Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

F E B RU A RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 | VO L . 3 4

N0. 38

For the Birds

Conservation efforts in northwest quadrant are mighty, but are development plans stronger? By Dylan Woolf Harris


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY FOWL PLAY

As the city and state peck and squawk over development deals, bird conservationists seek preservation. Cover illustration by Darya Buben

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 18 A&E 23 DINE 30 CINEMA 32 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

Five Spot, p. 8 Shake hands with one of our trusty editorial interns. Currently enrolled in the U of U.’s mass communication program, the Kearns native says the mentorship she’s received is a definite perk. “They’ve really challenged me to find my voice,” she notes. Interested in interning with us? Drop a line to comments@cityweekly.net and be cool like Rachelle.

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

NEWS

Secretary Zinke gets a warm Utah welcome. facebook.com/slcweekly

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

FILM

The only Black Panther review you need to read.

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com

ENTER TO WIN ... screening passes to Death Wish. More info on p. 30 and at cityweekly.net/freestuff.


SAVE

$100

$20

2 YEA

OVERSIZED CONE HELPS TO CREATE A SMOOTHER STRONGER BASS SOUND

WARRA R N W/ DEALETY

INSTALLA R TION

300 WATTS RMS 600 WATTS PEAK

10” WOOFER

10" SUBWOOFER

$12999 EACH

12" SUBWOOFERS

OVERSIZED CONE 300 WATTS RMS POWER 1300 WATTS PEAK POWER

EACH

MSRP: $18000

• 300 WATTS RMS • 600 PEAK POWER • TIGHT AND ACCURATE BASS

SAVE

$80

10” POWER SUB SYSTEM

$9999 EACH

$199

.99

List Price: 279.99

90

DAY PAYMENT

OPTION

$13999 EACH $80

12” POWER SUB SYSTEM

NO

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER & SUBWOOFER

$219.99

CREDIT NEEDED

List Price: 299.99

soundwarehouse.com/financing

APP RADIO SAVE

SAVE

SAVE

$175

$370

$200

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

PROGRESSIVE LEASE / PURCHASE 70% APPROVAL RATE

$60

12” WOOFER

SAVE

CREDIT CARD

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER & SUBWOOFER

SAVE

List Price: $12000

M.E.S.A. MONEY GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF

• KEVLAR FIBER CONES • 4 OHM DUAL VOICE COIL 400 WATTS RMS 800 WATTS PEAK

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

$7999

NOW:

PUNCH SERIES SAVE SUBWOOFERS $60

SAVE

7” touchscreen display Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling • Rear View Camera Ready • Steering Remote Ready • •

$349.99 List Price: 720.00

$324.99 List Price: 500.00

$399.99 List Price: 600.00

W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 2/22/18

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 3

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

NO DVD OR CD


GET YOUR KITTY FIX

@SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

Cover story, Feb. 1, “What Global Warming?” NEW CAFE HOURS OPEN AT 7AM TUES-SAT 302 E. 900 S. I TINKERSCATCAFE.COM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

F E B RUA RY 1 , 2 0 1 8 | VO L . 3 4

N0. 36

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

BETTER HEALTH CRYOTHERAPY IS NOW OPEN COME CHILL WITH US

OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24 11:00AM - 3:00 PM 12176 S. 1000 E. #1

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

SOAP BOX

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

Thank you for the excellent article, Paul Rosenberg. It’s great to see a detailed exposé of denialist tactics against science. I learned more about polar bears and science denial today. Keep up the good work. And thanks also to the scientists who discredit the denial. It’s peripheral to the polar bear arguments, but you mentioned here the attacks against Michael Mann, a preeminent climate scientist, after his publishing his first “hockey stick” graph in 1999. The hockey stick has been replicated dozens of times and confirmed. Yet, those vicious attacks are still going on today, 19 years later. For readers not familiar with that subject, Mann’s book, The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars is very good read, with hundreds of references to independent sources. The denier attack dogs never give up on a juicy bit of defamation. It is all they have, since they have no valid scientific arguments.

PETER SMITH

Via cityweekly.net Love this. Anthony Pacheco Via Facebook

Private Eye, Feb. 1, “Body Slams”

@SLCWEEKLY

your ready knowledge of parts of Utah history for which I have a huge blind spot. I am mystified by the LDS support for Trump, and you nailed the Mormon quandary.

DAVID IRVINE, Bountiful

Holladay has epically douchey ever since they joined forces with Cottonwood to make it a city. Cottonwood ruined Holladay.

J.G. BILLINGSLEY Via Facebook

Blog post, Feb. 1, “Clean Air Now, Ask Them How”

Unmasking a proxy war strategy by online climate change denialists. By Paul Rosenberg

did outside the state for vacations, it might make a world of difference to those struggling communities.

MARIANNE ESCOBEDO

Thanks for the great coverage of this project and all the clean air goings on at the Legislature!

Via Facebook

Via cityweekly.net

Via Facebook

Blog post, Feb. 9, Zinke visit protest

No shrinky Zinke!

KIRSTEN ALLEN

Our state has been so mismanaged we now need to sell off parts of it to keep the politicians solvent.

MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook

John, I always enjoy your writing, but last week’s editorial was exceptional. One of the things I really like about you is

What Global Warming?

Urban Living, Feb. 1, “Our Holladay”

Still government owned. Kind of wish it actually could get sold off, but it’s one agency or another. Maybe some of these people could actually go visit these areas instead of Vegas or Disneyland. If they spent as much money in Utah as they

LIGHT REFRESHMENTS

We are against the feds messing with our lands until we are for the Feds messing with our lands, I guess.

MATT HANDY

BRANDON MIKKELSEN Via Facebook

MIKE KOLAN Via Facebook

The feds will protect the uranium mines, don’t you worry.

Blog post, Feb. 9, “Zinke’s Mule Deer Announcement Gets Political”

MATT MORRIS Via Facebook

“Protection” defined loosely.

We should totes trust this asshole. I mean, super-nice, honest white guy.

Via Instagram

Via Facebook

Zinke is a phony and an enemy to hunters and other public land users.

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.

@WESTINJAY

GLENN SHERRILL Via Facebook

FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF WHAT CRYOTHERAPY IS ALL ABOUT (A $40.00 VALUE)

@SHAH_SLC_BELLYDANCE Via Instagram

Sad.

STORE ★★★★★

FIRST SESSION FOR JUST $10

Quit selling our public land for your gas- and mineral-drilling cronies!

FREDERICK THORNE

BIG SHINY ROBOT! News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

Both exclusively on

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

cityweekly.net -cityweekly.net/bigshinyrobot-cityweekly.net/underground-


STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Sales Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, ALEX MARKHAM, MIEKA SAWATZKI, JEREMIAH SMITH Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales MIKEY SALTAS Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

Circulation Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO Business/Office Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE

Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZ-KINNY, MATTHEW AULDRIC BEERE, TERESA BAGDASAROVA, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, SAMANTHA HERZOG, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, POLINA LYUBAVINA, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Marketing Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Editorial Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Editorial Assistant RAY HOWZE Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN Editorial Interns RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, SAMANTHA HERZOG Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, DAVID MILLER, ASPEN PERRY, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, ANDREW WRIGHT, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

| CITY WEEKLY |

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 5

All Contents © 2017


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

OPINION

Hoopla and Hearts

By the time I hit my teens, my emotions surrounding Valentine’s Day could be summed up in less than a word: meh. What can I say? Once the holiday ventured beyond the realms of blinged out shoe boxes and dorky cards, it lost all appeal. Looking back, perhaps the real shift began when I was in sixth grade. It was the first year that “I Dig You” dinosaur cards were replaced with a dance. It’s not that I was afraid my dance card would not fill up, quite the opposite. Socially awkward with palms that would break into a sweat the second I got nervous, my ideal scenario was to have my card remain blank. As luck would have it, by the day of the dance I was no longer allowed to attend. You see, the week prior I discovered a random object with a fuse in the catwalk of the junior high I walked through on my way to school. Naturally, I decided the most logical course of action would be to light the unknown fuse-ball in the furthest corner of the grassy field during recess. Even though it turned out to be nothing more than a harmless smoke bomb, my principal was not impressed and decided the best punishment was to quarantine me to the library during the dance. Unbeknownst to her, that was the equivalent of winning the lottery to my 12-year-old self. After the fortuitous break, my future Valentine’s days were forever doomed to be a letdown. Even before I understood the weight of consumerism, the shift from fun to romance was when the day became a major yawn fest. After all, the foundation of what makes romance exciting is spontaneity. Gifts given on a decided-upon day to express a

BY ASPEN PERRY spontaneous emotion simply misses the mark. It’s like when people think they can regain energy and clarity by fasting for a week. Sure, at a glance, the concept makes sense. But once you delve in, you come to realize nourishment is what gives a body energy. Ingesting nothing but water for days on end just makes you a grumpy asshole—and understandably so. Looking back, the teen angst version of Valentine’s is basically the gateway to keeping up with the Joneses. Couples destined to be in love forever—or at least for the week— adorn their sweethearts with glittery treasures from H&M and oversized bouquets. While simultaneously patting themselves on the back for a job well done … how romantic. During my adult-ish years waiting tables, the feeling that cupid was stupid didn’t stop me from capitalizing on the holiday. Back then, with the exception of Outdoor Retailer, the week of Feb. 14 was the only guaranteed cash cow. I considered it the serving industry’s version of bonus time, and like Clark Griswold before me, I depended on that bonus. Albeit my dependence wouldn’t result in a pool, but the extra cash made it possible to catch up on bills, pay for ludicrously expensive textbooks and cover poor judgment moments. Like the year I shelled out $400 to replace a fence, after driving my car off a bank into a horse pasture; a tale for another time. My industry days behind me, the Hallmark holiday no longer served a purpose that was profitable or fun. It just felt like another day where I was expected to behave a certain way. Admittedly after almost two decades of loathing, as I’ve noticed more companies marketing fun over romance in recent years, the all-red-and-pink-all-the-time holiday has started to reel me back in. Perhaps the shift started

with the advent of “non celebrating” celebrators, as the National Retail Federation terms them. These anti-Valentine shoppers, make up three out of 10 adult consumers, and have stirred up the way some companies market heart-filled festivities. A recent article on Business Insider listing 27 funny, nopressure V-Day gifts underscored my new-found hope. I mean, who wouldn’t want the Bob Ross “Art of Chill” board game? Another potential explanation, perhaps, could be due to the shift in our cultural concept of sexuality and love. As sexuality and love become more fluid concepts in our mind, we are more likely to break away from the traditional mold of yesteryear. Which would stand to reason, our consumer habits would become more fluid as well. While I do not think traditional shopping patterns will dwindle anytime soon—I’m sure February will remain a good time to bet short on Tiffany stock going up. I also find the pure existence of an alt-consumer market geared toward fun in itself encouraging. The knowledge that such a market makes up a smaller portion of the population does not take away my interest in seeing how our cultural habits will continue to evolve. As for me, thanks to being in the #momlife phase, I’m back to reliving all the simplicity I loved about Valentine’s through my little people. Our morning kicked off with heart shaped pancakes, then sending them off to school with their bejeweled shoe boxes and spaceship Valentines in tow. They dug it. CW

Aspen Perry is a Salt Lake City-based aspiring author and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 7


BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Put on the Red Light

IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

For all the speakers at Utah Foundation’s Practical Solutions to Utah’s Air Quality Problems, it’s interesting that the most outspoken critic is absent. You’ll hear Dr. Kerry Kelly, associate professor of chemical engineering at the University of Utah and chair of Utah’s Air Quality Board; Bryce Bird, executive director of the Utah Division of Air Quality; Jessica Reimer of HEAL Utah; and even Lee Peacock from the Utah Petroleum Association. But you won’t hear from petroleum’s harshest critic—Brian Moench of Utah Physicians for Healthy Environment.  While you hear about what’s being done, what you could do and the challenges ahead for breathing in Utah, you might ask the panel where Moench is in the debate. Disclaimer: This is, for now, a conspiracy theory.  Zions Bank building, Founders Room, 18th Floor, 1 S. Main, 801355-1400, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 8-9:30 a.m., free, bit.ly/2EcEnth.

Big Breaks, Big Donors

Remember all the indignation over the national bank bailout? “Too big to fail” was the maxim of the day as the nation bickered over the bank bailout of 2008. Now, we have something alike in the massive EnergySolutions financial parachute. The Utah House voted to give a yearly fee break of $1.72 million to ES, which The Salt Lake Tribune noted was the biggest donor to legislators last year. Even more stunning was the argument that competition is hurting the industry. Wait, what? As if the monetary giveaway isn’t enough, Utah continues to site dumps and welcome wastes to the state. Let’s think this through. What caused the financial crisis? What caused ES woes, if any? Many economists think it was a lack of regulation, according to Economic and Political Weekly. But regulation is hardly on the minds of our legislators.

A world away from the Wasatch Front, 9th & 9th resident Sebastián Uprimny is the first ever to represent his home country of Colombia in the Winter Olympic Games in the men’s 15 km free cross-country skiing event this Friday. Uprimny first caught a glimpse of the world’s most competitive platform during the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics in 2002, as a volunteer for a sports broadcasting network. Now at 42, the married father of four is fighting for the gold and representing his homeland, as well as Utah, in Pyeongchang.

Impaired and Distracted

What was it like when you found out you qualified?

As long as we’re talking about political disconnects, how about those impaired drivers? Sometimes we care; sometimes we don’t. “It’s a difficult balance to strike between public safety and personal rights and liberties,” The Salt Lake Tribune quoted Rep. Justin Fawson, R-North Ogden, as saying. Let’s test that theory. Fawson was one of the committee members who doomed a bill to restrict hand-held cell phones while driving. Rep. Carol Spackman Moss, D-Holladay, noted that distracted driving kills almost as many people as drunk driving. Never mind. In Utah, alcohol impairs, but texting does not. Another legislator is trying to delay the .05 percent blood alcohol content law. In 2016, 2,017 people nationwide died in crashes involving BACs of less than .08, according the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Website Stop the Texts, Stop the Wrecks says 3,450 people were killed by distracted drivers that same year.

CITIZEN REV LT AIR QUALITY TALK

Bring it on, Daily Mail! If it weren’t for the British tabloid, Utahns would still be feeling sad and sorry for Rep. Jon Stanard, whose sudden departure from the Legislature was off-limits to the media. Why? Because House Speaker Greg Hughes told them not to speculate about it. And you know Utahns. We like to be nice and obedient. The thing is that Hughes “is not the boss of us” and wrongly hid the facts from a public, which, according to later reports, footed the bill for Stanard’s liaisons with his hooker friend. As is so Utah, this is all about avoiding embarrassment, and that kind of avoidance always comes at a cost. Still, there were hints in the local media—some from Utah Policy and a headline in The Salt Lake Tribune, “Lawmaker ‘unexpectedly’ quits.” The Daily Mail went for facts rather than innuendo.

CAMPAIGN LESSONS

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

HITS&MISSES

My uncle was the first to call me, and he told me, “You are going to the biggest stage ever.”So, it took time to sink in. I think it’s really going to get into my mind when I get there. It has been just crazy.

How has the community reacted?

It’s been very exciting; my social media has exploded. It’s been really nice to see people so excited—not only my family but people that I don’t even know. It’s kind of crazy to see both locally and back in my country the amount of support we are getting.

What drove you to fulfill your dream of competing in the Olympics?

For me, just to make this happen is a dream come true. Since I was a kid I wanted to be an athlete. I never spent a lot of time on just one sport, so this was my opportunity. I grabbed it and I am thrilled to represent Colombia. This is a dream come true after 20-something years.

How did you keep your age from deterring you from your goals?

I know a guy from Mexico [Germán Madrazo], and I joke with him. I tell him, “I think we might be the only ones over 40—we’re going to have our own category.” So I think the Olympics is about stories. Maybe this gives someone hope. Maybe someone from a small country will say, “You know what, if Sebastián did it, I can do it.”

—RACHELLE FERNANDEZ comments@cityweekly.net

Utahns seem to like Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox—maybe even more than the governor. Cox will be speaking about Lessons Learned on the Campaign Trail at the Emerging Leaders Initiative of Utah where you might get fired up enough to run for office yourself. If not, this and an expected panel of “elected millennial officials” should point you in the right direction. Good question: how many “elected millennial officials” are there in Utah? Cox himself began his political career at  29 as a city councilman and was elected mayor at Fairview at  30. Church & State, 370 S. 300 East, 801-901-0459, Thursday, Feb. 22, 6-7:30 p.m., bit.ly/2EvfcBy.

ASSASSINATION THEN AND NOW

You won’t want to miss author, journalist and commentator Burton Hersh as he speaks On the Assassination of JFK–in the Times of Trump. Go ahead and let your imagination run wild. Hersh is considered the primary biographer of Edward Kennedy and has written a lot about the Kennedys v. J. Edgar Hoover. Hersh acknowledges the conspiracy aspect, but in a blogpost says, “The CIA was clearly preparing the ground and setting (Lee Harvey) Oswald up.” With that as a background, how could you not want to hear what he says about the current era? Hinckley Institute of Politics, 332 S. 1400 East, Building 17, Room 10, 801581-850, Wednesday, Feb. 21, noon1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2BRi3ni.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


THE Source for Tune-Ups, Rentals & Equipment

FREE

Expires 3/29/18

SKI TUNE-UP $15 REG $30 SNOWBOARD TUNE-UP $20 REG $40

698 Park Avenue • Park City Townlift • 435-649-3020 134 West 600 South • Salt Lake • 801-355-9088 2432 East Ft. Union • South Valley • 801-942-1522

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

50% OFF TUNE-UPS! Expires 3/29/18

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Get / 1 t Ren

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 9


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

352 MAIN ST. UNIT D, PARK CITY, UTAH #BARBARIC 435•714•0967

STRAIGHT DOPE Sky High

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

GET A DAMN HAIRCUT

An engineering professor used to tell our class, “Everything eventually fails. The question is, when?” So what happens with a mammoth building? What’s the intended life span of, say, the Willis Tower? The way cities are packed, I can’t imagine a demolition crew can just drop a hundred-story building without causing chaos. —Concerned Citizen in Chicago

I’ll concede that “Everything eventually fails” is more than useful enough as credos go. But there’s a power at work here that can give even the ravages of time a fair fight: the profit motive. Last winter, the owners of the Willis Tower announced a $500 million plan to modernize the 45-year-old building, and the city started issuing permits over the summer. Clearly somebody doesn’t think that thing’s coming down anytime soon. Renovating and retrofitting is increasingly the name of the game when it comes to giant buildings, the current thinking being that it’s financially (not to mention ecologically) smarter to refresh them periodically than to tear down and start anew. Most experts figure there’s no reason an appropriately upkept skyscraper can’t stay there pretty much indefinitely. Without upkeep? As we discussed in a 2016 column, towers in a low-lying city like New York, for instance, would have only about 50 years of life in them absent human intervention: water erodes foundations if no one’s around to continually pump it out. In general, if you want to keep a structure standing, you’re going to need a sound water-management plan; foundation aside, one requirement for skyscraper longevity is that their steel-reinforced concrete bones don’t get exposed to rain, the acid in which eats at the limestone content. But assuming they get proper TLC, the dinosaurs of the Manhattan skyline will likely hang around a while yet. Sure, we can expect to lose a few old office towers here and there in the coming decades, mainly structures that were built when energy was cheap and nowadays cost a fortune to heat and cool—all that single-pane glass, etc. But by and large in New York, market forces and building code collude to keep old buildings standing. Many skyscrapers went up in an era of fewer regulatory constraints, so developers thinking about a tear-down today may be looking at a necessarily smaller building in its place—and thus less rent revenue going forward. Now, Tokyo is another story. Owing to the local mix of property values, zoning laws, and design standards, it often makes more sense there to knock down and rebuild. As The New York Times put it a couple of years ago, there’s a bull market for demolition in Japan, and the nation is becoming a world leader in the fine art of removing skyscrapers.  The fine art? I’m guessing when you’re picturing the “chaos” of skyscraper demolition, CCC, you’re investing the scene

with a lot of unwarranted drama—dynamite, countdown, plunger-style detonator, great clouds of dust and debris. In fact, the implosion method is now used for only about 2 percent of demolitions; most buildings, particularly in dense urban areas, are taken apart more laboriously, using cranes and elbow grease. Those in the deconstruction business are constantly coming up with new techniques, though, and right now is a particularly exciting time to be a building wrecker. In South Africa, they’re using high-pressure gas canisters in place of dynamite to break up concrete—quieter, less violent, and a lot less permitting required. In France, remote-controlled hydraulic devices push over supporting walls on midlevel floors, causing the top of the building to cave in on itself and pancake the rest on its way down. But the Japanese are ahead of the pack. They’ve got lots of buildings to practice on, many just too tall and too tightly surrounded to raze the old-fashioned way, and since 2002 they’ve been bound by a stringent law mandating the reuse of building materials, encouraging them to make as little mess as possible. As such, Japanese companies have worked up startlingly gentle demolition techniques—you can find trippy time-lapse videos where structures appear to just slowly sink into the ground. In one method, the roof is held up by jacks as workers remove the top floor in its entirety; the roof is then lowered, and the process continues until the building’s disappeared. Employing a similar concept, another version starts from the bottom: workers jack up everything above the ground floor, then take that out; rinse, repeat.  Fancy, and not just on the safety front: these demolition firms boast that their recycling of materials and relatively modest use of heavy machinery leads to impressive reductions in carbon emissions—up to 85 percent in some cases. Plus, the whole deal looks about as quiet and smooth-running as the Tokyo subway. There’s no indication such techniques will make it to New York or Chicago in the near future, but neither will the incentives to demolish in the first place. Nor will notably quiet and smoothrunning subways, for that matter. In more ways than one, we’re stuck with the cities we’ve got. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607


NEWS

C A N N A B I S L E G I S L AT I O N

Reefer Radness

Carl Wimmer, former state representative

Meet the local voices behind the latest medical marijuana ballot push. BY RAY HOWZE rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1

B

y now, you’ve likely heard of or been asked to sign the ballot initiative that would allow the use of medical marijuana in the state. The latest effort didn’t come without years of attempts to pass legislation at the Capitol, though, and has resulted in an upswell of public support to change the law without the Legislature’s involvement. But who’s behind this latest grassroots lawmaking? At City Weekly, we asked some of the initiative’s sponsors and other advocates what keeps them motivated and how they don’t get discouraged after repeated failures on the Hill.

Christine Stenquist, TRUCE Utah

142,000 citizen signatures behind the initiative—more than enough of the required 113,000. Now, they must finish determining what districts the signatures came from to make sure there are enough from each voting district. “Those bills are too little and way too late,” Stenquist says about lawmakers’ efforts. “Four years ago, we started with small steps and they still haven’t done anything for patient research. They’re [the Legislature] not wanting to help patients.”

Melissa Butler, hospice nurse

Lindsey Ohlin, volunteer coordinator at TRUCE Utah

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 11

Lindsey Ohlin says she first knew she wanted to help bring medical marijuana to Utah after hearing about former Utah mom Enedina Stanger. Stanger was arrested and charged with felony child endangerment in 2015 after police found her using medical marijuana in her car while her husband and children went into a store, according to ABC Channel 4. As a result, Stanger and her family moved to Colorado. That ordeal, she says, was just one reason she knew she should help. “I was so heartbroken with the situation for Stanger. One of my good friends, her son has cerebral palsy and desperately needs the medicine and that was a big kick for me to get going,” Ohlin says. “I’ve had chronic pain the majority of my life. I have fibromyalgia, and I think I could benefit from it as well.” Ohlin says she has met “very few people who are opposed to this” since she’s been involved. The recent poll conducted by The Salt Lake Tribune and Hinckley Institute of Politics that showed 76 percent of Utah voters either strongly or somewhat support the initiative, keeps her motivated. “I’ve met so many patients along the way that just truly need it and they’re just in way worse shape than I am,” Ohlin says. “I’m in shape to go actually do something— some of these people are stuck at home and they can’t be working on this like some of us can.” CW

Melissa Butler is a nurse that works with hospice and homebound patients. Butler says she sees patients “all the time” that would benefit from access to medical marijuana. “Every day I see patients that would benefit from it,” Butler says. “A huge problem we see is neuropathy and the only way to treat it is with Gabapentin, and nerve pain doesn’t respond to opioids well either. In every case where the patient has tried medical marijuana, they report better pain relief.” While speaking to City Weekly, Butler had just finished a visit with one of her patients, Grant Adler, a veteran who is not terminally ill but is restricted to a wheelchair. Adler says he’s had numerous surgeries to help pain from injuries received while serving in the military, but, because

he is now missing part of his spine and had several surgeries on his hands, he has to rely on pain meds. “There’s not a cure for me,” Adler says. “They’ve done all the surgeries, so their idea of treatment is put me on maximum dosage of Gabapentin and put me on pain pills every three hours, or I can go have back surgery, which would put me in a wheelchair full-time.” Adler says he would benefit from medical marijuana and would rather not have to rely on opioid pain medication as much as he does now. “I realized there’s a girl [who wanted to use medical marijuana] who was in a wheelchair and she left the state,” Adler says. “Now that she’s able to get medical cannabis, she’s no longer in a wheelchair. “I’m looking at leaving Utah because I can’t get the medicine that I need.” Butler says she didn’t get involved in advocating for medical marijuana until after the Legislature failed to pass it. She says she was “sure there wouldn’t be a problem with the Legislature passing it, but we’ve seen that’s not the case.” “This is the best way I could be an advocate for them,” Butler says. “In [nursing] school, you’re always taught we’re supposed to be an advocate for your patients— I think at this point, in getting [the ballot initiative] passed, this is the best why I can be an advocate for my patients.”

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Christine Stenquist is the president of Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education (TRUCE). A self-described chronic pain sufferer, Stenquist has spent the past four years lobbying for medical marijuana legislation. Even after the Legislature defeated former Sen. Mark Madsen’s medical marijuana bill in 2016—a blow that led to his retirement—Stenquist says that while it was a setback, she wasn’t ready to give up. Even with a ballot initiative in the works, she still spends her days at the Capitol. “I’m up on the hill right now battling five cannabis bills that won’t do what it needs to for patients,” Stenquist says. “I don’t know if patients will have what they need because we have so much infighting going on in this Legislature … If that continues to be the case, we won’t have a thriving industry. “But I’m still hopeful because five years ago, nobody was talking about [medical marijuana] in this state.” Last week, the House passed a “rightto-try” bill, House Bill 195, that would give terminally ill patients a right to try medical marijuana. However, a companion bill, House Bill 197, initially failed in the House but resurfaced and was passed with a new substitute on Feb. 13. The bill would order the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food to grow some marijuana for the patients. The Senate will now determine the fate of both bills. Stenquist says organizers, including the Utah Patients Coalition, have about

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Carl Wimmer is a former state representative who left the political world in 2012 and now co-sponsors the ballot initiative. In an interview with City Weekly in January, Wimmer said he thinks the Legislature has failed its duty of public representation when it comes to medical marijuana. “Who has not been affected by a loved one who has suffered severely from cancer and other diseases?” Wimmer asks. “The bottom line is compassion and love for mankind demands that we allow whatever option is out there and these are possibilities for relief.” Several years ago, Wimmer says, a brother of his died from pancreatic cancer and “there was nothing the doctors could do that could take the pain out of him.” He says he would have liked to have at least the option of medical marijuana for his brother’s pain. Now an ex-Mormon, Wimmer has also publicly criticized the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for having a say in the state’s future for medical marijuana. “I think the majority are doing what the LDS church wants done regardless of their constituency, and I believe a majority of voters support this,” he says. Ballot supporters, such as Wimmer and Stenquist, now worry proposed legislation could have an impact on the initiative come November.


12 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |


By Dylan Woolf Harris |

@dylantheharris | Photos by Sarah Arnoff |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 13

the Great Salt Lake shoreline. And this season, he’s become a reliably predictable fixture, enough so that he’s earned himself a name. As if she can commune with animals, Sorensen informs the “semi-tame” Oscar that the car full of people means no harm. “Don’t get scared,” she says from inside the vehicle. With his sharp, hooked beak, he looks Hitchcockian—like he could, if inclined, peck one to shreds without provocation. He’s beautiful. Hoven steps out of the vehicle to open a gate near the sanctuary, and

| CITY WEEKLY |

Before the bird comes into full view, Sorensen and her fellow National Audubon Society member Heidi Hoven know where he’s perched. “He waits there every day to welcome us,” Sorensen says, personifying the raptor because it’s almost impossible not to as he sits prominently and purposefully. “And often is there to say goodbye [when we leave].” Oscar is a hawk, the rough-legged variety, a species that nests in the arctic but winters south. This particular bird, evidently, has taken a liking to an area between Salt Lake City and

Oscar spreads his wings the full 4-feet-or-so span revealing a dappled undercarriage. He then glides to a bare tamarisk branch 100 yards away. The Gillmor Sanctuary is a 2,900-acre preserve managed by the National Audubon Society. It’s just outside the city limits, but it’s a prime sample of the type of terrain conservationists are trying to preserve in the northwest quadrant. The area has become a development priority for the city and landowners. Soon enough, a state correctional facility will rise there, with other projects expected to follow. A dirt road leads out toward the sanctuary, flanked by low grasses and shrubby shade trees. “This view is going to disappear,” Hoven says. Development proposals in the quadrant have been kicked around for decades, but the looming prison and talk of an inland port have recently filled those sails with forceful winds. The proposed port, especially, is projected to be a massive economic driver for the state and everyone with a stake in it is eager to see it through. On Feb. 6, House Speaker Greg Hughes sat in the hot seat with other lawmakers smiling up at the Salt Lake City Council, who smiled back. The smiles reinforced the synergic words they seemed intent on repeating and reminding one another of every few minutes: We all want to collaborate as we figure out how to develop a port. But behind the pleasantries is the blunt truth: The city doesn’t want to lose land-use and taxing authority. From the state’s perspective, it doesn’t want the city to come knocking after stuff is built and then demand the state pay for road upkeep and a host of other infrastructure needs. Instead, Hughes argued, problems could be rectified early if the state was at the initial, decision-making table. The biggest group impacted by changes to the land south of the Great Salt Lake might be those without a voice, like Oscar and the other thousands of birds who nest or migrate through there.

s if he were expecting someone, Oscar the hawk peers down with the gravitas of a sentinel at a slowly approaching Subaru on a recent Wednesday morning. His talons are clutching the highest crossbar of a worn—but functional—cattle shoot at least 12 feet above the ground. From that vantage, Oscar scans the expanse before him for voles. That’s what Gillmor Sanctuary manager Ella Sorensen suspects anyway.

@saraharnoffphotos

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

A

Conservation efforts in northwest quadrant are mighty, but are development plans stronger?

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

For the Birds


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Heidi Hoven lifts up a board to let water flow from one area of the Gilmore Sanctuary to another.

Go West

Sorensen declined to wade into the politics of the northwest quadrant, but she says, in general, the gravest threat to shoreline birds is a loss of habitat. “It’s horrible,” she says. “The Great Salt Lake is dynamic so the lake comes up and the birds move up. I did a study in 1987 when the lake was up, and documented all the birds. As soon as the lake went out, people started filling everything in and developing it, closer and closer and closer and closer to the lake. They’re losing habitat. “So we’re giving them habitat—a natural habitat,” she says, referring to the sanctuary. Perhaps no one knows the wetland between Interstate 80 and the Great Salt Lake as well as Sorensen, who has worked in conservation for decades. A chemist by schooling, Sorensen fell in love with bird-watching after she had children. “It became an obsession,” she says. Her passion led to professional connections, and she was tasked to help revise the state bird list. Soon after, she landed a job with the environmental nonprofit. She and Hoven took City Weekly on a tour through Gillmor. This winter, Sorensen and Hoven conducted a quick bird count. “It took us 11 minutes because there weren’t any birds,” Sorensen says. The estimated number was around 450. In the spring and summer, however, more birds will flock to the shoreline. More than 40 species of bird have been documented at the Great Salt Lake, nine of which commonly nest in the region. On a high count, the number of individual birds at the sanctuary has reached 10,000. As development plans on the northwest quadrant advanced, the Salt Lake City Planning Committee agreed to a zoning plan that delineated developable land and natural space, and drew up a jagged buffer line between the two. Bird-friendly features also were recommended, such as win-

Ella Sorensen describes the unique sand found at the edge of the Great Salt Lake on a tour through the sanctuary.

dows made of glass designed with patterns that birds can see and avoid. The National Audubon Society authored a report for the Utah Division of Facilities Construction and Management, which is in charge of building the prison south of the area. It included requests for using bird-friendly design, such as downward-facing lighting. In his retirement, Wayne Martinson volunteers for the Great Salt Lake Audubon Society’s conservation committee, but for a quarter century before that, he worked at the National Audubon Society where his focus was on the Great Salt Lake and the Gillmor Sanctuary. In his Audubon Society days, Martinson says he used to drive out to 7200 West, and as he reached the crest of the overpass, he’d look out to the expansive, untrammeled terrain. A couple years ago, though, Martinson decided it was time to retire. The prospect of buildings and roads replacing the unique natural beauty made the decision a little easier. “I didn’t want to drive out there anymore and look at the land being developed. I didn’t want to see that,” he says. “But I also feel like we did the best that we could working with private landowners in developing a situation that’s the best deal we could get for wildlife, and they can go forward with their development.” Martinson is a realist, and with the state’s growth forecasts being what they are, the best he can hope for is a strategic conservation component to any development plan. “It’s not something that I’m for, but it’s not something I’m in a position to say no to.” At 8800 West, there is a dividing line, with development to the east and the Inland Sea Shorebird Reserve, a sanctuary managed by Rio Tinto Kennecott to the west. Continuing east, past the Goggin Drain, lies the Gillmor Sanctuary. Further to the northeast, about 15,000 acres are managed by 13 duck clubs all the way to the Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area. “What we have is this tremendous wetland area,” he says. “It’s all managed for wildlife—from the Lee Creek area to Farmington Bay Goose Creek Island on the shoreline, and

that’s a significant accomplishment, and that provides a great amount of habitat for birds and wildlife.” The land that is developable is in the upland area where Martinson expects habitat loses. But if portions of the land are preserved and remain natural, birds will continue to migrate there. “In some ways, we’ve got this great swath of land. When you get to 8800 West, there aren’t lights, there aren’t cars, there isn’t other stuff. Birds on their flyway will see some dark spaces. That’s significant and it’s valuable,” he says. But if the state tries to run the show, some conservationists are concerned that the plans they’ve drafted with the city might get tossed out the window.

Compromise vs. Development

Longtime activist Steve Erickson spends considerable time on the Hill during the legislative session, lobbying for environmental groups as well as a host of others, while priding himself on being one of the only lobbyists who refuses to wear a tie. Initially believing the state wouldn’t pass any legislation this year related to proposed development on the northwest quadrant, Erickson and others were relieved. But rumors soon started swirling through the marble halls of the Capitol that lawmakers were considering drafting something. “We’ve kind of come to this compromise: Yes, there’s going to be development. We want to keep it as bird-friendly as possible. Bird-friendly designs, less light pollution, all of that,” he says. But those compromises were made at the city level. “The concern from the advocates is that the Legislature will preempt everything that’s gone on and say, we don’t want it that way, we want it this way, and impose their will,” he says. The leadership hasn’t indicated it would scrap the environmental concessions, but Erickson has worked in the Capitol


On Notice

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 15

Other environmentalists, however, are less sanguine about the city planning proposal. Founder of the Great Salt Lake Keepers, Jeff Lake, has criticized fellow activists for capitulating to development plans, which sometimes puts him at odds with those who should be allies. “They don’t set their sights high enough,” he says of other conservation groups. “Birds and other wildlife and plants and water, those are all public trust resources and they’re supposed to be managed on behalf of the public in perpetuity,” he continues. “They’re not supposed to be sold off or given away. They’re supposed to be managed and protected.” The conservation fight over the northwest quadrant first made a blip on Lake’s radar more than 15 years ago when he learned about a proposal to install freeway billboards near the Great Saltair. He was disheartened by the thought that monolithic advertisements would mar the view and be deleterious to the migratory birds that swoop through the region. “Our primary concern was freeway billboards would impact the bird population and nesting,” he says. “It would give a place for predator birds to roost and watch and prey upon the nesting birds.”

Soon enough, he was tipped off to a proposal to develop the northwest quadrant, a packed suburb of single-family dwellings. “We called a big summit meeting with the city, and we put the city on notice,” he says. Although that residential development never came into fruition, Lake’s concern for the region remained, and he wasn’t happy when he learned about the latest plans. The largest problem he sees is the idea that the upland parts of the northwest quadrant are considered developable, while the lower wetlands are set aside for conservation. Categorizing the land in this fashion doesn’t account for flooding, he says. Wetlands have adapted to occasional inundation and the Great Salt Lake is naturally dynamic. When it’s high, the uplands will then serve as the shoreline. The map of the land is divided into two distinct sections: the uplands and playa wetlands. But sometimes the two are misunderstood to be mutually disjointed parts. The uplands are developable, and the playas, where the birds congregate, are not. Many say that’s not quite true: The uplands and wetlands are interconnected. Birds visit the uplands for some forage and protective cover and to nest. But the uplands also collect and drain water important to the wetlands. “The entire area out there has to be considered holistically,” Lake says. “The buffer is completely inadequate. It’s so artificial; it’s so contrived, and it does not take into account the interactions between upland and wetland that are necessary. “Bird-friendly windows are such a minor part of this. Some of these concessions that are being floated and discussed are minor compared to the fundamental flaws of the plan,” he continues. In general, Lake is leery of mitigation plans. Although they often mandate a certain number of acres be preserved for every acre that is developed, the implementation is not to a standard conservationists like him find acceptable. “The real problem with mitigation is mitigation projects almost always fail,” he says. “They are notorious in not succeeding in their goals to replace and sustain the habitat and the resources that

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Bailey’s Lake is a dry ravine that at one point more than a decade ago was considered being filled as a freshwater pond, one that environmentalists feared would be disturbed with waverunners. Sorensen was in the middle of the bout, or as she puts it: “I didn’t really have to fight it; I just had to tell people how stupid it was.” Now, folks like Hoven eye Bailey’s Lake as a potential conservation stronghold. “It has great restoration potential … bringing back a habitat that would support lots of wildlife,” she says.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

arena long enough to know that bills get amended—and sometimes for the worse. Based on talks at city council this month, the prevailing plan is for the Legislature to pass a bill that would create a board to oversee the inland port. “We want that to be an open, transparent process, where if we’re not at the table, at least we’re in the room,” he says. “We care about this being done properly so as to minimize the impacts. The governance, we probably won’t have a whole lot of say in the structure of that authority, but we think that a collaborative approach is the way to go.” Erickson says he’s hopeful that the state doesn’t bully municipal governments. “We would counsel legislators to go easy, go slow, let the process work the way it should work, which is in a collaborative fashion. Don’t be preemptive in your moves here.” And if the Legislature usurps the zoning agreements between the city and conservationists, the environmental community won’t go away quietly. “I think that would be an egregious overreach—as they like to say up here,” Erickson says, sitting on a bench in the Capitol’s hallway. Fortunately for the birds, the lower wetlands don’t lend themselves to development. But the interplay between the wetlands and the uplands is critical, says sanctuary manager Sorensen, and if all the uplands in the northwest quadrant are developed, that’s also cause for concern. To her, overflow channel Goggin Drain is a line in the sand. If developers seek projects beyond it and toward the lake, Sorensen vows she’ll be the first person on the phone giving them an earful. “We feel really strongly that that boundary—whoever takes it on—that natural boundary is intact,” Sorensen says. “It’s basically a boundary, a buffer, to protect the integrity of Bailey’s Lake, but also the buffer is to protect 20,000 acres of wetlands that are devoted to wildlife from the development.”


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Hoven and Sorensen want to preserve the wetlands near the northwest quadrant as development plans ramp up.

they’ve impacted. Oftentimes, because they’re not adequately designed or they don’t have enough space or the resources to sustain those wetlands really aren’t there. Many times, these mitigation wetlands have to be created from scratch.” And local governments, he contends, don’t have the scientific background to navigate the regulatory laws that are supposed to be enforced by agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Climate and Conservation

The job of a sanctuary manager mandates opening and closing waterways, eliminating noxious weeds, surveying and monitoring the birds and reminding trespassers that they’ve crossed into private property. Development compounds the strain on an environment that is already being tested by a changing climate and other unknown factors. Headed toward the Great Salt Lake, Sorensen asks to kill the motor and points to a bevy of tundra swans. It’s early in the season for them to be stopped here, she notes, but this year has been exceptionally warm and the ponds aren’t frozen over. A considerable percentage of the region’s population of swans migrate to the Great Salt Lake, and she’s counted up to 4,000 at Gillmor alone in the past. “It looked like a solid lake made up of white swans,” she says. In July 2009, the Gillmor Sanctuary’s water-control system was completed. In the back of the conservationists’ minds is the need to retain salt. “Once you lose all your salt by putting water in and letting it flow through an area and carrying out all the salt, leaching it from the sediment, freshening it up, that’s when you run into trouble with emerging vegetation coming in because there’s nothing keeping it from growing

anymore,” Hoven says. “We need these salts to keep it looking like we have it now.” Sorensen is a meticulous record-keeper, including bird counts and preparing annual vegetation maps to help understand the changing landscape. When you picture wetland habitat, you’re probably conjuring up an image of a peaty pond, or emergent marsh with waterfowl floating among cattails and reeds. But the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake are of a different sort. For starters, mudflats—swaths of caky mud that remain after water levels have receded or seeped into the ground—are integral components. And unlike the long grasses one might expect, the natural vegetation here is short. Taller trees, such as the tamarisks, are invasive. One of the Audubon Society’s ongoing tasks is to clear the encroaching vegetation by chainsawing it to a stump, and then painting a toxin on the remains that works its way to the roots without contaminating the surrounding soil. “We’ve had lots of progress opening up the landscape,” Hoven says. Phragmites grow lengthy, golden stalks topped with tufts; they’re also invasive. Along the tour, Hoven spots a nascent patch of phragmites and takes note that it needs to be removed, a laborious process that requires perennial treatment.

Rooted in History

Sorensen can recite the history of the land. She’ll tell you, for example, where the Jordan River once fed into the Great Salt Lake thousands of years ago before a geologic phenomenon called isostatic rebound shifted the tributary east. She can also ballpark the age of the surrounding mountains; factoids she’s gleaned from trusted scholars. She’s picked up information about ancient people who populated the land hundreds of years before Brigham Young led pioneers into the Valley, remnants of their culture is preserved at precious cultural sites that she’s reluctant to talk about in detail.

And she knows about the Mormon settlers, too. In addition to being the second prophet of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Young was an industrious bull, who used to run cattle along the shores and all the way out to Antelope Island, when the waterline permitted. “The Great Salt Lake is dynamic so these habitats are moving around in different places every year. If the lake is down, they’re in certain places than if the lake is up. And we as humans come in and we’re just developing so the lake doesn’t have that ability to create things like this,” Sorensen says standing near the shore. The creation of the Gillmor Sanctuary was a long drawnout ordeal that relied on deft negotiations over land acquisition—some of which is ongoing. A section of sanctuary land was donated by the Gillmors, ranchers who grazed cattle on the land for around a century. Part of the agreement allows for the family to continue running some cattle in the area. Change is the only constant thing, and progress (a word that has somehow become nearly synonymous with development) is inexorable, and that means that parcels of habitat are being wiped away. Almost nothing is as critical to a species as its habitat. That’s why conservationists take stands that might otherwise seem foolhardy and obstinate. But it’s also why groups like the Audubon Society want to ensure that when developers look over the landscape that will one day be sectioned with roads and buildings, they leave something for the animals. The Gillmor Sanctuary is closed to the public. Usually when people see it, they’re accompanied by Sorensen. In a state like Utah, renowned for its slopes and red-rock desertscapes, the wetlands around Great Salt Lake are overlooked as areas of natural beauty, but Sorensen says she’s seen the landscape move grown adults to tears. She recalls a tour of Gillmor years ago. The Great Salt Lake had risen and filled in river channels, then retreated. “The area was literally covered with birds,” she says. “The sun was setting. There were all these ibis, shorebirds and [a visitor] sat there and just wept.” CW


We buy cars (801) 845-2423 creditrefresh.cityweekly.net

CITY WEEKLY AUTOS Growing Auto Site

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Utah’s Fastest

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 17

A BETTER WAY TO BUY & SELL YOUR NEXT VEHICLE! REGISTER ON WWW.CITYWEEKLYAUTOS.COM TO WIN $100 MAVERIK GAS CARD


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, FEB. 15-21, 2018

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

DAVID WAITZ

ROBIN VAN SWANK

PIONEER THEATRE COMPANY

STANLEY KRAMER PRODUCTIONS

ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 2/15

FRIDAY 2/16

SATURDAY 2/17

SATURDAY 2/17

Murder and crime have always been a preferred brand of escapism for Americans; we love the scary, the creepy and the macabre. So for all of us who secretly maintain a morbid interest in violence, here’s the perfect podcast. My Favorite Murder was first released in early 2016. The show, like so many hit podcasts, revolves around murder, but hosts Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark offer a new and refreshing take on stories of violent crime evidenced by their day jobs—Kilgariff works as a stand-up comedian, and Hardstark hosts a show on The Cooking Channel. Jokes and profanity set a casual mood, balanced out by empathetic advice, leaving listeners feeling content and satisfied—which is a strange feeling to have after listening to the grizzly details of the Bundy murders. As part of the largely-improvised show, each host usually shares a true-crime story, as well as an occasional “hometown murder” tale provided by a listener. While murder is a central concept of the show, the discussion is rarely restricted to crime. The lively banter often covers everything from the weird to the mundane, and the loose style makes for an engaging and often hilarious listen. My Favorite Murder is known as much for its popularity as it is for its quality. A regular on iTunes charts and number one on Spotify’s most listened to list, the show has a devout fan base. Many venues for this tour have already sold out. So grab your tickets while they last and enjoy an exciting, fun and slightly morbid live showing. (David Miller) My Favorite Murder Live @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-5817100, Feb. 15-16, $39.50, tickets.utah.edu

The press release for Pioneer Theater Co.’s world-premiere production of Jeff Talbott’s i plays a bit coy with the synopsis, describing it as “a mysterious love story … set a few days after tomorrow.” It’s a necessary bit of obfuscation, Talbott believes, for a story that unfolds in a near-future where some of what has gone before the on-stage action is part of the mystery. “Revealing too much … would open up too much about the plot,” Talbott says. “Really, it’s about two people who have had a rough time in life, a little bit bruised by the world, opening up to each other.” An actor as well as a playwright—including an appearance in the cast of PTC’s 2007 production of Doubt—Talbott believes he applies that on-stage experience to the way he writes, “because I’m trying to get to the emotional heart of things. As an actor, I’m very impatient when I think, ‘Well, that’s just something a writer thinks is interesting to say.’” He also recognizes that the actor performing a role changes the nature of the work, something he saw close-up with i between a staged reading in January of 2017—where local actress Susanna Florence played one of the lead roles as Sarah—and this production with Kathleen McElfresh in the role. “When it’s done, both of their DNA is in the play,” Talbott says. “Once an actor starts saying it out loud, it becomes much more theirs than mine. … New plays are constantly shifting. They are not done until the author walks away from it.” (Scott Renshaw) i @ Pioneer Theater Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Feb. 16-March 3, dates and times vary, $25-$44, pioneertheatre.org

Even before movies had sound, music played a critical role in bringing films to life. The intrigue and emotion that marked the screen classics of yesteryear were heightened by stirring soundtracks that fueled the drama. Such was the case with the 1952 film High Noon, which starred Oscar-winning actor Gary Cooper as Marshall Will Kane, a principled man duty-bound to stand up to the villainous Frank Miller, a vengeful ex-con. Kane’s potential allies abandon him, and even his wife Amy, an avowed pacifist, isn’t willing to stand by as he faces off—alone and outnumbered—against Miller’s gang on the dusty streets of their otherwise defenseless town. The music swells and the drama heightens when Kane, a sworn servant of the people, faces off against the vicious outlaw who, like most bad guys, has scant concern for innocent lives, and even less for those sworn to protect them. That stirring combination of movies and music is revisited when the Utah Symphony performs the sweeping Dimitri Tiomkin score while accompanying a special screening of the classic film. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Go West! Art of the American Frontier at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, High Noon reaches unique heights in this live performance. “It’s exciting for Utah Symphony to present the world premiere performance of Tiomkin’s Oscar-winning soundtrack,” Utah Symphony President and CEO Paul Meecham says via email. “There is nothing quite like the immersive experience of watching a feature film on the giant screen while the soundtrack is played by a live orchestra.” Indeed, that’s one quick draw. (Lee Zimmerman) High Noon in Concert @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-533-6683, Feb. 17, 7 p.m., $15-$32, utahsymphony.org

“There are some things that Jews just don’t do,” Bob Garfield says in his one-man performance Ruggedly Jewish. “Jews don’t fix our own trucks. We don’t own trucks. … Jews do not suspend chunks of fruit in our Jell-O.” That might sound like the stuff of old-time Borscht Belt comedy, but Garfield is interested in more than self-deprecating humor—and it’s part of an evening that he defines as an Odysseus-like heroic quest. A veteran journalist for outlets like The New York Times, Sports Illustrated and Wired, as well as the 17-year co-host of the Peabody Award-winning public radio program On the Media, Garfield spends the 90 minutes of Ruggedly Jewish in part telling stories of his professional travels around the country and around the world, including everything from (in his words) “singing to tasteful nudity.” Along the way, he provides not just an insight into his own experience wrestling with being a secular Jew in America, but an alternately funny and disconcerting exploration of the country’s cultural tapestry in an era of open nationalism and anti-Semitism. “This is certainly a spectacle of me trying to make sense of who I am,” Garfield said to Chicago Jewish News in November 2017, “but it’s really much more concerned with who you are—who we all are—as individuals and as a society. Especially at this particular political moment.” “Most of all, there will be a search for identity: mine, yours and everybody else’s,” Garfield says in the show. Join him on this uniquely American odyssey. (SR) Bob Garfield: Ruggedly Jewish @ Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435655-3114, Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m., $29-$27, ecclescenter.org

My Favorite Murder Live

Pioneer Theater Co.: i

High Noon in Concert

Bob Garfield: Ruggedly Jewish


CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

2.10 @ CUPID’S CLUB CRAWL + AFTER PARTY

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

VIVA LA DIVA

7:00PM - 11:00PM

AT CLUB-X

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 19

FEBRUARY 17, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

UPCOMING EVENTS


Struggles with familybuilding lead to the creation of The Art of Infertility. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

XOXOXO Valentine’s Day XOXOXO XOXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOXO

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

Fertile Ground

! h a u M ah! u M ah! u M

XOXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOXO

20 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

A&E

ART

XOXO Wed, February 14th XOXO

s with any emotionally trying life experience, dealing with infertility is hard to do alone. A new local art exhibit on the subject of infertility similarly proves the importance of such support, as it required a collaboration between three organizations. That story behind The Art of Infertility began not locally, but in Michigan in 2014. Elizabeth Walker, who began her own journey with infertility with her husband in 2009, had approached the Ella Sharp Museum in Jackson, Mich., about an exhibit of work—both visual art and oral histories—by people struggling with infertility that might offer therapeutic opportunities for the artists, and education for the public. While that exhibit was up in May of 2014, Walker traveled to Washington, D.C., for a legislative advocacy day by a national infertility support group. There she met Maria Novotny, also a Michigan resident, who was beginning graduate study focusing on the way women process and talk about infertility. “At that time, Elizabeth didn’t really have a plan,” Novotny says. “So we started discussing what she wanted to do with the project.” Initially, the scope was small. Walker and Novotny brought their Art of Infertility work to “pop-up” events affiliated with fundraising walks in California, but they began to realize that they wanted to include stories representing as many perspectives as possible. “The stories you don’t hear are the stories of more diverse experiences,” Walker says. “Infertility doesn’t discriminate.” The Art of Infertility project began to receive media coverage in outlets including Psychology Today and Huffington Post, and subsequently came to the attention of Camille Hawkins, executive director of the Utah Infertility Resource Center. Hawkins was looking for a community partner to work with on bringing the project to Utah, and a friend mentioned the mission of Art Access Gallery to bring art opportunities to under-served communities. “We decided this would be a really cool opportunity both to help our clients engage in artwork in an art workshop setting with professional artists and art therapists,” Hawkins says, “and then to display the artwork and use it as a method of storytelling to bring awareness to what people struggling with infertility and family-building go through.”

Beginning last year, Utah Infertility Resource Center clients participated in workshops at Art Access Gallery, including mentorships in which they would be paired with a professional artist. Yet the goal was not on producing a “professional” work of art, according to Hawkins, which helped allay the anxieties of participants about the potential for these works to appear on a gallery wall. “We explained to the attendees that it’s not about the artwork being a masterpiece; it’s about the artwork reflecting what it’s like to go through infertility,” she says. “It’s an awareness tool, so our community can learn more. That really helped everybody understand, it doesn’t matter what this piece looks like. What matters is the story.” Those stories cover a broad range of experiences, and a wide emotional spectrum, according to Art Access Gallery programs director Elise Butterfield. “One of the things I found interesting when I first started talking to Camille,” she says, “is they don’t think of infertility as just a medical situation, but perhaps a same-sex couple that can’t conceive on their own, or a single parent who doesn’t have a partner. … I think that while there is certainly pain expressed in a lot of these works, there’s also a pretty deep sense of hope, and this vision of what could be. I don’t think that all of it is necessarily about heartbreak, sadness or medical trauma.” The exhibit is expected to represent local participants in about 80 percent of the works, according to Butterfield, with the rest coming from Art of Infertility’s permanent collection. Additional programming includes a screening of the infertility-themed documentary One More Shot on Feb. 15, followed by a panel discussion with Walker and Novoty, as well as the filmmakers.

Jill Levario’s mixed-media work “Baby on the Brain” from Art Access Gallery‘s Art of Infertility.

While the educational component of the exhibition is certainly important in raising awareness about the many kinds of infertility journeys that exist, all of the organizers seem to agree that the most fulfilling part of this process has been seeing the artists turn their experiences into a creative work. “It was very powerful to watch clients who have no control over their reproduction, and their ability to have a family, take control over a piece of artwork, and use materials to put together something very meaningful to reflect their experience,” Hawkins says. “When you think about infertility,” Novotny says, “there’s a lack of materiality. Art became that materiality, a visible thing so people could see and understand that experience.” To which Walker adds, “[Clients] can be reluctant or scared to come, but they’re really surprised by how easy it is, how accessible it is, having that opportunity to create something when you’ve been trying so hard to create, with no success.” CW

ART OF INFERTILITY

Art Access Gallery 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125 Feb. 16-March 9 Opening reception Feb. 16, 6-9 p.m. ONE MORE SHOT

Urban Arts Gallery 137 S. Rio Grande St. Feb. 15 6 p.m. artofinfertility.org


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Elizabeth M. Claffey’s series Matrilinear (#10 is pictured) addresses family folklore, ritual and objects passed down through generations of women at Granary Art Center (86 N. Main, Ephraim, granaryartcenter.org) through May 11.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

DANCE

Ballet West: Cinderella Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, through Feb. 25, times and dates vary, artsaltlake.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

COMEDY & IMPROV

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 21

Bobbie Pyron: A Pup Called Trouble The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Feb. 17, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Deborah Reed: The Days When Birds Come Back The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Feb. 20, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Courtney Alameda: Pitch Dark The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Feb. 21, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

LITERATURE

Aaron Woodall Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Feb. 15, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; Feb. 16, 8 p.m., 21+ wiseguyscomedy.com Improv Student Graduation Show Sugar Space, 132 S. 800 West, 7 p.m. Jacob Leigh Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Feb. 15, 7 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Feb. 16-17, 8 p.m., 15+, wiseguyscomedy.com Steve Rannazzisi Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Feb. 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Utah Symphony: High Noon in Concert Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Feb. 17, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Concerto Night: A Valentine’s Date to Remember Ragan Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu MOTUS After Dark Avant Groove, 122 W. Pierpont, Feb. 16, 9 p.m., saltycricket.org

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Annie Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Feb. 24, dates and times vary, drapertheatre.org The Beautiful Game Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, Feb. 16-March 4, times vary, tickets. utah.edu Busytown the Musical Utah Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State., 801-532-6000, through Feb. 17, times and dates vary, uctheatre.org Cash on Delivery Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 17, dates and times vary, hct.org Evita The Electric Theater Center, 68 E. Tabernacle, St. George, Feb. 14-24, dates and times vary, thestagedoortheater.com Hir Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through March 11, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org The Hunchback of Notre Dame Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 31, dates and time vary, hit.org i Pioneer Theater Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Feb. 16-March 3, times vary, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 18) I and You Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through Feb. 17, times and dates vary, artsaltlake.org The Little Mermaid Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 500 North, Orem, through April 14, dates and times vary, halecenter.org Lyric Opera Ensemble: Bernstein’s Trouble in Tahiti Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 16-17, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940 Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through Feb. 24, grandtheatrecompany.com The Music Man Rose Wagner Center 138 W. 300 South, through Feb. 23., times vary, artsaltlake.org My Favorite Murder Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, through Feb. 16, 8 p.m., tickets.utah.edu (see p. 18) The Nerd Theater at Mount Jordan, 300 E. 9400 South, Sandy, Feb. 16-March 3, FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., sandyarts.com

Passion Good Company Theatre, 2402 Wall Ave., Ogden, through March 3, Saturday-Sunday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., goodcotheatre.com Power Rangers Live Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Feb. 20, 7 p.m., live-at-the-eccles.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Banff Film Festival Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Cir., 801-581-7100, Feb. 20-Feb. 22, 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

TALKS & LECTURES

Bob Garfield: Ruggedly Jewish George S. & Dolores Dore Eccles Center Theater, 1750 Kearns Blvd., 435-655-3114, Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., parkcityinstitute.org (see p. 18) Fighting Serious Crimes: Strategies and Tactics for Conflict-Affected Societies Jewett Center, Westminster College 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-832-3270, Feb. 20, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org Personal Privacy, Cell Phone Tracking and the 4th Amendment Quinney College of Law, 383 S. University St., Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m., law.utah.edu

SEASONAL EVENTS

2018 Chinese New Year Celebration Cottonwood High School Auditorium, 5717 S. 1300 East, Feb. 17, 6:30 p.m., utahchinese.org Chinese New Year Celebration Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, Feb. 17, 1-4 p.m., viridiancenter.org Ice Rink Station Park 140 N. Union Ave., Farmington, 801-923-9111, through Feb. 25, shopstationpark.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

2018 Mask Gallery Exhibit Gallery UAF, 230 S. 500 West, No. 120, Feb. 2-16, uaf.org All Those Who Wander: Exploring the World by Lens Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, through Feb. 28, bdac.org Andrew Alba: Spring and All Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Annual Faculty Show Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Feb. 24, suu.edu/pva Art of Infertility Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, Feb. 16-March 9, accessart.org (see p. 20) Basha: Six Stories Above Sugar House Redman Building, 1240 E. 2100 South, Feb. 16, 6-9 p.m., bashaworldwide.com Bill Reed: Jupiter’s Belts Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 S., 801-363-4088, Feb. 12-Mar. 10, times vary, artatthemain.com Bob Hope: An American Treasure Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through April 28, culturalcelebration.org Chauncey Secrist: Icons: Assemblages Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through March 6, slcpl.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through May 26, utahmoca.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 13, utahmoca.org

Elizabeth M. Claffey: Matrilinear Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through May 11, granaryartcenter.org (see p. 21) Eric Overton: Monument UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 17, utahmoca.org George Beard: Mormon Pioneer Artist With a Camera Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through March 2, visualarts.utah.gov Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through March 11, umfa.utah.edu Jenny Floor Photography: Animal Love Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through March 2, slcpl.org Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org Justin Watson: Permadeath UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 3, utahmoca.org Jylian Gustlin: Statera Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, through Feb. 20, gallerymar.com Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Lawrence Magana: Our Native Color DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through Feb. 17, slcpl.org Leslie Randolph: Fire Paintings and MacroGalleries Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Feb. 16, slcpl.org Lucy Peterson Watkins: Fiber Art Exhibit Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Feb. 25, redbuttegarden.org Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, May 12, utahmoca.org Miroslava K. Vomela: Vivid Image-ination Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Nathan Florence: Toward Home Modern West Fine Art, 177 W. 200 South, through March 10, modernwestfineart.com Nicole Pietrantoni: Alas, Alack Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through April 15, kimballartcenter.org Once Upon a Time Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through March 4, urbanartsgallery.org Paul Crow: On Thin Ice Weber County Building, 2380 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-810-2898, through Feb. 23, ogdenfirst.org Peter Ruplinger: Custom Stained Glass Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801594-8611, through March 15, slcpl.org Rebecca Pyle: Paintings, Other Artwork Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Simon Blundell: Fragmentation and Language Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, through Feb. 23, slcpl.org Square One: Helper Artists of Utah Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Feb. 23, saltlakearts.org Tim Peterson: A Risk Taker Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 18, slcpl.org World of the Wild Art Show Hogle Zoo, 2600 Sunnyside Ave., 801-584-1700, through March 3, hoglezoo.org


Eat your feelings at these six comfort food spots. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

If you’re nursing a recently broken heart, it’s high time to punish the organ that’s causing you all that grief. It is only through the immolation of your atria and ventricles that you can truly begin to heal, so head over to Lucky 13 (135 W. 1300 South, 801-487-4418, lucky13slc.com) and order yourself a Ring of Fire ($10). Even if you’re no stranger to spicy burgers, the mixture of roasted jalapeño

Something Traditional Since its invention, ice cream has functioned as the cool balm that

For those whose world has been sufficiently rocked by the sudden insignificance of a once-significant other, ice cream and lemon cake might not do the trick. If this is the case, then you’re in need of something you can vicously tear apart and lick from your fingers. Enter the wagyu bone marrow ($17) from

If the Hallmark holiday simply puts you in the mood to take a break from the human race for a while, Tinker’s Cat Café (302 E. 900 South, 801-519-2287, tinkerscatcafe.com) offers two tickets to purr-adise. Although their coffee shop menu has many tasty treats, including a few vegan options, Tinker’s curative properties come from the meditative state achieved with observing the quiet grace of the feline friends who live there. Slowly nursing a cup of coffee or tea while relaxing with a menagerie of lounging, stretching, yawning and purring cats provides a welcome reprieve from all those pain-in-theass emotions that come with being a human. Your future crazy cat lady or dude self will thank you. CW

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 23

Something Spicy

Something Savage

Something Fuzzy

| CITY WEEKLY |

of dropping such a bomb is a point of sociopathic fascination for me, and my heart goes out to those who have a nasty case of valentine venom. If Valentine’s Day hasn’t been particularly kind and your heart chafes with the ides of February, here’s a sample of some culinary comfort you can serve yourself.

Whether we’re bouncing back from a recent breakup or lamenting your lack of progress in finding a soul mate, it’s nice to have a supportive venting session. When you’re in need of something warm and uplifting like a hug—but aren’t above a little bad-mouthing—a slice of David’s Luscious Lemon Cake ($4) from Canyon Rim’s The Baking Hive (3362 S. 2300 East, 801-419-0187, Millcreek bakinghive.com) is what you’re after. The soft, yielding texture of the cake embraces your taste buds while the tart flechette of lemon flavor talks shit on every scrub that did you wrong.

The Copper Onion (111 E. 300 South, 801-355-3282, thecopperonion.com). The primal sensation of sucking perfectly roasted marrow out of a charred beef bone speaks for itself. It’s tactile, it’s satisfying and at the end of the meal, you have this big ol’ bone that you can chuck through your ex’s bedroom window.

E

very time Valentine’s Day rolls around, I can’t help but think of the time a good friend of mine got brutally dumped on this fateful day of the Cupid. The really sick part of the whole fiasco was that his birthday also happens to fall on Feb. 14 (happy b-day, dude). The sheer insensitivity

Something Sweet (but still kind of a bitch)

soothes most forms of heartache. My current prescription for frozen feel-good comes from Howdy Homemade Ice Cream (2670 S. 2000 East, 801-410-4302, howdyslc.com). Among their wide range of flavors, the Dr. Pepper chocolate chip ($8 per pint) is ideal for any V-Day-related doldrums. It’s the right mixture of excessive and familiar, which generally provides the endorphin-surge needed to soften a lack of romantic prospects. For reinforcements, I suggest hitting up Chip Cookies (2180 S. 300 West, 801-889-2412, chipcookies.co), who are bravely standing by to deliver monstrous chocolate chip cookies ($10 for a box of four) to the lovelorn from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Table for One?

and habanero peppers will sear you straight to the core. If you’re prone to tears during your visit, don’t worry—no one will judge you for crying while you battle this beast. In fact, it’d be weird if you didn’t. Johnny Cash once famously said, “Love is a burning thing.” Thanks to the Ring of Fire, now you are too.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

FOOD MATTERS

coffee, crepes & a mic

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

sustain yourself!

THE

On our website FIVEALLS.COM OR CALL US AT

801.582.1400 RESTAURANT

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 01-466-3 2 7 3

Dinner with #SLCtoo

7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m.

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

SLC’S newest sushi lounge

488 E 100 S 801.359.2092 hamachislc.com

The newly fledged #SLCtoo (slctoo.com) organization hosts its first event on Feb. 17: a panel discussion, dinner and cocktail party seeking to galvanize the community in an effort to address local sexual violence. #SLCtoo organizes with local groups such as Honey, UCASA, Still Not Asking For It and Equality Utah, to collaborate with concerned citizens about how to best approach the dismantling of institutionalized sexual harassment and assault. The event takes place at Ember (623 S. State), where the discussion commences at 8:30 p.m. followed by dinner and drinks. Tickets are available via Eventbrite and are $30 for the seminar and bar access or $65 to include a three-course dinner. All proceeds will be donated to the Rape Recovery Center.

Dungeness Crab Season at Current

For seafood restaurants like Current Fish & Oyster (279 E. 300 South, 801-326-3474, currentfishandoyster.com) Dungeness crab season is a bit like Christmas. Executive Chef Alan Brines orders fresh Dungeness crab directly from the Oregon coast, through Feb. 28. Diners can expect to see him and the Current staff serving these tasty Pacific gems whole with a bit of herb compound butter, which is just the way God intended. On days when Brines is feeling experimental, there’s no telling what sumptuous dishes he might concoct with fresh ingredients.

Caputo’s Best in Utah

Open for Valentine’s Day

Make your reservations online at

FIVEALLS.COM

1458 South Foothill Drive

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

At this point, if you’re not aware of how vast and diverse our local food scene is, it’s time to get educated. Luckily, the 15th and 15th location of Caputo’s Deli (1516 S. 1500 East, 801-486-6615, caputos.com) teaches attendees all about what the Wasatch Front has to offer. The class begins with a gastronomic tour of Utah courtesy of Matt Caputo, where attendees get a taste of the historical context behind some of our local food producers and a rundown of where to go for a bit of local flavor. It concludes with a carefully curated menu of locally made chocolate, beer and wine, along with some cheese pairings straight from Caputo’s own cheese cave. The class takes place at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 21, and tickets can be purchased for $45 or $25 without the alcoholic beverages option. Quote of the Week: “Crabs may be prepared in 50 ways and all of them are good.” —H.L. Mencken Food matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net 2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181


N E W LO C ATION! RA

G

ND OP 1 2 3 S O U T H ST ENING ATE STREET IN OREM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

CHINESE SEAFOOD | SUSHI | MONGOLIAN

T E L : 8 0 1 . 9 6 9 . 6 6 6 6 | 5 6 6 8 S R E D W O O D R D TAY L O R S V I L L E , U T T E L : 8 0 1 . 9 6 0 . 9 6 6 9 | 1 2 3 S O U T H S TAT E S T R E E T, O R E M , U T

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 25

KING BUFFET

L U N C H B U F F E T • D I N N E R B U F F E T • S AT U R D AY & S U N D AY A L L D AY D I N N E R B U F F E T


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

26 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Seeing Red

Boneyard’s new brew is bloody good. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

W

ay back in the early 1970s, when I was a but a wee lad, my memories of beer were simple and innocent. Those recollections are basically distilled down to my Pop coming home from work and me bringing him his after-work beer, once we’d settled in to watch Laugh-In or Adam-12. One evening, though, my old man threw a wrench in our nightly routine when he opted to prepare his Olympia lager solo. Not only did he have the balls to shut me out of my sacred duties, he also proceeded to to pour tomato juice into the damned beer. Now, I wasn’t a huge fan of beer or tomato juice; I’d ask for a sip of beer on occasion, but it would immediately be spat into the sink. So you can probably imagine my disdain for that murky red abomination that threw chaos into my hallowed suburban routine. Fast-forward into adulthood. After a week of sucking down Uinta Cutthroats

and margaritas while vacationing on Lake Powell, a pal of mine from Colorado did the unthinkable: He poured Clamato into his Coors. If you’re not familiar with Clamato, it’s basically a combination of tomato juice and clam broth in a bottle. You can just imagine my reaction—but you’d be wrong. This alternative beer blend that broke my fragile adolescent psyche all those years ago was suddenly tasting ... OK. I’m sure it was beer fatigue combined with the savory zip of the Clamato, but I was finally a convert to the cult of bloody beers. Then, last summer at City Weekly’s Utah Beer Festival, I discovered a home-grown option being made with one of Utah’s most popular producer of bloody mary mixes. Boneyard’s Bloody Blend has been making their special cocktail mixer since 2012—a spicy and savory tomatobased concoction that the manufacturer recommends you enhance with Clamato and vodka. For this special “bloody beer,” the Woods Cross-based company has teamed up with Idaho’s Laughing Dog Brewing Co. to produce a chelada-like beer that’s worth checking out. Boneyard’s Bloody Brew is a beer that has an opaque (almost soupy looking) cardinal red color. The head is practically nonexistent. There is some froth that forms on the base beer, but it doesn’t last long, and settles to a thin film on top. The nose is quite potent. Of course there’s big tomato right

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

off the bat, with some nice black peppercorn and a hint of poultry seasoning. It really stimulated the hinges of my jaw, causing a tingling sensation, and made my mouth water. The taste starts with tomato and pickle juice; light onion and garlic come in next, with black and cayenne peppers helping to round out the full body of the beer. The finish has a slight malt presence, but for the most part it’s all about the juice. Think bloody mary with a bit of fizz, a tasty alternative to your standard lager or ale.

Overall: This a primo breakfast or hangover drink. Bloody beers are also a nice change of pace when you want a beer, but “don’t want a beer.” I love it as a breakfast beverage, and I’ve found that it goes well with frittatas, bacon, eggs and breakfast burritos. I urge you to put your beer geek attitudes aside and check out this 4 percent ABV bloody mary-meets-beer refreshment. It’s available in most grocery and convenience stores. As always, cheers! CW


FAST CASUAL DINING

2110 w. No. Temple

nomad-eatery.com

801.938.9629

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

dl stott & the imperial rhythm boys

FEB 23RD

jt draper & kelly bellarose

FEB 24TH

bob bland

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

BREAKFAST and LUNCH served

 Established 2004 

ALL DAY!

20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Stay warm with your friends at

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

FEB 17TH

Contemporary Japanese Dining

| CITY WEEKLY |

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 27

694 East Union Square, SANDY


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

28 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Lake Effect

Mon.-Fri. 5pm-10pm Sat.-Sun. 11am-10pm

9460 S Union Square #106, Sandy 801-432-8736

Simply Delicious! -SINCE 1968-

italianvillageslc.com

5370 S. 900 E. 8 0 1 . 2 6 6 . 4 1 8 2

MON - T HU 1 1a-11p FR I-SAT 1 1a-12a SUN 3p-10p

Lake Effect is the restaurant incarnation of a vampire from an Anne Rice novel—a reborn, revitalized, dangerously sexy version of its past self, positively dripping with frontier-goth style. Since much of the focus here is on swanky drinks from the kilometer-long cocktail list and live music, the food menu is not without a few hiccups. The chile verde ($18) arrives beautifully plated with two bedsheet-sized housemade tortillas and a cheerful pop of red from cherry tomatoes, but the portion size was surprisingly small, and while the pork was cooked to perfection, the dish’s flavor profile was a bit underdeveloped. The nopales and Jack skillet appetizer ($10) is a nice evolution of the ubiquitous chips and queso, offering a textural complexity that you don’t often get in a starter dish. If you’re craving tacos, you shouldn’t overlook the lunch specials, which offer half-off any taco on the menu; the veggie version was a standout, with winter squash and black beans playing epicurean hopscotch, highlighting each other’s natural sweetness. Despite a few minor inconsistencies, this is the type of establishment that considerably elevates downtown Salt Lake’s hip quotient. Reviewed Jan. 18. 155 W. 200 South, 801-532-2068


Breakfast

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

Lunch & Dinner

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

OMELETTES | PANCAKES GREEK SPECIALTIES

HOMEMADE SOUP GREEK SPECIALS GREEK SALADS HOT OR COLD SANDWICHES | KABOBS PASTA | FISH STEAKS | CHOPS GREEK PLATTERS & GREEK DESSERTS

Beer & Wine EAT MORE

LAMB

Hector’s Mexican Food

Hector’s serves up some of the tastiest south-ofthe-border fare in all of the Salt Lake Valley. Popular combo plates include carne asada, machaca, chorizo, chimichangas and chile relleno plates. The fresh guacamole and housemade picante sauce are stars here. You also can’t go wrong with one of the Mexican tortas—especially the delicious carnitas option. 2901 E. 3300 South, 801-487-3850

Hell’s Backbone Grill

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT

Open 7 days a week

469 EAST 300 SOUTH | 521-6567

SALT LAKE'S AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE since 1990

JOIN US FOR DINNER!!! 7 DayS a wEEk LUNch BUFFEt mON-Sat JUST 3 MIN from Downtown! 1659 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City (inside the RAMADA INN) PLENTY OF FREE PARKING

801-363-7555 - We Deliver!

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

Stella Grill

Soups, salads and sandwiches here are reminiscent of the fare at Red Butte Café and Desert Edge Brewery, which are owned by the same restaurant group. The French onion soup—dripping with melted Gruyère cheese—is top-notch, and both the grilled Reuben and the Italian dip (a variation on the French dip sandwich but with grilled peppers and onion, mozzarella, spicy balsamic and roasted pepper au jus), are dependable choices for lunch or a light dinner. There’s a lot to love: friendly, efficient service, a pleasant atmosphere and excellent dishes at very fair prices. 4291 S. 900 East, Millcreek, 801-288-0051, stellagrill.com

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Starofindiaonline.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

RESERVE OUR BANQUET HALL FOR YOUR EVENT!

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM

Nestled just off of Utah’s famed Highway 12 in Boulder, this farm-to-table eatery is open seasonally providing not-so-typical road trip fare. Acclaimed chefs and owners Jen Castle and Blake Spalding are committed to sustainable farming and dining practices, which show in every one of their delectable dishes. The ever-popular spicy Breakfast Jenchilada is a plate of smothered toasted corn tortillas, sagepotato pancakes and rice and beans. There’s plenty to tuck into at lunch, too, like the Boulter Patty Melt and the award-winning Backbone House Salad. Next time you’re down south admiring Utah’s red-rock wilderness, stop off and admire Hell’s Backbone, as well. No. 20 North Highway 12, Boulder, 435-3357464, hellsbackbonegrill.com

get one monday - friday only

equal or lesser value w/ this ad expires 03.30.18

54 w. 1700 s. M-F 7:30am-3pm Sat/Sun 7:30am-4pm

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 29

free!

| CITY WEEKLY |

Buy one entree


FILM REVIEW

Feet of Clay

Aardman’s trademark wit is missing from the trite underdog sports plot of Early Man. BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net @maryannjohanson

Is Hiring AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Responsibilities include: Selling print and digital advertising to local and some regional businesses.

Email your resume to jennifer@cityweekly.net

t breaks my heart to say this because I’ve been such a huge fan of animator Nick Park, but his latest years-in-the-making claymation opus, Early Man, simply isn’t very good. The lovingly handcrafted stop-motion animation is intact, as you’d expect, since that’s Park’s trademark. But smart humor— subversive and satirical, while also somehow magically heartwarming—is also a crucial part of what has made his work so special. For example, the devoted yet contentious relationship between dim-witted cheeseloving inventor Wallace and his anxious, genius dog Gromit in their legendarily brilliant short films and the 2005 feature The Curse of the Were-Rabbit? There is nothing like that in Early Man. The sweet yet profoundly seditious undermining of authority and the-water-we-swim-in rebellion of the egg-layers of 2000’s Chicken Run? Not a sign of that here. What happened? Those absences might have been forgivable if the other thing that made Park’s work so extraordinary—the sending up of classic genres, like escape flicks in Chicken Run or monster horror in Were-Rabbit— wasn’t completely missing from Early Man. This is just a standard-issue triumph-ofthe-underdog sports comedy that we’ve seen a million times before—one deployed with no seeming awareness of all the stereotypes it is full of, or of the tediously familiar story it is telling, no matter its fantastical setting. Here we have Dug (Eddie Redmayne), a caveman from the “Neo Pleistocene” era whose Stone Age tribe of doofuses—all of whom make him look smart only by comparison—find themselves under threat from the larger Bronze Age world that has moved on without them beyond their protected glen. Dug arranges with enemy ruler Lord Nooth (Tom Hiddleston, doing an inexplicable cartoon French accent) for his tribe to compete in a soccer match with

AARDMAN ANIMATION

I

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

30 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

CINEMA

the professional players of Nooth’s more advanced city, with the self-determination of Dug’s tribe as the prize. Will they be left alone in their backwater cave-dwelling ways? Or will they be forced to work in Nooth’s metal mines? To call Early Man wildly anachronistic would be an understatement: The opening flashback sequence that depicts humans and dinosaurs living side by side is but the first of its obvious and unclever bizarre-ities. But that’s nowhere near as problematic as the suggestion that less “advanced” people are literally stupid. That’s nowhere near as disappointing as the movie’s low humor; simple slapstick, mild gay panic, crotch injuries and “isn’t it hilarious that women are sexual beings” are the most it stretches to. The puns aren’t groan-inducingly bad, so much as they aren’t even puns: When one caveman complains that it’s a “bit early” in the morning for him to go hunting, Dug replies, “But we’re early man!” That doesn’t even make any sense, not even as a poor attempt at humor. Movies about sports usually work to appeal to those of us [raises hand] who aren’t into sports at all by letting the sports stuff serve as a metaphor for something larger and potentially more inclusive. But Early Man is about almost literally nothing except soccer. The “mythology” of the movie’s

Dug and dog in Early Man.

focus is on how Dug’s tribe, in even deeper pre-history, invented the game, and now only they’ve got the heart to win against professional players. Or something. It’s strained even as these sorts of movies go. The script is by first-timer James Higginson and Aardman Animation vet Mark Burton, but they don’t seem to have any idea what to do with it besides indulge in the most tiresome of predictable plots, including giving Dug a manic pixie Bronze Age dream girl, Goona (Maisie Williams), to train the moronic Stone Agers in preparation for their Big Game. I’m so disappointed I can barely think of any caveman-inspired quips to sum up my dismay over this movie. Is Early Man crude and simple where Aardman’s other work has been sophisticated and multilayered? Yes. But there’s no pleasure in saying so. CW

EARLY MAN

B.5 Eddie Redmayne Tom Hiddleston Maisie Williams Rated PG

TRY THESE Caveman (1981) Ringo Starr Barbara Bach PG

Victory (1981) Sylvester Stallone Michael Caine PG

Chicken Run (2000) Mel Gibson Julia Sawalha G

Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005) Peter Sallis Helena Bonham Carter G


NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 2018 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED SHORT FILMSDOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: BB.5 PROGRAM B: BBB.5 Historically, it’s been easy to guess the winner in this category as “whichever one is based on the most horrifying global tragedy.” These nominees offer more of a challenge, and intriguing diversity of topics and approaches. The “B” program features two films that both address people trying to help fellow humans at risk: Elaine McMillion Sheldon’s urgent Heroin(e), about three women—a fire chief, a drug court judge and a street missionary—fighting heroin abuse in Huntington, W.V.; and Thomas Lennon’s feel-good Knife Skills, focusing on a Cleveland restaurant that also provides postincarceration training for ex-convicts. The “A” program ranges from Frank Stiefel’s intriguing portrait of artist Mindy Alper’s struggles with severe mental illness in Heaven is a Traffic Jam on the 405, to the likely favorite in Laura Checkoway’s Edith + Eddie, about a nonagenarian couple fighting to decide their own fate. And then there’s Kate Davis’ Traffic Stop, a deeply frustrating portrait of a Texas woman’s experience with possible police brutality. Let’s just say if that turns out to be the winner, it will be more about the topic than the execution. Opens Feb. 16 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

EARLY MAN B.5 See review p. 30. Opens Feb. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

SAMSON [not yet reviewed] Biblical tale of the legendarily powerful Hebrew (Taylor James). Opens Feb. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS FOR AHKEEM At Main Library, Feb. 20, 7 p.m. (NR) I, TONYA At Park City Film Series, Feb. 16-17, 8 p.m. & Feb. 18, 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES THE 15:17 TO PARIS B Now three pictures into the “thoughtless heroism” phase of his career, Clint Eastwood brings us easily his most thoughtless picture, a 15-minute idea stretched to feature length. On Aug. 21, 2015, real-life friends Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos and

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

FIFTY SHADES FREED BB I’m all for the “female gaze;” just maybe give them something less tedious to gaze at. The trilogy finale finds Anastasia (Dakota Johnson) and Christian (Jamie Dornan) just married, facing typical newlywed challenges: Will she change her name? Who will make dinner? Will her vengeful ex-boss (Eric Johnson) kill her? The latter might make it sound like a thriller, but the plot takes up around 10 minutes of screen time, leaving much of the rest devoted to sexy hair-washing, sexy ice cream-eating, etc. Johnson remains a standout, giving herself earnestly to a portrait of a woman demanding equality of every kind from her relationship. Mostly, this is a movie about staring at things lustfully, and not just bodies. With all the luxurious living spaces and exotic getaways, this series is as much lifestyle-porn as porn-porn; more HGTV than BDSM. (R)—SR PETER RABBIT BBB Nominally based on the Beatrix Potter characters, it casts Peter (voice of James Corden) as a mischievous bunny who clashes with Thomas (Domhnall Gleeson), the city-dweller who inherits Mr. McGregor’s farm; neighbor Bea (Rose Byrne), an artist who loves drawing the bunnies, provides both romantic interest for Thomas and surrogate parent for Peter. Director Will Gluck makes the action more Bugs Bunny than Peter Rabbit in its slapstick intensity, and leans hard into referential humor and fourth-wall-breaking, undercutting the half-hearted attempts to give Peter’s story an emotional hook. But the gags are at least generally amusing rather than annoying, with Gleeson and Byrne committing fully to playing opposite CGI critters. While it might be a low bar, it’s nice nowadays when a family film makes you chuckle more than it makes you feel bad for young viewers. (PG)—SR

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL BBB It’s fitting that a movie about the magnetism of old-time movie stars revolves around the magnetism of its own star. Director Paul McGuigan adapts the memoir by Peter Turner (Jamie Bell) about his experience as a 26-year-old would-be actor in 1979 Liverpool, beginning a love affair with 55-year-old Oscarwinning actress Gloria Grahame (Annette Bening) while she’s doing theater workin England. The structure moves effectively across time periods, building compelling drama around what will obviously be a doomed romance. Bell does fine work, but the movie belongs to Bening, who turns Gloria’s flirtatious helium voice and emotional pivots into a fascinating portrait of a woman who can’t bear being thought of as old. There’s an odd late shift from Turner’s point of view, to show us things that should be obvious from context. All is forgiven, though, after a heartbreaking scene of Gloria performing Shakespeare,

THE INSULT BB.5 The Insult is well directed, well acted and beautifully filmed, and has been nominated for best foreign language film in the upcoming Academy Awards. It also features two lead characters who are so unlikeable—detestable, really—that to sit through 112 minutes of this movie requires not screaming, “Just fucking apologize and both of you stop being assholes.” There is a larger forest-for-thetrees argument to be made, which is that anyone with knowledge of Lebanese history—specifically the Damour massacre—will be enthralled. With context, it’s easy to see how one simple insult—a Palestinian man calls a Lebanese man a “fucking prick” after a disagreement over a drainage pipe—nearly spirals into full-fledged rioting that ends in a courtroom drama and pleas for peace from the president. Without context, it feels like a Trump supporter and a Clinton supporter screaming at each other for nearly two hours, but with subtitles. I’ve seen enough of that over the last two years. Opens Feb. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—David Riedel

Spencer Stone, on a Paris-bound train, subdued and foiled the plans of a heavily armed terrorist. Unfortunately, in dramatizing their story, Eastwood cast the men as themselves and—even grading on a curve—they’re bad. If the screenplay wasn’t filled with clunky foreshadowing and a too-long section telling the boys’ middle school stories—with dialogue so ham-fisted even professionals give execrable performances—there might have been something. As it is, it feels mostly like a bunch of reenacted home movies promoting a trip to Europe, with a little terrorism thrown in to break up the boredom. (R)—DR

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BLACK PANTHER [not yet reviewed] The super-heroic king of Wakanda (Chadwick Boseman) faces a threat to his rule. Opens Feb. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

conveying how real she could be as an actor, more real than she could be while performing in life as “Gloria Grahame, movie star.” Opens Feb. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

join us monday, feb. 19 for free screening of

FIFTY SHADES FREED

SWINGERS @ 7:30

ORGAZMO @ 9:30

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 31

BLACK PANTHER

| CITY WEEKLY |

FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: FEBRUARY 16TH - FEBRUARY 22ND

more than just movies at brewvies


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

32 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

CONCERT PREVIEW

We Need a Gimmick

MUSIC

Let’s talk oddball acts— because different is good. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

PAUL KOUDOUNARIS

S

alt Lake City is about to be blessed with another visit by the Black Sabbath/McDonald’s tribute band Mac Sabbath. This time, they’re bringing Star Wars-themed metal band Galactic Empire. We’ve already written about the fast-foodthemed heavy metal quartet (“May I Speak to the Manager?,” City Weekly, June 15, 2016), and there’s only so much you can say about the Empire, which is that they play metallic covers of John Williams’ SW scores while dressed as Darth Vader, Boba Fett, a Stormtrooper and a couple of—I dunno, Siths? So instead, let City Weekly enrich your lives with a list of other acts who serve their tunes with special sauce. Jon Wayne: This band of mystery men’s biggest exposure was having a song (“Texas Funeral”) in the 1995 Rodriguez-Tarantino film From Dusk Till Dawn. But some Salt Lakers might recall hearing this Texas band’s herky-jerky jam “Mr. Egyptian” on X96 in the ’90s. You might’ve blanched at the ostensible racism in the tune, but it’s actually a send-up of stereotypical, backward, bovine, willfully ignorant, truck ’n’ twang-lovin’ Texans. In fact, that’s their whole thing. Texas Funeral is on Amazon and Spotify, but you should dig up their harder-to-find second album, Two Graduated Jiggers. Buzz King: In “Talkin’ Seattle Grunge Blues,” Todd Snider jokes about a band getting big by using silence as a gimmick— “music’s original alternative”—before another band came along that “wasn’t even together.” Buzz King was meant to exist for no more than an afternoon in 2003, when its members convened to write and record I Shave my Pussy (aka I’m Truly Sorry). The purportedly all-improv album is remarkably decent, with laconic jangle-pop tunes like the title track, “Hot Dogs Is Good” and “Hollywood is for Assholes.” They wound up playing a few shows, but ultimately faded away. Snowmen: The 1970s shock-glam act Kiss was definitely onto something, so it’s only natural that somebody would try to borrow from or build upon their shtick. Coming out of Erie, Pa., in 1977, this hard rock/power-pop act wore white clothes, makeup and wigs. Even their amps, instruments, sets and—just speculatin’ here—cocaine were white. Maybe Trump should’ve asked these guys to play the inauguration. It would’ve really energized his (free)base. Clownvis Presley: He’s a little bit clown, a little bit king of rock ’n’ roll—and a little bit Bible historian on “Jesus Christ Eatin’ on a Chicken Wing,” where he croons about Jesus being “my lord and my savior/ watch him savor the flavor.” If you haven’t heard the tune, go to YouTube now. Don’t let another second of your life pass without this saucy nugget in your life. See also: “Dancing with the Wolfman (In a Non-Gay Way).” Fratello Metallo: Forget Ghost and their contrived (but still awesome) Black Pope ’n’ the Nameless Ghouls act. This Italian metal band is fronted by an honest-to-God Capuchin monk. Father Cesare Bonizzi happened to go to a Metallica concert sometime in the ’90s and became enamored by the music’s power. While FM’s music wasn’t necessarily Christian, Bonizzi did evangelize in his lyrics—and opted to flash the “I love you” sign instead of metal horns. The band released 11 albums, but broke up in 2009. Flipp: In case you haven’t already deduced this: Excessive

Mac Sabbath makeup and eccentric costumes automatically qualifies a band as weird. But this Minneapolis band is as good as they are odd, with catchy, snotty, arena-ready hard rock/punk songs to match their Kiss-inspired, four-character, comic-bookish superheroic aesthetic. They even have their own Flipp cereal, which, during one hometown show, they dumped on the crowd from a helicopter. As of 2016, they’re back—potentially for a limited time. Rockbitch: You know how Beavis and Butt-Head got a thrill out of Gwar and Green Jellÿ? It’s too bad they never got wind of Rockbitch—a pagan, polyamorous, feminist, sex-positive gothindustrial-prog band from the U.K. that played topless and performed live sex acts onstage. They even had a ritual at shows: The Golden Condom, where the band would toss a rubber into the crowd and whoever caught it, regardless of gender, was taken backstage for a good time with the band. That’s one gimmick that’s guaranteed to sell tickets. Alas, the band is no longer together. Space Alien Donald: Is age a gimmick? Sexuality? Being Canadian? How about all of the above? Before he left this planet in 2015, Space Alien Donald proudly called himself the “world’s oldest gay Canadian rapper.” He didn’t actually rap—it was more sing-songy talking—so that’s a four-headed gimmick hydra. Ya gotta love that. Especially when he recited the lyrics to Weird Al Yankovic’s “I Lost on Jeopardy” or performed S.A.D. originals about (you guessed it) space. But was this gimmick a gimmick? Or was Donald just plain out to lunch (on Mars)? If you have to ask, you’ve missed the point. Any of these acts could’ve played it straight and performed in normal stage attire under a normal name while playing normal songs. Maybe they would’ve made it. Maybe not. Instead, as oddball acts, they offer something different. No disrespect to Mac Sabbath’s parent company but, it’s like the great poet R.B. Arby said: “Different is good.” CW

MAC SABBATH

w/ Galactic Empire Wednesday, Feb. 21, 8 p.m. The Urban Lounge 241 S. 500 East 801-746-0557 $18 presale; $20 day of show 21+ theurbanloungeslc.com


ANNUAL JOHNNY CASH BIRTHDAY BASH!

UNDERGROUND CASH PLAYING ALL OF YOUR MAN IN BLACK FAVORITES CELEBRATE WITH US FRI. FEB. 23 ON STATE & SAT. FEB 24 ON HIGHLAND

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY

HIGHLAND live music

THURSDAY:

Gonzo @ 10:00 FRIDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00

FRI SAT

SATURDAY:

DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $1,600

HERBAN EMPIRE SAMEYEAM

MON & THURS

MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

WED

TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

THURS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $850 POT

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

THE SUES COMBINED HAVE PAID OUT MORE THAN ANY VENUE IN BREAKING BINGO. CLOSE TO 9K!!!!!

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

20 1 7

FRI SALT SHAKERS SAT THE AMERICAN HITMEN BREAKING BINGO THE SUE AT 8PM WED AT $350 POT SALT LAKES OWN BAND OF BAD ASS MARINES

2013

2014

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

TUES

WED

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

8136 SO. STATE ST

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 33

801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

| CITY WEEKLY |

KARAOKE

SUN &

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

STATE live music


LIVE

FRIDAY 2/16 Cake

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT

CITYWEEKLY.NET

BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & HOWARD HARDEE

ROBERT MCKNIGHT

One payday evening in 1994, the newrelease wall at CD Warehouse in Taylorsville didn’t offer a helluva lot. In fact, it was mostly off-label releases by glam/hair metal bands grasping for continued commercial viability with darker, heavier material in a bid to compete with the major-label grunge (which was darker, heavier and hairier), budding alternative/indie rock acts and gangsta rap. A friend pointed out Cake’s Motorcade of Generosity. It was on Capricorn Records, a label known for jam bands, but the simple retro cover art didn’t match the sound. It could’ve been space lounge, ska, jazz, straight-up alt-rock— maybe power pop. As we know now, almost exactly 24 years to the day of Motorcade’s release, and after five more albums, Cake is all that and more: world music, mariachi music, country, folk, funk—all informed by the sardonic, silly humor and imagery of main man John McCrea. And although they haven’t put out new music since 2011’s Showroom of Compassion (Upbeat), they’ve continued to tour and perform at festivals to a die-hard fan base that—perhaps all on the same night in 1994—were craving something really different, and finding it in Cake. (Randy Harward) Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 8 p.m., $25-$55, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com

the previous decade writing songs for marquee singers, from Cher to Rihanna, including the latter’s “Cheers (Drink to That).” Now she’s a pretty big deal herself, and deservedly so. Opening the show is Noah Kahan, an up-and-coming singer-songwriter out of Vermont with a distinctive

SATURDAY 2/17 LP, Noah Kahan

The LA-based singer-songwriter known as LP (real name Laura Pergolizzi) spent years working in the background of Top 40 before making her own name— and when you hear her sing, you’ll probably wonder how she wasn’t discovered sooner. On LP’s 2016 single “Lost on You”—which is about the disintegration of her relationship with her ex-girlfriend—her voice transforms from a nasally mumble to a hair-raising wail, showcasing powerful pipes and distinctive vibrato. The song first caught fire in Greece and became a surprise international hit, but Pergolizzi was no overnight LP success. She spent

Cake singing voice of his own (see his debut EP Hurt Somebody). His highly produced folk-pop tunes display an impressive vocal range and personal, heartfelt lyrics. The single “Hurt Somebody,” for instance, is about the paralyzing fear of not being able to end a relationship. (Howard Hardee) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8:30 p.m., $20-$22, 21+, metromusichall.com

Radio Moscow, Amplified Heat, Green River Blues

MICHAEL COMTE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

34 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

Every town has at least one story, and Story City, Iowa, gives us the saga of psych-rock trio Radio Moscow. Over five releases since their birth in 2003, the band has evolved through acid- and stoner-rock variants at times, overall producing something reminiscent of classic ’60s/’70s bands like Blue Cheer and Moby Grape, updating their sound for the amped-up and sped-up 21st century. The lineup has fluctuated a bit, but centers on the commanding vocals and fuzzed-out Strat artistry of Parker Griggs. Their latest, New Beginnings (Century Media, 2017) adds even more blues to the mix. Amplified Heat is also a three-piece, made up of the Ortiz brothers—Jim, Gian and Chris—out of musical hotbed Austin, Texas. So they’re tight in the musical as well as familial sense. Formerly on Gonzolandia Records, they showcase a sense of balls-out gonzo á la (pre-political spew) Ted Nugent, and a Southwestern hard blues rock flair not too far from early ZZ Top. Locals Green River Blues open. (Brian Staker) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroomslc.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 35


DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S! FEBRUARY 14

FEBRUARY 18, CONT.

CELEBRATE SINGLES AWARENESS DAY WITH CHRIS ORROCK AND THE LAZLOS PLAYING 10PM-1AM

JOSH HOYER AND SOUL COLOSSAL PLAYING 10PM-1AM

FEBRUARY 15

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

FEBRUARY 16

GRACIE’S TUESDAY NIGHT BLUEGRASS JAM WITH HOSTS PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM-10PM

BROTHER COYOTE 6PM-9PM LOS HELLCAMINOS PLAY 10PM-1AM MARMALADE HILL

FEBRUARY 17

SATURDAY BRUNCH CHASEONE2 10PM

FEBRUARY 19

FEBRUARY 20

FEBRUARY 18

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 GRACIE’S SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES WITH HOSTS NICK GRECO AND BLUES ON FIRST 7PM-10PM $3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight.

ALYSSA RISLEY

TONIGHT

Pixie and the Partygrass Boys

TUESDAY 2/20

Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam hosted by Pixie and the Partygrass Boys

Blues and jazz jam nights abound, as though these styles of music have a monopoly on the concept. Not that every genre is suited to the open-play format. I mean, what good could come from double Y-chromosome nü-metal/post-grunge seshes? Bluegrass, though? It might be the domain of acoustic instrumentation, but it has as many ace players as blues and jazz, and is just as suited to improvisation. And how many ’grass jams do you see? Not many. So a night like this is something different for fans and musicians alike. Hosted by local outfit Pixie and the Partygrass Boys, the new monthly event offers new sounds to the former and a new stage to the latter, which is an exciting prospect. Come out and support it so it sticks around and we can enjoy downtown hoedowns on Gracie’s patio in the summer. (RH) Gracie’s, 326 S. West Temple, 7-10 p.m., free, 21+, graciesslc.com

Lotus

WEDNESDAY 2/21 Lotus, Marvel Years

Whoever said jam bands have to play folk instruments, anyway? Apparently Lotus wasn’t listening. The long-running Philadelphia-based electronic instrumental band tends to extend songs past the 10-minute mark during their live shows, noodling around improvisationally à la Grateful Dead or Phish—except with electronic beats and lots of synthesizers. They incorporate elements of rock, electronica, jazz, jam, hip-hop and funk, and like to get weird and experimental at most every turn, but always fall back into a hula-hoop friendly groove, sometimes even working dubstep drops into their live sets. And speaking of genre mash-ups, Lotus is supported by glitch-hop/electro-soul producer Marvel Years, a guitar prodigy and beatmaker who blends classic-rock licks with modern EDM beats for an interesting (and danceable) hybrid. In addition to his shred-happy guitar technique, he’s known for remixing FM radio standards such as Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young’s “Ohio” as well as The Rolling Stones’ “Gimme Shelter.” (HH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 9 p.m., $20 presale; $23 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

*Dine-In Only

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MIKE RYAN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

LIVE GRAB A BITE


S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

2PM

HIGHLAND

Thursdays

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG-$2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS-

KARAOKE

Mondays 75¢ WINGS ALL DAY

saturdays

SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

e b o t e c a l p The ! i k s s è r p A r fo

Tuesdays KARAOKE 9PM

Wednesdays

BREAKING BINGO $3000 POT-8PM

32499

2.18 THE BETA VULGARIS 6-9

2.19 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

2.21 JIM FISH

2.22 MORGAN SNOW

$

2.16 & 2.17 STONEFED

WITH THESE RECEIVERS YOU CAN ENJOY APPLE CARPLAY™ IN A VEHICLE YOU ALREADY OWN AND GET THE LATEST IPHONE® TECHNOLOGY FOR YOUR CAR.

SO WHAT IS CARPLAY? IT IS THE SMARTER, SAFER AND MORE FUN WAY TO USE YOUR IPHONE IN THE CAR.

W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

10AM TO 7PM

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 2/22/18

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 37

COME IN TO YOUR NEAREST SOUND WAREHOUSE LOCATION TO SEE ONE OF OUR KENWOOD OR PIONEER MODELS

| CITY WEEKLY |

Double Din Touch Screen Entertainment System

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ting star at

2.15 MEANDER CAT

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

MONDAY 2/19

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ANNA LEE

Walk the Moon, Company of Thieves

THURSDAY 2/15 LIVE MUSIC

112 + Ginuwine + Jon B (The Complex) 1000mods + Telekinetic Yeti + Sleeping Tigers (Metro Music Hall) Andrew Cole (Snowbird) Artificial Aliens + InConfidence + Separating The Seas + Us Underwater + Gravity (The Loading Dock) Brittain Ashford + Marny Lion Proudfit + Jill Johnson (Kilby Court) Bruce Cockburn (The State Room) Charles Ellsworth (The Yes Hell) Chubby Checker & The Wildcats (Egyptian Theatre) David Gans (O.P. Rockwell) George Brown (Gallivan Center) Guitar Army (Feldman’s Deli) Meander Cat (Hog Wallow) No Sun + Cupidcome + Diotima (Urban Lounge) Reggae at The Royal (The Royal) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Telluride Meltdown (The Corner Store) Trichotomy (Avant Groove)

SATURDAY, FEB. 17

YOU TOPPLE OVER

Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) The Viiceroys + Telesomniac + Sepia Ria (Velour) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos feat. Mike & Dave (Tavernacle) Gothic + Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ The Blushing Violets (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Pegboard Nerds (Sky) Youth Jam Session (The Garage)

KARAOKE

Areaoke (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Funk ’n’ Dive)

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM

Ubiquitous, bandwagon-esque dance rock is so near its saturation point that even Disney puppy mill “artists” like Joe Jonas feel like it’s a safe bet for career revitalization. But some of it is great. A couple of years ago, a certain somebody (wife) insisted that I watch the video for Walk the Moon’s “Shut Up and Dance With Me.” The Ohio quartet’s mega-hit got me to listen to the rest of Talking Is Hard (RCA, 2014). I didn’t wanna dig it, but I did; I do. Almost every song is a winner. And, taken as a whole, Talking is a 1980s summer, bottled and corked and released into the 21st century. Those of us who grew up back then know those were the best summers. They were sunny and fun and positive and ripe with possibilities. We also know that seasons end, and things change. WTM’s new and somewhat disjointed 2017 album What If Nothing comes after singer Nicholas Petricca watched his father succumb to Alzheimer’s, and broke up with the woman who inspired “Shut Up and Dance” before undertaking the daunting task of questioning his sexuality. So change was inevitable. Also, following up lightning in a bottle isn’t easy. But while What If isn’t as immediately engaging as Talking or their self-titled 2011 debut, it’s still more inspired and substantial than other high-charting contemporary pop rock. And with three years and so much drama between albums, they could easily have broken up, leaving us with nothing but the dreck. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $35 presale; $37 day of show, all ages, thecomplexslc.com Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 2/16 LIVE MUSIC

A-Mac & The Height + Sun Divide (Piper Down Pub) Advent Horizon (Barbary Coast) Backwash (Garage on Beck) Black Rebel Motorcycle Club + Night Beats (Metro Music Hall) Blue Divide (The Spur) Cake (Eccles Theater) see p. 34 Chubby Checker & The Wildcats (Egyptian Theatre) The Cold Hard Cash Show (O.P. Rockwell) Deli Man (Feldman’s Deli) Elizabeth Hareza (Legends at Park City Mountain) Eric Anthony + Night Caps (Lake Effect) Frontier Ruckus + Cataldo + The Wykees (Kilby Court) Hippie Sabotage + MELVV + Azizi Gibson (The Complex) Kyle May (Deer Valley) Michelle Moonshine (ABG’s)

N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Nervo + TBA (Park City Live) The Patrollers (Brewskis) Plum Stickie (The Yes Hell) Poppy (The Complex) Rail Town (The Westerner) Royal Bliss + Penrose + Citizen Soldier + Opal Hill Drive (The Royal) Stonefed (Hog Wallow) The Strike + David Moon (Velour) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon) The Will Baxter Band (The Ice Haüs) The Wind & The Wave + Haley Johnson + Rachel Price (Urban Lounge) Zepparella + The Drugstore Gypsies (The State Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + & Dark Wave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Blass (Sky) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Mike (Tavernacle)

TUESDAYS

WEDNESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

9PM - NO COVER JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits

75+ BEERS available

ST. PAT’S TICKETS ON SALE 2/17 LIVE MUSIC 12PM - 12AM

JOIN US FOR APRÉS SKI FRIDAY & SATURDAY LOCATED AT THE LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM BASE OF THE CANYONS DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FULL DINING MENU BOOK YOUR NEXT BRUNCH PARTY FROM CAFE TRIO PARTY OR EVENT MARCH 11TH 11AM - 3PM AT ELIXIR!

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

February 14th Waterbrook Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve, Walla Walla Washington February 21st Ferrari-Carano Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma County Music at 7:30.

Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

$3 pints $3 whiskeys MONDAYS Blues night

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

...

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC FEBRUARY 14 FEBRUARY 15 FEBRUARY 16

FEBRUARY 18 FEBRUARY 19 FEBRUARY 21

| 7:30-10:30 PM | 6-9 PM | 10-1 PM | 6-9 PM | 10-1 PM | 10-1 PM | 10-1 PM | 10-1 PM | 8-1 PM | 7:30-10:30 PM | 7:30-10:30 PM

(801) 532-2068 – 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

VISIT WWW.PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

FOR TICKETS 2/16 - A-MAC & THE HEIGHT 2/20 - TAKE TWO 2/23 - TREVOR GREEN 1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 39

FEBRUARY 17

LULU FALL WITH CHRIS JOHNSON BAND SCOTT FOSTER DJ CHASEONE2 ERIC ANTHONY NIGHTCAPS DJ CHASEONE2 (RABBIT HOLE) JOSHY SOUL & THE COOL DJ MR. RAMIREZ (RABBIT HOLE) DJ DOLPH & CO. (RABBIT HOLE) HARRY LEE & THE BACK ALLEY BLUES BAND KEVIN FLYNN QUARTET

MURPHY AND THE GIANT RED HEADED STEP TWINS KOTTER PROJECT HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS RUSTED REEL

| CITY WEEKLY |

...

SUNDAY NIGHT

WICKED TINKERS

THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

THE REPUBLICAN

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

Dueling Pianos (Funk ’n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 2/17 LIVE MUSIC

A-Mac & The Height (Funk ’n’ Dive) B. D. Howes (Deer Valley) Changing Lanes Experience (Canyons Village) Chubby Checker & The Wildcats (Egyptian Theatre) Crook & The Bluff (The Yes Hell) Deadmau5 + Rinzen (Park City Live) The Gamma Rays (Brewskis)

Jayy & Dame + Blest Poetik (The Loading Dock) Joshy Soul & The Cool (Lake Effect) Junction City Blues Band (Garage on Beck) Junior & Transportation (The Cabin) LP + Noah Kahan (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Neck Deep + Seaway + Creeper + Speak Low If You Speak Love (The Complex) R.LUM.R + Gibbz (Kilby Court) Radio Moscow + Amplified Heat + Green River Blues (The State Room) see p. 34 Rail Town (The Westerner) The Reverend & The Revelry (Harp & Hound) Rostam + Joy Again (Urban Lounge) Royal Bliss (The Royal) Shuffle (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow)

Once my eyes adjust to the low lighting, I realize this Irish pub is huge. Maybe the nondescript façade is meant to keep hipsters away, and keep the pub full of patrons from the neighborhood, like the bar on the Showtime series Shameless. I mean, the pub does have a Russian woman behind the bar. But she’s different from the street-smart former sex worker on the show; she’s college-educated, and an accomplished violinist. She’s just one of many people of this caliber here on a Saturday night. Once my agoraphobia settles, I order an ale and start chatting with a couple of college students, software engineering majors. I am always amazed by computer folk, though I’m often lost in the technical language they use when describing their field of study. I pretend to understand until I see a chance to make like a social butterfly and flutter off in search of a conversation more my speed. But in reality, I’m more like that neighborhood-bar newcomer, awkwardly trying to find my place. Eventually I land on a stool next to a homesick Bosnian native who longs to return to his country and a local that can’t wait to leave town. Before we get too deep into that conversation, I notice a cabinet full of board games behind the bar. As I peruse the selection, someone challenges me to play Pokémon Master Trainer. I accept—but we’re too far into our delicious bloody marys and brown ales to read the handbook. Whatever, we say, and make up the rules as we go. (Rachelle Fernandez) The Republican, 917 S. State, 801-595-1916, facebook.com/therepublican801

The Strike + House of Lewis (Velour) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (Barbary Coast) You Topple Over (Johnny’s on Second) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon) Winter Grain + Folk Hogan (The Ice Haüs) Zepparella (O.P. Rockwell)

Sky Saturdays w/ DJ Ikon (Sky)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

Alternative/Top 40/ EDM w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) Burlesque & The Beats (Prohibition) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Gothic + Industrial + 80s w/ Courtney (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 2/18 Andy Frasco & The U.N. (O.P. Rockwell) Che Zuro (Deer Valley) Chubby Checker & The Wildcats (Egyptian Theatre) Elektric Voodoo (The Yes Hell) J.I.D. + EarthGang (Kilby Court) Judd Warrick (Snowbird) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) The Nods + Eleventh Door + 90s Television (Urban Lounge) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) PNB Rock + Lil Baby (The Complex) Shannon Runyon (Legends at Park City Mountain)


NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 2/19 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Streetcorner Boogie (Canyons Village) Walk The Moon + Company of Thieves (The Complex) see p. 38

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

LIVE MUSIC WEDNESDAYS WITH LOCAL ARTISTS

KARAOKE THAT DOESN’T SUCK EVERY THURSDAY W/ MIKEY DANGER

DANCE MUSIC ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY

$4 JAMESON $5 SHOT & BEER

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET SUN-THURS 5 PM - 1 AM 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY FRI-SAT 3 PM - 1 AM

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP

WINTER $2 VINYL SALE

FRIDAY, FEB 23RD & SATURDAY, FEB 24TH Most LP's valued @ $2 - $7, some $8 - $10 Over 1500 LP's added on both Fri & Sat @ 10:00 AM “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

NEW

GEEKS WHO DRINK

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 16TH

ADVENT HORIZON

BARBARY COAST SALOON YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17TH

TONY HOLIDAY & THE VELVETONES

9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

4242 South State Street SLC, UT 84107 Open from 10am - 2am

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

THURSDAY EVENT FEBRUARY 15TH

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Great Vinyl at Bargain $2.00 prices

Advocacy Government Relations

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 41

Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

| CITY WEEKLY |

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

LIVE Music

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 2/14

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 2/15 Reggae

thursday, february 15

eureka sound a-mac and the height something like seduction

karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY

at the Royal

$

5

friday, february 16

DJ MATTY MO

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

Live Music

friDAY 2/16

saturday, february 17

DJ LATU

TUESDAY 2/20

WEDNESDAY 2/21

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DUELING PIANOS (THE CABIN)

Holy Fawn + I Hear Sirens + Black Flak & The Nightmare Fighters (Diabolical Records) J Boog + Jesse Royal & Etana (The Depot) Joywave + Sasha + Kopps (Urban Lounge) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Take Two (Piper Down Pub) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam (Gracie’s) see p. 36

Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) DJ Battleship (Brewskis) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

Weeknights with special guests penrose • citizen soldier • opal hill drive saturday 2/17

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

Live Music

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Tuesday 2/20

open mic night

Great food

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Drew & Arian (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple Gothic & Industrial w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Youth Jam Session (The Garage)

A weekly video series highlighting the BEST things to do in SLC. ............................... Sponsored by:

$

5.99 lunch special

2/23

MONDAY - FRIDAY

ginger and the gents with special guests

berlin breaks • balls capone • veigar 3/2

: S T N E S E PR

Brisk (Downstairs) Harshmellow + The Deed Remaining + The Sardines + Mia Hicken (Kilby Court) Jim Fish (Hog Wallow) Judah & The Lion (In The Venue) Lauv + Alec Benjamin (The Complex) Lotus + Marvel Years (The Depot) see p. 36 Mac Sabbath + Galactic Empire (Urban Lounge) see p. 32 Shannon Runyan (The Spur)

zolopht

$

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

grits green • superbubble 3/9

american hitmen ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

VODKA

Find us on Facebook @WTFSLC


NIGHT LIGHTS

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Stephanie & Zac Warner, Shane Corellian, J.J. Bateman

@scheuerman7

ub Poplar Street Pest

242 S. 200 W b.com poplarstreetpu

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Dirk, Amoiri

Binks

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Joe Greenburg, Kassie Gahan, John Parrott

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 43

Cody, Scott, Sunny


© 2017

NOISE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

56. Low-____ 57. “Bald-faced” thing 58. Star of the short-lived reality show “I Pity the Fool” 59. Part of a stock exchange? 60. Stationery item: Abbr. 61. Marble ____

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

13. Mini-burger 18. Fork over 21. “Same here!” 22. Joule fraction 23. “Va-va-va- ____!” 24. Suffix with fashion 25. Job for a plumber 26. With no help 27. Mimic’s ability 30. Bactrian camel’s pair 32. Enya’s genre 33. Help desk sign 36. Spoken 37. “____ Mommy kissing ...” DOWN 38. With no help 1. Snappy dresser 39. ____ effort 2. Response on un questionnaire 42. One of the Kennedys 3. Snack brand featured on “Mad Men” 43. Confined 4. ____ Lemon, “30 Rock” character 5. Bobby who co-founded the Black Panthers 44. It may be spotted in a pet store 6. Unsolved cases, in TV lingo 45. Utah mountains 7. La ____ (term signifying Latino pride) 46. Opposite of dense 8. Woodworker’s tool 47. Great Plains tribespeople 9. Vote of support 51. Biomedical research org. 10. Arctic fishing tool 52. Diarist Nin 11. “Valley of the Dolls” author 54. Poor dating prospects 12. What odes do

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. They may be technical 6. Look inside? 10. AOL and MSN 14. Navel formation? 15. Lose vibrancy 16. Cheese ____ 17. Longtime slogan of Little Caesars 19. Morales of “La Bamba” 20. ____ land 21. “Since you didn’t hear me the first time ...” 22. Bad look 26. 1909 Matisse masterpiece 28. Flower girl? 29. Proprietor of a sort 31. Scored between 90 and 100, say 34. Gram or dram 35. Message on a JumboTron intended to amp up fans ... or a direction for solving 17-, 29-, 43- or 56-Across 40. 1970s-’80s sitcom locale 41. Become lenient 43. Swimming equipment that may be antileak or anti-fog 48. Face cream additive 49. Salon supply 50. Briefly 53. Arm bones 54. Nickel or dime 55. South American monkey 56. Tool that can extract nails 62. “____ hardly wait!” 63. Musical with the song “The Gods Love Nubia” 64. It may be dramatic 65. Like a busybody 66. To a smaller degree 67. Potbelly or Franklin, e.g.

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

FRIENDSHIP MANOR IS HIRING B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The posh magazine Tatler came up with a list of fashionable new names for parents who want to ensure their babies get a swanky start in life. Since you Aquarians are in a phase when you can generate good fortune by rebranding yourself or remaking your image, I figure you might be interested in using one of these monikers as a nickname or alias. At the very least, hearing them could whet your imagination to come up with your own ideas. Here are Tatler’s chic avant-garde names for girls: Czar-Czar, Debonaire, Estonia, Figgy, Gethsemane, Power, Queenie. Here are some boys’ names: Barclay, Euripides, Gustav, Innsbruck, Ra, Uxorious, Wigbert, Zebedee. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now that you have finally paid off one of your debts to the past, you can start window-shopping for the future’s best offers. The coming days will be a transition time as you vacate the power spot you’ve outgrown and ramble out to reconnoiter potential new power spots. So bid your crisp farewells to waning traditions, lost causes, ghostly temptations and the dead weight of people’s expectations. Then start preparing a vigorous first impression to present to promising allies out there in the frontier. ARIES (March 21-April 19): At 12,388 feet, Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest peak. If you’re in good shape, you can reach the top in seven hours. The return trip can be done in half the time—if you’re cautious. The loose rocks on the steep trail are more likely to knock you off your feet on the way down than on the way up. I suspect this is an apt metaphor for you in the coming weeks, Aries. Your necessary descent may be deceptively challenging. So make haste slowly! Your power animals are the rabbit and the snail.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Louise Glück has characterized herself as “afflicted with longing yet incapable of forming durable attachments.” If there is anything in you that even partially fits that description, I have good news: In the coming weeks, you’re likely to feel blessed by longing rather than afflicted by it. The foreseeable future will also be prime time for you to increase your motivation and capacity to form durable attachments. Take full advantage of this fertile grace period! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 2004, a man named Jerry Lynn tied a battery-operated alarm clock to a string and dangled it down a vent in his house. He was hoping that when the alarm sounded, he would get a sense of the best place to drill a hole in his wall to run a wire for his TV. But the knot he’d made wasn’t perfect, and the clock slipped off and plunged into an inaccessible spot behind the wall. Then, every night for 13 years, the alarm rang for a minute. The battery was unusually strong! A few months ago, Lynn decided to end the mild but constant irritation. Calling on the help of duct specialists, he retrieved the persistent clock. With this story as your inspiration, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you Virgos to finally put an end to your equivalent of the maddening alarm clock. (Read the story: tinyurl.com/alarmclockmadness.)

• Servers/Bussers

Great hours. Flexible Scheduling. Conveniently located on major bus and Trax lines. Adjacent to University of Utah. Health Insurance Benefits for Full Time. Retirement, Paid Leave and Complimentary Meals all Positions

Call Today! 801-582-3100

LAND IN TORREY AND BOULDER 2.3 acres in Torrey with knockout views. City water available. Enjoy nearby Capitol Reef.

$75,000

Very pretty acre lot in Boulder with town water. Pinion & Juniper. Close to Boulder Mountain & Grand Staircase.

$55,000

Cathy Bagley Torrey bouldermountainrealty.com 435-691-5424

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| COMMUNITY |

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 45

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Was Napoléon Bonaparte an oppressor or liberator? The answer is both. His work in the world hurt a lot of people and helped a lot of people. One of his more magnanimous escapades transpired in June 1798, when he and his naval forces invaded the island of Malta. During his six-day stay, he released political prisoners, abolished slavery, granted religious freedom to Jews, opened 15 schools, established the right to free speech, and shut TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright made a few short jaunts down the Inquisition. What do his heroics have to do with you? through the air in a flying machine they called the Flyer. It was I don’t want to exaggerate, but I expect that you, too, now have a germinal step in a process that ultimately led to your ability to the power to unleash a blizzard of benevolence in your sphere. travel 600 miles per hour while sitting in a chair 30,000 feet Do it in your own style, of course, not Napoléon’s. above the earth. Less than 66 years after the Wright Brothers’ breakthrough, American astronauts landed a space capsule on SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): the moon. They had with them a patch of fabric from the left “Trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit,” French playwing of the Flyer. I expect that during the coming weeks, you will wright Molière said. I’m going to make that your motto for be climaxing a long-running process that deserves a comparable now, Scorpio. You have pursued a gradual, steady approach to ritual. Revisit the early stages of the work that enabled you to be ripening, and soon it will pay off in the form of big bright blooms. Congratulations on having the faith to keep plugging away in the where you are now. dark! I applaud your determination to be dogged and persistent about following your intuition even though few people have GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 2006, 5 percent of the world’s astronomers gathered at appreciated what you were doing. an international conference and voted to demote Pluto from a planet to a “dwarf planet.” Much of the world agreed to SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): honor their declaration. Since then, though, there has arisen a The growth you can and should foster in the coming weeks campaign by equally authoritative astronomers to restore Pluto will be stimulated by quirky and unexpected prods. To get you to full planet status. The crux of the issue is this: How shall we started, here are a few such prods. 1. What’s your hidden or define the nature of a planet? But for the people of New Mexico, dormant talent, and what could you do to awaken and mobilize the question has been resolved. State legislators there formally it? 2. What’s something you’re afraid of but might be able to voted to regard Pluto as a planet. They didn’t accept the demo- turn into a resource? 3. If you were a different gender for a week, tion. I encourage you to be inspired by their example, Gemini. what would you do and what would your life be like? 4. Visualize Whenever there are good arguments from opposing sides about a dream you’d like to have while you’re asleep tonight. 5. If you important matters, trust your gut feelings. Stand up for your could transform anything about yourself, what would it be? 6. Imagine you’ve won a free vacation to anywhere you want. preferred version of the story. Where would you go? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ray Bradbury’s dystopian bestseller Fahrenheit 451 was among CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): the most successful of the 27 novels he wrote. It won numer- You might think you have uncovered the truth, the whole truth, ous awards and has been adopted into films, plays and graphic and nothing but the truth. But according to my analysis of the novels. Bradbury wrote the original version of the story in nine astrological omens, you’re just a bit more than halfway there. days, using a typewriter he rented for 20 cents per hour. When In order to get the rest of the goods, you’ll have to ignore your his publisher urged him to double the manuscript’s length, he itch to be done with the search. You’ll have to be unattached spent another nine days doing so. According to my reading of to being right and smart and authoritative. So please cultivate the planetary configurations, you Cancerians now have a similar patience. Be expansive and magnanimous as you dig deeper. potential to be surprisingly efficient and economical as you work For best results, align yourself with poet Richard Siken’s definion an interesting creation or breakthrough—especially if you tion: “The truth is complicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet.” mix a lot of play and delight into your labors.

• Cook, Dishwasher

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915029, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JARVIS NEZ, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JARVIS NEZ: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $10,153.15. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

46 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189900474, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. POHONGNAKI TAKO, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO POHONGNAKI TAKO: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $8,723.99. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915266, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. TAYLOR LANGSTON AND SHAYNA BRADFORD, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO TAYLOR LANGSTON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $13,007.75. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915254, JUDGE ANN BOYDEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JACE PAINTER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JACE PAINTER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $327.75. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189900935, JUDGE LAURA SCOTT. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MELANIE BRONAS, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MELANIE BRONAS: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,081.26. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189900970, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MIGUEL JIMENEZ, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MIGUEL JIMENEZ: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,284.99. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915026, JUDGE PAUL B PARKER. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. AKASHA BACON, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO AKASHA BACON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $10,966.34. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189901421, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. GARY GONZALES, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO GARY GONZALES: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $3,009.59. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189901220, JUDGE KENT HOLMBERG. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MICHAEL BYINGTON AND TANYA MARSH, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MICHAEL BYINGTON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,791.94. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

URBAN L I V I N

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Post-Retailer

At this time of year, local hoteliers and restaurants usually would be counting their shekels from the Outdoor Retailer show. Instead, Denver happily took their money and had a wang-dang-doodle of a trade show. The Salt Palace has other meetings coming our way, though. An estimated 2,800 people attended the Western Hunting & Conservation Expo, 2,000 at the Varsity Athletic Championships, 2,800 will come to the Utah Coalition Against Pornography conference, and 6,000 to the International Tattoo Convention. In April, the JAMZ Cheer and Dance will bring 2,000 folks, the SLC Marathon Quality of Life Expo expects 10,000 and the Utah Dental Association should bring in around 6,000 professionals to downtown. FitCon is gearing up for 13,000 people in April and the USA Taekwondo National Championships are here July 1-10. The folks at the Salt Palace work hard as hell to get conventioneers to Utah, and this year they’ve also landed the National Funeral Directors Association Annual Convention and Expo in November with 5,400 attendees expected, the Masters Weightlifting American Masters Championships in October, and the National Communication Association annual convention. Denver doesn’t have the multi-level marketing conventions we host in downtown. I know of folks who work in City Creek who say their stores live and breathe off the MLM conventions bringing foreign visitors wanting to buy American products or foreign goods at cheaper prices than they can find in their countries. Melaleuca will have 8,000 folks visit in May, Usana’s annual convention in August brings in 11,5000 members, Young Living Essential Oils fall retreat has 3,000 attendees, and doTerra’s mega convention will gather a whopping 30,000 people in September. SLC’s biggest convention is Salt Lake Comic Convention’s FanX, which attracts more than 120,000 people. Conventions aren’t the only events drawing people to Salt Lake. The Utah Pride Festival starts June 1, the Utah Arts Festival is June 21-24, the Vans Warped Tour passes through on June 30, and the Holi Festival of Colors is June 9. There are plenty of festivals and fairs in other parts of the state, too. Spanish Fork’s Festival of Colors is March 24-25 and the Dirty Dash in Midway is on June 9. Down south, the St. George Art Festival is in April, the Utah Shakespeare Festival starts June 28 in Cedar City, the Moab Folk Festival and the Moab “Scots on the Rocks” Celtic Festival are both set for November. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

University of Utah Hospital will be destroying radiology films with dates of service prior to 01/01/2008 and medical records with dates of service prior to 03/01/1996. Moran Eye Center will be destroying records with dates of service prior to 01/01/1987. If you would like access to your films or records prior to destruction, you must contact the respective facility: 801-581-2350(Radiology) ; 801-581-2704 (University Hospital) ; 801-585-6606 (Moran) before 03/01/2018. After that time the records will no longer be available

FANTASTIC MASSAGE Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

(Past) Presidential Quality Peasant Pricing! THIS WEEK’S FEATURED PARTLOW RENTALS:

UPPER AVES

HIGHLAND PARK

Amazing 3 bdrm 2 bath duplex w/ wrap around decks and city views! Recessed lighting, carport, hook-ups! PRICE DROP! $1645

Perfect 3-4 bdrm 2 bath home! Single Car Garage, balcony, patio, private yard! $1695

MILLCREEK

MILLCREEK

Must have 1 bdrm. w/ washer/ dryer included! Private patio, extra storage, community pool, cvrd. parking! $765

Magnificent 2 bdrm. duplex w/ private yard! Hook-ups, built in dressers, shed! Only $845!

DOWNTOWN

LIBERTY PARK

Delightful 1 bdrm. w/ hardwood floors and charming vintage details! On-site laundry! $745

Perfect 1 bdrm. w/ counter bar dining, track lighting, dishwasher, wall mounted A/C, on-site laundry! $735

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446


S NEofW the

Something to Sing About The Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Switzerland has a new course of study for scholars to pursue: a bachelor’s or master’s in yodeling. Beginning in the 201819 academic year, students will be able to major in the traditional form of singing, which was used by Swiss herdsmen to communicate with each other in the mountains. The BBC reported that prize-winning yodeler Nadja Rass will lead the courses, which will also include musical theory and history. “We have long dreamed of offering yodeling at the university,” gushed Michael Kaufmann, head of the school’s music department.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

position when he offered a special rent deal to an ITV Wales reporter with a hidden camera. The unnamed man posted an ad on Craigslist offering a 650-pound-permonth home with the option of a “reduced deposit/rent arrangement” for “alternative payments.” When he met reporter Sian Thomas at a restaurant to discuss the property, he said, “I don’t know if you have heard of a sort of ‘friends with benefits’ sort of arrangement,” reported Metro News on Jan. 30. He went on to say that if a once-a-week sex arrangement could be struck, “then I wouldn’t be interested in any rent from you at all.” The ITV Wales report was part of an investigation into “sex for rent” arrangements, which apparently are not uncommon in Wales, judging from other advertisements.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

Lovebirds

WEIRD

The Continuing Crisis Birds nesting near natural gas compressors have been found to suffer symptoms similar to PTSD in humans, according to researchers at the Florida Museum of Natural History, and noise pollution has been named the culprit. The Washington Post reported the team studied birds in the Rattlesnake Canyon Habitat Management Area in New Mexico, which is uninhabited by humans but does contain natural gas wells and compression stations that constantly emit a low-frequency hum. The steady noise was linked to abnormal levels of stress hormones, and the usually hardy western bluebirds in the area were found to be smaller and displayed bedraggled feathers. “The body is just starting to break down,” explained stress physiologist Christopher Lowry.

Brutally Honest Kane Blake of Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, has great things to say about his Springvalley home: “It’s a gorgeous neighborhood,” and his family loves most things about it. Nevertheless, the Blakes have listed their home for sale, with a sign out front reading: “Home for Sale by owner because neighbor is an ---hole.” Blake said a neighbor has been harassing his family for five years, including sending police and bylaws officers to the house for frivolous reasons and taking photos of Blake’s house. “My kids won’t even walk to school, they’re terrified,” he told the Kelowna Capital News, adding that he’s received several offers on his house. (Update: Kane has since removed the sign.)

Bright Idea A landlord in Cardiff, Wales, was caught in a compromising

Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 34 years in the Land of Zion

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

n In New Hampshire, the state legislature is considering a bill that would hold owners of poultry responsible for the birds’ trespassing. According to the proposal, reported by the Associated Press, “anyone who knowingly, recklessly or negligently allows their domestic fowl to enter someone else’s property without permission” can be convicted if the birds damage crops or property. Rep. Michael Moffett, a Loudon Republican, told a committee on Jan. 30 that one man told him his neighbor was using chickens as a “form of harassment and provocation.” But Earl Tuson, a local vegetable farmer, opposed the bill, noting, “Everyone loves eating bacon until they move in next to the pig farm.”

Smooth Reaction A Missouri State University freshman identified only as Hayden may have set the perfect stage for a romantic story he’ll tell into old age. In January, as he trolled Tinder, he spotted Claudia, also a student at MSU in Springfield. But, as the Springfield News-Leader reported, Hayden accidentally swiped left, rejecting her, so he decided on a bold move to find her. On Jan. 20, he searched the MSU website for every person named Claudia and emailed them all, asking “the” Claudia to email him back. He offered a doughnut date for “the one that got away.” Claudia Alley, a freshman from Jefferson City, got Hayden’s email and knew she was his target because he referenced a joke she made in her Tinder bio. Alley emailed Hayden, and the two planned to get doughnuts—and perhaps make history—later that week. Awesome! Rookie metal detectors Andy Sampson and Paul Adams were out looking for treasure along the Suffolk/Essex border in England when they came across more than 50 gold coins and pottery. Sampson said Adams started “shouting and jumping around and dancing.” As for himself, Sampson immediately started figuring out how he would spend the money, which the pair thought might amount to 250,000 pounds or more. Alas, when Sampson showed the coins to his neighbor, he said, “They’re not real— there’s something wrong with them.” Sure enough, when the treasure hunters made inquiries, they found that the coins and pottery were props for the BBC TV show Detectorists. Sampson and Adams told the BBC on Jan. 31 that they have “got over” their huge disappointment and will continue to metal detect.

Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com.

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY NMLS#243253 Loan officer

I

Julie Brizzee Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180 9785 S. Monroe St. #200 Sandy, UT 84070

801-747-1206 Providing All Mortgage Loan Services

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | 47

Toilet Ghost Homeowners in Noosa, Queensland, Australia, were perplexed about why their toilet kept randomly flushing, so on Jan. 28, they looked into the flush mechanism embedded in the wall behind the toilet. Then they summoned Luke Huntley, a local snake catcher. Huntley found a 13-foot brown tree snake in the niche, according to the Daily Mail, resting on the flush mechanism. “Hopefully, he’s going to be able to come straight out,” Huntley said on a video of the capture, “but he’s a little grumpy.”

Selling homes for 5 years

| COMMUNITY |

You Have the Right to Remain Silent Vincente Rodrigues-Ortiz, 22, was arrested on Jan. 24 in Grand Rapids, Mich., for the assault and murder of Andre Hawkins, 17, the day before. But when Rodrigues-Ortiz appeared in court on Jan. 25 for arraignment, he questioned the judge about his “other murder case.” WWMT TV reported that his query led prosecutors to interview and then swiftly charge him with the March 2017 homicide of Laurie Kay Lundeburg, and RodriguesOrtiz now awaits arraignment in that case as well.

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Armed and Naked In Texas, game wardens came across an arresting sight in Gregg County last November: an unnamed Upshur County man hunting in the nude along a state highway. The Houston Chronicle reported that the hunter, who is a well-known nudist and activist in the area, contested his arrest on charges including hunting without a license, but one look in court at the warden’s body cam footage undermined his case. The man then dropped his appeals and settled the citations.

Government in Action Saugatuck, Mich., attorney Michael Haddock’s dog, Ryder, probably gave the mail carrier a day off after receiving an unexpected letter on Jan. 27 from the State of Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency. According to WZZM TV, Haddock opened the envelope addressed to Ryder and found a letter saying that Ryder is eligible for $360 per week in unemployment benefits. “I knew he was clever,” Haddock said of Ryder, “but he surprised me this time.” The UIA admitted that its computer did send the notice to Ryder, but it was later flagged as suspicious, and the German shepherd won’t receive any benefits after all.

Julie “Bella” Hall


The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

WORDS sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947 VOICEOVER WORKSHOP Forming in SLC, Learn to earn voicing commercials & more. www.voscott.com/workshops.html

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

CITY WEEKLY STORE

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE

Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

OGDEN

PLUMBER - SILVER SUMMIT SERVICES

763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

Plumbing ∙ Home Repair ∙ Home Remodel

Licensed/Insured - 801-518-2325 silversummitservices@gmail.com

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license

801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

Sell Your Car Today With One PhOne Call

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

Toothache? Wisdom teeth? PULLMYTOOTH.

www.

com

Save time and money

Main Street Dental

48 | FEBRUARY 15, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

801.467.2255 3195 S. Main St #225 Salt Lake

Dedicated teacher yearns to be stay at home mom. Endless love, travel, music & dance all await your precious baby. Expenses pd. 877.696.1526

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations-

801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

City Weekly February 15, 2018  

For the Birds

City Weekly February 15, 2018  

For the Birds