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DABAKIS Ever boisterous and outspoken, the state senator says lending liberal voice trumps his bill tally. By Dylan Woolf Harris

IS

APRIL 5, 2018 | VOL. 34

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LEAVING THE BUILDING


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY IT’S A WRAP!

Outspoken Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, looks ahead. Cover photo by Enrique Limón

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 18 A&E 23 DINE 30 CINEMA 32 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

DYLAN W. HARRIS

Cover story, p. 13 From Payson to the world, Harris had a great run with us as staff writer. From intrepidly trekking to Bears Ears, to examining the viability of rabbit meat as protein, the crossword puzzle enthusiast’s energy will be sorely missed around our ink-stained halls.

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Cover story, March 22, “Are You Ready for Some Fútbol?

So excited for this team! Great cover.

@MICHELLE_PAGE Via Instagram

They aren’t the newest pro team. The rugby team, the Utah Warriors, is technically the newest pro team.

@BROWNTOWNSLC Via Twitter

Dine, March 22, “Rock the Goat!”

Just went had their cabeza taco (they were out of goat) and it was divine!

ANDREI MALYUCHIK Via Facebook

News, March 1, “Hare Apparent” Eat Thumper? No.

SUSAN BALLARD Via Facebook Jeezus, go catch squirrels or road kill.

@ITSONLYRKNROLL Via Twitter

We have a rabbit as a pet. While I couldn’t fathom killing and consuming it, I have

eaten rabbit before and have no objections to people raising them as livestock.

CORBAN ANDERSON Via Facebook

Growing up on a farm, we had an understanding: If a rabbit, chicken, pig or calf had a name, it was a pet. If it did not, it was food.

LYNN BAKER Via Facebook

Blog post, March 24, ‘How Much Longer Do We Have to Deal With This Shit?’

State-sponsored youth demonstrations to restrict freedoms. Pretty scary.

happened when I was a kid. Rather than blame guns, they should figure out what’s wrong with them.

BRUCE HISKEY

Via cityweekly.net Never thought I’d see the day people marched in the streets to ask their government for fewer rights while declaring the Constitution outdated.

MIKE STAPLEY Via Facebook

Why do most of the [comments] seem to belittle these gatherings?

DAVE CALDWELL

MIKE MITCHELL

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Didn’t Obama already come and take your guns? Oh, that’s right, he didn’t because no one is coming to take your guns away. Just like no one is coming to take away your right to own a gun.

Because Utah is the gun-nut capital of America.

MYKAEL HILL Via Facebook

I wish students would put some effort into understanding why their generation is shooting each other at school. It never

JOSH DIVELBISS Via Facebook

How much longer do we have to deal with dumbasses who think that talking about gun control is trying to destroy the Second Amendment?

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Blog post, March 28, “Guv Signs Medicaid Expansion Bill” It is really a joke. Deanna Bishoff Garcia Via Facebook

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PRIVATE EY

True Liars

What you’re about to read is the honest to God’s truth: You can’t believe a word I write. I’m a liar from the word go. I have been lying my entire life. I tell the truth only when I can’t think of a convenient lie. I believe in magic. I believe fire is man’s greatest discovery. I believe the wheel is man’s greatest discovery. I’ve been lower than a snake and I’ve been higher than a kite. I use clichés now and then but they weren’t cliché when I made them up. If you don’t believe that, you’re crazy. I’m a tool of George Soros. The only thing I know about Soros is that he is not a Greek, therefore, I don’t give a rat’s fanny about him. People should not be allowed to have Greek-sounding names if they’re not Greek. That goes for you, Arvydas Sabonis and double for you, Jesse the Body Ventura aka George Janos. Even if I wasn’t a tool of Soros, and I am not, many people reading this believe I am. They’ll believe that, because I am regarded as being a liberal. And liberals cannot be trusted. Nothing could be further from the truth. I am not a liberal; I just portray one in this newspaper. I’m an openminded, play-by-the-rules, conservative journalist with a 30-year record of never pissing anyone off in this community to prove it. I’m not even sure if this town has a liberal journalist. If we did, God would have rained hell on us already, so that’s proof we don’t have any. Liberals hate God and God hates liberals. I’ve seen both of those Facebook memes, so those statements are also true. I’ve also seen the meme that liberals hate Donald Trump more than they love America. That’s only true if you

believe it. I don’t. It’s trickier than that, and if I were telling the truth I’d say that only the most politically lazy among us would believe such a thing. Actually, the more correct and nuanced meme would be, “Liberals love America therefore they hate Trump,” a phrasing that would thrill elitist Ivy League liberals and René “cogito ergo sum” Descartes himself. I haven’t seen that meme yet. OK, I gotta stop here. The above is a garbled heap of overcooked, starchy canned spaghetti with every strand sticking to the next even if it doesn’t belong there. But that’s how I feel every day, asking what, exactly, can I believe any more? I can’t promise that what comes out of my keyboard next will be an improvement. But to be sure, I’m as confused as the next person as to what is real and what is not these days. While Trump is easily blamed for much of our confusiontriggered national migraine—lying regularly to the very citizenry who he should not tell lies to—there’s plenty of finger-pointing to go around: The proliferation of news channels, our growing propensity to only use one news channel, the weaving of entertainment and pop culture into hard news stories, the erosion of trust in the mainstream media, self-serving exclamations of FAKE NEWS by Trump, the list goes on. Meanwhile, America has managed to devalue our core education realms, we are factually dumber. Even though it’s our good neighbor, I’d lay a big bet that a high percentage of Americans couldn’t find Mexico on the map. That’s bad. Now ask them to find North Korea or Yemen. Yet, those same folks authoritatively claim expertise about Mexicans and immigration, North Koreans and nuclear weapons or Yemen and gas prices. We are fed a body of lies each and every day because lies move eyeballs. Lying is a big business. Marvel at what cable news has become and fear what traditional broadcast may become—

B Y J O H N S A LTA S @johnsaltas

a model cast by the ever larger and more influential Sinclair Media. Sinclair is turning trusted local news outlets into a national propaganda machine. It might be too late for those of us who merely lie in newsprint, but time will tell. According to University of Utah management professor Bryan Bonner, the fault lies with each of us and our propensity to fall prey to false expertise. Though Bonner’s ideas are meant to aid in business management, they are applicable in a broader sense, too. In an article by Khalil Smith in Strategy + Business Magazine, Bonner explains our brains pay closest attention to figures from our hometowns (wayda go Sinclair! You’ve stolen Mark and Shauna!), those who talk the most (cable TV talking heads), the loudest (Trump) or the tallest (Bill O’Reilly) in a room, or people with the best title (Idi Amin). People believe suave columnists like me or handsome radio hosts like Bill, Kerry and Gina because we have a perceived authority by virtue of our lucky DNA. We believe memes because they were shared by a mother or bishop. Meanwhile, our brain is taking short cuts to sort out all the information it’s given, fitting it all neatly into our growing (and hard to change) bias. We feed our bias and there are a growing number of outlets—political and financial—that have learned to capitalize on those biases. Russia did it; Sinclair is doing it. Meanwhile, neither you nor I know what is actually true. We just read, listen, watch and wait for our brains to file the information into the most convenient bucket. Even when we’re served a plate of wet spaghetti, like this column, many brains will go “Yeah, it’s by that fat Greek,” and file it under God’s Truth. It wasn’t and it isn’t. We all have to start paying better attention, folks. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT

GET YOUR KITTY FIX

IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

REAL WOMEN RUN

Well, real women would run—and win—if they’d just get started. No one argues that there are too many women in political office. Why? Because there aren’t. Utah ranked 38th nationally this year in the number of women in the Legislature, and has only one woman in Congress. With half of the population female, women hold only 20 percent of Utah’s legislative positions. No excuses. The facts are that women win office at the same rate as men—if only they run. Take the Real Women Run Spring Training. Thomas S. Monson Center, 411 E. South Temple, 801-537-8604, Saturday, April 7, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., $25, bit.ly/2J2TELV.

NEW CAFE HOURS OPEN AT 7AM TUES-SAT 302 E. 900 S. I TINKERSCATCAFE.COM

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE

You’re young, but hopefully not naïve. There are too many #fakenews outlets denying the existence of the Holocaust, a dark and terrifying chapter in world history. Please join the Utah Jewish Community as it gathers to observe the National Day of Remembrance, the annual commemoration of victims of the Holocaust. Holocaust Remembrance Day, also known as Yom Hashoah, commemorates the lives and heroism of Jewish people who died in the Holocaust between 1933 and 1945. Keynote speaker will be Peter Landau, who was born while his family was in hiding during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. United Jewish Federation of Utah, 2 Medical Drive North, 801-581-0102, Thursday, April 12, 1-3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2pOr4V Y.

GET A DAMN HAIRCUT

WATERWISE STRIPS

You know we live in a desert, right? That doesn’t mean that nothing grows. On the contrary. Still, let’s just get rid of that ultra-thirsty grass. “In the arid West, we will one day look back on lawns like we now do littering, smoking in bars and public urination,” says author Michael Pollan. If that doesn’t convince you, nothing will. Start small with Creating Waterwise Park Strips, a class focusing on techniques to save water through design, including plants that will thrive in these tough sites, according to the Conservation Garden Park staff. For free admittance to most classes, you only have to take a short survey. Conservation Garden Park, 8275 S. 1300 West, West Jordan, 801-256-4400, Thursday, April 5, 6:30-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2EdQrFU.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

352 MAIN ST. UNIT D, PARK CITY, UTAH #BARBARIC 435•714•0967


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Out With the Trash

Maybe you’ve seen the videos of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. You know, the one that’s twice the size of Texas and is not only disgusting but deadly. Well, Utah has its very own along the Jordan River above Farmington Bay, according to The Salt Lake Tribune, which referred to it as a “raft of trash.” The plastic bottles, cigarette boxes, tires, cans and everything else threaten the Great Salt Lake and its wetlands, which support an ecosystem of waterfowl. The Nature Conservancy and others persuaded Salt Lake County to install a trash boom to collect the garbage. This is what we get for being an amazing state that attracts business and recreation enthusiasts. So, you wonder why the Legislature didn’t approve a plastic bag ban? It would have been a start, but then you’ve got water bottles and straws and, of course, Huntsman Corp.

Mormon Inconsistency

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APRIL 5, 2018 | 9

It took the state long enough to figure out that the Utah Transit Authority had to change—big time. Well, it did, sort of. Its board has been trimmed to three full-time members and is losing its own legal team, but the agency still isn’t completely under state control. That despite its cute new name—TDU (Transit District of Utah). That’s a $50-million name, BTW, when you re-brand vehicles, signs, uniforms, etc. The fiscal note was not included in the bill, but who cares? UTA is known for its high-flying spending, and this would be the least of it. Well, if you’re doing a branding fix, you have to change the brands everywhere—permanently. The real question is whether it’s really worth it, or whether it’s much, ahem, T’DU about nothing.

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Much T’DU

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A Deseret News report about Utah Republicans pledging to support ethical and civil candidates made the rounds—the AP and U.S. News and World Report, for instance. The thing is, that’s not entirely true. The magazine highlighted a little GOP group called Character First—a group that wouldn’t be around but for Donald J. Trump and his Twitter-finger. Oh, there are others. Mormon Women for Ethical Government is one. But the real story is that they’re not exactly effective. While Trump’s approval rating is “way” up to 42 percent, U.S. Mormons—you know, that moral religious faction, approves of him at a higher rate than any other religious group—61 percent, according to a January Gallup poll. But one observer had this to say: “[Trump’s] not guilty of false advertising. He told us repeatedly through his campaign that he was a very poor human being, and he has been consistent with that promise.”


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10 | APRIL 5, 2018

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Happy Meal Why are processed foods bad? If I take a chicken breast and process it into a paste, is it worse for my health than if I ate the chicken whole? Please help before I get butt cancer from a chicken nugget! —Jim Huff Let’s get the bad news out of the way, Jim. Last month a big French study came out that tracked the diets of some 100,000 participants to better understand the relationship between cancer and what its authors refer to as “ultra-processed foods,” characterized by “a higher content of total fat, saturated fat, and added sugar and salt, along with a lower fiber and vitamin density.” And although butt cancer wasn’t named as a specific threat, the findings did in fact link a 10 percent proportional increase in consumption of such food with a 10 percent-plus rise in cancer risk overall. Further research is needed, but—brace yourself—it’s looking like chicken nuggets might not be amazing for your health. The good news? Your skepticism regarding any categorical condemnation of “processed foods” is entirely warranted. This reality, in fact, is a big part of the organizing principle underlying the French research—about which more later. Not only is there nothing inherently bad about processed foods, the phrase itself is so capacious and variously defined as to be basically meaningless. Unless you’re picking grapes off the vine, you’re eating food that’s been processed somehow or other: milk is pasteurized; wheat is ground; salad mix is washed. A 2000 article in the British Medical Bulletin defined food processing as “any procedure undergone by food commodities after they have left the primary producer, and before they reach the consumer”—mere refrigeration counts. That’s a distinctly capitalist formulation, but by most definitions, humans have engaged in food processing for millennia. Cooking with fire is the ur-processing method, and our ancestors might have been at it 1.5 million years ago. Other techniques have involved creative ways to unlock nutrition in food or extend its shelf life. In the former category, see e.g. nixtamalization, the practice of treating maize with limestone or lye, which helped the Aztecs and Mayans get more protein and disease-preventing vitamins in their diet. For the latter, see basically any form of fermentation: milk turned into cheese and yogurt is the most widespread, but you’ve also got Korean kimchi (fermented vegetables), Nigerian ogi (fermented grains), and assorted smelly preserved-fish dishes encountered at high latitudes, including Swedish surströmming, Norwegian rakfisk, and “stinkheads,” which the Yupik people of Alaska prepare by burying salmon heads in the ground and leaving them to age. Many methods of fermenting, curing, etc. rely on salt—an extremely consequential ingredient in this realm, particularly prior to refrigeration. But salt took its own place among processed foods early in the

20th century when we began fortifying it with iodine, essential for thyroid function. In coastal regions, iodine in the soil makes its way into the groundwater, but further inland you won’t find enough of it occurring naturally, and till the 1920s there was a huge swath of the northern U.S., stretching from the Appalachians to the Cascades—the “goiter belt,” they called it—where between a quarter and 70 percent of all kids displayed visibly enlarged thyroids. Just as adding vitamin D to milk took care of our national rickets problem, iodized salt pretty much wiped out goiter, plus some serious developmental disorders also associated with iodine deficiency. So yeah, food processing has done a thing or two for humanity. We haven’t even touched on the fact that urbanization would have been a hell of a lot harder without food preserved for shipping from the hinterlands, or that the zillion hours of food-prep labor we’ve saved by not making everything from scratch would have fallen disproportionately on women’s shoulders. Do “processed foods,” then, deserve their bad rap? Answer: no, which is something public-health experts are coming around on. The French study discussed above uses a four-category food-classification system proposed by Brazilian researchers in 2010 that separates harmless or beneficial food processing from the problematic sort. NOVA, as the scheme’s called, distinguishes between unprocessed or minimally processed foods (e.g. meats, plants); processed culinary ingredients (sugar, vegetable oils); processed foods (canned vegetables, cured meats); and, finally, ultra-processed foods, defined as “industrial formulations with five or more and usually many ingredients,” including “substances not commonly used in culinary preparations.” And yes, the NOVA authors list “poultry and fish ‘nuggets’” in this last group. Again, one thing typifying ultra-processed foods is low nutrient density and high energy density, what with all that added fat and carbs. Those traits are much of A) the real problem, as far as healthy eating goes, and B) why Doritos taste so good. But I hope by now you’re distinguishing this kind of stuff from your homemade chicken paste, which isn’t the kind of processed food you need to worry about. Appealing as it sounds, though, I’m afraid I’ve got dinner plans. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.


BY GRAHAM LEE BREWER comments@cityweekly.net @grahambrewer

A version of this article appeared in High Country News.

APRIL 5, 2018 | 11

rest. And that can have dire consequences. A 2016 study by the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission found transgender Navajos felt not only misunderstood by their own people and subject to higherthan-average rates of violence, but also that violence against them is tolerated. “It’s very clear that if you identify as trans, especially if you’re a Navajo trans woman living here on the reservation, it’s more likely you’re going to see violence within your lifetime because it’s become so normalized and it’s an issue that no one is really talking about,” Nelson told me. The continued legacy of colonialism, a tragic but very real part of this country’s history, leaves indigenous peoples experiencing higher rates of violence, trauma, abuse, and a variety of negative health consequences. Compounding that with gender discrimination has truly horrifying results. One study found among Native Americans who identify as “two-spirit,” a distinction often used to describe several gender identifications, 78 percent of female-identified respondents “reported being physically assaulted in their lifetime,” and 85 percent “reported being sexually assaulted in their lifetime.” As Native peoples who are constantly asking the broader country to recognize and respect our unique and important histories and cultures, it hardly seems appropriate to use our sovereign authority to discriminate against our own. CW

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laws, as well as popular opinion, which could present a danger to sovereignty. As law professor Marcia Zug astutely noted in a 2016 piece for The Atlantic: “tribal sovereignty remains precarious,” and the longer tribes enact same-sex marriage bans “the higher the likelihood that they will negatively impact perceptions of tribes and tribal justice. Historically, when tribal and Anglo-American values were in conflict, non-Indians tended to disparage tribal values as backwards, inferior, and unjust.” This was certainly the case when my tribe, the Cherokee Nation, revoked the citizenship of the Freedmen, the descendants of black slaves once held by Cherokees. The move was widely condemned as a civil rights violation, and it spurred federal lawmakers and agencies to withhold funds and even question the legitimacy of the Cherokees to govern themselves. The Cherokee Freedmen eventually won in court and have since been granted full tribal citizenship. Civil rights protections for minority communities have seen significant setbacks under President Donald Trump’s administration, and Nelson argues that tribes should instead assert their sovereign authority by stepping in where the government is failing those communities. “Use our sovereignty as a way to protect our people,” he said. But while LGBTQ Navajo Nation employees who are paid through federal grants have workplace-discrimination protections, the tribe has no laws protecting the

A

lray Nelson has campaigned for years for the right to marry the man he loves. Nelson, 32, a member of the Navajo Nation, works with his nonprofit, Diné Equality, to educate tribal council members and citizens about the need for marriage equality on the reservation. When he speaks to people living there, young and old, Nelson says he generally finds Navajos to be accepting of LGBTQ individuals. However, the tribal council, which in 2005 outlawed same-sex marriage, is the biggest roadblock between him and equal rights. Nelson said a recent president of the Navajo Nation told him gay and lesbian couples should leave the reservation because marriage equality was a “white man’s way of thinking.” But, Nelson contends, most of America’s tribal nations traditionally accept, and in many cases

revere, LGBTQ members. In fact, for the Navajos, the nadleeh, a complex gender identification category, is part of the tribe’s creation story. It was the introduction of Christianity and the erasure of culture that gave rise to the idea in Native American communities that homosexuality was wrong. “Point period: It’s wrong for anyone, whether a young person or an elder, to think LGBTQ is not traditional,” Nelson says. “We were getting married long before Stonewall had happened in New York City,” he said, referencing the 1969 uprising against homophobic police brutality. “We were recognizing the rights of LGBTQ and trans men and women in our communities, and we were holding them as sacred beings.” Nelson said he is not aware of a tribe that did not traditionally accept LGBTQ members. However, among the 567 federally recognized tribes in the United States, he and his colleagues count only 35 that recognize same-sex marriage. Territorially, Navajo Nation covers approximately 17.5 million acres, occupying portions of southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico. Its population of roughly 350,000 disproportionately faces poverty, unemployment and health problems arising from past unregulated uranium mining. As marriage equality continues to gain acceptance across the country, tribal nations that refuse to recognize same-sex marriages will find themselves increasingly at odds with state and federal

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More Native Americans are returning to traditional perspectives that accept and honor LGBTQ members.

Participants in the 35th Native Community Connections parade in Phoenix, Ariz., show their LGBTQ pride.

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Changing Tribal Views

EQUAL RIGHTS

PAULANN EGELHOFF

NEWS


12 | APRIL 5, 2018

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Ever boisterous and outspoken, state senator says lending liberal voice trumps his bill tally. @dylantheharris | Photos by Enrique Limón

APRIL 5, 2018 | 13

R-Holladay, seeks support for a Medicaid expansion bill. But before the roll call, Dabakis having yet to pick up the ball, rises and gives an animated speech, waving his arms and alternately pulling on and off his spectacles. He’s tired of the state’s obstinate refusal to take federal dollars at the cost of poor citizens’ health, he declares. Tax dollars that could be put toward health care are languishing in a “giant bucket in Washington, D.C.,” Dabakis says. Zehnder’s bill isn’t a full expansion, and therefore isn’t getting his vote.

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He doesn’t. Instead, Dabakis gives the ball a hearty squeeze like it’s the proverbial turnip from which he must extract blood. An impossibility, of course. In some ways, Dabakis’ tenure as a state senator is made up of a long compendium of impossible tasks. In the super-minority party, not only is Dabakis excluded from setting the agenda, he’s barely given a chance to mold it. But that doesn’t mean he has to hold his tongue. On the last day of the 2018 session—the same night Dabakis mucks around with the stress ball—freshman Sen. Brian Zehnder,

So Dabakis moves to amend Zehnder’s bill to expand Medicaid services with the expectation that the state would foot 10 percent of the costs. “We’re taking a check for $858 million to go to the poorest of the poor and we’re ripping it up and we’re shaking our fist toward Washington and we’re saying, ‘You keep this. We don’t want it because we have some Utah plan,’” he says, summarizing the idea as one that ruthlessly denies coverage: “Our Utah plan is, ‘No. No insurance for you and you and you and you.’” It’s an amendment Dabakis knew fully well had no chance of passage, and almost as quickly as it was introduced, the body rejects “the good senator from Salt Lake City.” It’s a scene that in many ways epitomizes Dabakis’ time in the statehouse. He pitched a grand, liberal solution to fix an issue that he finds unconscionably broken—only to see it go nowhere and get little support. Since 2012, when voters picked Dabakis to serve, he’s passed a mere four bills as the primary sponsor. He was a floor sponsor on nine additional bills. Altogether, more than half were resolutions, including one from 2016 honoring Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda and another the year prior recognizing the 100th anniversary of the settlement of Clarion, Utah. Asked about the dearth of successful bills that bear his name, Dabakis wears his record with unabashed satisfaction. “I’m proud of that fact,” he says, adding, “somehow we have allowed this idea that the success of a legislator equals the number of bills passed.” Dabakis represents the state’s 2nd Senatorial District, the “People’s Republic of the Avenues,” he says tongue in cheek. But Dabakis has

hy, you might ask yourself, is Sen. Jim Dabakis rhythmically rolling a yellow stress ball between his palms as he lounges at his back-row desk in the Senate chamber? You’d ask, because in his sixth year, the Salt Lake City Democrat doesn’t appear to need stress relief. Rather, he looks comfortable, content and contemplative— like a student conjuring what he’ll do on summer vacation as he awaits the end of the school year. Reclining in his chair, he’s passively observing the legislative machine at work—anticipating the midnight deadline only a few hours away. Dabakis flicks the golden orb a foot into the air and snatches it when it comes back down. A moment or two later, he jokingly pantomimes that he’s going to pelt one of his Senate colleagues in the back of the head with the stress ball.

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By Dylan Woolf Harris | comments@cityweekly.net |

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DABAKIS IS LEAVING THE BUILDING


“Somehow we have allowed this idea that the success of a legislator equals the number of bills passed.”

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A BIGGER RESPONSIBILITY

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announced this term, which concludes at the end of the year, will be his last. Dabakis isn’t the only senator who’s calling it quits after this session. The turnover is substantive, in fact, with party leaders in both chambers announcing the plan to retire. Nor is Dabakis the only lawmaker who represents a portion of Salt Lake City to leave the statehouse in pursuit of other interests. But Dabakis’ brand is recognizably unique. A headline magnet, Dabakis might be described as the Capitol’s best “performer” if his antics weren’t tempered by sincere conviction.

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—Sen. Jim Dabakis

The morning after the session ended on another marathon slog, Dabakis meets with City Weekly at a coffeehouse in the Avenues. Having just come from a live RadioWest broadcast where he and House Speaker Greg Hughes touched on session high- and lowlights, Dabakis is busy hunt-and-pecking away at an email as he reflects on his time in office. The sheer number of bills introduced continues to climb each year—a fact that members of the legislative and executive branch aren’t shy to criticize. For Dabakis, bill quantity is a vacuous achievement. “I could be there all day long getting crosswalk bills, and getting resolutions and bills that say good things about fighting cancer,” he says. “But Democrats, in particular, have a bigger responsibility because Republicans are not going to let them pass serious bills. “When is the last time a Democrat carried a $100-million education bill? When was the last time a Democrat was allowed to pass a major clean-air bill?” he continues. “They just don’t happen, so you have to decide as a legislator: All right. What do I want to do? Do I want to pass bills in a frenzy or do I want to speak to the broader issues.” And, Dabakis notes, just because his name isn’t attached to a bill doesn’t mean he wasn’t hustling behind the scenes, as was the case with a bill passed during the 2015 session to protect LGBTQ folks from employment and housing discrimination. “Maybe my most important issue was bringing the homos and the Momos together,” the openly gay Dabakis says. “But you will not find my name on that bill. It’s nowhere to be found.” He sought common ground with high-ranking LDS church leaders the winter before that session. Sensing resistance from some lawmakers, Dabakis urged fellow senators Stuart Adams and Stephen Urquhart to co-sponsor the bill—to show that it was backed by leadership. In this instance, Dabakis’ concerns didn’t rest on whether he should send out a progressive Bat-Signal but focused solely on passing a law that would protect a marginalized demographic from discriminatory practices.

“I don’t give a shit if it’s my name on that or not,” he says. “And I knew it would be less likely to pass if it had my name on it. So if I have a great idea and I really want it to pass, I go to my friends in the Senate and say this is a great idea and you really ought to do this. This whole ego thing of, ‘My name is on the bill’ and this frantic running around, particularly by Democrats, they waste too much time trying to prove to the world that they’re relevant and they lose their voice and their ability to stand up and say, ‘You know what? The emperor is naked.’”

THE SPOTLIGHT TOOLBOX

More often, Dabakis finds himself opposing legislation as it fast-tracks through committee hearings and floor votes. Dabakis, in this arena, assumes the role of a bullhorn amplifying what he finds absurd. “Sometimes a spotlight and sometimes cynicism and a bit of poking fun is the best way to call attention to the ridiculous,” he says. On Feb. 22, for example, Dabakis introduced a DUI-related bill to a Senate committee but waited until nearly the end of his testimony to disclose that he went to breakfast that morning and drank enough mimosas to register a .05 blood-alcohol concentration. He held up the breathalyzer encased in a plastic bag—like it was a piece of evidence from a crime scene. “My entire presentation has been at .05,” he told them. Dabakis’ bill asked to delay Utah’s forthcoming DUI change until three other states also lowered their DUI limit from .08 to .05. The point, he explains later, was to demonstrate to some teetotaling lawmakers that a person with a BAC of .05 can function. “This .05 is a draconian, non-scientific, horrendous change in our culture that is going to send potentially thousands of people to jail and affect their lives dramatically. A .05 to .08 is not drunk driving. It’s not,” he tells City Weekly. “They act like it’s normal. It’s not normal. It’s going to destroy a lot of lives. I could have gotten up there and given a speech that wouldn’t have been noticed, but I think I made the point a lot better.” Still, his bill failed miserably, and as of press time, the DUI law—the first of its kind in the nation—will go into effect at the year’s end. Dabakis’ larks sometimes lead to successful outcomes, though, or at least contribute to GOP lawmakers pumping the brakes, he says. Retiring Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, introduced a bill this session to rename a freeway in southern Utah the Donald J. Trump Utah National Parks Highway. Noel wanted to honor the president for reducing the size of two national monuments in the state, Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante. Although the idea seemed premature to several officials, the bill passed convincingly through a House committee with a favorable recommendation. To Dabakis, the proposal wasn’t just premature, but “incredibly offensive.” And so


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Whether the deference Dabakis receives from his GOP counterparts is due to his principled defenses or not, they do respect him. Gov. Gary Herbert offered a ceremonial goodbye after sine die, congratulating Dabakis for serving six years that “felt like 24,” he joked. On RadioWest the following morning, exiting House Speaker Hughes declared he’d enjoyed sparring with Dabakis throughout the years. “He is a good man, and I love serving with him.” Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, who also announced he will retire from the Legislature at the end of the year, is the mirror image of Dabakis in politics and demeanor and most other ways, too. He’s a guy you might expect fights back the urge to roll his eyes whenever Dabakis takes the floor. But you’d be wrong. “He always makes it fun,” Niederhauser tells City Weekly. “I always have to smile when he gets up to oppose one of the Republican bills. A lot of people, I think, interpret that to be pure conflict but I’ve never seen it that way. He’s become a dear friend of mine, and I always appreciated his point of view. He represents a constituency and his district well.” Niederhauser also disagrees that the number of bills passed is a meaningful yardstick. Instead, he says, hammering out legislation that tackles problems in major sectors of government like education, transportation and infrastructure should be held up as measures of success. “Those are things that are going to make a difference for a long time … not 10 bills that change a word here or a phrase there,” he says. “And most of those big issues take a lot of effort.” Dabakis feels similarly about Republicans. He says, for instance, he’d love to have Herbert as a neighbor, and considers the governor a good guy coming at life from a different world view.

Despite his vehement opposition to the GOP platform, Dabakis says he’s never uttered a harsh word about any of his Senate colleagues. “It’s a hard needle to thread, but I can stand up and say what I’m going to say. It’s never personal about any senator, and they allow me the freedom because they know it’s sincere,” he says. “I’m not trying to play politics or kill somebody’s bill because of personalities or whatever. These [issues] are passionately what I feel and what my constituents feel, and importantly, what 35 percent of the state believes.” Which raises another quirk of Dabakis’ political career: He doesn’t see himself as merely a stand-in for voters in his district—but as a voice for the estimated third of Utahns who identify as progressive or left-leaning. “It’s 35 to 40 percent of the people all over the state who feel like they have no representation,” he says. “To give that up, to say, ‘OK, I’ve got this small bill or that small bill.’ Or to say, ‘I’ve got 10 bills passed this session,’ seems to me to be a deal with the devil.” He blames gerrymandering for Democratic underrepresentation. The party disparity is so blatant to Dabakis, he has memorized data down to the decimal point: Democrats in legislative races get 38.7 percent of the statewide votes, he says, but only hold 22 percent of legislative seats. “I mean, this would make Putin proud,” he comments. Illustrating the problem, Dabakis draws a diagram on a legal pad representing the city of Ogden. The urban area is sliced up like a pie. Slivers of the city are clumped with suburban and rural populations, diluting the urban voice. And city dwellers, he argues, have unique issues that aren’t being represented.

RED VS. REDNECK

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A DEAL WITH THE DEVIL

“I can go through a number of districts where there is no voice. People in Ogden are right. There is no voice for them. Nobody stands up. Who speaks for the Ogdens all over, who speaks for people all over the state who feel like, ‘What the hell? Nobody is representing me,’” he says. “I always felt that’s my job.” Dabakis is hopeful that his successor won’t get caught up in passing bills by bending to Republican demands. “They decide who passes bills and who doesn’t and invariably that means they extract something for that,” he says. “But I think our majority party colleagues respect me. They don’t respect the Stockholm Syndrome people who roll into a ball and say, ‘Pass one of my bills and leave me alone.’ I hope that whoever replaces me will recognize that and be a loud voice. That’s the only way to have influence. You can’t just march in there and be quiet.”

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he threatened to append the measure by christening an adjacent frontage road the Stormy Daniels Rampway, memorializing the adult film actress who allegedly had a secret tryst with Trump. Dabakis knew that amendment wouldn’t pass. But it helped draw national media attention. “I suspect the reason they pulled [Noel’s bill] out is because CNN did a piece, The New York Times did a piece, The Washington Post did a piece, the New York Daily News did a piece,” he says. “No bill of mine would have had an effect, but it was blowing the whistle that made them say, ‘We’re not going to go there. We’re getting rid of this bill.’” Shortly after, the bill lost steam, and Noel decided against pushing for a floor vote. Dabakis can’t help but feel partly responsible. “That’s my power to countervail this great majority,” he says. “If you’re a conscientious legislator, you use the whole toolbox, and so far, we don’t have a big toolbox as Democrats.”

Sen. Jim Dabakis calls House Bill 155, Utah's controversial .05 DUI law, a "giant political blunder" at a rally on March 17, 2017.


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“We’re a red state, but we’re not a redneck state,” Dabakis says. “So even though I disagree with Gov. Herbert a lot and I think he’s dithering too much and he’s not as bold a leader as I want, when I look at a lot of the crazy governors … these fringe ideologs, I think, ‘Thank God we have Gov. Herbert and Jon Huntsman before.’ Even though they are wrong policy-wise, they are not nutcases.”

A DEFIANT VOICE

Senate Minority Leader Gene Davis, D-Salt Lake City, remembers offering advice to Dabakis, who as party chair had earned a reputation for throwing haymakers. Davis suggested that Dabakis—then a freshman—be disciplined and focused in his opposition, and when debating, stick to the matter at hand. More than half a decade later, Davis says Dabakis followed his advice. “Sen. Dabakis has been a good, strong voice for his district. He’s outspoken and he speaks his mind on issues,” Davis says. “He’s in probably the most progressive district in the state, and he represents the folks in that district very, very well. And he tends to get along with those on the other side of the aisle.” The reality, Davis says, is that no Democratic senator passes a lot of bills. “Do I pass a lot of bills? Probably not as many as I’d like,” he says. “Our job is not to run the show; it’s to respond to the show.” Although Davis doesn’t have Dabakis’ flair, he respects his colleague for standing up and making his opposition known. He hopes his replacement will be a strong leader. “His voice and his spirit are going to be missed,” Davis asserts. Retiring from the public sector, Dabakis will continue to run Utah Progressives (UP), a grassroots outreach campaign for Utah liberals. Here, Dabakis is in his element. Conceptualizing it as a counterbalance to the conservative Utah Eagle Forum, UP has snowballed over the last two years through broadcast social media content and an email newsletter blast that reaches some 63,000 inboxes. In this capacity, Dabakis also has found room to pull political stunts. On March 31, 2017, Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, braced for a town hall meeting in West High School. Dabakis knew what was in store: Stewart was going to get an earful from his constituents, akin to the reception Rep. Jason Chaffetz received a month earlier in a town hall meeting that went so disastrously off script that it became a viral, referential postmark in Chaffetz’ tenure. At the time, the response from Chaffetz’ camp was that the loud and sustained boos came from paid rabble rousers. Dabakis expected the same rhetorical line from Stewart. “[Stewart] reserved the auditorium, which allowed him to say who could go in or out,” Dabakis reflects. “So we rented the corridor outside the hallway, and he couldn’t stop us. We gave him permission to walk through our corridor to get to his town hall.” Dabakis set up shop handing out 10-ruble notes featuring a picture of Lenin as the line snaked past—sardonically labeling each person a paid protester.

LANDSLIDE JIM

For decades, Dabakis made a living dealing art, mostly in Russia. But when a Russian business partner ripped him off, Dabakis returned home and spiraled into severe depression, he says. Around 2010, after consulting with his husband, Stephen, and his father, Dabakis turned to politics and decided to run for “the one thing I thought I could win”— the Democratic state party chair. Two years later, he eyed the state Senate. In a special election to fill newly elected Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams’ seat, he narrowly beat out former Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon by six delegate votes, earning him the antithetic nickname “Landslide Jim,” according to Dabakis. Since then, Dabakis says politics has permeated his bones, but the Senate is in need of new blood. “It’s been my life and I’m not complaining,” he reflects. “I’ve loved every minute of it, but I also believe in a citizen legislature. People leave their firms and their art dealerships and doctors offices, and they go up and concentrate and do the work, but then you’ve got to get the hell out.” CW

DABAKIS ON DABAKIS The candid senator looks back on some of his more memorable quotes. By Enrique Limón | editor@cityweekly.net |

T

he second floor of the Senate Office Building is about to get a lot quieter. That’s where for the better part of the past six years, Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, has machined the viral mystique that has tinged his tenure. Fine art in gilded frames decorates one side of his compact working area—remnants, he says, from his days as an art dealer to the Russian elite—while a desk of sorts (a table covered with a picnic-style vinyl cloth and fake, toy food), a logo-emblazoned banner backdrop and professional lights hanging from above fill out the other side of the space. “The job of the person from Senate District 2 is a sacred, holy seat. And I think the job for somebody who sits in this chair, is to be a voice for 40 percent of Utah. Not just in Salt Lake City, but all over the state, and so the way to have influence is not to lose every vote 24-5, it is this way—talking over Facebook; letting the message out; it’s tweeting; it’s having 30,000 Facebook friends—that’s the only way to get the message out,” he says of the impromptu TV studio. “If you play by their rules, you’ll lose every vote.” As the senator adjusts his pink tie (“I like to make people uncomfortable,” Dabakis says of the choice with a wink), he’s confronted with some of his more indelible remarks, and with the buoyancy of a freshly popped bottle of bubbly, gives updated context for a meta experience. True to form, he’ll go off the record several times with a cat-that-atethe-canary grin, leaving his best, most unabashed comments on the cutting room floor. Quote No. 1: “The mayor evolved on LGBT issues, but I wouldn’t exactly call him a Harvey Milk. It just hasn’t been a top issue with him.” -On former Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker, City Weekly, July 15, 2015. Dabakis on Dabakis: “What can I say? … Ralph was a beloved mayor.” (Laughs) “[It’s] like asking the NBA to come up with new rules for lacrosse. Having Utah be on the cutting-edge of national liquor laws, simply doesn’t make sense.” -Anti-HB155 gathering at the Capitol, March 17, 2017. DoD: “Well, I was right. The whole State Legislature was wrong, and we’re gonna pay a huge price in tourism and in economic development—that’s pretty serious.”

@enriquelimon

“Today I said YES to serving on the UTA Board of Trustees (pending approval by the SLC Council). I realize there may be some heartburn in some circles.” -Press release, May 31, 2017. DoD: “Right. Well, the Utah Transit Authority and the City Council won the sprint, but I won the marathon because we totally obliterated the governing method of the whole corrupt UTA and I’m proud to have done that … and I’m grateful to the Salt Lake City Council for doing the wrong thing, because I think that went a long way toward motivating the destruction of the UTA board.” “I am grateful that I was able to play a part in bringing the ‘homos and the Momos’ together with the historic 2015 LGBTQ NonDiscrimination Law ...” -Facebook post announcing he wouldn’t be seeking re-election, Feb. 20. DoD: “It was hard, but at least for one brief, shining moment, we were there all together like Camelot.” “I went out and had breakfast and had two mimosas and I feel perfectly fine.” -Speaking before the Senate Transportation Committee during a legislative hearing, Feb. 22. DoD: “Look, this is preposterous, having these men make the liquor laws. It’s like—what is a very strange combination?—it’s like having vegetarians write the rules for slaughterhouses. You know? It makes no sense. It’s just crazy.” “HB 481, ‘Donald J. Trump Utah National Parks Highway Designation’ passed House Committee 9 to 2. If it gets to the Senate, I will present an amendment that the frontage road be designated as the Stormy Daniels rampway.” -Twitter post, March 5. DoD: “I’m a little disappointed, because I think the Stormy Daniels Rampway would have been a big tourist attraction. We would have picked exit ramps with a lot of curves, and ones that … well, OK, I can’t go down that road.” (Laughs) CW


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18 | APRIL 5, 2018

Pete Lee

Pete Lee’s unassuming style and Everyman appeal aren’t necessarily in sync with your typical 21st-century stand-up type. He is, by his own description, “tall, dark and pleasant.” He’s also become something of a comedy sensation in the past decade. Likewise, his self-effacing humor and Midwestern persona imbue him with a generally upbeat attitude that’s fairly uncommon. “Most comedians think they’re being ‘real’ onstage by being negative,” Lee said via email. “But there is another side of the truth: Positivity. I love to do humor that finds the deeper truth in life. There is something fun in everything.” It’s a combination that has worked well for him since the beginning, starting with his debut on Comedy Central in 2005, and a subsequent appearance at the Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. In 2008, Lee became a finalist on NBC’s Last Comic Standing and made his acting debut on As The World Turns. By year’s end, he could claim his own Comedy Central half hour special. A favorite on college campuses, he picked up a web show on MSN.com, and was subsequently hired as a writer and cast member on FUSE TV’s Video on Trial, the NFL Network’s Top 10’s, VH1’s Best Week, Nickelodeon’s Nicktoons, Comedy Central’s Roast Battle and his own Comedy Central Snapchat Show. With all those projects underway, one wonders how he acquires so much material. “I get my inspiration from making fun of myself,” he insists. “I absolutely roast myself on stage. The best jokes are where people go, ‘Oh wow! I totally do that, too!’” (Lee Zimmerman) Pete Lee @ Wiseguys Gateway, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 6-7, 7:30 p.m. & 9 p.m., $15, wiseguyscomedy.com

KARYN ALLEN

DAV.D PHOTOGRAPHY

ROSHAN MOYAD

FRIDAY 4/6

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, APRIL 5-11, 2018

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

FRIDAY 4/6

SATURDAY 4/7

If your idea of a Broadway musical was shaped by Rodgers & Hammerstein, grandly operatic works or even rambunctious comedies like The Producers or The Book of Mormon, Fun Home might feel like an outlier. After all, it’s based on an autobiographical graphic novel by Alison Bechdel—namesake of the “Bechdel test” for female representation in movies—about her experience coming out as gay, and her complicated relationship with her closeted gay father, Bruce. It’s hard to envision big dance numbers for such a story. But from the perspective of Jason Bowcutt— director of Salt Lake Acting Co.’s regional premiere of this 2015 Tony Award winner for Best Musical—there’s no need to limit what kind of material can inspire a musical. “At the Signature Theatre [in Washington, D.C.], the artistic director would emphasize, ‘It’s a written piece,’” Bowcutt recalls. “‘The reason people start to sing is because it’s the only way the next thing could be expressed.’” The show’s narrative moves back and forth in time, as a 43-year-old Alison reflects on two crucial points in her life: as a child, and as a college student discovering her sexuality. While the relationship between Alison and her father is a central component, so is the different ways that those two people were able to approach being gay. “There’s a lyric, ‘Am I just like you, Dad?’” Bowcutt says. “That’s the question the piece poses … It explores [Alison’s] capacity to come out, that she had the ability to come out [in the 1980s], as opposed to what Bruce had the capacity to do in his lifetime.” (Scott Renshaw) Fun Home @ Salt Lake Acting Company, 168 N. 500 West, 801-363-7522, April 6-May 13, dates and times vary, $15-$42, saltlakeactingcompany.org

Ideally, a dance performance should have an audience mesmerized by the seemingly effortless ways dancers glide across the stage. But talented people pour hundreds of hours of labor into each performance, and these artisans often go unsung. Highlighting some of this invisible artistic labor is Body Logic Dance Co.’s second annual Choreography Festival, which includes four open-to-the-public classes in modern, hip-hop, jazz and Afro-fusion/samba dance, as well as a competition dedicated to choreographers starting their dance careers. Serena Webb, co-artistic director, says it’s uncommon for choreographers to be spotlighted in general. “I feel like in the entertainment world, we focus on these amazing dancers,” Webb says. “But one of the biggest parts of the dance world is actually choreography.” The festival sets no stylistic limit on choreographers, though most of this year’s performances are contemporary and modern dance. This includes a rare aerial dance piece, a subgenre of modern dance rarely spotlighted in Utah. Since dance styles vary, Webb says the three judges—representing established local dance companies—don’t dwell on dancer skill, but instead focus on how well the choreographers craft their routines, and their ability to convey a theme through them. Those judges will also offer feedback both choreographers and audience can learn from. “It’s something that if you go to college for dance, you get to hear all the time, but our audience doesn’t understand what goes into choreographing,” Webb says. “They’re going to come out of there with an education in dance.” (Kylee Ehmann) Body Logic Dance Festival @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-5663010, April 7, Master Classes: 9 a.m.4 p.m., $18-$65; Adjudication Concert:  7 p.m., $15, bodylogicdance.com

Salt Lake Acting Co.: Fun Home

JOAN MARCUS

ESSENTIALS

the

Body Logic Dance Festival

WEDNESDAY 4.11

Broadway at the Eccles: Hamilton: An American Musical

Hey, wait, is Hamilton coming to town? I hadn’t heard anything about it. All kidding aside, every once in a while a Broadway musical hits town for the first time with so much buzz—think Wicked or The Book of Mormon—that it feels like a genuine happening. Such is the case for the 2016 Tony Award-winning Best Musical, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. From the moment it exploded onto Broadway in August 2015, it has been a phenomenon, inspiring unique interest and expanding the musical theater audience. And it’s easy to understand why. Creator LinManuel Miranda took the story of 18th-century America’s founding fathers and the Revolutionary War and turned it upside-down, casting characters like Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr and Thomas Jefferson with non-white actors as a way to emphasize the American story as an immigrant story. The songs—with their mix of traditional musical-theater melodies and rapidfire rap lyrics—further accentuated the show’s sense of inviting everyone into the experience. While the entire run of the show is officially sold out—the tickets having been scooped up online with a desperation generally associated with Black Friday deals at Walmart—there is still a way to get a seat. Visit hamiltonmusical.com/ lottery to register for daily opportunities to purchase some of the 40 $10 orchestra tickets per performance, beginning 11 a.m. two days before each show date, and closing 9 a.m. the day before show date. Only one entry for two tickets is allowed per person, but you don’t want to be throwing away your shot. (SR) Broadway at the Eccles: Hamilton: An American Musical @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, April 11-May 6, dates and times vary, $10 ticket lottery at hamiltonmusical.com/lottery


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After #MeToo A new play two years in the making addresses sexual assault in a new landscape. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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hen the Weber State University theater department world-premieres Class of ’94, it would be easy to see a “torn from today’s headlines” quality in its story of the aftermath of, and response to, a sexual assault. Of course, that would ignore the fact that the project has been two years in the making. In a sense, it might even go back further than that, to the 2014 first meeting between playwright Diana Grisanti, playwright-inresidence at Louisville, Ky.’s Theatre [502], and director Jennifer Kokai, an associate professor of theater at Weber State. Or to the fact that Grisanti and Kokai both grew up in Louisville, and even attended the same high school at different times. But the process that would lead to Class of ’94 began in earnest in 2016, as Kokai prepared for WSU’s quadrennial season of all-new plays, including receiving a visiting artist grant to commission a new play. “Jenny sent me an email and asked, ‘How much are you charging these days for a commission?’” Grisanti recalls. “I thought she was going to be writing something herself, and was asking for negotiation advice. I was all set to give her my rules for playing hardball.” Instead, Grisanti was given free rein to develop any idea she wanted. What came to her was a concept inspired by a story told to her by a friend, about an incident at a Catholic high school, where a beloved guidance counselor had been fired. “One of the girls had confided in her that she’d been sexually assaulted,” Grisanti says, “and the counselor didn’t report it to her parents, breaking mandatory reporting rules. My friend is telling me all the details, but absent from the story was the guy who had committed the assault. I thought, ‘That’s an interesting idea for the play.’” A university commissioning a new play is a rare occurrence, and it offered Grisanti some rare artistic freedom. Where most playwrights tend to limit the number of actors required for a play, since plays with smaller casts are more likely to get produced, Grisanti realized she could put 22 cast members in Class of ’94. “[In college], they’re all unpaid,” she says with a laugh, “so I don’t have to worry about it.” As challenging as it was to write scenes featuring so many characters, there was also a thematically appropriate component to the large cast, according to Kokai. “It allows us to really have a bunch of voices,” she says. “At the end of the day, ‘don’t rape

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people’ is a fairly easy perspective to have. What’s complicated is how different people react.” Once Grisanti had settled on her subject, the development process for Class of ’94 involved multiple steps. In fall 2016, Grisanti visited Ogden to meet with students about their lives and perspectives on sexual violence. She began the writing process, did a workshop of the piece at Theatre [502] last summer, then returned this winter to further revise and work with the cast members. “The week I was there, could actually hear the words in the mouth of the actor,” she says. “I made some changes like, for example, ‘Oh, this joke isn’t landing. It’s not the right actor/joke combination.’” Then there was the unexpected confluence of the play’s development with the #MeToo movement, and a brighter spotlight shining on harassment and sexual violence. “That was a total coincidence,” Kokai says, “[The play] is not didactic, and it’s not propaganda. … But some of the lines were altered. One of the things a character says now is, ‘We’re in a moment when people are believing women.’” That dynamic was significant for Grisanti, who was determined to avoid some of the pitfalls she identified in other dramatic works about sexual assault. “In the play, no one ever questions the assault,” Grisanti says. “That was important, to never ask, ‘Well, did it happen?’ I find that question boring and inauthentic to real people’s experiences. “It’s tempting for a dramatist to make this the question. But what other questions

Estephani Cerros in Class of ’94

are dramatic that we can be asking around sexual violence? … What is the balance between punishment and reconciliation? Do we ostracize people who commit violence, or try to reform them? How do communities heal after something like this?” While audiences might come in with expectations about the subject matter based on media headlines, Kokai focuses on the work of crafting the best production possible, while also recognizing the delicacy of the subject matter. “We did think a lot about triggers and how audience members might be impacted by the performance,” she says. “That’s why we strategically partnered with the Women’s Center, to provide resources and also outlets for those who have experienced sexual assault.” “It’s been weird to feel this seismic shift,” Grisanti says. “For people in social justice circles, like me and most women, we already knew that shit was fucked up. So I guess the feeling is, other people are finally seeing what we’ve seen all this time.” CW

CLASS OF ’94

Val A. Browning Center 1901 University Circle, Ogden Weber State University April 6-14 Dates and times vary $11-$13 weberstatetickets.com


moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Alexis Furlong creates artificial representations of flowers as a way to explore the commodification of the natural world in Radical Botanical at Office Evolution (221 25th St., Ogden, officeevolution.com), part of the April First Friday Ogden Gallery Stroll, April 6, 6-8 p.m.

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

Body Logic Dance Festival Rose Wagner Center Black Box Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, April 7, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Modern Dance Senior Concert Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, Ste. 106, April 5 & April 12, 5:30 p.m.; April 6-7 & April 13-14, 7:30 p.m., dance.utah.edu Riverdance Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through April 8, broadway-at-the-eccles.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

COMEDY & IMPROV

Pete Lee Wiseguys Gateway, 194 S. 400 West, April 6-7, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18) Todd Johnson Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, April 6-7, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Jay Whittaker Wiseguys Jordan Landing, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, April 6-7, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

APRIL 5, 2018 | 21

Jen Sincero: You Are a Badass at Making Money Barnes & Noble University Crossings Plaza, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, April 11, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Kate Jarvik Birch: Unraveled The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 5, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Kristen Eliason: Picture Dictionary Carolyn Tanner Irish Humanities Building, 215 Central Campus Drive, April 10, 7:30 p.m., kingsenglish.com Neeli Cherkovski: Elegy for My Beat Generation Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, April 11, 7 p.m., slcpl.org

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AUTHOR APPEARANCES

LITERATURE

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Kevin Kenner Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, April 6, 7:30 p.m., bachauer.com New Paradigm Trio Gallivan Center, 239 Main St., April 5, 7:30 p.m., excellenceconcerts.org Utah Symphony: Tchaikovsky’s “Little Russian” & Prokoviev with Conrad Tao Abravanel Hall, 123 S. West Temple, April 6-7, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

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Cabaret SLCC Black Box Theatre, 1575 S. State, April 5-14, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., slcc.edu Class of ‘94 Val A. Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, April 6-14, dates and times vary, weber.edu (see p. 20) Hamilton Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2797, April 11-May 16, broadway-at-the-eccles.com (see p. 18) Etiquette Desert Edge Brewery and Watchtower Cafe, through April 15, dates and times vary, sackerson.org Fun Home Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through May 13, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org (see p. 18) Jump Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, through April 15, 2 p.m., 4 p.m. and 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org The Lion King Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through April 16, dates and times vary, broadway-at-the-eccles.com The Memory of Water Westminster College Dumke Auditorium, 1840 S. 1300 East, through April 14, dates and times vary, halecenter.org Molly & Peter Southern Utah University Black Box Theatre, 351 W. University Blvd., Cedar City, through April 7, 7:30 p.m., suu.edu/pva Our Country’s Good Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-7100, Apr. 6-Apr. 15, times and dates vary, theatre.utah.edu Short Attention Span Theatre Noorda Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, through April 7, 7 & 9 p.m., uvu.edu Tuck Everlasting Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, April 2-May 31, dates and times vary, hct.org Twelfth Night Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through April 14, times vary, pioneertheatre.org A View from the Bridge The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through April 7, dates and times vary, grandtheatrecompany.com The Viva La DIVA Show Club X, 445 S. 400 West, April 7, 8 p.m., thevivaladivashow.com

DANCE


SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Dragon Lights SLC Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, through May 6, dragonlightsslc.com Wasatch Mountain Film Festival Multiple locations, through April 8, wasatchfilmfestival.org Thin Air Innovation Festival Park City, April 5-7, thinairparkcity.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Neri Oxman: Innovation in Design Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, April 6, 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

VISUAL ART

22 | APRIL 5, 2018

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Alexis Furlong: Radical Botanical Office Evolution, 221 25th St., Ogden, April 6, 6-8 p.m., officeevolution.com (see p. 21) Banyan Fierer: Seeing Unseen Art Access II Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through April 13, accessart.org Bob Hope: An American Treasure Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through April 28, culturalcelebration.org Blaine Clayton and Nina Plant: From Painting to Pottery Local Colors Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through April 18, localcolorsart.com Blue Nude Migration Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, through May 12, slcpl.org Cory Dumont: Artwork Chapman Branch Library, 577 S. 900 West, through April 26, times vary, slcpl.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 26, utahmoca.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 13, utahmoca.org Ellen Marie Lewis: Visions Seldom All They Seem Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through April 20, slcpl.org Elizabeth M. Claffey: Matrilinear Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through May 11, granaryartcenter.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Fahamu Pecou: DO or DIE: Affect, Ritual, Resistance Shaw Gallery, Weber State University, 3964 W. Campus Drive, Ogden, through April 7, weber.edu/shawgallery Familiar Flora: Four Visual Responses to Living With Plants Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through May 11, visualarts.utah.gov Florescentia: Works by Emily Fox King Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through May 4, visualarts.utah.gov

Gavan Nelson: River Inside Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, through May 18, times vary, slcpl.org Intermountain Society of Artists Spring Show Visual Art Institute, 2901 S. Highland Drive, April 9-29, visualartinstitute.org Jake Gilson: Ripening “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through April 7, agalleryonline.com Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Mandelman & Ribak Exhibition Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Marcia Walke Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through April 22, redbuttegarden.org McGarren Flack: Vulnerability Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through April 13, accessart.org Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 12, utahmoca.org Nicole Pietrantoni: Alas, Alack Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through April 15, kimballartcenter.org Randy Laub and Stephanie Swift Salt Lake Culinary Center, 2233 S. 300 East, through March 30, saltlakeculinarycenter.com River Inside: Photographs by Gavan Nelson Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org Spencer Finch: Great Salt Lake and Vicinity Utah Museum of Fine Arts, March 30, 7 p.m., umfa.utah.edu Sugar-Coated Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through April 14, saltlakearts.org Thomas B. Szalay: Images from Timeless Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 31, slcpl.org Todd Powelson: The Thunder, Perfect Mind Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through April 21 Tom Howard / Simone Simonian Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through April 13, phillips-gallery.com Trent Alvey & Claudia Sisemore: What I Did on My Summer Vacation Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through April 13, slcpl.org Upcycle Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through April 29, urbanartsgallery.org Urban Visions Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through April 29, urbanartsgallery.org Visions Seldom All They Seem: DoubleExposure Photography by Ellen Marie Lewis Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through April 20, slcpl.org


ENRIQUE LIMÓN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Thursday, 6-9:30 p.m; Friday-Saturday, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Best bet: The delectable filet Oscar Can’t miss: Spring the extra $4 for the sour cream cheesecake

APRIL 5, 2018 | 23

This peculiarity made me a little nervous, truth be told. I’ve typically had bad experiences with restaurants that add some kind of gimmick to their presentation—the now-closed Mayan and its stable of cliff divers come to mind—because they tend to think they can get away with charging you extra for dinner and a show.

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Now that I’ve gotten that out of my system, let’s unpack this peculiar place, shall we? Initial research revealed a peculiar air surrounding The Five Alls: It’s only open during dinner hours three days a week; they only serve fivecourse meals; and its interior has been painstakingly stylized as an Old English pub.

G

ood morrow and salutations, dear readers! As one whose knavish exploits hath trod culinary paths both delightsome and dour, I dare adventure my discretion to proclaim The Five Alls (1458 S. Foothill Drive, 801-582-1400, fivealls.com) a most worthy destination for evening festivities. Dost thy jowls froth at the mention of a five-course supper? Dost thy eye revere rustic craftsmanship and lusty environs? Then I prithee, unbend thyself and make way to The Five Alls.

meat closest to the bone was tough to cut through, and even tougher to chew. Along with this brief misstep, our service was a little slower than it should have been. My friends and I were fully prepared to spend a few hours here, because multi-course meals aren’t typically served in quick succession, but our wait to be seated was longer than I expected, even though we had a reservation. The tableside service also had some pacing hiccups—some courses were delivered promptly and others were not, setting an uneven time frame for the meal. Despite a few minor issues with the evening, I fully expect to add The Five Alls to my list of destination dining spots in Salt Lake. Anyone who has even a slight tinge anglophilic blood in their system is sure to feel the same. Gramercy! CW

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The Five Alls takes diners back in time—in a good way.

of going to The Five Alls is to feast, and feasting did readily commence. Service consists of five courses, with a choice of entrée. The menu is a tad on the pricier side—come ready to drop a good $40-$50 per person—but, with a few exceptions, the food is worth the price. A few of the starters were one-note and could create a misrepresentation of the main courses’ quality—the sour cream heavy-clam dip is not as good as the sour cream-heavy herring—but that’s not what you came for anyway. The chef recommendations are all great bets, chief among them the pictured filet Oscar ($51). It’s a lovely filet mignon, topped with the glorious combination of king crab, asparagus and béarnaise. Even without a sauce medley that would make a boot taste good, this tender filet was exactly what I was hoping for. Despite its stigma as a culinary cliché, the chicken Kiev ($30) made good use of its buttery stuffing—its crisp exterior yields to some truly tender and juicy chicken. The stuffed pork chop ($34) had the potential to be one of the highlights of the menu, but ours happened to be overcooked—the

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Renaissance Fare

Based on my experience with The Five Alls, that’s not its angle at all. Yes, it’s just barely toeing the line between cheesy and tasteful, and yes, the waitresses wear corsets, but there’s an endearing sincerity going on here. If you’ve ever been to a renaissance fair and enjoyed yourself, there’s a good chance you’d feel right at home here. Broadswords and shields decorate the walls, tables come complete with pewter mugs and charger plates and backlit stained glass windows depict each of the five “alls”—the story of which is cleverly described within each menu. In many ways, the sheer fact that a place like this exists in Salt Lake was enough to ignite my enthusiasm. It’s a ballsy move to scrape so deliberately against the grain of restaurant culture by opening an atmosphereheavy eatery like this, even ballsier to continue serving dishes like chicken Kiev and filet Oscar, and ballsier still to keep the place open for close to 50 years. The restaurant’s adherence to the traditions that originally brought it to life, exude a defiant confidence that’s instantly captivating. Bells and whistles aside, the point


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FOOD MATTERS

coffee, crepes & a mic

BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

sustain yourself!

Street cart-style corn at Alemexo

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 01-466-3 2 7 3 DEREK CARLISLE

7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m.

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

SLC’S newest sushi lounge

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

New Menu at Alamexo

Based on customer feedback, the team at Alamexo Cantina (1059 E. 900 South, 801-658-5859, alamexocantina.com) have moved to differentiate their menu from that of their sister restaurant. The cantina’s spring menu features dishes like enchiladas con mole Poblano and enchiladas Suizas, plus new tacos like the smoky tacos de pollo y adobo and tacos de pescado mixtos for seafood lovers. Additional items include the sweet and savory plátanos con crema and elotes de la calle, the popular—and tasty—street-cart-style corn on the cob with lime aioli and queso fresco. ¡Provecho!

Award Winning Donuts

Tip Your Servers 488 E 100 S 801.359.2092 hamachislc.com

Last December, the Department of Labor and the National Restaurant Association proposed legislation that would allow restaurant owners to keep their employees’ tips without offering a pay raise. It’s the kind of despicable move that isn’t terribly surprising considering the massive deluge of ickiness that the Trump administration is currently vomiting all over the country. But the good news is that the move failed. Opposition gained bipartisan support, and tips for restaurant workers have secured federal protection. The situation also serves as yet another warning for future organizations to stop giving themselves names that abbreviate to NRA.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

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Our friendly farmers market to the south is getting ready for another bounteous year of local grocers, growers and green thumbs. As they get closer to opening day (May 12), event organizers are holding vendor meetings in the Ancestor Square courtyard (St. George Boulevard and Main, ancestorsquare.com) on Tuesday, April 10 at 5 p.m. and Saturday, April 14 at 10 a.m. First time vendors are encouraged to attend. Previous vendors may also wish to participate as there have been a few changes since last year. Quote of the Week: “A cannibal is a person who walks into a restaurant and orders a waiter.” —Morey Amsterdam Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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Hunter 801-417-8290 5620 W. 4100 S.

So. Salt Lake 801-467-8343 275 E. 3300 S.

Sandy 801-566-0706 7669 S. 700 E.

Downtown 801-746-7499 470 S. 700 E.

Kearns/ W. Jordan 801-982-7499 4950 W. 6200 S.

APRIL 5, 2018 | 25

West Valley 801-613-4991 3576 W. 3500 S.

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Passion fruit vs. orange make for two very different beers. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

W

henever possible, I like to try get all of the flavor details on the newest local offerings hitting Utah’s craft beer scene. This week, there are two brand-new fruited beers that are very different in flavor and construction. Epic Brainless Passion Fruit: This beer pours a clear, bright straw color that’s tinged with rose highlights. After a lessthan-agressive pour, the head started with one finger of loosely foamy and rather bubbly white that faded to a ring clinging to the edge of a tulip glass. The aroma has a fresh passion fruit bouquet that intermingles with the spicier aspects of the beer’s Belgian yeast strain. The yeast adds notes of clove, which gives it a sweetly medicinal

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26 | APRIL 5, 2018

MIKE RIEDEL

A Fruitful Discussion

zap as it intermingles with some metallic alcohol. All of this can’t manage to stifle the subtle graham cracker bed the malts create at the beer’s base. The taste starts bready, light and doughy, with more graham cracker malts. From here, the passion fruit kicks in. The flavors are tart with tropical sweetness, notably, nuances of pineapple, papaya, mango, citrus and guava. Now the base beer takes over. This Belgian-style golden ale is, at its core, a yeast-driven beer. The phenolic yeast flavors are hard to miss, and smack you in the face with spicy notes of clove and coriander. This carries into the finish, which takes on a well-behaved estery booziness. Overall: This is an excellent, fruited 8.8 percent ABV Belgian-style golden ale. Although this is not the typical pairing of fruit and beer, it works because the brewers took care to make sure all of the flavors—from all parts of the beer—don’t overshadow the others. If you’re looking for fruit-driven beer, this is probably not the one for you. I invite you to get to know this newest edition to Epic’s Brainless line of beers. Squatters Chasing Tail Orange Golden Ale: Chasing Tail has been a staple at Squatters for the past 13 years. It started in Squatters’ downtown brewpub as a draft-only offering, and soon made it to the bottling line, and is currently enjoyed around the state in cans. This

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BEER NERD

newest incarnation of Chasing Tail is a slightly amped-up version, dialing in at 5.5 percent ABV plus the additional orange flavoring. This American-style golden ale pours a hazy amber color with orange highlights. The head is sudsy and sturdy with impressive staying power. The nose takes you straight to the orange crates of your local supermarket produce section. You get aromas of orange syrup, cascade hops and a hint of pepper. At first sip, orange dominates. It starts off more or less natural-seeming, but starts to taste like an Orange Crush by mid-palate. At this point, some of the hops begin asserting themselves, adding bitterness and a bit of pith to make the orange flavoring seem

more natural. All of these aggressive flavors are rounded out in the back end with a bit of biscuit and pine. Overall: There’s no question that this is all beer; it doesn’t drift into the realm of shandies or malternatives. However, like many fruited brews that are popular right now, this one is aimed toward the craft beer newbie, or those who aren’t particularly fond of more traditional beers. These are two good examples of beers that are on different ends of the difficulty scale. While they are both fruity and tasty, neither one is guaranteed to appeal to all palates. I’ve done your homework for you. Now go out, decide and buy. As always, cheers! CW

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Fratelli Ristorante

Fratelli has been the winner of the Best Italian category several times over in City Weekly’s annual Best of Utah issue, and there’s little doubt why: Owners Pete and Dave Cannella created a menu traditional to homeland Italy, they preach and practice the use of fresh ingredients and they treat everyone who walks through the door like family. Their Italian fare includes an expansive list of pizzas, pastas and salads, as well as a beer and wine list. Save some room for the delectable tiramisu. 9236 S. Village Shop Drive, Sandy, 801495-4550, fratelliutah.com

Myung Ga

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wntown *Only at do location

123 E 200 S 801-355-0343 Salt Lake City

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

1891 Fort Union Blvd 885 E 3900 S 801-942-1333 801-269-1177 Cottonwood Heights Murray

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm & Fri-Sat 11am-10pm | www.MyCancunCafe.com

O D H E AV E N FO ManADN sen & Restauran s e t a G EGR c i l e erm t

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This eatery takes Korean barbecue to another level with sizzling and hefty portions of beef, chicken and pork. Along with the barbecue options, they also dish up insanely good dumplings; soups filled to the brim with scallops, shrimp and other seafood, and a cucumber kimchi that is out of this world. Myung Ga is capable of dishing up a quick meal for a lunch break or an extensive, authentic Korean meal for a pleasing dinner. 3353 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801953-0478

Paris Bistro

With an experienced staff of cooks and courteous service, Paris Bistro gives dining guests an experience much like you’d find on the Champs-Élysées. The filet mignon with squash blossoms and zucchini gratin is superb, and the lemongrass crème brûlée will satisfy even the pickiest of palates. An extensive wine list perfectly complements the exquisite cuisine. 1500 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-486-5585, theparis.net

Silver Fork Lodge

Nestled in picturesque Big Cottonwood Canyon, this cabin-like restaurant has something for every season. Taking in the view from Silver Fork’s large deck makes for a perfect environment to enjoy a chorizo sandwich or salmon Benedict in fine weather, but cozying up to the fire with a baked-fresh-daily cinnamon roll and hot cocoa (or cider) and watching the snow fall isn’t a bad option, either. If you get stranded in the snow, no worries: Silver Fork Lodge is just that—a lodge. Spend the night with them and get breakfast free the next morning, and you can also take advantage of their free shuttle to Brighton and Solitude to get your ski on. 11332 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Brighton, 801-533-9977, silverforklodge.com

Go

Greek

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH ● 521-6567


REVIEW BITES

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

A sample of our critic’s reviews

Pretty Bird

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Viet Pham’s highly anticipated new hot chicken enterprise has finally opened its doors, and the restaurant’s small interior is resplendent with the smell of frying oil and hot sauce. At the moment, the only two options on the menu are a fried chicken sandwich ($10.50) and a quarter bird ($9.50), which can both be made into combo meals for a couple bucks more. You get the choice of mild, medium, hot or “hot behind”—named for the warning line cooks yell when they’re running behind you with something molten. The “hot behind” sandwich comes topped with cider coleslaw, pickles and Pretty Bird Sauce—a magical blend of spices and aioli. The first thing I noticed was the complementary crunch that comes from the slaw, pickles and that oh-so-juicy fried chicken. Each bite is a glorious ode to texture, and then the nuanced spice ensemble starts to kick in. With every subsequent bite, the pepper flavor starts to build until it’s kissing the back of your throat. The balance of flavor and texture in this outwardly unassuming sandwich is not just pretty—it’s damned near beautiful. That’s a motherclucking good thing. Reviewed March 8. 146 S. Regent St., prettybirdchicken.com Stop In For Some Handcrafted Grilled Cheese Goodness!

GET $6

OFF

752 W. Blue Vista Lane Midvale, Ut 84047 801-432-7906

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

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“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

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SPEND $12

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4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM


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FILM REVIEW

Refined Crude

CINEMA

Blockers serves up its grossout gags with a side order of sentiment. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

W

hether or not American Pie is entirely to blame, I can’t say. But it’s the earliest instance I can recall of a phenomenon that rubs me the wrong way to this day: Crude, in-your-face comedies that feel obliged to neutralize all the bracing acidity with a heaping dose of sweetness. Perhaps it speaks more to some pathological need to compartmentalize genres, like making sure all the different foods on my plate never touch. I also fondly remember a time when a Mel Brooks comedy or Animal House could hit theatrical screens with an anarchic sense of what could be used as a punch line, and no accompanying need to teach us Very Important Lessons. For 20 years, some of the most successful R-rated comedies—from Wedding Crashers to The Hangover to Bridesmaids—have made sure to let us know between did-theyreally-just-do-that gags that they also care about, you know, people and emotions and stuff. Blockers begins with exactly the kind of concept that’s custom-designed for such an approach. From a prologue that introduces us to the lifelong friendship between Julie, Kayla and Samantha—as their respective parents, Lisa (Leslie Mann), Mitchell (John Cena) and Hunter (Ike Barinholtz) send them off on their first day of school—we spin through a montage toward prom night of the girls’ senior year of high school. Julie (Kathryn Newton) has decided that she’s going to take the opportunity to lose her virginity to her boyfriend, inspiring Kayla (Geraldine Viswanathan) to decide she will also have sex with her prom date, and Sam (Gideon Adlon) decides to join in even though she’s pretty sure she’s gay. When Lisa discovers a text about this pact, the three parents head out on a joint mission to make sure the trio of deflowerings don’t happen. If the entire premise seems grotesquely

retrograde, the script by Brian and Jim Kehoe is perfectly aware of it, including giving an irate speech to Mitchell’s wife (Sarayu Blue) about empowering female sexuality. It’s a neat little trick that Blockers manages to tap-dance around this idea in a way that makes the parents’ machinations even remotely sympathetic. It also manages to make those machinations pretty funny for much of the running time. It helps to begin with performers as game as Mann and Cena (a more endearing comedy beefcake than even Dwayne Johnson), who get terrific over-the-top moments for their characters. First-time director Kay Cannon (screenwriter for Pitch Perfect and creator of Netflix’s late, lamented, tarttongued Girlboss) allows Mann to show off her slapstick physicality as Lisa tries to escape undetected from Julie’s hotel room, while Cena’s uptight Mitchell endures a drinking game involving a beer enema. You’re also going to get stuff as rudimentary as a chain-reaction vomiting sequence straight out of Stand by Me, but with this solid cast—including Viswanathan, who is a revelation of comedic timing—most of the crude jokes land. Where they land, however, is in the middle of a story that keeps reminding you it’s about both coming-of-age and coming-ofmiddle-age. Our compassion for the parents is built around their difficulties facing the reality that their little girls aren’t little girls any more—that they’re going to move on, leaving the adults either alone or con-

Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz and John Cena in Blockers

fused or full of regret. Meanwhile, the action keeps returning to the young women and their own activities over the course of the evening, which are rarely as entertaining (except when Viswanathan is involved) and keep distracting from the parents and their well-meaning but emotionally fraught efforts at sexual sabotage. Blockers becomes a halting dance where the partners—raunchy jokes and the characters’ feelings—keep taking turns stepping on one another’s toes. Eventually, everyone discovers what they need to know about themselves, and about the other people in their lives, and a movie that includes things like fondled testicles and “ass beer” gives way to hugs and tears. Blockers has enough solid laughs to feel like a successful comedy, but movies of this kind always feel like they’re apologizing for their lack of decorum, like old-timey sex films had to pretend to be “educational” about marital relations. Sentiment has its place, but I’ll take my ass beer with no chaser, thanks. CW

BLOCKERS

BB.5 Leslie Mann John Cena Ike Barinholtz R

TRY THESE American Pie (1999) Jason Biggs Chris Klein R

Pitch Perfect (2012) Anna Kendrick Rebel Wilson PG-13

This Is 40 (2012) Paul Rudd Leslie Mann R

Trainwreck (2015) Amy Schumer Bill Hader R


NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BLOCKERS BB.5 See review on p. 30. Opens April 6 at theaters valleywide. (R) ISLE OF DOGS BBB.5 Twenty years in the future in the fictional city of Megasaki in Japan, all the dogs have been exiled to Trash Island after outbreaks of “dog flu” and “snout fever.” But then 12-year-old Atari (the voice of Koyu Rankin) sneaks onto the island to try to find his dog, Spots. Gruff Chief (the voice of Bryan Cranston)—a proud stray who doesn’t “believe in masters”—and his pals (the voices of Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray and Jeff Goldblum), who long for and miss their masters, will help him. Wes Anderson’s latest is absolutely delightful and utterly original, so deliciously odd and managing to pull off the rare feat of being funny and sad at the same time. But this question must be grappled with: Has Anderson engaged in unseemly appropriation of Japanese culture? Aside from one human character who has a tinge of “white savior” about her, this looks and feels like an affectionate homage to Japanese pop culture from anime to monster movies. Is it OK to enjoy such exoticism, as long as you don’t mistake it for true appreciation or understanding? Opens April 6 at Broadway Centre Cinema and Megaplex Jordan Commons. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

THE MIRACLE SEASON [not yet reviewed] A high-school volleyball teams tries to recover from the death of one of their teammates. Opens April 6 at theaters valleywide. (PG) A QUIET PLACE [not yet reviewed] A family tries to remain undetected by predatory, invading unearthly creatures. Opens April 6 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALPHAGO At Main Library, April 10, 7 p.m. (NR) THE BREADWINNER At Main Library, April 7, 11 a.m. (PG-13) A FANTASTIC WOMAN At Park City Film Series, April 6-7, 8 p.m. & April 8, 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING BBB It feels less like a sequel to Guillermo del Toro’s 2013 original than it does a better Transformers movie than anything Michael Bay could dream of. Ten years after the events of the first, scavenger Jake Pentecost (John Boyega)—son of Idris Elba’s heroic Stacker—has to rejoin the forces defending humanity from an extra-dimensional threat. The world-building is thinner here, and the first half is a slog through the throat-clearing and reluctant hero-ing of Jake and his young protégé (Cailee Spaeny). But Boyega and Spaeny are a major upgrade over Charlie Hunnam, providing a decent enough bridge to the reason we’re all here: watching giant things beat the crap out of one another. While this tale isn’t as directly indebted to Toho/Toei features, it brings enough mutated weirdness to the action that the silly sense of fun carries through. (PG-13)—SR READY PLAYER ONE BBB.5 Ernest Cline’s novel—about a dystopian future and a quest to win control over its omnipresent virtual-reality world—immersed readers in pop-culture minutiae to such a degree that nothing else mattered. Director Steven Spielberg gives more significance to the dystopian reality inhabited by protagonist Wade (Tye Sheridan), providing a bit of a moral for our perpetually-connected society. The movie still drops a lot of weapons-grade nostalgia, and while these details grow overwhelming in their ubiquity, it’s certainly more engaging to deal with the checklist of references in visual form, rather than hundreds of pages of text. Most of all, there’s Spielberg behind the camera, diving into fully digital realms with reckless energy. He understands that the pop art we fall in love with is based on creative spark, not just being old enough to nod at an Excalibur quote. (PG-13)—SR

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

THE DEATH OF STALIN BBBB Perhaps not since The Great Dictator has a filmmaker taken on such awful personalities and events, while attempting to make us laugh about them. Writer-director Armando Iannucci uses the machinations in the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death in 1953

to expose political muckety-mucks as terrified weasels jockeying for position. He’s adapting the graphic novel by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin, so the gall is not all his, but the inspired casting—Steve Buscemi as Nikita Khrushchev; Jeffrey Tambor as Stalin’s successor Georgy Malenkov; Jason Isaacs giving military honcho Georgy Zhukov an over-the-top Yorkshire accent—is. Above all, the absurdity of totalitarianism is mocked—that one man could instill such terror in so many people, and over such petty issues. It’s so tempting to try to connect it to the current deplorable state of politics. Better laugh while we can. (R)—MAJ

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THE LEISURE SEEKER B Ho ho! What an adventure! Isn’t it delightful to steal the family RV and leave Massachusetts for Florida when one of you has dementia caused by Alzheimer’s (Donald Sutherland) and one of you has terminal cancer (Helen Mirren)! Oh! And isn’t it hilarious when your adult children are nearly sick with worry! Oh, oh! And isn’t it a hoot when you find out your husband had an affair 40 years ago, and in a fit of rage you leave him at a dilapidated nursing home to die! And isn’t it grand to get angry at the Alzheimer’s patient because he has dementia! And isn’t a riot when he pees his pants! And isn’t it super great when your husband with Alzheimer’s forces his cancer-ridden wife to have sex after she nearly dies on a tour of Hemingway’s house in the Florida Keys! No? It’s not funny? It’s all totally contrived? Life isn’t like The Bucket List? Well, it should be! Duh, if you don’t get busy living, you’re going to get busy dying. TL;DR—Fuck this movie. Opens April 6 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—David Riedel

to keep Stanhope functional; and fresh-faced new arrival Raleigh (Asa Butterfield) comes to serve with his old friend Stanhope, who is engaged to Raleigh’s sister. Screenwriter Simon Reade adapts R.C. Sherriff’s novel and play into a portrait of anxious monotony, and men coping (or not) with that strain. Claflin captures a man whose leadership qualities are as evident as his alcoholism, leading a solid cast including Toby Jones as the company’s laconic cook. The moments of actual combat are sparse, leading to restlessness that might transfer from on-screen characters to viewers. But director Saul Dibb finds tension in unexpected places, like something as simple as a man wanting to forget for one minute that he’s about to undertake a suicide mission in seven minutes. Opens April 6 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Scott Renshaw

JOURNEY’S END BBB Silence dominates this different kind of war story, about the psychological strain of waiting. Set in March 1918, it focuses on three officers in a British Army company taking their six-day rotation in the trenches of northern France, just as a German push is expected to end the long stalemate. Company commander Stanhope (Sam Claflin) keeps himself generally drunk; Stanhope’s second-in-command, Osborne (Paul Bettany), tries

BLOCKERS

READY PLAYER ONE

SUPER TROOPERS 1 & 2 DOUBLE FEATURE @ 4:20

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500

APRIL 5, 2018 | 31

APRIL 19TH

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FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: APRIL 6TH - APRIL 12TH

more than just movies at brewvies


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CONCERT PREVIEW

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Le Voir explores dualities as it becomes a single entity. BY RANDY HARWARD comments@cityweekly.net

O

nstage, Le Voir’s Gillian Chase cuts two different figures. Under moody lighting, the titian-haired beauty stands tall (even though she’s not) on heels, and looks fit enough to administer a swift and devastating kick to the dome if anyone misbehaves. Her vocals range from seductive pouts, to wistful moans, to piercing yells. Her body language, however, betrays self-consciousness and vulnerability. She dances kinda awkwardly, as though she’s battling the awareness of so many lights and eyes on her, scrutinizing her and her songs. Such a duality makes someone who is already eminently watchable even more magnetic. You can’t fake that kind of involuntary honesty. So you’re even more willing to listen to her. On a rainy day in Sugar House, the diffuse light coming through the Soup Kitchen window reveals more. Chase stands tall offstage. Understatedly radiant, she makes eye contact, smiles warmly, asks questions, listens attentively. True to her stage persona, she appears composed, even serene, but intermittently flickers anxiety—like when she admits she often wonders, “Is my voice good enough?” Although she’s not really asking, her eyes briefly reveal an interest in the answer. Like any artist, she wants to know that people like her work, and if she’s connecting with her listeners. “Le Voir” is French for “to see him.” To Chase, it means “to see,” signifying introspection, a desire to look “deeper into my life and the things that move me.” On the band’s debut album, Dualities (levoirmusic.com, 2016), you can infer that Chase also wants to be seen, and found worthy of attention and connection. “Gravity” concerns the shrinking orbit of two bodies as they’re pulled toward one another: “I feel your pull in my bones like gravity/ … / Your intent I find/ is just like mine/ when our paths/ finally align.” Another song, “Tides,” concerns the cosmic ebb and flow that sees connections made and lost. These are universally relatable themes. But in their original synth-powered, night-drive, “soft-tronica” context (reference points: Com Truise, M83, the Drive soundtrack), the songs are narcotic fantasies narrated by Chase’s breathy, ethereal voice. The dance beats make the tunes more physical and sensual. This all but eclipses the lyrics’ emotional characteristics. As such, it somewhat impedes a connection. Over the past year, Chase has been listening to more folk and rock music. She credits this to her ex-boyfriend, Badfeather frontdude Rick Gerber. “He introduced me to a ton of new music,” she says between sips of coffee. “That really showed me that a song, the foundation of it, is the most important thing. You can add as many cool sounds as you want, but a good song is a good song, whether or not it be on a shitty old guitar from a pawn shop, or you produce the shit out of it.” Chase says that realization inspired her to tear down the curtain and expose her songs to metaphorical daylight on a new, mostly acoustic EP, Dualities After Dark. It seems like an ironic title, since “After Dark” typically signifies the things we do when the sun goes down. However, the collection (four re-recorded Dualities tracks

REED ROWE

4760 S 900 E, SLC

So Tomorrow That I Might See

MUSIC

Rob Leo, Gillian Chase, Clifford Moon of Le Voir between two new songs) can also be a morning album in that it heralds a new beginning. The re-recordings capture the mood of the original versions while adding more emotional depth. “Gravity” has even more weight, with Chase’s voice conveying exponentially more yearning—only it’s for more than physical intimacy. “Tides” is more heart-rending. Likewise, “Darker in the Morning,” concerns how sad days start out even sadder. “Unseen,” exploring separation, retains some of its original atmosphere, with Chase finding a bright side. But the most striking tracks on After Dark are the new ones. “Like Thunder Like Rain” is a startling opening bid, with Chase channeling Mazzy Star’s Hope Sandoval and Stevie Nicks over acoustic and electric guitars straight from the Ennio Morricone songbook (with a nod to Angel Olsen). The tune finds Chase distanced from a lover, retreating within herself to sort out the past while mourning the present sense of loss. “Through the White Noise” has a similar sound, and explores “ups and downs, ins and outs.” Chase says “Thunder,” the newest new song, almost didn’t make the EP because it’s so different from everything else on the album. “It does feel like a new chapter in my songwriting style,” she says. “The songs I am writing now are all of a similar sound.” It also marks Chase and her bandmates (guitarist Rob Leo, drummer/cellist Clifford Moon) settling into a comfortable creative place. “As a band, we really got into a great workflow with this last album, and lately I’m in an emotional space where writing is coming really easily.” Interestingly, Chase is most excited that Le Voir is becoming more of a group effort. “In the beginning, it was only my perspective,” she says. “Then I found amazing likeminded players who took my initial vision and added so much more color and depth. Then the music kind of takes on its own life form. You stop thinking about it as an extension of you, and rather as its own entity [that] constantly shifts and changes.” CW

LE VOIR ALBUM RELEASE

w/ RS2090 Friday, April 6, 7 p.m. The Downtown Artist Collective 258 E. 100 South 801-234-0679 $12, 21+


Concert photo contest #CWshaggyshots Winner: Ammon E. - BLISS

2nd place: Bodhi A. - THE CONNECTION

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APRIL 5, 2018 | 33

shaggybadger.com | shaggybadger@gmail.com

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Shaggy Badger is a recently formed business dedicated to providing bands with quality merchandise. As music lovers ourselves, our company aims to connect fans to their favorite bands through our locally designed products as well as the unique online platform and point of sale system we provide to bands. Unlike many merchandising services, we don’t cut corners. Our ink doesn’t crunch or fade, our shirts don’t shrink, and we’re always told how soft our shirts are!

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3rd place: Michael H. - OUT OF THE FOG AND INTO THE...


FRIDAY 4/6

The Darkness, Diarrhea Planet

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

Once upon a time (like 2006-ish), I thought I’d had a perfectly decent interview with Justin Hawkins—only to discover, upon disconnecting, that The Darkness’ frontman called his U.K. manager. That manager in turn called their U.K. publicist, who called the U.S. publicist who set up our chat, in order to complain about my use of the word “parody” and try to kill the story. Actually, I said that The Darkness “affectionately spoofed” arena rock from the ’70s and ’80s. You know, because the band’s first albums, Permission to Land (2003) and One Way Ticket to Hell… and Back (2005, Atlantic), were turgid with fist-pumpin’ bluesy glam-jams, dripping with droll British humor. The songs contained dick jokes (“Holding My Own”), cracks about STIs (“Growing on Me”) and male-pattern baldness (“Bald”). Plus, the band’s videos had them hatching from pterodactyl eggs as mustachioed children, shooting lasers from their guitars, prancing around naked, cruising the universe in space-hoopties, fighting crazy creatures and more such antics. Only the stuffiest of English butlers wouldn’t laugh—or happily spill five bucks worth of $10 stadium beer saluting the band for its faithful recreation of a classic sound often maligned as bygone. Considering that Hawkins has acknowledged he was marinated in booze and powdering his nose with his royalty payments circa that time period, it’s for-

Durand Jones & The Indications

SIMON EMMETT

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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & HOWARD HARDEE

givable. Especially because he’s 12 years sober now, and a markedly different person. The Darkness is on its third postreunion album, Pinewood Smile (Cooking Vinyl, 2017), which finds them still churning out epic riffs, fishhook choruses and chuckle fuel, like the line that promises they’re “never gonna stop shittin’ out solid gold.” Garage-punks Diarrhea Planet open. Go figure. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $29.50, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

HORATIO BALTZ

34 | APRIL 5, 2018

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

The Darkness

Durand Jones & The Indications,

It’s possible that Durand Jones just sang about his nuts. Yep. Upon further review of this live version of “Can’t Keep My Cool,” our judges have determined that the soul singer did, indeed, reference his parts. Quoting from the official transcript: “…talkin’ about that love/ yeah, yeah/ that put a fire/ shut up/ in your balls, yeah/ you know how I’m talkin’ about?/ you can’t keep your cool/ if you feel what I’m sayin’, say yeah!” Yeah! The studio version is so sublime, it’ll have you swaying absently, wearing a dumb grin. But on the live one, Jones & The Indications’ vampy preamble has you laughing like a hyena before you can get all swoony, thinking about whoever makes you lose your composure. The stage rap is an emotional palate cleanser coming off of the urgent “Make a Change” (as in, “Yooou/ got/ tooo/ make a chaaaaa-aaaaaaaaange!”), another live track from the deluxe version of Durand Jones & The Indications’ self-titled debut (Dead Oceans/ Colemine, 2017). By the end of that song, you’re focused and pumped—ain’t nobody got time for daydreams! So the transition to “Cool” is appreciated, not to mention an indication that this Indiana-based band doesn’t just play the true notes; they also have impeccable live instincts. (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $16, 21+, thestateroomslc.com


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ANDREW SOUTHAM

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LIVE

Toby Keith, Ned LeDoux, Krystal Keith & Lance Carpenter

Toby Keith’s 22-date tour, kicking off in Salt Lake City on Friday, is aptly named the Should’ve Been a Cowboy XXV Tour after his debut single—the most-played country song of the ’90s, according to CMT. Indeed, the Oklahoma hit-maker also known as the Big Dog Daddy embodies country music. He’s spent his decades-spanning career hammering home ’Merican values such as military force, freedom, waving the flag, shooting guns and kicking butts. Some people haven’t been impressed with Keith’s messages. He famously feuded with the Dixie Chicks over his post-9/11 song “Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue,” which carries a clear nationalistic sentiment and includes lyrics such as “’Cause we’ll put a boot in your ass/ It’s the American way.” The Dixie Chicks’ lead singer, Natalie Maines, said the song was “ignorant, and it makes country music sound ignorant.” Still, there’s no denying that lots of people are really, really into it: Keith’s put out 18 albums, two Christmas albums, six compilations and had 20 (!) No. 1 country hits. That’s a lot of butt-kicking. (Howard Hardee) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $17-$167, all ages, vivintarena.com

Alt-J 4.11 LORIN WALKER MADSEN

Toby Keith

TUESDAY 4/10

Alt-J, Twin Shadow

The experimental rock band Alt-J formed in 2007 by four friends who met at Leeds University in England. They spent years writing and recording their debut album An Awesome Wave, which was released in 2012 to critical acclaim, garnering Britain’s prestigious Mercury Prize and lazy comparisons to Radiohead. Now three albums in, Alt-J is known for their haunting, ethereal sound (see “Tessellate,” “Fitzpleasure” and “In Cold Blood”) and abundant curiosities about the group. For instance, they lifted the lyrics from Maurice Sendak’s classic children’s book Where The Wild Things Are for their hit single “Breezeblocks.” Drummer Thom Sonny Green has no cymbals in his kit, characterizing an unusual playing style far more influenced by electronic music than rock. Frontman Joe Newman’s flat-out strange vocal style often borders on incomprehensible (uh, what did he say?). Now playing as a trio following the departure of bassist/ guitarist Gwil Sainsbury, the band is on the cutting edge of live music technology. This summer, they’ll roll out a 360-degree sound system that makes it seem like noises are coming from every direction, no matter where people are standing in the audience. (HH) The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, 7 p.m., $52.20 presale; $57.20 day of show, all ages, thesaltair.com

4.13 TONY HOLIDAY & THE VELVETONES

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

GABRIEL GREEN

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WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT April 4th Joseph Phelps, Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley. April 11th Reuscher Haart Piesporter Gold Riesling, Mosel, Germany. THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast! SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

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FRIDAY- SATURDAY 4/6-4/7

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ANGIE CARDEÑA

Petty Theft: San Francisco Tribute to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers

THURSDAY 4/5 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

City Animals + Suit Up Soldier + My Dear Watson (Velour) The Dirty 30’s (Liquid Joe’s) Gill Landry + TBD (The State Room) The Howls + Hard Times + Telesomniac + Tayler Lacey (Kilby Court) Jay Farrar Duo (Egyptian Theatre) Lash LaRue (The Corner Store) Latin Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Michelle Moonshine & Co. (Lake Effect) Missio + Morgan Saint (Urban Lounge) Nick Garn (The Yes Hell) New Paradigm Trio (Gallivan Center) Peter Frampton (Eccles Theatre) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Ryan Walsh (Hog Wallow Pub) The Singing Bois (Kingsbury Hall) Soft Kill + VOWWS + Choir Boy (Metro Music Hall) Steaksauce Mustache + IBTBWYN + Together Forever + Swarmer (The Underground) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) The Will Baxter Band (Canyons Village)

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Joe McQueen (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Synesthesia w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Cash Cash (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 4/6 LIVE MUSIC

Acoustic Jam (The Wall at BYU) AZ IZ (The Barbary Coast ) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) The Darkness + Diarrhea Planet

MONDAYS

THE SILVER TONGUE BREAKING BINGO DEVILS 9PM $600

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

Of all the puns that tributes to the dearly departed Floridian songsmith Tom Petty could use, this self-deprecating appellation is the best. That’s why there are two Petty Thefts, and why this one includes a geographical distinction in their name. Formed in 2003, long before the great TP passed on, PT wears the moniker reverently and irreverently. They know they’re playing someone else’s music. They’re aware of Tom Petty’s cultural importance. And they’re hip to the fact that, notwithstanding his legend status, a major part of the classic rocker’s appeal was that he and his band always came off as regular dudes—just like the characters in Petty’s songs, and the everyday people who identify with them. That’s why you won’t see Petty Theft trying to cop the look onstage, with flaxen Petty or frizzy Mike Campbell wigs, or trying too hard to hit the high notes. Singer-guitarist Dan Durkin “sounds like the current Petty with the lower-register voice, not like the younger Petty,” PT guitarist Monroe Grisman told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2015. “He’s not wearing a top hat or a blond wig. We don’t have a look, but the Heartbreakers don’t have a look either, they just dress rock ’n’ roll.” That approach ensures, fittingly, that the focus is on the songs. (Randy Harward) April 6: O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $18-$40, oprockwell.com; April 7: The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

(The Complex) see p. 34 Deli Man (Feldman’s Deli) Dubwise w/ Shank Aaron + Tusk + Darkside + illoom (Urban Lounge) Durand Jones & The Indicators + TBD (The State Room) see p. 34 Electric Radio Kings w/ Reloaded + Trainwreck + Danger Alley (The Royal) Harshmellow (The Beehive) High Wyred (Snowbird) Jay Farrar Duo (Egyptian Theatre) Kyle May (Deer Valley) Le Voir + RS2090 (Downtown Artist Collective) see p. 32 Lil Scrappy + Lil Cuete (Liquid Joe’s) Lil Toa$t (The Loading Dock) Mi Cielo feat. DJ Santarosa (Sky) The Mix & Burlesque (Prohibition) Murphy & The Giant + The Anchorage & Big News (Piper Down Pub) Nate Robinson (Legends Park City) Nick Johnson & Amber Russell (Pale Horse Sound) Note of Passage (The Bayou) Petty Theft (O.P. Rockwell) see above The Pour (The Yes Hell) Red Shot Pony (Brewskis) Rooster w/ Chris Aguilar + Carrie Myers

WEDNESDAYS

+ Cherry Thomas (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Royal Bliss Tom Petty Tribute Experience + Break On Through Door Tribute Band (The Depot) Ryan Innes + Jenn Blosil (Velour) Shuffle (The Spur) Southbound (The Westerner) SuperBubble (Hog Wallow Pub) Take Two (Lake Effect) Thin Air Concert feat. Citizen Cope (Deer Valley) Toby Keith + Ned LeDoux + Krystal Keith & Lance Carpenter (Vivint Arena) see p. 36 ToKiMonsta + Flash & Flare + Regular Ass Dude (Metro Music Hall) Triathlon + Luke Olson (of The Walters) + Dendrons (Kilby Court) Two Peace + Sun Divide (The Ice Haüs)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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APRIL 5, 2018 | 39

TUESDAYS 9PM BREAKING BINGO


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

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Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

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LIVE MUSIC

1.21 Gigawatts (Piper Down Pub) Big Blue Ox (Hog Wallow Pub) Bill ‘n Diane (The Harp & Hound) Billie Eilish + Reo Cragun (The Complex) Blue on Black (The Barbary Coast) Brisk (Downstairs) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Cover Dogs (Brewskis) Dead Meadow + 90s Television + Mad Alchemy (Urban Lounge) The Garden +Tijuana Panthers + Cowgirl Clue (Kilby Court) Grand Theft Audio ’90s Tribute Band + The Outcome + Strawberry Bitch + Brute Kiss (The Royal) Grizfolk (Canyons Village) The Hellcaminos (The Yes Hell) Jay Farrar Duo (Egyptian Theatre) Jungle + Omar Apollo (The Depot) Lash LaRue (Deer Valley) Latin Jazz Factory (The Bayou) Live Trio (The Red Door) Motherlode Canyon Band (The Spur) Nate Robinson Trio (Snowbird) Neal Morse (Metro Music Hall) The Neighbourhood + Health + Field Medic (The Complex) New Electric Sound + Say Hey + New Hollywood (Velour) OK Go (Eccles Center) Ol’ Fashion Depot (The Beehive) Petty Theft Tribute to Tom Petty (The State Room) see p. 38 Raja + Gia Bianca Stephens + Lilia Maughn + Molly Mormon + Xaina + Ellissdee + DJ Justin Hollister + DJ Shutter (Metro Music Hall) Satin Steel (The Union Tavern) Scott Foster + The Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect) Southbound (The Westerner) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tim Daniels Band (Park City Mountain) Two Peace + From the Sun (Funk ‘n’ Dive)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Burlesque & The Beats (Prohibition) DJ Dance Party (Club 90)

DJ Dr3w + Stuey (Alleged) DJ Handsome Hands(Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) House DJ (The Ruin) Sky Saturdays feat. Joe Maz (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 4/8 LIVE MUSIC

Acid Mothers Temple + Yoo Doo Right (Urban Lounge) Amalo +Valentine & The Regard + Mia Hicken + Abz (Kilby Court) The Breakfast Klub (Canyons Village) Caskey + Gucci Baghdad + Shah Team + Zac Ivie (Metro Music Hall) Ghostowne (Snowbird) Irish Session Folk (Sugar House Coffee) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Metal Dogs (Canyons Village) Moth Closet (The Beehive) Motherlode Canyon Band (Legends Park City) Mudd Puddle (Deer Valley)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Après Ski (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 4/9 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Island Time II Music & Dance from Polynesia (Covey Center for Arts) Jazz Ensemble w/ Galeb Curtis (Fine Arts West) Moose Blood + Lydia McCafferty (The Complex) Spring Family Band (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Sure Sure + Mojave Nomads + The Solarists (Kilby Court) Timber Timbre + Thor & Friends (Urban Lounge)


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WASTED SPACE

RANDY HARWARD

BAR FLY

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUESDAY 4/10 LIVE MUSIC

Alt-J + Twin Shadow (The Great Saltair) see p. 36 Brooke Mackintosh (Lake Effect) Ces Cru + G-MoSkee + Shadow D + DJ Chunk (Metro Music Hall) Cherry Thomas (Piper Down Pub) The Critical Shakes + Martian Cult + Lovely Noughts + Baby Pink (Urban Lounge)

Damien Jurado (Velour) Echosmith + The Score + Jena Rose (The Depot) I’m With Her + Jonny Fritz (The State Room) MitiS + PRXZM w/ Party Nails (The Complex) Percussion Ensemble (Weber State College of Arts & Humanities) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Sonnets + Outlier + Words From Aztecs + Threar (The Underground) The U of U Percussion Ensemble (Kingsbury Hall) Whistling Rufus (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue)

Maybe it’s just me, but it feels like the bartender is the ice cream man. That’d make my friends and me the kids barely containing ourselves in anticipation of refreshing, ice-cold treats. Having just inhaled at least two slices apiece at the Pie Hole, washing them down with a measly 12-ounce can of PBR, we’re definitely still thirsty. At the first taste of Stella Artois, I’m considering alternate, consciousness-altering connotations of this State Street joint’s name. It’s been a rough day, after all. A nice beer buzz augmented with a shot or four of the establishment’s cheapest, finest well whiskey sure would take the edge off. Then again, tomorrow is a weekday, and a hangover workday is a wasted day. But didn’t the poet Sir Sebastian Bach once write, “Is it all just wasted time?” Huh. I’ll have to think about that. In the meantime, I ask the ice cream man for a couple bucks in quarters so I can try to snatch a trucker hat from the claw machine. After two attempts, I judge the claw as too weak to grab even lightweight headgear, and walk away. Bach’s voice again invades my inner monologue: “Can you live with yourself when you think of what you left behind?” I think so. After all, it’s only a hat. Then again, maybe it’s just me. (Randy Harward) 342 S. State, 801-532-2107, bit.ly/2DZeZlI

WEDNESDAY 4/11 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Big Something + Funk & Gonzo (Elevate) Boy Venus + Primitive Programme + Dead Be Joint + The Debbie Downers (Kilby Court) The Critical Shakes + Jacknife + Before It’s Gone (The Underground) Dashboard Confessional + Beach Slang + Kississippi (The Complex) Diego’s Umbrella + Orphans Cabaret (The Ice Haüs) Hold Close + Crooked Teeth + Southpaw + Guilty Scapegoat + Behind The Wheat Grinder (The Loading Dock) Lorin Walker Madsen (Hog Wallow Pub) Luke Combs + Ashley McBryde (The Complex) Moonchild + Elise Trouw (Urban Lounge) Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox

(The Depot) The Victoriana + 90s Television + Ani Christ + Eleventh Door (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos feat. Rick Gerber & Mike Rogers (The Cabin) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Youth Jam Session (Music Garage)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)


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APRIL 5, 2018 | 43

357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday PROHIBITION 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, everything from live music to karaoke to burlesque THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 SWITCH 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-5132955, house and techno events TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-3828567, karaoke Tuesday, Wednesday & Sunday; DJs Thursday-Saturday JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801478-4310, DJs


© 2017

WAGES

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Collides with force 2. Attacks

40. Grumpy ____ 42. New York Times colleague of Kristof and Krugman 46. “Like?” 47. “Fingers crossed” 48. O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs 50. Sworn ____ 52. Rouen’s Gustave Flaubert Bridge spans it 53. Less nutty 54. What dinosaurs don’t do anymore 55. Chills, so to speak 60. Butt 61. Carrere of “Wayne’s World”

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

3. Window alternative 4. A thing for Duke Ellington? 5. Chemical extractions 6. Car model first produced in Wolfsburg, Germany in 1979 7. Jet that began regular service between New York and Europe in 1977 8. Barack’s brother-in-law 9. Enya and Yanni, for two 10. Pentagon-to-Lincoln Memorial dir. 11. From left to right, what’s being accomplished in 32-, 6-, 9- and 11-Down 12. Menzel who voices Elsa in “Frozen” 13. Scored in the 80s 21. It may be trending 22. Its TV ads once featured a Native American woman saying “You call it corn, we call it maize” 27. “____ been wondering ...” 29. “Hardly!” 30. Helping hand 31. Quentin directed her in “Pulp Fiction” 32. Flower with a horrible smell? 33. Like chinchillas and llamas 36. “Don’t give ____ second thought” 37. Mind reading, for short 39. First U.S. state alphabetically: Abbr.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Millennial’s “I don’t care” 8. Network with a studio offering tours to those with an Atlanta CityPASS 11. Freak (out) 14. Beehive and others 15. Stimpy’s TV pal 16. Shakespeare’s “Much ____ About Nothing” 17. ____ rifle 18. Wow 19. “Skedaddle!” 20. “Days of Heaven” director Terrence 21. 31-Down’s role in “Pulp Fiction” 22. Suvari of “American Beauty” 23. They can get the blood flowing 24. “Which came first?” option 25. He “piled upon the whale’s white hump the sum of all the general rage & hate felt by his whole race” 26. Go up the river? 28. Wyoming Senator Mike 30. Mystique 34. Mad. in Manhattan 35. Spike’s role in “Do the Right Thing” 38. Comment from someone just getting by 40. Butcher’s offerings 41. Take one’s sweet time 42. Marx’s “____ Kapital” 43. Dreaded letters for a procrastinator? 44. Young on film 45. Singer Redding 47. Company credited with running the first TV ad featuring a gay couple, 1994 49. JDate user 51. Bleeped person 56. “Private Benjamin” star 57. Put the kibosh on 58. Alpine climber’s tool 59. Pop star Rita whose last name is the title of her 2012 debut album 60. GPS recommendation: Abbr. 61. Hummus and baba ghanouj flavorers 62. Mastermind game piece 63. Green machine 64. Most goofy 65. Chemistry suffix 66. “____ I?” 67. States with conviction

SUDOKU

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44 | APRIL 5, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Eighty-three-year-old author Harlan Ellison has had a long and successful career. In the course of publishing hundreds of literary works in seven different genres, he has won numerous awards. But when he was in his 30s, there was an interruption in the upward arc of his career. The film production company Walt Disney Studios hired him as a writer. During his first day on the job, Roy Disney overheard Ellison joking with a co-worker about using Disney characters in an animated pornographic movie. Ellison was fired on the spot. I am by no means predicting a comparable event in your life, Aries. On the contrary. By giving you this heads-up, I’m hoping you’ll be scrupulous and adroit in how you act in the early stages of a new project—so scrupulous and adroit that you will sail on to the next stages.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to my analysis of the cosmic omens, your impact is rising. You’re gaining influence. More people are tuning in to what you have to offer. And yet your stress levels also seem to be increasing. Why is that? Do you assume that having more power requires you to endure higher tension? Do you unconsciously believe that being more worried is the price of being more responsible? If so, banish that nonsense. The truth is this: The best way to manage your growing clout is to relax into it.

AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Responsibilities include: Selling print and digital advertising to local and some regional businesses.

Email your resume to jennifer@cityweekly.net

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| COMMUNITY |

APRIL 5, 2018 | 45

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The immediate future will challenge you to revisit several fundamental Scorpio struggles. For best results, welcome these seeming intrusions as blessings and opportunities, and follow these guidelines: 1. Your control over external circumstances will increase in direct proportion to your control over your inner TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you an evolving Taurus or an unevolving Taurus? Are you demons. 2. Your ability to do what you want will thrive to the an aspiring master of gradual, incremental progress or a com- degree that you stop focusing on what you don’t want. 3. Your placent excuse-maker who secretly welcomes inertia? Will the skill at regulating and triumphing over chaos will be invincible if theme of your next social media post be “The Smart Art of you’re not engrossed in blaming others. Compromise” or “The Stingy Glory of Stubbornness”? I’m hoping you will opt for the former rather than the latter in each SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): of the three choices I just offered. Your behavior in the coming I’m about to say things that sound extraordinary. And it’s posweeks will be pivotal in your long-term ability to animate your sible that they are in fact a bit overblown. But even if that’s the case, I trust that there is a core of truth in them. So rejoice highest self and avoid lapsing into your mediocre self. in their oracular radiance. First, if you have been hoping for a miracle cure, the next four weeks will be a time when you’re GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you fly in a passenger jet from New York to London, the trip more likely than usual to find it or generate it. Second, if you usually takes more than six hours. But on Jan. 8, 2015, a power- have fantasized about getting help to address a seemingly irreful jet stream surging across the North Atlantic reduced that mediable problem, asking aggressively for that help now will time significantly. With the wind’s extra push, several flights lead to at least a partial fix. Third, if you have wondered whether completed the trip in five hours and 20 minutes. I suspect you’ll you could ever retrieve a lost or missing part of your soul, the have comparable assistance in the course of your upcoming jour- odds are more in your favor than they’ve been in a long time. neys and projects, Gemini. You’ll feel like the wind is at your back. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The French government defines books as an “essential good,” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Actor Keanu Reeves’ career ascended to a higher level when he along with water, bread, and electricity. Would you add anything appeared as a lead character in the film Speed. It was the first to that list of life’s basics? Companionship? Stories? Deep sleep? time he had been a headliner in a big-budget production. But Pleasurable exercise and movement? Once you identify your he turned down an offer to reprise his starring role in the sequel, “essential goods,” I invite you to raise the level of reverence and care Speed 2. Instead he toured with his grunge band Dogstar and you give them. Take an oath to treat them as holy treasures. Boost played the role of Hamlet in a production staged by a local your determination and ability to get all you need of their blesstheater company in Winnipeg, Manitoba. I admire him for being ings. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to enhance your motivated more by love and passion than by fame and fortune. appreciation of the fundamentals you sometimes take for granted. In my estimation, Cancerian, you face a choice that in some ways resembles Keanu’s, but in other ways doesn’t. You shouldn’t AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): automatically assume that what your ego craves is opposed to Buckingham Palace is the home and office of the Queen of England. It has been the main royal residence since Queen what your heart yearns for and your soul needs. Victoria took the throne in 1837. But in earlier times, the site served other purposes. The 17th-century English lawyer LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A Leo sculptor I know is working on a 40-foot-long statue of a Clement Walker described the building occupying that land as lion. Another Leo friend borrowed $30,000 to build a record- a brothel, a hotbed of “debauchery.” Before that the space was ing studio in her garage so she can pursue her quixotic dream of a mulberry garden where silkworms tuned mulberry leaves into a music career. Of my other Leo acquaintances, one is writing a raw material for silk fabrics. I see the potential for an almost memoir of her time as a black-market orchid smuggler, another equally dramatic transformation of a certain place in your life, just did four sky dives in three days and another embarked on a Aquarius. Start dreaming and scheming about the possibilities. long-postponed pilgrimage to Slovenia, land of her ancestors. What about you? Are there any breathtaking challenges or PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): smart gambles you’re considering? I trust you can surf the same Poet Carolyn Forché is a role model for how to leave one’s comfort zone. In her early career, she earned writing degrees astrological wave. at placid universities near her childhood home in the American Midwest. Her first book mined material about her family; its VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How sexy is it possible for you to be? I’m referring to authentic first poem is addressed to her grandmother. But then she relosoul-stirring sexiness, not the contrived, glitzy, counterfeit cated to El Salvador, where she served as a human rights advoversion. I’m alluding to the irresistible magnetism that wells up cate during that country’s civil war. Later she lived and wrote in in you when you tap in to your core self and summon a reverent Lebanon at the height of its political strife. Her drive to expand devotion to your life’s mission. However sexy it is possible for her range of experience invigorated her poetry and widened her you to be, Virgo, I suggest you unleash that magic in the coming audience. Would you consider drawing inspiration from Forché weeks. It’s the most reliable strategy for attracting the spiritual in the coming weeks and months, Pisces? I don’t necessarily experiences and material resources and psychological support recommend quite so dramatic a departure for you, but even a mild version will be well rewarded. you need.

Is Hiring


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

46 | APRIL 5, 2018

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189903898, JUDGE MARK KOURIS. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JAMES EDWIN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JAMES EDWIN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $1,120.50. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH DONALD E. SANCHEZ and MARGO SANCHEZ, Husband and Wife, Plaintiffs, Case No. CV 18-54 vs. RANDY SANCHEZ, ALVA JONES, DON SANCHEZ, LINDA BALL, JOSEPH SANCHEZ, LAURA NELSON, DAVID SANCHEZ, SABRA RICHINS, CRISTI MILLARD, TAMMY O’NEAL, TRACY BROWN, JENNY MORROW, HEATHER BROWN, SCOTT BROWN, GARY SANCHEZ AND DIANA MCKUNE heirs to the Estate of THEODORE A. SANCHEZ, and/or ELLEN J. SANCHEZ; and JOHN and JANE DOES I-X, AND ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS OF REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH, STATE OF IDAHO, TO WIT: The South Half of the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 44 North, Range 3 West, B.M., Benewah County, Idaho. Defendants. TO: RANDY SANCHEZ, ALVA JONES, DON SANCHEZ, LINDA BALL, JOSEPH SANCHEZ, LAURA NELSON, DAVID SANCHEZ, SABRA RICHINS, CRISTI MILLARD, TAMMY O’NEAL, TRACY BROWN, JENNY MORROW, HEATHER BROWN, SCOTT BROWN, GARY SANCHEZ AND DIANA MCKUNE heirs to the Estate of THEODORE A. SANCHEZ, and/or ELLEN J. SANCHEZ; and JOHN or JANE DOES I-X, OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS OF REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH, STATE OF IDAHO. You have been sued by Donald E. and Margo Sanchez, the Plaintiffs, in the District Court in and for Benewah County, Idaho, Case No. CV 17-346. The nature of the claim against you is an Action to Quiet Title to real property. Any time after 21 days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response, in the proper form, including the Case No., and paid any required filing fee to the Clerk of the Court at 701 W. College Avenue, Ste. 203, St. Maries, Idaho 83861, (208) 245-3241, and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff ’s attorney at Lake City Law Group PLLC, 907 Main Avenue, St. Maries, Idaho 83861, (208) 245-9155.A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiffs. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter.

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George Metos George@UBCUtah.com SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189903897, JUDGE JAMES BLANCH. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. LARRY ROBINSON AND AISHA WELLS, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO LARRY ROBINSON AND AISHA WELLS: You are each summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must each file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must each mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $17,038.02. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussena SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915027, JUDGE ANN BOYDEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. PEGGY NOELANI TAHU, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO PEGGY NOELANI TAHU: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,554.01. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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URBAN L I V I N

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WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Face the Face

For the past few weeks, all the buzz has been about Facebook. The social media giant has been publically busted for not holding up its agreement with users to not sell information about its members or allow companies to mine Facebook data for their own profit. Big duh. I believe that the minute I signed into the internet some 25-plus years ago, my details became public. I think I joined Myspace—at one time the most visited social network site in the world with 75.9 million unique visitors—in 2006. My internet footprint left tracks allowing folks to categorize me, follow me, put me in a demographic box and deliver me to advertisers and bad guys with a big fat bow on top. From whom I love to the underwear I put on in the mornings, someone and their computer knows what I’m doing and is selling that information. Luckily, I haven’t been hacked too many times. But, oy, one of my credit cards is a favorite of criminals using the dark web. Even though I’m a doddering old fart, you certainly must laugh along with me when my friends say they will “stop using Facebook because they don’t want their personal information going to the wrong people.” Oh, please. Your selfie is being used right now for something nefarious, and that Snapchat you thought disappeared, didn’t. That ad for yoga pants didn’t just pop up on the right side of your social media page randomly. Nor did that ad for lotion made specifically for darker skin hues show up on BET TV’s Rap City for no reason. Advertisers spend a fortune to target audiences. So why the big brouhaha of surprise about Facebook’s advertisers targeting specific races and age groups? I can, for free, go onto my Facebook page and target market people buying a home, choosing folks who post that they are: 1. buying a home, 2. first-time buyers and 3. house hunting. Under that category I can exclude people of an “ethnic affinity” whom I don’t want to advertise to (African American, Asian American, Hispanic, etc.). Would I personally eliminate ethnic types in my search for real estate clients? Hell, no—I want anyone with greenbacks in their pocket to sell or buy a home through me! My point is, unless you have successfully unplugged from the grid, everything in your life is data being mined by someone or something. Advertisers have and will always target you by income, race, marital status, career, education, hobbies and the like. And with every click you give to social media, you give more and more power to fine tune what information gets to you. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner a billion eyes for one blind mindthe stars scream about it. the seasons morph out of it. terrible beauty in innocent violence like a vine in the sun sprouting thorns to save itself from what?

Devin Sams Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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S NEofW the

Pets on a Plane In the same week that a dog perished after a United Airlines flight attendant insisted it be stored in an overhead compartment on a flight from Houston to New York City, another family’s pet was lost by the beleaguered carrier. Irgo, a 10-year-old German shepherd belonging to the Swindle family, was mistakenly sent to Japan instead of Kansas City, Mo. When Kara Swindle and her children went to pick up their dog on March 13 after flying from Oregon, they were given a Great Dane—whose destination was supposed to be Japan. The dogs got mixed up in Denver, where they both had connecting flights. Swindle was concerned that her dog wouldn’t survive the long flight back: “He is a 10-year-old dog, and he’s never been on a flight before,” she told KCTV 5 News. However, United had Irgo checked out by a veterinarian in Tokyo and loaded onto a private charter to Wichita, Kan., where he was reunited with his family on March 15.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

Restoring Faith in Humanity The Rev. Alex Santora of Our Lady of Grace Church in Hoboken, N.J., called local police on March 14 when a suspicious package was delivered to the house of worship. But after officers from the Hoboken Police Department declared it to be safe, church staff found a surprising delivery inside: a baby Jesus statue that had been stolen from the church’s Nativity scene about 90 years ago. WPIX-TV reported that an unsigned note inside the package explained: The statue was stolen when the note-writer’s mother was a young girl, and it became a sort of heirloom in her family. When she died, it was passed on to the note-writer, who thought it should be returned.

WEIRD

I Am Not Dead Yet! Constantin Reliu, 63, appealed unsuccessfully to a court in Barlad, Romania, in March to overturn a death certificate that his wife had obtained after not hearing from him for more than a decade. According to The Guardian, Reliu left Romania for Turkey in 1992 to look for employment, but neglected to keep in touch with his family. In 2003, Reliu’s wife, believing he had died in an earthquake in Turkey, argued in court for a death certificate, which didn’t come to light until Reliu was deported back to Romania because of expired papers in Turkey. Upon his arrival, immigration officers explained to Reliu that he had died in 2003. His appeal failed, as the court maintained he was too late, and the ruling is final, leaving Reliu in an odd state of limbo. “I am officially dead, although I’m alive,” Reliu told Romanian media outlets. “I have no income and because I am listed dead, I can’t do anything.”

Least-Competent Criminals Siblings Antoine Dorsey, 23, and Antoinette Dorsey, 27, of St. Louis cooked up a clever scheme to steal a car. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that on March 14, the two went to Joe-K Used Cars and asked to test drive a 2012 Dodge Charger. The salesman drove them off the lot, and the Dorseys asked him to drive to their apartment building so they could retrieve their IDs. In the parking lot of the apartment, Antoinette got out of the car, and an unidentified person drove up next to the Charger in a Volvo and got into the Charger, pulling a gun on the salesman and demanding he get out of the car. Then the man with the gun got back into the Volvo and drove away, while Antoine took off in the Charger. However, Antoine crashed and flipped the Charger, then was tracked down by police aided by witnesses to the wreck. Both siblings were charged with first-degree robbery. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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APRIL 5, 2018 | 47

Animals With Issues Louis, an 18-year-old male gorilla at the Philadelphia Zoo, appears to be something of a germophobe, according to the Associated Press. When he is carrying food, 6-foot-tall Louis walks on his hind legs, like a human, rather than leaning forward on his front knuckles, as gorillas usually do. Zoo curator Michael Stern says workers installed a fire hose over a mud puddle in Louis’ yard, which he crosses like a tightrope to avoid getting his feet dirty. Stern says in the wild, gorillas may stand up on their hind feet to reach food or wade in a swamp, but only for a few seconds.

Ferula! Springville, Utah, resident Tiffany King has weathered devastating health problems. KSTU Channel 13 reported that she suffers from a condition for which the medication weakened her immune system. In January, she contracted pneumonia, which led to a blood infection, and complications forced doctors to amputate both her legs and arms. King, who is engaged, hopes to complete therapy and walk down the aisle with prosthetic legs and arms, which is where a unique fundraiser comes in: On March 17, King’s friends announced “Phoenix Wing Productions Welcomes Harry Potter to Burlesque,” a caricature of the blockbuster movies based on J.K. Rowling’s books. All proceeds from the event on April 20 at the Utah Arts Alliance in Salt Lake City will go toward buying King’s prosthetic limbs. “I’m going to work hard,” King said, “because I have a family I need to get back to.”

Babs De Lay

| COMMUNITY |

n Destiny Church in Columbia, Md., tried a novel approach to attract new members to its congregation. On March 4, the church gave away five used cars to “demonstrate God’s unbelievable, no-strings-attached goodness,” according to The Washington Post. The idea was hatched to increase attendance at the church’s new location after several years meeting in a high school auditorium. “Who doesn’t need a new car?” asked Sandy Dobson, who came with her son. “Different people have different things that bring them to Christ, to church. It doesn’t always have to be traditional methods.” Pastor Stephen Chandler added that Jesus himself taught that giveaways are guaranteed to draw a crowd: The biggest gatherings Christ preached to came on the two times he distributed free loaves and fishes.

Spooky A member of the Listowel Paranormal Society in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, was surprised when police arrived at his door on March 13, inquiring about a small black box with a red wire protruding from it that had been left at Mackenzie Hall in Windsor. The Windsor Police Explosives Disposal Unit was called to the hall to investigate the box, but determined it was “safe” and not explosive. Society members had used the box on March 9 at the historic building to sweep for spirits. Jen Parker, assistant director for the society, called the box an EMF (electromagnetic field) sensor and said each team member carries one when they’re looking for ghosts. The society’s spokesperson also told the CBC that there were strong signs of paranormal activity at the hall, especially in the old jail, dressing room and basement.

Garden Gnomes

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Divine Intervention In a recent interview on “60 Minutes Overtime,” Oprah Winfrey said that if God wanted her to run for president, “wouldn’t God kind of tell me?” Oprah may have gotten her answer in the form of a letter from Jesus Christ, an 83-year-old North Waterboro, Maine, woman who started a letter-writing campaign 50 years ago to spread a message of faith and peace—around the same time that she changed her name. WGME-TV reported that Christ sent her letter to Winfrey on March 9, without knowledge of the media speculation, or Winfrey’s wish for a heavenly sign, regarding her running for president. Christ said she sent the letter because she likes Winfrey, but “If she does (run), I’ll vote for her—that’s for sure.”

Ewwwww! Ravenna, Ohio, resident Nickolette Botsford was startled by what felt like an extra-hard cashew as she enjoyed some Planters nuts in early March. As she drove, she handed the object to her mom, who turned on the interior light in the car and realized it was a human tooth -- with dried blood on it. “I got very upset, I was crying, I threw up two or three times,” Botsford told WOIOTV. She went to a hospital, where doctors confirmed it was a human tooth and treated her for exposure to blood or bodily fluids. Botsford called Planters, and parent company Kraft Heinz sent a courier to pick up the tooth for testing. The company said it is investigating its manufacturing process and suppliers.

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City Weekly April 5, 2018  

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