a connoisseur of transformation, an adept of novelty. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Granny Smith apples are widely available. But before 1868, the tart, crispy, juicy fruit never existed on planet Earth. Around that time, an Australian mother of eight named Maria Ann Smith threw the cores of French crab apples out her window while she was cooking. The seeds were fertilized by the pollen from a different, unknown variety of apple, and a new type was born: Granny Smith. I foresee the possibility of a metaphorically comparable event in your future: a lucky accident that enables you to weave together two interesting threads into a fascinating third thread. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Every masterpiece is just dirt and ash put together in some perfect way,” writes storyteller Chuck Palahniuk, who has completed several novelistic masterpieces. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Leos have assembled much of the dirt and ash necessary to create your next masterpiece, and are now ready to move on to the next phase. And what is that phase? Identifying the help and support you’ll need for the rest of the process.

DOWN

1. People say you shouldn't live in it 2. Russian czarist dynasty 3. Hindrances 4. Quake 5. This point forward 6. 1 or 11, in blackjack

7. Inventor with a coil named after him 8. The U.S.'s first multimillionaire 9. Exam for a future Rx writer 10. Roman in the movie business 11. '90s "SNL" regular Cheri 12. Digs for pigs 13. "A mouse!" 14. R&B's ____ Hill 20. Elite Eight org. 22. Patronizes, as a motel 24. Puerto ____ 26. Napped 27. "That is sooo cute!" 28. W-2 info 31. "Only the Lonely" singer 34. Guitar, in slang 36. Affleck of "Gone Girl" 37. Author LeShan 39. Getting stuff done, initially 41. Slide out of place 42. "Let us know if you're coming" letters 43. Comedy bit 44. Dedicator of Iceland's Imagine Peace Tower 47. Major natural disasters, slangily 48. Pro with a couch 51. Hubs

53. Try to induce a bigger purchase 56. "... but I could be wrong" 57. Bagel order, maybe 58. Jungle noises 59. "To whom ____ concern ..." 61. Industry mogul 63. "R.I.P." singer Rita 64. Shop-____ 65. It'll never fly 66. Dumbbell abbr.

Last week’s answers

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 | 37

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Actress and author Ruby Dee formulated an unusual prayer. “God,” she wrote, “make me so uncomfortable that I will do the very thing I fear.” As you might imagine, she was a brave activist who risked her reputation and career working for the civil rights movement and other idealistic causes. I think her exceptional request to a Higher Power makes good sense for you right now. You’re in a phase when you can generate practical blessings by doing the very things that intimidate you or make

ARIES (March 21-April 19): We’re in the equinoctial season. During this pregnant pause, the sun seems to hover directly over the equator; the lengths of night and day are equal. For all of us, but especially for you, it’s a favorable phase to conjure and cultivate more sweet symmetry, calming balance and healing harmony. In that spirit, I encourage you to temporarily suspend any rough, tough approaches you might have in regard to those themes. Resist the temptation to slam two opposites together simply to see what happens. Avoid engaging in the pseudo-fun of purging by day and bingeing by night. And don’t you dare get swept up in hating what you love or loving what you hate.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Do silly things,” advised playwright Anton Chekhov. “Foolishness is a great deal more vital and healthy than our straining and striving after a meaningful life.” I think that’s a perspective worth adopting now and then. Most of us go through phases when we take things too seriously and too personally and too literally. Bouts of fun absurdity can be healing agents for that affliction. But now is not one of those times for you, in my opinion. Just the reverse is true, in fact. I encourage you to cultivate majestic moods and seek out awe-inspiring experiences and induce sublime perspectives. Your serious and noble quest for a meaningful life can be especially rewarding in the coming weeks.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Syndicated cartoon strip “Calvin and Hobbes” appeared for 10 years in 2,400 newspapers in 50 countries. It wielded a sizable cultural influence. For example, in 1992, 6-year-old Calvin decided “The Big Bang” was a boring term for how the universe began, and instead proposed we call it the “Horrendous Space Kablooie.” A number of real scientists subsequently adopted Calvin’s innovation, and it has been invoked playfully but seriously in university courses and textbooks. In that spirit, I encourage you to give fun new names to anything and everything you feel like spicing up. You now have substantial power to reshape and revamp the components of your world. It’s Identify-Shifting Time.

1. Yearwood of country music 7. Scot's headwear 10. Got ready to be photographed 15. Class for cooking, sewing, etc. 16. F1 neighbor 17. Animal that frolics in streams 18. Britain, Spain or France, once 19. Film director who was once told by Jack Nicholson "Just because you're a perfectionist doesn't mean you're perfect" 21. Bel ____ cheese 22. Miniature racer 23. Physical, as a store 25. Novelists Shreve and Brookner 29. "... or ____ thought" 30. Actress Long 31. Defense grp. since 1948 32. Hammer-on-the-thumb cries 33. Rating for "Game of Thrones" 35. Modern lead-in to space or security 38. Neighborhood to get kimchi and bibimbap, informally 40. Look some homeowners achieve by stripping away drywall ... or what's created in four places by the walls of this puzzle? 43. Dead duck 45. Diarist Nin 46. ____ ghanouj 49. Pantry pest 50. O'er and o'er 52. "Law & Order: ____" 54. Something to confess at a confessional 55. What Beyoncé decided to do in 2002 57. Making a faux pas 60. Animal in a Beatles ballad 62. Stand-up comedian's prop, often 63. Neapolitan or Margherita, perhaps 66. Like some custards 67. Univision newsman Jorge ____ 68. ___ Lingus 69. Three-alarm events 70. Below 90° 71. Hosp. staffers 72. Most foxy

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1990, the New Zealand government appointed educator, magician and comedian Ian Brackenbury Channell to be the official Wizard of New Zealand. His jobs include protecting the government, blessing new enterprises, casting out evil spirits, upsetting fanatics, and cheering people up. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to find your personal equivalents of an inspirational force like that. There’s really no need to scrimp. According to my reading of the cosmic energies, you have license to be extravagant in getting what you need to thrive.

you nervous. And maybe the best way to motivate and mobilize yourself is by getting at least a bit flustered or unsettled.

ACROSS

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

BRICK

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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© 2019

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA Senior Software Engineer to develop, IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE design & modify software products THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT according to clients’ needs. Oversee COUNTY OF GREENVILLE software development projects. Mon-Fri, WITH BABS DELAY DOCKET NO.: 2019-DR-23-2593 40 hrs/wk. 12 months’ exp. or an AAS in Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com T __ L _ B__, Plaintiff, Software Development req’d. vs.Gabriel Michael Bottoms, Birth Father Mail resume to Devsquad LLC 17 E WinDefendant chester Street St. 100 Murray, UT 84107 AMENDED SUMMONS IN THE INTEREST OF N_ H_ B__ and Software Engineer in Test Sure, you know me from writing this colB__ R__ B__, minor children II sought by Workfront, umn, but for 28 years I had a radio program under the ages of eighteen years dedicated to women’s music, women’s hisInc. in Lehi, UT. Develop/ TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVEtory and women’s news. It was the longest running program of its kind in the country. execute test cases for NAMED: I write this because I still pay close attenYou are hereby summoned and required to software apps. Apply tion to women in the news and women’s answer the Complaint in this action, a copy music. Utah’s women have been getting a @ jobpostingtoday.com great deal of recognition as of late, to wit: of which is served upon you, and serve a n  The Utah Women and Leadership Proj(ref #82145). copy of your Answer to the Complaint upon ect just released a study that found Utah the subscriber at 1212 Haywood Road, Bldg. women are voting more now than in any election since 2006. This ranks female vot300, Ste. D, Greenville, South Carolina, ers in Utah 11th in the nation for women who 29615, within thirty (30) days after service vote, up from 35th in the nation in 2006. hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. This is terrific news, but the report states there are 316,000 women in Utah who have If you fail to answer the Complaint within not registered to vote. Whether you’re male for UNCENCENSORED fun! that time, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court or female, it’s so simple to register to vote for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Browse and Reply for FREE in local and national elections. Go to vote. utah.gov for more information. TO THE DEFENDANT(S) UNDER THE 801-512-2061 n  The flip side of more women voting is AGE OF FOURTEEN, AND THEIR WalletHub’s 2019’s Best & Worst States for www.megamates.com 18+ GENERAL OR TESTAMENTARY Women’s Equality report that found Utah to be the worst state for women’s equality. GUARDIAN, IF ANY: You are further How did they determine this? By looking at summoned and notified to apply for the MediaBids_190103_24.indd 1 12/28/2018 5:15:20 PM women’s health and doctor visit affordabilappointment of a Guardian ad litem to ity, education, number of women in the Legislature, income disparity and workplace represent you in this action within thirty (30) environment. They also ranked the Beehive days after service of this Summons and State 49th for the largest gap in wages and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, the women holding elected positions. The best state for women’s equality? Maine. Plaintiffs herein will apply to this Court for n  Another study funded by Utah’s Young the appointment of some suitable and proper Women’s Christian Association, the Status person to represent you in this action. of Women in the States and the Institute for Women’s Policy Research finds Utah women Raymond W. Godwin, Esq. (SC Bar #2162) make 69.8% of what Utah men make, which PO Box 354 is about 10% lower than the national averGreenville, SC 29602 age. Women who work full time are making an average $36,300 annually, and white (864) 241-2883 • (864) 255-4342 (fax) women are making more than Hispanic ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFFS women. Also, it’s interesting to note that Dated: June 25, 2019 Utah has the highest percentage of women

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Ewwww! A Whataburger location in Bastrop, Texas, was the scene of a gruesome plunge to an oily demise on Aug. 31. As customers waited in line at the counter, the Austin American-Statesman reported, kitchen workers tried to catch a mouse scampering across the food prep counter. A customer captured the scene on video as the mouse, fleeing a person trying to trap it, leapt into a fryer full of hot grease. On the video, an employee can be heard asking, “Who else needs a refund?” The video was posted to Facebook, prompting Whataburger to comment that the location had been closed and “the entire restaurant has since been cleaned and sanitized.”

Mysterious Police in Hamilton Township, N.J., say an unnamed 80-year-old woman snoozed right through an apparent carjacking on Aug. 28—even though she was in the car. The victim told police she had fallen asleep in her car, parked in her driveway, around 9 p.m. that evening. She called police around 4 a.m. to say she woke up on the driveway and her car was gone, but she had no recollection of how she got there, the New York Daily News reported. Police observed a fresh abrasion and bruise on her face. The car was recovered later that day in Trenton, but the search is still on for suspects.

Awesome! For her Aug. 10 wedding in Omaha, Neb., Deanna Adams, 40, told her bridesmaids, including her sister and maid of honor, Christina Meador, they could wear “anything” they’d be comfortable in. So after carefully considering several options, Meador chose her outfit: an inflatable T. rex costume. As the bride and her groom took their vows, Meador towered over them, delicately clutching her bouquet of sunflowers and, no

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News You Can Use In Jacksonville, Fla., as Hurricane Dorian approached on Sept. 3, Patrick Eldridge became concerned that his Smart car would “blow away.” So he proposed to his wife, Jessica, that he park it in their kitchen. (Her car was already in the garage.) She doubted he could do it, but “he opened the double doors and had it in. I was amazed that it could fit,” Jessica told the Associated Press. She said there was still room to move around and cook, but “my dogs are confused by it.” Dorian narrowly missed Jacksonville as it moved up the East Coast. Least Competent Criminals If you’re going to commit a crime, go all in, we always say. But two unidentified crooks in the Bronx, N.Y., went to great lengths Sept. 2 to rob a Little Caesar’s pizza shop and took ... a pizza, police said. Video shows one thief holding open the drive-thru window, the New York Post reported, as the other crawled in on his belly, but workers rushed to push him back out. Changing tactics, the two then entered through the front door, threatened workers with a knife and made off with a $23 pizza order. “They did all that just for pizza?” a police source told the paper. Chances are, the evidence is long gone. Irony The former Spearmint Rhino Gentleman’s Club in Trenton, Wis., has found an unlikely new life as the Ozaukee Christian School, opening on Sept. 16, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. Kris Austin, the school’s administrator, said the stripper pole had been removed, along with the leopard-print carpet, but the stage and bar are still there, and the building is still owned by the Spearmint Rhino chain, based in California. It’s an arrangement school leaders have had to come to terms with. “Our take on it is that people are people,” said school board president David Swartz. “We’re sinners, too. Even though we don’t agree with their business model per se. ... Now we’re going to transfer that place into a place where boys and girls are raised to be our next leaders with character.” Ow! Ow! Ow! Jamie Quinlan, 12, of Louth, Lincolnshire, England, was bouncing on a trampoline in his friend’s backyard in early September when a spring broke off and lodged in the boy’s back. Jamie’s dad, Ian, rushed him to Sheffield Children’s Hospital, where surgeons removed the spring. “It took them about 10 minutes to actually get the spring out of my back,” Jamie told Sky News. “The doctors said they had never heard of something like this happening with a trampoline.” He said he didn’t realize the piece of metal had entered his back, but “All my friends looked shocked.” Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Inexplicable Uber driver Yasser Hadi of Atlanta was going about his business, dropping off a fare on Aug. 25, when a woman “came out of nowhere, threatened to kill him, and then violently bit him,” Fox5 News reported. Hadi told the station: “She’s acting weird, she’s acting wild, and she’s on the car hitting it, telling me I need to die. ...” Next the woman climbed inside the car, and scratched and bit Hadi as he tried to pull her out. “I said, ‘God, just let her take my flesh, I don’t care.’ I want her to go away from me,” Hadi said. Later, Atlanta police arrested 26-year-old Tasheena Campbell, who already had a warrant for an assault charge, for battery and criminal trespass. But Hadi is left with a damaged car, medical expenses and no insurance. “She’s hit me in my job, my health and my financial pocket money. It’s hard,” he explained.

TEACHERS!

| COMMUNITY |

n  A graffiti artist in Frankston, Australia, has been painting the Melbourne suburb purple with a message to someone named Chris, saying “u need 2 talk 2 me B4 baby is born, or don’t bother after,” according to a July 30 report from the Australian Broadcasting Corp. The messages have appeared on several public spaces, such as sidewalks and the sides of buildings. Frankston Mayor Michael O’Reilly said the city council “would encourage those involved to consider more constructive, and less illegal ways of communicating in the future. ... I hope Chris and this mystery person can work through their issues.”

Crime Report Izaebela Kolano, 49, of Nutley, N.J., pulled a fast one on Costco employees in two stores on Sept. 1, police said. Kolano first visited a Costco in Wayne, N.J., where she allegedly stole a $2,000 diamond ring. Then, authorities say, she went to a store in nearby Clifton, where she asked to see a $28,000 diamond ring—and handed back the $2,000 ring, which was similar. Costco employees didn’t notice the switcharoo until Kolano was out of the building, the Associated Press reported. Police found Kolano at home, and eventually recovered the ring. Kolano was charged with theft.

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Bright Ideas In the Mexican state of Tlaxcala, high school instructor Luis Juarez Texis inflamed the ire of parents when he made students wear cardboard boxes (with cut-out eye holes) on their heads as they took an exam in order to deter cheating. Parents are calling for Texis’ removal, OddityCentral reported, saying the boxes amounted to “acts of humiliation, physical, emotional and psychological violence.” Others, however, applauded Texis’ idea, with one saying the boxes “teach them a great lesson.” Texis told reporters the students consented to the anti-cheating method.

doubt, shedding a few dinosaur tears. Meador, 38, told Adams ahead of time that she would wear the costume, according to the Omaha World-Herald, giving Adams a chance to shut the idea down, but her sister didn’t balk. In fact, Adams defended the choice on Facebook: “It’s a giant middle finger at spending thousands of dollars and putting ungodly amounts of pressure on ourselves ... The point was to get married to the man who treats me like I hung the moon, and we did that part.”


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The Road Out

City Weekly September 19, 2019  

The Road Out