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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

APRIL 19, 2018 | VOL. 34

N0. 47

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY

47 IDEAS TO REDUCE GUN VIOLENCE AND SAVE LIVES. BY WILSON CRISCIONE, MITCH RYALS, DANIEL WALTERS, QUINN WELSCH AND SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY TRIGGER HAPPY PEOPLE

Can one lil’ weekly solve America’s gun crisis? Maybe.

Cover photo by Sarah Arnoff saraharnoff.com

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 26 A&E 33 DINE 39 CINEMA 41 MUSIC 53 COMMUNITY

KELAN LYONS

News, p. 12 Shake ink-stained hands with the most recent addition to our editorial team. “I love it here,” the Medill grad and Legend of Zelda expert says after traveling 1,300 miles to his new SLC home. “Everywhere you turn is like a postcard.”

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Sights from the latest pro-gun rally at the Capitol. facebook.com/slcweekly

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N0. 45

@SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY @SLCWEEKLY

352 MAIN ST. UNIT D, PARK CITY, UTAH #BARBARIC 435•714•0967

Cover story, April 5, “Dabakis Is Leaving the Building”

Great. Best thing that ever happened to Salt Lake City!

STEVEN ZERVOS Via Facebook

Sen. Jim Dabakis will be missed deeply. Very few political figures are for-and-with the people.

@IRONGRINDNOMIND Via Instagram I will miss his emails.

VIRGIL GLASS Via Twitter

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

I’m so sad. He’s my hero.

ALLY BEE Via Facebook I am happy.

Interested in being a Foster Parent ? Open your heart & home to a child in need.

SAMUEL WILSON Via Facebook He will be greatly missed.

Wonder if they still make their clam dip and yummy, soft breadsticks?

@THEPMKID Via Instagram

I went there for junior prom in the early 80s. I always smile when I drive by and see it’s still open. I feel the same about La Caille.

TODD MECHAM Via Facebook

Beer Nerd, April 5, “A Fruitful Discussion” Ugh.

Blog post, April 15, “Couple Hundred Gather at Capitol Steps for Pro-Gun Rights Rally”

Sad to see him go; I loved reading his posts exposing Utah’s political ongoings.

CASSIUS SEELEY Via Facebook

www.starlightprogram.org

Restaurant review, April 5, The Five Alls

Good riddance.

CRAIG SCHRÖERLÜCKE Via Facebook

DABAKIS

RICK GOLDEN Via Facebook

JIM BREITINGER Via Twitter

The only person that made me feel like I was being represented in some way. Now, not so much.

801-747-3556 345 e. 4500 s., Murray #260

I’m gonna miss that guy. Hell, the whole state is gonna miss him, and two-thirds of them don’t even know it.

TERESA CONWAY Via Twitter

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4 | APRIL 19, 2018

SOAP BOX

C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

How could anyone be against background checks for the mentally ill? They must be mentally ill and should probably fear background checks with good reason.

WENDI GUERRERO Via Facebook

IS

LEAVING THE BUILDING

Ever boisterous and outspoken, the state senator says lending liberal voice trumps his bill tally. By Dylan Woolf Harris

Second pro-gun parade in as many months. If only the Second Amendment fetishists actually did what they think they did and protected America from the constant government oversight that plagues society every day. But yeah, we really need another pride parade.

BRANDON EBERHARD Via Facebook

Ammosexual Pride Parade.

ROY WEBB Via Facebook

Were there enough Twinkies to go around? Looks like “tens” of people showed up.

JIMMY ROBERTSON Via Facebook

The only good American is a dead American that doesn’t own a gun, beside the patriot who shot him, right?

work. If you look in the back pages of it, all it’s supporting/ promoting is the porn community—with chat lines, massage parlors and adult entertainment industries.

DAVID MELLEN Via Facebook

Kudos to City Weekly for covering this. I think the rally is ridiculous, as this is similar to white people marching for Civil Rights, but all we can [expect] of our press, is that they try and cover every angle of things. This issue clearly means a lot to some people in the public, so it’s cool it got some coverage.

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Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, WILSON CRISCIONE, BABS DE LAY, HOWARD HARDEE, RANDY HARWARD, MARYANN JOHANSON, CASEY KOLDEWYN, JOHN RASMUSON, MIKE RIEDEL, MITCH RYALS, ALEX SPRINGER, DANIEL WALTERS, QUINN WELSCH, SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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OPINION

Good Friend, Good

“Friend. Good.” —Dr. Frankenstein’s monster

Having a friend is not just good, it is good for you. Friendship is as salutary as giving up cigarettes, shedding belly fat and taking a daily walk. Studies show a good chance for a longer life when you have friends. A 2015 study at Brigham Young University found that “social relationships are vital of our physical health and ultimately longevity.” Said study leader Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad in an interview with the Deseret News, “We need to start taking our social relationships as seriously as our health.” So let’s get started. First, I don’t think Holt-Lunstad was promoting more Facebooking. A social medium like Facebook is a mirror in which your attention is drawn to your own face. It is ironic that the practice of cultivating an image of yourself is equated with cultivating a “friend” you have never met in the flesh, as is the experience of one in three Facebookers. It’s as if you are claiming credit for improved social relationships when your avatar hangs out with other avatars in the virtual world of Second Life. Besides, the five hours a day the average American spends sitting in front of a screen is tantamount to a life-shortening diet of corndogs and donuts. Second, the state of my social relations has never come up during consultations with my doctor. I think that’s the norm. Her focus is on my innards, from stem to stern, as if they are capable of delivering a long life all by themselves. She counsels me to eat kale and blueberries, lose 10 pounds, drink less wine and take brisk walks three or four

BY JOHN RASMUSON times a week. However, she has yet to promote the healthful twofer of walking with a friend. Statistically speaking, my life expectancy is 76 years— the day after tomorrow, in other words. I’m all in favor of extending it a few years, but I’d rather do it by playing more pickleball, not by eating kale, drinking less wine or swallowing another prescription drug. More time playing poker with the boys would be fine, too. Welcome to the selfhelp realm! Where’s the how-to manual? Is there a YouTube video for developing a life-long friendship? An inventory comes next. I have six clusters of friends. Each is the yield of a time and a place. A Venn diagram illustrates how the six circles of friends intersect, to the extent that they do. A few friends from my days at the University of Utah live close by. Others have never set foot in Utah. A 20-year sojourn in rural Massachusetts has bestowed a handful of friends I see once or twice a year. I have five or six holdover friendships from places I worked, and the church I attend has provided a number of valued friends. Some of my most durable friendships date to the Vietnam-era Army, and in the last six years, I have become friendly with about 50 men and women I have met on Salt Lake City’s pickleball courts. Pickleball is a social sport. Pickup doubles is the rule, and while waiting for an open court, players chat about recent trips or knee replacements. I don’t know many of their surnames, but I know the time spent in their company is as pleasurable as a hot tub on a snowy night. The inventory shows that most of my friends are men— aging, white, married—whose life experience is as varied as a menu at a Chinese restaurant. Some lean left; others are conservative enough to defend Trump. None wears religion on his sleeve or a pistol in his belt. Several have written books. A few are bilingual. The taproot of one particular friendship reaches 1963, the year John Kennedy

was shot. Its 50-year history includes double dates, church basketball, deburr jobs in a machine shop, and Las Vegas packing fake ID. A few weeks ago we met at a downtown restaurant. He has a new, metal hip; his wife has a shoulder replacement in the offing. Thereupon, the conversation drifted into what Joan Didion calls “interminable desultory recollections.” (“War stories” in old-soldier parlance.) It will always be thus. Men are less skillful at friendship than women, so some like me rely on nostalgic prompts—sentences beginning “remember when”—to bolster conversation. As it turns out, nostalgia is also healthful—more so than kale, to my taste. “Nostalgia confers psychological benefits,” asserts the University of Southampton’s Nostalgia website. Among them are “a stronger sense of belongingness, affiliation or sociality.” My inventory dredges up lapsed friendships, too. For every friend I include in my Venn diagram, there are five who are lost—co-workers, roommates, carpoolers, classmates. Some of them were more valued friends than those who emailed me last week. What claimed them? The usual suspects: moving out of town, a new job, divorce, the culture wars. (One in five Americans reports losing a friend to hyper-partisan politics.) And neglect, I must say. Laziness, too. Any friendship worth its salt is going to take some work. Sustaining a friendship requires periodic face-toface conversation, doses of nostalgia and empathetic hugs. Otherwise, it withers like an untended garden. It is clear that self-interest is best served by taking the stairs, not riding the elevator; subsisting on kale, not corndogs; and dispensing with ear buds for a walk with a friend. If short on friends, upgrade some acquaintances. The process is one you will need in the assisted-living facility so you might as well get some practice. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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8 | APRIL 19, 2018

CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

SYRIAN REFUGEE DIALOGUE

As refugees flee their war-torn countries, the United States has been alternately welcoming and dismissive. The Syrian Refugee Crisis is one of the more horrific and urgent, as more than 250,000 have lost their lives and some 11 million forced from their homes. Join Salem Ajluni, former academic economist and former U.N. economist stationed in the Middle East, as he analyzes the impact of Syrian refugee flows on the neighboring countries of Lebanon and Jordan. As a board member of the Amaan Charitable Foundation, he has been assisting refugees arriving in Northern California. University of Utah Hinckley Institute caucus room, Building 73, Room 110, 332 S. 1400 East, 801-581-8501, Friday, April 20, noon-1 p.m., free, bit. ly/2pNtyUl.

EARTH DAY CLEANUP

On Earth Day, no one wants to think about garbage. But last year, 100 stalwart volunteers ventured out in Dimple Dell Park and picked up tons of trash and debris. This year, the park will be divided into working zones, and they need at least 500 volunteers to help clean the park’s 646 acres at the Earth Day Park Cleanup. “We will take all comers on the day of the event, but because the park is so vast, and the goal so ambitious this year, we are looking for Scouts, neighbors, business employee service groups, clubs or community groups who can cover pre-assigned work zones,” say Keep Dimple Dell Wild organizers. Dimple Dell Park, 2755 E. Dimple Dell Road, Sandy, Saturday, April 21, check-in 9 a.m., free, bit.ly/2GGelPB.

BEAR RIVER DIVERSION PANEL

Utahns need to think about water and how we use it, and how our rivers and streams are at risk. At The Bear River: Thinking Below the Surface, you will hear about problems and solutions to a long-standing plan to dam the Bear River, largely to sustain population growth and agriculture. Panelists will explore how Utah will meet its future water demands; how a dam would affect surrounding ecosystems and wildlife, and other environmental issues. A Q&A will follow the panel, moderated by Rod Decker. Westminster College, Gore Auditorium, 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-832-2308, Monday, April 23, 6-7:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2IdO7kx.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Seeing Green

GET YOUR KITTY FIX

The best outcome for the Northwest Quadrant would be if no one developed it at all. You know, with its fragile ecosystem and rapidly shrinking wetlands. But that’s not the view of House Speaker Greg Hughes, who is just righteously indignant about anyone—especially Salt Lake City—questioning his intentions and making what he sees as false statements, according to the Deseret News. The Inland Port Authority is supposed to be Hughes’ lasting legacy, one with lots of zeros and dollar signs—all for the state to manage. The city quickly moved in to create deals with developers. “Since the area was going to be developed, the thought was that the city would be more conscience of environmental factors than if the state were in charge, so we tried to get in front of it,” Councilman Charlie Luke told City Weekly via email. But under the new law, the state can veto any city decisions.

Monolithic Irony

make someone ’ s day

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801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

While there is no dearth of #fakenews in our political environment, the #truenews department gets some props for crunching the numbers on Operation Rio Grande. “Statistics show that aggregate crime has been falling steadily in Salt Lake City as a whole since 2015, and the total analyzed crimes committed are at the lowest point since 2013,” a Pioneer Park Coalition study notes. There was a downside, however. Rapes have been increasing. Whether due to better reporting, the #metoo movement or more instances, it’s a concern that should be addressed. The coalition had hoped to parse numbers from cities like West Valley City, Taylorsville, South Salt Lake and Murray, but the up-to-date data were not made available. If cities are concerned that crime is moving in, they should focus on the data to prove it.

t r A The l a r Flo

True News

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You’ve got to love the irony of white people crying discrimination among the Native American population. When The Salt Lake Tribune ran the headline that included, “We’ve been disenfranchised,” there was a perceptible din of disbelief. “Isn’t it enough that that we’ve taken away Native Americans’ land? Do we have to take away their votes as well?” Paul Simmons wrote in retort. Another writer called it Jim Crow thinking. But white Republican whining is exactly what’s happening in San Juan County ever since a federal judge redrew voting boundaries to give Navajos a majority. “He stabbed the citizens of San Juan County in the heart,” one white voter said. Now that the statewide redistricting ballot is being certified, we’ll see what happens to the rest of this otherwise monolithic state.


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10 | APRIL 19, 2018

STRAIGHT DOPE To The Letter

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

One of a kind items at a one of a kind store

Why oh why did the USPS decree a two-letter abbreviation for states? With three letters you can not only have an unambiguous designation, but one that can be recognized as the state designated without memorizing an arbitrary two-letter code. Surely it isn’t saving ink. What nefarious plot brought this plague upon us? —Richard Trombley

Unique decorative items for home or office. Lower Level Center Court Trolley Square

If you feel overwhelmed by two-letter state abbreviations, wait’ll you hear about 13-letter city abbreviations. I pray you never have to use it, Richard, but yes, the United States Postal Service publishes a list of approved city-name truncations, for those emergencies when you need to send something to Rancho Santa Margarita, California, but your address template permits only so many spaces. And that’s the limiting factor here: it’s not ink the USPS is worried about but mailing-label real estate. If need be, they figure, everything on the bottom line of an address should fit into 28 character positions: according to Publication 28, their addressing-standards bible, that’s 13 characters for the city, a space afterward, two characters for the state, two spaces (“preferred”) between state and ZIP, and ten characters (including hyphen) for the ZIP+4. This wasn’t always a concern, of course. In the abbreviation-happy 1800s, when every James or Robert was a Jas. or Robt., the Post Office Department (as it was then known) just needed some way of guessing where these people wanted their mail to go. Until the mid-20th century, the P.O. preferred that senders write out state names in full, but was willing to meet the abbreviating public halfway by providing an occasionally updated list of suggested short forms. These were all over the place lengthwise, from two or three letters on up: Massachusetts was “Ms.” on the 1831 list, but had settled out at “Mass.” by 1874; Michigan evolved from “Mic. T.” (for “Michigan Territory”) to “Mich.” and stayed thus for 90 years. Meanwhile, mail delivery tended to be circuitous and inefficient, because we lacked an orderly sorting method. A letter might be handled by as many as ten carriers on its voyage from sender to recipient; one addressed to Charleston, South Carolina, could well make an errant stop in Charleston, West Virginia. And the mail system became taxed by ever-greater usage, booming along with everything else post-W WII: between 1940 and 1965, Americans’ use of the mail grew by nearly 160 percent. What nefarious plot was cooked up to solve this problem? The Zone Improvement Plan, introduced in 1963, in which geographical areas were assigned a numeric code for easier sorting and delivery. Along with this came the now-familiar all-caps, no-periods state abbreviations, which were actually rolled out twice that year. The first batch, in June, contained lots of three- and

even four-letter entries: IDA, OKLA, MONT, etc. But by October the postal service, looking to preserve more character space for the new codes, published a revised list using a consistent two letters per state. It’s been emended only once since: Under the second 1963 scheme Nebraska was given NB, which inspired objections—polite ones, we’ll assume—from Canadian postal authorities fearing potential confusion with New Brunswick. In 1969 Nebraska became NE. ZIP codes evolved more significantly: ZIP+4 was added in 1983 to identify a particular side of the street, or an office building; starting in ’93, 11-digit ZIPs allowed for mail to be sorted in order of the carrier’s route. As demanding as some might find those twoletter abbreviations, AL, AK, and the rest are really the least significant facet of the Zone Improvement Plan, which transformed the way mail was delivered in the United States. For a deeper dive on this subject, I’ll refer you to a 2013 report by the USPS’s Office of the Inspector General, The Untold Story of the ZIP Code. If that’s even a slightly punchier title than you’d expect from an IG report, blame it on enthusiasm: these guys, it quickly becomes apparent, are really proud of their little mail-sorting system and its “positive spillover effects” on the nation as a whole. ZIP codes are nonproprietary, we’re reminded, and so have been available for societally beneficial use by demographers, public-health officials, emergency workers, and insurance providers alike. (Plus schlock-TV producers—Beverly Hills, 90210 rates a mention in the report’s third sentence.) As calculated by the authors, the ZIP scheme adds about $10 billion annually to the economy, and yet it exists only “out of pure good will.” Seriously, you will never love anything as much as the USPS Inspector General’s office loves ZIP codes. The report also suggests avenues for future growth—notably linking ZIPs with geocoding (latitude and longitude coordinates), to make delivery routes yet more efficient and facilitate better communication with people in high-risk areas like flood or wildfire zones. “This is the opportunity to innovate anew on an old innovation frontier,” the IG’s office says: “This is our 1963.” Which seems to me like kind of a weird call to arms. I mean, innovation’s great and all, but the invention of the ZIP isn’t exactly the first thing that year’s remembered for. n

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Declutter Day friday, april 27th, 2018

FREE TO THE PUBLIC, NO BUSINESSES PLEASE for a complete list of items accepted at the free public event log on: www.commerce.utah.gov/declutter

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APRIL 19, 2018 | 11


NEWS

A Call to Arms

“There are no ugly guns,” Second Amendment supporters proclaim at gathering.

GUN-CONTROL

BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

12 | APRIL 19, 2018

SARAH ARNOFF

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“No one, not children, not politicians, not business leaders, not religious leaders, not even the president of the United States—no one gets to use a crisis or a tragedy to take away any of our civil rights,” Women Against Gun Control’s Janalee Tobias told the crowd of Second Amendment supporters on April 14.

ames Waller hadn’t planned on spending his Saturday afternoon rallying with a horde of fellow Second Amendment supporters until his local gun store sent him an email tipping him off to a planned gathering at the Capitol steps. “I love roaming the Capitol, and it’s something I believe in,” Waller said, a clearly visible handgun holstered at his chest. (A loaded clip, he noted, but with no rounds in the chamber, given the Capitol “seems like a pretty safe place.”) The Gardner family made the gathering a kindred affair, bringing their young children to exercise their First Amendment rights to voice their support of the Second. Nate Gardner, father and sixth-grade teacher, said his son fired his first gun around age 2, and estimated his daughter did the same around age 3 or 4. “Honestly, if we start them earlier, they won’t fear the gun,” Gardner said. “They’ll respect the gun.” They were in vocal company. The couple hundred folks who gathered at the Capitol on April 14 joined in with “the support of thousands of American Patriots across this great country,” according to the National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans’ website, which called for said patriots to rally at state capitols across the U.S. to “show our support for our [Second] Amendment rights and to support our Constitution as a whole.” Some 10 speakers addressed a range of topics, from the need to “streamline the death penalty,” to the “God-given right to self defense,” how Second Amendment supporters “have to be vigilant,” the necessity to “reach out to the other side” and contacting local representatives if they threaten their constituents’ gun-bearing rights. Groups participating in the rally included the Utah Unorganized Constitutional Militia, a coalition that, according to its Facebook page, aims to “protect individual freedom”; Women Against Gun Control, a group of “ladies of high-caliber” whose website notes that, “The [Second] Amendment is the Equal Rights Amendment”; High School Kids for Guns, whose representative at the rally, Collin Thorup, spoke about not participating in the student-led March for Our Lives demonstration on March 24 in which his classmates walked out of class in support of gun-control legislation; and, among other supporters, Stonewall Shooting Sports, “weapon advocates and owners in Utah” who stand “for the legal, responsible and safe use of weapons for our self defense, recreation and weapon-sports competition.” After attendees recited the Pledge of Allegiance and sang the national anthem en masse, the many gun-carrying, flag-wearing, sign-holding members of the crowd shouted out a range of responses to the speakers over the roughly twohour rally, including: “Assault is an action, not a gun!”; “There are no ugly guns!”; and “We’re proud of you!”

Some also offered to drive, or pay for, guncontrol advocates’ “Commie asses” to be sent away from the U.S. to nations that have passed gun-control legislation. Villina Greenwell is from one of those countries. The Australian speaker told the crowd about her country of origin’s gun-control laws and gun buyback program, which she said, contrary to popular belief, is no model for U.S. gun laws. “I lived it,” Greenwell said. “Don’t believe the mass hysteria of the liberal left wing media. It’s rubbish.” Steven Lund, owner of West Jordan’s ACE Firearms, spoke of the need to “hold criminals responsible for their actions” and train some teachers in defensive tactics after arming them and putting a safe in their classrooms that would notify the cops when it was opened. “As my God-given right to self defense, I want a bigger gun than my enemy,” Lund said. Robert Whalen, from the Unorganized Constitutional Militia, introduced most of the speakers. Referring to the people who want to pass gun-control laws, Whalen said, “they are not our friends. They are not our allies. They definitely are not Americans.” Every gun bill that has been passed, Whalen said, is a violation of the Second Amendment. A 10-year Utahn, Waller moved to the Beehive State from Los Angeles, Calif. “When I first moved here, I thought, ‘You can buy firearms?’” He said. Now, he owns three of them, which he said he uses for recreational purposes like shooting cans and dirt. Waller said gun-control measures are about disarming law-abiding white populations, arguing that “the United States does not have a crime problem; the U.S. has a demographics problem.” Janalee Tobias, founder and president of Women Against Gun Control, said in a phone interview two days after the rally that she considers the gathering a success, and that she’s “very pleased with the media turnout,” recognizing that many consider media outlets, including City Weekly, to ooze liberal bias. “Our side deserves to be heard,” Tobias said of “typical gun owners,” whom she called “good people.” “I don’t know of any more plans to protest,” Tobias wrote in a follow-up email. “What I’d really like to do… is not to protest. It’s time for us to meet and talk personally instead of rallying. The pro-gun people have a hard time taking time off work, family responsibilities, church responsibilities to take time off to attend protests.” The rally followed a late-March walkout by high school students in which 8,000 kids, parents and supporters from across the state gathered at the same Capitol steps to demand a legislative fix to end gun violence in schools. Tobias says she’s gotten a lot of hateful responses to her pro-gun stance. “People think just because I’m pro-gun means I don’t care about kids. “It tugs at our heartstrings to see these high school kids marching in the streets. To think that they’re going to school and have to worry about a mass shooter,” she says, rejecting the idea that just because she’s a vocal gun supporter means she’s against the safety of high school students. “It’s painful to see them have to worry about this.” Speaking at the rally, Tobias said that, as sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, friends and neighbors, “We mourn with the victims of every school shooting.” “If we don’t start attacking crime at the root, nothing’s ever going to change,” she said. CW


SARAH ARNOFF

BY WILSON CRISCIONE, MITCH RYALS, DANIEL WALTERS, QUINN WELSCH AND SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

1. PLUG HOLES IN THE BACKGROUNDCHECK SYSTEM

Gaps in the federal background-check system (the National Instant Criminal Background Check System) allow domestic abusers, convicted felons and people with mental illness to purchase guns. Roughly 20 percent of Americans purchase guns without a background check. A 2013 survey of prisoners locked up for gun violence found that more than 96 percent of offenders who were legally prohibited from owning guns purchased them without a background check. Experts point to three major holes: 1. In most states, gun buyers are able to purchase guns from unlicensed dealers who aren’t required to run a background check at all. Some states, including Utah, require retail gun dealers to conduct background checks. However, Utah law also allows for individual citizens to buy and sell firearms without conducting a

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and the analysis of experts. Some ideas are good—they have a decent shot at saving lives. Some are messy, with the potential benefits weighed down by potential costs. Some are ineffective; doing little to nothing to combat gun violence. And some are just plain ugly—more likely to result in more death and injury, rather than less.

Proposals likely to reduce gun violence and save lives:

background check. After Missouri, for example, stopped requiring background checks for all firearm purchases, researchers found a 25 percent increase in firearm homicides. 2. If the FBI doesn’t complete a background check in three business days, licensed dealers are free to sell the gun anyway. This is how the man who killed nine parishioners inside a black church in Charleston, S.C., bought a gun. FBI data indicates that authorities failed to meet the three-day deadline 1.1 million times between 2014 and 2017. However, it’s unclear how many firearms were actually sold because dealers have discretion to wait until the check is completed. 3. The federal definition of “domestic abuser” doesn’t include unmarried or childless couples. Many states have closed the so-called “Boyfriend Loophole.” Strengthening the federal backgroundcheck system is one of the most feasible and most effective measures to reduce gun violence, surveys and research show. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that states requiring universal background checks have lower gun-death rates. Surveys show overwhelming public support.

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Today, high school and middle-school students across the nation, including here in Salt Lake City, have risen up in protests and marches after the Parkland shooting, demanding that something be done. So now what? We looked at 47 ideas to reduce gun violence, weighing the results of academic research

THE GOOD

FIRST THE GOOD NEWS: America, overall, is a much less violent place than it used to be. Our reported violent-crime rate is almost half what it was in 1991. The bad? Mass shootings haven’t decreased. In fact, they’ve become even deadlier. In 2010, the World Health Organization found that the United States’ gun-homicide rates were more than 25 times higher than in any other high-income country. That was before Las Vegas. And before Parkland, Fla. During the past decade, we’ve witnessed 19 of the 30 deadliest mass shootings in modern U.S. history. And it isn’t just about murders. The suicide rate has been skyrocketing as well, reaching a 30-year high in 2016. More than half of those suicides were with firearms.

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47 IDEAS TO REDUCE GUN VIOLENCE AND SAVE LIVES.

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THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY


SARAH ARNOFF

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14 | APRIL 19, 2018

Second Amendment supporters congregate at the Capitol on April 14.

2. LET AMERICANS SUE GUN MANUFACTURERS AGAIN

It’s the American way: If a product is killing an unbelievable number of people, the proper remedy is to sue the hell out of them. This, after all, was the plot of the 2003 movie adaptation of John Grisham’s Runaway Jury. But since 2005, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act made gun manufacturers and dealers essentially legally bulletproof. A victim can still sue if a gun, for example, malfunctions and explodes—but not if a teenager uses it to kill 14 of his classmates. Guns are meant to kill, the Republican argument went, so why should people be able to sue when the gun has done what it was built to do? Remove the shield, a recent op-ed in The New York Times pointed out, and that means gun manufacturers suddenly would have a financial incentive, like every other industry, to make their products safer—likely preventing more accidental shootings. While Democrats have repeatedly tried to push legislation to disarm the gun industry’s special shield, it doesn’t have a chance while Republicans are in control.

3. LIFT THE BAN ON GUN-CONTROL RESEARCH

From 2004 to 2014, gun violence killed about as many people as life-threatening infections known as sepsis, but funding for gun violence research was only about 0.7 percent of the amount spent to study sepsis, according to a 2017 research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In fact, the researchers found that gun violence was the least researched cause of death, in relation to mortality rate. Only research into deaths by falling are funded less. The nonpartisan RAND Corporation looked at thousands of U.S. gun-control studies and found that, in many areas, there just wasn’t enough research to definitively show effects one way or another. The lack of research in certain areas muddles debates over policies, like some listed in this story. Part of what has stymied gun research in the U.S. is the 1996 “Dickey Amendment,” which prevents the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from spending money on activities that “advocate or promote gun control.” Former Arkansas Republican Rep. Jay Dickey, the amendment’s namesake, told NPR he never intended for the amendment to cut off federal gun research altogether, only gun-control advocacy, and regrets that the effect was to essentially halt research in the area. In March, President Donald Trump signed a spending bill that left the Dickey Amendment in place but clarifies that the CDC can research the causes of gun violence. It’s not clear yet if federal research will increase, though, as no funding for gun-violence research was included.

4. COPY THE AUSSIES

It’s considered perhaps one of the most successful gun-control programs in history. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have both pointed to Australia as a model of how dramatic gun control can make a nation safer. It’s also about as close to “taking your guns” as the mainstream gun-control movement gets. Here are the simple facts: There were 13 mass shootings in 18 years before Australia’s sweeping National Firearms Agreement in 1997. In the following 20 years, there’s been just one. While skeptics quibble with whether the law can be entirely credited, the country’s already-low firearm-homicide rate fell further—and suicides absolutely plunged. The flashiest piece of the program featured a mandatory buyback program that gathered around 650,000 firearms—a full fifth of the country’s arsenal. However, today Australia has about as many guns as before the buyback. Instead, the key, as the Science Vs. podcast explains, seemed to be the thicket of other laws that came with it, including a ban on semi-automatic and pump-action rifles and shotguns. You have to show a good reason to own a gun—and self-defense doesn’t count. You can only sell through a licensed dealer. You have to register your gun and report it if it’s stolen. Much of the Australia program would also almost certainly be struck down by the Supreme Court—and the cultural and physical geography of the United States would create serious regulatory challenges. But even some pieces of Australia’s gun-control program, when combined, could seriously reduce deaths.

5. TRACK GUNS—AND MANDATE REPORTING IF THEY’RE STOLEN

One of the most effective parts of Australia’s gun-control strategy was simply creating a gun registry—and then enforcing it. In the United States, gun-rights activists fear registries are only the first step to confiscation—and research on their effectiveness in the U.S. is limited. Yet, the potential benefits are clear, particularly when combined with a requirement that lost or stolen guns are reported: It’s a way to close the loophole of “straw purchasers”—where a person illegally buys a gun for somebody else ineligible to purchase one. It hands law enforcement officers the ability to actually identify which guns are stolen—cracking down on both illicit arms traders and allowing cops to get convictions for thieves. And it encourages gun owners to do a better job of safely securing their weapons. A 2002 report from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms concluded that about 85 percent of criminal gun owners weren’t the original purchaser of their gun. So if you’re worried about stopping a bad guy with a gun—make sure he doesn’t get one in the first place.


7. BAN HIGH-CAPACITY MAGAZINES

HAKAN DHALSTROM PHOTO

10. BAN BUMP STOCKS

When a mass shooter fires into a crowd with a semi-automatic rifle, how fast he can pull the trigger becomes a life-or-death question. In the Las Vegas shooting last October, the gunman in the Mandalay Bay Hotel room was able to fire nine rounds per second. That’s all thanks to a rifle modification called a bump stock, which harnesses the recoil of a weapon to allow a shooter to fire at speeds comparable to already illegal automatic weapons.

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An eighth-grade school shooter in Townville, S.C., The Washington Post reported, thought he’d be able to kill at least 50 of his classmates—150 if he got lucky. But he couldn’t get into the gun safe where he thought his dad kept the powerful Ruger Mini-14 semi-automatic rifle. Instead, he settled for a pistol he found in his dad’s

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8. MAKE FIREARM OWNERS LOCK ’EM UP

Before the Parkland shooting, Florida was such a pro-gun state that it actually passed a law restricting doctors’ abilities to ask their patients about gun ownership. (The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals struck it down last year.) That flies in the face of recommendations from the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics, both of which recommend doctors discuss guns with their patients to prevent accidental shootings and suicides. So far, the research on the effectiveness of doctors talking with patients about guns is limited and mixed, but it does seem to improve patients’ use of safe storage devices, especially when doctors actually give out the devices. Not only that, but one 2000 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry study found that after counseling from a psychiatrist, a third of the parents of suicidal teens removed firearms from their homes. With suicide, by far, the leading cause of deaths from firearms—that’s a big deal.

To trained hands, reloading a weapon is second nature, like wiping your brow or cracking your knuckles. The rounds run out, the bolt slams forward, the magazine drops with a simple push of a finger and a new magazine is inserted. It only takes a few seconds. But in a mass shooting, those seconds can buy people time to get to safety—or disarm the shooter. At Seattle Pacific University in 2014, an unarmed student used pepper spray to subdue a shooter while he was reloading. And as advocates of high-capacity magazine bans point out, you wouldn’t need more than 10 rounds before reloading to kill a deer. High-capacity magazines and the weapons capable of bearing them, including handguns, were disproportionately recovered by police in connection with violent crimes in Baltimore, Minneapolis and Richmond. These same types of magazines were used in the 2017 Las Vegas shooting. Ultimately, reducing the number of rounds that can be shot from any weapon will reduce its lethality.

9. PUSH DOCTORS TO TALK TO PATIENTS ABOUT GUNS

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Only a handful of states currently have laws regulating the purchase of ammunition. Federal law does not currently require ammo purchasers to submit to a background check. This year, congressional Democrats introduced a bill that would establish a federal background check system for ammo. U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, DFlorida, one of the sponsors of the bill, has said it would plug an “absurd loophole” that allows people to “amass hundreds of rounds of ammunition without so much as sharing their first name with a gun store clerk.” Starting in 2019, California will require ammo vendors to report bullet sales to the state’s Department of Justice and conduct background checks on ammunition sales. New York and New Jersey have similar laws. While the NRA has opposed such proposals, a 2013 Fox News poll found 80 percent of respondents were in favor of ammunition background checks. And a study in the journal Injury Prevention analyzing school shootings between 2013 and 2015 found that states with ammunition background checks (along with other factors) have lower rates of school shooting incidents.

dresser—a pistol that jammed after he shot several elementary school students. He didn’t notice that the rifle hadn’t actually been locked up either. More than two-thirds of school shooters got their guns from their own homes or homes of relatives. Massachusetts legally requires guns to be either kept in locked containers or protected with a trigger lock that prevents them from being fired. Gun-rights advocates strenuously objected, arguing that locking up their firearms made it nearly impossible to ward off a home invader. But a 2015 Harvard University analysis found that victims using guns to ward off criminals were more likely to be injured than people who just tried to run away. By contrast, other studies have found that safe storage practices significantly reduce the risk of suicide and accidental gun deaths. Not only that, it makes it harder for thieves to steal them during a burglary. If you don’t want the outlaws to get guns, in other words, outlaw leaving guns where outlaws can get them.

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6. INSTITUTE BACKGROUND CHECKS AND TRACKING FOR AMMUNITION


ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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“Most of us believe that’s a Second Amendment right that’s not to be trifled with,” Sen. Orrin Hatch said of gun-control in February.

After Las Vegas, banning bump stocks has become a rare gun-control measure even Republicans in Congress say they support—though not, so far, enough to actually pass federal legislation to ban them. But the impact would likely be small. While fewer people might have died in Las Vegas if bump stocks were banned, the devices have rarely, if ever, been used in prior shootings.

11. RAISE THE FIREARM-PURCHASING AGE

Check out this absurdity: You can’t buy a handgun from a licensed dealer if you’re under 21. But if you’re 18, you can buy an AR-15. While Republicans like State Sen. Orrin Hatch remain wishy-washy on the subject (“We’ll have to look at that. That’s not something you just shove aside,” he said during a February interview), after the Parkland shooting, even gun-rights-loving Florida passed a bill that hiked the age to 21. (Utah law provides that no person under age 18 may possess a handgun, sawed-off rifle, sawed-off shotgun or fully automatic weapon unless he or she: Has the permission of one’s parent or guardian to have the weapon; or is accompanied by a parent or guardian while in possession of the gun.) The proposed reform is unlikely to have a dramatic impact on mass shootings, however: Out of the 156 mass shootings since 2009, a Vox piece explained, only one was committed by a gunman under age of 21 with a legally purchased semi-automatic rifle. So gun-control advocates suggest going further: Raise the legal age for unlicensed dealers as well, barring informal gun-sellers—dealers at gun shows, for instance—and online stores from selling handguns and rifles. Heck, raise it to 25. Treat guns as seriously as rental cars. FBI data shows that more than half of firearm-homicide offenders from 2005 to 2015 were under age 25.

12. GIVE COPS THE POWER TO RESPOND TO RED FLAGS

The horror of the Parkland shooting was compounded by the fact that so many people knew that the shooter was a danger. Why didn’t anyone take away his weapons? They legally couldn’t. All the red flags in the world can’t do much if the cops don’t have a legal right to act on them. It’s caused a number of states to enact “red flag” laws, giving cops the power to ask a court for a warrant to temporarily remove a person’s access to firearms if they’re an imminent danger to themselves or others. In the 14 years after Connecticut implemented such a law in 1999, police temporarily removed an average of seven firearms from each at-risk gun owner across 762 firearm-removal cases, one study found. Often, those gun owners were connected with mental-health treatment they wouldn’t have received otherwise. Ultimately, more than 100 suicides could have been prevented, the study estimated.

13. LET FAMILY MEMBERS PETITION FOR GUN REMOVALS

The profile of mass shooters can vary radically, but a few things keep popping up: They’re almost always men. And they very often have a history of domestic violence. In fact, more than half of the shootings from 2009 to 2016 tallied by Everytown For Gun Safety involved domestic or family violence. It’s scary as hell to be a woman trapped in a violent relationship—it’s even scarier if he can kill you with the click of a trigger. It’s why some states have adopted the use of Gun Violence Restraining Orders. Red-flag laws in states like California and Washington let family members, friends and employers—not just a police officer—ask a court to temporarily take away a person’s firearm access.

14. ALERT THE COPS WHEN SOMEONE FAILS A GUN BACKGROUND CHECK

Here’s a policy both Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio and his counterpart Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson support: Federal officials are required to notify local authorities within 24 hours whenever someone tries to buy a gun, but fails the National Instant Criminal Background Check System. Last year, Washington state passed a similar bill—requiring gun dealers to report a failed background check. A KING 5 report found that there were almost 4,000 instances of failed backgrounds checks per year in Washington state, but police were doing little to follow up to find out why ineligible buyers were trying to purchase weapons. It’s a minor fix, but since authorities often miss multiple red flags before mass shootings, this would at least make the red flags shine a little brighter.

15. REQUIRE STATES TO SHARE MENTAL-HEALTH RECORDS WITH THE FEDS

Technically, federal law already prohibits people with a history of some mentalhealth conditions from possessing guns. But the FBI’s federal background check system relies on states voluntarily reporting that information, and participation is spotty. A New York Times report in 2016 found that Pennsylvania had entered more than 718,000 mental records (5,618 per 100,000 residents) into the federal background check system, for example, while Montana had entered in a grand total of four. Utah, meanwhile, submitted 8,240 records—about 280 per every 100,000 residents. There are legitimate debates about which mental-health conditions should exclude a person from gun ownership; the vast majority of people with mental-health conditions, after all, are not violent. But as it stands, some states failing to share their information or properly enforce the law has allowed dangerous individuals like the Virginia Tech shooter to gain access to guns. Recent bipartisan legislation has directed grant money to help states better share that information.


In some countries, the checklist of what people need in order to buy a gun includes

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18. REQUIRE FIREARM OWNERS TAKE GUN-SAFETY CLASSES

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In 1911, New York passed the Sullivan Act. Richard Aborn, president of the Citizens Crime Commission of New York City, calls the act “possibly the most effective guncontrol law in the history of the country,” in an interview on Slate’s podcast, The Gist. In New York, it generally takes about six months to get a gun after the applications, background check, safety training and an interview with a uniformed NYPD officer, Aborn says. New York also requires safe storage and reporting if a gun is lost or stolen and bans large-capacity magazines and assault-style weapons. “The goal is not to prevent law-abiding citizens from getting guns,” Aborn says on the podcast. “But rather to make sure criminals didn’t get a gun. And guess what? It works!” Firearm death rates in New York are consistently among the lowest in the entire country. In 2016, CDC data shows a rate of 4.2 firearm deaths per 100,000 people, compared to say, Alaska’s 23.3 or Utah’s 12.9.

More than a dozen weapons confiscated by Washington state law enforcement since 2010 later ended up as evidence in new crimes, according to an extensive Associated Press investigation. Research shows that as gun ownership increases, so do gun homicides. With that in mind, the state law requiring the Washington State Patrol to sell or trade back to the public most of the guns it confiscates seems counterproductive. In fact, this legislative session WSP supported a bill that would have given them the option to destroy confiscated firearms. It didn’t pass. While some police chiefs wince at the idea of recirculating guns back to the public, others, such as Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl, contend that the firearms sales are an essential source of income. Utah lawmakers passed House Bill 252 in 2017 that created a state-sponsored sales channel for confiscated or unclaimed firearms. Prior to the bill’s implementation, law enforcement agencies either sold the guns themselves or destroyed the firearms. The bill, which took effect this year, requires the Utah Department of Public Safety to contract with a federally licensed gun dealer. Any revenue from the state-sponsored sale goes toward non-profit agencies that help families of fallen officers. However, the agency can still sell the guns themselves if it gets approval from its city or county governing body. They are also still permitted to destroy the guns if the agency deems it necessary. For example, if the weapon was used in a notorious crime or the gun is unfit to sell to the public, the firearm might be destroyed.

17. REQUIRE A POLICE INTERVIEW TO GET A GUN

19. LET COPS DESTROY SEIZED GUNS

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This legislative session, Washington State passed a first-of-its-kind law intended to prevent suicides. Citizens can now voluntarily waive their rights to own a gun by having their name added to a list of prohibited purchasers in the national background-check database. The new law outlines a process to make sure identities aren’t falsely added to the prohibited list, and also includes a way for people to restore their gun rights later. Making it harder to access guns can stop suicides: About half of people who survived suicide attempts and were interviewed for studies said just a few minutes to half an hour passed between when they felt suicidal and when they attempted. Guns are more lethal than other suicide methods, leading to death more than 80 percent of the time. Other means of voluntary gun surrender vary. Most law enforcement agencies and gun sellers are willing to temporarily store guns for people who are concerned their loved one is suicidal or worried about their gun being safely stored while they are away from home or have visitors over, according to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health in October 2017. About 75 percent of the 448 law enforcement agencies in the eight states surveyed in the study already provided some form of temporary storage.

a requirement to take a gun-safety course and pass a test, demonstrate gun knowledge or get a membership at a shooting club or range. In the United States, about 61 percent of gun owners have gotten some type of training, which typically included information about safe handling, storage and preventing accidents, according to a 2015 University of Washington study. But the study identified gaps in training: Only 15 percent of owners said they were trained about suicide prevention, and only 14 percent of those who lived with gun owners had received any safety training. In countries that require some type of safety course (often coupled with other strict rules around gun ownership) such as Japan, the U.K. and India, the rate of gun deaths are significantly lower than those in the U.S. And according to a new Johns Hopkins study, those who said a gun-safety course influenced their storage practices were more than twice as likely to store all their weapons in a locked manner as the general population.

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16. LET GUN OWNERS IN CRISIS TEMPORARILY SURRENDER THEIR WEAPONS

SARAH ARNOFF

SLC’s March for Our Lives drew an estimated 8,000 supporters to the Capitol.


SARAH ARNOFF

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18 | APRIL 19, 2018

Scenes from the local March for Our Lives.

20. HELP GUNSHOT VICTIMS PREVENT BEING SHOT AGAIN

Start with the premise that violence begets violence. Research shows that people who have been shot and survived have a much higher chance of being shot again, but also of committing more crime. Hospital intervention, then, aims to meet victims of violent, often gun-related injuries before they’re released. Case workers offer services before victims walk out of the hospital (housing, education, transportation, treatment) and continue to follow up for months afterward. These programs have been successful at reducing crime recidivism and some peer-reviewed research indicates the effects could be long-lasting, though more data is needed.

21. CONNECT SHOOTERS WITH THE COMMUNITY

Perhaps the most popular example of this is Boston’s “Operation Ceasefire” in the 1990s, which is credited with a 63 percent reduction in youth homicide. The program brings together community members, social service workers and police with victims and perpetrators of gun violence and has shown success, particularly in cities with a small group of readily identifiable offenders. The idea is for community members (clergy, victims, reformed offenders) to invite those responsible for gun violence to a face-to-face meeting. There, they send a clear message that the violence must stop and offer services (education, housing support, substance abuse and mental health treatment, tattoo removal). Several cities plagued by gun violence have shown reductions in gun-related homicides and gang-related violence.

22. MANUFACTURE AND SELL SMART GUNS

A 2-year-old shot and killed his mother inside a Hayden, Idaho, Walmart in 2014. From the shopping cart, the toddler had reached inside the 29-year-old mother’s purse, where she kept a concealed pistol. When we talk about smart guns, advocates often point to this example for support. Smart guns are designed to restrict who can fire them. Some require an authorized fingerprint, others use a radio-controlled watch or other device that must be within a certain distance of the gun in order to fire. There are also trigger guards that require a fingerprint to unlock. A small 2003 study of 117 unintentional and undetermined firearm-related deaths found that personalized firearms technology was among the most effective at reducing accidental deaths. While the National Institute of Justice issued baseline requirements for smart guns at Obama’s direction, so far, a relative lack of funding along with backlash

from gun-rights proponents, including the NRA, has stifled smart guns’ popularity. An NRA-led boycott of Smith & Wesson almost put the gun maker out of business after it pledged to research smart guns among other reforms.

23. REQUIRE GUNS WITH MAGAZINE SAFETIES OR CHAMBER INDICATORS

It’s easy to forget there could be one in the chamber. That same 2003 study found that two gun-safety features designed to address the forgotten round in the chamber are also effective at reducing accidental deaths. The first is known as a loaded-chamber indicator, which on some guns is a small pin that sticks up from the top. The second is a magazine safety, which disables the gun if the magazine is removed. Still, accidental or unintentional firearm deaths only account for a fraction of total gun-related deaths in the U.S and have declined to 489 in 2015 from 824 in 1999, according to CDC data.

24. GIVE LOCAL GOVERNMENTS THE POWER TO REGULATE GUNS

Most states have laws broadly preventing local governments from regulating guns. Since the 1980s, prompted by the NRA and other gun-rights groups, at least 43 states have passed “preemption” laws, which advocates argue prevent a burdensome patchwork of local rules. Associations that represent the rights of cities say preemption laws have prevented them from tailoring legislation to prevent gun violence in ways that are specific to large urban cities—say, by preventing guns from being allowed in certain parks or requiring permits to buy a gun. In states without preemption, like California, cities have the flexibility to impose local gun-control policies: San Francisco requires safe storage in a locked container when the owner isn’t carrying the gun, which studies show can prevent accidental shootings, a leading cause of death for children. Still, local rules come with inherent limitations: High-crime cities like Chicago show that even strict local laws can’t stop guns from crossing state and local borders.

25. BAN “ASSAULT-STYLE” WEAPONS

In 1994, the United States banned the manufacture and sale of certain semiautomatic weapons with military-style features and large-capacity magazines. The idea was to limit the number of crimes committed using weapons that could fire a large number of bullets rapidly. In several of the highest-casualty mass shootings in modern U.S. history, the shooters used semi-automatic weapons.


SARAH ARNOFF

After each mass shooting, experts call for the media not to name the shooter, arguing that glorifying and obsessing over shooters only gives them infamy and creates copycats. And after each shooting, while some members of the media comply, most news organizations publish the shooter’s name and details. Many school shooters say they studied those before them to learn how to make their shooting more memorable. And research shows there is some contagion effect—a 2015 study by an Arizona State University researcher found that mass shootings are often inspired by other shootings weeks earlier. The problem with never naming a shooter is the public will find out anyway. Plus, naming a shooter can prevent misinformation, like the wrong person being blamed

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The idea is to require a gun buyer to wait some period of time between the purchase and when they actually takes possession of the gun. Waiting periods give authorities more time to complete background checks, advocates say. Research strongly

29. NAME SCHOOL SHOOTERS LESS

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27. MAKE GUN BUYERS WAIT

Mental health counselors in schools can play a critical role in identifying at-risk students and referring them to appropriate treatment. That can prevent students, including would-be school shooters, from harming themselves or others. Nearly 87 percent of shooters leave behind evidence that they were victims of severe bullying that resulted in thoughts of suicide or revenge, studies have shown. Although most bullied children do not decide to open fire on fellow students as revenge, providing resources to these students could prevent harm. While schools typically lack the number of school psychologists recommended by the National Association of School Psychologists, school leadership has in recent years been more open to adding mental-health resources and threat assessment teams in schools. The drawbacks to this are minimal. Even if the increased mental-health counselors don’t prevent any school shootings, they’re sure to provide easy access to muchneeded support for troubled students.

In 1996, University of Chicago researchers studied the link between a citizen’s right to carry a concealed handgun and the violent crime rate. John Lott and David Mustard concluded that “allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons deters violent crimes and it appears to produce no increase in accidental deaths.” Further, they predicted that states without concealed carry laws could have avoided a total of 1,570 murders, 4,177 rapes and more than 60,000 assaults. At the time, the research was used to support right-to-carry laws, which allow people to carry concealed firearms. All states now allow concealed carry in some form. The NRA has pushed for permitless concealed carry laws, which already exist in some states. In the two decades since Lott and Mustard’s study, academics have debunked their research, concluding that right-to-carry laws actually lead to higher rates of violent crime. Consider the case of Edward Bushnell, the Spokane man who shot and killed another man in the back after a scuffle. Bushnell was legally carrying a handgun and was later acquitted of murder by a jury. Efforts to eliminate or restrict concealed carry are sure to be (and have been) met with legal challenges. Appeals courts are mixed, and the U.S. Supreme Court has recently declined to weigh in on the issue.

28. INCREASE MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING IN SCHOOLS

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26. REPEAL RIGHT-TO-CARRY LAWS

suggests waiting periods can create a “cooling off” period and reduce impulsive violence and suicides. The American Medical Association has voiced support of waiting periods, and a Quinnipiac University poll found 79 percent of voters support such a mandate. At least nine states and the District of Columbia have some sort of waiting period (typically between two and seven days), according to the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. There is no federally mandated waiting period to purchase firearms. A 2017 study in the National Academy of Sciences journal using data on waiting period laws from 1970 to 2014 found that the laws are associated with a 17 percent reduction in gun homicides and a 7 percent to 11 percent reduction in gun-related suicides. Utah has no law imposing a waiting period prior to the purchase of a firearm.

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The ban was lifted in 2004. A 2018 Quinnipiac poll found that 67 percent of Americans support the ban returning. A federally funded study found the effect on overall violence to be minimal, in part because assault weapons are used in so few incidents (though high-capacity magazines were more common), and in part because the ban’s narrow definition of “assault weapon” hinges on military-style features such as a pistol grip or a folding stock. “We cannot clearly credit the ban with any of the nation’s recent drop in gun violence,” study authors wrote. “Should it be renewed, the ban’s effects on gun violence are likely to be small at best and perhaps too small for reliable measurement.” Although semi-automatic rifles are rarely used to commit crimes, when they are, the potential devastation is terrifying. The purpose of the ban in 1994 was to reduce the lethality of mass shootings: Mass shootings have become much more lethal since the ban expired.


AVERY JENSEN

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A teacher at Washington, D.C.’s March for Our Lives schools attendees.

for a shooting, says Kelly McBride, vice president of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies. Details of a shooter—their motivation, access to weapons, clues that were missed—can give information that might help prevent future tragedies. Journalists shouldn’t vow not to name a shooter, she says, but instead name shooters only when pertinent. And they should always tell victims’ stories completely.

30. HARNESS THE MIGHTY POWER OF CORPORATIONS

One sign the response to the Parkland shootings has been different? Corporations started speaking out: Walmart, Dick’s Sporting Goods and Kroger raised restrictions on the minimum age required to buy firearms. CitiGroup banned their business partners from selling firearms to those under 21—and from selling highcapacity magazines or bump stocks at all. Major investment firm BlackRock announced they’d offer customers the ability to invest in funds that did not include gun manufacturers. Companies like Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Symantec, Metlife, Delta and United all announced they’d be ending their discount programs for NRA members. Some pundits urge corporations to go even further: The New York Times’ Andrew Ross Sorkin argues Visa and Mastercard could follow the example of PayPal and Square by refusing to allow their products to be used to purchase guns. It’s uncertain whether many companies will be willing to infuriate major chunks of their customers by championing regulation of their gun rights. But we’ve already seen what sort of massive power corporations wield when they get into politics. As an example, look at how they beat back trans-bathroom bills in Texas and North Carolina.

THE INEFFECTIVE Proposals unlikely to reduce gun violence:

31. ELIMINATE GUN-FREE ZONES

The argument against gun-free zones is that they are attractive targets for active shooters and leave their potential victims defenseless. Trump even told voters he would end gun-free zones during the 2016 campaign. But the evidence, championed by gun-rights activists, is thin. Active shooters don’t necessarily target gun-free zones. Rather, shooters target places they know, many of which happen to have that designation. Additionally, research shows that armed citizens rarely are able to stop a mass shooting or reduce the number of casualties.

32. HARDEN SCHOOLS

Since the Columbine shooting in 1999, schools have worked to limit access points to buildings in order to prevent those who would do harm from entering. There are no good studies on the effect these measures have had on preventing mass shootings. Studies have suggested, however, it has little effect on preventing other violent or serious crimes in schools. And most school shooters are students or staff who would already have access to those schools—or else they find other ways in. A few schools have used metal detectors to prevent guns from entering schools. This is costly, but they have been proven to keep guns out of schools in neighborhoods with high crime. Experts, however, say metal detectors are unlikely to stop a gunman who wants to commit a mass shooting. And metal detectors are likely to increase students’ perception of fear and disorder within a school. Some of the low-cost measures like limiting access points or locking classroom doors from the inside might be worth it. Metal detectors can prove useful in some schools, but none of it is likely to be a major deterrent for a potential shooter, and it could increase student fear instead of easing it.

33. TEACH GUN SAFETY IN SCHOOLS

The Idaho Legislature recently passed a bill to allow gun-safety classes to be taught in schools, but it’s unclear whether or not that will do anything to prevent even accidental shootings. Last year, the U.S. Government Accountability Office released a report saying gun-safety programs like the NRA’s are ineffective in teaching children basic rules about what to do if they come across a gun. A 2004 study by the American Academy of Pediatrics found that gun-safety programs taught children to verbally repeat gun-safety messages, but did not make a difference in real-life situations. It’s possible that this is an issue with the content, not the concept, but so far there’s nothing to prove it prevents shootings.

34. TAX GUNS AND AMMO

Sin taxes have long been used as effective ways to discourage negative behavior. Want fewer people to smoke? Tax the hell out of cigarettes. Local governments such as those in Seattle and Cook County, Ill., have levied fees on the purchase of guns and ammunition, with the intent on using the money raised to combat gun violence. But does it work as a method of gun control? So far, it’s doubtful. Gun violence actually went up in Seattle the year after the tax was implemented. The tax did generate about $200,000 for gun research. But that was less than anticipated—and a pittance compared with Seattle’s $6-billion operating budget. And if the dealer that sells 80 percent of guns in Seattle leaves the city,


35. REDUCE VIDEO GAME VIOLENCE

THE MESSY Proposals where the potential benefits come coupled with downsides and risks:

38. REPEAL THE SECOND AMENDMENT

37. INSTALL GUNSHOT TRACKING TECHNOLOGY IN CITIES

39. PLACE ARMED POLICE OFFICERS IN SCHOOLS

A series of microphones placed throughout about 90 major metropolitan cities detect gunshots in real time and immediately alert police.

In a vacuum, the idea of having more armed police officers in schools to prevent school shootings seems like a no-brainer. It avoids the complications of arming

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It’s a simple enough idea: If guns on the streets are dangerous, why not pay people to turn in their guns, no questions asked? It’s been tried by plenty of police departments across the country. But most studies have suggested the impact on homicide rates has been insignificant. In 2013, three researchers at State University of New York College at Buffalo looked at five years of gun-buyback programs in Buffalo, N.Y. The conclusion was scathing. “Gun-buyback programs appear to satisfy a local administrator’s need for instant solutions to a problem, despite a lack of evidence demonstrating effectiveness as a violence-reduction strategy,” researchers concluded.

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36. HOLD VOLUNTARY GUN BUYBACKS

So why not simply ban all guns? Or why not require all guns be kept at an armory, instead of the home? Why not imitate Britain or Australia or Japan? Because the Constitution, that’s why. An Antonin Scalia-penned Supreme Court decision in 2008 left plenty of room for gun regulation, but invalidated sweeping gun-control measures like an outright ban on handguns. That’s led an increasing number of commentators—including former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens—to note there’s a simple way to fix that: Repeal the Second Amendment. The road to an amendment is ridiculously steep, requiring either the vote of twothirds of both houses of Congress or two-thirds of the state legislatures. But even if it can’t be done, it could at least shift the terms of the debate, supporters argue. “Why can’t the NRA’s extremism be countered with equal extremism?” writes Vox’s German Lopez. “That seems like a potential way to get to the middle that the great majority of Americans agree with.” Go for it, far-right conservatives say: Embed repealing one of the bedrock principles of the country into the Democratic Party platform. Watch what happens to your swing states and rural elected representatives. Watch as the donations to the NRA skyrocket and gun purchases soar as the fear that the government’s coming for your guns seems more real than ever. Ultimately, it might be far easier to put more liberal-leaning Stevens-style justices on the court, to sweep away Scalia’s precedent, than taking on the Constitution directly.

President Trump summoned video game developers to the White House in March for a meeting that opened with a video of grisly kill shots from games like Fallout 4 and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. It was almost a throwback to the let’s-blameColumbine-on-Marilyn-Manson days—condemning games for, in the words of a 2012 Trump tweet, “creating monsters.” Both the law and the science are stacked against Trump: In 2011, the Supreme Court struck down violent video game restrictions on First Amendment grounds, noting that there wasn’t any clear link between violent games and violent kids. Yes, some kids play more aggressively after playing violent games, a New York Times review of the research concluded, but actual violent offenders typically have consumed less media than average. Juvenile violence overall has plummeted even as the number of kids playing video games has soared. And as The NYT pointed out, Japan, a country by any measure more obsessed with games than the United States, had a grand total of six gun deaths in 2014. The United States? More than 33,000. Yes, something’s different between those two countries—and it isn’t violent video games.

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The technology, known as ShotSpotter, lets officers respond quickly and accurately to gunfire, which could lead to more cases of gun violence getting solved. Yet, some reports indicate the expensive technology plays only a minor role in reducing gun violence. The Center for Investigative Reporting found that over a two-year period in San Francisco, only two arrests were made out of 3,000 ShotSpotter alerts.

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as it has threatened to, the tax will raise even less than that. The trouble is, guns aren’t like cigarettes, the Los Angeles Times editorial board points out: “A criminal who needs a gun as a primary tool of his trade would hardly be put off by a slightly higher price.”

ACTIVISION

With more than 250 million units sold, Call of Duty is the most successful first-person shooter video game.


OFFICIAL DHS PHOTO

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22 | APRIL 19, 2018

Originally, the 2016 Pulse shooter intended to target Disney World, before killing 49 people in the Orlando, Fla., nightclub.

teachers—officers have more training for high-intensity situations—and there have been, in fact, several instances where armed guards stopped an active shooter from inflicting more damage. However, there have also been instances like the Parkland shooting, when the armed deputy failed to act. But it’s more complicated than that. Mass school shootings remain relatively rare in the everyday life of students, and other than a few high-profile cases there is little research on whether the presence of armed officers prevents them. Meanwhile, on a day-to-day basis, the increase in recent years of resource officers in schools, according to a 2013 Congressional Research Service study, can also increase student arrests for nonviolent offenses—often on vague charges like “disorderly conduct”— and it disproportionately sends students of color into the criminal-justice system. Student advocacy groups have pushed to instead focus on providing more counselors in schools instead of police. The impact armed officers have on preventing school shootings isn’t clear, and the potential drawbacks of increasing their presence need to be considered.

40. REQUIRE A DOCTOR’S NOTE TO PURCHASE A GUN

Per the Gun Control Act of 1968, a person who has been deemed mentally “defective” or who has been involuntarily committed to a mental hospital cannot own or purchase a gun. Background checks are supposed to alert sellers to those marks on people’s records, but they don’t always show up due to the unreliable nature of sharing those records with state and federal databases. So rather than wait for proof of a potentially disqualifying mental health issue, some countries (like India, Germany, Japan, Brazil and Russia) require some sort of doctor’s note before a person can own a gun. But physicians might be reluctant to be the final arbiters of a person’s right to purchase, own or carry a gun. A 2013 article by a group of physicians lays out a few reasons why: A lack of standards and training, concern over divulging private medical information and differing opinions on what should disqualify a person.

41. GIVE COPS THE CHOICE TO REFUSE TO ISSUE A CONCEALED-CARRY PERMIT

The distinction between “may issue” states and “shall issue” states typically comes up in the debate about concealed-carry permits. Some states, such as Utah, must issue permits to those who qualify. Others give law enforcement the discretion to issue a permit. Appeals court judges have come to conflicting conclusions about states’ authority to issue permits on a discretionary basis, though the Supreme Court recently declined to review a case out of California. In doing so, it let stand a ruling that says

law enforcement can refuse to issue concealed-carry permits. Some gun-safety advocates have taken the idea of discretionary licensure even further. They argue that law enforcement should have discretion over not only who can carry a gun in public, but who can purchase one. Those advocates point to the fact that the Parkland shooter’s struggle with depression, violent tendencies and prior contact with police did not disqualify him from buying a gun. Given the Supreme Court’s previous Second Amendment ruling, and its reluctance to define the law further, it’s unclear whether “may issue” laws for gun purchases would pass constitutional muster.

42. BAN THOSE ON THE TERRORIST WATCH-LIST FROM BUYING GUNS

It’s a proposal that combines the GOP’s hatred of terrorists with Democrats’ hatred of guns. After the 2016 Pulse shooting in Orlando, congressional leaders floated legislation to prevent suspected terrorists from buying guns. Denying potential terrorists guns seems like a no-brainer—why would you ban a person from boarding an airplane but let them purchase a gun? But whether you’re using the broader terrorist watch-list or the smaller no-fly list, there are thousands of innocent people who would be impacted, raising serious constitutional and dueprocess concerns. As the American Civil Liberties Union pointed out that same year, the proposal would further entrench a watch-list system that was “error-prone and unreliable,” relying on “vague and overbroad criteria and secret evidence” to put people on the list without a path to clearing their names.

43. CHALLENGE PRO-GUN DEMOCRATS IN PRIMARIES

There’s a reason why gun-control legislation is so hard to pass, despite polling that says the majority of voters support many measures: Gun-rights voters care more. Cross the NRA as a Republican legislator, and the possibility of being a defeated by someone even more conservative in the next primary is very real. Oppose gun control as a Democrat—like 16 Democratic senators did with a 2013 assault-weaponsban bill, and, well, nothing happens. If gun-control advocates want new laws, they could change that incentive structure by running candidates to defeat pro-gun Democrats in the primary. The Tea Party example shows the benefits and the risks of such an approach: Tea Party conservatives were able to successfully push the GOP to the right by demanding purity from their legislators. But, at times, they also elevated candidates who had no chance of winning in the general election, costing Republicans in crucial elections.


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FINALLY, THE UGLY Proposals likely to result in more injuries or deaths:

44. ARM TEACHERS

While this is an idea supported by 45 percent of adults, according to the Pew Research Center, it’s widely panned by experts, teachers and school resource officers. There is little research on the effect arming teachers would have on preventing mass school shootings, but study after study is clear on one thing: More guns leads to more gun violence. And in the context of a school, that could put children in danger. Setting aside the question of what an armed teacher would do with a splitsecond decision in the face of a shooter carrying an AR-15, there are other questions to consider. Where would the teacher store a gun in a way that’s accessible in a tragic event but safe from students? Who would pay for the gun and the training? Would the presence of a gun escalate everyday interactions with students? Right now, there’s simply no evidence that arming teachers would prevent mass school shootings. There’s little chance it will happen, since schools and teachers across the country have thus far strongly resisted the idea. And the potential for accidental gun violence further traumatizing kids is too high.

45. ENACT THE CONCEALED CARRY RECIPROCITY ACT

The first major gun-related piece of legislation acted on by Congress following two of the most deadly shootings in U.S. history (in Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs, Texas) would essentially allow any gun owner permitted to carry a concealed weapon in one state to do so in any other state. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 is one of the biggest priorities of the National Rifle Association, which proclaimed the vote a “watershed moment for Second Amendment rights,” and has long espoused the idea that the answer to gun violence is to arm more citizens. Opponents argue that reciprocity undermines states’ rights to regulate who can and cannot carry a concealed gun and essentially makes the least restrictive concealed-carry laws the law of the land. Some states, such as Idaho, generally do not require a permit to carry a concealed weapon. Empirical evidence has shown that armed citizens rarely stop gun violence. An FBI study of 160 active shooters from 2000 to 2013 found only five incidents that were

SARAH ARNOFF

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“March Before Our Lives” protesters crash SLC’s March for Our Lives rally on March 24.

ended after an armed, non-police officer intervened. Since 2007, people permitted to carry concealed guns have been responsible for nearly 1,200 deaths that did not qualify as self defense, according to the Violence Policy Center, a gun-safety group. Those deaths include 31 from mass shootings and 21 of law enforcement officers.

46. PASS “STAND YOUR GROUND” LAWS

This Legislative session, HB129, a “Stand Your Ground Law” was approved with a 7-3 vote by House Law Enforcement Committee but failed to pass the House. Nearly half of the United States has enacted some form of this law, which provides some immunity from prosecution “in the use of deadly force” when that person has a right to be there. The debate over stand-your-ground laws intensified after the 2012 death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin, whose killer was acquitted by a jury. Florida State Republican Sen. Dennis Baxley has attributed the overall decline in the state’s violent crime rate to its stand-your-ground law. However, research suggests the opposite: Violent crime fell across the nation— and states with stand-your-ground laws generally have higher firearm homicide rates than those that do not. While violent crime rates have steadily declined since the early ’90s, there is no research indicating the reduction is related to stand-your-ground laws.

47. ENCOURAGE MORE GUN OWNERSHIP

An armed population is a more polite population. It’s the “good guy with a gun” argument, a favorite of Second Amendment supporters. Essentially, more guns, more safety. But that reasoning has been widely debunked. An October 2017 article in the Scientific American says that in about “30 careful studies,” more guns lead to more crimes, including murder and rape. Fewer studies show the opposite. For instance, a 2015 study based on information from the FBI and CDC found that “firearm assaults were 6.8 times more common in the states with the most guns versus those with the least.” “When all but a few studies point in the same direction,” Scientific American wrote, “we can feel confident that the arrow is aiming at the truth—which is, in this case, that guns do not inhibit crime and violence but instead make it worse.” CW A version of this article appeared in The Inlander, a Spokane-based alt-weekly.


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SIMON AND SCHUSTER

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ISMAEL ARRIETA

COURTESY THANKSGIVING POINT

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, APRIL 19-25, 2018

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ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 4/19

THURSDAY 4/19

FRIDAY 4/20

TUESDAY 4/24

Nothing says spring quite like 55 acres sprouting almost 300,000 tulips of more than 100 unique varieties. Tulips are real-world phoenixes: If cared for correctly, they can re-bloom season after season, espousing living history and soon-to-awaken potential. At Thanksgiving Point’s 14th annual Tulip Festival, tulips from as long ago as 1595 are featured in an Antique Tulip Area. Given personal care the rest of the year from the Hortus Bulborum—a living museum in Limmen, Noord-Holland—these bulbs have been planted and replanted in a continuous stream of life and rebirth. The festival runs through May 5 in Thanksgiving Point’s Ashton Gardens. Aside from ancient tulips, the festival also provides attendees the chance to wander through sections of tulip-filled gardens devoted to themes like “Tulip Riot,” “Tulip Fashion Show,” “Italian Gardens” and, for the bibliophiles out there, the “Secret Garden,” to name a few. Dutch traditions—as well as scavenger hunts, weekly vendor and food truck markets, dancing and more—are also part of the agenda. On the festival’s final day, events culminate with a 7:30 p.m. concert by the American Heritage Lyceum Orchestra, which is included in the price of the day’s admission. Once the event concludes, attendees can take a floral souvenir home with them, with the formerly planted tulip bulbs sold at $4 per dozen, to rise again in gardens all across Utah. (Casey Koldewyn) Thanksgiving Point Tulip Festival @ Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, 801-768-2300, through May 5, Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., $15-$20, thanksgivingpoint.org

SALT Contemporary Dance founder and creative director Michelle Nielsen calls Utah “a dancing state,” one where dance studios dot every suburban street, and where multiple professional companies thrive. In such an environment, she believes there’s a uniquely important place for a company focused on contemporary dance. “Contemporary dance is really the evolution of ballet and modern dance,” Nielsen says. “We have companies that do classic work, and that will always be there. It’s classic, it’s foundational and it’s what our dancers train in on a daily basis. What we have needed is contemporary.” SALT marks the conclusion of its fifth anniversary season providing that contemporary flavor with an eclectic program of world-premiere choreography. Among those is a new work by celebrated Spanish choreographer Gustavo Ramírez Sansano, and bringing him to Utah involved a two-year process of fund-raising. His piece, set to pop music, includes among its components a sequence where two dancers attempt to lower an orange to the ground with their bodies. That’s exactly the kind of work Nielsen is thinking of when she describes SALT’s mission to collect and showcase the most innovative voices in the field. “We want Utah audiences to have a front-row seat for what is on the cusp of the field globally,” Nielsen says. “Who are the buzz artists: Have you seen that? Have you seen what they’re doing? … I want the theme of the show to feel like it’s ‘I haven’t seen that before.’ Things people are going to be surprised by, and excited about.” (Scott Renshaw) SALT Contemporary Dance Spring Concert @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 18-20, 7:30 p.m., $25, saltdance.com

When Pygmalion Theatre Co. artistic director Frances Pruyn got the opportunity to be part of the rolling world premiere of Red Bike, she knew the play’s unusual format would be well worth the challenge. The bones of the script are written in tight poetic verses, so the flesh and stage direction of the play are left largely to the director and crew. “I said to myself, ‘I must do this show,’ because I see it as such an interdisciplinary piece of theater,” Pruyn says. “It’s storytelling through the device of not only the epic poem that it is, but also through music, movement, drumming and shadows that are all used to forward the plot.” Since the interior landscape of the story is so abstract, she needed to find a special kind of cast that could work with her as a team to create a unique interpretive vision. “I chose my cast for their ability to work together as an ensemble and because they weren’t married to traditional stage methodologies,” Pruyn says. “I needed actors that could play!” In this twisted vision of the American Dream, even the titular red bike itself becomes a silent character, and so can your own—whatever color it might be. Working together with the SLC Bicycle Collective, if you bring a bike to the show for donation, it will become a special set piece for the night, you’ll get $5 off your ticket price and you just might make someone else’s American Dream a little better. (Samantha Herzog) Pygmalion Theatre Co.: Red Bike @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, April 20-May 5, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., $15-$20, artsaltlake.org

As Jeff Benedict—co-author with Armen Keteyian of Tiger Woods, a tell-all book about the rise and rapid fall of the enigmatic golfing icon—points out, there are only a handful of celebrities known by one name: Elvis, Prince, Madonna. But in the sports world, Tiger Woods—make that “Tiger”—remains one of the most readily recognized individuals on the planet. Mickey Mantle, Mohamed Ali and Michael Jordan were sports heroes of legendary proportion, but few athletes scaled higher heights, or suffered more humiliating disgrace, than that which marked Tiger’s career. Benedict calls Tiger’s decline the steepest and swiftest in sports history. At one point, Tiger was among the wealthiest individuals in professional sports, worth an estimated $1 billion. He was admired and inspiring, causing the biggest corporations to clamor for him and beg for his endorsements. However, his sudden downfall in November 2009—a perfect storm resulting from an infidelity scandal, sex addiction, prescription drug dependency, divorce and an arrest for DUI—turned that image upside-down, costing him millions and threatening his career. Which makes his comeback in recent months all the more remarkable. “It’s so much more than a sports story,” Benedict says. “Tiger’s return is a human-interest story. His vulnerabilities have finally made him relatable. There is nothing quite as compelling as redemption.” Or, hearing the author share his Tiger tale from a personal perspective. In literary circles, this is the equivalent of a hole in one. (Lee Zimmerman) Jeff Benedict: Tiger Woods @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, April 24, 7 p.m., signing line reserved for those who purchase the book from the store, kingsenglish.com

Thanksgiving Point Tulip Festival

SALT Contemporary Dance Spring Concert

Pygmalion Theatre Co.: Red Bike

Jeff Benedict: Tiger Woods


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Failing Up

We need to allow our heroic narratives to address what happens when we fall. BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

“W

hy do we fall?” Thomas Wayne rhetorically asks his son in Batman Begins. His answer? “So that we can learn to pick ourselves up.” This is the central conceit in heroic narratives. Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey revolves around that cycle of failure and learning, and it’s embedded in almost all of geekdom’s great storytelling, designed to show us hope through the darkest parts of our journeys. Sometimes, however, fandom can rebel, especially in an age of instant gratification. The cliffhangers that used to keep us questioning now feel like flaws or mistakes to many fans. How would the reaction to the bleak ending of The Empire Strikes Back play out today? Our heroes are scattered to the wind: Han Solo is trapped in carbonite, Luke is a mess who has lost his hand and found out who is father is. This spells bad news for the galaxy. “How in the world are they going to get out of this one?” we’re left asking. In the moment, Empire seemed unsatisfying—it’s a film without a neat and tidy ending. When Return of the Jedi came out, we saw the resolution of Empire. As a result, that “unsatisfying” middle chapter cemented its reputation as, arguably, the best of the Star Wars films. The same pattern is repeated in 2017’s yet-to-be-resolved The Last Jedi. In that film, Luke Skywalker sacrifices himself to save a handful of Resistance fighters, few enough by this point that the entirety of that rebellion can fit aboard the Millennium Falcon. Things are bleak. And a small, vocal band of fans revolted.

big SHINY ROBOT

The discourse was anything but civil. Director Rian Johnson even received death threats. This group didn’t like not seeing the happily ever after they expected. They didn’t like seeing Poe Dameron make bad decisions. They didn’t like watching Rey fail so hard that she inadvertently helped Ben Solo/ Kylo Ren become the unhinged leader of the First Order. And they certainly didn’t like watching the Resistance get torn to pieces. The Last Jedi might not have given us the heroes we wanted, but I’ll be damned if they weren’t the heroes we needed. We needed to see their failures in order to pave way for future success, and their eventual victory will be all the sweeter. Why else do we fall? Would Frodo have gotten the ring to Mount Doom had the fellowship not broken? Would Bruce Wayne have become Batman without the guilt of failing to save his parents? Would Harry Potter have defeated Voldemort had he not learned the lessons from Cedric Diggory’s death? It’s doubtful any of those heroes would have succeeded without what appeared at the time to be failures. All of this has me worried about how audiences might react to the impending release of Avengers: Infinity War. It’s the first part of a two-part story involving what looks to be the end of the Avengers as we currently know them. If you’ve read the comics the film is loosely inspired by, you know that things don’t go well for our heroes. In fact, in the comics, Thanos kills pretty much the entire Marvel Universe of heroes. They fail. They fail pretty hard. And it’s going to be brutal to see it play out onscreen. But the surviving heroes, at least in the comics, learn from those failures, and eventually overcome them. That’s what the entire hero’s journey is about. Will fans learn from their reaction to The Last Jedi as they watch their favorite heroes from The Avengers get pulled apart? I hope so. Like Master Yoda reminds us in The Last Jedi, “The greatest teacher, failure is.” CW

LUCASFILM

28 | APRIL 19, 2018

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A&E


moreESSENTIALS

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Photographer Howie Garber shows fascinating landscape and nature images in Fine Art Photography from the American West and Beyond at Evolutionary Healthcare Gallery (461 E. 200 South) through the month of April, with a Gallery Stroll reception on Friday, April 20, 6-9 p.m.

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

Bert Kreischer Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, April 19, 7:30 p.m.; April 20-21, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Dan Cummins Wiseguys West Jordan 3763 W. Center Park Drive, April 20-21, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Marcus and Guy Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., April 20-21, 21+, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Science On Tap Presents an Evening with the Most Interesting Seismologist in the World Piper Down Pub, 1492 S. State, April 19, 7 p.m., 21+, piperdownpub.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

APRIL 19, 2018 | 29

George Handley: A Sense of Place: Cause or Solution to Our Environmental Crisis? Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, April 19, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jeff Benedict: Tiger Woods The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, April 24, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 26) Lorraine Massey: Silver Hair: A Handbook Curly Hair Studio, 500 S. 1555 Stratford Ave., April 20, 5 p.m., curlyhairstudio.com Matthew Bowman: Christian: The Politics of a Word in America The King’s English

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LITERATURE

SALT in Concert Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through April 20, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 26) The Shakespeare Suite Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through April 21, dates and times vary, balletwest.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

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DANCE

Browning String Trio Val A. Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, April 20, 7:30 p.m., weber.edu/cahcalendar Humanity Unleashed Ragan Theater at UVU, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, April 25, 7:30 p.m., uvu.universitytickets.com Sing the Frescos at St. Francis Saint Francis of Assisi Church, 65 E. 500 North, Orem, 801-8637529, April 19, 7:30 p.m., uvu.universitytickets.com SUU Wind Symphony Concert Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, April 20, 7:30 p.m., suu.edu/pva Utah Symphony: Alexandra Dariescu: Grieg’s Piano Concerto Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, April 20-21, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org

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Ass Utah Museum of Fine Arts Dumke Auditorium, 410 Campus Center Dr., April 20, 7:30 p.m.; April 21, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., pioneertheatre.org Cabaret Noorda Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, through April 28, dates and times vary, uvu.edu Camelot CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through May 12, dates and times vary, centerpointtheatre.org Candide Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, April 20-21, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu The Christians Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, through May 6, times and dates vary, goodcotheatre.com The Drowsy Chaperone Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through April 30, FridaySaturday & Monday, 7 p.m., drapertheatre.org Fun Home Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through May 13, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Hamilton Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, April 11-May 6, broadway-at-the-eccles.com The Music Man Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through June 9, dates and times vary, hct.org Othello New World Shakespeare, 2225 S. 600 East, April 19-28, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., newworldshakespeare.org Red Bike Rose Wagner Center Black Box Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, April 20-May 5, dates and times vary, pygmalionproductions.org (see p. 26) Tuck Everlasting Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through May 31, dates and times vary, hct.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY


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PERRY’S EGYPTIAN THEATER • OGDEN • MAY 17TH @ 8:00PM TO THE REPUBLICAN STATE DELEGATES:

We ask that your vote does NOT go for Mitt Romney; he is a fake, a phony, and an Orrin Hatch clone. Paid for by Wade Marshall Miller dermille1960@yahoo.com


moreESSENTIALS Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 21, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Paula Longhurst: A Shot of Treason The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, April 25, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Tween Author Boot Camp Provo City Library at Academy Square, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-484-9100, April 24, 3;45 p.m., tweenabc.com

TALKS & LECTURES

The Leonardo After Hours & Womenpreneurs: The Pitch 2.0: How & Who to Pitch for Results The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, April 25, 5 p.m., theleonardo.org 2018 Lectures in Entrepreneurship Series: Wendy Bird Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-832-2682, April 25, 6:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu 2018 Lectures in Entrepreneurship Series: Brian Sather Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-832-2682, April 25, 8 p.m., westminstercollege.edu

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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APRIL 19, 2018 | 31

Bob Hope: An American Treasure Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through April 28, culturalcelebration.org Blue Nude Migration Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, through May 12, slcpl.org Cory Dumont: Artwork Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through April 26, times vary, slcpl.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 26, utahmoca.org Ditchbank: Paintings and Ceramics Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, April 21-June 15, times vary, slcpl.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 13, utahmoca.org

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Dragon Lights SLC Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, through May 6, dragonlightsslc.com Gypsy Caravan Motorcycle & Tatoo Show Addictive Behavior Motoworks, 454 S. 500 West, 385-549-2181, April 21, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., facebook.com/travellingypsy Mommy and Me Fairy Tea Party Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, West Jordan, 801-566-8903, through May 12, Saturdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m., gardnervillage.com The Sharing Place’s 25th Birthday Carnival The Sharing Place, 1695 E. 3300 South, April 21, noon-4 p.m., thesharingplace.org Thanksgiving Point Tulip Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, 801-7682300, through May 5, Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.8 p.m., thanksgivingpoint.org (see p. 26) Woodland Fairy Festival Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, 801-566-8903, through June 23, times vary, gardnervillage.com

Ellen Marie Lewis: Visions Seldom All They Seem Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through April 20, slcpl.org Elizabeth M. Claffey: Matrilinear Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through May 11, granaryartcenter.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Familiar Flora: Four Visual Responses to Living With Plants Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through May 11, visualarts.utah.gov Florescentia: Works by Emily Fox King Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through May 4, visualarts.utah.gov Gavan Nelson: River Inside Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org Howie Garber: Fine Art Photography from the American West and Beyond Evolutionary Health Care Gallery, 461 E. 200 South, artist reception April 20, 6-9 p.m., evolutionaryhealthcare.com (see p. 29) In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through May 18, slcpl.org Intermountain Society of Artists Spring Show Visual Art Institute, 2901 S. Highland Drive, through April 29, visualartinstitute.org InVisible Monsters Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, April 20, 5:30-9 p.m., downtownartistcollective.org James W. Stewart: NIGHT and DAY Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through May 12, slcpl.org Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu LEGO City Blocks The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org Lenka Konopasek and Sarah Bown Roberts Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, April 20June 8, saltlakearts.org Mandelman & Ribak Exhibition Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Marcia Walke Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, through April 22, redbuttegarden.org Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 12, utahmoca.org Morgaine Fehlauer: Rituals God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, April 20-May 11, godhatesrobots.com Play On! Chase Home Museum of Utah Folk Arts, 1150 S. Constitution Drive, April 20-June 29; reception April 20, 6-9 p.m., heritage.utah.gov River Inside: Photographs by Gavan Nelson Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org Thomas B. Szalay: Images from Timeless Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 31, slcpl.org Todd Powelson: The Thunder, Perfect Mind Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., through April 21 Upcycle Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through April 29, reception April 20, 6-9 p.m., urbanartsgallery.org Urban Visions Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through April 29, urbanartsgallery.org Visions Seldom All They Seem: DoubleExposure Photography by Ellen Marie Lewis Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through April 20, slcpl.org

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KING

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Karim Bakery does Mediterranean and Middle Eastern dessert right.

a compact bakery and dining space attached, but once you try their transcendent take on traditional flavors, it’s easy to feel right at home. Karim Bakery is the passion project of Syrian

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Saturday, 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Best bet: The gooey pistachio baklava Can’t miss: The flavorful lamb shawarma

APRIL 19, 2018 | 33

If this phenomenon is something you have yet to experience, consider a visit to Karim Bakery (2575 S. State, 801-6454533, karimbakery.com). At first glance, it’s an unassuming Mediterranean market with

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N

o matter what country you’re in, bakeries are sugarglazed windows into the soul of a culture. There’s something magical and unifying that happens during your first few steps into a bakery—sharing the aromas of fresh bread and melting butter somehow makes us forget the things that make us different and instead embrace our similarities.

of surprisingly intense flavors, and its affordability makes it easy to get two or three—or four or five—to go. In true Mediterranean style, Karim Bakery isn’t about taking a deep dive into the sugary end of the dessert pool, which is one of the reasons it’s such an important part of our baking ecosystem. Every so often, I get into a baking rut where cookies, doughnuts and cakes run a bit too sweet for my sweet tooth. When I’m in such a rut, but still need something to satisfy my craving for bite-sized confections, Karim Bakery is sure to be on my rotation. Coupled with their comforting savory dishes and welcoming atmosphere, I’m happy to recommend that likeminded bakery aficionados do the same. CW

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

ent going on with Karim’s. The top layers of dough are light and pleasantly crunchy as it should be, but the nuts have a much rougher chop, yielding larger overall pieces in the filling. I wouldn’t have thought I’d be a fan; I like it when the nuts in my desserts are ground down to a powder, leaving only the ghost of their flavor behind. But the flavor that seeps into the dough and the thick layers of honey and syrup dig deep into the realm of caramelized, earthy goodness. And while I’ve eaten a lot of baklava, I feel like this was the first time I actually tasted flavors other than sweet. Recently, Karim started to offer more savory items like safeeha ($2), a housemade flatbread topped with finely ground beef, lamb and chopped tomatoes. These dishes are a bit like pizza’s healthier cousin— the toppings are lean and intensely seasoned, and they leave you pleasantly devoid of cheese grease. I’m currently obsessed with the shawarma ($2), as it is a simply prepared pastry filled with beautifully seasoned lamb that has been sliced gyro-style. It’s a perfect little pocket

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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Textures and Traditions

immigrants Abdulkarim Alhasnawy and Zahra Altahan along with their family, who have owned, operated and managed the space since August 2017. Their daughter Ihsan explains that all of them share responsibilities, which means they’re all professional and talented bakers. The menu includes a wide range of traditional Mediterranean and Middle Eastern items. Historically, treats from this region pre-date the spread of cane sugar, which is why texture is the star of the show and sweetness is only a backup dancer. Blankets of crisp phyllo dough keep crushed walnuts or pistachios and honey cozy within Karim’s famous baklava ($1.50 for walnut; $2 for pistachio); buttery maamoul cookies (85 cents) break open to reveal dense, luxurious fillings made from either chopped dates or pistachios; and the coconut-soaked basbousa cake (pictured; $1.50 a slice) is almost pudding-like. While a lot of local spots offer some variation of baklava, and it usually tastes good—honey, nuts and crunchy dough are tough to screw up—there’s something differ-


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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A Taste of Africa

Pierpont Place (163 W. Pierpont Ave., 801-5984444, pierpontplace.com) also hosts a delectable food event on Friday, April 20 for those interested in the cuisine of Mama Africa, one of Utah’s most venerated culinary treasures. Cathy Tshilombo-Lokemba (pictured above) made a name for herself as Mama Africa during her many appearances at local events like the Downtown Farmers Market, Craft Lake City and other public gatherings. She specializes in glazed ribs, samosas and fried plantains, all of which are on display at the event. To top off a truly multicultural experience, the food is accompanied by the music of Ngomba Africa. Doors open at 6 p.m and admission is $25.

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Under the Sea Sips

For those who prefer to dine with fish instead of on fish, the Loveland Living Planet Aquarium (12033 Lone Peak Parkway, Draper, 801-355-3474, thelivingplanet.com) is hosting a bacon-themed Sips Under the Sea dining event on Friday, April 20. It’s worth noting that when they say “bacon-themed,” they mean a seven-course meal featuring everyone’s favorite crispy cured pork in its porcine glory. As the title implies, sipping is also a big part of the evening, with a cash bar stocked with beer, wine and cocktails. The menu definitely has bacon-lovers in mind—dishes like candied pig strips with maple dipping sauce and Sriracha pork belly and pineapple skewers promise to deliver the sweet-meets-salty kick that’s made bacon more popular than ever. The event lasts from 7-11 p.m., and tickets are $39.95 per person ($5 discount for aquarium members).

Drafts Burger Bar

Longtime fans of Drafts Sports Bar & Grill at the Westgate Park City Resort & Spa (3000 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, 435-655-2270, westgatedestinations.com/drafts) have voiced their desire for a more burger-focused joint, and lo, Drafts Burger Bar was born. What was once a place that maintained a casual relationship with burgers is now a haven for spectacular burger craftsmanship. As if that wasn’t good enough, Drafts Burger Bar has also developed a line of batshit crazy milkshakes, such as the Wake Me Up Before You Coco, adorned with a whole chocolate donut, and the Vanilla Ice, equipped with a Hostess Twinkie.

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APRIL 19, 2018 | 35

Dining

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Straight and Narrow RoHa Brewing Project’s beers keep it classic. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

he RoHa Brewing Project has been working hard to push the concept of non-gimmicky beers to Utah’s craftbeer lovers. This isn’t easy in a climate that craves weird beer. While RoHa’s owners aren’t opposed to a little crazy in your mug now and then, they know that once you get your fill of açai berry barley wines, you’ll want your tastes readjusted with a few tried-and-true brews. I got a chance to sample two of RoHa’s newest offerings. Maltese Cross: This beer has a crystalclear orange-brown color with deep ruby highlights on the edges. Surprisingly, I get cake aromas as soon as I raise my glass. Were it not for the toastiness on the nose, it would come off like red velvet cake—lots of cereal, caramel, brown sugar and a hint

of coconut. The hops start to pull you away from the confection side of the spectrum with herbaceous and pine notes, with a low level of fruit scents as well. Flavor-wise, we’re in the same ballpark: Toasty grains and sweet caramel are immediately noticeable, with a bit of vanilla-bean sweetness backing it up. You might also detect some faint berry notes coming from the beer’s barley base. Before this begins to become overly cloying, hop bitterness slides in with pine and a slight herbal bite. The finish is semi-malty and ghostly fruity—lightbodied, fluffy and with a moderately carbonated mouth feel. The 4 percent ABV is light, and allows for another round. Overall: This beer is true neutral: If you order an ale, without any qualifiers, this is what the barman should hand you. Maltese Cross shines in its simplicity. Its strong malt backbone and the simple/subtle hop aromas and flavors keep it from getting overly complex. It’s also worth noting that it’s made in cooperation with Salt Lake City’s Local 81 Firefighters. Proceeds from the sale of Maltese Cross go to benefit charities supported by the Utah chapter of the International Association of Firefighters. Nights Out: This brand-new stout is a Belgian style that pours a mostly clear dark brown and yields three fingers of light tan head. The aroma is roasty, just as you’d expect, but there’s also the addition of spicy

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yeast notes, along with a touch of chocolate. Normally, I’d like more of a punch in the nose, but in this case, too much phenolic yeast combined with the char from the malt would be heavily medicinal and off-putting. The taste here has lightly roasted flavors and some spicy yeast up front—definitely Belgian in style. Some caramel and roasted notes come next, with touches of milk chocolate on the back of the tongue. Hints of bitter chocolate are in the finish, as well. The 8 percent ABV adds body without much heat. Overall: A solid beer, but Belgian stouts seem to exist in that realm between roasted chocolate and spicy/fruity flavors. They’re

kind of caught in the middle somewhere. This one is interesting and flavorful enough, but doesn’t really come out boldly and make a statement. Check it out if you’re a fan of the style (or stouts in general), but not if you’re craving a Belgian dark ale. RoHa currently offers seven packaged beers (high and low point) and a half-dozen or so draft options. One of my favorite features of their Salt Lake City brewhouse pub is their “buy a drink” board. Look it over, because someone might have anonymously bought you a beer. Conversely, you can also pay it forward and share the beer love. As always, cheers! CW


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Riverhorse on Main

Riverhorse on Main is a pioneering eatery of sorts: Established in 1987, it was one of the first finedining restaurants to enter the now competitive Park City market. The craftily prepared meals look almost like artwork, and the ultra slick and modern interior is equally impressive. As far as the fare goes, there’s something special about the grilled local rack of lamb, served with cuminscented couscous, honey, cucumber-mint relish and cauliflower. 540 Main, Park City, 435649-3536, riverhorseparkcity.com

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APRIL 19, 2018 | 37

RESTAURANT

3

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THE OTHER PLACE

The Salt Lake Valley let out a collective wail of mourning when Hector’s announced it would no longer serve its unparalleled Mexican grub 24 hours a day, and instead close its doors at a reasonable hour (8 p.m.). Although you can’t get your smothered burrito fix in the early light of dawn anymore, Hector’s still stands at the pinnacle of local Mexican takeout, and is the go-to for customers from all walks of life. For a meal on the go, there’s no wrong choice, though the carnitas torta is a must-try. 2901 E. 3300 South, 801-487-3850

old jews telling jokes

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Hector’s

APR 21ST

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Go

This movie-theater-turned-restaurant serves fresh and unique pizzas and calzones. Start off with their breadsticks and Killer Cheese Dip: artichoke heart, spinach and sun dried tomatoes mixed into three melty, delicious cheeses. Move on to a specialty pizza like the pesto chicken or enjoy your selection in calzone form. You also can have complete control with the build-your-own options, and wash it all down with a local brew. 2010 S. State, 801-483-2120

deli man w/ pat & roy

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As it proclaims on its website, this eatery “takes their dawgs seriously.” With top-quality meat in their Polish and beef hot dogs, daily baked buns and a housemade sauce from a generations-old family recipe, Oscar Mayer these wieners are not. The owner pawned his Fender Telecaster to fund the opening of the original Provo location, and J. Dawgs has since spread to several spots along the Wasatch. Their simple menu and tasty food make it easy to see why they’re so popular: dawg, drink and chips—what more do you need? Multiple locations, jdawgs.com

@

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REVIEW BITES

El Cabrito

Despite it being the most consumed red meat in the world, goat has yet to catch on widely stateside. Rose Park’s El Cabrito is the best spot for curious carnivores interested in giving goat a try. The interior is a pleasant throwback to its authentic Mexican roots; the stucco walls are painted to resemble aging adobe and exposed brick, transporting the diner to a location that could easily be found closer to the southern border. Goat novitiates will want to start with the tacos de chivo ($2.25), served street-style on El Cabrito’s housemade tortillas with a generous helping of meat, a dish of salsa, onions, cilantro and several sauces. The meat is slow-roasted, letting the goat’s lean, slightly sweet flavor shine through. The carnitas burrito ($6.99) just might be the acme of burrito evolution: slathered in green chile and a healthy dose of melted Oaxaca cheese, stuffed with slow-roasted pork carnitas, rice, beans … and that’s it. Despite its unassuming presentation, this burrito could take down just about every other one I’ve eaten to date. Even if you’re not ready to give goat a try, trust me: The carnitas alone are well worth the trip. Reviewed March 22. 956 W. 1000 North, 801-363-2645


FILM REVIEW

Studio Sessions

CINEMA

OF THE TO PHO WEEK

An artist and his subject collide in Final Portrait.

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Armie Hammer and Geoffrey Rush in Final Portrait only be done on film. The camera gets so close to Hammer’s unnaturally still face as he poses, but this isn’t a replication of human intimacy, as a filmic close-up usually represents: Rush’s Giacometti is sitting across the studio and doesn’t have this view of his subject—at least not visually. As the painter translates what he sees into impressionistic brushstrokes on the canvas, Tucci’s eye—wielded by cinematographer Danny Cohen’s camera—is Giacometti’s imaginary one. “You have the head of a brute,” he tells his subject. (The handsome Hammer, not a bad stand-in for the handsome Lord, doesn’t look like a brute to us.) But Lord also shouldn’t worry about this because “I’ll never be able to paint you as I see you.” What value does his interpretation of Lord have, then? The eternal question of all art, then, is here in Final Portrait: What’s it for? What does it mean? Does it mean anything at all? Wisely, Tucci declines to presume he has all the answers. CW

FINAL PORTRAIT

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BBB Geoffrey Rush Armie Hammer Tony Shalhoub Rated R

TRY THESE Frida (2002) Salma Hayek Alfred Molina R

Girl With a Pearl Earring (2003) Scarlett Johansson Colin Firth PG-13

Mr. Turner (2014) Timothy Spall Paul Jesson R

APRIL 19, 2018 | 39

Big Night (1996) Stanley Tucci Tony Shalhoub R

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while Lord—suffering from the “physical and psychological strain” of posing— seems to become infected with Giacometti’s capriciousness and cruelty. Is his art worth the pain he inflicts on everyone around him? His wife, Annette Arm (Sylvie Testud), takes the brunt of it, as he ignores her in favor of his prostitute mistress, Caroline (Clémence Poésy). Only his brother, Diego (Tony Shalhoub) seems immune— but then again, he’s another artist. Is his art worth his subject turning on the people waiting for him back in New York? As Lord postpones his flight again and again, his calls home to announce the delays become increasingly unpleasant to the unseen and unheard significant other on the telephone, as he defends the notion that the art must take priority over everything else. Must it, though? It’s left to you to make that decision. We see the portrait of Lord taking shape through many iterations here, and you can see the actual painting at the website for Christie’s auction house, which says it’s “among the best known of [Giacometti’s] works on canvas.” You can read the memoir Lord wrote about this experience, which surely influenced—but is not the sole source for—Tucci’s script. Perhaps Tucci’s uniquely cinematic take on this singular moment in the artist’s history—one of his last works before his death in 1966— will help you decide. Tucci’s script might almost work as a mostly two-man stage play, but how he deploys the camera’s perspective could

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n 1964 Paris, Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti (Geoffrey Rush) invites a friend, American journalist James Lord (Armie Hammer), to sit for a portrait. Lord is about to fly home to New York in a few days, but Giacometti promises that this favor to him will require “two to three hours, an afternoon at the most.” Spoiler (not really): It takes quite a bit longer than that. Writer-director Stanley Tucci’s, well, portrait of how friendship is tested between the always irascible Giacometti and the usually unflappable Lord begins as a bleakly funny gloss on the clichés of temperamental creative genius. Rush is a crotchety delight as the self-described “neurotic” artist who proclaims that portraiture is “meaningless … and impossible” (even as he engages in the form) since photography became a thing, and despairs that his work is never finished, even stuff that he’s shown publicly. Both director and actor play the artist’s selfdoubt, even at this late stage of a hugely successful career, as part of the bitter humor; Rush’s constant anguished refrain of “Oh fuck!” as he sits at the easel is funnier than it has any right to be. But there’s also sly irony: Any creative person, no matter how successful—including, I am certain, Tucci and Rush themselves—can give in to insecurity about their own talents. And if Portrait doesn’t have a lot of sympathy for Giacometti and his wildly swinging moods, it certainly has a touch of self-deprecation to it. Among other of the film’s aspects, the grays of its palette, echoing the clay of Giacometti’s studio and the paints of his pallet, seem to speak to a certain misery of spirit. The near-farce of Portrait’s first half, though, slowly morphs into something almost genteelly warped. The artist reveals some startling violent fantasies to Lord,

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CINEMA CLIPS

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NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net FINAL PORTRAIT BBB See review on p. 39. Opens April 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) I FEEL PRETTY [not yet reviewed] An insecure woman (Amy Schumer) awakens from a bump on the head convinced she’s beautiful and capable. Opens April 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) LEANING INTO THE WIND: ANDY GOLDSWORTHY BBBB Seventeen years since director Thomas Riedelsheimer visited with environmental artist Andy Goldsworthy in Rivers and Tides, time plays even more of a role, as this documentary explores a man whose creations are often designed around planned impermanence. Riedelsheimer has a gift for capturing the beauty of Goldsworthy’s transitory work—dust tossed into a shaft of sunlight—and observes silently long enough for special moments to appear. While it’s always tricky to let artists talk about themselves and their work, Goldsworthy reveals enough to allow an understanding of how the mortality that has always been part of his work feels more present as he grows older. It’s startling to see his daughter Holly as a child in footage from Rivers and Tides, now old enough to serve as his assistant, and his fascination with rock creations that feel like tombs carries unusual weight.

If Riedelsheimer did nothing but create a record of momentary works of art, it would be lovely enough; it’s also surprisingly touching at capturing the momentary nature of life. Opens April 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw SUPER TROOPERS 2 [not yet reviewed] The Broken Lizard comedy troupe follows up their 2001 comedy about bumbling Vermont state troopers. Opens April 20 at theaters valleywide. (R) YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE BBBB Lynne Ramsay’s haunting adaptation of Jonathan Ames’ novel feels like an impressionist gloss on Logan. It takes a full 20 minutes for it to be clear whether Joe (Joaquin Phoenix) is a hero or a villain, and there’s a thin line between the two in his work as a brutal freelance investigator tracking down missing and exploited children. His latest case involves applying his trusty ball peen hammer to those prostituting the runaway daughter of a New York state senator, but it quickly turns more dangerous than Joe expected. Phoenix delivers a stellar internalized performance as a ronin trying to save his soul by saving others. But the real star here is Ramsay’s direction, bringing intensity and efficiency to a story where an assault on a brothel for underage girls plays out through grainy security camera footage, and Joe’s lifetime of trauma emerges in brief, jarring flashbacks explaining the scars on his body and his psyche. It’s a tale of monsters created by their past, trying to focus their monstrous wrath on those who have it coming. Opens April 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS FACES PLACES At Utah Museum of Fine Art, April 25, 7 p.m. (NR) FIVE SEASONS: THE GARDENS OF PIET OUDOLF At Main Library, April 24, 7 p.m. (NR) FOXTROT At Park City Film Series, April 20-21, 8 p.m. & April 22, 6 p.m. (R) REBELS ON POINTE At Main Library, April 19, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES BLOCKERS BB.5 Three parents (Leslie Mann, John Cena and Ike Barinholtz) discover that their daughters all plan to lose their virginity on prom night, so they set out to thwart the deflowerings. If the premise seems retrograde, the script tap-dances around the idea in a way that makes the parents’ machinations somewhat sympathetic—though the comic timing of Cena, Mann and newcomer Geraldine Viswanathan also helps make those machinations funny. Yet while many of the jokes land, they land in the middle of a story that keeps reminding you it’s about both coming-of-age and coming-of-middle age. There’s no need to apologize for, e.g. a punch line built on a beer enema, like old-timey sex films pretended to be “educational” about marital relations. I’ll take my ass beer with no chaser, thanks. (R)—SR FINDING YOUR FEET BBB.5 When snooty Sandra (Imelda Staunton) discovers that her husband is cheating on her, she flees her English countryside manor to the cramped London flat of her free-spirited, longestranged sister, Bif (Celia Imrie). Sandra seems awful at first as she bursts into Bif’s life, and just as we’re about to grumble, “Who the hell do you think you are?” Bif does so herself. The story settles into a tart, ultimately life-affirming dramedy that’s edgier and far less predictable than it has any right to be. Director Richard Loncraine guides Staunton and Imrie in shaping the surface clichés of both characters into complex, warm portraits of aging women struggling to make the most of the years they have left, even if they decide they want different things out of them. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

FOXTROT BBB.5 Writer/director Samuel Maoz’ drama opens with a visit from Israeli Army officers to the home of Michael Feldman (Lior Ashkenazi) and his wife, informing them that their son, Jonathan, was killed in action. The first act seems to be a compelling study of repressed male grief, but then there’s a shift, focusing on Checkpoint Foxtrot where Jonathan (Yonathan Shiray) is stationed, and suddenly it becomes a story of guilt, as Maoz employs a God’s-eye-view camera perspective to emphasize characters being judged from on high. Then it shifts again, adding additional force to both key thematic ideas. If Maoz gets a little cutesy with literalizing the title of his movie, he earns leeway with a mix of bold visuals and even bolder storytelling. (R)—SR ISLE OF DOGS BBB.5 Twenty years in the future in a fictional Japanese city, all dogs have been exiled to Trash Island after outbreaks of “dog flu” and “snout fever.” Then 12-year-old Atari (Koyu Rankin) sneaks onto the island to try to find his dog, Spots, assisted by proud stray Chief (Bryan Cranston) and his pals. Wes Anderson’s stopmotion tale is delightful and utterly original—deliciously odd and pulling off the rare feat of being both funny and sad. But has Anderson engaged in unseemly appropriation of Japanese culture? Aside from one human character who has a tinge of “white savior” about her, this looks and feels like an affectionate homage to Japanese pop culture from anime to monster movies. Is it OK to enjoy such exoticism, as long as you don’t mistake it for true appreciation or understanding? (PG-13)—MAJ RAMPAGE BB.5 In a movie about 50-foot mutant animals, you shouldn’t be noticing implausibilities unrelated to 50-foot mutant animals. Dwayne Johnson plays Davis Okoye, a former Special Forces operative who has made a career change to studying primates—as one does. Three critters, including Okoye’s albino gorilla pal, are exposed to an experimental toxin, and suddenly monstrous beasts are attacking Chicago. Jeffrey Dean Morgan gets an enjoyable scenerychewing role, and it’s exciting once the creatures start fighting each other rather than simply swatting down helicopters. It’s just sluggish enough of the time that you might wonder how Johnson’s character spends the final half hour running around with a gunshot wound to the abdomen, clutching it occasionally as if to say, “Oh yeah, I should be almost dead.” (PG-13)—SR

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CONCERT PREVIEW

Defying Expectations

MUSIC

Wild Child’s new album shows off a willingness to be playful and experimental. BY HOWARD HARDEE comments@cityweekly.net

Wild Child

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Righteous Brothers. True to the spirit of Wild Child, the members of the band were all for it. “Those guys were in such a cool headspace,” McMicken says. “They were so open-minded and so willing to try it out, thankfully. If they weren’t, I probably wouldn’t have pushed very hard, but they were down for whatever.” For his part, Beggins appreciates that McMicken didn’t suffer from “demo-itis”—the inability to hear a song a different way than it was originally presented—and that he advocated for his own vision. McMicken also helped with the vocal arrangements. As a backup vocalist, Beggins provides an effortless and casual counterpoint to Wilson’s virtuosity as a soul singer. The way Beggins tells it, Wilson sang backup when Wild Child first formed, but then they started going back and forth more often as her voice developed “more grit and soul,” he says. Now, she’s stepping into the lead role, with Beggins mostly laying down foundational, low-end vocals and sometimes backing off entirely. As Wild Child’s primary songwriters, Beggins and Wilson usually figure out harmonies by sitting at a piano and experimenting with chord combinations—the stranger, the better. “I think the vocal harmonies are pretty pivotal for our music,” Beggins says. “Kelsey is so good at finding different ones quickly, so we can play around with them, and it’s usually the weirder harmonies that just seem right. Then we run them through different effects and use different mics and whatnot. That’s the really fun part of the recording process, for us. We love clowning around with different sounds.” CW

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SEAN DAIGLE

O

WILD CHILD

w/ Stelth Ulvang Kilby Court 741 S. Kilby Court Monday, April 23, 7 p.m. $15 (sold out at press time) kilbycourt.com

APRIL 19, 2018 | 41

n the set of a music video recently shot in Terlingua, Texas, the leaders of the indie-pop band Wild Child— Kelsey Wilson and Alexander Beggins—did a live take of their new song, “The One.” There happened to be an outdoor bathtub on the property, so they filled it with bubbles and Wilson got in on a whim. In fading daylight, the duo delivered a hair-raisingly beautiful performance of the plainspoken folk song. “It was a last-minute thing to do it that way,” Beggins recalls. “The cameras were set up and the crew was like, ‘You’ve got two takes before the sun goes down, so don’t fuck it up.’ But, yeah, it came out cool. A lot of music videos feel cliché and storyboarded, so it’s nice to bounce strange ideas off the wall.” The video certainly is strange. It shows a fully clothed Beggins strumming his ukulele and trading verses with Wilson, whose body is covered only by rapidly disappearing bubbles. Their voices interweaving in harmony, they sing together: “We don’t mind staying up all night/ Because we talk a lot sweeter with booze/ Never can remember even half of the fights/ But you’ll never forget when I lose.” The song is simultaneously goofy and touching, which is a good way to describe most of Wild Child’s four-album catalog dating back to 2011’s Pillow Talk. The spirit of the music is a reflection of the seven carefree personalities that make up the mini-pop orchestra, and it permeates their new album, Expectations. Speaking with City Weekly ahead of Wild Child’s April 23 local stop, Beggins says they worked with several producers to create Expectations. The Austin, Texas-based group traveled to locations as far-flung as ex-Death Cab for Cutie guitarist Chris Walla’s studio in Tromsø, Norway, and a makeshift setup in Wilson’s abandoned childhood home in Wimberley, Texas. The result is a multifaceted album cobbled together from wildly different recording experiences, covering styles as disparate as the disco-funk of “Think It Over” and the soul-inspired “Back and Forth.” The songs don’t have much in common sonically, but they’re held together by the lyrical theme of personal awakening in the aftermath of heartbreak. The album’s dreamy closing track, “Goodbye Goodnight,” was recorded at the home-built studio of Dr. Dog’s Scott McMicken in Philadelphia. Rather than assuming a traditional producer’s role, McMicken picked up a bass and essentially joined the band for the four-day session. “It worked well with Wild Child because we were vibing on a basic level,” McMicken says. “The truest criterion that defines the quality of a recording session ends up being the vibe—like, if we laughed a lot. It’s not too heady a process, and certainly not one that allows a lot of stress and anxiety. With those guys, we had a kinship on that level because they’re joyous people. I just thought of myself as another member of the band—not the boss of the situation, but another head in the mix, you know?” The demo version of “Goodbye Goodnight” was more up-tempo, but McMicken encouraged the band to slow it down, fall into a 6-by-8 shuffle and adopt an old-time aesthetic à la Elvis or The


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BY RANDY HARWARD & LEE ZIMMERMAN

—LOCATIONS— 6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

SAM CRUMP

677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

SATURDAY 4/21

Talia Keys & the Love album release, Dale James

“I am here to fuck shit up,” Talia Keys says in her bio touting the release of We’re Here (taliakeys.com), her second full-length album (not counting Soak Your Meat in This, her 2012 debut as a member of Marinade). She follows this proclamation with a shit-specific checklist: “Music. Politics. Stereotypes. Patriarchy. Hatred. Judgement. Gender Roles.” With a to-do list like that, it’s good that she’s got backup. Once again produced by local

Nick Passey

studio wiz Mike Sasich, We’re Here is the first album credited to Talia Keys & the Love, the band she’s been performing with for the past few years. Keys is already known for incendiary live performances with and without a band, but this group consists of four aces—drummer Dave Brogan (ALO, Incidental Animals, Mokie), keyboardist Ryan Conger (Joe McQueen Quartet, Earthestra), bassist Josh Olsen and backing vocalist Lisa Giacoletto. The musicians pour extra fuel on the album’s dozen fiery tracks including the reggaeinflected “Burn” (where Steve Miller’s “Fly Like an Eagle” meets Bob Marley’s “Get Up, Stand Up”), the fuzzy funk-rock jam “Rise Up” and the nimble hip-hop number “Closed Mouth”—making We’re

ERIC BATES

42 | APRIL 19, 2018

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LIVE

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Talia Keys & the Love Here a stunning personal and collective manifesto. (Randy Harward) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $15, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

Nick Passey vinyl release

Why pay a therapist when you can work out your worries through songwriting? Just Working Through Some Shit (nickpassey.com, 2017) came about when Folk Hogan frontguy Nick Passey’s therapist told him that, if nothing else, his problems were great song fodder. Without context, telling him to do something he already does seems like an obvious insight for $75 an hour. But reading between the lines, Passey’s therapist meant he should examine what was coming through his pen, but also to write with the intent of purging said metaphorical poop. “It’s cheaper than therapy/ to keep writin’ fourchord songs/ I always seem to find the friends that don’t mind singin’ along,” Passey sings on the title track. When his chorus of familiars answers, “Frankly, you’ve been worryin’ us with all your sad, sad songs,” Passey replies, “Everything’s just fine/ I’m just workin’ through some shit.” In that song, and the four that follow, he strays from Folk Hogan’s folk-punk tunes into territory more familiar to fans of musician-satirist Tom Lehrer, mope maven Mark Eitzel and wiseass stoner bard Todd Snider. This reveals Passey to be an artist with infinitely more to say—which makes his therapist’s advice psychologically, musically and financially sound. (RH) The Patio, 328 S. State, 10 p.m., free, 21+, nickpassey.com


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Brian Wilson with Al Jardine

One of the most iconic artists of our time— the man responsible for helping to expand the boundaries of pop music—Brian Wilson is also a tortured genius, a man whose battles with psychosis, dependency, insecurity and various shamans have taken their toll on his sanity and stability. It’s surprising— make that shocking—that Wilson found the stamina to return to the road, intent on reviving his aborted masterpiece Smile, to tout the 50th anniversary of his classic album Pet Sounds and celebrate a half century of the Beach Boys via 2012’s muchballyhooed reunion tour. Sadly, the harmony and happiness evoked by the latter didn’t last very long once his cousin and former collaborator Mike Love opted to fire the last surviving Wilson brother and abscond with the brand at the same time. Happily, Brian rebounded, enlisting original Beach Boy Al Jardine and transitional member Blondie Chaplin to carry on. With an ace backing band in tow, their performance not only revisits the group’s seminal classics, but provides an added authenticity by having

Rogue Wave

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ANDREW PAYNTER

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SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

Brian Wilson

the Beach Boys’ original instigator involved. Indeed, the opportunity to witness a living legend guarantees a memorable experience. Naturally, one can expect to hear the hits, but it’s the gentle journey back to a time when innocence and exuberance weren’t in such short supply that makes it sublime as well. (Lee Zimmerman) Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 8 p.m., $55-$80, tuacahn.org

WEDNESDAY 4/25

Rogue Wave: Asleep at Heaven’s Gate

Rogue Wave’s early opus Asleep At Heaven’s Gate—originally released in 2007, and recently reissued to mark its 10-year anniversary—is, by the band members’ own admission, still a highpoint of their fabled career. An album of shifting sentiments, expansive melodies and obvious ambition, it remains a source of pride and prominence, reflecting what their namesake Zach Rogue later described in a news release as “the most magical and productive time we ever had as a band.” Indeed, it’s evident now that it laid a foundation for a sound that’s not easily defined, but consistently peers upward regardless. As the band takes a victory lap to commemorate their milestone, they’ve opted to perform the album in full, giving its eloquence, intrigue and experimentation another opportunity to come to the fore. Rogue also noted, that at the time, the group was immersing themselves in some essential soundtracks—Tron, A Clockwork Orange and The Shining in particular—and it was the influence of the music’s composer, synthesizer pioneer Wendy Carlos, that informed their efforts. Those lessons were also tucked away for the future, and as their last effort—2016’s tellingly titled Delusions of Grand Fur—attests, ambiance and atmosphere remain as integral to their MO as the hook-laden songs they shadow. (LZ) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., 21+, $16 presale; $18 day of show, theurbanloungeslc.com


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MONDAYS 7:30PM TUESDAYS 9PM $4 JAMESON TRIVIA WITH BREAKING BINGO $5 SHOT & BEER THE TRIVIA FACTORY DAILY

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET OPEN NIGHTLY 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY 5 PM - 1 AM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19TH

SCIENCE ON TAP FRIDAY, APRIL 20TH

SATURDAY, APRIL 21ST

CORY MON W/ SIX FEET IN THE PINE

TONY HOLIDAY & THE VELVETONES

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

Saturday, April 21St

SNOOZY MOON W/ RIDING GRAVITY + THE ELDERS

THE KLAW, CITIZEN HYPOCRISY & VERONICA BLUE

Friday, April 20TH

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With Promo Code: SOUNDWAREHOUSE4X4 - receive a 20% discount on tickets purchased on-line. Visit www.slorex.com

PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

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TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 4/26/18

kitchen open until midnight 7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 • OPEN 11AM WEEKDAYS - 10 AM WEEKENDS

APRIL 19, 2018 | 45

10AM TO 7PM

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HOURS

FRIDAY 1PM- 9PM • SATURDAY 9AM-7PM


MARA ROBINSON

mc chris, Bitforce

serving locally produced beers & spirits

LIVE MUSIC

75+ BEERS AVAILABLE

CRAFT COCKTAILS - WINE - BEER

80’S NEW WAVE NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY 7PM-11PM W/ DJ BIRDMAN (RAFFLE PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS) FEATURING ONE OF EAST SIDE SALT LAKE’S BEST PATIOS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY OR EVENT AT ELIXIR!

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com SATURDAY, APRIL 21

MONDAYS

MICHELLE MOONSHINE BREAKING BINGO & THE DISTILLERS 9PM

$650

Mainstream nerdery has already conquered vast swathes of popular culture, and the world of hip-hop and heavy metal are no exceptions. In fact, with the rise of the nerdcore movement, these two seemingly unrelated musical genres have been some of geek culture’s most eager adopters. One of nerdcore’s pioneering members is Los Angelino mc chris, who earned his nerdy chops as the lead animator on some of Adult Swim’s foundational programming, including Sealab 2021, Space Ghost Coast to Coast and Aqua Teen Hunger Force. He’s released a total of 17 albums—the most recent being The April Fools Collection released via Bandcamp on April 1. It’s a mashup of hip-hop odes to characters like Ash Williams from Evil Dead (“detriment to the Deadites/ they might end up even deader/ I trap them then I blast them/ assassin wearing leather”) and Neville Longbottom from Harry Potter, plus meditations on David Lynch’s surreal Twin Peaks. Texas-based Bitforce joins mc chris for this leg of the tour, complementing the pop culture-obsessed hiphop with some metal remixes of classic music from old-school and contemporary video games, along with a few riffs on the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers for good measure. For better or worse, nerdcore is here to stay, and this particular lineup promises to officiate an unholy, polyamorous union among hip-hop, heavy metal and goofy-ass media references. (Alex Springer) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 6 p.m., 21+, $17 presale; $20 day of show, theurbanloungeslc.com

THURSDAY 4/19

PROUDLY

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46 | APRIL 19, 2018

FRIDAY 4/20

CONCERTS & CLUBS

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

Bill & Diane (The Yes Hell) CAM (The State Room) Coastlands + I Hear Sirens + Black Flak (Funk ’n’ Dive) Crooked Feathers + The Mystic + Uncle Fuzz (Velour) Jay Lawrence Quartet (Gallivan Center) Latin Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Meander Cat (Hog Wallow Pub) Reggae at the Royal w/ Servants + Makisi + The House of Roots Band (The Royal) Ripe + The Dip + Motion Coaster (Kilby Court) Sonnei + Stephanie Mabey + Julian Moon (Urban Lounge) Texas Hippie Coalition + Kobra & The Lotus + Brand of Julez + Granny 4 Barrel + Truce in Blood (Metro Music Hall) Watsky + Adam Vida & Invisible Inc. (The Depot)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE WEDNESDAYS

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Handsome Hands + DJ Brisk + DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Drew + Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Jake Lambros Quintet (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. 3LAU (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Funk ’n’ Dive) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 4/20 LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY

9PM - NO COVER JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


CONCERTS & CLUBS

GRAB A BITE

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET A.M. Bump (The Bayou) Book of Love (The State Room) Browning Trio (Val A. Browning Center for The Performing Arts) Bucky Cash & The The Low Point (Pat’s BBQ) Caleb Chapman (Velour) Charlie Henriksen (Dumke Recital Hall) Colt .46 (The Westerner) Dethrone The Sovereign + Classic Jack + A Traitor’s Last Breath + Founders of Ruin (Metro Music Hall) Donner Pass (The Spur) Echo Muse + Poolside At The Flamingo + Crown Magnetar + Screaming by Design (The Loading Dock) Eighth Day (Club 90) Grassy Dread + Mas & DJ Nizzle

(Liquid Joe’s) Hemwick + Earthworm + Clesh (Funk ’n’ Dive) In This Moment + Hollywood Undead + The World Alive + DED (The Complex) Junction City Blues (The Yes Hell) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs) Mokie (The Depot) Murphy & The Giants (ABG’s) November Hotel (The Ruin) Penrose (The Barbary Coast) Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Garage on Beck) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Reefer Madness + Kapix + Season of the Witch + The Arvos + German Wyoming (Urban Lounge) Ritual + Sumthin Sumthin + Yoko (Sky)

TONIGHT

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S! EVERY TUESDAY

BLUEGRASS JAM WITH HOSTS PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM-10PM APRIL 21

CHASEONE2 10PM

APRIL 19 TERENCE HANSEN 6PM

SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES JAM WITH NICK GRECO AND BLUES ON FIRST 7PM

MATTHEW AND THE HOPE 10PM

APRIL 23

FUNKY FRIDAY WITH DJ GODINA 10PM

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight.

From, John & Pete Saltas

APRIL 19, 2018 | 47

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

| CITY WEEKLY |

Congratulations to Royal Bliss on 20 Years!

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

*Dine-In Only

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APRIL 20 BBX 6PM

APRIL 22

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APRIL 18

LIVE MUSIC WITH MICHELLE MOONSHINE AT 10PM


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48 | APRIL 19, 2018

WICKED POUR HOUSE

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

Royal Bliss + Ginger & The Gents (The Royal) Sammy Brue + The Wednesday People + Branson Anderson (Kilby Court) Scheming Thieves + Wicked Bears (The Beehive) Snoozy Moon + Riding Gravity + The Elders (The Ice Haüs) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Sun Divide (Brewskis) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (Piper Down Pub) Tribe Of I (Snowbird) Voodoo Darlings Burlesque Presents Sirens of The Stage (Prohibition) The Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Brisk + DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90)

DJ Jeff (The Red Door) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Drew (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) mc chris + Bitforce (Urban Lounge) see p. 46 New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 4/21 LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael (The Bayou)

Walking into Wicked Pour House with Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man” playing in the background is probably the coolest I’ve ever felt in my life. Too bad no one is there to witness it—the bar is oddly quiet for a Saturday night. So I sit down and meet Wicked Pour House’s neighbor and loyal patron, Jack. Jack stands like a timber tree. Dressed in plaid he dons a black leather Crocodile Dundeestyle hat (which by the way he adamantly says he ‘earned’), and we start to chat. “This is the coolest bar ever,” Jack says. “I love the owners; they are laid-back cool cats.” With all the laughs and friendly smiles, I would never have imagined Jack was a bouncer for more than two decades. “I am a nice guy, you just don’t want to piss me off,” he says. He then quickly switches the conversation from fist fighting to his granddaughter. He starts showing me pictures. “She’s a Jazz fan,” Jack says, as he proudly swipes through the photos. The night progresses and people start trickling in. Wicked Pour House feels like a place where everyone knows everyone. The bartender serves her boyfriend, also a bartender. The owners sit at the bar, quietly observing their patrons. Jack starts warming up a little too much toward me, so I make my way to the Family Guy pinball machine—yes that’s right. Now I might not be cool, but I certainly felt cool breaking more than a million points on that machine. Best 50 cents I ever spent. (Rachelle Fernandez) 3556 S. State, 801-685-6116, facebook.com/wickedpourhouse

Blue On First (Snowbird) Brian Wilson with Al Jardine (Tuacahn Center for The Arts) see p. 44 Caleb Chapman (Velour) Cherry Thomas (Harp & Hound) Cigarettes After Sex (Urban Lounge) Colt .46 (The Westerner) Cory Mon + Six Feet In The Pine (Piper Down Pub) Eighth Day (Club 90) Final Satan Showcase (The Beehive) Front 242 + Contaminated Intelligence (Metro Music Hall) Kash’d Out + Tunnel Vision + Newborn Slaves (The Royal) The Klaw + Citizen Hypocrisy + Veronica Blue (The Ice Haüs) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Matt Calder + The Nightcaps (Lake Effect) Mullet Hatchet (Brewskis) Nick Passey (The Patio) see p. 42 One Punch Opie (The Union Tavern)

Opal Hill Drive + The Four Horsemen (The Barbary Coast) The Pack A.D. + See Night (Kilby Court) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Snoozy Moon + The Baker Street Blues Band + Salduro (Funk ’n’ Dive) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Garage on Beck) Swantourage (The Red Door) Talia Keys + Dale James (The State Room) see p. 42 Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (The Yes Hell) Voodoo Darlings Burlesque Presents Sirens of The Stage (Prohibition) Will Baxter Trio (Pat’s BBQ) You Topple Over (Hog Wallow Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Joel (Twist)


KARAOKE

PINKY’S CABARET

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

MENU

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

POOL TOURNAMENTS MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

TEXAS HOLDEM MONDAYS & THURSDAY

FREE FASHION SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY NOON TILL 2PM

BEST

GARLIC BURGER

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

Advocacy Government Relations

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com

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YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE

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FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK\ \RIBEYE SPECIAL $8 ON FRIDAY'S

PENROSE W/ RIDING GRAVITY SATURDAY, APRIL 21ST

OPAL HILL DRIVE

WE CARRY THE MLB PACKAGE

Open from 10am -2am 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

4 24 2 S o u th S t a te S t re e t S LC , U T 8 4107

APRIL 19, 2018 | 49

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

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FRIDAY, APRIL 20TH


COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

LIVE Music thursday, April 19

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, April 20

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | APRIL 19, 2018

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 4/18

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 4/19 Reggae at the Royal

Servants, Makisi, & The House of Roots Band

$

TERENCE HANSEN TRIO

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 4/20

Live Music

saturday, April 21

DJ LATU

ROYAL BLISS 20th anniversary

nfl and nba playoffs!

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

Weeknights

celebration with Ginger & The Gents & more!

monday

tix available on smithstix and at the royal vip packages available

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

saturday 4/21

Live Music

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Great food

Tuesday 4/24

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM $

5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY

coming soon 4/28

$

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

5/5

5/11

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

5/12

BACA Charity w/ Danger Alley, Jana & The Rebels & more! ken-rubber-ducky charity race! American Hitmen retro riot dance party sammy j

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Soulman (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Jules + Mike (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. Craig Smoove (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ Garett Walker (Touche Tavern)

SUNDAY 4/22 LIVE MUSIC

Brain Bagz + Porn Bloopers + Red Bennies + Moon of Delirium (Metro Music Hall) Carpenter Brut + Jean Jean (Urban Lounge) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Mikky Ekko + NoMBe (The Complex) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Reverend Beat-Man w/ Nicole Izobel Garcia + Los Yayaz + Jacob Skeen (Garage on Beck) Swagger (Snowbird) Van Brando Sylint (The Loading Dock)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Après Ski (The Cabin) Gracie’s Sunday Night Blues Jam w/ Nick Greco and Blues on First (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 4/23 LIVE MUSIC

3Teeth + Ho9909 + Street Sects (Metro Music Hall) Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Hard Times + Tenkaras + Slick Velveteens (Urban Lounge) Jazz Ensemble Concert (Fine Arts West) Wild Child + Stelth Ulvang (Kilby Court) see p. 33

Swarmer (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Gracie’s Tuesday Night Blues Jam w/ Pixie Partygrass Boys (Gracie’s) Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ KJ Johnny Irish (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 4/25 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

APRIL 19, 2018 | 51

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Areaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second)

| CITY WEEKLY |

KARAOKE

Anna McClellan + Staffers + Opaline + Krooked Kings (Kilby Court) Dreamdecay + Mananero + No Sun (Diabolical Records) Frank Zoo + Na-G + Ian Hullinger + Spencer Nelson (Velour) Jessie Ware + Albin Lee Meldau (The Depot) Kevin Schaffer (The Spur) Khruangbin + The Mattson 2 (The State Room) Melody Pulsipher (Piper Down Pub) Michael Barr + Sleeptalk + Hush + Taylor Garner + Jeffry Steck (The Loading Dock) Necrowolf (The Beehive) Opiuo + SubDocta (Metro Music Hall) Roots Of Creation (Elevate) Sister Brother (Lake Effect) Twiztid + Blaze Ya Dead Homie + Gorilla Voltage + Shadow D (The Complex) Whores + Bummer + Baby Gurl +

Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Rick Gerber (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos feat. Mike + Dave (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Sugar House Coffee) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Youth Jam Session (Music Garage)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

TUESDAY 4/24

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

The Brevet w/ Edison + Eixo (Metro Music Hall) Cub Sport + Skating Polly (Kilby Court) The Home Team + Skies Like Rockets + Rejoin The Team + Behind The Wheat Grinder (The Loading Dock) Kevyn Dern (Hog Wallow Pub) Nick Garn (The Yes Hell) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Rogue Wave + Business of Dreams (Urban Lounge) see p. 44 Skizzy Mars + Oliver Tree (The Complex) Tune-Yards + My Brightest Diamond (The Depot)


© 2017

PREMARITAL SACKS

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Parenting challenges 2. It’s nothing 3. Unsettling dream, maybe 4. One on the left?: Abbr. 5. U.S. city that hosts the world’s largest jalapeño festival 6. Allergy sufferer’s lifesaver 7. Card game stake 8. Behind 9. Actor Mineo

50. Within: Prefix 51. Apple debut of 2001 52. Carter of “Gimme a Break!” 53. Something to clear up? 54. Farm female 55. Store with a three-syllable name in four letters 56. Requests, with “for” 58. Moonshiner’s vessel 59. Dump

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

10. Sterling or Shannon of the NFL 11. Go back and forth 12. Big boats 13. Slob’s creation 18. Most wanted 19. Concert memorabilia 23. Actor LaBeouf 24. “____ goes nothin’!” 25. San Antonio hoopsters 26. Major manufacturer of soda cans 27. Flower part 28. When some bars close 29. Overly theatrical type 30. Garlicky mayonnaise 31. “NCIS” airer 32. “Siddhartha” author 37. Sunset’s direction 38. 6 ft., maybe 39. Xbox space-war franchise 41. ____ Yello (soft drink) 42. Dropped off 44. “Hear, hear!” 45. Husky cousins 46. Football Hall-ofFamer Ernie 49. Grp. that interrogated Alger Hiss

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Preppy clothing line 5. Some jets 10. Email best not replied to 14. Bit of viral web content 15. Sleep clinic concern 16. Racer with the tortoise 17. What Tom Brady suffered on the field before he wed Gisele Bundchen? 20. John Quincy Adams, to John Adams 21. Ostracized sort 22. Lock of hair 23. Ally (with) 24. “Two, three, four” lead-in 25. “Goldman’s banking partner? He’s catching some rays!”? 33. The “P” of R.S.V.P. 34. Polemologists study them 35. “May ____ excused?” 36. Where Arthur Ashe played college tennis 37. Exclamation of feigned innocence 39. “Bonanza” brother 40. Orbison or Lichtenstein 41. Very large, informally 42. Disney and Whitman 43. Title that Kenny G would gladly accept, presumably? 47. Ctrl-____-Del 48. Bingo relative 49. Katherine of “27 Dresses” 52. Green 54. Filmdom’s Farrow 57. Situation after all the security guards quit their jobs at a luxury store located at 611 Fifth Avenue? 60. Stick ____ in the water 61. Kind of nerve 62. “Star ____ Beyond” (2016 film) 63. Do some programming 64. “____ you!” 65. Pro votes

SUDOKU

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52 | APRIL 19, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the early history of the automobile, electric engines were more popular and common than gasoline-powered engines. They were less noisy, dirty, smelly and difficult to operate. It’s too bad that thereafter the technology for gasoline cars developed at a faster rate than the technology for electric cars. By the end of the first decade of the 20th century, the petroleumsuckers were in ascendance. They have remained so ever since, playing a significant role in our world’s ongoing environmental degradation. Moral of the story: Sometimes the original idea or the early model or the first try is better. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should consider applying this hypothesis to your current state of affairs. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Chesapeake Bay is a fertile estuary that teems with life. It’s 200 miles long and holds 18 trillion gallons of water. More than 150 streams and rivers course into its drainage basin. And yet it’s relatively shallow. If you’re six feet tall, you could wade through more than a thousand square miles of its mix of fresh and salt water without getting your hat wet. I see this place as an apt metaphor for your life in the coming weeks: an expanse of flowing fecundity that is vast but not so deep that you’ll get overwhelmed. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll soon arrive at a pressure-packed turning point. You’ll stand poised at a pivotal twist of fate where you must trust your intuition to reveal the differences between smart risks and careless gambles. Are you willing to let your half-naked emotions show? Will you have the courage to be brazenly loyal to your deepest values? I won’t wish you luck, because how the story evolves will be fueled solely by your determination, not by accident or happenstance. You will know you’re in a good position to solve the Big Riddles if they feel both scary and fun.

Lynch asked him for the right to use his tune “In Dreams” for the movie Blue Velvet. Orbison denied the request, but Lynch incorporated the tune anyway. Surprise! Blue Velvet was nominated for an Academy Award and played a big role in reviving Orbison’s fame. Later, the singer came to appreciate not only the career boost, but also Lynch’s unusual aesthetic, testifying that the film gave his song an “otherworldly quality that added a whole new dimension.” Now let’s meditate on how this story might serve as a parable for your life. Was there an opportunity that you once turned down but will benefit from anyway? Or is there a current opportunity that maybe you shouldn’t turn down, even if it seems odd? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ve been to the Land of No Return and back more than anyone. But soon you’ll be visiting a remote enclave in this realm that you’re not very familiar with. I call it the Mother Lode of Sexy Truth. It’s where tender explorers go when they must transform outworn aspects of their approach to partnership and togetherness. On the eve of your quest, shall we conduct an inventory of your capacity to outgrow your habitual assumptions about relationships? No, let’s not. That sounds too stiff and formal. Instead, I’ll simply ask you to strip away any falseness that interferes with vivacious and catalytic intimacy.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915027, JUDGE ANN BOYDEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. PEGGY NOELANI TAHU, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO PEGGY NOELANI TAHU: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,554.01. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189903897, JUDGE JAMES BLANCH. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. LARRY ROBINSON AND AISHA WELLS, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO LARRY ROBINSON AND AISHA WELLS: You are each summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must each file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must each mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $17,038.02. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussena

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915249, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ANDREW FARLEY, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO ANDREW FARLEY: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $8,959.77. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1824, two British explorers climbed a mountain in southwestern Australia. They were hoping to get a sweeping view of Port Phillip Bay, on which the present-day city of Melbourne is located. But when they reached the top, their view was largely obstructed by trees. Out of perverse spite, they decided to call the peak Mount Disappointment, a name it retains to this day. I suspect you might soon have your own personal version of an adventure that falls short of your expectations. I hope—and also predict—that your experience won’t demoralize you, but will rather mobilize you to attempt a new experiment that CANCER (June 21-July 22): Strong softness is one of your specialties. So are empathetic ultimately surpasses your original expectations. rigor, creative responsiveness, and daring acts of nurturing. Now is a perfect time to summon and express all of these quali- CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): ties with extra flair. If you do, your influence will exceed its nor- Capricorn rock musician Lemmy Kilmister bragged that he mal quotas. Your ability to heal and inspire your favorite people swigged a bottle of Jack Daniel’s whiskey every day from 1975 will be at a peak. So I hereby invite you to explore the frontiers to 2013. While I admire his dedication to inducing altered states of aggressive receptivity. Wield your courage and power with of consciousness, I can’t recommend such a strategy for you. But a fierce vulnerability. Be tenderly sensitive as an antidote to any I will love it if you undertake a more disciplined crusade to escape numbing routines and irrelevant habits in the next four weeks. headstrong lovelessness you encounter. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have a special knack for this practical art. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1973, Pink Floyd released the album The Dark Side of the Moon. Since then, it has been on various Billboard charts for more than AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): 1,700 weeks, and has sold more than 45 million copies. Judging Germany was one of the big losers of World War I, which ended from the astrological aspects coming to bear on you, Leo, I suspect in 1919. By accepting the terms of the Versailles Treaty, it you could create or produce a beautiful thing with a similar staying agreed to pay reparations equivalent to 96,000 tons of gold. power in the next five months. What vitalizing influence would Not until 2010, decades after the war, did Germany finally settle its bill and fulfill its obligation. I’m sure your own big, you like to have in your life for at least the next 30 years? long-running debt is nowhere near as big or as long-running as that one, Aquarius. But you will nonetheless have reason VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I beg you to take a break sometime soon. Give yourself permis- to be ecstatic when you finally discharge it. And according to sion to indulge in a vacation or recess or sabbatical. Wander my reading of the astrological omens, that could and should away on a leave of absence. Explore the mysteries of a siesta happen sometime soon. (P.S. The “debt” could be emotional or blended with a fiesta. If you don’t grant yourself this favor, I spiritual rather than financial.) might be forced to bark “Chill out, dammit!” at you until you do. Please don’t misunderstand my intention here. The rest of PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): us appreciate the way you’ve been attending to the complicated “I would rather have a drop of luck than a barrel of brains,” the details that are too exacting for us. But we can also see that if ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes said. Fortunately, that’s you don’t ease up, there will soon be diminishing returns. It’s not a choice you will have to face in the coming weeks, Pisces. According to my reading of the cosmic signs, your brain will be time to return to your studies of relaxing freedom. working with even greater efficiency and ingenuity than it usually does. Meanwhile, a stronger-than-expected flow of luck will LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Singer-songwriter Roy Orbison achieved great success in the be swirling around in your vicinity. One of your main tasks will be 1960s, charting 22 songs on the Billboard Top 40. But his to harness your enhanced intelligence to take shrewd advantage career declined after that. Years later, in 1986, filmmaker David of the good fortune.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189903898, JUDGE MARK KOURIS. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JAMES EDWIN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JAMES EDWIN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $1,120.50. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH DONALD E. SANCHEZ and MARGO SANCHEZ, Husband and Wife, Plaintiffs, Case No. CV 18-54 vs. RANDY SANCHEZ, ALVA JONES, DON SANCHEZ, LINDA BALL, JOSEPH SANCHEZ, LAURA NELSON, DAVID SANCHEZ, SABRA RICHINS, CRISTI MILLARD, TAMMY O’NEAL, TRACY BROWN, JENNY MORROW, HEATHER BROWN, SCOTT BROWN, GARY SANCHEZ AND DIANA MCKUNE heirs to the Estate of THEODORE A. SANCHEZ, and/or ELLEN J. SANCHEZ; and JOHN and JANE DOES I-X, AND ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS OF REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH, STATE OF IDAHO, TO WIT: The South Half of the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 44 North, Range 3 West, B.M., Benewah County, Idaho. Defendants. TO: RANDY SANCHEZ, ALVA JONES, DON SANCHEZ, LINDA BALL, JOSEPH SANCHEZ, LAURA NELSON, DAVID SANCHEZ, SABRA RICHINS, CRISTI MILLARD, TAMMY O’NEAL, TRACY BROWN, JENNY MORROW, HEATHER BROWN, SCOTT BROWN, GARY SANCHEZ AND DIANA MCKUNE heirs to the Estate of THEODORE A. SANCHEZ, and/or ELLEN J. SANCHEZ; and JOHN or JANE DOES I-X, OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS OF REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH, STATE OF IDAHO. You have been sued by Donald E. and Margo Sanchez, the Plaintiffs, in the District Court in and for Benewah County, Idaho, Case No. CV 17-346. The nature of the claim against you is an Action to Quiet Title to real property. Any time after 21 days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response, in the proper form, including the Case No., and paid any required filing fee to the Clerk of the Court at 701 W. College Avenue, Ste. 203, St. Maries, Idaho 83861, (208) 245-3241, and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff ’s attorney at Lake City Law Group PLLC, 907 Main Avenue, St. Maries, Idaho 83861, (208) 245-9155.A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiffs. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter.

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Rental Woes

It’s hard to find a place to rent these days. St. George has practically run out of rentals, and despite all the high-rises going up in Salt Lake City, we, too, have a huge housing shortage. According to the Utah Apartment Association website, they have more than 3,500 members representing more than 75,000 apartments throughout the state. You’d probably be a member if you’re an apartment owner, manager, developer or builder because they offer some terrific benefits. The nonprofit group was founded in 1934 as the Apartment Association of Utah. The National Apartment Association is only 75 years old, which, to me, indicates Utah was ahead of the pack in helping assist owners and managers. But why would a renter care about this group? Well: n  Their website (uaagq.org) connects to rentals.com, forrent.com, utahrealestate.com and rentler.com. n  It has help lines and phone numbers for tenants having problems with landlords, including Salt Lake Community Action, 2-1-1 information, Disability Law Center and Utah State Courts. n  It directs veterans to specific housing resources. n  And it provides free forms for tenants to give landlords notice they are moving out, give notice of a deficient condition, reasonable accommodation request due to health issues, and request the landlord to provide deposit deposition. For owners currently renting out property or wanting to become a landlord, Utah Apartment Association offers a live Good Landlord class. If landlords agree to evict problem tenants immediately, keep their properties “clean and green” and in compliance with local housing codes, they can possibly get a discount on licensing fees. Salt Lake City, for example, discounts participants’ business license fees from $342 per unit to $322 per unit. This incentive is intended to educate landlords on management strategies to prevent crime, maintain equity and promote compatibility with surrounding neighborhoods. As South Salt Lake says on its website: “The city has found that landlords who follow best management practices on background checks, tenant leases, crime prevention and eviction procedures as necessary, reduce the service costs borne by South Salt Lake taxpayers.” n

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Conjoining at a point undecided, The warrior left alone as a sun rises, Before fire left a breathing earth, Love sacrificed beauty, Beauty became death, The warrior moves on through dust.

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Mistaken Identity Around 4:30 a.m. on March 22, High Point, N.C., 911 dispatchers received a surprising call from a man informing them he had broken into a business. “Yes, this is Jesus Christ, and I just broke into the Pizza Hut,” claimed 46-year-old Richard Lee Quintero of Greensboro, according to WFMY TV. “Jesus is here, he’s back to Earth. I just broke in and had a pizza. I’m Jesus,” Quintero told dispatchers. “Because I’m Jesus, I can do whatever I want.” He also complained that “everybody’s been treating me mean.” High Point police officers arrested Quintero and charged him with breaking and entering and larceny.

Extreme Measures Shannon Dean Egeland, 43, of Kuna, Ore., was found guilty Feb. 28 in an elaborate scheme to delay a prison sentence and collect insurance. The Idaho Statesman reported that shortly before Egeland was to begin a 10-year jail term in 2014 for his role in a $20 million housing scandal, he took out a disability insurance policy and talked his then-17-year-old son into shooting him in the legs with a 20-gauge shotgun, which would delay his prison term—not to mention let him collect on the new insurance policy. After the teenager shot him, Egeland called police and said he’d been assaulted, but police became suspicious when they found Egeland’s wallet and BMW were still at the scene. U.S. District Judge Anna J. Brown tacked three years and 10 months of additional time onto Egeland’s original sentence. Egeland, who eventually lost his left leg, stood before the judge on his prosthetic leg and said he’d had a lot of time to reflect on his crimes and realized he needs mental health counseling. Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott Bradford called him a “menace to society.”

friend for a ride home, his Kohl’s accomplice, April Wright, 48, showed up—and she, too, was arrested and charged.

n John Silva and Derrick Irving thought they had a foolproof plan to cover their tracks after breaking into a mutual acquaintance’s apartment on March 13 in DeLand, Fla. The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office told News 6 the men stole appliances and a flat-screen TV from the home, then stopped before leaving to set a pot of spaghetti sauce on a hot burner and place a washcloth nearby so it would catch fire and destroy evidence. The victim had been alerted to the break-in by security cameras and called police, who stopped the two and found among the stolen goods in their car an empty jar of Ragu spaghetti sauce. Both men were charged with unarmed burglary, grand theft and arson.

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Feuds In Toronto, a group of animal rights advocates started protesting outside a restaurant called Antler in early December. By March, the protests had grown, and Antler’s co-owner, Michael Hunter, had had enough of the “murder” signs and “You’ve got blood on your hands” chants. So on March 23, he told the Globe and Mail, he figured, “I’m going to have my own protest. ... This is who we are and what we do. So I went and got a deer leg.” Hunter brought a cutting board, knife and the hindquarter of a deer into the front window and butchered the meat while the protesters looked on. As a result, Hunter and the protesters are now trying to open a dialogue, and reservation requests at Antler have increased. n Neighbors in Gainesville, Fla., called police on March 11 after finding a set of stairs barricaded in their condominium complex. The Gainesville Sun reported that Derrick Lamar Walker, 34, told officers on their arrival that his neighbors had been stomping in the stairwell outside his apartment to “get back at him for his several (insurance-related) lawsuits,” according to a police department report. In retaliation, Walker had covered the stairs with fishing line, thin rubber gaskets, duct tape and cooking oil to try to keep the neighbors away. He was arrested on a criminal mischief charge and was held at the Alachua County Jail.

Oops! A young driver in Buffalo, Minn., wasted no time earning an EPIC FAIL on her driver’s test on March 21 when she rammed the car into the examination station before she’d even pulled out of the parking space. As the driving test began, the 17-year-old shifted her 2014 Chevy Equinox into drive instead of reverse and hit the accelerator, causing the car to lurch forward, jump the curb and crash through the window of the station, located in a strip mall. While the driver was not hurt, the examiner, 60, was taken to a hospital with noncritical injuries. Buffalo Police Chief Pat Budke told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that no charges would be filed. n Presumably in the throes of a serious case of munchies, Lizabeth Ildefonso, 44, drove up to the security booth at the Suffolk County (N.Y.) jail at 10:12 a.m. on March 16 and tried to order a “bacon, egg and cheese” sandwich. Deputy Sheriff Yvonne DeCaro explained that she was at the jail, but Ildefonso “insisted that she really wanted a sandwich,” the Riverhead News-Review reported. The deputy noticed Ildefonso’s eyes were dilated and glassy, and that she had white powdery residue in her left nostril. DeCaro also checked her license and found it was not valid. After failing a field sobriety exam, Ildefonso was charged with felony driving while ability impaired by drugs and driving without a valid license.

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Least Competent Criminals When an intoxicated man arrived at the Delaware State Police Troop 1 station in Wilmington on March 20, looking for a ride home, officers thought he seemed familiar. Turns out he was Christopher McDowell, 34, a suspect in a Feb. 22 shoplifting incident at a local Kohl’s store, according to the News Journal. McDowell was charged with shoplifting and arraigned, then released on $1,000 bail. After he made a phone call to a

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Bright Idea A traditional March wedding at Peckforton Castle in Tarporley, Cheshire, England, was briefly interrupted when an owl trained to deliver the rings to a waiting best man changed its mind about where to land. The betrothed Jeni Arrowsmith and Mark Wood of Wrexham watched as the barn owl flew down the aisle toward the best man, but a seated groomsman then pointed at the bird, which it took as a signal to fly to his hand. “The owl just dived in and hit the guy—who is terrified of birds!” said wedding photographer Stacey Oliver. “He fell off his chair.” “Everyone was absolutely hysterical,” the bride later told the BBC. “It made the wedding because we were talking about it all night.”

All saints, sinners, sisterwives and...

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Just Can’t Get Enough It’s been a twisty, U-turny road for Brittany Ann Koerselman, 19, and her first (soon-to-be second) husband, Jeremie Rook, 24, of Little Rock, Iowa. The two originally married in 2014, when Koerselman, then 15, was pregnant with Rook’s child. But they divorced when she was 18. “He just wasn’t ready to be all of that,” Koerselman told Metro News. “The parent, the husband, the responsible person. He just wasn’t ready for that.” She said she and Rook have gotten back together and split up seven times since their divorce, but they can’t stand being apart, so they’re planning a “f-ing princess wedding” for this summer. “The last time I got married, I got swollen on the way to Missouri—it’s six hours (drive), so my shoes didn’t fit,” Koerselman recalled. “We’re reusing (the) old engagement ring. He’s different this time,” she told (herself).

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City Weekly April 18, 2018  

The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

City Weekly April 18, 2018  

The Good, The Bad, The Ugly