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CITYWEEKLY.NET JULY 13, 2017 | VOL. 34 N0. 7

Into the

Wild Small Northern Utah zoo sets sights on survival. By Thomas Sorenson


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY LET’S GET ANIMAL, ANIMAL

Logan’s Zootah is where the wild things are. Cover photo by Matthew Halton

15

CONTRIBUTOR

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THOMAS SORENSON

Cover story, p. 15 Sorenson is a recent journalism graduate from USU and currently serves as managing editor for The Utah Statesman. Asked what his favorite animals at the zoo were, he said, “I love the hyraxes—they’re some of the most energetic animals at Zootah. It was fun to watch them run around in the sun and play with each other.”

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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

Cover story, June 29, “Shelter War”

Well, it appears nothing is going to happen. The proposed new “shelters” were all pushed back by the NIMBY crew, and politicians listened. Nobody wants the drugs and violence, but nobody wants to help, either. Anyone working within the downtown area has had at least one altercation with a vagrant, so we all have a negative view on them. Looking forward to seeing the progress. Simpson Avenue looks like a Syrian warzone at times.

CONOR PAPINEAU Via Facebook

I appreciated the words of [social worker] Ryan Parker. When the block becomes profitable, restaurants and apartments, the politicians and elitist Pioneer Park Coalitioners will sit back and claim they did it. They will have only moved the problem. With as many City Weekly articles that have come out about “the Block” and the rags-to-riches stories, you’d think we would have come up with a solution.

LAURA JANE Via Facebook

Hey, legalize the dope and let them set up vendor booths. It sort of like that now anyway.

CRAIG S. MATTICE Via Facebook

We need to make sure that the tax base doesn’t infringe on the rights of people shitting, littering and doing drugs downtown.

RICKY STODDARD Via Facebook

We are failing as a society.

JENNIFER CARESS Via Facebook

Wow, for anyone to say these people have given up on life is ridiculous! Life has given up on them—or should I say society has? Every time someone says, “Oh, they should just get a job,” I ask them, “Would you hire someone who looks like that?” They say, “Hell no!” and all I can say is, “Exactly.” I don’t think current programs help at all; they only lead to laziness or not much better off from where they started. The problem is the way it’s being handled, for sure, but pushing them out of the neighborhood does nothing but delay results.

CANDACE EWELL Via Facebook

These are God’s kids, too! We must use humility and love them more. Our government can’t do it alone, nor will they.

MARK MASSEY Via Facebook

I moved from SLC to PDX. Portland’s homeless problem is 10 times what Salt Lake City deals with.

BRANDI MORGAN Via Facebook

A mayor who wouldn’t comment on her No. 1 issue and a “coalition” that believes homeless should be hidden away. Great article, City Weekly.

Via Facebook

MARIE MAXWELL LANE

EMILY MCNARY

There’s a massive public housing backlog in this city, which actions like closing The Road Home are only going to make much worse. Expansion, not detraction of services, is the right choice economically and ethically. Not that any business leader or registered Republican cares.

RUMAL KALUARACHCHI Via Facebook

So, let me get this straight. The Road Home has been downtown for a very long time. In the past 10 or so years, a bunch of businesses move downtown next to the homeless shelter that has been there for a long time and don’t like it that homeless people are there doing what homeless people do because they are mentally ill or on drugs or both. Fucking unbelievable.

BOB DOBBS Via Facebook

It’s disgusting. I went to the farmers market and was afraid to sit on the grass. It was dirty, stinky and homeless people sleeping under trees. I’ll never go back to SLC farmers market again until they can fix this problem of drug use. I love that they have money to buy drugs but no money to pay for a room to rent. Choices.

ASHLEY ROLLER WOLFGRAMM Via Facebook

I find the lack of empathy and presence of entitlement highly disturbing. The homeless are not less than you and not all are addicts. If you’ve never struggled with addiction or you’ve never been homeless, and your largest complaint is to have to witness the way some people live—wow, Salt Lake.

RAMEN EGGLAND Via Facebook

Zero sympathy for the homeless shelter folks here. They were given a blank check by Boyer. They vehemently refused and [are] now in this quagmire.

@UTAHPIGBUS Via Twitter

I support bus tickets to liberal states. L.A., Vegas, Portland—they love these people.

KERRY KNOWLES Via Facebook

N0. 5

SHELTER

@SLCWEEKLY I don’t think it matters which city has it worse, as both cities have different histories when it comes to the community outreach and views of homelessness. Providing accessible support and means to survive is important for all human life. SLC needs to seriously think about [what] pushing lower-income/homeless west of I-15 will do to the city. “Cleaning up” shouldn’t mean hiding people somewhere else because people don’t want to see them in downtown SLC/near the temple.

JUNE 29, 2017 | VOL. 34

WAR

@BBART76

In the fight over the future of the downtown homeless, the Pioneer Park Coalition looms large.

Via Twitter

Music, June 29, “Listener Supported”

BY STEPHEN DARK

So strange—was just talking about Bad Brad Wheeler at work, mentioning how his soooothing voice was not on the radio to calm us on Friday. Via Facebook Yes! Bad Brad’s unique voice and wealth of musical knowledge is so missed.

JENNIE WILLIAMS Via Facebook

Miss hearing you on the radio, Brad.

STERLING PERRY Via Facebook

I sure do miss him. So many nights sitting in my car in the garage after getting home from work waiting for a chance to run inside and finish his show. God bless Brad Wheeler.

GAM GAM

Via Facebook

Dine, June 29, “‘Cue for You”

Thank you for choosing to mention my favorite BBQ place, Holy Smoke. Not only is the meat smoked to perfection—their side dishes can be meals all by themselves.

ANGELA URREA Via Facebook

Oh, there are days when I miss the land behind the Zion Curtain, and reading this made me homesick again.

@ALVINSMOM Via Twitter

Opinion, June 14, “Social Media in Salt Lake”

Stan Rosenzweig makes a classic mistake about emergency communications; he assumes that a technology that’s easy to use is therefore efficient and, in the worst of circumstances, robust. Having been involved in long-term planning with the state’s emergency managers and literally dozens of agencies across a range of projected hazards, I assure you that no one expects or is prepared to rely on any single platform to deliver effective public communications during a crisis. Power goes out, cell towers go silent, smartphones become dead weight. This is true whether the event is sudden, like the “Big Shake” (to use Mr. Rosenzweig’s term), or drawn out like the pandemic “we never had.” Twitter is great for active, localized events. However, social media platforms rely on individuals subscribing to and ac-

tively allowing updates from a given agency. Following an individual’s social media account during a crisis, no matter what agency they represent, is effectively daft. Yes, the public should subscribe to the social media accounts of state and local agencies for updates and preparedness information, but we should not rely on them categorically for real-time information. In 2008, I participated in a community emergency-management conference at FEMA’s campus in Emmitsburg, Md. The week-long workshop led up to an earthquake drill. This was essentially 48 hours of real-time response compacted into two sessions, morning and afternoon. In the heat of it, I could not get in touch with my agency liaison at the simulated Joint Information Center. In reality, she was one door down the hall. But she could not respond to my calls. What happened? As soon as leadership understood she had a background in journalism and writing press releases, she was tasked with writing all the press releases that were issued from the JIC. Through no fault of her own she was pulled out of her agency role and assigned something completely different. The next day, we resolved the issue, though it was a bit trick y. My takeaway from that exchange: Real-time response pulls one in several directions at once. I’m often asked to speak at various conferences—including one organized by Mr. Rosenzweig—so I coined a shorthand phrase for what might be expected: Develop an alloy of characteristics. Learn how to function when you haven’t slept in two days, when you haven’t had a shower in three days, and when the last meal you had was served in a styrofoam clamshell. If you are in the zone, your best friend is likely to be a radio, and a raft of A A batteries. If you have the time and gumption, become a licensed amateur radio operator. Train with your local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). Join a voluntary agency like the American Red Cross, if only to learn how the response apparatus is actually supposed to function.

DAVID NEALE,

Former Dir. of Emergency Services, State Disaster Relations Liaison for the American Red Cross, Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter


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OPINION

Better Times Ahead

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

At dinner the other night, I asked a GOP friend who follows @realDonaldTrump on Twitter how he thinks things are going. “Are you kidding me?” he responded. He then expressed disappointment at the poor and divisive way things seem to be turning out in American politics. It was a poor choice of topic for a dinner conversation, as it unleashed some serious angst over what resembles buyer’s remorse in those many friends of mine who are both welleducated and financially successful. The mild concern that POTUS won’t evolve into being presidential has morphed into outright alarm as my friends are beginning to mirror the panicky hyperventilation seen in Democrats. The recent G20 meeting in Germany hasn’t done much to improve the growing unease in America, not to mention the exacerbating medical insurance crisis, the chestthumping over Syria and North Korea, and the way POTUS agrees with Russia’s president over how nasty the press is to the two of them (although, so far, POTUS doesn’t appear to be considering murdering press people as is alleged to occur in the Kremlin). Before we all jump off a cliff into utter despair, allow me to shed some refreshing sunshine on this darkly perceived political sky, starting with the G20 meeting. For starters, while Russia’s Putin was quick to say that Trump agreed with him that there was no proof of Russian meddling in the U.S. election, our own officials quickly refuted it. Score one for sunshine. Also, while Trump stood his ground in opposition to the Paris climate accord, Germany’s Chancellor Merkel didn’t let the G20 tradition of forced unanimity

keep her and the other great countries from effectively becoming the G19 in solidarity for the Paris Agreement. As an American, you might feel a little left out, but as a citizen of the world, sunshine won again. Even Trump managed a refreshingly cordial tweet: “The #G20Summit was a wonderful success and carried out beautifully by Chancellor Angela Merkel. Thank you!” So, watching Trump-the-chest-thumper and Trumpthe-G20-diplomat, are we on a road to perdition or salvation? I suggest we check with Karl Rove. As you might recall, Rove was a senior advisor and deputy chief of staff to President George W. Bush. If you go back to the early 2000s, you will find plenty of Democratic handwringing about the evil Rove, just as they now complain about Trump’s advisor Steve Bannon. Like Bannon, Rove was often referred to as Bush’s brain. He was connected with the West Wing that lost 22 million emails, many of which were supposed to prove that Sadam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction. Oh? Thanks to Jason Chaffetz, you thought email malaise was only a Hillary problem. Nope. Bush and Rove set the standard for lost emails. OK, bygones. Today, Rove runs the conservative political action committee American Crossroads and is a successful writer who, interestingly enough, recently wrote a phenomenally calming column in The Wall Street Journal on how history shows that left- and right-wing divisiveness always resolves itself, and that “The U.S. specializes in comebacks.” He wrote, “the country has been deeply divided before, but it always manages to pull itself together,” citing “practical common sense.” Then he gave evidence that this is so. Drawing on his recent book research, he found that in the five presidential elections leading up to 1896, not one of the winners had a majority of votes and that, in 1888, Democrats

were so ticked off that they refused to answer congressional roll calls, denying a quorum to get anything done for months. So, here we are again. Like those terrible four years in our political past when there was a 100 percent GOP president, House and Senate for two years and another two years when all three were in Democratic hands—and half our citizens were filled with dread. But, as we now know, America always recovers. To do it again, it requires most of us on both sides to simply get a grip. Sit down. Take few deep breaths. Go to an air-conditioned movie theater and watch a comedy. Chill. Will hard-core Democrats recognize you are being selfdestructive when you alienate low-income job seekers who are really afraid of your revolutionary rhetoric? Will you right-wing Republicans stop scaring single moms who cannot afford both a one-bedroom apartment and a child’s health care? Compromise really is better for all Americans. In Utah, where Gov. Herbert hypes our great economy, let’s expand discussions beyond homelessness and air quality (important issues, but not the only ones) and consider the plight of rural citizens who have no idea what they will do when more coal jobs are gone. Those of us who grew up in the spirit of compromise need to educate the hundreds of ideologue delegates in each of the parties who seem to prefer screaming at each other rather than heal America. I know, based on our history, that all of this craziness will pass—across America and here in Utah. We Americans of all political stripes are proud of our comebacks. The ideological left and the ideological right, it is hoped, will find their respective Zen, and responsible adults from both sides will join together and, dare I say it, make America great once again. CW

COMPROMISE REALLY IS BETTER FOR ALL AMERICANS.

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

You’ve heard the old saying about giving away the farm. That’s exactly what Utah’s doing with its generous, albeit onerous, tax incentive program. Don’t get me wrong. It did help the state weather the recession— but at what cost? The Salt Lake Tribune ran a package of stories questioning why the state keeps its tax-incentive data secret. After all, it just handed Amazon the deal of the century. The company will get a $5.6 million rebate for building a warehouse here, promising 1,500 jobs, but only 130 will be required to pay above county average. In 2012, Think Progress criticized Utah’s decision to give Goldman Sachs, one of the country’s most profitable companies, some $47.3 million for 1,065 jobs. The Pew Center warns that lawmakers often approve incentives without knowing potential costs, and Utah’s hidden data doesn’t help. With tax dollars flowing liberally to businesses, it’s no wonder there’s an initiative to raise taxes for schools.

Extract This!

It must have hit them upside the head when state Treasurer David Damschen scrutinized some pretty nice subsidies to rural counties. And, of course, the subsidies were to help out the state’s extractive industries—you know, coal, oil and such. Damschen, a board member of the Seven County Infrastructure Coalition, questioned the legality of using Permanent Community Impact Fund money for these rural projects, and criticized the lack of transparency, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. Indeed, rural Utah is at a disadvantage economically. It hasn’t faced the cruel reality of the failing extractive industry. Apparently, neither has the federal government. The Bureau of Land Management is considering allowing drilling in Recapture Canyon, famed for the chest-pounding ATV protest and rich in Native American artifacts.

Down With History

There they go. Four historic structures in what expert Allen Roberts calls Murray’s Temple Square. Since 2011, the city has allowed demolition of historic buildings if the project added value to the tax base, the Trib reported. Can you say development? That is the byword of the day. Preservation has always been a hard sell in Utah, where private property rights reign supreme. While Roberts said this wouldn’t happen in Salt Lake City, it actually did. Among them were the Salt Lake Temple Annex, the Gardo House and—perhaps most significantly—Louis Sullivan’s Dooly Building, demolished in 1964. Utah is rich with history, much of which lies in its architecture. It’s too bad not enough people seem to care.

AUSTIN FULLER

The Price of Job Growth

Nineteen-year-old Kayden Troff of West Jordan learned to play chess as a toddler. He’s now among 20 of the country’s top-ranked players competing through July 18 at the U.S. Junior Championship in St. Louis. Troff—who earned the astral title of Grandmaster at age 14—is playing for $31,000 in prizes and a berth in the U.S. Championships. Each round is streamed live at uschesschamps.com.

You started playing at an early age, correct?

Yes, I started playing chess at age 3 after watching my father and brothers play. I was so young, I don’t remember a time in my life without chess.

Do you currently hold a title? How do you rank against other players in the world?

I am a Grandmaster, which is the highest official chess title. I rank in the top 50 players in the United States and among the top 1,000 players in the world for active players—and that is non-age restrictive.

What’s a Grandmaster? Is there an equivalent title in other sports—like a black belt in karate?

Other than becoming a world champion, Grandmaster is the highest title a chess player can achieve and it is a title held for life. A black belt would be a good comparison; however, chess is very different and it’s tough to make a direct comparison to any professional title or sport.

Do you have a coach? And how do you keep in touch?

I am currently working with a coach via Skype. Chess is really nice and unique in that going online can be an option—whether it be practicing, playing or working with someone.

How much do you practice?

I try to spend about six hours a day on chess—except on Saturdays and Sundays. Although during tournaments, the time I spend practicing chess can range between 8-12 hours.

Is it accurate to call chess a “sport”?

In my opinion, chess hits all the critical criteria of what actually makes a sport. However, I don’t think it fits the mold of what most people consider to be a sport. I generally refer to chess as a game. But if you analyze chess step-by-step, I think many people would be surprised how easily it can be classified as a sport.

Do you have plans to enter a profession—or is chess it?

I would really enjoy doing something in communications. I do imagine chess will be a part of that, whether through teaching chess or sharing some of the things I have learned because of chess.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


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BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Autopilot People talk as if self-driving cars are only a few years away. This seems nuts to me. My Galaxy smartphone can’t even do voice recognition properly, and we’re banking that a car will be able to drive itself safely in the complexity of city traffic? —Astro,

You might not expect to see self-driving cars on the road soon, but you know who does? Ford, for one, which plans to release a fully autonomous vehicle by 2021. BMW says the same thing. Audi wants to debut one by 2020; Volkswagen, by 2019. Like objects in your passenger-side mirror, the future might in fact be closer than it appears. Still, you’ve got a point. No technology goes from rare to ubiquitous overnight, and certainly not cars, which Americans hold on to for more than a decade, on average, before getting a new one. So will driverless vehicles really be on the road in two or three years? Heck, they’re there now: As of March, 27 developers were operating a total of 180 autonomous cars on California highways. Will we see them in cities? Uber’s been testing its cars in Pittsburgh since last fall. Will they soon become available to any buyer who’s ready to try one? Well, that’s what could take a little longer. These three major roadblocks will have to be tackled before widespread adoption: 1. Regulatory. Fifty different states? As it stands, that makes 50 entities with different regulations governing selfdriving cars, if they’ve bothered to write any. This presents an impediment to manufacturers who want their products to go national and can’t design a car for both Michigan (where regulators are leaning toward allowing steering-wheel-less, brake-pedal-less vehicles) and California (where they’re not). Then there’s the city level. According to a recent report, only 6 percent of major American municipalities had some transportation plan on the books dealing with autonomous vehicles. Should, for example, driverless cars get their own lanes? Don’t expect consensus off the bat. 2. Legal. Whose insurance company is on the hook in a crash where both drivers are computers? Here’s an example of the wholesale cultural transformation that any significant switch to driverless vehicles will entail, changing not just how we design cars and roads, but how we think about things like car insurance, public transportation, etc. In this case the short answer is: Most experts figure that in the self-driving-car era, liability will no longer be on drivers but on manufacturers, as with most consumer products. This question of “fault,” we should add, isn’t just for the lawyers; ethicists need to chew it over, too. Say a kid jumps out in front of your car and the only way to avoid hitting him is to swerve into a pole, thereby putting Grandma, riding shotgun, in mortal danger. That’s tough enough for a human to think through; how’s a computer going to make the call?

3. Technological. Plenty going on here. Proposed federal regulations would mandate, in the next few years, that all cars come equipped with vehicle-to-vehicle technology, whereby they can share data with one another—to activate, for instance, autonomous braking if one car finds itself too close to the next car’s bumper. Driverless cars will also need to get better at staying in their lane when road-surface markings are obscured by rain or snow. And developers are figuring out how to provide vehicles with site-specific info about wherever they’re driving: Google, perhaps unsurprisingly, is out there making ultra-detailed 3-D maps, to be updated continually; Tesla is using what it calls “fleet learning,” building a database using readings sent in from its cars already on the road. Like crowd-sourcing, but with robots. In short, there are still a few kinks to be worked out. I left the tech part for last because in some ways that’s the lowest hurdle—it might take some tinkering, but everybody pretty much assumes it’s only a matter of time. From another angle, though, it presents the biggest problem: not the apparatus and software itself, but getting people to trust that these cars aren’t going to get them killed. This is no small matter: A recent survey found that 78 percent of Americans are afraid of self-driving cars. As analysts have pointed out, new car technology faces a unique degree of marketplace resistance; with a smartphone, say, consumers will overlook a few not-yet-resolved bugs to get the latest functionality, but they’re not quite as risk-tolerant when those bugs might involve pulling out in front of a semi. So any minor incident tends to put a chill on the whole self-driving conversation—as it did last year, when a Google-operated Lexus sideswiped a public bus in the company’s hometown of Mountain View, Calif. There were no injuries—the car was going 2 mph— and that’s after 1.45 million miles of safe test-driving. What’s the big deal? “For there to be consumer acceptance of these vehicles, they have to be virtually perfect,” a former director of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration told a panel audience last year. In other words, we’re dealing not so much with technological problems as with ones of human behavior— suggesting we might have a while to wait. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

Eight ways Gordon Hayward leaving the Utah Jazz will affect your life:

8. Gordon Hayward leaving the Utah Jazz will have no effect on your life.

7. The millionaire making more

millions across the country will have no bearing on your existence.

6. Maybe you’ll ponder

how stupid and ineffectual the #Stayward hashtag was.

5. ... and come to the

realization that it should have been #GordoNoGo.

4.

The sportsball man sportsing in another town won’t impact you in the least.

3. The Jazz will still never win a championship because the NBA is a rigged, fraudulent system.

2. I mean, keep on believin’! 1. Like you’re even going to

notice that there’s one less white guy in Utah.

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

WORLD REFUGEE DAY

Utah has long welcomed refugees, but their future is uncertain in the current political climate. This annual event, established by the U.N. General Assembly in 2000, honors the strength and resilience of refugees around the world. In an effort to raise awareness in the community, the state Department of Workforce Services hosts SLC’s World Refugee Day celebration, which includes games, a global market and a 5k “Run for Refugees.” There are 22.5 million people in refugee camps around the world, and donations are always needed. Liberty Park, 600 E. 1300 South, 801-618-5096, Saturday, July 15, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., free, bit.ly/2sIPX9I

TRANSPORTATION INPUT

You’ve heard it before—they want your opinions on Utah’s transportation problems. Well, they really do this time. At least that’s what the Wasatch Front Regional Council says. “Now more than ever, we must work together to coordinate our transportation investments with land use and economic development considerations so that we maximize the value of those investments and utilize our resources efficiently,” WFRC Executive Director Andrew Gruber says in a press release. Make your voice heard on the $5 billion 2018-2023 Transportation Improvement Program draft. Do you want more bike-sharing options? More parkway trails? Roadways? Tell the representatives in-person at one of the two open houses: Ogden Intermodal Center, 2350 Wall Ave., Tuesday, July 18; Salt Lake Central Station, 250 S. 600 West, Thursday, July 20, both run from 4:30-7 p.m., bit.ly/2sL0EJ4

CLEAN AIR PANEL

Take a deep breath, but only during the summer. Utah can have the worst air quality in the nation for a few days each winter, and it’s hard to know who to blame. At the upcoming panel discussion, Science & Civics: Clean Air in Utah, you’ll learn that “inconsistent bipartisan support for clean-air regulation and the region’s weather and geography combine to set a deadly trap for bad air,” according to the event page. Local and national experts are ready to talk bipartisan, long-term solutions through clean-air regulations. Salt Lake County Library, Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, 801-943-4636,Thursday, July 20, 6-8 p.m., free, dinner served, registration required, bit.ly/2sOxIee

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


‘It Just Got Real’ 3rd Congressional write-in candidate Russell Roesler has something to say. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

F

POLITICS

Political outsider Russ Roesler strikes a pose inside his Sandy home on Monday, July 10.

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But in 2010, she made news for a different reason. That election cycle, Murkowski was primaried out by a young Tea Party candidate, Joe Miller, who ran to the right of the established senator. (Meanwhile, in Utah, the same thing was happening with incumbent Sen. Bob Bennett by to-the-right challenger Mike Lee.) Down, but not defeated, Murkowski ran as a write-in candidate in the general election, and clobbered her ballot opponent. The differences between Murkowski and Roesler are many, though. As are the differences between Murkowski and most write-in candidates. Her name recognition and incumbency, for starters, gave her a massive advantage. Roesler gets it. Even if he doesn’t win over a single voter, he says this experience has been an education, and it won’t quell his aspirations to run for office again. Next time, perhaps, with his name on the ballot. “I want to try for it,” he says. CW

On the Trump administration’s travel ban, he says: “You’re punishing many for the few, but how do you know? You don’t know who the bad guys are.” But he doesn’t dismiss the move entirely. “If ISIS wants to come in here, they’re going to find a way to do it. It’s big, and not something you’re going to solve in a day.” Roesler agrees with local politicians who say residents near Bears Ears should have a say in how the area should be protected—from what and to what extent. Realistically, however, Roesler’s positions are moot. Like most write-in candidates, the likelihood of garnering enough votes to register a blip on the election result radar—let alone win the seat—are next to zero. But it happens. Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski is a case in point. If you’ve heard Murkowski’s name mentioned lately, it’s probably because she has been lumped together with holdout Republicans who haven’t backed the alternative GOP health care bill.

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But there was another route, he was informed. He could run a write-in campaign as long as he was registered before the September cutoff. Roesler convinced his children to take a trip with him to the Capitol. “They watched as I did the paperwork, and the official stamped it,” he says. “I looked at my oldest and I said, ‘It just got real.’” Roesler grew up a “quiet little kid” who “didn’t like to cause trouble” in Ceresco, Neb., a small town north of Lincoln. He says he was “naive to the world” during his formative years. At 18, he joined the U.S. Army and moved to Fort Sill, Okla., aspiring to be a helicopter pilot. There, he befriended a family in Oklahoma who happened to be members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sure enough, Roesler converted. He soon found himself deployed to Saudi Arabia as an Army specialist radio operator in Operation Desert Shield. When he returned from the Middle East and moved back home with his parents to attend the University of Nebraska, Roesler switched his focus from piloting to engineering. “I did really bad there,” he says of his first semester at school. “If you checked my transcript, you’d say I was a bad kid.” One summer, he visited Utah to stay with a friend who had moved to Clinton. “I fell in love with Utah. It just felt right,” he reminisces. The vacation led him to relocate to Provo. Once settled, a roommate invited Roesler to hang out with a small group of friends, one of whom was a woman “way out of [his] league” from the Dominican Republic, studying English. His Utah County love story didn’t stray from the archetypal script: About a year after dating, the two were married. Now, he and his wife live in Sandy and are the parents of three children ages 18, 16 and 11. At the Sandy City Library on a recent morning, Roesler is clutching a manila folder stuffed with printed articles and political notes. Compared with the GOP field, he sticks out as a centrist on several key issues, including the everpressing health care. “Honestly, I don’t think Obamacare is a bad thing. It actually helped some people out,” he says, adding, “Just because you don’t like President Obama doesn’t mean you have to destroy what he did.” With the aid of his sons, Roesler says he plans to upload YouTube videos that further explain his stances. As a former soldier, Roesler hopes the U.S. won’t overreact to North Korea’s military peacocking and get baited into striking prematurely. “Don’t piss them off,” he says. “Just let them flex.” Though, he adds, the U.S. should keep a close eye on Kim Jong-un and his ilk.

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or a conspicuous beat, Russ Roesler’s parents were stone silent. They’d just heard their 47-year-old son—an airport customerservice agent with minimal political background who had never run for so much as planning commissioner—confide to them that he wanted to be a U.S. congressman. In a field of District 3 candidates that runs the gamut in experience, political ideology and electability, Roesler is an outlier—not least of which is his unconventional route to getting there: running as a write-in candidate. A representative democracy, structured so that laypersons can join in governance, requires regular folks to step up to the task. And Roesler is as salt-of-the-earth as they come. Thus his parents’ quiet disbelief. “You could hear it in the long, silent pause,” he recounts to City Weekly. Days before talking to his parents, Roesler had been at home, likely doing yard work, he says, listening to KSL’s Doug Wright talk about Rep. Jason Chaffetz’ decision to leave office. The conversation stuck with him. “I couldn’t get it out of my head,” he says. Roesler says he started reading up on Chaffetz and his voting record, familiarizing himself with the duties of a congressman. Then he decided serving in Washington was his next goal. The day after Chaffetz announced that June would be his last month on Capitol Hill, Gov. Gary Herbert opened up the races. Over the next week, a flurry of candidates descended on the lieutenant governor’s HQ and filed the requisite paperwork to fill the impending vacancy. By the deadline for party-affiliated candidates, 22 hopefuls from four political parties had entered the ring. Roesler was not one of them. He had missed the deadline. The next option, he was told by the lieutenant governor’s office, was to run as an unaffiliated candidate. The move required him to gather at least 300 signatures from registered voters, and he didn’t think he’d have time before the next deadline.

SARAH ARNOFF

NEWS


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Into the Wild By Thomas Sorenson

comments@cityweekly.net @tomcat340

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JULY 13, 2017 | 15

the birds. Her name is Madge, a citron-crested cockatoo, and word is she’s the queen of the zoo—a nod perhaps to Willow Park Zoo’s origins as an aviary back in the 1970s. Madge bobs her head as Roach talks, like she’s nodding along with what he’s saying. He pulls her out of the cage and sets her on a perch next to the counter where he’s working, as if to reinforce her status. Madge has been a park fixture since she arrived here in 1999, and has the distinction of being Zootah’s longest-residing tenant. Madge chirps at Roach and he talks to her intermittently, but mostly he works in silence. He enjoys spending time with the birds and the small mammals in this building, but his passion is the reptiles and amphibians. Still in his early 20s, Roach’s dream is to work with large crocodiles in a bigger zoo someday, but the training that would require is beyond what he currently has access to. Part-time jobs don’t pay for college degrees. He looks at Madge and laughs. “Are you happy, pretty girl?” In response, she raises the orange crest on top of her head, contrasting sharply with her white body, and starts to bob again. The keeper smiles. Another worker joins Roach. Her name is Liz Park. The entire zoo is managed by a small staff—just two full-time employees, 11 part-time workers and a handful of volunteers and interns. Technically, Roach is one of the part-time employees. Realistically, the entire staff volunteers. “I just get paid for the time I’m in here cleaning and feeding,” Roach says. “Pretty much all the time I spend with the animals, I don’t get paid for.” Park, officially one of the volunteers, comes in a morning or two per week to handle some of the more menial tasks. She grabs a pail, a scoop and a brush and climbs into one of the bird cages. “If you’re working in a zoo,” she says, “it’s mostly just cleaning poop.” She scrubs the wire netting of the cage sides with the brush, then proceeds to the unenviable task of scraping the end result of feeding time off the ground. The birds hop around on their perches above her, blissfully unaware that they’re the reason she’s on her hands and knees.

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Photos by Matthew Halton

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F

or Zach Roach, nearly every morning starts the same. He shows up to work just before 8 a.m., Logan’s Willow Park Zoo name and logo emblazoned on his shirt, and walks by a large wooden sign near the front entrance that simply reads ZOO in large font. Remaining letters spelling out “Zootah,” the zoo’s official name since last February, will fill out the empty space once rebranding efforts are completed. Roach unlocks the door to a large, plain building next to the entrance and is met by the sight of nondescript cinder block walls. He opens another door inside and is bombarded with the familiar cacophony of dozens of birds chirping and singing. The din is jarring when compared to the quiet of the suburb surrounding the grounds. With expert precision, Roach begins preparing food for the animals—meat for the eagle, hawk and owls is quickly cut into strips, weighed and logged in a record book. Fruits and vegetables are chopped for the other small animals. The room is utilitarian, with industrial-sized sinks and concrete floors. It’s dimly lit, and only a few pieces of paper—outlining procedures and other reminders—break the visual monotony of the gray-hued walls. Tall enclosures with varying bird species line the perimeter in a half-circle, and a locked gate separates the capuchin monkeys, kinkajou and hyraxes from the birds. “The doves are loud today,” Roach says under his breath, glancing over his shoulder at their enclosure. His hands barely stop moving. After preparing the meat and vegetables, Roach moves on to construct the enrichment activities. He grabs an old magazine from a stack and begins ripping out pages to wrap around the produce. The balls of paper and food are designed to be toys for the animals—a way to stimulate their brains. The birds will pick at the paper slowly, but the two monkeys know there’s a prize on the inside. They will rip the wrapping apart like a kid on Christmas morning to reveal the juicy reward. The staff will need to create some new puzzles for the monkeys soon, Roach says. The monkeys figure out the enrichment activities too quickly to really be beneficial. The handler yawns. He takes a momentary respite from food prep to talk to one of

Small Northern Utah zoo sets sights on survival.


BARBARA TEW, EDUCATION DIRECTOR

TROY COOPER

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ZACH ROACH, HANDLER

Some of the cages are home to just one or two birds, and are cleaned relatively quickly. Others, like the one housing the doves, host 15-20 animals. The two workers don’t talk much. The bird chatter only increases at feeding time. Finally, after more than two hours, food preparation is done. Roach puts Madge back in her cage, then dumps a bowl of fruits and veggies on a tray and offers it to the monkeys. They swing across the enclosure and start eating, but stare at Roach suspiciously as they pick up their food. “The monkeys are jerks,” Roach says. Now, for the first time since he arrived at work, it’s time to go outside. Roach grabs a coat, checks his boots, picks up the plastic containers of meat and opens the door. The feathered symphony is suddenly drowned out by the sound of a heavy morning rainstorm. He laughs ironically, then pulls up the hood on his jacket, glances at Park for encouragement and runs out. The job of running a small zoo can be monotonous, uncomfortable and exhausting, but it’s more than just a job to these two. For the employees and volunteers at Zootah, they believe they are impacting the world, one animal and one visitor at a time.

GETTING THEIR BEARINGS

It’s spring break for the K-12 school districts in Cache Valley and Troy Cooper is taking advantage. Cooper, Zootah’s director, has a friendly smile and a personality to match. His geniality is on full display as he takes money from parents and stamps childrens’ hands. “Which animal are you excited to see?” Cooper asks one of the kids. The answer gets buried as all the children listening respond at the same time. Cooper laughs and tells them to make sure they visit the muntjac deer, one of the smallest and oldest species in the deer world. The process repeats on a loop. “Swing by Appa before you leave, he’s our yak and he’s a ton of fun,” Cooper tells one group. “Bob and Tabitha are our bobcats, they’d love for you to stop by and say hi,” he tells another,

reaching out the window with his hand stamp. Peacocks freely wander the grounds, much to the children’s delight. The colorful birds, it turns out, have proven themselves to be good mousers. The plaintive cry of one rings out and the response from another can be heard across the park. The warbles of the sandhill cranes join the staccato clucks of the ducks in the stream as other birds join in. The sound of the natural orchestra rises and falls, but never completely fades. The trumpeter swan and the pelican, perhaps showing off for the visitors, gather in the stream near the intersection of two walking paths. A small crowd quickly forms. A young girl, with a pink jacket and curly blond hair, laughs and points at the birds, then grabs her dad’s hand and smiles up at him. He crouches down to give her a hug and talk about the birds. Another boy, wearing a raccoon sweatshirt with small ears on the hood, giggles as the swan cries out. “He’s talking to you!” the boy’s mom says. He laughs again. A third boy, running toward the birds, trips and skins his knee in the dirt next to the exhibit. He looks like he’s about to cry, then remembers the animals and starts running again. “Mom!” he yells. “Look at that one!” Thanks to a special event that weekend, Cooper estimates the zoo received more than 500 visitors—a number in keeping with his lofty expectations. Cooper has been director for four years now, and was tasked with expanding and improving the zoo. The rebranding, the gift shop and many of the new animal species are all part of that effort. The zoo already operates on a very thin margin, however, making further financial investments difficult. Renaming the zoo is part of a larger goal to become more attractive to the region, rather than only bringing in visitors from the Cache Valley community. There have been discussions about relocating the zoo to a place with room for expansion elsewhere, but no specific location has been selected and there are currently no plans, timetable or budget. Zootah needs to become self-sustaining before it can take such a drastic step. Instead, Cooper is focused on changes he can make at the current location to increase revenue. “I’d love a bear,” he says. “A bear would be a draw. A jaguar, a wolverine. Some other types of kudu or an eland.”

Part of the zoo’s struggles, Cooper says, is that it’s only open during the late spring and summer. Building better infrastructure could bring in more visitors. Those are long-term goals, though. This year, he’s more worried about the now. Last winter, veterinary bills and other zoo expenses stretched an already tight budget to the breaking point. “This is a pivotal year for us,” Cooper says. “We’ve got to find a way to cover what we have and carry us through the wintertime.” On a whiteboard inside his office, Cooper keeps a list of ideas to bring in donations, including the names of people who might be willing to help. Without additional cash flow this year, the zoo will struggle to make it till next spring. Even if those donations come through, the zoo needs to become self-sustaining to continue operating into the future, Cooper admits. Recent improvements during his tenure have all been focused on the same goal—helping visitors create enduring memories. “If they can have an experience, then they’ll tell people,” Cooper says. “We want people to have experiences.” The initiative, he is swift to point out, is designed to enrich the zoo, not the people behind it. “We’re not doing this to pad our own pockets,” he says. “We’re not doing this so the staff can all live in really fancy houses or that I can drive a really fancy zoo car. That’s not what we’re doing this for.”

RIGHTING WRONGS

Inside the Wildlife Learning Center, in the southwest corner of the zoo, there’s a piece of paper next to a desk. Across the top it reads, “Mission Statement.” The text is simple: “At Willow Park Zoo, we strive to affect positive change in people’s lives, one animal at a time.” While the new name hasn’t yet made its way into the letterhead, the sentiment can be felt throughout Zootah. Education Director Barbara Tew is talking to a class of second-graders in the learning center. They stare at her, enthralled, as she tells them the story of a bird who,


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Back inside the gift shop, Cooper is bragging about some of the other animals under his care. At the moment, he’s talking to a family about Zootah’s blue-throated macaw, known simply as Blue. “I love that macaw—he is so cool,” Cooper says. His voice changes speeds as he talks, slowing down for the

able home for Indiana. Because of the eagle’s vision, he struggled to see the mesh netting around his enclosure and would frequently cut himself by running into it. The staff has hung colorful streamers on the outside of the exhibit to help the eagle better gauge the distance. The streamers don’t visually fit the rest of the exhibit and noticeably stand out, but they seem to be working as it’s been awhile since he hurt himself in the netting. The keepers have taken other steps to help Indiana feel more at home. After Roach finishes his duties, he’ll often clock out and spend an hour reading a book in the eagle’s enclosure to help him adjust to having humans around. There are other animals living in the zoo because they wouldn’t survive life on the outside. Appa, the yak, is blind. Kiss, the Senegal parrot, was also a pet. And all but one of the birds of prey arrived at Zootah after an injury. One of them, Houdini the screech owl, is a staff favorite. At 16 years old, she has more than tripled the average age of a screech owl in the wild. She spends most of her time in a box in her enclosure, sometimes poking her head out of a hole to gawk at passersby. During one of Roach’s morning shifts, he stops by Houdini’s exhibit to feed her. He peeks in the hole to make sure she’s OK, then coos at her and says hello. With a laugh, he scratches her neck. The dance then starts. She ducks her head, hunches her shoulders and closes her eyes, then slowly rolls her head back and opens her beak, almost like a smile. When he stops, she whips her head around and stares at him, as if asking for more. Nearby, one of the visiting families is approaching the birds of prey. Suddenly, one of the boys sees Indiana’s enclosure. He has already started to run as he yells over his shoulder, “The best animal’s over here—an eagle!” He and his siblings stare in amazement as the bird watches them. In spite of the injuries and the cage, the bald eagle still somehow looks dignified and majestic. The family stands by the exhibit, talking about the eagle for a minute or two, before moving on. They don’t mention the colored streamers.

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BEAK GEEKS

things he wants to emphasize. “He’s really friendly and he loves to be loved.” Cooper draws the family in with general conversation about the bird, then shifts focus, telling them about a breeding program he wants to get Blue into. “You know how estimates go,” Cooper says, “but they estimate there’s only 300-500 of those birds left in the wild.” “That’s it?” the father asks, surprised. Cooper nods. These are the conversations he hopes for because they allow the zoo’s mission to ring true. “Yup. He’s an endangered species,” Cooper adds. “I want to be on a program where they reintroduce them back into their native habitat.” Even in casual conversation, Cooper is looking for an opportunity to educate. Still, the animals aren’t merely a tool to spread the message; they’re important to the Zootah staff. Many of the animals under the zoo’s care ended up there because they couldn’t survive in the wild. Bix, the Canada lynx, was taken in by a family as a kitten and essentially raised as a housecat. It got to the point where the family could no longer care for him, but releasing him into the wild would have been a death sentence. He has lived at Willow Park ever since. Like Bix, the birds of prey look like specimens that should be allowed to freely live in the wild. Indiana, the majestic bald eagle, spends his days sitting on a perch in his enclosure. It’s a particularly cruel twist of fate that this American symbol of freedom is destined to spend its life in a cage. But Indiana was injured in the wild and part of his wing was amputated. A flightless eagle would not survive very long on its own. Now he resides at Zootah, having traded the gift of flight for that of life. Some would argue that’s not a fair trade. Cheyne Warren, one of the volunteer zookeepers, says she understands people who question the morality of zoos. “There are good zoos, there are bad zoos and there are zoos in between,” she says. “It depends on the quality of the zoo, and how well the zoo cares for the animals.” For their part, staff has sought to provide a comfort-

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through evolution over millions of years, came to be the ostriches that we know today. She then shows the children different animals—a tortoise, a parrot, a salamander—and talks about their own adaptations. Her presentation is arresting. She crouches down to draw the kids in, gesturing with her hands as she moves from point to point. The children are fascinated by the animals as Tew walks down the aisles with them. The tortoise elicits particular excitement from the kids. Soon, the classes rotate and another group comes in to hear Tew’s words. She gives the same presentation, with the same excitement from herself and the same interest from the children. The process will repeat itself one more time before the morning is over. As part of her role, Tew has made an effort to bring school groups in. And given Zootah’s regional focus, she’s tried to invite schools from outside the valley, with some success. For Tew, the excursions are more than just field trips to see animals. “As environmental educators, we’ve been doing it wrong,” she says. “It’s about changing lives. We’re different than other zoos because other zoos are all about the animals, all about conservation. We’re about human beings.” Tew believes that personal interactions with animals is what will inspire children to care about climate and environmental issues as they grow older. Her concern is that much of the education today is built around “scare tactics and with crap science,” rather than giving people a personal reason to care. “Like those kids today,” she says, “you see those kids light up and you go, ‘This is all worth it, this is what we want to see.’”

TROY COOPER, ZOO DIRECTOR


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MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS

There was an experience they had last year, Cooper and Tew say, that they can’t explain. A guest came to the zoo who was deaf and blind and had developmental disabilities. Cooper was holding Madge, the cockatoo, and showing her to some other visitors. When the bird saw this man, Cooper and Tew agree, it was like her entire demeanor changed. The man was 10-15 feet away when the bird began to bob her head and dance. He was blind and deaf and had no way of knowing she was there, but he began to smile. “And the closer I got,” Cooper recalls, “the more frantic her dance and the wider he grinned and he was just giggling. He couldn’t see her. He couldn’t hear her.” Neither Cooper nor Tew can offer an explanation, other than to say it’s evidence of the special connection between humans and animals. That connection, they believe, is crucial. “Look at the world,” Cooper says. “We just need to be a little nicer, a little more patient, a little bit more giving than we have been. And animals have a way of doing that for a lot of people.” Zootah can have a larger social impact as well, Cooper says. People don’t spend as much time interacting with each other as they used to, but maybe the zoo can help build a sense of community. Children and their parents creating lasting memories, friends sharing a laugh—it can all further that feeling of togetherness. “My hope is that Zootah can be a type of community for people,” he says. That takes effort and time to build, however. Cooper and Tew are the only full-time employees, and each spend far more time at the zoo than their salary would suggest. Even if she were to work standard full-time hours, Tew says, she would earn less than $15 per hour. Still, she says she’s not at Zootah for the money. Tew sits down on a bench to rest for a moment as she talks. There was no sign of fatigue as she presented to the children earlier in the morning, but now her energetic nature and the 60-hour work weeks are catching up to her. “My grandma was an artist, and when she was asked why she painted so much, she said, ‘It’s an illness. I can’t help it,’” Tew says. She pauses for a moment, then continues. “I hate this job, but I love this job.” Suddenly, Tew’s face lights up as she starts to tell another story. She had been attending to some of the animals on the zoo grounds one day when she noticed a woman crying next to an exhibit. “I started thinking, ‘What did we do? We must have done something bad,’” she recalls. Tew approached the woman and realized she was staring at the grey crowned cranes. When the guest regained composure, Tew asked if everything was all right. The visitor was from Uganda, in East Africa, she said, and this was her country’s national bird. “It just makes me so thankful for my home country,” the woman said. About as far away from Africa as she could possibly be, for just a moment, the visitor felt at home. “We made a change in her life that day,” Tew says. She looks out over the zoo with a contemplative look. The sun is shining and the temperature has risen enough for the monkeys to come outside. A peacock walks by as another one cries out in the distance. A goose honks in response. Nearby, the hyraxes are wrestling and chasing each other around their exhibit. Tew smiles, enjoying the respite. After a few seconds, she stands up, ready to head back inside. She has more work to do. CW


Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

CJ STRONG

3H PRODUCTIONS

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JULY 13-19, 2017

Neil Simon Festival By its very nature, comedy is never taken seriously enough; we tend to associate true artistry with the darkest emotions. Indeed, were it not for misplaced intellectual attitude, neglect or simply snobbery, playwright Neil Simon would likely be considered the artistic equal of Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee or even Shakespeare himself, thanks to an ability to dissect interpersonal relationships and expose their inherent foibles. “The uniquely American artistry of Neil Simon—his ability to create characters and situations on the stage that we can all relate to—makes his canon of plays worth honoring and preserving,” Richard Bugg, founder and executive producer of Utah’s Neil Simon Festival, suggests. It’s in that spirit that the festival launches its 15th anniversary season with four productions that represent the essential wit, humor and humanity embodied in Simon’s work. Two are signature plays by the festival’s namesake himself—Broadway Bound, the final installment of Simon’s autobiographical trilogy detailing his breakthrough into show biz (Simon Festival actor Peter Sham, from 2016’s production of Brighton Beach Memoirs is pictured) and The Dinner Party, a dramedy about three divorced couples unwittingly lured to a special gathering by a host who never shows. The other two offerings—the everpopular British backstage farce Noises Off and a world premiere entitled Under Construction: The Blue Collar Musical—fill out the season. A free Sunday night variety show, Fireside in Zarehemla, and a staged reading of the festival’s seventh annual New Play Contest winner, William Blake in Hollywood, round out the summer of laughs. (Lee Zimmerman) Neil Simon Festival @ Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 866357-4666, July 16-Aug. 12, $80 for all four shows, simonfest.org

JULY 13, 2017 | 19

The subject matter of David Harrower’s 2005 play Blackbird is the stuff for which the word “triggered” was invented: a confrontation between a 27-year-old woman named Una and a 55-year-old man named Ray about the brief sexual relationship they had 15 years earlier, when she was only 12. It’s understandable, then, if actor Mark Fossen (pictured above) is somewhat conflicted about taking on the role of Ray. “I’m deeply in love with it,” Fossen tells City Weekly about the script, “and it’s a challenge I want to do. I have kind of a history of playing disgusting human beings. I also find [Ray] completely repellent, and the closer we got to rehearsals, the more it built up. That tension is still there.” Harrower’s two-character structure—with Anne Louise Brings playing Una in Utah Repertory Theater’s production—makes it clear that Ray has spent time in prison for his crimes, and is attempting to build a new life. That doesn’t necessarily make it easy for Fossen to humanize him. “Ray’s got a lot of charm to him,” Fossen says, “but I feel a personal responsibility not to excuse him. One of the early things I sort of latched on to was, in general, he tells the truth, or at least what he thinks is the truth. He’s actually a bad guy, but he is a person, not a twodimensional cartoon.” The text explores power dynamics of age and gender as Una attempts to deal with unresolved feelings about what happened to her as a child, evoking comparisons to David Mamet’s Oleanna. For Fossen, that comparison only goes so far. “I think Oleanna touts itself as morally complicated,” he says, “but actually, it’s not. This play actually is in that moral grey area. This is the play Oleanna purports itself to be.” (SR) Utah Repertory Theater: Blackbird @ Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, July 14-30, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; July 30, 3 p.m. matinee, $17-$20, utahrep.org

SUNDAY 7/16

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Ask any young child: Animation can be as addictive as sugary breakfast cereal. Since at least the pop art movement of the 1960s, visual artists have incorporated images and themes from the genre into their work, often as commentary on popular culture. Under the Influence at Rio Gallery collects works from local artists whose creations bear a distinct impression from the art of animation. Jason Jones, who curated the new exhibit, says, “Animation offers an opportunity for spontaneity. This show celebrates an art form often seen as fringe or outsider.” Ultimately, animation is about the ways we perceive the world, especially the ways objects in motion appear to us, how we experience emotional states or simply physical existence—what it feels like to inhabit a body. It often distorts objects, rendering them elastic, seemingly frozen or in explosive motion. The resulting images can portray exaggerated emotions and anthropomorphized non-humans, all in a bright color palette. Presented works range from Robin Banks’ papier-mâché pieces on the theme of depression to Trent Call’s animated video loop to “ultra-zany professional mythmaker” Mike Murdock’s folk art-influenced paintings on wood. Other featured artists include Sri Whipple (whose untitled piece is pictured) and curator Jones himself. Jones didn’t just ask artists to provide the pieces; he interviewed each one about this influence, and compiled responses in the format of a graphic novel, on boards hung up for display, in addition to bound copies for sale. The result is a show with eye-popping energy. (Brian Staker) Under the Influence: Eight Local Artists Influenced by Animation @ Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., July 14-Sept. 1; artist reception, July 21, 6-9 p.m., free, visualarts.utah.gov

The official Pride Month might be over, but for the Utah Film Center’s annual Damn These Heels Film Festival, it makes sense to program this showcase of queer-themed films in July. “There’s a lot going on in June for the local LGBTQ community,” says Patrick Hubley, Utah Film Center’s director of programming. “An LGBTQ festival can be any time.” Over three days, Damn These Heels showcases 23 features and nine short films, representing a dozen countries. Among the fascinating documentaries is Small Talk, with Taiwanese filmmaker Hui-Chen Huang trying to get her lesbian mother (pictured) to open up about her life experience (July 16, 12:30 p.m.). Dramatic features include God’s Own Country, a 2017 Sundance Film Festival entry, with lead actor Alec Secareanu in attendance for a Q&A (July 15, 7:30 p.m.). Programming the festival has evolved over its 14-year history, according to Hubley, by circumstance and design. Where the program once skewed heavily toward narrative features, programmers have made a more concerted effort to include documentaries. The quality of available films has also increased, Hubley says: “Every [festival] programmer will tell you decisions are hard, but I think I easily could have picked another 10.” Most significant, though, is striving to represent the broad spectrum of LGBTQ experience—a goal made easier through the recent increase in number and quality of films with transgender themes, for example. “It’s really important that we try to represent the community as a whole,” Hubley says. “We want to be sure that the festival speaks for everybody.” (Scott Renshaw) Damn These Heels LGBTQ Film Festival @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, July 14-16, times vary, $10 individual screenings; passes $60-$200, utahfilmcenter.org

Utah Repertory Theater: Blackbird

SATURDAY 7/15

Damn These Heels LGBTQ Film Festival

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FRIDAY 7/14

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FRIDAY 7/14

Under the Influence: Eight Local Artists Influenced by Animation

KARL HUGH

ESSENTIALS

the


7.8 ALT PRESS FEST

Driving Force Journalist Becky Aikman explores the rough road to creating the classic Thelma & Louise. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

O

7.9 URBAN FLEA MARKET

UPCOMING EVENTS LIBERTY PARK MARKET

JULY 14, 2017

AT LIBERTY PARK

WASATCH MOUNTAIN MUSIC FEST

JULY 15, 2017

AT SOLDIER HOLLOW

n May 24, 1991, Becky Aikman was in the audience for the opening night of Thelma & Louise, an under-theradar comedy-drama about two women on an outlaw road trip, which was opening opposite macho big-budget action movies like Hudson Hawk and Backdraft. “There hadn’t been much marketing or publicity about it,” Aikman recalls, “so I didn’t know what to expect. And it completely blew my mind, because there was nothing else like it at the time. I didn’t fully appreciate until later how improbable it was.” Aikman—a veteran journalist for outlets including Newsday, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times—certainly appreciates it now, after spending more than two years researching the story behind the making of Thelma & Louise. Her new book Off the Cliff dives into how deeply the deck in late 1980s/ early 1990s Hollywood was stacked against a movie written by a first-time female screenwriter, with two women in the lead roles and which built toward a climax set in the Southern Utah desert that every studio executive would consider too depressing. After making initial contact with co-star Geena Davis, screenwriter Callie Khouri and producer Mimi Polk, Aikman was able to get 25-years-on reflections from key participants in the movie’s creation, including Davis’ co-star Susan Sarandon and director Ridley Scott. The book’s concept, though, was born not from Aikman’s fascination with this specific movie, but from the broader issue of how women are treated in the movie industry. “I started out thinking I wanted to write about the problem that there aren’t enough women’s voices being heard in Hollywood,” Aikman says. “I shortly came to the conclusion that if I droned on about this frustrating topic for 300 pages, I would lose my mind. So I thought, what if I followed a process of one great women’s film being made—and made right—to see what I could learn.” Once that perspective came into focus, Thelma & Louise felt like the obvious choice. “It was a huge cultural force when it came out,” she recalls. “It was a time when women were feeling frustrated, and it’s still fresh today. It was clear it must have been hard, because this kind of movie rarely gets through the system. One with a single female lead is rare enough. But two?” Despite getting one-on-one interviews with virtually everyone involved in the

ELENA SEIBERT

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BOOKS

film—with the notable exception of thenunknown Brad Pitt, a frustration Aikman acknowledges with an audible groan—the author opted to turn Off the Cliff into a full narrative, rather than the kind of “oral history” that has become popular for such retrospectives. “I wanted to knit the stories together,” she says, “get a lot more in by consolidating what people told me. There were cliffhangers and moments of drama, and ultimately moments of triumph. I thought it would be better written in a more novelistic way.” The details that Aikman uncovered are fascinating—many of them involving the casting decisions that almost came to pass. The role of bad-boy hitchhiker J.D. that eventually became a star-making moment for Pitt was originally given to Billy Baldwin, who dropped out at the last minute; one of the four finalists along with Pitt to replace Baldwin was a young George Clooney. Thelma and Louise themselves were almost played by Michelle Pfeiffer and Jodie Foster; when they dropped out, Meryl Streep and Goldie Hawn lobbied together for the plum roles. But the most compelling background of Off the Cliff—the one that had seemingly every actress in Hollywood pleading for a shot at Thelma & Louise—is the uphill climb faced by a movie built by and around women. “We’ve all read articles, and seen statistics, of how few movies are written by, or directed by, or star women,” Aikman says. “I interviewed so many people from that era, and I was truly shocked. They were blatantly sexually harassed, and treated with a lack of respect that must have made a lot of talented people think, ‘I don’t need this.’ A

Author Becky Aikman

lot of them were willing to talk about it now, but at the time, they were so desperate for work, they just put their heads down.” Despite the financial and pop-culture success of Thelma & Louise—which became a controversial topic of magazine thinkpieces and won an Oscar for screenwriter Khouri—the epilogue for Off the Cliff seems to be how little has changed in Hollywood over the ensuing quarter-century. During a summer that’s seen director Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman become a breakout hit, Aikman hopes she’s not being too naïve in hoping change is still possible. “You’ve gotta hope this is the moment when something happens, with so much attention,” she says. “Tired franchises dominate Hollywood so much, people want something fresh. You need to let outliers like Callie Khouri have their say, and try to put that on the screen. “That was a lesson of Thelma & Louise: Every studio but one said no to it. Nobody thought there was an audience for it. You have to let the people from a different background and perspective speak up, and take them seriously.” CW

BECKY AIKMAN: OFF THE CLIFF: HOW THE MAKING OF THELMA & LOUISE DROVE HOLLYWOOD TO THE EDGE

Screening of Thelma & Louise, followed by author talk and book-signing Salt Lake City Library, Tessman Auditorium 210 E. 400 South Tuesday, July 18, 7 p.m. kingsenglish.com


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2017 MA JOR EVENT SCHEDULE:

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RMRRACING.COM • 6555 W 2100 S • 801-252-9557

JULY 13, 2017 | 21

Next Midnight Drag: Saturday, July 28

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JUNE 23RD WINNER: DIXON RASMUSSEN

Rasmussen’s Mustang was awarded the City Weekly Car of the Week at Rocky Mountain Raceways’ June 23 Midnight Drags. In a sea of greatlooking cars, Rasmussen’s white ‘Stang stood out. Although Rasmussen and his father, Keith, are making some changes to the car — for example, its matte finish will soon return to pearly white — it was plain to see its classic beauty. The 27-year-old now owns WHP Coatings in Salt Lake City. Dixon’s love of cars showed up early in his life and remains very strong. “Anything with a motor,” he explained. That love of fast machines led Dixon, who was just a freshman at the time, to an East High shop class. And it was there that a rough-looking Mustang came into his life. They’ve been taking care of each other ever since.


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Artist Luke Watson explores the complex dynamic of how physical places in the universe might appear outside of human perception (“Color City” is pictured) in Anthropocene at Chapman Branch Library (577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, slcpl.org) through Aug. 24.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

The 3 Amigos Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug 19, times vary, desertstar.biz As You Like It Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 7, times vary, bard.org Blackbird Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, July 14-30, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; 3 p.m. matinee Sunday, July 30, utahrep.org (see p. 19) Broadway Bound Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435267-0194, July 18-Aug. 12, dates and times vary, simonfest.org (see p. 19) Cabaret Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, through July 23, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., egyptiantheatrecompany.org The Dinner Party Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435267-0194, July 16-Aug. 11, dates and times vary, simonfest.org (see p. 19) Guys and Dolls Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 1, times vary, bard.org How Long Can You Stand on the Train Tracks: A Game for Two Sisters Babcock Theatre, 240 S. 1500 East, through July 16, sackerson.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Aug. 12, times vary, hct.org Madama Butterfly Ellen Eccles Theater, 43 S. Main, Logan, 800-262-0074, through Aug. 8, artsaltlake.org A Midsummer Night’s Dream Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 453-5867878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org A Night at the Imperial Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through July 29, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Noises Off Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 West, Cedar City, 435-2670194, July 19-Aug. 9, dates and times vary, simonfest.org (see p. 19)

Romeo and Juliet Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435586-7878, through Sept. 9, times vary, bard.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 27, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Seussical The Musical Eccles Theatre, 131 S. Main, 385-468-1010, through Aug. 7, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org Shakespeare in Love Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435586-7878, through Sept. 8, times vary, bard.org Treasure Island Randall L. Jones Theatre 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 2, times vary, bard.org Under Construction: The Blue Collar Musical Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-267-0194, July 20-Aug. 12, dates and times vary, simonfest.org (see p. 19)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Pioneer Day Concert LDS Conference Center, 60 W. North Temple, July 14-15, 8 p.m., sold out, lds.org/church/events/2017

COMEDY & IMPROV

Craig Bielick Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, July 14-15, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Joe Rogan Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, July 14-15, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com John DiCrosta DeJoria Center, 970 N. State Road 32, Kamas, 435-783-3113, July 15, 7 p.m., dejoriacenter.com Steve Soelberg Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, July 13, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Dr. John D. Day & Jane Ann Day: The Longevity Plan The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 13, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com


moreESSENTIALS Kirk McKnight Barnes and Noble, 7517 Plaza Center Drive, West Jordan, 801-282-1324, July 14, 4 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Abby Fabiaschi: I Liked My Life The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, July 15, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Lanna Cairns: A Mindful Life: A Spiritual Guide to Making Peace with Your Mind, Time and Space The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 14, 7-9 p.m., kingsenglish.com Becky Aikman: Off the Cliff: How the Making of Thelma & Louise Drove Hollywood to the Edge SLC Public Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, July 18, 7 p.m., slcpl.org (see p. 20) Terryl Givens: Books and Bridges Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, July 18, 7-8:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Sarah M. Eden: Romancing Daphne The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, July 18, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Romina Russell: Black Moon; Aditi Knorana: The Library of Fates; Danielle Vega: The Merciless III: Origins of Evil; Morgan Rhodes: A Book of Spirits & Thieves The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 19, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

FARMERS MARKETS

RACING

Bam! Fest 2017 Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, 385-352-3991, July 16, 9 a.m.-11 p.m., rmrracing.com NHRDA Diesel Points Event Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, 385-352-3991, July 14, 4:30 p.m., rmrracing.com Oval Racing Rocky Mountain Raceways,

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

All-State Utah High School Art Show Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through July 29, slcpl.org Corinne Humphrey: Tao of Rudy—Essential Dog-ma for Everyday Joy SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Aug. 7, slcpl.org Face of Utah Sculpture XIII Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801965-5100, July 13-Aug. 30; opening reception July 13, 6-8 p.m., culturalcelebration.org INK Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801230-0820, through July 30, urbanartsgallery.org Joseph Cipro: Cosmic Musings Gallery 814, 814 E. 100 South, 801-533-0204, through July 31 Linnie Brown: Maps of Insufficient Clarity Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-5965000, through Aug. 4, saltlakearts.org Luke Watson: Anthropocene Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Aug. 24, slcpl.org (see p. 22) Masterworks of Western American Art David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through Aug. 31, daviddeefinearts.com Michael Ryan Handley: Sublimation UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 9, utahmoca.org Pamela Murphy & Sarah Winkler: Past | Present Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, 435-649-3001, through July 31, gallerymar.com Richard Serra: Prints Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., 435-649-8882, through Aug. 20, kimballartcenter.org Scott Filipiak Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Aug. 4, saltlakearts.org Scott Horsley: I Learned it from Watching You UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 15, utahmoca.org Under the Influence: Eight Local Artists Influenced by Animation Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, July 14-Sept. 1, heritage.utah.gov (see p. 19) Willow Skye-Biggs: Tastes Like Mandy UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Aug. 12, utahmoca.org Wren Ross: Sticks Laid in Patterns and Other Mundane Oracles Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, July 14-Sept. 8, heritage.utah.gov

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9th West Farmers Market International Peace Garden, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

6555 W. 2100 South, 385-352-3991, July 15, 4 p.m., rmrracing.com

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Damn These Heels LGBTQ Film Festival Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, July 14-16, times vary, $10 individual screenings, passes $60-$200, utahfilmcenter.org (see p. 19)

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DINE

The Bold and the Bountiful Royal India dishes up unflinching Indian fare. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @Critic1

W

hen thinking of destination dining, Bountiful might not come most immediately to mind. The city is rife with franchise- and chain eateries which probably outnumber independents 20-to1. That said, it’s notable that three of my favorite Utah restaurants are there. First, there is the venerable Mandarin, where the Skedros family and their staff of chefs has been dishing up bona fide Chinese fare since 1978. Then there is Ti Amo, another delectable family-run operation. Mauro and Gloria Bonfanti, along with their children, pump out some of the best Neapolitan-style, wood-fired pizza you’ll ever taste, along with plenty of smiles and warmth. Rounding out the list is Royal India. A younger sibling to the original in Sandy, the Bountiful iteration offers the same bright and bold Indian flavors, albeit in a smaller space with not quite as much ambience. The good news is, because this excellent establishment hasn’t hit everyone’s radar yet, there’s rarely a table wait. The backbone of both restaurants is owner/chef Emmanuel Shanthakumar, who occasionally returns to India to sharpen his knowledge of the country’s diverse cuisines—bringing back new expertise reflected in his dishes. Shanthakumar is also one of the most affable, kind and generous chefs I’ve met, seemingly never without a broad, infectious smile. I’d smile a lot, too, if I were able to indulge in Royal India fare as much as he does. There are very few eateries—Indian or otherwise—with flavors as fresh, as curries and other sauces are all made from scratch. The menu here is a smidge smaller than Sandy’s—where you’d need to go to enjoy a

Royal India’s lamb rojan josh handful of specialty items such as ground lamb-stuffed keema samosa, and some southern Indian dishes like masala dosa and a fried lentil crepe called ghee dosa. Otherwise, the two menus are pretty much identical. At the Bountiful location, I always begin my meal with an order of papadum ($2.95)—a generous serving of four crispy lentil wafers, seasoned with tart spices such as cumin and coriander. You also can’t go wrong with the mixed appetizers plate ($7.95), which includes vegetable samosa (fried, fluffy pastry dough stuffed with spiced potatoes and peas) and pakora (battered and deep-fried chicken tenders and veggies, served with chutney and dipping sauce). My go-to curry dish has always been the exquisite chicken vindaloo ($12.95). It’s a tangy mélange of boneless chicken morsels, potatoes, onions and tomatoes in a tart vinegar-based curry sauce. Though lately I’ve been more drawn to the lamb rojan josh ($15.95) a specialty here. For it, boneless chunks of tender, lean lamb are bathed in a silky, spicy sauce made with tomatoes and cream, accented with bay leaves, cumin, ginger and other sensational spices. I always order a side of multi-layered paratha ($2.95)—whole wheat bread baked in a clay tandoor oven—to help with soaking up all of that sauce. For a milder experience, but just as layered, complex and rich, I recommend my wife’s favorite dish: shrimp saag ($15.95). Common in th state of Punjab, saag is a creamy, greens-based dish (spinach, in this case) cooked with onions, spices and tomatoes. All the menu items are generously portioned and shareable, tending to leave plenty of leftovers for a next-day lunch or snack. As an added bonus, this location also offers online ordering. So, if you’re looking for authentic Indian flavors, head down Bountiful way. CW

ROYAL INDIA

55 N. Main, Bountiful 801-292-1835 royalindiautah.com


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Kaito Benjamin

Beltran

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

JULY 13, 2017 | 27

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

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28 | JULY 13, 2017

FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

How the Whiskey Was Won

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Park City’s High West Distillery is noteworthy enough for being the first legal distillery to open in Utah since the 1870s. To coincide with their first decade in business, co-founder Jane Perkins releases a new book—The Golden Elixir of the West— co-written with Sherry Monahan, about the role of whiskey on the American frontier. Perkins reads from and discusses the book at an Art Talk event at St. Regis’ Deer Crest Club (2300 Deer Valley Drive, Park City, 435-940-5810) in conjunction with Kimball Art Center, on Wednesday, July 19, from 6-7:30 p.m. Visit kimballartcenter.org to RSVP for a fascinating history lesson.

Tacos for a Cause

Many of Utah’s most talented taco purveyors are gathering for one day, all to support a worthy cause. Tacofest 2017, scheduled for Aug. 5, from 10 a.m.-10 p.m. at the Mexican Civic Center (155 S. 600 West) serves as a benefit for Meals on Wheels, according to festival founder/ organizer Marcelo Bayon. “I heard that Meals on Wheels funding might be impacted,” Bayon says via email, “and growing up, I recall my friends mentioning how much Meals on Wheels helped their families. So I decided to bring people together with tacos to raise money.” The $5 admission cost goes toward the program, and includes entertainment like live music, comedy and children’s activities. Food from 15-20 taco trucks and other local vendors—participants were not set at press time, according to Bayon—are a separate cost, but guests can also be part of the inaugural Best Taco Awards. Visit bit.ly/slctacofest for more information.

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Pie Perfection

Just in time for “Pie and Beer Day,” you can learn how to make one of those flaky, fruity desserts that might seem intimidating if you’re inexperienced. Alta Community Enrichment offers a two-hour pie-making class July 18, 5:30 p.m. at Black Bear Chalet (9920 E. Peruvian Acre Road, Alta, 801-608-9370), and admission is free. See more details at altaarts.org.

Award Winning Donuts

Quote of the Week: “I don’t eat fast-food often, but I love tacos. I could write prophetically about how perfect the taco is.” —Ken Baumann Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

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Sierra Nevada’s 3 Weight does not equal deadweight. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

It created a large and sturdy two fingers of bright, white soapy head that took its sweet-ass time drifting down and creating foamy lace. The nose has a dank quality right off the bat, reminiscent of moist hash but with vibrant tropical fruit, citrus and piney notes just below. It could be a little stronger, but still is very nice. The taste starts pleasantly bitter, but with a subdued citrus hop smack. The malts that follow up are lightly sweet and crisp. There is a mellow Honey Comb cereal graininess as well. The finish is slightly herbal and citrusy. You should have no problem downing two or three of these with little adverse effects. The final verdict: 3 Weight delivers a satisfactory dose of citrusy and grapefruit hop character from the use of new and old hop varietals. Sierra Nevada has always had a solid track record among craft-beer drinkers, and the fact that they’ve asked for local feedback deserves some cred in my book. Though this beer is only on draft for now, it will be appearing at your favorite grocery and C-stores in 12-ounce bottles in the coming weeks. Till then, as always, cheers! CW

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f you’ve been a Utah beer lover for some time over the past 10 years, you’ve likely become very familiar with grocery- and convenience stores’ options for out-of-state beers. In the past, a non-local beer was basically a yellow, fizzy, mass-produced lager from Budweiser, Coors or Miller. Most craft brewers outside the Beehive would have never considered brewing a low-point beer designated for the territory with the lowest beer consumption in all 50 states. Oh, how things have changed. Though Utah is still dead last in per-capita beer drinking in the U.S., craft brewers from beyond our borders are discovering that there is a thriving beer culture here that

BEER NERD

MIKE RIEDEL

High Marks for LowPoints

can’t be ignored. Names like Lagunitas, Black Diamond, Laughing Dog and Deschutes have been experimenting with 4 percent ABV suds specifically designed for our state’s distinct market. To be honest, some brewers do it better than others. Many forget that our local brewers have had decades to perfect the art of low-point beers. You can’t just water it down and call it “good for Utah’s standards.” A smart brewery takes the time to get to know the market and ask for input. That is what Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. has done with its first 3.2 entry into our market. A few months back, Sierra Nevada, one of America’s oldest and largest craft brewers, wanted to try its hand at brewing a session IPA just for us, so it enlisted the help of a half-dozen local experts to help create a beer designed by Utahns for Utahns. Two of those council members were Beer Bar coowners Richard Noel and Duncan Burrell. Both have experience with local and domestic craft brews that are poured from their tap handles, and both have a keen eye to predict what will sell. It’s that kind of insight that makes the local perspective invaluable. The beer they assisted in creating is named 3 Weight Session IPA and went on tap at the Beer Bar at the beginning of July. It was poured for me into a bulbous 16-ounce Beer Bar chalice. The beer was very clear—mostly golden hues with some amber highlights. The carbonation was quite active.

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JULY 13, 2017 | 29


A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

TED SCHEFFLER

Gourmet

REVIEW BITES

Burgers

Summer Patio OPEN

100+ Beers

Grilled calamari small plate.

Café Trio

Award

Winning Wine Open 7 days a week.

206 S. West Temple ˜ 801.890.5155 ˜ fatjacksut.com

Mikel Trapp has opened his third Café Trio location—and with this latest addition, he has upped the ante, including hiring Logen Crew as executive chef. A complete makeover has left no trace of the Ruby Tuesday that used to occupy the space; a large, backlit bar is the centerpiece of the restaurant, and a wood-fired pizza oven greets customers next to the entrance. The simple Parmesan flatbread starter ($4) is outstanding, requiring no sauce or extras. Additional flatbread options include one with tapenade, cucumber and chickpea purée, and another with fresh rosemary, goat cheese, tomatoes, roasted peppers and caramelized onions. Since Trio has a dedicated bar area, you can pop in just for a drink and nibble on something small, like housemade burrata and mozzarella with roasted tomato, basil oil and grilled bread ($13). The bowl of three tomato-braised meatballs with ricotta and basil ($9) is hearty and heavenly; another outstanding small-plate offering is grilled calamari ($12) with white beans, shaved carrot and charred lemon-scallion pesto. I look forward to seeing some of the new menu items at Trio’s Salt Lake Valley locations soon. Reviewed June 8. 6585 N. Landmark Drive, Park City, 435-649-9654, parkcity.triodining.com

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Chef-inspired, Locally Sourced

30 | JULY 13, 2017

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2014

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Brewvies

When you combine beer and movies in one convenient downtown SLC location, you get Brewvies Cinema Pub. What’s not to love about kicking back with a flick, a frothy pint and some hearty bar grub? The theater offers showings of the latest blockbusters and independent films, plus a separate bar area lined with pool tables, video games and TVs. 677 S. 200 West, 801-322-3891, brewvies.com

Pie Hole

now serving breakfast

With ovens firing until 2 a.m. on weeknights, and 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, there’s little surprise that the downtown Pie Hole is busiest after midnight—what sounds better than a hot, cheesy pizza after a long night out? Order it by the slice or get a whole pie (there’s even a vegan option), and satisfy those late-night hunger pangs with quality cuisine. 344 S. State, 801-359-4653, pieholeutah.com

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JULY 21ST

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32 | JULY 13, 2017

CINEMA

Human Grace War for the Planet of the Apes finds blockbuster action in fighting our own impulse to violence. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

t’s not unusual for genre fiction to offer compelling allegories for our time. It’s considerably more rare for those allegories to be so thorny that you need to wrestle with them for a while. Three movies into this 21st-century incarnation, the Planet of the Apes saga has become one of popular culture’s most fascinating explorations of humanity at its worst—and, occasionally, its best. In 2014’s Dawn of the Planet of the Apes in particular, director Matt Reeves crafted a tale with echoes of the War on Terror slippery enough to make it hard to know whether we should be rooting for humans to win or lose. Now, with War for the Planet of the Apes, Reeves has attempted an even bolder gambit. This is a story told entirely from the point of view of the apes, with the few humans as the clear villains of the piece—and even then, there’s a lot about the behavior of the movie’s protagonist that challenges our notion of what makes a hero. That hero is Caesar (Andy Serkis), the chimp who still leads the ape troop in the Northern California forest, several years into the plague that wiped out most of the human race. An unexpected reappearance of armed humans alarms Caesar, and an act of mercy on his part unexpectedly leads to an attack that costs him dearly. When he learns the identity of the man responsible—a relentless warlord known only as The Colonel (Woody Harrelson)—Caesar makes the unfamiliarto-him choice of seeking revenge. Any discussion of these movies must begin with a bow in the direction of Andy Serkis, whose motion-capture performances as Caesar are doomed to be accompanied by an asterisk when discussing great movie acting. His body and eyes provide the frame for the CGI-generated chimpanzee that give him soul, and create a character on whom the burden of leadership always seems to weigh heavily. In some ways, Caesar is the very model of great leadership: cautious, thoughtful, slow to violence, always

20TH CENTURY FOX

FILM REVIEW

Caesar (Andy Serkis) in War for the Planet of the Apes. considering the impact of his decisions on the lives of his charges. Serkis plays Caesar as Daniel Day-Lewis’ Lincoln in simian form, and the result is just as magnificent. Such a comparison also makes it unnerving when Caesar becomes a force for retribution after suffering a personal loss. Where Dawn of the Planet of the Apes offered the ape Koba—a radical convinced that there is no co-existing with humans, to the point that he launches a false-flag operation to provoke war—as counterpoint to Caesar, the realization now is that Caesar has some Koba within himself. The motivating power of fear and anger are always clear in these movies, but there’s no comfort in the possibility that a saintly, benevolent ruler can save us from our darkest impulses. Every one of us has to fight that urge. There’s an external threat, too, and Harrelson does a fine job portraying the kind of separatist militia leader whose racist rhetoric always makes at least a small amount of discomfiting sense. War for the Planet of the Apes presents a mutation of the “Simian Flu” virus that has begun robbing humans of their speech, and The Colonel views it as an existential threat; “This is a holy war,” he intones at one point, convinced that speech is a defining part of what makes us human. The fact that Caesar can also speak makes it easy to recognize how personal pain has led to The Colonel abandoning a fuller sense of the soul that defines humanity. All of that is heady stuff, which is never to suggest that these movies are tedious philosophical exercises. Much of the second half becomes a prison-escape movie, full of tension and close calls. It’s also hard to ignore the grim tone that Reeves brings to these stories, which makes it particularly crucial to have a comic-relief character in the form of Bad Ape (Steve Zahn), a chimp who has been living in isolation in an abandoned ski lodge. War for the Planet of the Apes might not be the kind of light-hearted fun we often expect from summer movies, but it’s adventure with a richer payoff than beating the bad guy: It’s about finding the strength to recognize the bad guy in ourselves. CW

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

BBB.5 Andy Serkis Woody Harrelson Steve Zahn PG-13


NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE B-SIDE: ELSA DORFMAN’S PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY BBB At first glance, the open, jovial Elsa Dorfman hardly seems like the kind of slippery subject—Donald Rumsfeld, Robert McNamara, Fred Leuchter—that documentary director Errol Morris has over the years pinned under the gaze of his “Interrotron” camera. Dorfman herself is a photographer, and The B-Side might have been intriguing simply for the images she has captured over the years of people like Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan and her longtime friend Allen Ginsburg. Yet the focal point becomes Dorfman’s chosen artistic instrument—the Polaroid camera—and how its obsolescence tracks with her nearing the end of her career, and the intimations of mortality she confronts in the death of friends and family, or watching herself get older in her self-portraits. “I’m totally not interested in capturing their souls,” Dorfman says of her portrait subjects, “only how they seem.” That honestly superficial approach to her art frames everything Morris shows us about Dorfman. Like this documentary, sometimes a work of art succeeds not by digging deeply, but simply by capturing an elusive moment in time. Opens July 14 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

WISH UPON [not yet reviewed] A teenager discovers a box with the dangerous magical ability to grant wishes. Opens July 14 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA At Tower Theatre, July 14-15, 11 p.m.; July 16, noon (PG-13) DAMN THESE HEELS LGBTQ FILM FESTIVAL See p. 19. At Rose Wagner Center, July 14-16 (NR) REVOLUTION: NEW ART FOR A NEW WORLD At Utah Museum of Fine Art, July 19, 7 p.m. (NR) THELMA & LOUISE See p. 20. At Main Library Auditorium, July 18, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING BBB.5 If we must have another Spider-Man movie, we should be glad we got this one—a reminder that this character (Tom Holland) has the typical problems of a 15-year-old kid in addition to those he encounters fighting super-villains. The context of Peter Parker as high-school nerd permeates Homecoming, as director Jon Watts aims for a vibe with more than a few nods to 1980s John Hughes comedies. This is also a comic-book movie, of course, and Watts understands how to make this story work in that kinetic idiom. This is the chatty Spider-Man of the comics—anchored by Holland’s engaging performance—but the adolescent tug-of-war between carefree childhood and the moral choices of an adult are everywhere. It’s good to have a Spider-Man whose exploits are complicated by a friend who reminds him, “But we have a Spanish quiz.” (PG-13)—SR

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WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES BBB.5 See review on p. 32. Opens July 14 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

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THE LITTLE HOURS BB Whatever Jeff Baena is trying to do as a filmmaker, I don’t get it. Following up his similarly inscrutable-to-me comedies like Life After Beth and Joshy, Baena loosely adapts a story from Bocaccio’s Decameron for the tale of a medieval Italian convent, and a trio of nuns (Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza and Kate Micucci) thrown into a tizzy by the arrival of a young servant (Dave Franco) seeking safe haven after cuckolding his master. An impressive supporting cast of comedic talent—Fred Armisen, Nick Offerman, Molly Shannon, John C. Reilly—brings multiple levels of goofiness to the proceedings, and Micucci’s manic performance is a standout. There’s just a level on which Baena seems convinced that it is self-evidently hilarious for nuns to say “fuck,” or to have lascivious thoughts—and that’s saying nothing of how weirdly dark this thing can turn in the blink of an eye. Whatever spirited satire of Catholic Church mores Bocaccio might have been offering, it’s lost here in material that seems far more concerned with being naughty than with making any sense. Opens July 14 at Tower Theatre. (R)—SR

THE WOMEN’S BALCONY BBB.5 This Israeli box-office hit opens with one of the most delightful depictions of a joyful life I’ve ever seen on screen: Neighbors wending their way through narrow Jerusalem streets, carrying homemade food to a potluck celebration, all laughing and happy in their party clothes. They are on their way to a bar mitzvah—a gathering primarily defined, it seems, by eating and ritual, and by the gentle humor of people ribbing their friends and family. The dramedy that springs from that point is all about what happens when a newcomer sows discord. Their charismatic new rabbi is much more conservative than even these Orthodox Jews, and his plans for their synagogue, both the building and the congregation, cause a rift between the men and the women; the ladies do not appreciate the tiny box the rabbi would like to constrain them to, staging an angry but affable revolt. This first feature from TV director Emil Ben-Shimon and screenwriter Shlomit Nehama is a beautifully sketched portrait of a community under strain, one you do not have to be Jewish or even religious to take great pleasure in. Opens July 14 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson

FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: JULY 14TH - JULY 20TH

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JULY 13, 2017 | 33

2

$

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more than just movies at brewvies


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BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Dragon On

4 | JULY 13, 2017

TV

Game of Thrones penultimately returns; Friends from College flunks out.

F

riends from College (series debut, Friday, July 14, Netflix), from Neighbors and Forgetting Sarah Marshall producer Nicholas Stoller, might have made a better movie than eight-episode streamer. Or not: Who needs another outlet on any platform for pretty, well-off 30-somethings (the College was Harvard, and the Friends live in, of course, New York) to marinate on the hardships of adulting? Despite a killer cast (including Keegan-Michael Key, Cobie Smulders, Annie Parisse, Nat Faxon, Fred Savage and Jae Suh Park), Friends from College doesn’t make a case to give a shit about any of them—or its worst-of-the’90s Spotify soundtrack. Still Star-Crossed and Will failed to generate any interest in Shakespeare on the small screen, and A Midsummer’s Nightmare (series postponed at press time, Friday, July 14, Lifetime) won’t fare any better. This modern-day, “psychological thriller” take on A Midsummer Night’s Dream looks typically cheap and Canadian, as per Lifetime, and the relative star power (how’d they get Dominic Monaghan and Courtney Love?) makes little difference in a story so riddled with dramatic clichés that you’d think it was based on the work of the writer who invented almost every dramatic cliché there is centuries ago. Keep Shakespeare on the stage, ’Merica. Yet again, HBO has decided that TV critics don’t need to see any of the new Game of Thrones (Season 7 premiere, Sunday, July 16, HBO), and that’s cool with me. Anything that annoys tubby TV critics (who, despite the rise of Peak TV, still haven’t reached the level of self-grandeur of movie critics—sad!) should be applauded. Anyway: What’s known about the penultimate season of the ultimate blood ’n’ boobs fantasy series is … well, nothing. Sure, there’s speculation on everything from the inevitability of Daenerys finally crossing paths with Jon Snow (duh) to the idea that Ned Stark is still alive (oh, shut up, nerds), but I’ll be watching Twin Peaks. Eternal darkness has fallen, and a totalitarian regime that rules though fear and intimidation has taken command. Relax, it’s just The Strain (Season 4 premiere, Sunday, July 16, FX)—what did you think I was talking about? You’re watching too much fake news. The fourth and final season of Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s vampireapocalypse epic finds our heroes Eph (Corey Stoll), Fet (Kevin Durand) and Dutch (Ruta Gedmintas) seemingly

defeated by the Strigoi, who are thriving in the nuclear winter, but the war between humans and bloodsuckers isn’t over yet. Hulu Seasons 1-3; The Strain is better than any of that zombie fluff. “The story of four tech entrepreneurs and childhood friends who, on the heels of selling their gaming company, become multi-millionaires and are forced to deal with the pitfalls that come with being an overnight success.” Is it Silicon Valley? Halt and Catch Fire? No, just British import Loaded (series debut, Monday, July 17, AMC), which is neither as funny as the former nor as dramatically compelling as the latter—but it does have Mary McCormack as a deliciously nasty boss lady (“Think of me as a sexy Darth Vader, because yesterday you got bought out by the Empire, and behind me, there’s an emperor”). She’s the reason to check out Loaded. The network won’t acknowledge it, but Shooter (Season 2 premiere, Tuesday, July 18, USA), based on the 2007 Mark

Friends from College (Netflix) Wahlberg flick, is a hit with conservative Flyover America. Since the debut of its first season was delayed from summer to post-election 2016 due to, you know, actual shootings around the country, Shooter’s semi-jingoistic edge long preceded the “Should we Satanic Hollywood Liberals address whatever the hell falls between New York and California?” discussion. Politics aside, star Ryan Phillippe is far better as a Marine sniper on the lam than Wahlberg was, and Shooter’s worth a look. You can watch it with your parents instead of Fox News! CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

One of Utah’s

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M O N DAYS

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and started playing guitar and writing songs. Many of his early tracks are inspired by his encounters with the homeless, particularly how he could relate to their stories. Soon after picking up a guitar, he befriended successful local musicians Jordan Matthew Young and Tony Holiday, who invited him along on a U.S. tour, teaching him a thing or two as he honed his songwriting skills and one-man band, where he plays guitar, drums and harmonica. In spite of the overwhelmingly positive reaction from audiences, Bennett returned from the tour looking for a steady job. “But this homeless man, who was a friend of mine, said, ‘No, man. You should just be brave and keep touring,’” he says. So Bennett bought a GMC Yukon, put a bed in the back, and hit the road. When he was home, he busked on the streets of downtown SLC. This turned into a gig playing in the lobby of the Peery Hotel, and later became a local singer-songwriter night called A Good Ole Time, which eventually moved to Zest. He formed the label Sweet Salt Records, releasing his debut album followed by Live in Colorado (2016) and a three-song EP, I Am Everywhere, this past February. After getting married and moving to St. George last year, Bennett started performing at a local bakery in FLDS-dominated Colorado City, Ariz., where a young polygamist boy suggested that Bennett put on the town’s first-ever music festival. It took some work, since the town hadn’t even drafted laws or permits regarding such events, but they were receptive to the idea, and it was a success. “We did it totally for free,” he says. “We had six bands come from all over the Western United States, USA Today did two three-page articles on it, and 1,000 people showed up.” He plans to do it again next May. Until then, he’ll keep playing. Even before the festival, Bennett had worked up to around 300 gigs a year. Speaking of which, his break is over. “I don’t mean to cut you off,” he says, “but they’re waiting for me to come on stage right now.” CW

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t’s hard to believe anyone could have a story like Tom Bennett’s—at least nowadays, when it’s trendy to adopt the image of a dusty, itinerant troubadour with a gritty past. Bennett, however, is the genuine article—and his tale is a whopper. His debut album, The Man Who Shook the Trail of the Devil’s Hounds (Sweet Salt, 2015), starts with an introduction from his friend, local poet Martin Willcocks, who talks of Bennett’s Georgia upbringing; his Mormon mission and flirtation with LDS fundamentalism; and the time he spent train-hopping and dealing drugs, followed by redemption as a community activist. “He was given his first harmonica by an old woman from West Virginia when he was just 9 years old,” Willcocks says on the recording. “Tom’s great-grandfather, Roy Ferguson, performed at the Grand Ole Opry, and later died in a Holiday Inn parking lot. Tom is carrying on the family tradition.” Willcocks’ English accent and occupation ring with authority and credibility, but then he steps aside for Bennett, who performs the title track. It’s 58 seconds of handclaps and gospel vox that you’d never expect from a fresh-faced dude who’s part Georgia cracker, part Mormon boy. Then Bennett, on the next track, “Satan, I’m Knockin’ on Your Door,” plays slow, low blues, talking about battles between good and evil, then strums and howls and blows on his harmonica. Here, you know he’s no fake, and every ensuing song reaffirms that faith. Over the phone, Bennett’s even easier to believe, with his own warm, Southern accent, residual Mormon politeness and a confidence honed through an itinerant lifestyle where he’s done good and bad alike while trying to survive. Although he could easily leave out details that would clutter his fantastic tale—like how he sang with emo/screamo bands before becoming an Americana artist— he doesn’t, because it happened, and it led him to where he is today. Just like when he was arrested for selling cocaine—a far greater sin, for which he’s atoned: “I never touched it again,” he says. While he came to Utah as a missionary in 2000, it was during that time that he became involved with fundamentalist Mormonism. “I was supposed to help start a united order, and this guy wanted me to marry both of his daughters,” Bennett says. “It got really, really intense, because some people thought I was a prophet.” He wound up having to meet with Elder L. Tom Perry of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and was almost excommunicated. “But they didn’t excommunicate me because I didn’t claim to be a prophet,” he says. “It was other people saying it. But it kinda freaked me out.” Immediately after his two-year mission, Bennett retreated to Georgia, but decided to return to Utah in 2003. That’s when he got involved in the local music scene—playing with bands like Murrieta, who opened for My Chemical Romance—and eventually got arrested in 2006. “I kinda went off the deep end for a while there,” he says. Fortunately, he didn’t have a prior criminal record, and he was able to get the charges expunged so he could work as a director at a local Boys & Girls Club a couple years later. “I wanted to try to find a way to benefit the community,” he says. In 2013, Bennett began working with the homeless community,


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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 7/13

Suzanne Vega is the author and velvety voice behind “Tom’s Diner,” originally an a cappella track until British duo DNA remixed it into the most popular version—with a skipping beat set to Vega’s “di-di-diii-di” vocal line— that most of us associate with the tune. She’s also behind the moody rocker “Left of Center,” co-written with Joe Jackson and featured in the John Hughes film Pretty in Pink. But the singer-songwriter’s biggest hit will always be “Luka,” about the kid that lives on the second floor—you know, upstairs from you? Yes, I think you’ve heard it before, with its heavy lyrics misleadingly floating over the song’s breezy, Fleetwood Mac-ish folk-rock melody. Chances are you’ve thought about that titular tot and how you’d like to kick his abusive parents’ asses up and down the block. That’s Vega’s trick: dropping you into these moments and making you really feel something. In “Luka,” it’s the helplessness and frustration of hearing a boy say he’s abused, but ask you not to try to help. In “Left of Center,” it’s the sense that, in the absence of a loved one, everything is askew. In “Tom’s Diner,” it’s feeling detached and invisible while pondering the last time you experienced a real connection to someone. This effect is pervasive in Vega’s acclaimed catalog, which spans 35 years but only nine studio albums. But while her canon is shallow in raw numbers, you can bet that it’s deep in quality. Lover, Beloved: Songs From an Evening With Carson McCullers (Amanuensis, 2016) is based on the 2011 play written by and starring Vega, a lifelong fan of the Southern writer—which explains a lot. (Randy Harward) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., sold out, 21+, thestateroom.com

North Mississippi Osborne

OLAF TAUSCH VIA WIKIMEDIA

Suzanne Vega, special guest TBD

FRIDAY 7/14

North Mississippi Osborne, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real

North Mississippi Osborne, or NMO, is an ad hoc super-trio comprised of Swedishborn, New Orleans-based guitarist/songwriter/producer Anders Osborne and North Mississippi Allstars brothers Luther and Cody Dickinson. Their debut album, Freedom & Dreams (andersosborne.com/nmo, 2015), offers a sprawling, loose-limbed blend of country, rural rock, blues and ballads that brings to mind the music made by the brothers’ dad—legendary performer, producer, bandleader, session player and early Americana forerunner Jim Dickinson. Since they’re headlining on the strength of just their first album, the NMO pumps up their sets with songs culled from their respective catalogs, as well as covers of tunes by Junior Kimbrough, R.L. Burnside, Bukka White, Muddy Waters and more. The upshot is a hearty helping of musical

Suzanne Vega comfort food, served up in true Southern style—grits and gravy not included. Opening act Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real ensures you’re full-to-bursting by night’s end. (Lee Zimmerman) Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre, 2280 E. Red Butte Canyon Road, 7 p.m., $34-$41, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

SATURDAY 7/15

Beach Fossils, She-Devils, Ablebody

Brooklyn-based indie band Beach Fossils has spent the better part of the past decade exploring the sand between their toes, and their recent release, Somersault (Bayonet) finds them extending their aural sauntering, albeit in a leisurely manner. Meanwhile, Montreal’s She-Devils make pop that’s influenced as much by Phil Spector as by

Beach Fossils

KOHEI KAWASHIMA

MICHAEL BLOOM

36 | JULY 13, 2017

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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JULY 13, 2017 | 37


LIVE SALT LAKE’S FAVORITE LIVE MUSIC PARTY BAR

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5

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Live Music

signal sound cd release party

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saturday 7/15

Live Music

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Andy Warhol—enthralling visually as well as sonically. If you’re a fan of Best Coast, then She-Devils vocalist Audrey Ann Boucher should be able to push your buttons, too, in a good way. The third act on this bill, Ablebody, hails from Los Angeles and plays smart synth-pop that’s cool like a palm tree in the breeze. (Brian Staker) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 7 p.m., $16, all ages, inthevenueslc.com

Records, 2014), he surrounds himself with ace players capable of keeping up with— and challenging—him. This leads to some astonishing musical moments, which is why, when you have the chance to see Denson do it live, you take it. Every time. (RH) O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $30-$50 presale, 21+, oprockwell.com

SATURDAY 7/15

TUESDAY 7/18

Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Elektric Voodoo

A dude like Karl Denson doesn’t live in a microcosm; he rules in the macro, a musical giant who simply makes the world around him appear small. That’s because, like a saxplayin’ Kevin Bacon, you can connect him to so many other acts through associations, collaborations, studio sessions or jams. With his own bands, like KDTU and The Greyboy Allstars, or as a full-fledged member of Slightly Stoopid and touring member of the Rolling Stones, Denson plays his horn like lead guitar, blowing notes that rasp, skronk, squeal and scream while singing his muthafunky ass off. On every project, including his most recent album New Ammo (Stoopid

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Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe

The Phoenix Jazz & Swing Band

It’s Big Band Tuesday at the Gallivan Center’s Excellence in the Community concert series. The Phoenix Jazz & Swing Band appears hot on the heels of their Utah Arts Festival performance with guest vocalist Jack Wood from Southern California. Now in their 28th year, the band received 501(c) (3) nonprofit status a decade ago for their educational and community outreach program, where they teach and perform at local schools and senior centers, helping to keep alive a uniquely American genre of music born in the 1930s. Swing dancing is a great way to spend a warm summer evening, and PJ&SB shows always include free lessons at 7 p.m. (BS) The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., free, all ages, excellenceconcerts.org

7/21

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4760 S 900 E, SLC

THEODORUSREX VIA WIKIMEDIA

THUR JULY 13 & 20


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WED

MONDAY - FRIDAY

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

Great food

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STATE live music

saturday, july 15

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3928 HIGHLAND DR

friday, july 14


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40 | JULY 13, 2017

THURSDAY 7/13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

SNAKESPHOTO

Zombiecock’s Video Wrap Party

THURSDAY 7/13 LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael (Garage on Beck) All Time Low + SWMRS + Waterparks + The Wrecks (The Complex) Amos Lee + Swami Tommy + The Belvederes (Red Butte Garden) Bermuda + Armed for Apocalypse + Filth + DiseNgaged (The Loading Dock) Cephas + Social Conduct + Widow Case + The Sardines (Kilby Court) Dirty Reggae Punx + Version Two + The Mindless (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Harold Henry + Johnny Betts + Kelli Moyle (Urban Lounge) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub) Nick Petty (Legacy Village) Reggae Thursday feat. Skank Roots Project + Skunk Dub + Wasted Noise (The Royal) Ryan Hiller Band (Gracie’s)

Suzanne Vega + special guest TBD (The State Room) see p. 36 Zombiecock’s Video Wrap-Up Party (Metro Music Hall) see above

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Jules & Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (‘80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Wiwek + Vindata (Sky)

FRIDAY 7/14 LIVE MUSIC

Croatia Squad (Downstairs) Cvpitvls + Despite Despair + Tiger Fang

THU 7.13 • SLUG LOCALIZED HAROLD HENRY JOHNNY BETTS, KELLI MOYLE

FRI 7.14• TOM BENNETT OSKAR & JULIA 6PM DOORS

FRI 7.14• NITE JEWEL

GENEVA JACUZZI, HARRIET BROWN 9PM DOORS

SAT 7.15 • MICHELLE BRANCH MON 7.17 • JARED & THE MILL

7/20: BILLY CHANGER 7/21: BACK TO THE FUTURE PROM 7/22: ROONEY 7/22: VISITORS 7/24: PIE & BEER DAY 7/25: IN THE VALLEY BELOW

KOLARS

It was only last Halloween when local horrorpunk quartet Zombiecock dropped their first music video, “Rest in Pieces,” from their 2014 debut Zombies Love Punk Rock! (zombiecock.bandcamp.com). Since then, they released an eponymous full-length in summer 2016 and a new single, “Alucard,” this past June. On July 13, they’re filming a video for that one. “It’s inspired by the [video] game Castlevania: Symphony of the Night,” singer-guitarist Willie Wolfbite says. The clip, directed by Adam Judd of Horrorshow Pictures (who also helmed “Rest in Pieces”), will keep with the game’s gothic, Dark Ages vibe and include “some live performance shots and some super rad Dracula concepts.” Tonight’s show is a production-wrap party, but Wolfbite says Zombiecock tends to celebrate around every project. “We always make sure to put together an event whenever we release something big,” he says. “It’s fun for the fans and a blast for us, too!” The band expects to finish post-production on the clip in time for a fall release. In the meantime, they’re writing and recording even more new music—both albums and singles—and planning small West Coast tours. “Nothing too crazy,” Wolfbite says. Of course not. They have too much work to do, and parties to plan. (Randy Harward) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., free, 21+, metromusichall.com

+ Wulf Blitzer (Metro Music Hall) Donna the Buffalo (O.P. Rockwell) Highball Train (Piper Down Pub) KC & The Broken Outlaws (Brewskis) Natural Causes (Club 90) Loren Walker Madsen (Garage on Beck) Luna 13 (Club X) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Nite Jewel + Geneva Jacuzzi + Harriet Brown (Urban Lounge) North Mississippi Allstars & Anders Osborne present: NMO + Lukas Nelson + Promise of the Real (Red Butte Garden) see p. 36 The Pelicants + Gorgeous Gorges + Uvluv (Kilby Court) Rage Against the Supremes (The Spur) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Ritual + Conrank + Proko (Sky) Rhapsody in Blue (Snow Park Amphitheater) Satin Steel (The Ice Haüs) Strange Mistress (Funk ‘n’ Dive)

SATURDAY 7/15 LIVE MUSIC

Bass Breakerz feat. Breaks Edition + Diggabeatz + Loki + SL Steez + DC Haze + Decent (In the Venue)

FRI 7.15 • MUTOID MAN HELMS ALEE, KORIHOR, STORMS

FRI 7.16 • DAISY & THE MOONSHINES FAREWELL SHOW, THOM SIMON, MARTIAN CULT, LIGHTSPEED BUS

7/22: BETH DITTO 7/25: 3TEETH 7/26: SLAP FROST TOUR 7/28: THE CRYSTAL METHOD 7/29: HALLOWEEN IN JULY 7/30: EX-CULT

WED 7.19 • UNMERCIFUL DISSENSION, ENVENOM

WED 7.19 • MARK MAGELBY BENEFIT,

FRI 7.21 • HAVEN OF HUES QUEER DANCE PARTY

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

All-Request Gothic, Industrial, EBM and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Brisk & Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ OG Skillz (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle)

DESPITE DESPAIR, TIGER FANG, WULF BLITZER

THUR 7.20 • JASON MERRIAM BENEFIT

JOSEPH MICHAEL PEDERSEN, THE BULLY

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

THUR 7.13 • ZOMBIECOCK - VIDEO WRAP-UP PARTY FRI 7.14 • CVPIVTLS ALBUM RELEASE

TUE 7.18 • SLICK VELVETEENS

THE ARTIFICIAL FLOWER COMPANY, KAPIX, PIGGET

The Strike + Federal Empire (Velour) Tom Bennett + Oskar & Julia (Urban Lounge) see p. 35 Troubled Youth (Sugar House Art Walk) Wildside + Reloaded (Liquid Joe’s)

FOLK HOGAN, DEZECRATION

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Karaoke

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AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! New menu additions! Saturday & Sunday Brunch, Mimosa, and Mary

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RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

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AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

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9PM | 21+

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Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun


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RANDY HARWARD

City Weekly copy editor Andrea Harvey (right) sings with buskers outside Cheers to You.

IT’S

FRIDAYS AND SUNDAYS Karaoke at Cheers to You

The best nights out just happen. There’s no real plan, just a precipitating event that sets you on a path. It’s like those ‘80s road movies, where you detour into random encounters with kooks, kindred spirits and gurus who lead you to personal insights that help make sense of life. Not that these evenings require significance; sometimes it’s just about taking a break. A few weeks ago, one such night began at the intersection of 300 S. Main, with irresistibly funky theme music from a busking sax-drums-keys combo. After listening for a few minutes, my co-worker and I ducked into Cheers to You. Inside, I was shocked to see an oddball who’d chatted me up at another bar earlier that day. I kept my head down, eager to avoid an encore. At one of the last open booths, my friend and I ordered shots and steins, then shot the breeze. Some time and another stein later, Cheers patrons lined up for karaoke, alternately butchering and killing songs by Journey and Billy Idol. Not being a singer myself— but knowing my companion, City Weekly’s copy editor Andrea Harvey, has golden pipes—I wondered if she’d take the opportunity to show off. Alas, since we both had places to be, and karaoke is always a people-watching goldmine, we tore ourselves away—only to find the band of buskers powering karaoke on the street. Feeling a solid buzz, ‘Dre performed “I Will Survive” for a crowd of pedicab drivers and passersby. It was a fitting warm-up for a return to Cheers, either on a Friday or Sunday, where she’ll undoubtedly out-warble the bunch—and rule the kickass street-corner after-party. (Randy Harward) Cheers to You, 315 S. Main, Fridays and Sundays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., facebook.com/cheers-to-you-slc-51753592319

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

100° OUTSIDE.

OUR PATIOS HAVE MISTERS. AND WE HAVE PALOMAS!

Dueling Pianos feat. Jules and Jeremy (Tavernacle) DJ Brisk & Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ EV (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ OG Skillz + Ortega Omega (The Ice Haüs) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist)

SUNDAY 7/16

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

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DIAMOND POOL TABLES

PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

42 | JULY 13, 2017

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BAR FLY

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Mon-Thurs: 11am-11pm Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-10pm

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Beach Fossils + She-Devils + Ablebody (In the Venue) see p. 36 Better Off with the Blues (Feldman’s Deli) The Brocks + Goldmyth (Velour) Cool Air Concert Series feat. Dan Weldon + Maggie Koerner (Snowbird Resort) The Fabulous Flynnstones (Canyons Village Stage) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe + Elektric Voodoo (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 38 King Cardinal + The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers (Alleged) Leslie Odom Jr. w/ the Utah Symphony (Snow Park Amphitheater) Natural Causes (Club 90) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Michelle Branch + Haerts (Urban Lounge) Motherlode Canyon Band (The Spur) Mutoid Man + Helms Alee + Korihor + Storms (Metro Music Hall) Pace (Pioneer Park) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Troubled Youth (Pat’s BBQ) Will Baxter Duo (afternoon show) (Park City Base Area) Will Baxter Trio (evening show) (Garage on Beck)

LIVE MUSIC

Anarbor + Sundressed + Memories Lost (Kilby Court) Martian Cult + thom simon + Lightspeed Bus + Family Gallows (Metro Music Hall) Kellie Pickler (Snow Park Amphitheater) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Riksha + Natas Lived (Club X)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

MONDAY 7/17 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Jared & The Mill + KOLARS (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE


COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub)

TUESDAY 7/18 LIVE MUSIC

Dashboard Confessional + All-American Rejects (Sandy Amphitheater) Mathew Lanier (Piper Down Pub) Moonwalker + Noise Ordinance + Cardinal Bloom (The Loading Dock) Scott Foster (The Spur) Slick Velveteens + The Artificial Flower Company + Kapix + Pigget (Urban Lounge) The Phoenix Jazz & Swing Band (Gallivan Center) see p. 38 Zealyn + Amy Guess (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House)

WEDNESDAY 7/19 LIVE MUSIC

Tony Holiday Duo (The Spur) Lucy Daus + Strong Words (Kilby Court) Unmerciful + Dissension + Envenom (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

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7.13 7.14 7.15 7.17

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY

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period.

S ON U W FOLLO GRAM A T S IN


© 2017

TYPOGLYCEMIA

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. 201, in Ramon narumels 2. Bcak msucle, for sorht 3. Smoe TV darma stetings 4. Logtimne Pailestinan cihef Yisar 5. Aersterd 6. Amora 7. Manediterrean furits 8. Tineson reeliver 9. “____ Dxiie” (1988 #1 cronuty hit by Dwhigt Yokaam) 10. Geek 11. Beoxr who copmeetd on “Dannicg Wtih

46. Wlid gessues 47. Mhotnly foshian isuses 48. St. ____ and Nives 50. Big wnid 51. Atscers Flaco 52. Lesor to Bacark in 2012 55. Siffux wtih racnh 56. ____ Mecixo 57. Lagre cffoee severr

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

the Sarts” 12. Aizz of “Praks and Raceretoin” 13. Starnds afetr a bizzarld 14. Bdoy sohp jbos 20. “Yu’voe got mial” co. 21. Loliwfe 22. Icth 23. Ralod who careted Wlily Wokna 27. Acotr LaeouBf 28. Silm bartety 29. T.J. ____ (Khol’s ravil) 31. Oascr wennir Hatawhay 32. Pantier Manodrain 34. Kendeny and LaduariGa, for two 35. Hsop. sacn 36. Buhsy prat of a siqurrel 37. “Let me tinhk ... yaeh, taht’s spitud” 38. Tlol raod 40. 2000 Jefinner Lepoz flim 42. Fernch petsidren’s pacale 43. Bolarbild’s bset 44. Pisoon ____ 45. Errbamassed

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Rmvoee sonw form, e.g. 9. Lkie miosac steons 15. It may be lisented to on the raod 16. Eevnt taht mihgt invvloe a Ojiua broad 17. “Not hanpepnig” 18. Up 19. Leterts taht hvae not been chagend in ecah of the wrods of tihs pezzlu’s cules 21. Cronuty taht spilt in two in 2011 24. Citric Erebt, ilfornmaly 25. Filescher and Ossanis 26. Siffux wtih thenco or atuo 27. AMC sieres “Beettr Clal ____” 29. Big waetr ppie 30. “Ick!” 31. “Mboy-Dcik” ctapain 32. Firend 33. Frsit lday atefr Mllecihe 35. Hvae a tssule 39. Ocne ____ wlihe 40. “Jussaric Prak” dnio 41. “Waht ____, cheppod levir?” 42. Fernch 101 vreb 44. “____ the jockpat!” 45. Anterlavite to siwm 46. Feed, as pgis 47. Graden of Eedn wamon 48. One of the Kridashaans 49. As denifed on Wipikedia, trem uesd to discrebe how “redears can unerdsantd the mennaig of wodrs in a snetecne eevn wehn the initorer leterts of ecah wrod are sclambred” 53. Satr-raleted 54. It has Cut, Cpoy and Patse cammonds 58. Cilsasc VW 59. One who leevas a mses bihend 60. Flees 61. Daspiptoins

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) “Do not be too timid and squeamish about your actions,” Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote. “All life is an experiment.” I’d love to see you make that your operative strategy in the coming weeks, Cancerian. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now is a favorable time to overthrow your habits, rebel against your certainties and cruise through a series of freewheeling escapades that will change your mind in a hundred different ways. Do you love life enough to ask more questions than you’ve ever asked before? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Thank you for contacting the Center for Epicurean Education. If you need advice on how to help your imagination lose its inhibitions, please press 1. If you’d like guidance on how to run wild in the woods or in the streets without losing your friends or your job, press 2. If you want to learn more about spiritual sex or sensual wisdom, press 3. If you’d like assistance in initiating a rowdy yet focused search for fresh inspiration, press 4. For information about dancing lessons or flying lessons or dancing-while-flying lessons, press 5. For advice on how to stop making so much sense, press 6. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The cereus cactus grows in the deserts of the southwestern U.S. Most of the time it’s scraggly and brittle-looking. But one night of the year, in June or July, it blooms with a fragrant, trumpetshaped flower. By dawn, the creamy white petals close and start to wither. During that brief celebration, the plant’s main pollinator, the sphinx moth, has to discover the marvelous event and come to gather the cactus flower’s pollen. I suspect this scenario has metaphorical resemblances to a task you could benefit from carrying out in the days ahead. Be alert for a sudden, spectacular and rare eruption of beauty that you can feed from and propagate.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) It’s not your birthday, but I feel like you need to get presents. The astrological omens agree with me. In fact, they suggest you should show people this horoscope to motivate them to do the right thing and shower you with practical blessings. And why exactly do you need these rewards? Here’s one reason: Now is a pivotal moment in the development of your own ability to give the unique gifts you have to give. If you receive tangible demonstrations that your contributions are appreciated, you’ll be better able to rise to the next level of your generosity. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Other astrologers and fortune-tellers might enjoy scaring the hell out of you, but not me. My job is to keep you apprised of the ways that life aims to help you, educate you and lead you out of your suffering. The truth is, Taurus, that if you look hard enough, there are always seemingly legitimate reasons to be afraid of pretty much everything. But that’s a stupid way to live, especially since there are also always legitimate reasons to be excited about pretty much everything. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to work on retraining yourself to make the latter approach your default tendency. I have rarely seen a better phase than now to replace chronic anxiety with shrewd hope. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) At least for the short-range future, benign neglect can be an effective game plan for you. In other words, Gemini, allow inaction to do the job that can’t be accomplished through strenuous action. Stay put. Be patient and cagey and observant. Seek strength in silence and restraint. Let problems heal through the passage of time. Give yourself permission to watch and wait, to reserve judgment and withhold criticism. Why do I suggest this approach? Here’s a secret: Forces that are currently working in the dark and behind the scenes will generate the best possible outcome.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) In late 1811 and early 1812, parts of the mighty Mississippi River flowed backward several times. Earthquakes were the cause. Now, more than two centuries later, you Sagittarians have a chance—maybe even a mandate—to accomplish a more modest rendition of what nature did way back then. Do you dare to shift the course of a great, flowing, vital force? I think you should at least consider it. In my opinion, that great, flowing, vital force could benefit from an adjustment that you have the wisdom and luck to understand and accomplish.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “There is a direct correlation between playfulness and intelligence, since the most intelligent animals engage in the greatest amount of playful activities,” National Geographic reports. “The reason is simple: Intelligence is the capacity for learning, and to play is to learn.” I suggest you make these thoughts the centerpiece of your life in the coming weeks. You’re in a phase when you have an enhanced capacity to master new tricks. That’s fortunate, because you’re also in a phase when it’s especially crucial for you to learn new tricks. The best way to ensure it all unfolds with maximum grace is to play as much as possible.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) I advise you against snorting cocaine, MDMA, heroin or bath salts. But if you do, don’t lay out your lines of powder on a kitchen table or a baby’s diaper-changing counter in a public restroom. Places like those are not exactly clean, and you could end up propelling contaminants close to your brain. Please observe similar care with any other activity that involves altering your consciousness or changing the way you see the world. Do it in a nurturing location that ensures healthy results. P.S. The coming weeks will be a great time to expand your mind if you do it in all-natural ways such as through conversations with interesting people, travel to places that excite your awe and encounters with provocative teachings.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) This is one of those rare grace periods when you can slip into a smooth groove without worrying that it will degenerate into a repetitive rut. You’ll feel natural and comfortable as you attend to your duties, not blank or numb. You’ll be entertained and educated by exacting details, not bored by them. I conclude, therefore, that this will be an excellent time to lay the gritty foundation for expansive and productive adventures later this year. If you’ve been hoping to get an advantage over your competitors and diminish the negative influences of people who don’t empathize with you, now is the time.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) If I had more room here, I would offer an inspirational Powerpoint presentation designed just for you. In the beginning, I would seize your attention with an evocative image that my marketing department had determined would give you a visceral thrill. (Like maybe a photoshopped image of you wearing a crown and holding a scepter.) In the next part, I would describe various wonderful and beautiful things about you. Then I’d tactfully describe an aspect of your life that’s underdeveloped and could use some work. I’d say, “I’d love for you to be more strategic in promoting your good ideas. I’d love for you to have a wellcrafted master plan that will attract the contacts and resources necessary to lift your dream to the next level.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You’re entering into the Uncanny Zone, Capricorn. During your brief journey through this alternate reality, the wind and the dew will be your teachers. Animals will provide special favors. You may experience true fantasies, like being able to sense people’s thoughts and hear the sound of leaves converting sunlight into nourishment. It’s possible you’ll feel the moon tugging at the waters of your body and glimpse visions of the best possible future. Will any of this be of practical use? Yes! More than you can imagine. And not in ways you can imagine yet.

FANTASTIC MASSAGE


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J-Town Remnants

Utah honors its Mormon pioneers during July with parades, fireworks, pie and beer, commemorating their trek from Nauvoo, Ill., in 1847. There had been French trappers, Spanish priests and, of course, indigenous peoples here before the Mormons, but once Brigham’s people arrived, Salt Lake City became a destination point and a home for people of all colors and creeds. Historians report that the first Japanese folks arrived here in 1884 and created a long-gone Japantown in 1907 about where the Calvin L. Rampton Convention Center now is located. The warren of noodle houses and shops were torn down in 1966 to make way for the first Salt Palace, but the Buddhist Temple (built in 1912) and the Japanese Church of Christ (built in 1918) remained. When I was a planning commissioner for Salt Lake City, there was an urgent request—almost a threat—from Outdoor Industry Association to expand the convention hall space if we wanted their annual shows to stay. The city planners and mayor rushed through approval of a convention center extension to the west. It circled around the hotel at South Temple and 300 West and abutted the Church of Christ. As a condition of the expansion, we made it clear that Salt Lake City had to create some kind of gardens or space between the church and the center’s semi-truck loading areas. If you drive by there today on 100 South between 200 and 300 West, you’ll see a lovely garden protecting the east side of the church (you’re welcome!). Developers have now announced a huge project for Block 67, which is where the downtown U.S. Post Office and the rundown Royal Wood Office Plaza are located. Lardy, lardy brethren, three more high rises are planned for the 6.5 acres there with more than 650 residential units, 100,000 square-feet of retail space, a 271-room hotel and 430,000 square-feet of office space. Not to panic, though. The Ritchie Group’s developers are going to divide the block into four pieces so you can walk through the maze. This is not, however, the location of the long-awaited “convention hotel” (soon to be announced). The senior citizen high-rise just behind the post office and the Buddhist Temple will remain. Thus, the last remnants of J-town are protected. Next up on the development spinning wheel? Salt Lake City is looking at the Vivint arena, The Gateway and nearby properties to be part of a proposed entertainment district. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Hog Hunt Tourists and father-son duos looking for outof-this-world bonding experiences are paying up to $50,000 for the opportunity to hunt feral hogs from helicopters in Texas, sometimes using machine guns. “There’s only so many places in the world you can shoot machine guns out of a helicopter and no one shoots back,” HeliBacon company co-owner Chris Britt said. n Texas passed the “pork-chopper” bill in 2011, allowing aerial hunting of feral hogs. In May, legislators approved hunting from hot-air balloons, which are quieter and allow a steadier shot.

Pre-Existing Condition Enterprising mother Jeannine Isom in Cedar Hills, Utah, took her 7-year-old son’s dental care into her own hands in June when she purchased hand sanitizer and needle-nose pliers at Walmart, then ushered her son into the store’s restroom and pulled out two of his teeth. Police were alerted after the boy’s older brother heard him screaming. The mother was charged with felony child abuse. Sweet Revenge A frustrated victim of bedbugs in Augusta, Maine, reacted to city inaction by bringing a cup of bedbugs to a municipal office building and slamming it down on the counter, scattering about 100 insects and forcing the closure of several offices as officials scrambled to contain them. The apartment dweller had requested help finding other housing, but city officials told him he didn’t qualify.

Fashion Emergency French fashion label Y/Project, in an apparent response to the eternal question “Do these jeans make my butt look big?” is selling buttless jeans. The waistband attaches to the legs of the jeans with a series of clasps and straps, so the pant legs hang loose on the wearer. The Detachable Button Down pants are priced at $570.

n Maintenance workers at the courthouse in Jonesboro, Ark., are fed up with people urinating in elevators, especially considering restrooms are within spitting distance of them. Craighead County officials hope to stem the tide with newly installed security cameras, which have caught three men in the act.

Frontiers of Marketing At the June 15 Jacksonville, Fla., Jumbo Shrimp minor league game, male baseball fans were treated to a novel promotional

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n A stretch limo wasn’t posh enough for Saudia Shuler, a Philadelphia mom who wanted to make her son’s high school prom memorable. Instead, she spent $25,000 creating a Dubaithemed prom night, including 3 tons of sand and a camel (for pre-prom photos). The lucky senior took not one, but three dates to the dance, who along with him wore designer clothes and accessories. Shuler also sprang for a rented Lamborghini, Rolls-Royce and Range Rover.

Bright Ideas Japan’s Samurai Age store, which (naturally) offers novelty samurai apparel, is featuring a new line of armor outfits for cats and dogs. The body armor is sized for small pets, but custom orders for larger sizes are possible, and can include a helmet and mask. Samurai enthusiasts can also order armor for liquor bottles and dolls. n Suspicions were aroused in New Hope, Ala., when veteran mail carrier Susanna Burhans, 47, was seen throwing food at a dog along her route. On June 1, she was charged with aggravated animal cruelty after the dog’s owner found a nail-filled meatball near his house, and a subsequent X-ray revealed nails in its stomach. The USPS has put the mail carrier on non-duty status. n Thailand’s Scorpion Queen, who set a Guinness World Record for holding a scorpion in her mouth (3 minutes and 28 seconds), shocked onlookers in June as she let scorpions crawl all over her body and in and out of her mouth as part of a show in Pattaya, a city on the Gulf of Thailand. Kanchana Kaetkaew also holds the record for co-habiting with 5,000 scorpions in a 12-meter square glass enclosure for 33 days.

Wait, What? The Zoological Wildlife Conservation Center in Rainier, Ore., offers sleepovers in its sloth sanctuary. The visit includes a tent with a cot and satellite TV (in case the animals are being too slothlike). Visitors, who pay $600 (double occupancy) for the 12-hour experience, are asked to whisper so as not to stress out the sloths. Great Art! French performance artist Abraham Poincheval managed to hatch nine chicken eggs in April by incubating them himself for three weeks inside a glass vivarium at Paris’ Palais de Tokyo contemporary art museum. Poincheval’s past projects have included sitting inside a block of stone for a week and living in a hollowedout bear sculpture for two weeks. Least-Competent Criminal Baggy blue jeans were the ill-fated getaway vehicle for 15 quartsize bottles of Pennzoil motor oil and 30 DVDs of Treasure Hunt in a badly planned theft in Lakeland, Fla., in June. William Jason Hall, 38, stuffed the loot into his pants inside a 7-Eleven store without realizing that a detective in an unmarked police car outside was watching him. Because it was his third arrest on petty theft, he was charged with a felony. Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Undignified Demise Robert Dreyer, celebrating his 89th birthday, suffered no apparent injury when he crashed his car into a fire hydrant in Viera, Fla., in May. But as he got out of the car to check the damage, he was sucked into the hole by the strong water pressure where the hydrant had been, and drowned. A bystander tried to rescue Dreyer, but couldn’t overcome the water pressure to reach him.

People and Their Money Because leaving your falcon at home while you do errands is too painful, high-end automaker Bentley now offers a customized SUV featuring a “removable transportation perch and tether” for hunting birds and a wood inlay in the shape of a falcon on the dash. At a starting price of $230,000, the Bentayga Falconry also features a refreshment case and special compartments for bird hoods and gauntlets. “Falconry is regarded as the sport of kings in the Middle East, so it was vital that the kit we create … appeal to our valued customers there and around the world,” noted Geoff Dowding with Bentley’s Mulliner division.

PIONEERS

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Ewwwww! The Happiest Place on Earth was a little less joyful for 17 visitors in June, when a hazardous materials team was dispatched to Main Street at Disneyland after park-goers reported being struck by feces. Experts quickly realized that rather than being victims of a bathroom bomber, the park guests had been regrettably positioned beneath a flock of geese flying overhead. The victims were ushered to a private restroom to clean up and were provided with fresh clothing.

giveaway: pregnancy tests. The “You Might Be the Father” promotion was conceived to help fans decide whether they should return for the Father’s Day game on Sunday, June 18.

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Things We Didn’t Know We Needed Are cute vegetables easier to swallow? A Chinese company has developed fruit- and vegetable molds that form growing foods into little Buddhas, hearts, stars and skulls. Farmers affix the plastic molds over the stems of growing plants, and the fruit fills the mold as it grows. Some designs include words, and the company also offers custom molds.

BY THE EDITORS AT ANDRE WS M C MEEL


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