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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T J A N U A RY 5 , 2 0 1 7 | V O L . 3 3 N 0 . 3 5

HOME SWEET H•ME? How a single real estate deal highlights a city in flux and in crisis.

By Colby Frazier


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY THE FABULOUS SULA

Recently sold residential building holds storied past and is perhaps the norm for real estate future in SLC. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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MARYANN JOHANSON

Cinema, p. 27 “I’ve been fascinated by movies since as far back in childhood as I can remember,” Johanson says. Since 2002, she’s contributed witty and thought-provoking film reviews to City Weekly. Her pride and joy, however, is her website flickfilosopher.com—one of the oldest and most popular film criticism sites out there.

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Comic, Dec. 23, “Temple Square Lights Behind the Scenes”

Who knows what animal wastes, airborne chemicals, etc., are in there. I recommend you do not “bring a cup.”

WILL CROWTHER Via Facebook

Didn’t get the joke? Eh fella?

PAX RASMUSSEN

I think it’s a good first hard step that apparently no one else has the balls to do. The county and the state should have been addressing this years ago, but, you know … Who cares? … Just don’t bother us out here in the ’burbs. I don’t agree with the mayor’s lack of transparency, but at least she is doing something, which is more than I can say for any other elected official in this “pretty, great” state.

ceremony of President-elect Donald Trump. It is wrong on so many levels. Trump’s sexist and degrading comments regarding women and minorities, his shady business dealings, and the garish, uncouth way in which he conducts himself are antithetical to Mormon values. Performing for Trump would be an implicit endorsement of him, which is extremely problematic. It sends the message to youth and potential converts that the church condones sexual assault, unfettered greed and anti-immigrant nativism. To set a good example, the choir should do the morally responsible thing and withdraw immediately.

Via Facebook

Salt Lake City

The unilateral and dictatorial manner in which this decision was made is unacceptable and the situation has been further aggravated by the ridiculous excuse the Salt Lake City Council and the mayor have proffered for this behavior. The idea that they seem to feel they were elected to do what is best for us, whether we like it or not, is frightening.

A curse

shelter are drug-addicted criminals that have no interest of helping themselves and only take advantage of the current system that’s in place. For those that think this comment is uncaring, rude and outta line, perhaps you should go down to the shelter now and just take a walk around it once or twice. ... Needless to say, I’m happy that I live nowhere near that shelter or any of the new proposed locations nor would I welcome one in my neighborhood.

BOBBY HERRERA

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Haha do it! It’s even better than sacrament. #yumyum

@IMAGINEYOURESTRANGE Via Instagram

And you will be allowed to have and see visions. If you don’t believe me just ask the profit [sic].

ROBERT JENSEN Via Facebook

DALLAS ROBBINS

I love the grape Kool-Aid idea.

DANA DAHL Via Facebook

Blog, Dec. 16, “Residents, business owners express concern over proposed shelter locations”

Everyone wants something done but no one wants it near them. It’s part of a growing city. Tough, but change is inevitable.

JEFFREY WOOD

CHRIS LANE

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Meh. While it will placate the business owners in the area of the current shelter, it’s just shifted the burden to family neighborhoods and eliminated 500 needed beds. Not sure how this can be considered a step up.

AUTUMN BAROWSKI Via Facebook

I’m all for trying to help people that wanna help themselves, but let’s be real here for a second. A lot of these folks down at that

Five Spot, Dec. 22, Cat Palmer

Cat is an awesome person! I’m glad to see her get some well-deserved recognition.

DOUG RICE

Via cityweekly.net

Sour note

I was both shocked and disappointed by the news of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s upcoming performance at the inaugural

RYAN D. CURTIS,

After witnessing the nightmarish end to the quest by the University of Utah’s football team to finally break through to the top in the PAC-12 football standings, I had a restless night. My sleep was interrupted by a vision—a ghost of a Ute Indian tribal elder. He stated that the Utah Ute tribe has always honored the environment and the earth, and it was part of the foundation of their culture—a fundamental part of their lives and heritage. He said their leaders from the past were extremely disappointed to see the university that bears their name turn their backs on this principle with the way the administration treated internationally renowned naturalist, writer and teacher Terry Tempest Williams, who went so far as to purchase at great expense to her personally a tract of land to be utilized as an outdoor classroom, creating a never-ending generator of energy that would honor and fuel the ideals of environmental

education and protection. He proclaimed that as long as the university continues on this path and does not rectify the situation with Ms. Tempest Williams—much like the The Curse of The Bambino with the Boston Red Sox or the The Curse of the Billy Goat with the Chicago Cubs—it will be a long and torturous road until the university’s sports teams reach the heights they envision and desire.

JERRY SCHMIDT, Salt Lake City

Five Spot, Dec. 8, “Santa Ed”

We were fortunate to have Santa Ed be the center of our holiday party for three years. He was the most realistic and loving Santa. He will be greatly missed.

J. BURGOYNE

Via cityweekly.net Rest peacefully, Mr. Scott.

LAURIE OBERG

Via cityweekly.net RIP

@IRISBREEZE Via Twitter

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OPINION

Gone to Pot

You may or may not respect my opinion on the need to make medical marijuana legal in Utah. That’s fine. Truth be told, my personal experience with that leafy plant is totally nonexistent. I don’t use it, and have never needed to. But I do respect opinions of trained professionals who know enough about it to be taken seriously. For instance, according to well-regarded emergency room physician and state Sen. Brian Shiozawa, Utah should legalize medical marijuana, or at least perform scientific studies necessary to determine exactly what benefits it has to offer. He is in favor of legal studies to determine how much good, if any, medical marijuana can do as a replacement for various opioids that can lead to addiction and sometimes death. In a recent meeting on the subject, Shiozawa summed up his thoughts this way: “The bill that I co-sponsored to allow cannabinoid oil that helps kids with seizures has had mixed results, but it has had some positive effects to get them off of those very expensive anti-convulsive drugs that have so many side effects. Marijuana probably does have some beneficial effects, so let’s find out what components and compounds in the plant are most beneficial, in what concentrations, and how to use them. “Let’s look at patients such as at the Huntsman cancer group. We know that cannabis is an appetite stimulant for those poor people who are suffering, just have no appetite and are literally wasting away, not just from the effects of the tumor, but because they are not eating. “We know it will prolong your chances for a few years and ultimately the cancer may overtake you. But there are some thoughts that there are anti-tumor effects in the plant, and we hear stories of people who have brain cancer, and their tumors shrink and go away. “What if there is a certain type of cancer that was treatable [by marijuana]—not just

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

palliative, but curative. The problem is we haven’t done studies to determine which parts of the plants and which tumors are affected.” So, I asked the senator, why should it fall on Utah to take the lead on this, when there are so many areas more socially in-tune with marijuana? Aren’t there other areas more suitable for study, where the public might be more in favor of investigating the possibilities—say, California, for instance? Shiozawa points to the wonderful research infrastructure at the University of Utah. “We have DEA endorsements, so they can do research,” he says. “We can get a supply line from the NIH and NIDA, which is the National Institute of Drug Abuse, so they can supply the product. Our researchers can get a certain group of patients and controls to say we’re going to research, for instance, PTSD, or seizures, or nausea in cancer patients. They could follow them to see the effects. And then they would do their follow up MRI studies, check their pain scales, seizure scales, etc.” And he has already proposed to the Utah Senate Health and Human Services Committee that the state could conduct several studies for less than a million dollars—a relatively small amount of the budget when compared to, for example, Utah State Prison. Shiozawa mentions that we will spend $100 million for just stabilizing the ground for a prison site. That is 100 times more than it would cost to launch three of four potentially life-saving studies with real patients and real results. In this next legislative session, a set of bills will address a very specific formulation of marijuana, grown in certain places here in Utah under strict governmentcontrolled conditions. The proposal is to produce this non-recreational strain and then do specific medical research to see how well it works.

These bills will not pass unanimously, of course. On the other hand, the senator notes that Utah research institutions support these proposals and are anxious to go forward because these controlled studies will be done by our own scientists who then can publish the resulting data. “Utah religious organizations, including the LDS Church,” according to Shiozawa, “are willing to say that this medicinal research is reasonable because, what if it really does help in certain circumstances?” Also, he reminds us that people who need treatment because of MS, PTSD, chronic pain, seizures and cancer, are so desperate for medicinal treatment beyond opioids that they’re now willing to go out of state to get it. “But it’s incomplete research,” he says. “So, why not take a relatively inexpensive but scientifically viable approach and help answer this question? Why do we have to let our people drive out of state to seek something that we could, and maybe should, have an opportunity to provide help in this state?” Now appears to be the right time to move Utah toward some very reasonable scientific research that will add to our knowledge base and could alleviate suffering in many patients. The medical community looks at the few hundred patients who could be involved in these studies and, in addition to actually helping these people, would produce some really great data. They could publish it in the New England Journal of Medicine, and this would showcase Utah in yet another favorable scientific light. So, what’s the likelihood of getting this legislative ball rolling in the upcoming session? Shiozawa thinks there’s a good possibility the Legislature will approve these bills because of obvious benefits for our citizens, our research institutions and our state. CW

THESE BILLS WILL NOT PASS UNANIMOUSLY, OF COURSE.

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What’s the worst that could happen if Utah legalized marijuana? Nicole Enright: People here might be able to relax and enjoy themselves. GASP! Enrique Limón: Better driving, perhaps? Rhett Wilkinson: Students—gasp!—learn about responsible practice (it’s hard to come by given no sex ed).

Scott Renshaw: A devastating blow to the prescription mood-enhancer industry.

Sierra Sessions: Picture a world where everyone is in a good mood; they’re pain-free and just loving life. The local news stations have nothing bad to report anymore. They have to resort to filming squirrels fight on Main Street. Can you imagine? Worst thing to happen is either that or the skunky smell. (Not that I would know.)

Jeremiah Smith: Happy Valley would become a lot happier .

Randy Harward: That seems like pie-inthe-sky fantasy ’cause trying in vain to force guy-in-the-sky belief systems, heterosexuality, multi-level marketing scams and sobriety on the population is kinda totally Utah’s thing. I can’t see the Legislature/Mo-Vatican giving up on that. But if we do legalize it, and suddenly everyone in town is roasting bowls and having deep thoughts that seem like great ideas and actually get up off the couch and follow through with them, the worst thing I could imagine is that we’d wind up with another goofy religion to foist upon the world. But it seems more likely that everything would just be mellow.

Pete Saltas: The Legislature could get addicted to the new tax base.

WE WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE AFTER THE FIRST SESSION.

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

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The worst part of the Bears Ears monument designation was very simply the federal government. Utahns generally don’t like the feds and think Utah can do everything better—way better. Just look at the image the feds used in their announcement—Arches National Park. And then, Utahns ask, what do you have against funding schoolchildren? You know, because Bears Ears includes School Institutional Trust Lands that can be traded for money. The Salt Lake Tribune debunked the idea in a story by Benjamin Woods wherein he mentions the 109,000 acres of SITLA lands and the opportunities for lucrative trades. Of course, Utah Treasurer David Damschen was just appalled by the feds’ actions, even though the state maintains control of those lands. Damschen, in a post to Utah Political Capitol’s MJ Orton, admitted he’s hopeful. But you know—damned feds.

Morality Check

As Republicans maintain a vice-grip hold on Utah and the nation, citizens need to steel themselves for a spate of morals legislation. You know how the GOP has your best interests at heart and how they’re going to help you overcome all your bad habits—like drinking. We won’t even get into sex yet, but those bills are coming. Rep. Norm Thurston wants to reduce the legal driving limit to 0.05 percent blood alcohol content—something the National Transportation Safety Board wants. Articles in both The Salt Lake Tribune and Los Angeles Times note that alcohol limits don’t really prevent drunk driving. Not even the local nonprofit Mothers Against Drunk Driving like the idea because it’s hard to enforce.

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Back to the sex legislation. Yes, Sen. Todd Weiler, RWoods Cross, wants to let people sue pornographers for emotional and psychological damage, the Trib reports. Weiler’s the guy who gave Utah another first in the nation with a resolution declaring pornography a publichealth crisis. It would indeed be interesting to watch someone prove in court how they’ve been hurt. A lengthy piece in Slate magazine examined the many problems with pornography research— many of which are gender-based. Ultimately, it says, the damage might have been done. PornHub, for instance, claims to get 100 million visitors a day. Still, we know the real reason Utah legislators are so interested. According to RT News (formerly Russia Today), porn leads to less “desire in young men to marry, dissatisfaction in marriage and infidelity.” Let’s not mess with getting men hitched.

S NEofW the

Oh-So-Sweet Dreams The Hastens workshop in Koping, Sweden, liberally using the phrase “master artisans” recently, unveiled its made-to-order $149,900 mattress. Bloomberg News reported in December on Hastens’ use of superior construction materials such as pure steel springs, “slowgrowing” pine, multiple layers of flax, horsehair lining (braided by hand, then unwound to ensure extra spring), and cotton covered by flame-retardant wool batting. With a 25-year guarantee, an eight-hour-a-day sleep habit works out to $2 an hour. Bonus: The Bloomberg reviewer, after a trial run, gave the “Vividus” a glowing thumbs-up.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

States. The U.S. State Department finally persuaded Ghanian officials to close it down, but it is unknown if any purchasers were ever caught trying to immigrate. The “embassy,” with a U.S. flag outside, had well-spoken “consular officers” who reportedly collected about $6,000 per visa.

WEIRD

The Job of the Researcher Humans are good at recognizing faces, but exceptionally poor at recognition when the same face’s features are scrambled or upside down. In December, a research team from the Netherlands and Japan published findings that chimpanzees are the same way—when it comes to recognizing other chimps’ butts. That suggests, the scientists concluded, that sophisticated recognition of rear ends is as important for chimps (as “socio-sexual signaling,” such as prevention of inbreeding) as faces are to humans. Suspicions Confirmed Humanity has accumulated an estimated 30 trillion tons of “stuff,” according to research by University of Leicester geologists—enough to fit over 100 pounds’ worth over every square meter of the planet’s surface. The scientists, writing in The Anthropocene Review, are even more alarmed that very little of it is ever recycled and that buried layers of technofossils that define our era will clutter and weigh down the planet, hampering future generations. Finer Points of the Law A federal appeals court agreed with a jury in December that Battle Creek, Mich., police were justified in shooting (and killing) two hardly misbehaving family dogs during a legal search of a house’s basement. Mark and Cheryl Brown had pointed out that their dogs never attacked; one, an officer admitted, was “just standing there” when shot and killed. The officers said that conducting a thorough search of the premises might have riled the dogs and threatened their safety. (Unaddressed was whether a dog might avoid being shot if it masters the classic trick of “playing dead.”) Sounds Like a Joke Spencer Hanvey, 22, was charged with four burglaries of the same MedCare Pharmacy in Conway, Ark., in October and November, using the same modus operandi each time to steal drugs. Bonus: Oddly, the drugs were not for obsessive-compulsive disorder. n Hamden (Connecticut) High School was put into lockdown for an hour on Dec. 15 when a student was seen running in the hallway, zig-zagging from side to side, swinging an arm and leaping into the air. Police were called, but quickly learned that it was just a 12th-grade boy practicing a basketball move and pretending to dunk. [Arkansas Online, Dec. 7, 2016]

The Aristocrats! A camera-less Alan Ralph, 62, was arrested in Sarasota, Fla., in December after being seen on surveillance video in October in a Wal-Mart stooping down to the floor to peer up the skirt of a woman. n John Kuznezow, 54, was charged with invasion of privacy in Madison, Wis., in November after he was discovered, pants down, up a tree outside a woman’s second-floor bedroom window.

Bright Ideas For about 10 years, organized crime rings operated a makeshift U.S. “embassy” in a rundown pink building in Accra, the capital of Ghana, issuing official-looking identification papers, including “visas” that theoretically permitted entry into the United

Weird Old World Wu Jianping, 25, from China’s Henan province, complained in November that he had been denied home loans at several banks for not providing fingerprints—because he has no arms (following a childhood accident) and “signs” documents by holding a pen in his mouth. He was not allowed to substitute “toeprints.” n Classes were canceled in early December in the village of Batagai in the Yakutia region of Siberia when the temperature reached -53 Celsius (-63 Fahrenheit)—but only for kids 15 and under; older children still had to get to school. Yakutia is regarded as the coldest inhabited region on the planet.

Sex Toys in the News The government in Saxony, Germany, chose as third-place winner of its 2016 prize for innovation and start-up companies the inventor of the ingenious silent vibrator (leading to shaming of the economy minister Martin Dulig, now known as “Dildo Dulig”). n An unknown armed robber made off with cash at the Lotions and Lace adult store in San Bernardino, Calif., in December— although employees told police they angrily pelted the man with dildos from the shelves as he ran out the door.

Least Competent Criminals Leonard Rinaldi, 53, was arrested in Torrington, Conn., in November following his theft of a rare-coin collection belonging to his father. The coins were valued at about $8,000, but apparently to make his theft less easily discoverable, he ran them through a Coinstar coin-cashing machine—netting himself a cool $60. n James Walsh was arrested in Port St. Lucie, Fla., on Dec. 12, 2016, at a Walmart after carting out an unpaid-for big-screen TV. Walsh said he had swiped another TV on Dec. 11 with no problem—but failed to notice that, on the 12th, the store had a “shop with a cop” event at which St. Lucie County deputies were buying toys for kids.

Recurring Themes Zimbabwe’s hyperinflation remains the most storied, but Venezuela is catching up. In mid-December, the government declared its largest-currency bill (the 100-bolivar note) worthless, replacing it with larger denomination money (after a brief cash-in period that has ended and which some drug dealers were likely shut out of). The 100-bolivar’s value had shrunk to 2 cents on the black market. Stacks of it were required to make even the smallest food purchases, and since wallets could no longer hold the notes, robbers feasted on the “packages” of money people carried around while shopping. The Passing Parade In October, Chicago alderman Howard Brookins Jr. publicly denounced “aggressive” squirrels that were gnawing through trash cans and costing the city an extra $300,000. A month later, Brookins was badly injured in a bicycle collision (broken nose, missing teeth) when a squirrel (in either a mighty coincidence or suicide terrorism) jumped into one of his wheels, sending Brookins over the handlebar. n In October, officials of Alaska’s Iditarod reaffirmed an earlier decision to allow mushers to use mobile phones during the 2017 race; “purists” maintain that phones destroy the “frontierness” of the event.

Thanks this week to Stan Kaplan, Rob Zimmer, Alan Magid and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.


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I keep hearing about the bright future of gene editing, specifically involving something called CRISPR. I’ve seen claims that it could cure cancer and most genetic diseases, maybe even prolong life to infinity and beyond. Is this kooky futurist crap, or maybe something that’ll be too expensive for mass distribution?

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Altered Genes —Julia The experts predicting cancer cures are the relatively sober, realistic ones, Julia— we’ve got CRISPR teams living the sci-fi dream, sticking preserved mammoth genes into elephant cells. The CRISPR-Cas9 editing process still looks like the revolutionary development it’s been touted as over the last four years, and research hums along at a remarkable pace. Still, some of the more dramatic projections surely won’t pan out, and those that do will have to overcome all kinds of stumbling blocks—biological, ethical, legal, ecological and, yes, financial. Let’s catch everyone up on what we’re talking about. The immune systems of certain bacteria use DNA sequences called CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), containing genetic material collected from viruses the bacteria have been exposed to. When one of these viruses attacks again, the matching CRISPR segment gets copied to an RNA molecule (remember from bio class? Like DNA, but just one strand?) that tracks down and binds to the virus’ own DNA, allowing a specialized enzyme called a Cas (CRISPR-associated) protein to cut the DNA and disable the virus. So in CRISPR-Cas9 editing, researchers create guide RNA sequences that match parts of whatever gene they want to alter and use them to essentially program Cas enzymes to go make cuts at the desired spots, adding or removing DNA as needed. This turns out to be easier, cheaper, more precise and more flexible than previous gene-editing methods, and since late 2012 scientists everywhere have been putting CRISPR to ambitious use. Researchers in Pennsylvania used it to cure hemophilia in mice, with major implications for other genetic disorders. At UC Davis, they’re getting ready to create a modified pig that will grow a (presumably transplantable) human pancreas inside it. Just two months ago, in the first such test on an actual person, Chinese oncologists introduced CRISPR-edited immune-response cells into a lung cancer patient. As one might guess with such a pervasive and powerful new methodology, critics have raised concerns about the safety of performing CRISPR editing on human genes. Chief among cited risks is what’s called off-target effects, in which the guide RNA gets confused by multiple similar DNA strings and the wrong gene gets edited; even when the enzyme finds and cuts the correct DNA, it can still dart off and snip some other segment, too. The resulting potential for cellular mayhem is serious: A mistargeted edit could, for example, activate a gene, causing cancer. Efforts to identify and minimize off-target trouble spots are complicated by the fact that

each person’s genome is different and might contain more repeated segments than usual. The field of embryonic gene editing is both more promising and more ethically troubling. We might soon be able to correct genetic problems or add immunities in utero, but such prenatal tinkering refuels perennial fears of creating designer babies, customized for attractiveness or intelligence. CRISPR-edited genes might also head out into the ecosystem: Scientists anticipate being able to quickly wipe out pest species (mosquitoes being the classic) using something called a gene drive, which would cause a sterility mutation to spread through the population much more quickly than ordinary heredity could manage. The low cost of CRISPR research democratizes the research process but thereby increases the likelihood of error by a careless team, and it’s not like there’s much regulation to keep mavericks in line. There are more restrictions on the embryo-modification front: Some countries ban it outright, or permit it only for research; others have spelledout but unenforceable guidelines. A year ago, scientific bodies in the U.S., the UK and China called for a moratorium on making any heritable changes to human DNA. Since then, though, Swedish and British biologists have begun CRISPR-based research on healthy human embryos. The understanding is that these won’t be brought to term, but given such obvious potential for clinical benefit, this might be a tough door to keep closed. With scientists predicting that competition between China and the U.S. for CRISPR supremacy will become the fiercest scientific rivalry since the space race, it’s unlikely that either government will want to set up too many regulatory hoops for scientists to leap through. On the other hand, there’s existing intellectual property law. Wherever billions of dollars are at stake, lawsuits proliferate— competing researchers are now battling over CRISPR-related patent claims in U.S. federal court, and they won’t be the last. And though the research itself might be cheap, any resulting medical treatment likely won’t be. In recent SEC filings, two CRISPR research firms stated their investors’ profits will hinge on the availability of insurance coverage for their still-developing procedures. That’s no hypothetical concern—insurers have been reluctant to cover medical procedures tailored to individual patients. The biggest obstacle to the life-altering breakthroughs CRISPR might yield could well be our kludgy healthcare system. Those designer babies ain’t gonna pay for themselves. n

Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


THE

OCHO

CITIZEN REVOLT

In a week, you can CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

Judgement-Free, Equipment-Free, Salad-Free Zone”)

7. Puke Crossfit (“Surge and Purge!”)

6. Pizzatheory Fitness (“All the Slices You Can Lift”)

5. The BroZone (“The All-Flexing and High-Fiving Workout”)

3. Krossfit Klatch (“Cute Outfits, Wine, No Workouts and Free Daycare”) Exists on Facebook. Shame Your Friends Today!”)

1. Existential Lifetime Fitness

(“You Could Change … but Why?”)

No matter which side of the political aisle you sit on, the conservative Utah Taxpayers Association’s Legislative Outlook Conference is worth the time. Leaders from the Utah State Senate and House of Representatives, policy experts and community leaders cover a broad range of issues expected to be considered at the upcoming session of the Utah Legislature. That includes decreasing taxes, warning of an incometax increase, transparency in taxation and more. You need to know the issues before they take a bite out of you, your pocketbook or your ethics. Little America Hotel, 500 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-972-8814, Monday, Jan. 9, 9 a.m.-noon, free, utahtaxpayers.org

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

JANUARY 5, 2017 | 11

2. The Check-In Gym (“It Only

LEGISLATIVE OUTLOOK CONFERENCE

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We’re Closed”)

The resistance is happening, and you can be part of it. All you need is dedication to the environment and humanity. The #Earth2Trump Roadshow of Resistance visits Salt Lake City, one of 16 cities it’s hitting on its way to Washington, D.C. The idea is to bring thousands of people to protest the presidential inauguration. Expect a great lineup of speakers—including some from the Utah League of Native American Voters—and live music from folk/alternative rock musician Dana Lyons and guitarist Makana. The rally stands to oppose every Donald Trump policy that hurts wildlife, poisons our air and water, destroys our climate, promotes racism, misogyny or homophobia and marginalizes entire segments of our society. Ember, 623 S. State, Salt Lake City, Sunday, Jan. 8, 6:30 p.m., free, RSVP, biologicaldiversity.org

4. 24-Minute Fitness (“Sorry,

EARTH2TRUMP ROADSHOW

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8. Planet Fatass (“The

Here’s a chance to see if that great idea of yours will go anywhere, and if it has the potential to make money. WSU’s Small Business Development Center is hosting 1 Million Cups, an opportunity for entrepreneurs to present ideas to business leaders and receive feedback. Startup Ogden, Weber State University Downtown, 2314 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-626-7232, Wednesday, Jan. 4, 9 a.m., free/registration required, 1millioncups.com/ogden

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Eight gyms for semi-committed New Year’s Resolutioners in 2017:

PITCH BUSINESS IDEAS


Biskupski: The First Year

Milestones, missteps line the mayor’s first 366 days in office. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @DylantheHarris

T

12 | JANUARY 5, 2017

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welve months ago, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski publically promised to shake up the culture in City Hall. She recommended her dawning administration instill a “collaborative, bottom-up, inclusive” framework for city government. “We already have ‘everyday’ experts, and it’s time those of us at the top listened to them,” she said in her State of the City address. But several top city employees were never provided that chance to listen. Before stepping into office, Biskupski asked that all but a couple department heads tender their resignations. Several opted instead to leave before her swearing in. This supposed purge, she told City Weekly at the time, was a means of ensuring city officials were on the same page. Former Mayor Rocky Anderson, who supported Biskupski on the campaign trail, was livid. Had Anderson known then that “she was going to fire so many world-class city employees and completely fail to replace them with anyone that had remotely the same education or experience in the field,” he never would have championed her campaign. Matthew Rojas, the mayor’s communications director, argues that Biskupski’s process was more nuanced than she’s been given credit. Instead of firing public employees, he says, the mayor interviewed each to determine whether they adhered to the team’s

GOVERNMENT common vision. Department directors were expressly told they wouldn’t necessarily lose their jobs. And about half of the cabinet heads were retained after Biskupski interviewed them. Since then, a couple of more have left for other jobs or retired, Rojas adds. “The team that has been put together is a great team,” he says. “All people who were new or elevated had to be confirmed by the council, and every person was confirmed unanimously by the council.” But Anderson says Biskupski created a vacuum of institutional knowledge. Thus began Biskupski’s tenure in office, a bold proclamation that drew sideways glances and pointed comments. Her first year was bookended with more controversy when the city shocked four neighborhoods by revealing they would house new homeless shelters. Still, the mayor’s office offers a litany of successes in 2016, from securing a new UPS hub and 1,500 jobs, to switching to a more efficient and collaborative 911 model. Members of the community certainly congratulated Biskupski throughout the year. The Road Home Executive Director Matt Minkevitch, for example, applauds Operation Diversion—the joint city-county sting that offered prompt drug and alcohol treatment in lieu of jail for homeless people caught with narcotics. “It had an immediate and visible impact upon Rio Grande Street and 500 West,” he says. And true to her campaign platform, Biskupski committed to improving the foul air quality. Several days each year, the valley sky is gray and bleak with pollutants. Toxic air has been cause for concern for several years and politicians uniformly agree it’s a problem. This summer, the city passed a resolution pledging to run off 100 percent renewable energy by 2032, and reduce 80 percent of its carbon emissions by 2040. “This is probably one of the things the mayor is most proud of this year,” Rojas says. Heal Utah Executive Director Matt Pacenza agrees. “That’s a welcome and ambitious and exciting initiative with

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the mayor and her staff,” he says. “I do think in the environmental arena a lot of great stuff has happened.” Salt Lake City also renegotiated its franchise agreement with Rocky Mountain Power a few months later. Instead of a 20-year contract, however, the new agreement will expire in 5. The shorter contract allows the city to evaluate and update the agreement in a manageable time frame. But the mayor’s first term has undergone plenty of shaky moments beyond turnover and issues related to homelessness. In February, 2016, police shot 17-yearold Abdi Mohamed for allegedly beat-

ing another man with a stick. Mohamed denied the allegation, saying he carried the broomstick for protection. Despite requests for the police-cam footage, it has not been released to the public. At the time, Biskupski encouraged Police Chief Mike Brown to meet with a community board to mollify simmering tensions. But when investigators announced in August that the shooting was justified— even while an oversight board determined police broke protocol—a protest descended on City Hall. Demonstrators called for the ouster of Biskupski—for not taking a stronger stand against the police—and District Attorney Sim Gill.

A month-by-month look at Biskupski’s first year January

Biskupski delivers her inaugural address: “As the new mayor of the capital city, I promise improving our air quality will be at the core of every decision and policy we make.”

February

Seventeen-year-old Abdi Mohamed is shot by Salt Lake City police in Rio Grande. It was the third “use of force” incident by SLC police that year: “I had a serious conversation with Police Chief Brown and members of his team to review details about each of these incidents, including a discussion on training and whether deescalation efforts could have been implemented.”

March

Public Service Director April Townsend resigns after a month on the job. She had replaced 35-year-veteran Rick Graham, who the mayor fired: “April is highly qualified and an excellent choice to lead the Department of Public Services, but this department requires enormous commitment and responsibility from its director. April expressed to me a need to devote more attention to other areas of her life.”

April

Biskupski bans city funded or sponsored travel to Mississippi and North Carolina—states that passed anti-LGBTQ legislation: “Our nation and our local community has come too far to allow our progress to be undermined by desperate laws that seem designed only to limit opportunity and access for certain individuals”

May

The city commits to doubling its solar-powered operations from 6 percent to 12 percent: “We are thrilled to align with Subscriber Solar and invest in clean, carbonfree energy to better serve our community.”

June

To offer temporary relief to the homeless, the city establishes a number of mitigation measures: “These recommended projects will provide some short-term relief to individuals experiencing homelessness, while we continue to move forward with our longer-term plans to provide homeless services.”

July

Biskupski shuts down a sincere questioner at a forum meant to repair relationships between police and the public: "I don't want this to be an intimidation that is occurring."

August

A 90-day parking ticket amnesty program is implemented: “When this was first proposed to me by our finance team, it sounded like a win-win for everyone involved.”


November

Ongoing protests near Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota capture the nation’s attention: “Members of Native American tribes in Salt Lake City are rightfully concerned about the Dakota Pipeline’s impact on sacred cultural sites, as well as climate-change issues caused by a new project devoted to more burning of fossil fuels.”

December

The mayor reveals four locations where the city will build homeless resource centers: “The sites we are announcing today represent more than just land; they are spaces of hope for those in need.”

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Biskupski airs frustration to The Salt Lake Tribune editorial board regarding a budget spat with the City Council. The council moved monies earmarked for the redevelopment agency to pay for housing projects: "It all just unraveled in front of us. The decisions that were being made were random."

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October

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Salt Lake City and Rocky Mountain Power negotiate a clean energy agreement: “We need to put strong action behind our pledges to clear our air and address the threat of climate change.”

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September

out controversy. “We can either try to find reasons for this to not work and not be successful, or we can find reasons to make sure it is successful,” she said. “I’m hoping that you who serve in the media will not be out running around looking for reasons for us to fail, but to find good reasons for us to succeed.” Rojas acknowledged a backlash of grief. Some interpreted the mayor’s words to be chastising reporters for refusing to function as a mouthpiece on behalf of the mayor and the city. But he refutes that interpretation. The news is hyperfocused on Rio Grande, he says, which leads residents to believe the same broken system will be operating near them. But the city is doing what it can to avoid replicating that antiquated model. The new shelters will offer daytime resources, thereby preventing residents from milling in long lines outside the shelter, like they do now. “What she’s really thinking is that there are things that could work rather than only thinking of the negative things that we’re trying to change,” he says. By way of example, the mayor points to the Y.M.C.A., which offers services and housing without bothering its neighbors. As for her relationship with the media in general, Rojas says what can come off as guarded boils down to time, or a lack thereof. Biskupski reads every resolution and ordinance, according to Rojas, and she prefers precision rather than quick “victory laps” when interacting with media members. Anderson, who served as SLC mayor for eight years, doesn’t buy it. “Who’s too hard-working that they can’t take a call from members of the media?” he asks. “I worked my tail off when I was there. I worked there basically seven days a week and still made time to talk to reporters.” Attending to a family emergency in Minnesota, Biskupski was unable to speak with City Weekly for this article. Standing in the cold last January, the same month she asked for department leaders’ resignations, Biskupski assured to empower city employees, to visit the offices, garages and service stations. “While I may not get my hands as dirty as some of you,” she said, “I can assure you this is a hands-together administration.” That promise, she said, was one she intended to keep for the next four years. CW

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The latest uproar, however, is one that could resonate for years to come. The marquee moves in her inaugural year will likely refine the landscape of Salt Lake City’s oftmaligned Rio Grande neighborhood. If the city is successful on a path of reform, it will indelibly alter homelessness downtown. The Road Home shelter—which sleeps more than 1,000 homeless—sits on Rio Grande Street, an area that has devolved into a hotbed of drugs and crime. It’s a place with criminal infiltration, where drug pushers have embedded themselves among the most vulnerable. As a result, this ground zero for the destitute has been a prickly thorn in the sides of neighborhood businesses and any politician within earshot. Speaking in a lilting yet authoritative cadence, Biskupski took to the microphone at a mid-December press conference and asked the public to accept that the city was making a difficult decision it believed would lead to a better solution for the homeless. “Today is an important day in Salt Lake City, a day which I ask everyone to have the courage to acknowledge the harsh realities we face in the Rio Grande neighborhood and to support us so that we might transform the future for that neighborhood and the people who will and currently are experiencing homelessness,” she read from a prepared speech. Despite Biskupski’s request, the response from those a stone’s throw from the new sites has not been pretty. Highest on the list of residents’ complaints was that they weren’t allowed to weigh in on where the sites should go. The city moved on a decision without public input. Rojas says the mayor and council members were willing to take a political hit rather than pit neighborhoods against one another. “They didn’t believe that would be a productive conversation,” he says. A steering committee gathered input from the public to develop a rubric for the new sites. “The No. 1 criteria was that the new sites not be conducive for drug trade,” Rojas says. “The public basically told us that public safety was No. 1.” When asked about neighborhood vitality and what she expected from the unhappy residents that reporters were bound to find and interview, Biskupski responded in a peeved plea that the media try not to root

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HOME SWEET H•ME?

How a single real estate deal highlights a city in flux and in crisis.

By Colby Frazier cfrazier@cityweekly.net Photos by Niki Chan

t was by accident that Dick and Jean Raybould came to own the SULA apartment building at 60 E St. in the Avenues neighborhood of Salt Lake City. In January of 1974, Dick’s brother told him that he was owed $10,000— an amount that could not be paid in any currency besides the sevenunit, red brick apartment that has, since 1909, been anchored between First and Second Avenue. Apartment No. 66 had been charred by fire sometime that winter. Water remained on the floor, and it needed to be rebuilt, which is where Dick fit in. His brother would accept the building as payment for the debt only if Dick agreed to rebuild the burned-out apartment—a challenge he accepted, and one that earned him an ownership stake in the building and a long career as an accidental landlord and maintenance man. It has been a decade since Dick, 88, has been permitted to stand atop a ladder and perform maintenance work on the building. And his daughter, Robyn Raybould, 62, who has acted as de-facto maintenance manager for years, has long been looking forward to the day when she could move out of state to be closer to her grandchildren. And so, by the accident of age and time’s relentless passage, the Rayboulds sold their proud building last summer, a building where, for the past two years, I have lived with my family. The sale of the SULA, a name that no one seems to know the exact meaning of (Dick believes it could be an acronym for Single Unit Lease Agreements, while Robyn likes to think it is a term for a water bird), sent a wave of change through the lives of many who called the place home. And it also became a metaphor of sorts for Salt Lake City’s housing crisis, where rental vacancy rates are at a scant 2.5 percent, homelessness is on the rise and because housing demands exceed supply, prices are soaring. Rather than reporting on the city’s housing issues from the bureaucratic heights of cold numbers and statistics, this story is one of a single real estate deal in a single city that is, apparently at the same time, growing into and out of itself. And, just like many American cities, Salt Lake City is experiencing a wave of prosperity for some, while many others are being minced by the jaws of basic market economics. At the SULA—whose new owners, SEPR Real Estate LLC, did not respond to requests to comment for this story—four of the seven tenants moved out upon being notified that their rents would, in some cases, double, and in other instances, be raised by around 40 percent. Other tenants interviewed said they had plans to vacate in the near future. For me, the $850 I was paying for a spacious two-bedroom place, replete with the masonry walls and other charms of the SULA, but lacking amenities like washing machines and off-street parking, was hiked to $1,350 per month.

Like my neighbors, I anticipated that a rent hike, courtesy of new ownership, was imminent. But $500 more a month? This amount was surprising, depressing and, ultimately, far more than I could afford. As I waded into the rental market, I found several things to be true, including the fact that renting in Salt Lake City was no longer a game that I could play. According to Mike Akerlow, director of the city’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division, more than 50 percent of the city’s renters pay more than 30 percent of their income on housing. Once housing costs exceed 30 percent of one’s income, this housing is considered unaffordable. And in Salt Lake City, where Akerlow says about 50 percent of the city’s residents are renters, this means that a good number can’t afford where they’re living. So I set out to buy, begging and borrowing money from as many loved ones as I could to come up with a down payment. As my wife, daughter and I searched for homes, though, it became apparent that our loss in an affordable place to live would soon spiral into a lucky gain that would almost inevitably morph into another person’s loss. This pattern, I imagined, would repeat itself until, somewhere down the line, a person less lucky than I would end up homeless. It is this cycle—the loss of affordable units to increasing housing values and escalating rents—Akerlow says, that the city, which has declared an affordable housing crisis and is preparing to spend tens of millions on affordable housing initiatives, does not have a handle on. “With the timing of our market here, the increase in home sale prices and rental rates, we are taking existing affordable housing and making it more expensive,” he says. “The housing we are building is too expensive, so we’re out of options. There’s always a problem if you’ve got people living in your city who can’t afford to live in their homes.”

No. 62A

For the past seven years, David Ashton has lived in a small one-bedroom apartment in the SULA. Like many residents here, Ashton was notified at the beginning of October that his rent would be increased, and that he had 20 days to notify the new owners if he planned to stay or go. “They raised my rent by $500 and that’s kind of life-changing right now,” says Ashton, who was paying $450. Like many of his neighbors, Ashton considers SULA, and the wider Avenues neighborhood, his home. He works downtown in retail management, and for a number of years, he didn’t need a car and walked everywhere he went. But the SULA, under the stewardship of the Rayboulds, became an affordable sanctuary when Ashton fell ill with a genetic issue, forcing him to undergo open-heart surgery.


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JANUARY 5, 2017 | 15

At 65, Amy, who asked that her real name be withheld from the story, has lived at the SULA since 2004, paying $650 for her two-bedroom apartment. Over the years, Amy’s son, and her grandson, have lived with her. And every Sunday, Amy walks to the Cathedral of the Madeleine on South Temple, just a few blocks from her place, to take her grandson to church. Her apartment, she says, is everything to her. “I get very attached to where I live,” she says. “This is my home, I’m protected; I feel protected by these four walls. I loved this apartment and I loved being secure. All that shattered when they sold this building.” Amy was one of the first SULA tenants to receive notice that her rent was being raised, and she says the increase of $450 per month sent her into a state of shock. Amy approached my wife and I, asking if our rent had been increased as well. When we said no, she seemed hurt and wondered aloud why the new landlords were singling her out. I tried to assure her that I had faith that soon, my rent, too, would be increased. But these assurances didn’t seem to soothe Amy’s anger. Like Ashton and myself, she turned to a rental market that seemed to have left her in the dust. She says her searches for a comparable place in the neighborhood yielded options ranging $1,100-$1,300. “Who can imagine coming up with $500 more a month in rent?” she asks. Amy liked the Rayboulds because they didn’t hassle her, and they kept the rent low. In exchange for the low rent, Amy says she felt comfortable buying new blinds and going without amenities like a dishwasher. And the SULA cast its spell on her, she says, charming her with its big front windows that allow the sun to pour in, the brick walls and her patio, where she planted flowers. Amy knows, just as Ashton knows, that the Rayboulds were giving them a screaming deal. Dick even let Amy pay her rent in two monthly chunks because it was hard for her to make a lump sum payment. “They were just wonderful landlords,” she says. “We loved this neighborhood. We love this area and I don’t want to leave this area.”

Dick Raybould says that after he took over ownership of the SULA, prior owners had racked up a series of high-interest loans on the place, which he inherited. But once these were paid off, the building became a reliable source of income for his family. The Rayboulds realized that consistency in renters was the key to, not only their happiness, but to the happiness of their renters as well. And so when someone was fortunate enough to snag an apartment in the SULA, their rent began at or near fair-market value, but was never raised.

Apt. No. 68

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Priorities

“Our first priority was having renters that tell you if the plumbing’s leaking so you can get over and get it fixed right now,” Dick Raybould says. “Once we had it fully rented, the name of the game was to keep it fully rented, then it became a cash cow.” In four decades, the Rayboulds have only ever had to ask two renters to leave; one exited in a huff, the other with grace. And at two years, my tenure at the SULA was by far the slimmest, as I shared walls with a woman—who asked that her name be withheld—who lived there for 12 years, Ashton for seven, and Gloria for 10. Dick Raybould, who retired from a military career but who had always been taken by architecture, says his love for the SULA stemmed from its design. The two-bedroom apartments feature large living and dining rooms, their own front doors and back doors, and small bedrooms. “I just liked the building,” he says. “It’s a great, solid, brick building. I like the architecture of it, with the private entrance, private exit in the rear; it looked like a place I’d like to live.” While the SULA has always been rich in character and charm, Robyn Raybould says that she didn’t feel the need to charge high rental prices, and also didn’t feel bad levying less than market rate, because the units lacked many of the amenities renters might expect if paying top dollar. It’s difficult to know the situation of the new owners, who seemed like nice enough people. Real estate website Zillow shows that the SULA sold in July for $699,900. The Rayboulds said that they received upward of 20 offers for the property, and went with the eventual buyers because they wrote a nice letter, and seemed genuine when they insinuated that their ambitions were not to simply flip the place. Dick Raybould notes that during the sale, a real estate agent remarked that it was kind of him to provide charity housing for people. While some of the rates were undoubtedly low, Robyn Raybould says her father’s ethos, when it came to his tenants, was to hold onto them as long as possible. “Dad didn’t like to kick people out. He listened to everyone’s life,” Robyn Raybould says. “Different people were in different places. We cared about the people and we didn’t raise the rent and everybody was happy.”

Gloria

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“Having a place like this helps me survive because rent was affordable,” Ashton says. “I would be homeless if I didn’t have this building. That’s how this place has affected me. It’s been my home for the last seven years.” When Ashton underwent surgery, he was a couple of weeks late on rent. The landlords, he said, told him not to worry and to pay when he could. When he returned to his apartment from the hospital, he says that Robyn Raybould had made him cookies. A couple of years ago, Ashton says he was short on rent money and asked the Rayboulds if there was anything he could do to help make up the gap. He stained the fence and helped Robyn with various maintenance projects and, he says, rent for that month was waived. “They were really, really great to rent from.” Ashton says he can’t afford to pay the new monthly rent of $950. But when he began his search for a new place, he found that over the past seven years, rental prices had skyrocketed. “I kind of expected to find something for $750-ish for a one bedroom,” Ashton says. “I’ve been shocked to find everything $850, $900, $1,100. I’m trying to figure out a new budget.” Aside from having to leave the SULA, Ashton is also disappointed that he might have to leave the Avenues, a neighborhood he has called home for 16 years. He enjoys walking to the liquor store, only a few blocks up E Street, and the Smith’s Marketplace grocery store. “I’ve often said to people, ‘I have no reason to leave the Avenues, everything I need is here,’” he says. “It’s my home. It’s super sad.”

David Ashton


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Kirk and Alex Campbell

Amy says that she had a small savings that she used to pay a couple of months’ rent at the SULA while she continued her search for a place. Short of that savings, though, she says she doesn’t know what she would have done. She says that her experience at the SULA has opened her eyes to how a person could end up on the street. “Losing where you live is not fun; it makes you sick,” she says. “This is how people get homeless.”

Apt. No. 62B

Gloria was the first resident I met at the SULA; we shared a patio that overlooked E Street, where every single morning, horns blare in the street as traffic overflows from the popular Java Jo’s drive-thru coffee shop. For Gloria, life at the SULA has lasted 10 years. Ashton got his place in the building, just across the hall from Gloria, because she recommended him to the Rayboulds. The $475 per month she paid over those years was raised last October to $950—an amount that she says is going to force her to grow up and look at buying a place. “I was expecting them to raise the rent by maybe a couple hundred bucks, but I definitely wasn’t expecting double,” she says. Gloria has lived in the Avenues for 20 years, and she says the neighborhood feels like home. When she needs groceries, she feels comfortable heading to Smith’s in her pajamas. The Rayboulds, Gloria says, were kind to her. Shortly after moving in, she dropped something into her sink, cracking the porcelain. Dick replaced it, but a short time later, Gloria says she broke the new one. She fessed up and told Dick that before she left town for a vacation, she would leave some money for a new sink. When she returned, not only had the sink been replaced, but the countertop as well. When Gloria attempted to find a new place to live, she says she was greeted by the same reality as other SULA residents: Rent had shot up to the point where it was difficult to justify renting. “It’s painful to pay double the price for the same place,” Gloria says. “It’s just changing times. I was re-

Robyn, Jean and Dick Raybould

ally surprised by how much the rents have gone up in this area. That’s one of the shockers. It’ll be sad to move from the Avenues. There’s a good chance that I’m going to have to move from the Avenues because it’s too expensive.”

Apt. No. 66

Kirk and Alex Campbell moved into the SULA shortly after marrying in 2009. Earlier this year, Alex gave birth to a baby boy, Rocky, who on summer nights, when all of the windows were open, I could sometimes hear crying. “This is the only place we’ve ever lived,” Alex says of her time being married to Kirk, and the new addition to the family. Alex says the SULA’s close proximity to the University of Utah came in handy when she was a student there, and now, it is close to her job downtown. And $700 a month for a two-bedroom apartment was pretty reasonable even in 2009. The couple work opposite schedules, and currently can swing it so that Rocky is with one of them while the other is at work. As they have mulled moving, they say that it is difficult to find an affordable place to live in the neighborhood, but the further they branch out away from their jobs, the more expensive childcare and other tangential expenses become. As is the case with Gloria, Alex and Kirk say they’re thinking about buying a place (they plan to stay at the SULA while they’re looking). “It no longer makes fiscal sense to pay that high of rent here,” Kirk says. “It’s not all bad because now we’re, like, ‘what do we really want to do?’” The couple also says that the Rayboulds were great landlords, and that they got used to living without certain amenities, and living with quirks, like the pigeons inhabiting the swamp cooler. “They just valued you staying,” Alex says. “They valued somebody staying for a long time over an investment. They’d rather have tenants they trusted, that stayed long term, rather than charging more.”

Trouble ahead, trouble behind

Housing and Neighborhood Development Director Akerlow says that signs of an affordable housing crunch were showing up years before it became the crises he says it is today. And while the city has made some efforts to grapple with housing needs for the poor, Akerlow says it is very difficult to gauge how many affordable units the city is losing as landlords raise rents, forcing tenants to flee. “My guess is, and I’m pretty certain on this, we’re at a net loss,” Akerlow says of affordable housing units. “We are losing affordable housing.” Around the same time tenants at the SULA were notified of rent hikes, the Salt Lake City Council voted to strip $21 million from the city’s Redevelopment Agency to put toward affordable housing projects. This money, hoped District 4 Councilman Derek Kitchen, could be used to incentivize developers to build affordable housing, to coax landlords into keeping existing units affordable, or funding a community land trust, whereby the city could buy land and eventually build affordable housing units. Some regulatory tools that are commonly used in other communities facing similar situations—like inclusionary zoning laws, which would force developers to build a certain number of affordable units as a condition of developing—have not yet been implemented in Salt Lake City. Part of the reason, Kitchen says, is the propensity of the Legislature to step in and forbid the city from enacting progressive agendas, as it did in 2012 when the city attempted to ban idling at drive-through windows, only to see state lawmakers forbid municipalities from taking such actions. “There’s no appetite for [inclusionary housing],” Kitchen says of the Legislature. “It’s always this really delicate dance we do to make sure that we don’t get out too far ahead.” Akerlow says that whether the goal is to build new affordable units or preserve old ones, there needs to be money.


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JANUARY 5, 2017 | 17

When my family and I moved into the SULA two years ago, we felt like we had struck gold. At the SULA, we paid $850, which—if federal statistics about median income in Salt Lake County are to be believed—still isn’t too far from the roughly $938 that a two-bedroom apartment should cost, in order to be affordable for the majority of those who live here. My daughter’s elementary school is just up the street from the SULA, which is flanked on both sides by coffee shops. From E Street, my City Weekly office is an easy walk or bike-ride away. The SULA’s ceilings were tall enough for my daughter’s loft bed. I drank gin and tonics on

timeframe, and possibly even verifying that some improvements were made, before a house-flipper can turn a property around. “All that did was drive up housing prices and made it so we couldn’t live in that house affordably,” Sarah says. During our home search, we entered two houses on the city’s west side where Hispanic ladies lived with their families. In one home, a room was occupied with a pair of neatly made beds with superhero sheets. A woman was in the kitchen, where pots of wonderful-smelling food bubbled on the stovetop. This house was fine, except for the fact that someone lived there. Sarah and I left with a sick feeling, knowing that if we bought that house, we’d be sending this lady and her children on the same frustrating journey that we were on. I hate moving, especially when I don’t want to. But this time around, I have realized that I occupy a perch somewhere in the middle section of a food chain that loves to eat itself alive. The new owners of the SULA have done whatever it is they believe they need to do. And in selling the SULA, the Rayboulds did what they needed to do. But while accomplishing these goals, most of the building's tenants were displaced. My response was to hire a real estate agent and begin scouring places where I could afford to live. The city’s west side, long affordable and home to diverse populations, was perfect. And so here comes Colby with his beard and his Protect Wild Utah bumper sticker to buy up a patch of the American dream. As I painted the brown walls, replaced the door knobs and cleaned out the gutters at my new house, I looked over the rooftops of a city in flux, and couldn’t help but wonder if I am as much a part of the problem as the landlords casually jacking up the rents, forcing people to grow up and get out. CW

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Apt. No. 64

the patio and got a kick out of my cat as she stalked birds in the window. “I liked being close to my school,” my daughter, June, says. “I liked how spacious it was and how quality the SULA was. It was built well, I guess.” My wife, Sarah, says she liked the brick walls; the interior walls were lined with wood, probably cedar, giving the place a genuine '70s look. When our rent was raised in October, we set out to be home buyers, and we succeeded, buying a small house in the Glendale neighborhood. But this isn’t where the story ends happily. We made offers on three houses before one was accepted. On the second-to-last one, we were beat out by a cash offer. Before the offer on our eventual house closed, we saw the same house that had gone to the cash buyer go back on the market for $40,000 more. The new owner didn’t appear to have made a single improvement, and even used the same pictures from the previous listing. The criminality in this rabid speculation and money-making made us angry. Sarah says she’d like to see some regulations put into place restricting the

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Helping to fuel the housing shortage, Akerlow says, are prices that have now crested pre-recession levels, with the median home price in Salt Lake County jumping to more than $300,000 for the first time in the state’s history. While rental and home prices have jumped, incomes, Akerlow says, have remained mostly stagnant, meaning that more and more people are being forced to spend more than they can afford on housing. In an apparent attempt to ease the strain of the growing homeless population living along Rio Grande Street, the council announced the locations of four 150-bed homeless shelters in December. With the planned closure of the nearly 1,000-bed Road Home shelter, though, the success of these new, smaller shelters at easing the housing crunch is a big question mark. “We are now in the middle of a crisis because the housing is not there, the funding is so limited, our options are so few that unless there’s a dramatic change, we are going to continue to lose,” he says.

The author surrounded by his wife Sarah and daughter June


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Repertory Dance Theatre: Emerge Utah’s Repertory Dance Theatre is unique in the dance world for many reasons. One of the most important is the approach to dance as more than just a vessel to be filled with the energetic creations of seasoned choreographers. The performers are also expected to be teachers and choreographers in their own right. Starting with the very first group of RDT dancers in 1966, this collective pushed each other to become better at their art by tackling it from all angles, as creator and dancer. It’s the kind of experience that has led to tremendous careers later on down the road for many of RDT’s alumni. The current group of dancers has, for the most part, been working together for the past two or three seasons, solidifying relationships with each other that become more apparent every time they perform. They are ready to take it to the next level. And so, with Emerge, these dancers are given the next challenge: to present themselves as emerging choreographers, putting all that they have learned, and all that they wish to express, out there for us to see in their own “words.” Emerge showcases the work of seven company members—Justin Bass, Jaclyn Brown, Lauren Curley, Efren Corado Garcia, Dan Higgins, Tyler Orcutt and Ursula Perry—and the company’s artistic director and former RDT dancer, Nicholas Cendese. (Katherine Pioli) Repertory Dance Theater: Emerge @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, Jan 6-7, 7:30 p.m., $15, students/ seniors $12. artsaltlake.arttix.org

FRIDAY 1.6

Pioneer Theatre Co.: Fences It comes as a complete coincidence that Pioneer Theatre Co.’s production of August Wilson’s Fences premieres just as Denzel Washington’s film version hits theaters. But director Timothy Douglas isn’t worrying about how that coincidence might affect audience response. He’s focused on his own approach to it—which is probably easier to do when you have a 30-year history with the material. Douglas’ experience with Fences goes back to the world premiere of the play, when he understudied the role of Gabriel at Yale Repertory Theatre in 1985. Like so much of Wilson’s writing, Fences endures beyond the specifics of the play’s setting. Though the story takes place in the 1950s—following an ex-Negro League baseball player named Troy and his sometimes-volatile family relationships—Douglas believes that the play’s exploration of race and the legacy of discrimination might be particularly resonant after a volatile presidential election year. “Given the current political climate, and awareness of people of color, it’s very much in the American zeitgeist right now,” Douglas says. “There are lines, circumstances within the play that unfortunately remain very relevant. There’s nothing I can try to push into the play that’s not already there.” For Douglas, whether audiences are more familiar with the material now thanks to the movie, the approach remains simple: Trust in Wilson’s text. “I’m smart enough to step back, because the words themselves will ring like a bell,” he says. “The cleaner and leaner I can be with it, it will have a greater impact.” (Scott Renshaw) Fences @ Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Jan. 6-21, $29$44. pioneertheatre.org

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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JANUARY 5-11, 2017

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The number of problems with the criminal justice system is so high, it can be hard to know where to begin. The prison population of the United States is so large that it exceeds that of some countries; police disproportionately target and incarcerate people of color for minor crimes; prisons practically encourage recidivism. The list goes on and on. None of these problems can be fixed in the two-hour runtime of this lecture, nor are they likely to change drastically given the incoming administration. But Parks City’s Eccles Center for the Performing Arts offers a chance for people to come and learn about the problems facing America’s penal system, and how to raise awareness and move forward. Leading the night’s discussion is Van Jones, CNN contributor, attorney and former White House adviser who rose to prominence during the most recent election cycle. Joining him is Mike Farrell, star of the television show M*A*S*H* and an advocate for ending the death penalty; and Kirk Bloodsworth, the first man released from death row based on DNA evidence not presented at trial. The conversation covers a broad array of issues within the justice system, but given Farrell and Bloodsworth’s advocacy, the night focuses around the ways these failings are especially highlighted in America’s use of capital punishment. As one of the few lecture-based events in this season’s performance lineup, the night is unique within the Eccles Center’s current session. (Kylee Ehmann) Criminal Justice Reform with Van Jones @ Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Jan. 7, 7:30 p.m., $29. ecclescenter.org

Local multiplexes fill up at year-end with movies that are pushing for awards consideration. You might have to go just a bit farther—to Park City, perhaps—to catch up with 2016’s best film on a theater screen. The term “monumental” feels like it must be hyperbole, but there’s really nothing else that captures what veteran documentary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson has achieved with Cameraperson. It’s an idea that sounds on the surface like a snooze: compiling snippets of footage from many of the documentary films she’s shot over the course of 25 years, for high-profile documentary directors including Michael Moore and Kirby Dick, plus her own home movies. But what emerges in that footage is something that strips bare the idea of “objective” journalistic filmmaking to find the humanity in every work of artistic creation—the person behind the camera. And that person emerges here in ways both adorably small (a sneeze that shakes the camera, or a shadow on the sidewalk) to gasp-inducingly huge (watching without interfering as a Bosnian toddler tries to play with a hatchet lodged in a stump). The on-camera subjects are often fascinating all on their own, whether they’re survivors of genocide or Johnson’s own mother struggling with dementia. It’s the way these moments are put together, however—in one of the greatest works of film editing you’ll ever find—that results in an emotional bombshell about art and the simple experience of caring about other people. (SR) Park City Film Series: Cameraperson @ Jim Santy Auditorium, 1255 Park Ave., Park City, Jan. 6-7, 8 p.m.; Jan. 8, 6 p.m., free. parkcityfilmseries.com

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Park City Film Series: Cameraperson


A&E New Year’s Uplift

A reminder of the geek stories that offered cheer in a rough year. BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

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Woman: The True Amazon tells a story from Wonder Woman’s past, during her formative years on Themyscira. The book is self-contained, so you won’t need to read any more or any less to enjoy it. There are hints of bittersweet to it, but Thompson’s art and watercolors are jaw-dropping and it leaves you feeling good about yourself and the story, and that’s the most important thing there is. Go down to Black Cat Comics or Dr. Volt’s and pick up a copy now. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: Though not everyone will have been able to see the next chapter of the Harry Potter saga on the London stage, the script for the play was released. And although it does elicit tears at many points, the fragile understanding between generations, particularly between Harry and his son, was one of the most uplifting things in nerd literature this year. The play is set years after the final book and movie in the Harry Potter saga, and follows Harry’s son, Albus Severus, as he tries to navigate the world with the weight of his father’s legacy on his shoulders. In the course of the story, he has to face horrible things and, at the end, he and his father are finally able to better understand one another. If you can, see the play. If not, the book is almost as great. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: Hear me out on this one. Yes, I said the new Star Wars movie was as bleak and depressing as 2016, but if you dig a little deeper, it has the message we need to get us beyond that awful year: Hope. The film is really about a generation of rebels who will do whatever it takes, up to and including the ultimate sacrifice, to ensure the next generation has the chance of a better life. Yes, it’s sad, but we need more stories about such heroic selflessness. Once you get over the initial shock of emotion, you can find the uplifting themes. Like 2016 itself, that hope might be a little harder to find, but once you see it, you cling to it. This is but a taste of the great things we got this last year. I’d be happy to hear what some of your favorite pick-me-up stories of 2016 were. We all have them; with how bad the year was, we all had to have them. Be sure to share them when you think of them. I feel like we’re all going to need it. CW

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t’s almost a cliché at this point to say that 2016 was a bad year. It’s given us the despicable Donald Trump and taken away from us some of our most important artists ranging from David Bowie, Prince and Leonard Cohen to Anton Yelchin, Gene Wilder and Alan Rickman. Even the Star Wars movie released was good, but as depressing as the rest of the year. We get it: 2016 had it out for us. But not everything about last year was a bleak downer; we got some truly great and uplifting nerd stories, and I’m here to highlight some of my favorites. Ghostbusters: Director Paul Feig brought us a surprisingly fresh and hilarious take on an old classic when he cast four women as the face of the new Ghostbusters. The movie was one of the best times I’ve had in a movie theater, laughing out loud and literally slapping my knee. It was no mistake that the bad guy, both in the film and for fans of it, was an entitled white guy who wanted to ruin everything for the world because he thought he knew better than everyone else. Was it the best movie? No. But it was fun as hell, and we needed it. Dr. Strange: After Marvel’s Civil War, I felt like superhero movies were going to be nothing but gritty affairs with most of the fun drained from them. But that was before I saw Dr. Strange. Benedict Cumberbatch brought an arrogant glee to the Sorcerer Supreme that was fun to watch. The film carried offered lots of great quips and jokes matched with a great story where good triumphs over evil. It was exactly the breath of fresh air required in the runup to the election. Wonder Woman: The True Amazon: Written and drawn by Jill Thompson in honor of Wonder Woman’s 75th anniversary, Wonder

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Salt Lake City-based photographer Benjamin Cook presents his photography of peaks in Allure of the Mountains at Chapman Library (577 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8623, slcpl.org), through Feb. 28.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

A Year With Frog and Toad SCERA, 745 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, Jan. 6-26, Monday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., scera.org Cash on Delivery Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Feb. 4, times vary, haletheater.org Fences Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6961, daily except Sundays, times vary, Jan. 6-21, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 18) Gidion’s Knot Westminster College Dumke Auditorium, 1250 E. 1700 South, Salt Lake City, Jan. 5-21, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 21, 2 p.m. matinee, pinnacleactingcompany.org Live Museum Theater Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6927, through April 15, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu The Marvelous Wonderettes Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Washington Terrace, 801-393-0700, Monday, Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Feb. 11, terraceplayhouse.com The Nerd Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley, 801-984-9000, daily except Sundays, times vary, through Feb. 4, hct.org Wizard of Oz Utah Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-532-6000, through Jan. 14, dates and times vary, uctheatre.org

DANCE

Emerge Leona Wagner Black Box Theater, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, Jan. 6-7, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Utah Symphony Haitian fund concert Susan Swartz Studios, 260 Main, Park City, 435-6551201, Jan. 8, 4 p.m., susanswartz.com Utah Symphony: Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-3552787, Jan. 6-7, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Collin Williams, Jackson Banks & Nicholas Smith Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison, Sandy, 801-255-2078, Jan. 6, 8:30 p.m., sandystation.com Free Kittens: A Stand Up Comedy Show The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, Salt Lake

City, 801-746-0557, Jan. 6 & Feb. 3, 7 p.m., theurbanloungeslc.com ImprovBroadway 496 N. 900 East, Provo, 909-260-2509, every Saturday, 8 p.m., improvbroadway.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, every Saturday, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com Jacob Leigh Wiseguys, 194 S. 400 West, 801-5325233, Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com John Heffron Wiseguys, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Jan. 6-7, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., laughingstock.us Marcus & Guy Seidel Wiseguys, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-463-2909, Jan. 6-7, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., drapertheatre.org Open-Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Random Tangent Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801572-4144, Saturdays, 10 p.m., drapertheatre.org Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Alan Bernheimer: Lost Profiles Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Salt Lake City, 801-3282586, Jan. 9, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Alexandra Bracken & Susan Dennard: Wayfarer & Windwitch The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Jan. 9, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Erin Summerhill: Ever the Hunted Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-4849100, Dec. 29, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Local Author Showcase The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City 801-484-9100, Jan. 10, 7-9 p.m., kingsenglish.com

Mette Ivie Harrison: For Time and All Eternities The King’s English, 1511 S., 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Jan. 11, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Robert T. Winn: Night Reflections: A True Story of Friendship, Love, Cancer, and Survival The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-464-9100, Jan. 6, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., Salt Lake City, through April 22, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Subaru WinterFest Snowbird Resort, Hwy. 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, 801-933-2222, Jan. 7-8, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., snowbird.com/events

TALKS & LECTURES

Criminal Justice Reform with Van Jones, Mike Farrell & Kirk Bloodsworth Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Jan. 7, 7:3010 p.m., ecclescenter.org (see p. 18) Leah Murray: The Election of 2016 Hurst Center, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, 801-6266706, Jan. 9, 7 p.m., weber.edu/history Kevin Bales Grand America, 555 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-258-6000, Jan. 9, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Alyce Carrier: Old Work Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Jan. 14, utahmoca.org Amy Caron: Angel Series Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., Salt Lake City, 801-594-8651, reception Jan. 14, 3 p.m.; exhibit Jan. 9-Feb. 25, slcpl.org The Art of Joy! Local Colors of Utah, 1054 E. 2100 South, 801-363-3922, through Jan. 10, localcolorsart.com Benjamin Cook: Allure of the Mountains Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623,

Jan. 7 reception, 4-5 p.m.; exhibit through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Ben Steele: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-3553383, through Jan. 14, modernwestfineart.com Carl Richards: This is Where I Draw the Line Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Jan. 8, kimballartcenter.org David Levinthal: The Wild West Julie Nester Gallery, 1280 Iron Horse Drive, Park City, 435-6497855, through Jan. 17, julienestergallery.com Drew Conrad: The Desert Is A Good Place To Die CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 385215-6768, through Jan. 13, cuartcenter.org Faces & Places West Jordan Schorr Gallery 8000 S. Redwood Road, third floor, West Jordan, 801-569-5000, through Jan. 6, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., wjordan.com Gallery at the Station: Michael Calles/Saline Visions Union Station, 2501 S. Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-393-9890, through Jan. 6, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, theunionstation.org Holly Manneck: Popped & Twisted Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-6498882, through Jan. 8, kimballartcenter.org Jazmine Martinez: Ciclo Vital Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, Salt Lake City, 801-596-0500, through Jan. 14, facebook.com/mestizoarts Jeri Jonise: Together Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Jan. 20, slcpl.org Kaori Takamura & Gwen Davidson: Look Closely Meyer Gallery, 305 Main, Park City, 435-649-8160, through Jan. 14, meyergallery.com Lewis J. Crawford: Geometry from Public Space Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 6, slcpl.org Megan Gibbons: Beyond the Narrative Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, through Jan. 13, Monday-Friday, visualarts.utah.org Peter Everett: Transmutation CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Jan. 13, cuartcenter.org Phoebe Berrey: Fun with Stuff Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 6, slcpl.org Rick Whitson: From Souks to the Sahara: Visions of Morocco Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8640, through Jan. 7, slcpl.org Scott Filipiak: The Fragility of Nature Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8611, daily except Sundays, 10 a.m., through Jan. 26, slcpl.org Stephanie Leitch: Interstices Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, 435-283-3456, through Jan. 27, granaryartcenter.org Jordan Brun: Garish SLC Main Library, Level 2, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-524-8200, reception Jan. 23, 6:30-8 p.m.; exhibit Jan. 11-Feb. 10, slcpl.org Kaori Takamura & Gwen Davidson: Look Closely Meyer Gallery, 305 Main St., Park City, 435-649-8160, Dec. 26-Jan. 14, meyergallery.com Lindsay Daniels: Nepal Rises Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8640, reception Jan. 17, 6:30 p.m., exhibit Jan. 9-March 18, slcpl.org Phoebe Berrey: Fun with Stuff Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801524-8200, through Jan. 6, slcpl.org Western Landscapes 1859-1978 David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, Salt Lake City, 801-583-8143, Tuesday-Friday, 1-5:30 p.m., through Jan. 6, daviddeefinearts.com


RESTAURANT REVIEWS

Beyond Pho

DINE

Tracking Vietnamese flavors from Midvale to Clearfield. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

Pho Banh’s curry chicken banh mi

PHO BANH

1286 S. Legend Hills Drive, Clearfield 801-773-3922 phobanhlayton.com

JANUARY 5, 2017 | 21

7640 S. State, Midvale 801-889-4090 pho33utah.com

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PHO 33

placed an order for pho and banh mi. I felt a little guilty—like I’d just committed a bank heist—when the bill, including drinks, came to less than $20 for two hungry people. The shrimp rolls—steamed shrimp, shredded carrots, lettuce and vermicelli in rice paper—were satisfying, especially for a mere $2.75. My wife enjoyed an excellent banh mi sandwich—there are 10 different ones to choose from—of cari ga, or curried chicken. The sandwiches are served on slightly crisp, lightly toasted hoagiestyle rolls with butter, cucumber, jalapeño, cilantro, carrot, pickles and lettuce, plus whatever main ingredients you’d like. Options include barbecue lemongrass pork, teriyaki chicken, garlic beef, lemongrass tofu, grilled pork meatballs and traditional pork. Beyond the alluring flavors and textures—spicy and sweet, crunchy and soft— the cari ga was also a bargain; it was much more than we could eat in a single sitting. Luckily, Pho Banh is well-equipped for food on the fly. It’s the perfect place to grab a to-go meal the next time you find yourself hankering for Vietnamese flavors in Clearfield. CW

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Pho 33 strives to satisfy a range of palates with a pan-Asian menu where you’ll find, in addition to Vietnamese dishes, ones like pad Thai, sweet-and-sour pork, Malaysian rice noodles, walnut shrimp and kung pao chicken. Still, lots of regular customers come for the pho, Vietnam’s contribution to the world’s great soups. At Pho 33, it ranges from $3.95 for the kids’ size, to $6.50-$12.50 for adult servings. Options include tripe, meatballs, rare beef, brisket, tendon, chicken, tofu and veggie. I opted for the priciest version: pho with kobe beef ($12.50). The well-balanced beef broth was subtle and quite clear, not cloudy, with flavors and aromas of cinnamon, star anise, ginger, black cardamom and onion. A hefty portion of perfectly cooked rice noodles was submerged in the broth, with thinly sliced, lean kobe beef and scallions floating on top. Alongside were the traditional accoutrements of Thai basil, bean sprouts, cilantro, jalapeño slices and lime to use as desired. While heading up to Ogden recently, I spotted a little Vietnamese eatery just off the interstate in Clearfield. Pho Banh is a Vietnamese sandwich and noodle shop located in the Legend Hills development just north of Layton, which is also home to Lucky Slice Pizza, Chen’s Asian Cuisine, Tepanyaki Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Ya. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but left Pho Banh saying, “I’ll be back!” Low prices and super-friendly service will have you saying the same. It’s a tiny place where you order at the counter, and much of the food is served on Styrofoam. We grabbed an order of shrimp spring rolls ($2.75) from the refrigerated self-serve shelves (where you’ll also find avocado rolls, cold drinks and such) and

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TED SCHEFFLER

A

positive result of the emigration to this country by Vietnamese families, both during and following the Vietnam War, is that their cuisine was exported along with parts of their culture, and it’s now become part of ours. There are dozens of eateries along the Wasatch Front that feature popular Vietnamese foods such as pho and banh mi, like the two I’m focusing on here: one down south in Midvale, the other up north in Clearfield. Pho 33 probably wouldn’t have shown up on my culinary radar otherwise, but their discount dinner coupons offered through the City Weekly Store caught my attention. The restaurant doesn’t have much curb appeal. In fact, walking into a nondescript side-door off the parking lot, it looks like an underground drinking club, or a meeting space for secret societies. Frankly, it’s not a whole lot better inside, décor-wise. But, it’s a large space where you won’t be cramped, and the staff is very friendly and welcoming. We settled into a booth and ordered beverages (no booze here) and a couple of appetizers from the extensive menu. I was immediately struck by how low the prices were. For example, an order of fresh shrimp spring rolls is $4.50. Wrapped in rice paper, cut into six manageable pieces and served cold, two full-sized spring rolls are stuffed with tender cooked shrimp (tofu is also an option), shredded lettuce, avocado wedges, mint and thin vermicelli noodles. The thick, rich peanut dipping sauce alongside was wonderful. Another enjoyable appetizer is dau hu me ($4.25)—firm tofu that is battered, deepfried and coated with sesame seeds. I liked the tofu quite a lot, but couldn’t detect any sesame seeds, besides those floating in the tasty garlic-soy sauce it’s served with. Folks like me, who don’t mind a meaty salad, will enjoy the goi bo, a salad of cubed beef filet with cucumber, celery, onion and tomato, all tossed in a zippy chile-lime dressing ($9.95). Service could not have been friendlier or more informative, which makes Pho 33 a good choice for anyone new to Vietnamese cuisine, or who might be intimidated by the exotic menu. One stir-fry dish we enjoyed, which was recommended by our server, is lemongrass chicken ($7.50) called com ga xa. It’s a simple, but flavorful plate of tender, lemongrass-infused, boneless pieces of chicken fried with onions and hot dried chili peppers, served with rice and a side salad.


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22 | JANUARY 5, 2017

FOOD MATTERS

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

BRING THE FAMILY UP EMIGRATION CANYON THIS HOLIDAY SEASON -Creekside Patio -87 Years and Going Strong -Breakfast served daily until 4pm -Delicious Mimosas & Bloody Marys -Gift Cards for sale in diner or online

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Tracy Aviary DEREK CARLISLE

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

Tradition... Tradition

WTF

If, like me, you consider Tracy Aviary’s EatDrink-SLC to be one of the tastiest soirées of the year, here’s good news. The event’s wintertime sister, WTF, takes place on Saturday, Jan. 14 at the Rose Wagner Jeanne Theater. WTF stands for Wine, Theater and Food, and includes boutique wines from family-owned wineries and cocktails from Takashi mixologist Rich Romney, courtesy of Vine Lore Wine and Spirits. Restaurants such as Frida Bistro, Pallet, Copper Onion, Whiskey Street, Zest and others provide the food. The theater aspect includes “pop-up entertainment from alternative arts groups,” according to Stephen Brown of nonprofit SB Dance, which is one of the beneficiaries of the event. The 21-and-over shindig begins at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are $75 per person, which includes food, a signature apothecary glass, drink tickets, entertainment by SB Dance, silent auction and dancing. For tickets and further information, visit sbdance.com.

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

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Award Winning Donuts

Fire & Ice

During the Sundance Film Festival, the Waldorf Astoria Park City (2100 Frostwood Drive) invites hotel guests and visitors alike to experience their al fresco, firethemed lounge called Firestorm Lounge by Lamborghini. It’s a poolside, outdoor venue, which might sound icy and dicey. But don’t fret; you won’t freeze with the Lounge’s fire pits and fire walls, entertainment by fire dancers and culinary treats like fondue, chocolate-themed cocktails and a chocolate volcano. The Firestorm Lounge is sponsored by Lamborghini; the luxury auto outfit exhibit cars on-property for all you motorheads to drool over.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

o o d Times G & B e er, P izza

Taste Tickets

It might seem early to be planning for August, but it’s never too early to get your tickets for the Aug. 6 Taste of the Wasatch, which are on sale now at tasteofthewasatch.org. As you probably know, Taste of the Wasatch is held to benefit anti-hunger programs in our community, and features an enormous array of foods, wine, beer, auction items, entertainment and more. Each ticket purchased before May 1 includes automatic entry to a drawing for a two-night stay in a condominium at Solitude Mountain Resort. Quote of the week: “There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.” —Mahatma Gandhi Tips to: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

2991 E. 3300 S.

385.528.0181


Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

6001 S. State St. Murray | 801-263-8889 cafetrangonline.com

*Gluten-free menu options available

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Contemporary Japanese Dining

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18 WEST MARKET STREET

801.519.9595

JANUARY 5, 2017 | 23

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS


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24 | JANUARY 5, 2017

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Wine Trends for 2017

What and how we’ll drink in the coming year. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

f 2016 was any indication, 2017 promises to be a tumultuous year. I, for one, will probably be drinking more than usual. But what and how I drink will be partly determined by trends in the food and wine industry. Based on stats and sales from previous years, there are a few overall trends that we can predict for 2017. I’m certain, for example, that the popularity of biodynamic, organic and natural wines—the type that winemaker Evan Lewandowski produces here—will continue to blossom. As they are with their food purchases, consumers are becoming much more sav v y about what goes into (or doesn’t go into) their wines, and that will lead them more and more to natural

products like those from Ruth Lewandowski Wines and others. This is particularly true when you factor in that an increasing sector of the market is impacted by millennials, who tend to be smart, informed consumers, and accounted for a whopping 36 percent of all wine purchases last year. “Biodynamic is the future for Champagne,” Louis Roederer cellar master Jean-Baptiste Lecaillon says. Sparkling wines other than Champagne will continue to be popular. The last couple of years showed an astonishing growth—estimated to be as much as 40 percent—of non-Champagne sparkling wine sales, with Italy’s prosecco leading the charge. Prosecco, which is typically a great value and quite food friendly, will continue its climb in popularity. But, so will Spanish cavas and an up-and-coming wine category: sparkling reds. Look for lesser-known white wine varietals from Europe in the stores and restaurants this year. Wine buyers, both professional and amateur, are getting smart about the relative bargains to be had with wines such as Portuguese whites (like Vinho Verde) and chardonnay-like varietals (such as Encruzado, Antão Vaz and Arinto). Likewise, I expect to see more Austrian Grüner Veltliner being poured, along with Albariño/Alvarino from Spain and Portugal, and Spain’s verdejo-based

DRINK Rueda wines. Look also for white rioja/ rioja blanco, which is becoming a darling of some sommeliers around the world. Personally, I find myself experimenting increasingly with more obscure wines and I think others will, too. It’s not that I don’t love pinot noir, chardonnay, Bordeaux and all the other rock stars of the wine world. But in addition to “orange” and pétillant wines, I’m enjoying tasting obscure wines like Picpouls, Mondeuse, Ribolla Gialla, Malvasia Istriana, Viura, Silvaner, Mourvedre and Moschofilero—just to name a few. Likewise, sommeliers and wine buyers are unearthing quality wines from little-known wine regions and stocking their stores and wine lists with them. So, look for interesting wines from countries like Croatia, Greece, Lebanon, Romania, Canada, Uruguay, Slovenia, Turkey (which has the fourthlargest vineyard acreage in the world) and Morocco. In the U.S., there’s increasing interest in vino from the lesser-known regions of California—like Mendocino and Lake Counties, Santa

Barbara County, the Sierra Foothills, Monterey County and others. Anyone can order a bottle of French burgundy, but you’ll really impress your somm by knowing to order a California pinot noir from the Santa Lucia Highlands. I think unpredictable food and wine pairings will become more acceptable and common this year. There’s nothing wrong with classic pairings like sauvignon blanc and scallops or oysters with chablis. But there’s a whole world of potential wine and food pairings that have yet to be discovered. Austrian white wines, for example, tend to be very clean and are a beautiful match for many fish and seafood dishes. And my brain nearly breaks when I think of the beauty of an unorthodox pairing like that of Leroy Bourgogne Rouge with black sea bass and hot-andsour soup—the creation of the genius Le Bernardin sommelier, Aldo Sohm. Whatever and however you’re drinking, I hope your 2017 is spectacular! CW


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

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deli • bakery • coffee shop

Mon-Sat 7am-9pm & Sunday 9:30am-4pm • 1560 E 3300 S

A DELICIOUS RESOLUTION

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Stay warm with your friends at

Brewvies

When you add beer and movies in one convenient downtown location, you get Brewvies Cinema Pub. What’s not to like about kicking back with a flick, a frothy beverage and specialty dishes? Brewvies offers showings of the latest blockbusters and independent films, as well as a separate bar area lined with pool tables, video games and TVs. 677 S. 200 West, Salt Lake City, 801-355-5500, brewvies.com

20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891 | siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

Fresh Flavors, Ancient Secrets Breakfast ·Lunch ·Dinner | Beer & Wine

Coffee Garden

Dragon Diner

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italianvillageslc.com

Although there’s a pint-size sit-down area at Dragon Diner in Millcreek, most people prefer the take-out option. The inexpensive Chinese eatery prides itself on its authenticity and fast delivery services, which are available until 10 p.m. every day except Sunday. Start off with the cream cheese wontons before you make your way to the dinner favorite, Dragon and Phoenix, served with General Tso’s chicken and hotand-spicy shrimp. 1331 E. 3900 South, Millcreek, 801-272-9333, thedragondiner.com

THE OTHER PLACE RESTAURANT

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Coffee Garden treats those who come in regularly like family, and both locations (downtown and 9th & 9th) are irreplaceable in their respective communities by providing high-quality coffee along with great customer service. Each location has a distinct personality: Main Street’s is literary and incisive; 9th & 9th is cinematic and expansive. 878 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3425; 254 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-364-0768

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AND ASIAN GRILL

9000 S 109 W , SANDY & 3424 S State St 801.566.0721 • 801.251.0682 ichibansushiut.com

JANUARY 5, 2017 | 25

Mon-Thurs 11-10 Friday 11-11 Saturday 12-11 Sunday 12-9


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26 | JANUARY 5, 2017

P.J. SNELLING

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190

AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE

Ti Amo’s Neapolitan-style pizza Ti Amo

INDIAPALACEUTAH.COM 1086 WEST SOUTH JORDAN PARKWAY (10500 S.) #111 | 801.302.0777

The best Neapolitan-style pizza I’ve tasted in Utah is at Bountiful’s Ti Amo. In Italy, uttering ti amo to someone means you are deeply in love with them. Just ask the establishment owners. Long before Mauro and Gloria Bonfanti moved here—in Marina di Pisa on the Mediterranean west coast—Mauro shouted at his would-be wife, “Ti amo, Gloria!” They would eventually marry, have three children (their two sons work in the restaurant) and bring fresh, Italian pizza flavors to Utah. Mauro cooks his pizzas at around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit in a wood-fired brick oven imported from Italy. He is a master pizzaiolo, and rarely takes his eyes off of the pizzas baking in his small oven, occasionally rotating them to cook evenly. The dough is made with local wheat flour, water, salt, yeast and extra-virgin olive oil, yet it simply tastes better than most; it has flavor as well as perfect texture. The sauce is made from San Marzano tomatoes, giving it sweetness to balance the tomato tang. And fresh, whole-milk mozzarella imparts a creamy, rich flavor and texture. Reviewed Oct. 27. 515 W. 2600 South, Bountiful, 801-294-5180, tiamopizza.co

ENJOY THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF EUROPEAN FOODS

SMOKED MACKERAL & HERRING | GERMAN KALE SCANDINAVIAN KAVLIE & FINN CRISP CRACKERS GERMAN PICKLES

2696 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City | 801-467-5052 | olddutchstore.com


FILM REVIEW

Math Effect

CINEMA

Hidden Figures tells an about-damn-time story of history-making women of color. BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net

O

Janelle Monáe, Taraji P. Henson and Octavia Spencer in Hidden Figures so Hidden Figures makes up for another omission of cinema: We’ve barely seen onscreen the realities of day-to-day workplace life under segregation, a shameful period of the nation’s history that demands much more examination in pop culture. Here, through the interconnected stories of all three women, we feel the weight of the the ignominy of separate public facilities and the pressure to not complain about it, lest one be tagged as a troublemaker. Johnson does finally snap in a scene that is devastating. Some white folks do get woke over the course of the narrative, but they are not the focus of the story; they are merely listening to the voices and experiences of black women being heard, really heard, at long last. And therein lies the beauty of Hidden Figures. This shouldn’t be a rarity. It’s a hugely entertaining movie, but it’s also an important and necessary one. CW

O B O R Y N I H S G I B

T!

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

HIDDEN FIGURES

| CITY WEEKLY |

BBBB Taraji P. Henson Octavia Spencer Janelle Monáe Rated PG-13

TRY THESE Hustle & Flow (2005) Terrence Howard Taraji P. Henson Rated R

The Help (2011) Emma Stone Octavia Spencer Rated PG-13

St. Vincent (2014) Bill Murray Melissa McCarthy Rated PG-13

exclusively on cityweekly.net

JANUARY 5, 2017 | 27

The Right Stuff (1983) Sam Shepard Scott Glenn Rated PG

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turning in her head, and we share how transporting it is for her to escape into numbers when so much of her day is spent merely convincing the white men around her that she can do the job. Director Theodore Melfi (St. Vincent) wrings a lot of wry humor out of simple visual moments, such as when Johnson hesitates while typing a report for reasons that have everything to do with her agitating for validation. Melfi also makes sly visual allusions to iconic moments from The Right Stuff: Johnson does a lot of running around NASA’s Langley, Va., campus à la Jeff Goldblum in the 1983 film, though for wildly different reasons. Melfi’s use of the “victory walk,” which The Right Stuff director Philip Kaufman all but invented, has the always-wonderful Octavia Spencer as Vaughn leading her “colored computers” to a plum new assignment at NASA that she has made possible. It’s clearly meant to elevate these women (and rightly so) to a realm as rarefied as the one the Mercury 7 astronauts have enjoyed, thanks in part to Kaufman’s visual iconography. Melfi might be the first filmmaker to have truly recaptured the power of those images, with characters who have actually earned the right to be proud of their achievements. It’s a glorious moment in the film. Then there’s Jackson, whom Janelle Monáe makes the spikiest of the three as she faces an actual legal battle to get into NASA’s engineering training program. And

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

nce upon a time—during the early years of America’s space program— “computer” meant “person who does manual calculations.” This was considered rather menial labor, particularly when a woman did it—and lots of women did it. Though they were as smart and as educated—and often did much of the same work—they were paid less in money and in respect than their male counterparts (who held titles such as “engineer”). Anything done by black women was, obviously, barely worth mentioning. And barely mentioned at all has, outrageously, been the fate of so many black women who were essential to the U.S. space program of the 1960s. You know Alan Shepard (first American in space) and John Glenn (first American to orbit Earth). But you have probably never heard of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn and Mary Jackson—who were pioneers in, respectively, mathematics, computer programming and engineering at NASA—without whom those guys never would have flown. Hidden Figures is an about-damn-time true story that smashes the notion that the only people who had the Right Stuff in the moon-shot effort were white and male. This is no dry history lesson, though, but an often funny, ultimately feel-good triumph of geeks who faced even more absurd obstacles than any white boy with a pocket protector. It’s disgraceful that it has taken this long for its like to come along. Now that it’s here, Hidden Figures is cause for celebration. Empire’s Taraji P. Henson is completely marvelous as Johnson, who does a lot of standing at blackboards chalking out calculations and making that process genuinely thrilling, not only because—geeky squee—she is trying to invent the math needed to put a ship into orbit and return it safely to Earth. She lets us feel the gears


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. AMITYVILLE: THE AWAKENING [not yet reviewed] A mother (Jennifer Jason Leigh) moves her family into an infamously haunted house. Opens Jan. 6 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

A MONSTER CALLS BB.5 There are stories that can make the transition from allegory on the page to a movie, and there are those that cannot; count this among the latter. Patrick Ness adapts his own illustrated novel about a boy named Conor O’Malley (Lewis MacDougall) living with his cancer-stricken single mother (Felicity Jones) who is visited in the night by a mysterious creature in the form of a giant anthropomorphic yew tree (voiced by Liam Neeson). Director J.A. Bayona effectively re-creates the style of Jim Kay’s book illustrations and more than a few stunning visuals of his own, and gets a strong performance from MacDougall as a boy wrestling with fear and anger over his mother’s illness. But the structure of the book as a literary fable allows Ness to get away with a featurelength therapy session, where putting those same elements on a big screen does not. Many viewers will undoubtedly be moved to tears by its child’s-eye-view approach to processing grief; I might have joined them if it hadn’t felt like this movie was cutting onions beneath my chin to extract those tears. Opens Jan. 6 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw HIDDEN FIGURES BBBB See review p. 27. Opens Jan. 6 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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HUNTER GATHERER BB.5 There’s a funky, loose vibe to writer/director Josh Locy’s lowkey drama that gives it a unique flavor, even as it’s often hard to latch on to what it’s all about beyond its colorful central character. His name is Ashley Douglas (Andre Royo), a recently released middle-aged ex-con trying to restart his life, including convincing his onetime girlfriend, Linda (Ashley Wilkerson), to take another chance. Locy populates his world with interesting supporting characters like Ashley’s new young friend Jeremy (George Sample III) and a neighborhood photography entrepreneur called Santa, and bounces along on a surprisingly lively tone built largely on Royo’s charismatic performance as an inveterate schemer making only the most superficial efforts to improve his situation. It’s too bad that there’s never the same energy when the story shifts focus to Jeremy and his efforts to care for his

THINGS TO COME BBB Mia Hansen-Løve has become one of cinema’s finest crafters of intimately detailed character studies, which makes for a potent result when that character is played by Isabelle Huppert. She plays Nathalie, a Parisian philosophy professor experiencing multiple bumpy life transitions at once, including her husband (André Marcon) leaving her for another woman, the fading interest in her scholarship and struggles dealing with her needy, aging mother (Edith Scob). Hansen-Løve isn’t timid about allowing her stories to drift into tangents, which occasionally can make it hard to get a handle on what the story is about. But Huppert rewards a viewer’s patience by digging into the way Nathalie thoughtfully processes arriving at an unexpected point in her life, including great material with Nathalie interacting with a former student (Roman Kolinka) and his group of young political activists. “I think I’m too old for radicality,” Nathalie says at one point, but Things to Come finds lovely small drama in a woman’s radical act of re-inventing herself when all of her previous self-definitions no longer apply. Opens Jan. 6 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR UNDERWORLD: BLOOD WARS [not yet reviewed] Vampires. Werewolves. Kate Beckinsale. Fighting. Whaddaya need, a road map? Opens Jan. 6 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS CAMERAPERSON At Park City Film Series, Jan. 6-7, 8 p.m. & Jan. 8, 6 p.m. (NR) THE LOST WORLD (1960) At Main Library Auditorium, Jan. 10, 7 p.m. (NR) ONLY YESTERDAY At Main Library Auditorium, Jan. 7, 11 a.m. (G) TOMMY BOY At Brewvies, Jan. 9, 10 p.m. (PG-13) WILD HEARTS CAN’T BE BROKEN At Main Library Auditorium, Jan. 11, 2 p.m. (G)

CURRENT RELEASES

ASSASSIN’S CREED B In a just world, a movie starring Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons, Charlotte Rampling and Brendan Gleeson would be a lush historical epic or period drama. But since the world is garbage, it’s another turgid, useless video-game adaptation. A murderer named Lynch (Fassbender) learns he’s descended from 15th-century Spanish assassins who pledged to protect a sacred artifact; the bad guys (Cotillard and Irons) use science and magic to make Lynch relive his ancestor’s life and find the dingus, leading to battle and bloodshed (and, for some reason, parkour). There are recognizable human emotions and motivations buried under humorless exposition and tedious bloodletting, but extraneous elements like “story” and “character” are abandoned so we can focus on what’s important: scene after scene of self-serious cyphers fighting over something we don’t care about. I smell something, but it’s not an Oscar. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

FENCES BBB.5 Denzel Washington and Viola Davis won Tony Awards for their performances in the 2010 Broadway revival of August Wilson’s Fences, and this big-screen adaptation gives them an opportunity to burn down the screen. Davis does in her portrayal of Rose, a long-suffering wife to Troy (Washington). If only Washington the director had made Washington the actor rise to Davis’ level, instead offering a quite-good performance that still feels like an amalgamation of other, better Washington performances. But with material this strong, it’s impossible not to get swept up in the story of a former Negro League ballplayer looking back at his life. The story is also bigger than that—a dense drama with enough subtext to demand repeated viewings. The supporting cast—Stephen Henderson and Russell Hornsby—is excellent, and Charlotte Bruus Christensen’s handsome cinematography almost makes Fences transcend its stage roots. (R)—David Riedel

JACKIE BBB Chilean director Pablo Larraín and screenwriter Noah Oppenheim often nail the connection between history and image in their profile of Jackie Kennedy (Natalie Portman) the week following JFK’s assassination. The narrative darts back and forth in time, from framing narrative with a journalist (Billy Crudup) interviewing Jackie about the tragic day, then weaving back to the immediate aftermath in flashbacks. Much of the running time surrounds her detailed involvement in orchestrating the president’s funeral procession, while repeating more or less the same concept: giving her husband an epic send-off to cement his legacy in the American consciousness. Portman walks an effective, tricky line humanizing

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invalid grandfather, building to a conclusion that comes with strangely abrupt tonal shifts. Locy might not know quite how to bring Hunter Gatherer in for a landing, but Ashley’s irrepressible spirit at least makes for a mostly satisfying ride. Opens Jan. 6 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

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an icon whose goal was to render her family iconic, but the script is content to repeat variations on a theme. (R)—SR LION BB Half of a fascinating real-life story is a decent start, but it’s not enough when the theoretically feel-good half is a soggy dud. In 1986, 5-year-old Saroo (Sunny Pawar) is separated from his family in India, and winds up orphaned before he’s ultimately adopted by an Australian couple (Nicole Kidman and David Wenham). That compelling first hour follows the lost boy through various perilous encounters, until we flash-forward 20 years to now-adult Saroo (Dev Patel) becoming obsessed with the possibility of finding his birth family. While there might be some way to dramatize Saroo’s inner turmoil beyond Patel’s performance full of frustrationsignifying tics, the second half falls dead, having rushed through relationships so that there’s no emotional hook connecting plot points. Whatever investment a viewer might have in the fate of that little boy never transfers to this moping adult. (PG-13)—SR

SING BBB.5 Yes, Sing bears some similarity to Zootopia, but the two movies are very different in tone, humor, drama and intent; this could be a light comedy produced in Zootopia. Theatrical impressario Buster Moon (Matthew McConaughey), a koala, stages a voicetalent show in a last-ditch attempt to save his failing theater. McConaughey’s transcendent voice performance sells Buster as a bear of big ideas and bigger optimism, never mind the details. With a simpler story and gentler metaphors than Zootopia, Sing will be easier going for younger kids, and it might even get them interested in classic pop standards (though there’s tons of modern pop here, too). With smart attention to the trials and foibles of a diverse range of characters—not just in species, but in gender, too—and some irresistibly toe-tapping musical numbers, Sing is a sweet, funny delight. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson WHY HIM? BB.5 James Franco actually starts to seem like a bona fide movie star whenever his character is dialed up to 11—like Laird Mayhew, the unfiltered, tatted-up video-game millionaire trying to impress Ned (Bryan Cranston) and Barb Fleming (Megan Mullally), the Midwestern parents of his girlfriend (Zoey Deutch), during a preChristmas visit to his California mansion. Plenty of broad, crude, R-rated shenanigans ensue—a literal tidal wave of piss may be involved—with predictably uneven results. But Cranston and Mullally are aces at incredulous-bordering-on-horrified reaction takes, while Franco goes for the gusto playing a guy with a completely ingenuous sincerity behind his obliviousness to decorum, making him—God forgive me for saying so—almost endearing. It might be the kind of studio comedy that you know will include weird cameos, but at least it sells the weirdness at its center. (R)—SR

THEATER DIRECTORY SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 brewvies.com

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7670 S. Union Park Ave., Sandy 801-568-3699 cinemark.com

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 megaplextheatres.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 saltlakefilmsociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 801-486-9652 cinemark.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 801-571-0968 cinemark.com

WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 801-334-8655 cinemark.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 cinemark.com

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9335 S. State, Sandy 801-304-4577 megaplextheatres.com

Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-325-7500 megaplextheatres.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 3761 W. Parkway Plaza Drive, South Jordan 801-304-4019 megaplextheatres.com

Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 redwooddrivein.com

WEST VALLEY AMC 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-568-0855 cinemark.com

Cinemark Provo Movies 8 2424 N. University Parkway, Orem 801-375-0127 cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 801-852-8526 cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Orem 800-246-3627 cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 cinemark.com

Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-768-2700 megaplextheatres.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 801-546-4764 cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 watergardenstheatres.com

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Cinemark Bountiful 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-298-0326 cinemark.com

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Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 801-969-6711 cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 amctheatres.com

Cinemark American Fork 715 W. Main St., American Fork 801-756-7897 cinemark.com

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 801-282-8847 cinemark.com

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market St. 435-575-0221 metrotheatres.com

UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-9345 carmike.com

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Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 saltlakefilmsociety.org

PARK CITY Metropolitan Holiday Village 4 1776 Park Ave. 435-940-0347 metrotheatres.com

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-528-5800 megaplextheatres.com

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PASSENGERS BB Only once the final credits roll does it become clear how badly director Morten Tyldum misjudges the necessary tone, and how indefensible the ending is. Jim (Chris Pratt), an engineer aboard an interstellar ship, awakens 90 years early from cryosleep due to a malfunction, then makes a desperate choice to awaken another passenger, Aurora (Jennifer Lawrence), rather than live the rest of his life alone. The story is strong while it’s a two-hander morality play about justifying actions for our own survival, leaving aside cribbing its most romantic moment from WALL-E. Then it turns into a crisis sci-fi adventure, which might have been justifiable if it had built to a resolution with some bite. Instead, Passengers fails miserably at guiding

the characters to the only place that would have allowed them to be something besides a criminal and a victim. (PG-13)—SR


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BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Crazy Cool

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Crazyhead reinvigorates the demon dramedy; Tom Hardy is Taboo. Crazyhead Streaming (Netflix)

New Series: Few, if any, Buffy the Vampire Slayer “tributes” (or, if you prefer, “loving rip-offs”) have gotten that classic series’ deft blend of horror and humor as wonderfully right as British import Crazyhead, created and written by Misfits’ Howard Overman. When 20-something Bristolian Amy (Cara Theobold) discovers she’s a “seer” who can recognize the demon-possessed hiding among us, she forms an at-first-unlikely alliance with fellow seer-turned-hunter Raquel (Susan Wokoma); much ass-whipping and sass-quipping ensue. But, the six-episode Crazyhead’s bedrock isn’t action and wisecracks—it’s the friendship between Amy and Raquel, a sweetly rocky bond that’s as believable as it is hysterical. Also: killer soundtrack. Also, also: some of the loveliest public restrooms on television, British or otherwise.

One Day at a Time Friday, Jan. 6 (Netflix)

Series Debut: A remake of the ’70s sitcom with a Cuban-American twist, complete with single mom (Justina Machado), precocious kids, a sleazy building manager and, unfortunately, a damned laugh track. Norman Lear, the 94-year-old former comedy kingpin who managed to escape the Grim Reaper of 2016, is listed as an executive producer, but there’s little reason for this to be called, or linked to, One Day at a Time, even with a Gloria Estefan re-recording of the theme song: It’s a bland, lazy sitcom in its own right. But, that hasn’t hurt Netflix’s other dim throwbacks, Fuller House and The Ranch, so this One Day at a Time will probably outlast Lear.

Emerald City Friday, Jan. 6 (NBC)

Series Debut: A smoldering Puerto-Rican Dorothy (Adria Arjona, True Detective) and a promisingly weird Wizard casting (Vincent D’Onofrio!) headline a “reimagining” of The Wizard of Oz that’s been kicked by NBC around for almost two years. Syfy tried this in 2007 with Tin Man, a mess of a miniseries that dropped Zooey Deschanel into a steampunk nightmare that went nowhere darkly and slowly. Emerald City is more in-line with its Friday-night

lead-in Grimm: fantastical and soapy, but rarely scary (and, unlike Grimm, eye-poppingly expensive-looking; the CGI effects and D’Onofrio’s wigs probably cost NBC more than all 12 current Chicago dramas combined). Intriguing, but not built (or priced) to last.

Taboo Tuesday, Jan. 10 (FX)

Series Debut: Long-missing-and-presumed-dead James Delancy (Tom Hardy) returns to 1814 London to inherit his late father’s East India Company empire, only to become caught up in a treacherous trade conspiracy that might get him killed, as well. FX’s last attempt at a period drama, The Bastard Executioner, suffered from lack of star power (unless you count Vampire Bill from True Blood, which no one did), among many other problems; Taboo has Bane and Mad Max, fergawdsakes! It also has Ridley Scott and Steven Knight (Peaky Blinders) onboard as producers, as well as a Too Many Shows-friendlier runtime of eight episodes. Dark, violent and sexy, Taboo should at least tide you over until the return of FX’s Baskets.

Crazyhead (Netflix)

Jeff & Some Aliens Wednesday, Jan. 11 (Comedy Central)

Series Debut: Loser Earthling Jeff (voiced by Brett Gelman) is observed by, and annoyed with, a trio of aliens crashing in his apartment. As Comedy Central cartoons go … this is one of them. As with most—OK, all—animated shorts from the network’s TripTank series, Jeff & Some Aliens offers little evidence that it deserves to be expanded into primetime and share an hour with a proven player like Workaholics, but here it is. Still, comedy MVP Gelman can’t help but make anything he’s involved with better (ever seen Blunt Talk?), and his distinctive delivery elevates Jeff & Some Aliens from standard stoner comedy to tolerable stoner comedy. An achievement, really.

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

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naïve. But fuck it—it’s the music I was making.” In 2011, DeGraw played her first open mic in Provo at Velour, then started gigging there. She credits owner and “good friend” Corey Fox with giving her support and encouragement, but says she didn’t take it too seriously; “I just wanted to play music.” Eventually, she moved to Salt Lake City, where she started performing occasional solo shows and joined Crook & the Bluff as their drummer. She says the experience was “fun as hell,” the music is “amazing,” and respects her former bandmates, but, “I have more to say than just a drum beat.” Sensing a ticking clock, DeGraw left the Western blues band last August to concentrate on a solo career. “You can always do something that’s fun or enjoyable, but you …” She trails off, looking at her lap. “You can’t fake passion. You can’t fake what makes you tick.” Now 22, DeGraw performs her poignant, confessional songs regularly. “When I’ve poured out my whole self, I can relax,” she says. She’s charmed audiences and peers like local producer Mike Sasich, who offered be DeGraw’s guitarist, which led to a full band with Greg Shaw on bass and Brian Thurber on drums. They debuted—after only one rehearsal—supporting Jackie Greene’s sold-out State Room performance in September. “It just fucking worked,” DeGraw says. “We nailed it.” With her band, she’s playing electric guitar and writing louder, bluesier songs. Why the change? “It’s still the same writing; it’s just coming out differently. It’s just a little more gritty and a little bit more up-front and abrasive. Because I feel like it has to be.” Like her younger self, DeGraw wants to be heard. Her voice rises to adjust for the ambience of the increasingly loud, crowded bar. Acoustic shows reach fewer people, she says, especially because smartphones breed inattentiveness. “It’s not 1971. You’re not gonna sit in the middle of a sold-out venue with people sitting down and shutting the fuck up for just a minute.” She insists the shift wasn’t premeditated, though—it just happened. “I don’t think anything that I’ve done so far has been really thought-out. Nothing’s been contrived,” she says. It’s time to go. DeGraw says not to make her look foolish or “I’ll punch you,” then reaches out for a hug. We laugh and part. A couple of blocks away, she reappears—she’s parked nearby—and knocks on my window. “Don’t make me look like a fool,” she reiterates. “I will punch you.” CW

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n the phone, Sarah Anne DeGraw called a stranger “dude” and dropped F-bombs without a hint of self-awareness. It fit how she looks in the Crook & the Bluff band photo. Neither smiling nor scowling, she wears a long black coat and matching bowler hat. She leans against a wall but slightly forward, as if preparing to push off and sock you in the jaw. It follows that DeGraw would stand out in a room—have presence. But when I got to meet her at Ruin, two different patrons seem like they could be her. One, at an elevated table against the east wall, is tallish, her hair and coat are long but not black—but she vibes mousy. The other occupies a low table in the back corner, head down, haloed by clean white light. She seems too gentle, too reserved. I fire off a text and wait to see who shoots back. A survey of the room ends at the back-corner woman, with a smile as bright as her halo and eyes that spark memories of her YouTube videos. In “Ten Cent Lovers,” she strolls onstage in a sundress and sweater, saying, “I’m glad to be here. And that’s all I am.” A jump-cut finds her seated, vignetted by the spotlight, trying to keep her bangs out of sad blue eyes that pop against a red velvet backdrop. She breaks a reverent silence with fingerpicked arpeggios that sound like falling tears, punctuated by single-note harmonics like sighs. In a bewitching, mellifluous, achy voice, she sings. Someone can write and sing a song and still say nothing. When Sarah Anne DeGraw performs, every lyric, strum, rake, pluck and rest resonates. You’re utterly rapt, feeling tranquil and in tune with her. Pity the fool who shatters the trance. In conversation, DeGraw’s tough and tender sides dovetail. “Dudes” and “fucks” abound. She speaks candidly, both making and avoiding eye contact. She wants to share, but has a threshold. When discussing her itinerant childhood singing folk, gospel and barbershop music with her family band and running their merch booth, she politely demands to go off-the-record. What she shares isn’t a bombshell, but someday will make a great story. “I was born in Utah, but I’m not really from a place,” she says. As a child, she socialized more with adults than children. “I was outspoken,” she says, but her mother didn’t take her 8-year-old daughter’s protests seriously. DeGraw never relented, but by 14, she turned to songwriting as an additional outlet. She feels that her first song, “Better You,” is well constructed but lyrically “really dumb and very

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After one band cancels, three bands more than make up for it. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

I

’ve spent the last year trying to see The Nods. Tonight, I finally made it. I’m even early. Anticipation tempers the tension accompanying a looming late-night deadline. Then Mike Sartain hands me my first beer, along with some news: “They canceled. One of them is sick.” It just so happens that the story due in the morning was gonna be all about requital re: The Nods. (Not that they knew this—and no hard feelings. Hope you feel better soon, Rocky.) Luckily, I still get to see Muzzle Tung and 90s Television. I’d narrowly missed them both on other bills. More significantly, I missed Koala Temple altogether in my time away from the scene. This one-off reunion gig might be the first and only time I’ll ever see them. There is a certain romance to the notion, almost like it’s a predestined onenight stand. As Muzzle Tung singer-bassist Geoffrey Leonard starts a yelping mic-check, a friend shows up and we proceed to imbibe. A waxing buzz suits the band’s fuzzy, febrile post-punk songs, which feel like futuristic beat poetry that you can either dance to or stand and contemplate like gallery art. Distractions, however, abound as our group expands. Further contemplation is required and planned. On the patio between sets, suitably lubed by libations, new acquaintances talk like old friends, and stress wanes. Back inside, the stage is dressed in colorful plush and props: a Fraggle, a baby mask, an E.T. whose raised finger looks more defiant than healing, a Christmas tree, a jack-o’-lantern, a giant two-dimensional Easter egg. And a Tyco Hot Lixx Guitar! It’s weird. I love weird, and I really love all four of 90s Television’s albums,

Craig Michael Murray and Taylor Clark of Koala Temple

so full of catchy, well-smithed songs that check some of my favorite musical flavors: power pop, dream pop, psych and surf. Sucked in, I’m a drunken fanboy trying to snap decent pictures without spilling my drink or missing the real-life 360-degree action around me. References swirl in my dizzy head (Donovan, The Hate Bombs, Spacemen 3). Singer-guitarist Josh Brown, rockin’ a Robin Trower T-shirt, hypes the headlining band—somewhat cheekily, considering he and bassist Craig Michael Murray are two-thirds of Koala Temple. He says something about City Weekly declaring this the most important night of the year. Someone in the crowd shouts, “You’re doin’ fine!” The band proceeds to rocket through the rest of their set, including a delightful and bitchin’ Tyco toy solo by Victor Blandon. This is why we go to rock shows: to escape. Once more to the patio and back. The stage is clear of all but instruments, gear and cups. Koala Temple will rely solely upon their music, which is as fuzzy and epic as their name would imply, plus lights and fog. Murray, now playing guitar and singing, looks like the lost ginger Beatle and one of the dudes from Angel (both clear influences). Brown now wields the Thunderbird bass Murray used in the last set. Drummer Taylor Clark pounds the skins behind them, and each new song brings more energy and intensity. Murray and Brown get active, whipping their hair, playing on their knees and giving birthday hugs to fans. Clark and Murray trade places to perform the former’s song, “Probably Sick.” As the energy builds, so does the pressure of beer on my bladder. Instead of returning to the front row, I watch from the back. Murray is spending more time on the floor and engaging with fans. A sax player, then Blando and his toy axe, make cameos. Behind the crowd, gathered as tightly to the stage as when the set began, happy fans run to and from the bar, happy to have thwarted last call and eager to get back to the show. Speaking of getting back, I’m mindful of my responsibilities. On my way out, I recall a moment where Murray expressed gratitude for the crowd’s interest, “especially on a Wednesday night. Thanks, guys.” Back atcha, dude. CW


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(bass), Blair Draper (drums), Justin Richardson (guitar)—played soul/R&B, while Martian Cult (all of the above plus Derek Clark on synths) plays, according to Asplund, “post-punk, I guess. Or prog punk.” Whatever it is, I’m following a hunch that I’ll dig it. Support acts include Dream Slut (a new City Weekly obsession), Slick Velveteens and Beachmen. (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Reverend Horton Heat

Are they psycho, or simply psychobilly? That’s the question the fans and followers of the Reverend Horton Heat (aka Jim Heath) have been pondering for more than 30 years. Indeed, purveying an approach generally described as “country-fed punkabilly,” the Rev created a signature sound that combines his own singular form of pure punk insurgence with rock, rockabilly, surf and swing. Led by singer-guitarist (and native Texan) Heath, the trio combines an homage to country legend Johnny Horton, a shortened version of Heath’s last name and

Reverend Horton Heat presumably a heightened sense of reverence for the music they make. Over the course of a dozen albums, they’ve even wrangled their way into the mainstream courtesy of commercials, cartoons and video games. And dang, when you have such idiosyncratic icons as Tony Hawk, Beavis and Butt-head and Hot Wheels tapping your tunes, stardom seems inevitable. Or not. It’s likely Reverend Horton Heat are destined to remain cult faves, too rowdy for all except a restive few. No matter. Feel the Heat, fuel the frenzy and let this turbulent trio do the rest. No need for reverence. (Lee Zimmerman) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $21 in advance, $26 day of show, depotslc.com

FRIDAY 1.6 Slow Caves

With its general jam-band mentality, Colorado isn’t exactly known for synth-punk,

Slow Caves

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JANUARY 5, 2017 | 33

BODIE HULTIN

Martian Cult

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

This is Martian Cult’s debut show. Why cover a band we haven’t heard yet? Have you ever bought a record based solely on a band name (or cover art or song titles) and it turns out to be pure gold? Any good music glutton has a story like that, and the satisfaction accompanying semi-blind buys is enormous. Now, Martian Cult isn’t entirely new to the scene. You might have caught one of the six shows they played as Terracotta (a name that’s not nearly as far-out, alien sects being far sexier than earthenware ceramics), and three-fifths of the band Moonlight with Daisy and the Moonshines. But Terracotta— Jared Asplund (vocals), Elowyn LaPointe

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It’s so weird how major labels operate now. They’ve always looked for the marketable moneymakers, but now they seem totally confused. So much so, that they sign bands like Badflower, who’re more or less a straightup rock ’n’ roll band. Sure, you can pick out alternative rock influences, and even some indie fandom, in their mostly blues-based sound, but it boils down to pure rock. There’s no bid to join an extant movement. They don’t cop a look beyond jeans and T-shirts (aside from the Amish hats they wear in one of their videos). Instead, they appear focused on writing epic, stomping, anthemic rock songs that sound as good in a club as they would in an arena. Which is refreshing, to say the least. Could it be that Universal/ Republic figured out that simple is good? Maybe, maybe not. But if there was ever a time when we needed a return to basics in the mainstream, it’s now. (Randy Harward) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 8 p.m., $7 in advance, $12 day of show, 21+, liquidjoes.net

PINKY’S


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INGRID HERTFELDER

LIVE

but Slow Caves have created a mighty buzz in the two years since releasing their selftitled debut—enough to bring them a national profile. Their website says they were originally inspired by “late nights in Hollywood, car chases, red-eye flights and vintage skateboard videos,” but insists the band’s sole goal is “to make quality music that lasts in your mind forever.” OK, that description is a bit ambiguous, but there’s nothing vague about the band’s visceral delivery, singer Jakob Mueller’s caressing croon, or the group’s relentless rhythms. Don’t let the name fool you; Slow Cave’s music isn’t at all meditative like their handle might suggest. It’s aggressive, surly and sonically striking— a sound that takes them to a higher plateau. (LZ) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5 suggested donation, facebook.com/diabolicalrecords

SATURDAY 1.7 Michel Camilo Trio

Hailing from Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic, Michel Camilo started playing piano at age 9, and caught the jazz bug at 14. That was roughly 1968, and

Michel Camilo

nearly 50 years later, he’s a legend. Maybe not in the same sense as the cats who influenced him—guys like Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea whose names register higher in pop cultural awareness. But in jazz circles, he’s a badass, the recipient of numerous prestigious appointments, awards and designations recognizing his contributions to jazz music and his jaw-dropping live exercises in musical prestidigitation. He’s performed with everyone from Dizzy Gillespie to George Benson to Celia Cruz to Esperanza Spalding. This week he performs with Cliff Almond and Lincoln Goines—the same musicians who accompany him in the award-winning 2015 documentary Playing Lecuona, a tribute to the late Cuban composter Ernesto Lecuona. For a taste of what they’re serving, search “Para Vigo Me Voy” on YouTube. (If you’re short on time and just wanna see the Camilo’s fingers in full flurry, skip to 3:48—but you’re just gonna play the whole thing, anyway.) (RH) Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 7:30 p.m., $29.50, artssaltlake.org

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LIVE Music thursday, january 5

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JAQUELINE BOUTTIER

CONCERTS & CLUBS

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 1.10-11

Stale Street Thingy Wingy feat. The Nods, Super 78, Muzzle Tung, 90s Television and more

The Stale Street Underground, like the late, storied Moroccan, was a commune/venue for local musicians—and the 11 bands playing this two-night reunion of sorts all had members who at one time called it home. That includes a lot of bands you know. Night 1 consists of sets by The Nods, Cupidcome, The Artificial Flower Company, Eleventh Door, Echoplaxia, while Night 2 features Super 78, Muzzle Tung, 90s Television, Lord Vox and Bengt & Hoochie Power. Alas, the “Thingy Wingy” part of the title appears not to be an allusion to the night’s eats. So don’t expect big plates of wings. They should recruit local musician/filmmaker Dan Morley to right this wrong. Like the two venues, his wings are legend. Speakin’ of the Moroccan—how about a two-night reunion of those bands? (Randy Harward) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $3 per night, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 1.5 LIVE MUSIC

90s Television + Fake Awake + GABI (Kilby Court) Badflower (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 33 Martian Cult + Dream Slut + Slick Velveteens + Beachmen (The Urban Lounge) see p. 33 Gonzo + DJ Shams + Louie Castle (The Royal) Illenium (Sky) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Michelle Moonshine (Gracie’s) Proper Way (The Hog Wallow) Reverend Horton Heat (The Depot) see p. 33 Rylee McDonald (Twist)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke with TIYB (Club 90)

LIVE MUSIC

American Hitmen + OHD (The Ice Haus) Dubwise + Amit + Shoebox + illoom (The Urban Lounge) Lake Effect (The Spur Bar and Grill) Party Favor (Park City Live)

DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ ChaseOne2 (Twist) DJ Juggy (The Downstairs) Toothpick & AtrophIA (Sky)

Come in or call for one of our many remote starts today!!!

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 1.7 LIVE MUSIC

Bone + Renee Plant Band + Eminence Front (The Royal) The Flower Ball + Brancho + Ivouries + Yung Cake Boi + DeelanZ (Kilby Court) G-Life Album Release (Metro Music Hall) Michel Camilo Trio (Capitol Theatre) see p. 34 Michelle Moonshine (The Spur Bar and Grill) Naked Walrus (Muse Music) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Strong Words Album Release + The Circulars + Indigo Plateau + Motion Books DJ Set (The Urban Lounge) Tom Bennette + George Wilson (Johnny’s on Second) Wisebird (The Hog Wallow)

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FRIDAY 1.6

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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DJ Birdman (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar & Grill) Funkee Boss (The Downstairs) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Therapy Thursdays feat. Illenium (Sky) Reggae Thursday (The Royal)

The Pour (The Hog Wallow) Slow Caves (Diabolical Records) see p. 33 Sister Wives + Jeremiah Maxey + Jana and the Rebels (The Royal) Uvluv Album Release + Panthermilk + tot + Piggett (Kilby Court) Visigoth + Envenom + Darklord (Metro Music Hall)

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WEDNESDAY 1.11

CONCERTS & CLUBS

KIRSTEN COHEN

Lil’ Smokies, Michelle Moonshine

Just when you think every other newgrass/nü-grass or progressive bluegrass band sounds the same, or at least does the same increasingly lame classic-rock covers shtick, along comes a band like the Lil’ Smokies. While they’re not averse to dropping a cover—like their ace retread of Dire Straits’ “Money for Nothing,” their originals aren’t the usual hipster-ly take on highlonesome acoustic Americana. Instead, their songs are most redolent of a New England band that used to be a popular draw here in Salt Lake City during the mid-to-late ’90s Zephyr Club scene: The Courage Brothers. Singer-Dobro player Andy Dunnigan, in fact, bears a striking vocal resemblance to lead Co-Bro Todd Thibaud. The songs have the same quiet ache and intensity, too. If you have a taste for that band, and solid acoustic musicianship influenced by more than Americana, you’ll gobble up Lil’ Smokies. (RH) O.P. Rockwell, 628 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $15 in advance, $17 day of show, oprockwell.com


CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Bizzy (The Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist)

KARAOKE

KARAOKE

SUNDAY 1.8 DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Juggy (The Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 1.9 Carlos Emjay (The Spur Bar and Grill)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Monday Night Jazz Session feat. David Halliday + The JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

Joyce Manor + The Hotelier + Crying (Kilby Court)

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY 1.11 LIVE MUSIC

Lil’ Smokies + Michelle Moonshine (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 38 Stale Street Thingy Wingy, feat. Super 78 + Muzzle Tung + 90s Television + Lord Vox + Bengt & Hoochie Power (The Urban Lounge) see p. 36 Jordan Young (The Spur Bar and Grill) Static Nostalgia + Saline Lakes + The Vandigue + Mount Inertia (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (Muse Music) DJ Birdman (Twist) DJ Kurtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge)

KARAOKE

TUESDAY 1.10

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Areaoke (Area 51) Karaoke (Johnny’s on Second) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

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JANUARY 7 @ 9PM

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WEDNESDAYS

THE ARTIFICIAL FLOWER COMPANY ELEVENTH DOOR ECHOPLAXIA

SUPER 78 90S TELEVISION

MUZZLE TUNG LORD VOX BENGT & HOOCHIE POWER

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KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

4 SA HBOETE &R

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LIVE MUSIC

HOME OF THE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

Scott Klismith (The Spur Bar and Grill) Stale Street Thingy Wingy, feat. The Nods + Cupidcome + The Artificial Flower Company + Eleventh Door + Echoplaxia (The Urban Lounge) see p. 36


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40 | JANUARY 5, 2017

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-3552287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801394-1713, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801566-3254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801261-2337, Live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435615-7200, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-953-6374, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, Karaoke Thurs.

FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S TAVERN 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801521-3904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-268-2228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-7335567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-3828567, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801363-3638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed. LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland

Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801468-1492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

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Š 2016

SIGN FAIL

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Grocery section 2. Find, as an idea 3. "Wow, that's shocking!" 4. Deficiency 5. "Later!"

47. "The philosophy of our time": Jean-Paul Sartre 49. College concentration 50. NBA big man 51. Bigots 52. ____Kosh B'Gosh 54. Grammy winner Ronstadt 57. Eliot's "cruellest" mo. 58. Signals 59. Superman sans cape 60. Those, in Tijuana 61. ____ for 67-Across 62. "When ____ good time?" 63. King in 1922 news

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

6. Portrait photographer Richard 7. Play by a different ____ rules 8. Fe, chemically 9. Many a Yelp link 10. Its banknotes have denominations from 1,000 to 10,000 11. Assn. 12. Put to work 15. "The proper task of life," per Nietzsche 16. Duties 20. ____ Jima 24. Radio host Glass 25. Place for a soak 26. Opposite of WNW 28. ____-80 (early home computer) 29. Night that "Friends" aired: Abbr. 30. Tolkien monster 31. Big laugh 33. "Full Frontal with Samantha Bee" network 36. Not yet on the sked 37. It's in general circulation 38. Singer 39. [that's what it said] 40. Have a mortgage, e.g. 41. "Platoon" war zone 42. American ____ 45. Wind farm sight 46. The States, to Mexicans

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Rock's Everly or Collins 5. "SNL" alum Pedrad 10. The "Y" of TTYL 13. Terza ____ (Italian verse form) 14. Jenny Craig targets 17. Suffix with psych or narc 18. It's part of the Rockies 19. Food chain store that, after a neon sign fail left only its circled letters glowing, really turned off customers? 21. ____ creek 22. Kennel sound 23. Diamond in the sky? 27. Provincial place 29. Kids' store that, after a neon sign fail left only its circled letters glowing, really turned off customers? 32. Cabinet dept. formed in response to the 1973 oil crisis 33. Drive-____ 34. He's to the right of Teddy on Mount Rushmore 35. Coffee chain store that, after a neon sign fail left only its circled letters glowing, really turned off customers? 40. Bob Marley's "____ Love" 43. Editorial slant 44. Part of an agenda 48. Retail giant that, after a neon sign fail left only its circled letters glowing, really turned off customers? 50. Count at the breakfast table 53. Watson of the Harry Potter films 54. Actresses Michele and Thompson 55. Furlough, to a GI 56. Fast-food restaurant that, after a neon sign fail left only its circled letters glowing, really turned off customers? 61. Musician known as the "King of Mambo" 64. iPhone assistant 65. "Uncle!" 66. Bugs in "A Bug's Life" 67. 61-Down for ____ 68. Hollywood Boulevard sights 69. Look

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nostalgic experience. Once they’re here, they’re friends.” Red Barn Collections also creates custom orders so people can memorialize a book from their past, or fashion a particularly touching gift for the future. “I have a customer who has a Christmas journal for her grandson,” Burgee says. “Every year she uses a page to write a letter to him about their Christmas, and she’ll give it to him someday.” On top of creating one-of-a-kind keepsakes, Red Barn Collections is also helping to improve the environment. The business has a partnership with Interwest Paper, which receives roughly 80 tons of books per week. “We take things out of the recycling stream, saving resources,” Burgee says. This practice won the company an award in 2016 from the Utah Recycling Coalition for Innovative Product of the Year. n

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A new year means new resolutions, and what better way to keep track of progress than with a new journal? For a notebook as unique as you, check out Red Barn Collections—a local company that upcycles old books into new creations. “There are a lot of fun moving parts involved in this business,” co-owner Brooke Burgee says. “Finding and discovering the books is always fantastic. We find so many interesting titles, vintage books, new books. The hunt is always an adventure.” That hunt is also a family affair, Burgee says. Her parents and aunt are all retired and live back East, where they find amazing vintage books at estate sales and thrift stores. “My aunt is in Cape Cod,” she says. “She just sent me a shipment of books, and I practically drooled.” The business is named after their family farm in Vermont, and was directly inspired by a conversation Burgee had with her mother after moving to Utah. “My mom called and asked, ‘What are you going to do with all these books you left behind?’” Burgee says. Suddenly the idea to upcyle—to give them new life rather than sending them to the dump—was born. Burgee and her co-owner, Ben Bowen, got a street permit and started selling their products at parks and on sidewalks. Soon they were setting up shop at f lea markets, farmers markets and large expo shows. “When customers come in, it’s like they’re visiting grandma’s house,” Burgee says. People find old books that they recognize from childhood. “It’s such a

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) I thought of you when I read a tweet by a person who calls himself Vexing Voidsquid. “I feel imbued with a mysterious positive energy,” he wrote, “as if thousands of supplicants are worshipping golden statues of me somewhere.” Given the astrological omens, I think it’s quite possible you will have similar feelings on regular occasions in 2017. I’m not necessarily saying there will literally be golden statues of you in town squares and religious shrines, nor am I guaranteeing that thousands of supplicants will telepathically bathe you in adoration. But who cares how you’re imbued with mysterious positive energy as long as you are?

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The creature known as the short-eared elephant shrew is typically four inches long and weighs a little more than one ounce. And yet it’s more genetically similar to elephants than to true shrews. In its home habitat of southern Africa, it’s known as the sengi. I propose we regard it as one of your spirit animals in 2017. Its playful place in your life will symbolize the fact that you, too, will have secret connections to big, strong influences; you, too, will have natural links with powerhouses that outwardly don’t resemble you.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “When I look back, I see my former selves, numerous as the AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) When it’s summer in the Northern Hemisphere, the birds known as trees,” writes Leo poet Chase Twichell. I’m sure that’s an expearctic terns hang out in Greenland and Iceland. Before the chill sets rience you’ve had yourself. Do you find it comforting? Does it in, they embark on an epic migration to Antarctica, arriving in time feel like being surrounded by old friends who cushion you with for another summer. But when the weather begins to turn too cold nurturing familiarity? Or is it oppressive and claustrophobic? there, they head to the far north again. This is their yearly routine. In Does it muffle your spontaneity and keep you tethered to the the course of a lifetime, a single bird might travel as far as 1.25 million past? I think these are important questions for you to meditate miles—the equivalent of three roundtrips to the moon. I propose on in 2017. It’s time to be very conscious and creative about that you make this creature your spirit animal in 2017, Aquarius. May shaping your relationships with all the people you used to be. the arctic tern inspire you to journey as far as necessary to fulfill your VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) personal equivalent of a quest for endless summer. “‘Life experience’ does not amount to very much and could be learned from novels alone … without any help from life.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) In June 1962, three prisoners sneaked out of the Alcatraz Federal So said Nobel Prize-winning author Elias Canetti, who was Penitentiary, located on an island in San Francisco Bay. Did they born in Bulgaria, had British citizenship, and wrote in German. succeed in escaping? Did they swim to safety through the frigid Although his idea contradicts conventional wisdom, I am prewater and start new lives abroad? No one knows. Law enforcement senting it for your consideration in 2017. You’re ready for a officials never found them. Even today, though, the U.S. Marshals massive upgrade in your understanding about the nature of Service keeps the case open, and still investigates new evidence reality—and firsthand “life experience” alone won’t be enough when it comes in. Are there comparable enigmas in your own life, to ensure that. Pisces? Events in your past that raised questions you’ve never been able to solve? In 2017, I bet you will finally get to the bottom of them. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) I am rooting for you to be flagrantly unique in 2017. I vehemently want you to be uninhibited about expressing your deepest, rawARIES (March 21-April 19) Light, electricity, and magnetism are different expressions of a est, hottest inclinations. In this spirit, I offer the following four single phenomenon. Scottish scientist and mathematician James rallying cries: 1. “Don’t be addicted to looking cool, baby!”-my Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) was the first to formulate a theory to friend Luther. 2. Creative power arises when you conquer your explain that startling fact. One of the cornerstones of his work was tendency to stay detached.-paraphrased from poet Marianne a set of 20 equations with 20 unknowns. But a younger scientist Moore. 3. If you want to be original, have the courage to be an named Oliver Heaviside decided this was much too complicated. He amateur.-paraphrased from poet Wallace Stevens. 4. “In the recast Maxwell’s cumbersome theory in the form of four equations beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, in the expert’s with four unknowns. That became the new standard. In 2017, I mind there are few.”-Zen teacher Shunryu Suzuki. believe you Aries will have a knack akin to Heaviside’s. You’ll see the concise essentials obscured by needless complexity. You’ll extract SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “There is a desperation for unknown things,” wrote poet the shining truths trapped inside messy confusions. Charles Wright, “a thirst for endlessness that snakes through our bones.” Every one of us has that desperation and thirst TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “The thornbush is the old obstacle in the road,” wrote Franz from time to time, but no one feels the pull toward perplexKafka. “It must catch fire if you want to go further.” Let’s analyze ing enchantments and eternal riddles more often and more this thought, Taurus. If it’s to be of maximum use for you in 2017, intensely than you Scorpios. And according to my astrological we will have to develop it further. So here are my questions. Did meditations on your life in 2017, you will experience this pull Kafka mean that you’re supposed to wait around passively, hoping even more often and with greater intensity than ever before. Is the thornbush will somehow catch fire, either through a lucky that a problem? I don’t see why it should be. In fact, it could make lightning strike or an act of random vandalism? Or should you, you sexier and smarter than ever—especially if you regard it as instead, take matters into your own hands—douse the thornbush a golden opportunity to become sexier and smarter than ever. with gasoline and throw a match into it? Here’s another pertinent query: Is the thornbush really so broad and hardy that it blocks the SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) I hope you will seek out a wide range of intoxicating experiwhole road? If not, maybe you could just go around it. ences in 2017. The omens predict it. Fate sanctifies it. I hope you will gracefully barrel your way through the daily whirl with GEMINI (May 21-June 20) The fictional character Scott Pilgrim is the hero of Bryan Lee a constant expectation of sly epiphanies, amusing ecstasies, O’Malley’s series of graphic novels. He becomes infatuated and practical miracles. There has rarely been a time in your life with a “ninja delivery girl” named Ramona Flowers, but there’s when you’ve had so much potential to heal old wounds through a complication. Before he can win her heart, he must defeat immersions in uncanny bliss. But please note: The best of these all seven of her evil ex-lovers. I’m sure your romantic history highs will NOT be induced by drugs or alcohol, but rather by has compelled you to deal with equally challenging dilemmas, natural means like sex, art, dancing, meditation, dreamwork, Gemini. But I suspect you’ll get a reprieve from that kind of dark singing, yoga, lucid perceptions and vivid conversations. melodrama in 2017. The coming months should be a bright and expansive chapter in your Book of Love.

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ANNA ESTHER WIESN ER Five decades, four years; friends mad, shed tears.

Aquarius began, Capricorn ended; footprints in the sand have barely faded.

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Canta de Salida que los Angeles del Cielo; rest in peace, my dear, con Dios mio.

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LAYTON

A friend sent me a lapel button she made to sum up the year: “F**k 2016.” Man, the past 12 months were brutal in so many ways for so many people. The presidential election, all the celebrities and great people who passed, the wild weather events around the world and the Olympics in Rio are among the obvious reasons. What I’m not going to forget is the Dec. 2 fire that destroyed Oakland’s Ghost Ship—a warehouse that had been converted to an underground artist collective. Every year in late September, my wife and I head to San Francisco to connect with our chosen family for a weekend of food and frolic. For several years we’ve been staying in the Castro at an Airbnb, a triplex owned by two wonderful men who live just down the street from their rental property. Some of our family members are minimum-wage earners, others are on salary, and it’s expensive for all of us to stay in a hotel together. Additionally, we each have dietary requirements that can’t be fulfilled by a hotel coffee shop. This past fall, our reservation got mixed up by our landlords and we had to find different accommodations. My wife, a former travel agent, got on the web and found a fantastic warehouse to rent in the Mission District, owned by Burners. The photos were phenomenal, with fabulous art hanging from the high ceilings and furniture from all over the world. Nothing compared. The community shower doubled as a greenhouse for indoor plants, and there was a hot tub on the roof and enough room for my wife to spin fire while our friends smoked cigars and drank brown liquor. Downstairs there was a small restaurant space closed for construction, a commercial kitchen used only at night by bakers, a large room with an AirStream trailer as a private bedroom, a community kitchen with a table that easily sat 16, and random storage for more art—mostly metal sculptures-inprogress hanging from the ceiling. The place looked almost identical to the photos/videos we saw of the Ghost Ship before the fire, and it was in the same condition. Have you been to the Mission District lately? For miles, the sidewalks are covered in tents—the homes of people who can’t afford housing the city. People like us who use Airbnb keep rentals off the market, while grocery-baggers and baristas live on the street outside. I’m part of the problem, for sure. And I know the place where we stayed was not up to code. Just like the 36 people who lost their lives in the Ghost Ship fire because they couldn’t afford legal, up-to-code housing in Oakland, we, too, put ourselves at risk. Those warehouses are also here in Salt Lake City. Our housing crisis is just as real. n


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Home Sweet Home?

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