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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T D E C E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 1 6 | V O L . 3 3 N 0 . 3 4

THE YEAR IN

PHOTO REVIEW


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2 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY OH, SNAP!

We take a photographic look at the past 12 months. Cover photo by Sarah Arnoff

19 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 15 A&E 27 DINE 33 CINEMA 37 TRUE TV 38 MUSIC 50 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR NIKI CHAN

Photographer ”I really enjoyed photographing ‘The Grits to be Here,’” Chan says of her work with us over the last year. ”The team’s processes, triumphs and struggles were inspiring to witness and the accompanying message to ‘never quit’ will remain with me to help with my own life struggles.”

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CITYWE

B T DECEM E K LY . N E

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

Blog, Dec. 19, “Utah’s six electors unanimously cast presidential votes for Trump”

THE TO BE HERE H H AT WEST HIG OTBALL COAC OVE FOR A NEW FO TEAM, LIFE LESSONS PR HIS D . AN LD OL FIE HO E SC TH AS LOSSES ON AS PAINFUL

BY RK STEPHEN DA

No shit.

@CARLIAL921 Via Twitter

Via Facebook And why would they vote any differently? If Adolf Hitler were running for POTUS with an R next to his name, you can bet your ass the Bishop at the local ward house would be telling his sheeple, “He’s a good guy,” haha! Pathetic pseudo-Christians are THE definition and epitome of insanity.

CRAIG PERRY Via Facebook

Via CityWeekly.net

Via Facebook

Great story.

Utah stands firm with misogyny!

Via Twitter

Via Facebook

Go Panthers!

In other shocking news, snow is cold.

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

How many times must Hillary lose before the snowflakes accept it? Trump is president; therefore, he’s your president if you’re an American.

MORT WIMMER Via Facebook

Thank you to the electoral college for completing their duty.

KRISTA HARRIS

DENNIS MARCUS

@EDWARDMURRELL8

JODI NELSON

CIRCE ARZOLA

Chris Stewart shows once again why he got a whopping 34 percent of the vote in the part of his district that is within Salt Lake County. Gerrymandering is the only reason that clown has a microphone. Someone needs to turn it off. Via Facebook I hope Obama designates it soon!

LANCE KEMMER Via Facebook

They don’t care about what future generations inherit. It’s the present riches that drive their lives.

DEBRA VASQUEZ Via Facebook

Conservatives—always on the wrong side of history.

SCOTT ALLEN Via Facebook

PAX RASMUSSEN Via Facebook

Music, Dec. 15 “I Believe in Ghosts”

Bob and this body of rare work will endure the test of time and that, way off into the future, he will be considered one of Utah’s greats. I will always miss my times with Bob, smokin’, jokin’, drinking whiskey and talkin’ Mo history. He was definitely one of a kind. I am reminded of Bob every day as I have 12 pieces of his Deseret Alphabet artwork on permanent display around my house.

TOM OWENS

Headline rewrite: Numskulls in Charge Announce Idiocy and Declare Greed.

Seems to me that Utah (as well as other states) ought to ban the transferring of students from one school to another simply on sports preferences. I graduated from Granite High, and this process of transferring from one school to another was one of the contributing factors in the decline and ultimate demise of one of the storied athletic programs in the state of Utah. Play where you live. Develop the love, dedication and commitment to that school.

CRAIG JAMES

Blog, Dec. 19 “Bears Ears Update”

JOHN BARNHILL

Shame. They cast their votes for a treasonous man with unconstitutional conflicts of interest who will bring ruin and shame to this nation.

DEREK HOWARD

Cover story, Dec. 15 “The Grits to Be Here”

@SLCWEEKLY

Bob [Moss] was not only everything that Brian [Staker] writes about here, but he was also an accomplished historian—especially the Mormon variety. He had a very large collection of Mormon and U.S. history books—some quite rare—and he read them all. He and I exchanged a lot of books over the 15 or so years I knew him, and we had many interesting discussions about Mormon historical events. His knowledge of the Mormon alphabet was very deep and very rare, and as far as I know, he was the only artist who made it a central part of his work. I believe that

Via CityWeekly.net I barely knew him, but when I met him @stakerized’s party, I knew he was something else. Wish I had the opportunity for more time.

@J37HR0 Via Twitter

True TV, Dec. 15 “TV Gone Wrong”

Presidential Election was terrible. Overthe-top characters, horrible writing and plot twists dependent on supporting characters being blindly stupid at every turn. I mean, really, the fourth estate of the most powerful and richest nation in history is going to let itself get played like that? Seriously? That being said, I respect how they committed to the full disaster season finale. Season 2 is going to be cray!

ROB TENNANT Via Facebook

Bates Motel … each season gets perpetually worse. Kinda like True Blood.

GLENN THOMPSON Via Facebook

Anything and everything on Bravo. Not to mention all the major networks.

ROBERT JENSEN Via Facebook

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Dining Listings MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Intern RHETT WILKINSON Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, BILL KOPP, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, ANDREW WRIGHT, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Production

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Art Director CAMILLE ELMER Graphic Artists CAIT LEE, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Circulation

Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

Business/Office

Accounting Manager CODY WINGET Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Business Department Administrator ALISSA DIMICK Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Office Administrator NICOLE ENRIGHT

Marketing

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Street Team STEPHANIE ABBOTT, SHAUNTEL ARCHULETTA, BEN BALDRIDGE, TYLER GRAHAM, ADAM LANE, ANDY ROMERO, LAUREN TAGGE, MIKAYLA THURBUR, STEVEN VARGO

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OPINION

Voting in the Past Election

I have lived through 12 U.S. presidents and 17 presidential elections before this one. From what I can remember, each one resulted similarly: Half the citizens of our country celebrated the longlast coming of the savior, while the other half bemoaned the arrival of end times. But in every single case, neither occurred. I am confident that this trend will continue. After so many decades, it almost pains me to note that most of our lives don’t seem to change after an election—regardless of how you vote, whether you vote at all, or which way the current political winds blow. Recall how we were recently bemused by bright shiny objects held before voters’ eyes in the form of outlandish pronouncements by Donald Trump. First, he planned to deport 12 million undocumented Mexicans. Then, only some of them. There was a wall, then a fence. Then, the banning of Muslims from entering America ... but allowing some after “extreme vetting.” He expects to punish women who choose to have abortions. But, then, maybe he won’t. Many of us marveled at how many shifting winds could come from one source. We were entertained because we knew that all of this would soon be behind us, when Hillary Clinton won by a landslide. On Sept. 28, a hurricane named Matthew struck, and suddenly we reacquainted ourselves less from the consequences of a blowhard and more from a hard, damaging blow. In little more than one week, that uncontrollable weather killed upward of 1,600 souls. Life as many knew it would be disrupted for decades to come. Millions suffered real economic and health harm, and more than $10 billion in damage was done. Much of the world jumped into action. Tens of thousands of victims were housed in Red Cross shelters. They were fed and hugged by volunteers—people of goodwill

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

and big hearts. The U.S. Navy and Marine helicopters brought food and supplies to starving people in Haiti. FEMA and various National Guard units deployed to hard-hit areas in Florida, Georgia, both Carolinas and Virginia. Then, all too quickly, the drama of unleashed nature lost its hold on our attention, as social media and cable news shifted back to the entertainment of presidential politics. That is how Americans are with our attention—quick gut reaction, selfless response, then back to our screens. Remember the “Bernie Revolution,” as it once was called? Previously apathetic young voters turned out to caucus in record numbers. The “revolution” blew in with hurricane force. Then, much like Matthew, it fizzled out. Silly me, I thought that the hundreds of thousands of people who lined up at polling places to vote for Sen. Sanders wanted all of the things he stood for: better jobs, affordable education, living wages, affordable health care, LGBTQ rights, tax reform, fairness to immigrants, etc. Evidently, it was none of those. It seems that many Americans were simply infatuated with the idea of revolution, and didn’t realize it requires more than a few signs and rallies. Sanders tried to keep his revolution alive throughout the election process, but it wasn’t to be. His revolutionary guard jumped to the trending new shiny object, Trump. Trump stands for nothing that Bernie supporters loved. Yet, many Berniacs became moths attracted to the Donald flame. He showed that his “art of the deal” is to find any parade to jump in front of. He renounced his prior progressive positions for a new right-wing agenda. As he had done before with bankers, business contractors and mail-order students, Trump adjusted his truths to appeal to the audience of the moment. He projected all the observations ever made about him onto his opponents. Lying

Donald, who never let truth get in his way, called out “Lyin’ Ted.” Then, after Trump won, the Ted formerly known as “lyin’,” was rehabilitated back into a good guy. Trump labeled House Speaker Ryan “weak,” but now Ryan is a good guy, too. Will Trump’s Supreme Court be antiLGBTQ? Sexist? Anti-human rights? Will he reduce taxes for the 1 percent and increase the burden for the lower 20 percent as reported by The Wall Street Journal? He built his career telling people what they want to hear, while equally screwing bankers, small business contractors, students looking for a better life, his own employees, and women. But, still, if you follow stock markets and culture news, you expect him to be honest. After Sanders lost the primary, he feared the Trump Armageddon and raced around the country trying to convince people to get off their butts and vote progressive to keep his vision alive. But, many of you who came out in brute force for the Bernie revolution forsook him in a heartbeat. Locally, you still had the power to use your loud caucus voice to change Utah Legislature, to improve the transportation system, to improve air quality, to protect water and to maintain the wonderful outdoor recreational mountains that you love. Well, as we know, a lot of you didn’t bother. Are any of these things as important to you as they were when you stood in line for hours during the caucus? If so, why did you give up and let the one-party system prevail as it does in Vladimir Putin’s Russia? In Utah, candidates who champion progressives had really counted on you. Those candidates who ran on your issues—like Suzanne Harrison, who lost by just five votes—will never be your voice in the legislature if all you continue to do is complain on Facebook. CW

IT SEEMS THAT MANY AMERICANS WERE SIMPLY INFATUATED WITH THE IDEA OF REVOLUTION.

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

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Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What is your New Year’s wish for our country? Randy Harward: To awaken from this nightmare—even if it’s into another bad dream that trades Trump for Freddy Krueger. Enrique Limón: That would be harsher punishment for parole violators … oh, and world peace. Juan Sanchez: Read. Be educated. Love. Unfuck yourself. Lisa Dorelli: Tolerance and consideration of one another. Oh, and figuring out how to turn off the notifications of people “going live” on Facebook. Scott Renshaw: Mere survival. I will take “the opportunity to have a New Year’s wish for our country one year from now” over anything else. Tyeson Rogers: I wish our country weren’t as easily manipulated as my 5-year-old son. Pull your head out of your ass and put in that work, people! Sierra Sessions: I wish for collective acknowledgment, acceptance and safety of marginalized groups of people, I wish to see proactive steps toward eradicating water crises everywhere, (Flint, Standing Rock, THE OCEAN,) and for everybody to recycle, stop littering and start using their blinkers. Oh yeah and for those garbage newspaper coupons they keep stuffing in my mailbox to stop. Rhett Wilkinson: That Civil War II or World War III doesn’t happen. Jeremiah Smith: I feel like a true, heartfelt, wish for peace would be the most appropriate thing to wish for in the coming year.


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They enter the bar in twos and threes … ordering a drink, donning yellow smocks and eventually settling down before blank canvases, brushes and styrofoam plates with dabs of acrylic paint. For the next 90 minutes, an instructor guides Paint Nite students in creating their own interpretation of a professional painting. Master Artist Marian Pham tells us about these events and their growing popularity at watering holes in the Salt Lake Valley and beyond.

from studying at California College of the Arts and Academy of Art University in San Francisco. I graduated with a degree in Illustration—but any artist will tell you that learning art and mastering your craft is an everyday practice, no matter your age or level of education.

Where did Paint Nite begin nationally?

Yes. But we accumulate a lot of duplicates. We usually use those extras to promote our events in a variety of ways: charity auctions, donations, etc. The frames are made by a wonderful local company called Frame This, a subset of Picture This! Photography, and they are an optional piece. The frames give a nice finishing touch to every painting and they are offered in a wide variety of styles, colors and price points.

In Boston, Massachusetts, where the first Paint Nites began in 2013. Paint Nite in Utah launched in 2014.

What’s the size of your typical group? And are there “regulars”?

Our events in Utah range to about 35-40 people on average, though we do hold some 50plus events at venues that have the space. Regulars are our best customers. Often, about one-third of the room are regulars.

How many have you staged over the past three years, and where?

According to my artist profile, I have hosted 147 events as of today. We have two major markets—Salt Lake City and Ogden and all of their surrounding cities. I launched Paint Nite Logan not too long ago, and we are in need of bars and restaurants there to host Paint Nite.

You have several instructors. Do they “graduate” to become Master Artists?

Something like that. In addition to passing the interview processes and proving their experience with art and people, we train our artists until they are ready to host an event on their own. Our guests should be having fun, so our artists should be fun people. Knowing how to teach and move paint around on a canvas is only part of the job; a Master Artist connects on some kind of level with the people who attend. It’s pretty powerful stuff, sharing our love of art and creativity with everyone.

Where did you train as an artist?

I showed an interest in art through most of my Utah childhood and teenage life, but the bulk of my knowledge and skill came

Do Paint Nite artists keep their paintings? And you offer frames, right?

Alcohol decreases inhibitions. Do you think it releases creativity?

I think it’s one way a person allows themselves to be creative, among other things. As painters, we can be our own worst critic, so if you need a cocktail or soda to quiet that criticism in order to feel creative for two hours, it’s all right with us. Drinking is certainly not mandatory, but we do encourage an open mind and spirited attitude to give it a chance.

Do participants ever have one too many and give up?

Well, yes, [laughs]. ‘Failing’ is an inevitable part of art making, in general, because you’re being challenged and put out of your comfort zone. It’s not so bad when you’re with people you love, anyway. Coming to a Paint Nite because, ‘I’m going out to try something new with my friends,’ is already a courageous step forward into the unknown, and I have told this to many participants who come absolutely nerve wracked. On the other hand, a participant would get so wasted that they couldn’t be bothered to continue following along with the instructor, and will paint over all their work with solid black—that has actually happened—and you just gotta laugh with them and leave them be.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


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10 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Anti-Semite Martin Luther Did Martin Luther, founder of the Protestant Reformation, instigate the Holocaust with his anti-Jewish writings, including his infamous On the Jews and Their Lies? —Curious in Colorado

Did Martin Luther instigate the Holocaust? Call me a traditionalist, but I figure that accomplishment can stay on Hitler’s rap sheet. What we can safely say, though, is, yes, the father of the Reformation did express starkly anti-Semitic sentiments in print and at great length—in the treatise you name, he explicitly advocates the persecution of German Jews, saying at one point “We are at fault in not slaying them”— and the Nazis couldn’t get enough of it. Luther hardly invented antiSemitism, but as a towering presence in German culture, he proved very useful in legitimizing the aims of the Third Reich. Always opposed to the practice of Judaism—he couldn’t understand why anyone would take a pass on the Christian promise of salvation—Luther initially adopted a honey-not-vinegar approach toward its adherents. His 1523 treatise That Jesus Christ Was Born a Jew condemned the Catholic Church for its mistreatment of Jews—not for humanitarian reasons, mind you, but because he felt it made Jews less likely to convert. On the basis of this position, a Jewish advocate solicited Luther’s aid in 1537 after Jews had been banned from the state of Saxony; Luther, by this time seemingly enraged at the failure of his conversion efforts, vehemently refused to intercede. Luther’s anti-Semitism reached full boil with the 1543 publication of On the Jews and Their Lies—basically a 65,000-word blast of what we’d nowadays call hate speech. After roundly condemning Jews as prideful, deceitful, indolent blasphemers, “possessed by all devils,” Luther sets forth a program of action: He calls for the burning of synagogues; forbidding rabbis from teaching; banning Jews from owning homes; denying them legal protection; confiscating their texts and money; and setting them to manual labor. This diatribe wasn’t a one-off, as Luther followed it up with further, equally combative treatises and a later series of anti-Semitic sermons before his death in 1546. And its arguments weren’t ineffective—a reprint helped stir up a Frankfurt pogrom in 1614. In his classic The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, William Shirer argues that here Luther had basically drafted the blueprints for the Holocaust, concluding that his “advice was literally followed.” We have no proof the young Hitler was aware of Luther’s anti-Semitic writings (the strongest stuff had been omitted from some editions of Luther’s collected work), or that they had a formative effect on his thinking; thus we can’t draw a direct line from Luther to Hitler to the Holocaust. However, it’s broadly true that Luther contributed to the culture of anti-Semitism that was especially virulent in Germany (although

hardly unknown elsewhere—for example in Russia, where Luther had no comparable influence). And by the 1930s at least, the Nazis were well aware of his work and used it to justify their actions. On the Jews and Their Lies was displayed prominently in a glass case during the Nuremberg rallies, and Nazi bigwigs regularly cited Luther as a kindred spirit. “No judgment could be sharper,” Heinrich Himmler said of Luther’s writings against the Jews; “With Luther,” according to Hans Hinkel of the Reich’s Propaganda Ministry, “the revolution of German blood and feeling against alien elements of the Volk was begun.” Bishop Martin Sasse, prominent in the proNazi German Christian movement, published a collection of Luther’s anti-Semitic writings, noting with satisfaction in its preface that “on November 10, 1938, on Luther’s birthday, the synagogues are burning in Germany” and calling Luther “the greatest anti-Semite of his time.” Nazi newspaper publisher Julius Streicher, who had received a first edition of On the Jews and Their Lies from the people of Nuremberg as a birthday present, referred to that work in his own defense while on trial in the same city after the war: “Dr. Martin Luther would very probably sit in my place in the defendants’ dock today, if this book had been taken into consideration by the prosecution.” Luther’s defenders emphasize that his prejudice against Jews was theological, rooted in their refusal to embrace Christianity, rather than strictly racist. But the relentless vigor with which he hammers away at “these base children of the devil, this brood of vipers” suggests more than a purely doctrinal bone to pick. As noted Lutheran scholar Eric Gritsch pointed out, Luther’s description of how Jews’ collective guilt for their supposed sins “still shines forth from their eyes and their skin” certainly implies some racial component to his animus. In Luther’s example, Shirer suggests, Hitler found a traditional justification not just for anti-Jewish policy, but also authoritarian rule; he contends that Luther’s own “passion for political autocracy ensured a mindless and provincial political absolutism” in German society. The Nazis organized Luther Day celebrations, calling Luther “the first German spiritual Führer,” and enlisted his teachings to support the idea that German exceptionalism and anti-Semitism were inseparable. We have no reason to think Luther would have approved of the Holocaust. But—and this is always the danger with rabble-rousers—he set his followers on the path. CW Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 11


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12 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

COURTESY RUSSELL GREER

NEWS

J U D I C AT U R E

The Price of Intimacy

A disabled man’s fight to legalize sex work in Utah veers into stormy waters. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

“I

just wish people understood what it’s like to be me,” Russell Greer says. When the 25-year-old rides Trax in downtown Salt Lake City, he occasionally hears a passenger comment on his facial paralysis. He has Möbius syndrome, which means he can’t move his eyes from side to side or close his lips. “What’s wrong with his face?” someone asks. He has to rein in his urge to lash out. “I’m not that kind of a person,” he says. “That’s why I like paying for sex. It helps calm me.” He says he suffers from anxiety and depression, and has found intercourse to be healing. “It’s really a shame the only legal place is Nevada.” His only choice—other than taking Amtrak or a plane to Nevada, where prostitution is legal in some counties—is to illegally pay for sex in Salt Lake City. In a February 2016 City Weekly profile called “Only the Lonely,” Greer discussed his inability to get dates, and the comfort he sought from sex workers. After Nevada became prohibitively expensive—and he alleges one brothel worker robbed him of $4,000—he turned to Utah. That opened him up to all sorts of problems—from potential STI exposure, to what he calls fraud by women who misrepresent themselves in online ads, or theft and violent assault by them or their male companions. Then there’s the threat of arrest and prosecution for soliciting. So he decided to open a brothel, which Utah law does not permit. On Oct. 18, 2016, Greer—a paralegal recently in the spotlight for unsuccessfully suing singer Taylor Swift— filed a lawsuit against city, county and state officials, including Gov. Gary Herbert, for violating his constitutional rights by upholding laws that make sex work illegal. State officials at the various governmental agencies declined to comment on pending litigation. In his 37-page complaint, Greer, representing himself, argues that Utah’s laws are hypocritical. On one hand, they sanction sexually oriented businesses such as escort agencies and novelty sex toy and lingerie stores, while banning others such as brothels. His motive for the lawsuit, he says, is to bring attention to his problems, not himself. “There are those who are unable to find partners their entire lives due to things beyond their control, and therefore live in loneliness and never experience intimacy,” he wrote in his complaint. “[He] felt that paying for intimacy would help him feel loved and help him cope with his disability and his depression after counseling and medicine proved to not be effective.” But in his quest to legalize prostitution in Utah, Greer stumbles into territory regarding sex-worker rights, arguments over decriminalization and language that highlights just how complex, nuanced and fraught the struggle over privacy and sexual rights continues to be, despite recent landmark legal decisions that opened the door to same-sex marriage and polygamy legalization. Former street sex worker Donna Steele welcomes the idea of a brothel, noting that Greer was far from the first disabled man seeking these services. “It would be helpful in a lot of

Russell Greer (left) poses for a photo with Dennis Hof—the famed owner of seven brothels in Nevada, including Moonlite Bunny Ranch, where Greer was a regular. ways,” she says, like keeping women from street-walking in front of businesses and keeping them safe from predators. “It’s not going to do any good to take prostitutes to jail. They’ll lose what little they have.” His co-plaintiff in the lawsuit is a Salt Lake City-based sex worker identified as Tricia Christie (there are no listings under that name in Utah’s district and justice court database). Greer paid Christie $500 for sex at her downtown apartment. He says Christie agreed to be co-plaintiff initially, then stopped taking his calls and blocked his number. A call to her number provided by Greer went unanswered. While Christie did not sign off on the complaint, he included her “to make the point people are willing to do this illegally rather than challenge the laws,” he says. Greer has broken the law in Utah repeatedly by soliciting sex, although he says his acts of “necessity” stopped in March 2016. He might appear to be exploiting Christie for his own interests, but, he says, “I’m trying to set an example of not just her but other people. You either follow the law or you don’t.” That’s just one of a number of problems Maxine Doogan has with Greer’s lawsuit. She’s a San Francisco-based sex worker who is also president of the nonprofit Erotic Service Provider Legal, Educational and Research Project (ESPLER). “It’s not OK to drag workers into something they don’t agree to,” she says. “That’s exploitative.” In 2015, ESPLER filed a lawsuit seeking to decriminalize sex work in California with four unnamed plaintiffs, three sex workers and a disabled man, John Doe. ESPLER’s lawsuit—which Greer used for some of his language—took on what Doogan calls “California’s anti-prostitution law, which challenges our right to free speech.” Even sex workers associating with each other, she says, is a felony in California. Doogan says Greer has put the cart before the horse. “He’s trying to bring in a regulation scheme when workers are still criminalized.” Doogan seeks decriminalization, not legalization—meaning do away with anti-prostitution laws altogether, rather than put in place laws that regulate sex work. She also questions Greer’s approach as a “customer-plaintiff who wants the right to be able to pay for sexual services. Having customers intimately involved in directing our work conditions is a problem.” In Greer’s brief, however, he stated he intends to hand over ownership and management of the brothel to an unidentified “educated, classy, beautiful woman,” who, he wrote, “could align with the policies of Greer’s

proposed brothel and help women in them.” Along with disputing the role customers should play in running brothels, ESPLER rejects the brothel model itself. “Workers have not collectively bargained those contracts. They work under conditions basically mandated by the brothel owners,” Doogan says. Greer frequented a Nevada brothel owned by Dennis Hof, who says Doogan is wrong. His brothels essentially work on rental agreements with independent contractors, and are run on “common sense” rules of the house. He’s proud of Greer for taking his fight to the courts. “The guy doesn’t have much opportunity with women. He’s taken the legal alternative. You’ve got to give him credit for that.” The very language of the brief is an issue for some. Greer wants “the classiest and most beautiful people” to work at his proposed brothel. Those who don’t meet his criteria (“too old, not attractive, they have STDs, etc.”), would be referred to talent agencies to find work. Turner C. Bitton is the recently appointed executive director of the Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault. “A lot of his language he’s using [in the complaint] is the very same kind of degrading language that perpetuates stereotypes of sex workers,” Bitton says, whether it’s that women engage in it because society has deemed them unattractive, or “that only lonely, desperate men engage in purchasing sexual services.” Gina Salazar, a former Salt Lake City sex worker who’s now a trafficking victim advocate, is also critical of Greer’s ambitions. “He wants to open a brothel so he can get pleasure. He doesn’t realize, in his own selfish game, what he’s doing to these women. He’s hurting them. I don’t know that any of these women are out there by choice. He’s judging the work the same way everybody in this small-minded community does.” It’s those judgments, she says, that mean it will never be legalized, let alone decriminalized. What drives Greer, as much as his concern about disabled rights, is to quiet the need he has for intimacy. Salazar questions that paying for sex is a way to do that. “I don’t think intimacy is made for us to give away or have for sale. It’s more than that, and when it’s false, then it kills a piece of your soul every time you give your body away.” But Greer says that even paid intimacy is an improvement on an absence of physical affection. “Intimacy is defined as affection, as pleasure. Maybe it’s not ‘real love,’ but when you have nothing, something is everything.” CW


S NEofW the

WEIRD

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD Holes Against Humanity The rebellion against the absurdities of Black Friday this year by the organization Cards Against Humanity came in the form of raising money to dig a pointless hole in the ground. During the last week of November, people “contributed” $100,573, with Cards digging initially for 5.5 seconds per donated dollar. In 2015, according to an NPR report, Cards raised $71,145 by promising to do “absolutely nothing” with it, and the year before, $180,000 by selling bits of bull feces. Asked why Cards doesn’t just give the money to charity, a spokesperson responded by asking why donors themselves don’t give it to charity. After all, it is their money. (NPR via KUOW Radio, Turnwater, Wash., Nov. 27, 2016) Government in Action New York City’s Department of Parks and Recreation has completed its two-year project of assigning ID numbers (with arboreal characteristics) to every one of the 685,781 trees in the city’s five boroughs. More than 2,300 volunteers walked the streets, then posted each tree’s location, measurements, Google Street View image and ecological benefits for the surrounding neighborhoods (rainwater retained, air pollution reduced). Privacy activists hope the National Security Agency is not inspired by this. (Architecture Daily, Nov. 28, 2016)

Thanks this week to Mark Hiester, Jay Sokolow, Damon Diehl, Mel Birge, Randy Baker and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

Ain’t Gonna Fly

Once upon a time at the Utah Capitol, there was a Christmas tree adorned with Beehive State symbols—beautiful golden ones. And they were … not bees. According to an entomologist (and Google, of course), the ornaments are flies. Bees have four wings, but these only have two. This distressed local resident Sheri Poe Bernard, who recently toured the rotunda. “I was admiring the enormous Christmas tree, all decked out in ... scores of sequined gold bees on the tree—unless you have any understanding of bugs, in which case, you know they aren’t bees at all,” she says. “The Capitol Christmas tree is covered in flying bugs that are known for their attraction to death and feces.”

Prison Controversy

In the never-ending prison controversy, we now hear that the airport prison might not be big enough. Forget the lengthy discussions about the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, reducing sentences for nonviolent crimes and, oh yes, offering meaningful rehabilitation. And don’t forget the cost. It’s now up to $650 million from $550 million, and the governor’s asking for another $100 million, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. But people are worried—like the corrections director, for one. And Sen. Jerry Stevenson says they can just build bigger and close the cells off. So the question is: Where’s Utah really headed with corrections? Maybe smaller prisons—like smaller homeless shelters—makes better sense. Or maybe we do need to build for all the illegal aliens Donald Trump plans to incarcerate.

is looking for editorial interns for the spring 2017 term. Do you love media, want to be part of a thriving newsroom and have a desire to hone your writing chops? We’re on the hunt for hard workers to assist in the inputting of online events and writing of blurbs/articles for our award-winning weekly paper and daily website. Requirements: • Be available 10-12 hours a week starting Wednesday, Jan. 4. • An interest in pursuing journalism as a career is a must. • As is a strong desire to add to City Weekly’s established, alternative voice. • You think outside the box, know how to take direction and pay attention to detail. • Ability to get along with others and keep your cool while working on deadline is non-negotiable. Please send résumé and no more than three published pieces to elimon@cityweekly.net by Friday, Dec. 30.

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 13

Wait—You Mean This Is Illegal? A substitute teacher at Sandhills Middle School in Gaston, S.C., was charged with cruelty to children in December after she, exasperated, taped two kids to their desk chairs for misbehaving. (The State, Columbia, S.C., Dec. 3, 2016)

Well that does it. Half of Utahns say they like Donald Trump’s cabinet picks; the same half (or about) of people who spurned the Mormon Church’s admonition about voting for someone who does not reflect the church’s values. So why wouldn’t they be just fine with his cabinet choices? We don’t know because the Deseret News ran the Utah Policy poll without any explanation from those polled. It’s probably not just Democrats who’d like to know why citizens support the prez-elect, although they’re doing a lot of research on that now. Meanwhile, readers are left in the dark. First, there is no indication that the poll mentioned the actual cabinet choices by name or office, and the newspaper mostly focused on Utahns who were in the mix. There was much attention on Mitt Romney, but he wasn’t a choice. Conservative “experts” said Utahns just want the president to succeed. But in this era lacking context, a little more would be nice.

| CITY WEEKLY |

n In November, after a companion asked Victoria Vanatter, 19, what blood-sucking was like, she let him slice her arm with a razor to have a taste, but the two then argued, and Vanatter allegedly grabbed a knife and slashed him for real. Police in Springfield, Mo., arrested her after both people were stitched up at a hospital. (Springfield News Leader, Nov. 18, 2016)

In the Cabinet

Ironies The county executive in Cleveland, Ohio, complained in November of lack of funds (because the county’s credit is “maxed out”) for necessary renovations to its well-known sports and concert venue, the Quicken Loans Arena. (Cleveland Scene, Nov. 30, 2016)

@kathybiele

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n Though the presidential election of 2016 was certainly more volatile than usual, one reaction to the outcome was the apparent ease with which some in America’s next generation of collegetrained leaders were sidelined by self-described emotional pain. The Wall Street Journal reported that special attention was given by administrators at Tufts University, the University of Kansas and Ivy League Cornell, among other places, where their young adults could “grieve” over the election and seek emotional support, such as use of “therapy dogs” in Kansas and, at the University of Michigan, the availability of Play-Doh and coloring books for distraction. (The Wall Street Journal, Nov. 9, 2016)

BY KATHARINE BIELE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

The Continuing Crisis A note in The New York Times in October mentioned a website that comprehensively covers everything worth knowing and wondering—about shoelaces. Ian’s Shoelace Site shows and discusses (and rates) lacing methods, how to mix lace colors, how to tie (comparing methods, variations and, again, ratings), lengths of laces (how to calculate, which formulas to use, what to do with excess lengths), “granny knots,” aglet repair and much more—neatly laid out in dozens of foolproof drawings for the shoelace- challenged so no one has to be caught in a shoelace faux pas. (Fieggen.com/Shoelace)

HITS&MISSES


CHANGE THE WORLD CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

UPCOMING EVENTS

7

EVE SLC

DECEMBER 30-31

CITY WEEKLY’S UTAH BEER FESTIVAL LOUNGE

AT THE SALT PALACE

FEATURING BREWERS FROM THE UTAH BEER FESTIVAL

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In a week, you can

VIVA LA DIVA NYE SHOWS DECEMBER 30-31 AT CLUB X

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CITYWEEKLYSTORE.COM

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

BUDDHIST CELEBRATION

@Bill _ Frost

It’s been a hectic year for us all. So there’s a good chance you’re in need of some relaxation to clear away the negativities and obstacles of the past. You can do this with the Tibetan Buddhists as they mark the end of 2016 and look to 2017 as an auspicious beginning. This weekend, Urgyen Samten Ling hosts the annual New Years Eve Puja, which includes a Tsok food offering as well as a fire Puja. The fire Puja takes place outside, so make sure that you bring some warm clothing. Where it really gets good is when you can write down all those barriers and pitfalls from the past year and release them into the fire. This is no Burning Man; in fact, it’s much better because of the deep spiritual cleansing that will leave you refreshed and prepared to take on 2017. Urgyen Samten Ling, 740 S. 300 West, 801328-4629, Saturday, Dec. 31, 10 p.m.1 a.m., free, Bit.ly/2hzhFvY

NOON YEAR’S EVE

Don’t like to stay out late when all the drunks are out driving? You’re certainly not alone here. Instead, take the whole family to the Utah Museum of Natural History’s Noon Year’s Eve Party. Families can explore the Museum galleries and the mysterious Power of Poison special exhibit, and enjoy hands-on activities, rockin’ music, a DJ-led countdown and an explosion of confetti to welcome 2017—at 12 p.m. rather than a.m. The first 1,000 kids receive free party packs that include a noisemaker, hat and a variety of celebratory toys. Hot chocolate and decorative cookies are available for $3 each. Utah Museum of Natural History, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-6927, Saturday, Dec. 31, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., $7.95$12.95, NHMU.Utah.edu

ADVOCACY TRAINING

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

THE

CITIZEN REVOLT

Are you interested in learning the innerworkings of the Utah Legislature? Are you interested in advocating for public policies to address sexual violence, but don’t know how to get involved? Attend this upcoming event to get the answers to these questions and many others. Attendees of the Sexual Violence Citizen Advocacy Training can stay up-to-date with current legislation related to sexual violence, and listen to presenters as they share tips on contacting elected officials and ensuring that citizens’ voices are heard throughout the legislative session. It’s easier than you think. Utah State Capitol, 350 N. State, Monday, Jan. 30, 8-11 a.m., free, RSVP, UCASA.org

—KATHARINE BIELE Tips: revolt@cityweekly.net

Eight tired phrases to leave behind in 2016 (and their 2017 replacements):

8.

“Hot take” (use instead: “Brain shart”)

7.

“Fam” and “Squad” (use instead: “Amalgamate” and “Reich”)

6. “Sorrynotsorry” (use instead: “SAD!”)

5. “Social Justice Warrior”

(use instead: “Unshitty Citizen”)

4. “Woke” (use instead: “Beyoncéd”)

3. “YASS!” (use instead: “¡BUENO QUESO!”)

2. “Start slideshow” (use

instead: “Just show me the whole list or I swear to Christ I’ll come to Brooklyn and burn that hipster cubicle farm to the ground!”)

1. “Climate change” (use instead: “Extinction 2.0”)


ENTERTAINMENT PICKS DEC. 29-JAN. 4, 2017

FRANCIS HILLS

BRENT UBERTY

DWAYNE PERKINS

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

Years after appearances in Bond films and starring as a baddie in Spy Kids, Alan Cumming isn’t taking a stealthy approach to the spotlight. And that’s not just onscreen, where he played a shady spin doctor on CBS’s recently wrapped The Good Wife. The ScottishAmerican actor boasts a Tony award-winning role on Broadway’s Cabaret, and this year sold out Carnegie Hall for his self-admitted Alan Cumming Sings Sappy Songs. That maudlin mash-up is the focus this Saturday, when the Park City Institute continues its tradition of New Year’s Eve events so personal, “you get more of an experience than a performance,” PCI publicist Bari Nan Rothchild says. “One of the things that keeps people coming back to the Eccles year after year is that you are part of a community,” she adds. In recent years, the Park City Institute has hosted New Year’s Eve functions with stage stars Kristin Chenoweth and Bernadette Peters. As for this week’s performer, Rothchild says he’s “the kind of guy … you instantly connect with.” She assures, “This will deliver.” Cumming premiered the show last year at Café Carlyle in New York before taking it into Canada, Australia and the U.K. He has repeatedly described it as “an emotional rollercoaster.” The New York Times called him “a formidable all-around entertainer on the level of Hugh Jackman. … He is completely at home onstage.” (Rhett Wilkinson) Alan Cumming @ Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Dec. 31, 8 p.m., $49-$189. EcclesCenter.org

TUESDAY 1.3

That boy-who-lived Harry Potter is some wiz kid; a lad of many guises. He first appeared as a super successful series of books; then he morphed into a super successful film franchise. Most recently, he transformed into a symphony performance that accompanies a screening of director Chris Columbus’s 2001 film version of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone for symphony audiences. John Williams’ score, performed in its entirety by the Utah Symphony, makes this music and movie combination an entirely new experience. Still, Harry apparently has one more trick up his sleeve. He sold out the two previously announced performances on Dec. 23 and Dec. 24, and, as if by magic, has conjured up an additional presentation on Jan. 3. “I’m thrilled that we have the chance to present to Utah audiences the iconic Harry Potter film Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone with live orchestral music,” Utah Symphony/Utah Opera President and CEO Paul Meecham said in a press release. “This is a fantastic opportunity for the Utah Symphony to expand its range of offerings and attract new audiences of all ages.” The Harry Potter Concert Series initiated its international tour in June of this year, so it’s fortuitous that we get another opportunity to witness it here. Given the combination of a 40-foot screen, the musicians involved and author J.K. Rowling’s inextinguishable imagination, Harry promises to provide another magical evening. (Lee Zimmerman) Utah Symphony: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Jan. 3, 6:30 p.m., $27. UtahSymphony.org

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 15

Dwayne Perkins is the kind of comedian you’ve most likely seen on your way to bed, or staying up to catch late-night talk shows. With a 20-plus year career performing around the country, as well as on radio and television, he might be known best to comedy fans from his appearances on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, where he presented segments like “Great White Moments in Black History.” Along with appearances on Conan and Comedy Central specials, the Brooklyn comic has kept busy being a part of the Bob & Tom Comedy Tour, appearing in the HBO film The Gristle and the independent film Target Audience 9.1. This year, he released an hourlong comedy special on Netflix called Take Note, which touches on several hilarious topics, like America’s disinterest with soccer; his experience going from a “creep” to merely a “dirty old man,” and the race-specific nature of certain first names. Perkins drops by SLC to close out the year with five shows that mix old and new material about complex issues, such as abuse, geekery, race and relationships. He presents them in a calm manner that feels like the cool kid in class teaching you a thing or two about life. If you’re looking for something fun to do at the end of the year, but want to avoid long blowout parties, check this show out. (Gavin Sheehan) Dwayne Perkins @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Dec. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 30-31, 7:30 p.m. & 9 p.m., $15. WiseguysComedy.com

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in Concert with Utah Symphony

| CITY WEEKLY |

Just when you think Salt Lake City’s annual Eve WinterFest can’t get any bigger and better, organizers prove you wrong. Now, you can spend pretty much the entire final week of 2016 preparing to bid it farewell. Many of the already-familiar components of the celebration return in this eighth annual incarnation. The family-friendly “Bounce Town” at Salt Palace is full of inflatables. Venues around the downtown area—including Clark Planetarium, Discovery Gateway, The Leonardo, Broadway Centre Cinemas and Off Broadway Theatre—include admission for one with the Eve festival pass. Free activities like the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art’s Iron Chef Artist competition and crafts at the Main Library add to the fun. A Utah Jazz game—against the Philadelphia 76ers on Dec. 29—is also part of the package (with special ticket redemption pick-up required). And the countdown to midnight on Dec. 31 will again feature the giant MirrorBall drop. This year, however, there are more days to take advantage of many of these options, as well as expanded hours for the full range of activities for kids and adults at Salt Palace Dec. 30-31. Come for main-stage entertainment from Kenshin Taiko drumming, Vicious Beat, Samba Fogo, The Inevitables, Lo-Fi Riot, DJ SL Steez and much more, as the entire downtown Salt Lake City area is turned into one big New Year’s Eve celebration. (Scott Renshaw) Eve WinterFest @ Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, Dec. 30, 6-10 p.m.; Dec. 31, 3-11:50 p.m.; events at various other downtown venues, see website for details, $15-$25; single-day $10-$20. EveSLC.com

Alan Cumming

SATURDAY 12.31

Dwayne Perkins

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FRIDAY 12.30

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THURSDAY 12.29 Eve WinterFest

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

ESSENTIALS

the


DEBRA MULLER

City Weekly contributors consider how to better appreciate the local arts scene. BY KYLEE EHMANN, KATHERINE PIOLI, SCOTT RENSHAW, GAVIN SHEEHAN & BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net

N

o matter your feelings about 2016— bad year or the worst year?—you’re still probably looking toward 2017 with trepidation. But art, as much as anything else, can offer hope and inspiration. City Weekly A&E writers pondered their resolutions for the next year regarding how best to take advantage of the gifts provided by Utah artists. Kylee Ehmann: I have vivid memories of the first time I stepped into one of Ogden’s many art displays. I remember it so clearly because my first visit was earlier this year, in June, when I stumbled into White Space Gallery. It was full of beautifully abstracted paintings and cubist sculpture, all created by local artists’ hands, and I wanted more. But despite living in Ogden for more than two decades, I had no idea where to begin. I knew all the small galleries of Salt Lake City, but I couldn’t have listed two places to view art in my own hometown if I tried. I’ve been slowly working on expanding my knowledge of Ogden’s art scene, exploring the galleries in the historic Union Station I had never noticed before, and strolling through the Victorian mansionturned-Eccles Community Art Center DANIELLE DEFRANCES

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You Say You Want a Resolution

16 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

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A&E

ARTS

Samba Fogo

(Ogden4Arts.org). But six months in, I feel like I’ve barely even scuffed the surface. So my 2017 resolution is to delve deeper into a community I’ve been blind to for years, and to meet the creators within. Katherine Pioli: This year’s dance resolution is to treat myself to more dance classes. Trust me, it’s a good idea for people who grew up dancing, as well as for those who’ve never tried a single plié. Why? Just like sports, dance is a workout for our minds and our bodies, improving coordination, mental agility, flexibility and balance. It also raises appreciation for the art. After a class, you’ll realize the talent and hard work behind all of our amazing professional dancers and companies. Here are a few classes for adults of all skill levels to check out this year: Samba Fogo Afro-Brazilian classes every Thursday night (SambaFogo.com/Classes); Repertory Dance Theatre adult classes for ballet, modern and hip-hop Monday-Friday evenings (RDTUtah.org/DanceClasses); BBoy Federation classes Tuesday and Thursday nights (BBoyFed.com/BBoy-Classes). Gavin Sheehan: My resolution is to go to more solo art shows. Solo exhibitions are in short supply, and while a group show might give an artist safe exposure, a solo show can enlighten and enrich the artist—and a viewer, as part of the audience—in greater ways. I have a better sense of the artist’s style, message, concept and even as a person when I’m surrounded by their work. Group exhibitions offer a small window into an artist, and I need more from art than the visual equivalent of a greatest-hits collection. No modern artist who has ever become a success or stood the test of time creatively did so by hiding among dozens. They rose up, took chances, showed off everything—including the works they hated—and let the masses decide. Brian Staker: In the age of DIY, artisanal everything and craft-making

Ogden’s Eccles Community Art Center attaining hipster status on par with indie rock, maybe you hit a few art openings on Gallery Stroll night and think to yourself, “Why can’t I do something like that?” I certainly have. Local classes and workshops provide something for almost anyone to nurture their inner Picasso, and these are just a few: Saltgrass Printmakers (SaltgrassPrintmakers.org) offers classes in a plethora of printmaking methods, with visiting artists. Art Access (AccessArt.org) holds workshops often aimed at underserved segments of the community and has youth programs, too. The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UtahMOCA.org) presents “Out Loud” for LGBTQ students grades 9-12 to learn to express their feelings through art. The Leonardo (TheLeonardo.org) offers programs that combine art and science, like their namesake did. In Park City, Kimball Art Center (KimballArtCenter.org) has classes for all ages, in all media. The Paint Mixer (ThePaintMixer.com) explores a different sort of pairing with “paint and sip” evenings combining pigment and pinot. Scott Renshaw: The challenge for me is always too many options, with too little time. While my “beat” here at City Weekly has tended to be film and theater, I want to make time for the things I’ve experienced too infrequently in my 20 years as a Utah resident. It feels like the best way might be to pick a random Friday night, throw a dozen options into a hat, and let fate decide what I’ll check out: A dance performance? A local stand-up comedian? A book signing? A poetry slam? A gallery opening? In short, my resolution is to give myself more opportunities for discovery, to experience first-hand even more of the amazing work that I know is out there. CW


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DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 17


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18 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, every Saturday, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us New Year’s Comedy Showcase Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison, Sandy, 801-255-2078, Dec. 30, 8 p.m., SandyStation.com Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Random Tangent Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801572-4144, Saturdays, 10 p.m., DraperTheatre.org

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Erin Summerhill: Ever the Hunted Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-4849100, Dec. 29, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

Cowboy toys become iconic representations of Western mythology through Polaroid photographs by David Levinthal in The Wild West exhibit at Park City’s Julie Nester Gallery (128 Iron Horse Drive, 435-649-7855, JulieNesterGallery.com). The exhibition runs through Jan. 18, with an artist reception Friday, Dec. 30, 6-8 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Imagine Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, Dec. 30-31, 8 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Alan Cumming Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Dec. 31, 8 p.m., EcclesCenter.org (see p. 15) Cash on Delivery Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Feb. 4, times vary, HaleTheater.org Cirque Dreams: Holidaze Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, Dec. 29-31, ArtSaltLake.org Live Museum Theater Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6927, through April 15, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., NHMU.Utah.edu The Marvelous Wonderettes Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Washington Terrace, 801-393-0700, Monday, Friday, Saturday, 7:309:30 p.m., through Feb. 11, TerracePlayhouse.com

The Nerd Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley, 801-984-9000, daily except Sundays, times vary, through Feb. 4, HCT.org Nutcracker: Men in Tights Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-2662600, through Dec. 31, DesertStar.biz Wizard of Oz Utah Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-532-6000, through Jan. 14, dates and times vary, UCTheatre.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Utah Symphony: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 385-468-1010, Jan. 3, 6:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org (see p. 15)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Dwayne Perkins Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Dec. 29-30, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 31, 7 p.m.; Dec. 30-31, 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 15) ImprovBroadway 496 N. 900 East, Provo, 909-260-2509, every Saturday, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS, FAIRS & MARKETS

EVE WinterFest Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-333-1133, through Dec. 31, times vary, EVESLC.com (see p. 15) Snowfest Park City Mountain Resort, 1310 Lowell Ave., Park City, 800-222-7275, Dec. 29-Jan. 1, 2:30-4:30 p.m., ParkCityMountain.com/Events Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., Salt Lake City, through April 22, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

SEASONAL EVENTS

Christmas in Color Ed Mayne Street, near Utah Olympic Oval, Kearns, through Dec. 31, MondayThursday, 5:30-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5:30-11 p.m., ChristmasInColor.net Christmas Village Ogden Amphitheater & City Hall Park, 343 E. 25th St., Ogden, 801-6298214, through Jan. 1, 5 p.m.-midnight, free, ChristmasVillageMap.OgdenCity.com Festival of the Seas Loveland Living Planet Aquarium, 12033 S. Lone Peak Parkway, Draper, 801-355-3474, Dec. 29-31, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., through Dec. 31, TheLivingPlanet.com Holiday Lights Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through Jan. 4, ArtAtTheMain.com Luminaria: Experience the Light Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, through Dec. 31, ThanksgivingPoint.org Night Bright: A New Year’s Eve Party Museum of Natural Curiosity, 3605 Garden Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-768-2300, Dec. 31, 8:30 p.m., ThanksgivingPoint.org/Experience Noon Year’s Eve Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, 801-5816927, Dec. 31, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., NHMU.Utah.edu Ogden’s Christmas Village Ogden Municipal Gardens, 343 25th St., Ogden, 801-399-4357, through Jan. 1, 5 p.m., OgdenCity.com Spanish Fork Festival of Lights Canyon View Park, 3300 E. Powerhouse Road, Spanish Fork, 801-804-4500, 6 p.m., through Jan. 1, SpanishFork.org/NewsEvents Trees of Diversity Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801965-5100, through Dec. 31, CulturalCelebration.org Zoo Lights Utah’s Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., Salt Lake city, 801-584-1700, through Dec. 31, nightly except Mondays, $5-$8, HogleZoo.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Alyce Carrier: Old Work Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Jan. 14, UtahMOCA.org The Art of Joy! Local Colors of Utah, 1054 E. 2100 South, 801-363-3922, through Jan. 10, LocalColorsArt.com Art Shop Project Gateway Mall, 18 N. Rio Grande St., 801-456-0000, through Dec. 31, ShopTheGateway.com Benjamin Cook: Allure of the Mountains Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, Jan. 7 reception, 4-5 p.m.; exhibit through Feb. 28, SLCPL.org Ben Steele: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-3553383, through Jan. 14, ModernWestFineArt.com David Levinthal: The Wild West Julie Nester Gallery, 1280 Iron Horse Drive, Park City, 435-6497855, through Jan. 17, JulieNesterGallery.com Drew Conrad: The Desert Is A Good Place To Die CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 385215-6768, through Jan. 13, CUArtCenter.org Faces & Places West Jordan Schorr Gallery 8000 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-569-5000, through Jan. 6, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., WJordan.com Gallery at the Station: Michael Calles/Saline Visions Union Station, 2501 S. Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-393-9890, through Jan. 6, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, TheUnionStation.org Holiday Group Show A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-583-4800, through Dec. 31, AGalleryOnline.com Holly Manneck: Popped & Twisted Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., 435-649-8882, through Jan. 8, KimballArtCenter.org Russel Albert Daniels: Blossom as a Rose God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, through Dec. 30, Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., GodHatesRobots.com Jazmine Martinez: Ciclo Vital Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, Salt Lake City, 801-596-0500, through Jan. 14, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Jeri Jonise: Together Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Jan. 20, SLCPL.org Kaori Takamura & Gwen Davidson: Look Closely Meyer Gallery, 305 Main, Park City, 435-649-8160, through Jan. 14, MeyerGallery.com Lewis J. Crawford: Geometry from Public Space Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 6, SLCPL.org Megan Gibbons: Beyond the Narrative Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, through Jan. 13, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.org Peter Everett: Transmutation CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Jan. 13, CUArtCenter.org Phoebe Berrey: Fun with Stuff Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 6, SLCPL.org Rick Whitson: From Souks to the Sahara: Visions of Morocco Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8640, through Jan. 7, SLCPL.org Western Landscapes 1859-1978 David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, Salt Lake City, 801-583-8143, Tuesday-Friday, 1-5:30 p.m., through Jan. 6, DavidDeeFineArts.com Where Children Sleep The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, through Jan. 31, TheLeonardo.org Work in Progress Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-3552787, through Jan. 14, UtahMOCA.org


THE YEAR IN

PHOTO REVIEW A LOOK BACK AT SOME OF THE MOMENTS THAT SHAPED 2016.

| CITY WEEKLY |

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 19

COLBY FRAZIER NIKI CHAN

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

O

ur peace-loving British-born senior staff writer Stephen Dark gets kneedeep in Utah’s gun culture. “Weapons are anathema to most journalists, unless you’re a gun-toting gonzo writer like Hunter S. Thompson,” Dark wrote. “Guns are about quelling violence, while reporting is about uncovering the root causes of violence so that it will end.” At the Eccles Library at Rowland Hall sits a painting by Peter Hayes emblazoned with his motto “Learning is Work.” The educator’s death in late 2015 dredged up fears that Red Butte Creek’s 2010 oil spill not only harmed the waterway but also the health of those who live along its banks. Despite new video footage, District Attorney Sim Gill, alongside newly sworn-in Mayor Jackie Biskupski and Police Chief Mike Brown, says at a press conference that officer Matthew Taylor’s shooting death of snow shoveler James Barker was justified.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

NIKI CHAN

JAN.

With images by: Sarah Arnoff, Weston Bury, Tyson Call, Derek Carlisle, Niki Chan, Stephen Dark, Nicole Enright, Jordan Floyd, Colby Frazier, Dylan Woolf Harris, Bert Johnson, Annie Knox, Enrique Limón, Josh Scheuerman and Guinnevere Shuster


With the chant “Fuck the Police” as a preferred verse, more than 1,000 protesters march through Salt Lake City, clogging the city’s busiest streets and ensuring that their calls for reductions in police violence are heard following the shooting of 17-year-old Abdullahi “Abdi” Mohamed. Veteran sex worker Donna Steele is one of many who call SLC’s budget notell motels home. “I wanted to just, kind of, raise awareness,” Frank Maea told City Weekly outside a bar he claimed denied him service due to his cultural heritage. “Racial discrimination is against the law.” Residents, developers find themselves at odds over future of Granite High School, a southside historic landmark.

NIKI CHAN

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

JOSH SCHEUREMAN

20 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

NICOLE ENRIGHT

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FEB.


ENRIQUE LIMÓN

MARCH

COLBY FRAZIER GUINNEVERE SHUSTER

We profi le local photographer Guinnevere Shuster, who has given shelter pets a new lease on life with her viral, photo booth-style shots. The city’s gamble to install an eye-catching and pricey piece of public art on Regent Street hits a snag. We remember the fiery Ethel Hale, SLC’s “conscience,” who passes away at age 94. During the 1950s and 1960s, Hale was one of Utah’s most outspoken critics of war, racism and the injustices of the day. Her activities sparked the interest of the FBI, which compiled 700 pages about the single mother with brown eyes, who weighed 135 pounds.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

APRIL

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

COLBY FRAZIER

Two high-profi le political visits, Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, draw staunch supporters, and at least in one case, fierce protests. “You are tired and I am tired of seeing videos of unarmed people being shot,” Sanders said, following this statement by mentioning the name of Abdullahi Mohamed. The Vermont senator managed to pack a crowd of 14,000 onto Th is Is the Place Heritage Park.

PETER VANDERMAKER

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 21

COURTESY PAUL WHARTON

| CITY WEEKLY |


22 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

NIKI CHAN

JORDAN FLOYD ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Community members band together after the tragic shooting at Pulse, an Orlando nightclub catering primarily to an LGBTQ audience. Utah’s lieutenant governor, Spencer Cox, becomes an unlikely viral hero. Adult male fans of My Little Pony come out of the shadows. The Mama Dragons, a group made up entirely of LDS women that wholeheartedly support their gay children, show you how it’s done.

We publish the Elizabeth Smart police report for the first time and Trevor Morse, whose father figure was Richard Ricci, speaks. Ricci died following a brain aneurysm inside his cell, after being considered the kidnapping’s “top potential subject.” “I’m alive. I could have died,” Abdi Mohamed tells City Weekly in an exclusive interview. He does not understand why two officers shot him. “They didn’t have to, like, shoot me because I had a broomstick in my hand. They had many options; they had tasers, batons, they could have used other results, instead of shooting a 17-year-old kid with a broomstick five times, you feel me?” Amid fanfare, 900 South becomes Harvey Milk Blvd.

DEREK CARLISLE

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

STEPHEN DARK

COLBY FRAZIER

MAY

JUNE


JULY

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

NIKI CHAN

SURJ

The #BlackLivesMatter movement picks up steam; eight women vie for the Mrs. Utah title in a dazzling display of brains, beauty and world peace; two months after purchasing and becoming publisher of The Salt Lake Tribune, Paul Huntsman announces that Editor Terry Orme, a 39year veteran of the newspaper, was no longer employed there; revelrous Motos in Moab gathering aims to put Beehive motorcycle culture on the map; following a City Weekly investigation, Unified Fire Authority Deputy Chief Gaylord Scott steps down. Chief Michael Jensen resigns the following month; Majestic Meadows mobile home park residents like Chris Strafford struggle with unexpected rent increases.

TYSON CALL

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

JORDAN FLOYD

COLBY FRAZIER

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 23

NIKI CHAN

| CITY WEEKLY |


JORDAN FLOYD

SARAH ARNOFF

BERT JOHNSON

NIKI CHAN

24 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Media chief Missy Larsen rises to chief of staff at the AG’s office amid transparency concerns. Larsen said when she started at the AG’s office, it “was in a state of extreme low morale. Many employees had been personally contacted by reporters and bloggers, even at their home, and expressed frustration.” City Creek Park holds fifth annual LDS mass resignation. “[H]aving support for those difficult moments in life is hugely important,” Steve Holbrook, leader of the Utah Valley PostMormons support group, said. After District Attorney Sim Gill announces that a pair of police officers was justified in shooting Abdi Mohamed, protesters gather to demand that Gill and Mayor Jackie Biskupski resign. We take you inside Mexico City to hear what locals think of Trump. Local sex workers take their act from the streets to mobile apps like Instagram. Joslyn Stevens says she grew up in generational poverty, where “nobody ever fucking has anything, everybody is always poor and nobody manages to escape that cycle.”

SARAH ARNOFF

AUGUST


NIKI CHAN COURTESY OF UTAH CORRECTIONS DEPARTMENT

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

U of U freshman Constance Caparas wavers when asked if she’ll vote, admitting she might not if she couldn’t find the polling location or get her hands on a mail-in ballot. Mike Pence gets a warm Utah reception. The prison system seems intent on ensuring that Rolf Kaestel, convicted of robbing $264 in 1981, dies in jail. “I see now that all of my life has flowed toward this end. And that’s a very peaceful awareness,” state inmate No. 137752 writes in a letter. Tragic details of Brock Tucker’s suicide in jail are brought back to life by his grandma’s lawsuit.

SEPT. OCT.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

NIKI CHAN

NIKI CHAN

“You can use health savings accounts; Thailand has offered loans for people to go have surgery,” Sophia Hawes-Tingey, director of Judiciary Committee at Women’s State Legislative Council of Utah, says of gender confirmation surgery. “As a software engineer, I borrowed from my retirement and have yet to pay it back.” Former AG Mark Shurtleff plans a second act and reflects on being radioactive, deliverance and medi-pot. “The reason why you can get a glass of water today in Cache County has nothing to do with a water district,” Zach Frankel, executive director of the Utah Rivers Council, says in “Bear River Blues.”

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 25

DW HARRIS

| CITY WEEKLY |


NIKI CHAN

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

ANNIE KNOX

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DW HARRIS

WESTON BURY

NOV.

DEC.

NIKI CHAN

DW HARRIS

SARAH ARNOFF

26 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall says the time to provide low-income housing with long-term support for sex workers is now. Six months after watershed speech, Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox talks equal rights, family life and virality. “I think it’s sad that a no-name, nobody lieutenant governor from a small state in the middle of nowhere gets all this attention just by saying, ‘We should be nice to each other,’” Cox muses. For a new football coach at West High School, and his team, life lessons prove as painful—if not more—than losses on the field.

Dark horse presidential candidate Evan McMullin strikes a pensive pose on Election Night inside The Depot. Robert Hunter, a film student at Salt Lake Community College, recruited a couple relatives as well as classmate Weston Bury and headed for the Dakotas to document the escalating Standing Rock conflict. U students Katie Kume and Lauren Radke compare T-shirts they received for pledging to intervene in situations they believe could lead to sexual assault. Housing First is the salvation of Utah’s chronically homeless. But for some, it doesn’t work.


YEAR IN REVIEW

Looking back on a tumultuous year for Utah restaurateurs and diners. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

N

Veneto Ristorante Italiano owners Amy and Marco Stevanoni

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| CITY WEEKLY |

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 27

Duke or Lynchburg Lemonade. A few blocks west, Ekamai was sold to husband and wife Wichai and Yupin Charoen, who turned the tiny space into Laan Na Thai (336 W. 300 South, 801-363-2717, Facebook.com/LaanNaThai). In addition to classic dishes many of you would be familiar with, they also serve several lesserknown specialties from their homeland in northeast Thailand. Cucina (1026 Second Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-322-3055, CucinaDeli.com) has been around since 1995, but underwent significant changes in décor and cuisine when talented young chef Joey Ferran left Log Haven to take over Cucina’s kitchen. The result was a tantalizing new evening tapas menu, along with monthly wine dinners that routinely sell out. One of my favorite new restaurants of 2016 is the family owned and operated Sicilia Mia (4536 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-274-0223, Facebook.com/ Sicilia-Mia). This is a place where everyone is Italian for an evening, as they’re enveloped in the warm hospitality of the owners. A crowd favorite—and a real showstopper—is the spaghetti carbonara, wherein a large, hollowed-out wheel of ParmigianoReggiano is rolled to the guests’ table and the dish is prepared tableside, right in the Parm wheel. Other new Salt Lake City eateries that fed me well this year include Mollie & Ollie (159 S. Main, 801-328-5659, MollieandOllie.com), the recently opened Table X (1457 E. 3350 South, 385-528-3712, TableXRestaurant.com) and Este Deli (1702 S. Main, 801-487-3354, Facebook.com/EsteDeli1)—where you’ll find damn good cheesesteaks, East Coast-style hoagies and an outrageously tasty Italianstyle roast pork sandwich with sharp provolone and broccoli rabe. Finally, it saddened so many of us to learn of the tragic death of John Williams last May. He and his Gastronomy Inc. partners opened The New Yorker, Baci Trattoria and Market Street restaurants, among others, and paved a path for fine dining in Salt Lake City. He was also an ardent supporter of the local art community and his charitable work was well known. John, we miss you. CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

eedless to say, 2016 was a turbulent year by any standards. That was also true of the local dining scene. I don’t recall a year when so many restaurants closed and morphed into new ones. Chefs bounced around like pinballs. Here are some of the highlights. In what I considered to be the biggest surprise of 2016, Forage closed. Originally created by Bowman Brown and Viet Pham, it was the most daring of eateries, offering wildly creative dishes that were always unique. Along with The Metropolitan in its heyday, Forage broke new ground and raised the bar for Utah diners. In its place, Marco and Amy Stevanoni opened Salt Lake City’s Veneto Ristorante Italiano (370 E. 900 South, 801-359-0708, VenetoSLC.com)—a culinary homage to Marco’s homeland and, in my opinion, easily the most authentic Italian restaurant in the Beehive. It’s also unique insofar as it is a no-tip establishment. “There’s no tipping in Veneto, so there’s no tipping at Veneto,” Marco once told me. Even as the tally of local Italian restaurants increased, we lost one in Vinto. I always liked David Harries’ ode, décor-wise, to the famous cathedral in Siena, where he and his wife Deborah spent their honeymoon. Thrilling ambiance aside, their pizzas and heavenly homemade meatballs kept me coming back. This past spring, Vinto closed, and HSL (418 E. 200 South, 801-5399999, Salt Lake City, HSLRestaurant.com) opened in its place by owners Briar Handly, Melissa Gray and Meagan Nash. Armed with a pantry of fresh, mostly locally procured produce, meats and such, Handly and fellow chef Craig Gerome treat guests to dishes as varied as General Tso’s-style cauliflower and ash-roasted cabbage with fermented chili romesco, and their fabulous beef cheek burger. And the tables in town kept turning. Faustina—a longtime SLC favorite on 300 South—was raised (literally, the ceilings and roof were heightened) and became Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar (454 E. 900 South, 801-746-4441, StanzaSLC.com). Stanza is a collaboration of restaurateurs Mikel Trapp and Joel LaSalle, who are also involved in Current Fish & Oyster, Luna Taquería, Trio, Oasis Café, Caffe Niche and others. Since it’s both a restaurant

DINE

and a wine bar, the owners wisely enlisted Jimmy Santangelo as their beverage director, and his pairing suggestions for dishes ranging from whole prosciutto-wrapped branzino to bucatini carbonara are always spot-on. Over at Current, Phelix Gardner took over the kitchen after leaving his position as chef at Finca. The Annex by Epic Brewing in Sugar House had been rebooted a couple times since opening in 2014, including chef Robert Angelilli moving on and chef Craig Gerome moving in. More recently, it went away altogether and was replaced with Mark Mason and Bleu Adams’ Black Sheep Café (1048 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-742-5490, BlackSheepSLC.com), which in turn followed the closure of their Blue Poblano restaurant. Confused? Me too. A beloved favorite of Park City locals since opening in 1972, The Eating Establishment (317 Main, Park City, 435649-8284) was purchased, revamped and recently reopened by Modern Family star Ty Burrell and his Edison Alley Group. Another PC classic, Cicero’s, bit the dust and has been completely gutted and made into Firewood (306 Main, 435-252-9900, FirewoodonMain.com). Most of the restaurant’s menu items are cooked by owner/ chef John Murcko and his crew on an eightstation wood-fired grill using an array of different woods. The restaurant opened just last week, barely making the 2016 cut. Back in Salt Lake City, one of our most cherished institutions, Fresco Italian Café, closed for business and was sold to restaurateur Scott Evans (of Pago, Finca, East Liberty Tap House and Hub & Spoke Diner), who reopened the spot as Trestle Tavern (1513 S. 1500 East, 801-532-3373, TrestleTavern.com). Here you’ll find craft beers and ciders and Bohemian-inspired cuisine—dishes such as cabbage rolls, späetzle and cheese, pierogis and goulash. Two downtown Asian eateries were shuttered and blossomed anew this year. Yellowtail Japanese Bistro—which had taken over the location that formerly housed Shogun—closed and became SoCo (319 S. Main, 801-532-3946, SoCoSLC.com). This Southern Comfort eatery whips up incredible stick-to-the-ribs fare, like fried chicken, hushpuppies and sensational shrimp and grits. Also impressive is their Southern-themed cocktails, such as the Daisy

NIKI CHAN

In With the New


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| CITY WEEKLY |

28 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

BRING THE FAMILY UP EMIGRATION CANYON THIS HOLIDAY SEASON -Creekside Patio -87 Years and Going Strong -Breakfast served daily until 4pm -Delicious Mimosas & Bloody Marys -Gift Cards for sale in diner or online

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

FOOD MATTERS

B e er, P izza &

BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Alamexo’s Enchiladas Rojas

Times Go o d

JOHN TAYLOR

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Alamexo Holidays

Through New Year’s Eve, chef/owner Matt Lake offers unique dinner specials geared for the holiday season at Alamexo (268 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-7794747, Alamexo.com). Special à la carte offerings include chile rellenos en nogada con borrego, which is two roasted poblano chilies filled with lamb picadillo, baked in a goat-cheese and walnut sauce and topped with fresh pomegranate seeds and cilantro. Also on the limitedtime menu is pescado tikin-xic: an entrée of wild mahi filet marinated in achiote and citrus, wrapped and grilled in a banana leaf and served with sweet plantains and habanero vegetable escabeche. Also, the new Alamexo Cantina in SLC’s 9th & 9th neighborhood is scheduled to open in March 2017.

2991 E. 3300 S.

385.528.0181

PC Distillery to Launch

Yet another new distillery heads our way in 2017: Park City-based Alpine Distilling (AlpineDistilling.com) pays homage to European liqueurs with products blended from natural flavors and botanicals with premium-grain neutral spirits. Its first two concoctions hit the shelves this January, and both have already earned medals in the international consumer tasting 2016 SIP Awards. The release of the black tea-, fruit- and spiceinspired Preserve Liqueur is accompanied by aromatic Stone Fruit-Primrose Bourbon Whiskey. Sounds intriguing, right? Managing Director Robert Sergent says, “Being recognized pre-launch with such high honors is very rewarding. We look forward to making them available to the public shortly.” Portions of proceeds from the products benefit nonprofits such as the Park City Community Foundation and Swaner Nature Preserve.

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Tradition... Tradition

Spice Kitchen Success

Spice Kitchen Incubator (SpiceKitchenIncubator.org)—which trains and assists new immigrants and refugees in creating their own food businesses— has added another success story to their ever-growing list of achievements. Chef Kaltum of Mother of All (purveyor of delicious Sudanese food) recently pulled up to the Spice Kitchen, grinning earto-ear, in what is now her very own food truck—and the first to be owned by a Spice entrepreneur. Congrats to all! Quote of the week: “He was a bold man that first ate an oyster.” —Jonathan Swift Tips: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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Contemporary Japanese Dining

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AND ASIAN GRILL

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18 WEST MARKET STREET

801.519.9595

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 29

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS


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30 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

NYE PunchOut

Usher in the new year with festive holiday punches. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

L

ots of us are ready to pop Champagne corks on New Year’s Eve—a tradition that isn’t going anywhere soon. However, celebrations like this one are exceptionally well-suited to punch-type drinks, especially when there’s a crowd. The selfserve aspect of the holiday concoction means that hosts and hostesses can focus on other essential tasks, like keeping Uncle Milt away from the tequila. Here are a few of my favorite punch bowls, including nonalcoholic. While serving as bar manager at San Francisco’s Rickhouse bar, Erick Castro created his excellent Champagne Holiday Punch. It calls for a Creole Shrubb, which is an orange-flavored rum. If you can’t find

it, substitute with a similar rum or a liqueur like Mandarin Napoleon. Likewise, you can trade out the genever for London dry gin. Combine 6 ounces of fresh lemon juice with 10 dashes of angostura bitters, 12 ounces of genever, 4 ounces of simple syrup and 4 ounces of Creole Shrubb. Refrigerate for a couple of hours until chilled. When ready to serve, gently stir in 4 ounces of Champagne or other sparkling wine, 8 ounces of club soda, large ice cubes and pods of star anise and pineapple slices to garnish. Anyone who’s ever sipped a screwdriver knows the affinities that vodka and orange juice have for each other. Here is a Vodka Punch I adapted from the Big Girls Small Kitchen blog (BigGirlsSmallKitchen.com). It’ll serve an army. Ideally, you’ll want to use fresh-squeezed orange, lemon and grapefruit juice; but in a pinch, you can use store-bought. In a large punch bowl, combine 3 cups of plain vodka (perhaps from local Kid Curry); 3 cups of orange-flavored vodka; 4 cups (total) of fresh lemon, orange and grapefruit juices; 1 quart of seltzer; 2 cups of simple syrup steeped with a handful of mint leaves; 2 cups of sparkling wine; 3 tablespoons of orange bitters (like Beehive Spiced Orange Cocktail Bitters); and 6 cups of ice. Garnish with fresh mint leaves. Both kids and adults love this non-alcoholic punch recipe. The ginger ale gives it some celebratory zest, in lieu of having to

DRINK use sparkling wine. To make Pretty Pink Punch, begin by dissolving 2 tablespoons of sugar in 3 cups of cold water in a punch bowl. Then add two 64-ounce bottles of chilled cranberryraspberry juice, a 46-ounce can of chilled pineapple juice and a 12-ozunce can of thawed frozen pink lemonade concentrate. You can do all of this ahead of time, and refrigerate until you’re ready to serve. Before serving, stir in 1 liter of ginger ale and garnish with lemon slices or raspberries. Though not technically punch, Rosé Champagne Cocktails aren’t too far off—and this mix is one of my favorites. It’s a drink that’s elegant in its simplicity. For two cocktails, slice a sugar cube in half with a serrated or sharp, thin knife. Place half a sugar cube into the

bottom of each of two Champagne flutes (I like to use old-fashioned coupes). Add four dashes of aromatic bitters (like Bitters Lab Aromatic) to each glass. Then top them off with rosé. Add a lemon twist garnish and you’re ready to rock. For whiskey fans, this Citrus-Irish Whiskey Punch recipe—which first appeared in Bon Appétit— is a must-try. It calls for oleo-saccharum, which adds a kick to the punch; you can find easy recipes for it online. In a large bowl or pitcher, combine 1 and twothirds cups of Irish whiskey, 1 and two-thirds cups of strong black tea, half a cup of fresh clementine or orange juice, half a cup of fresh lemon juice, half a cup of oleo-saccharum, seven dashes of aromatic bitters, and 1 and a half teaspoons of freshly grated nutmeg. Chill for 3-8 hours, then strain into a serving bowl. Garnish with lemon and orange slices, and serve over ice with freshly grated nutmeg. Happy New Year! CW


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Ruth’s Diner

The year 2017 marks the 87th anniversary of Ruth’s Diner, making it the second-oldest restaurant in Utah. It takes just a quick drive up Emigration Canyon to arrive at the historic diner, where a sprawling outdoor patio surrounded by beautiful scenery awaits. During colder months, take shelter indoors with a hot cup of joe and the famous mile-high biscuits and gravy. Along with traditional breakfast options, be sure to try contemporary dishes such as Erik’s raspberry chicken, a lunch favorite. 4160 E. Emigration Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-582-5807, RuthsDiner.com

Breakfast ·Lunch ·Dinner | Beer & Wine

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DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 31

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IGreek-American Gregory Skedros opened the doors to Mandarin in 1978, and it’s been Utah’s premier Chinese restaurant ever since. The kitchen is bustling with Chinese chefs from Hong Kong and San Francisco, whose woks fire up some of the best fare you’ll find in town. The family-run restaurant has sustained success in its Bountiful location with a combination of well-versed chefs, loyal customers and a menu that can’t be topped. 348 E. 900 North, Bountiful, 801-298-2406, MandarinUtah.com


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REVIEW BITES

TED SCHEFFLER

Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

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725 E. 3300 S. SLC (801) 803-9434

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Encore Bistro

While this restaurant might be located in the new George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater in downtown Salt Lake City, it’s going to attract more than theater-goers with cuisine that is fresh, clean and creative. If you’re looking for a fast, economical and delicious breakfast, I highly recommend their unique take on the now-ubiquitous chicken and waffles, with scrumptious housemade chicken sausage, soft and airy scrambled eggs and Utah cheddar cheese, all encased in a maple-flavored waffle. Lunchtime offerings include the excellent “power salad” with kale, watercress, arugula and roasted beets tossed with grapefruit, blueberries, goat cheese, pistachios and balsamic vinaigrette. The eclectic array of sandwiches, sliders, paninis and wraps offered for lunch range from a delightful Thai chicken wrap to slow-braised beef rib sliders; vegetable lovers will appreciate the “diva panini” with roasted red pepper, caramelized onions, portobello mushroom, spinach, grilled zucchini, havarti cheese and pesto on a ciabatta bun. During performance evenings, dinner is served with a menu tuned to the theme of each performance. I’m not sure exactly what that means, but I bet the food will make your taste buds do a standing O. Reviewed Sept. 29. 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-509-7871, EncoreBistroSLC.com


CINEMA

BEST OF 2016

List We Forget …

Celebrating the best of 2016 in film. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

Arrival

MaryAnn Johanson: It’s been a great year for films telling stories we haven’t seen a gazillion times before: new fantasy realms exploring grief, bigotry and the stifling pressures of conformity; long unsung real-life heroes finally getting their moment in the spotlight; complicated and cranky women making no apologies for themselves; harrowing examinations of the trials of the downtrodden; and even an escape into song and dance that is sharply sensible amid its joyful fancy. In 2016, even our entertainment got grim and bitter, and felt all the more pertinent because of it.

Andrew Wright: The discovery of inner power was a theme in some of 2016’s best movies—whether it was a little girl realizing her gifts in the beautifully rhythmic and creepy The Fits, or a giant amoeba-lizard developing a horrifically staged knack for plasma-ray destruction in Shin Godzilla. Nestled above the rest, though, is Zhang Yang’s Paths to the Soul, in which a group of Chinese villagers walk the snowy 1,000-plus miles to Tibet’s Holy Mountain, kowtowing with every step. In a sneakily impressive year, this almost indecently lovely, transcendent quasi-documentary shone the strongest.

1. Arrival 2. La La Land 3. A Monster Calls 4. The Lobster 5. Zootopia 6. A Bigger Splash 7. Miss Sloane 8. London Road 9. I, Daniel Blake 10. Hidden Figures

1. Paths of the Soul 2. The Fits 3. Shin Godzilla 4. Elle 5. Hell or High Water 6. Green Room 7. The Witch 8. Tower 9. Manchester by the Sea 10. Arrival

La La Land

Paths of the Soul

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 33

1. Arrival 2. Moonlight 3. La La Land 4. Green Room 5. Sing Street 6. The Witch 7. Pete’s Dragon 8. Manchester by the Sea 9. The Nice Guys 10. 10 Cloverfield Lane

continuously feints and dodges through multiple points of view, on its way to an unexpectedly resonant tale of challenging corrupt patriarchy. 2. Paterson: The deadpan magnificence of Jim Jarmusch remains an acquired taste, but there’s a special soulfulness to this story of a New Jersey bus driver (Adam Driver) who writes poetry he never shares with anyone. The cyclical rhythms of the protagonist’s days build toward something almost heroic about finding art in every possible moment. 1. Cameraperson: It’s not exaggerating matters to suggest that Kirsten Johnson has created an entirely new kind of film art here, combining snippets of footage from her 20 years as a documentary cinematographer into an essay with a hypnotic momentum. Individual images are some of the most gasp-inducing in recent memory, all in service of a remarkable reminder of the real humanity behind every creative work. CW

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Eric D. Snider: It is often claimed that “Hollywood” (meaning “the movies”) is out of touch with reality. And maybe it’s true. After all, 2016 was a garbage year in real life but a terrific one for movies. It’s the first time my Top 10 list has had two musicals on it. There’s hope for us yet!

Left: Kirsten Johnson’s Cameraperson Right: Adam Driver in Paterson

Other Top 10s:

their study of disgraced congressman Anthony Weiner’s comeback 2013 New York mayoral campaign into a portrait of political pathology—both a general and very specific kind. That this particular man and his pathology might have changed the course of a presidential election makes the story even more darkly fascinating. 4. The Witch: Writer/director Robert Eggers doesn’t mess around with ambiguity: The witch feared by the movie’s characters, exiled from their 17thcentury New England town for the father’s fundamentalist beliefs, most certainly exists. The key to Eggers’ study of evil and obsession with sin might be in the subtitle, “A New-England Folktale,” because the monster here is also a lesson to those wrestling with something we don’t fully understand, but know in our gut is real. 3. The Handmaiden: Park Chan-wook’s typically lush visual style adds a sociopolitical edge in this adaptation of Sarah Waters’ novel Fingersmith, set in Japanoccupied 1930s Korea. The narrative— about a thief working to facilitate a con artist’s efforts to marry an heiress—

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Thanksgiving gathering, anchoring one of the great film portraits of an addict. 7. La La Land: It’s easy to scoff at Damien Chazelle’s attempt to revive a certain brand of melancholy movie musical, but this love story involving a would-be actress (Emma Stone) and a struggling jazz musician (Ryan Gosling) in contemporary Los Angeles becomes an unapologetic celebration of the idea of romanticism and the euphoria that can be created by art that transports us. 6: Toni Erdmann: Even some people who love Maren Ade’s shaggy comedy—about a goofy music teacher (Peter Simonischek) trying to reconnect with his semi-estranged daughter, a corporate consultant (Sandra Hüller)—seemed to think it was another story about an uptight businessperson learning What Really Matters. There’s more complexity than that in the central relationship—and in Hüller’s best-of-theyear performance—even as Ade constructs several of the year’s funniest set pieces. 5. Weiner : Hell yes, this plays even more tragically depressing now than it did when it debuted at Sundance almost a year ago. Josh Kriegman and Elyse Steinberg turn

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n case there weren’t enough high-profile deaths in 2016—Prince, David Bowie, Carrie Fisher, democracy—we were told repeatedly in entertainment industry headlines that this was also the year cinema died. But around the margins of the franchises that tend to suck up all the media attention, there were plenty of wonderful movies—enough worthy ones that a top 10 list is merely the tip of the iceberg. If you’re looking for a place to start catching up on some 2016 greatness, I hope this’ll do. 10. Moonlight: Writer/director Barry Jenkins explores an African-American life in three acts—from grade school to high school to young adulthood—in this beautifully shot, phenomenally acted journey into hard-wired cultural ideas of black masculinity. 9. Kubo and the Two Strings: Laika’s stop-motion features have always been a distinctive variation in the CGI kid-flick landscape, but this tale of a young boy on a quest to find the magical artifacts that can protect him makes a case for the transcendent, transformative power of storytelling itself. 8. Krisha: Trey Edward Shults used his first feature to create a star-making role for his aunt, Krisha Fairchild, as a 60-something recovering alcoholic trying to atone for her role as perpetual black sheep at a family


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE EAGLE HUNTRESS At Park City Film Series, Dec. 30-31, 8 p.m.; Jan. 1, 6 p.m. (G)

CURRENT RELEASES

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ASSASSIN’S CREED B In a just world, a movie starring Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons, Charlotte Rampling and Brendan Gleeson would be a lush historical epic or period drama. But since the world is garbage, it’s another turgid, useless videogame adaptation. A murderer named Lynch (Fassbender) learns he’s descended from 15th-century Spanish assassins who pledged to protect a sacred artifact; the bad guys (Cotillard and Irons) use science and magic to make Lynch relive his ancestor’s life and find the dingus, leading to battle and bloodshed (and, for some reason, parkour). There are recognizable human emotions and motivations buried under humorless exposition and tedious bloodletting, but extraneous elements like “story” and “character” are abandoned so we can focus on what’s important: scene after scene of self-serious cyphers fighting over something we don’t care about. I smell something, but it’s not an Oscar. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

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FENCES BBB.5 Denzel Washington and Viola Davis won Tony Awards for their performances in the 2010 Broadway revival of August Wilson’s Fences, and this big-screen adaptation gives them an opportunity to burn down the screen. Davis does in her portrayal of Rose, a long-suffering wife to Troy (Washington). If only Washington the director had made Washington the actor rise to Davis’ level, instead offering a quite-good performance that still feels like an amalgamation of other, better Washington performances. But with material this strong, it’s impossible not to get swept up in the story of a former Negro League ballplayer looking back at his life. The story is also bigger than that—a dense drama with enough subtext to demand repeated viewings. The supporting cast—Stephen Henderson and Russell Hornsby—is excellent, and Charlotte Bruus Christensen’s handsome cinematography almost makes Fences transcend its stage roots. (R)—David Riedel

PASSENGERS BB Only once the final credits roll does it become clear how badly director Morten Tyldum misjudges the necessary tone, and how indefensible the ending is. Jim (Chris Pratt), an engineer aboard an interstellar ship, awakens 90 years early from cryosleep due to a malfunction, then makes a desperate choice to awaken another passenger, Aurora (Jennifer Lawrence), rather than live the rest of his life alone. The story is strong while it’s a two-hander morality play about justifying actions for our own survival, leaving aside cribbing its most romantic moment from WALL-E. Then it turns into a crisis sci-fi adventure, which might have been justifiable if it had built to a resolution with some bite. Instead, Passengers fails miserably at guiding the characters to the only place that would have allowed them to be something besides a criminal and a victim. (PG-13)—SR

LA LA LAND BBBB The movie musical is built almost entirely on the willingness of an audience to submit to romanticism, and writer/director Damien Chazelle wastes no time announcing what sort of movie this is with a “CinemaScope” title card and a dance number set in Southern California freeway traffic. The plot is simple bordering on simplistic—a boy-meets-girl tale of an aspiring actress (Emma Stone) and struggling jazz musician (Ryan Gosling)— built on the easy chemistry between the two leads and their sheer commitment to the kind of movie they’re in. But while Chazelle frequently name-checks vintage movie history, it’s not because he’s claiming an equal place. This is a movie about the euphoria that beautiful, silly and, yes, romantic art can inspire in viewers, maybe the kind of movie that matters most in a time when cynicism feels easiest. (PG-13)—SR

SING BBB.5 Yes, Sing bears some similarity to Zootopia, but the two movies are very different in tone, humor, drama and intent; this could be a light comedy produced in Zootopia. Theatrical impressario Buster Moon (Matthew McConaughey), a koala, stages a voicetalent show in a last-ditch attempt to save his failing theater. McConaughey’s transcendent voice performance sells Buster as a bear of big ideas and bigger optimism, never mind the details. With a simpler story and gentler metaphors than Zootopia, Sing will be easier going for younger kids, and it might even get them interested in classic pop standards (though there’s tons of modern pop here, too). With smart attention to the trials and foibles of a diverse range of characters—not just in species, but in gender, too—and some irresistibly toe-tapping musical numbers, Sing is a sweet, funny delight. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson

LION BB Half of a fascinating real-life story is a decent start, but it’s not enough when the theoretically feel-good half is a soggy dud. In 1986, 5-year-old Saroo (Sunny Pawar) is separated from his family in India, and winds up orphaned before he’s ultimately adopted by an Australian couple (Nicole Kidman and David Wenham). That compelling first hour follows the lost boy through various perilous encounters, until we flash-forward 20 years to now-adult Saroo (Dev Patel) becoming obsessed with the possibility of finding his birth family. While there might be some way to dramatize Saroo’s inner turmoil beyond Patel’s performance full of frustration-signifying tics, the second half falls dead, having rushed through relationships so that there’s no emotional hook connecting plot points. Whatever investment a viewer might have in the fate of that little boy never transfers to this moping adult. (PG-13)—SR

WHY HIM? BB.5 James Franco actually starts to seem like a bona fide movie star whenever his character is dialed up to 11—like Laird Mayhew, the unfiltered, tatted-up video-game millionaire trying to impress Ned (Bryan Cranston) and Barb Fleming (Megan Mullally), the Midwestern parents of his girlfriend (Zoey Deutch), during a pre-Christmas visit to his California mansion. Plenty of broad, crude, R-rated shenanigans ensue—a literal tidal wave of piss may be involved—with predictably uneven results. But Cranston and Mullally are aces at incredulous-bordering-on-horrified reaction takes, while Franco goes for the gusto playing a guy with a completely ingenuous sincerity behind his obliviousness to decorum, making him—God forgive me for saying so—almost endearing. It might be the kind of studio comedy that you know will include weird cameos, but at least it sells the weirdness at its center. (R)—SR

more than just movies at brewvies

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34 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

JACKIE BBB Chilean director Pablo Larraín and screenwriter Noah Oppenheim often nail the connection between history and image in their profile of Jackie Kennedy (Natalie Portman) the week following JFK’s assassination. The narrative darts back and forth in time, from framing narrative with a journalist (Billy Crudup) interviewing Jackie about the tragic day, then weaving back to the immediate aftermath in flashbacks. Much of the running time surrounds her detailed involvement in orchestrating the president’s funeral procession, while repeating more or less the same concept: giving her husband an epic send-off to cement his legacy in the American consciousness. Portman walks an effective, tricky line humanizing an icon whose goal was to render her family iconic, but the script is content to repeat variations on a theme. (R)—Scott Renshaw

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DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 35


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THEATER DIRECTORY SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7670 S. Union Park Ave., Sandy 801-568-3699 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 801-486-9652 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 801-571-0968 Cinemark.com

WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 801-334-8655 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9335 S. State, Sandy 801-304-4577 MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-325-7500 MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 3761 W. Parkway Plaza Drive, South Jordan 801-304-4019 MegaplexTheatres.com

Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 RedwoodDriveIn.com Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

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36 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

WEST VALLEY AMC 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-568-0855 Cinemark.com

T! O B O R Y N I H S BI G News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

exclusively on cityweekly.net

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 801-282-8847 Cinemark.com Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 801-969-6711 Cinemark.com

PARK CITY Metropolitan Holiday Village 4 1776 Park Ave. 435-940-0347 MetroTheatres.com Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market St. 435-575-0221 MetroTheatres.com DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-528-5800 MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-9345 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. Main, American Fork 801-756-7897 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Movies 8 2424 N. University Parkway, Orem 801-375-0127 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 801-852-8526 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Orem 800-246-3627 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi 801-768-2700 MegaplexTheatres.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 801-546-4764 Cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Cinemark Bountiful 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-298-0326 Cinemark.com


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Stay Tuned

TV

Kicking off 2017 with 17 new TV series. 1. The Mick (Sunday, Jan. 1, Fox) Broke lowlife Mickey (Kaitlin Olson, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia) gets stuck raising the kids of her just-incarcerated rich sister. It’s Uncle Buck meets Mary Poppins meets, well, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. 2. Ransom (Sunday, Jan. 1, CBS) A good-looking hostage negotiator (Eric Beaumont) and his good-looking team resolve kidnapping and ransom cases in Your Town, USA (which is really Canada—shhh!). Ransom moves to Saturdays after its debut, so it’s already canceled. 3. One Day at a Time (Friday, Jan. 6, Netflix) Remake of the ’70s sitcom—with a Cuban-American twist, complete with single mom (Justina Machado), precocious kids, sleazy building manager and, unfortunately, a damned laugh track. Almost had it, Netflix.

5. Taboo (Tuesday, Jan. 10, FX) Long-missing James (Tom Hardy) returns to 1814 London to inherit his father’s empire, only to become caught up in a treacherous legacy that might get him killed, as well. It’s FX’s sexiest period drama since The Bastard Executioner.

10. Riverdale (Thursday, Jan. 26, The CW) The “darksexy” Archie Comics drama no one asked for, with CWized Archie, Jughead, Betty, Veronica and even Josie & The Pussycats! Sound terrible? More like terribly entertaining! Bring it!

6. Jeff & Some Aliens (Wednesday, Jan. 11, Comedy Central) Loser earthling Jeff (voiced by Brett Gelman) is observed by, and annoyed with, a trio of aliens crashing in his apartment. As Comedy Central cartoons go … this is one of them.

11. Powerless (Thursday, Feb. 2, NBC) Vanessa Hudgens, Alan Tudyk, Danny Pudi and Ron Funches star in an (insurance) office-place comedy set in the DC Comics universe of superheroes and villains. The Good Place is no longer NBC’s strangest sitcom.

7. A Series of Unfortunate Events (Friday, Jan. 13, Netflix) Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Joan Cusack, Aasif Mandvi, Alfre Woodard, Don Johnson, Catherine O’Hara and more are here to erase that trainwreck 2004 Lemony Snicket flick from your meh-mory.

12. Santa Clarita Diet (Friday, Feb. 3, Netflix) Husband and wife SoCal realtors Joel and Sheila (Timothy Olyphant and Drew Barrymore) lead boring suburban lives … until they don’t. No further details, but it’s probably not about dieting.

8. Sneaky Pete (Friday, Jan. 13, Amazon Prime) A freshout-of-prison con man (Giovanni Ribisi) assumes the identity of his former cellmate to hide from a vengeful gangster, only to learn that his new “family” is just as dangerous. Smart upvote, Primers.

13. 24: Legacy (Sunday, Feb. 5, Fox) Another looming terrorist attack, same real-time 24-hour format—but no Jack Bauer! This time, Dr. Dre saves the day! Corey Hawkins (Straight Outta Compton) takes over for Kiefer Sutherland; otherwise, same show.

The Mick (Fox) 14. Legion (Wednesday, Feb. 8, FX) The producers of the Fargo series take on the X-Men, even if they’re not actually called X-Men (Apocalypse just ruined everything). Downton Abbey’s Dan Stevens stars, along with Aubrey Plaza and zero bald guys. 15. Doubt (Wednesday, Feb. 15, CBS) TV’s latest attempt to make Katherine Heigl a thing is yet another pretty lawyer show—but the cast (which includes Dulé Hill, Steven Pasquale, Elliott Gould, Dreama Walker and Laverne Cox) might save it ... might. 16. Crashing (Sunday, Feb. 19, HBO) Comedian Pete Holmes stars as a Pete Holmes-like comedian flailing in the New York City comedy scene, along with Artie Lange, Lauren Lapkus and T.J. Miller. This is a Judd Apatow production; proceed with caution. 17. The Good Fight (Sunday, Feb. 19, CBS) The Good Wife spin-off no one wants to watch will become even harder to get: After it premieres on CBS proper, The Good Fight moves to CBS All Access—a streamer with about 30 subscribers. Why not double-down and add Katherine Heigl, CBS? CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv

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9. Throwing Shade (Tuesday, Jan. 17, TV Land) Erin Gibson and Bryan Safi adapt their pop-culture-skewering podcast to television. Wait ... You can do that? Any networks out there want to turn my podcast into a TV show? Comedy Central? Telemundo? Anybody?

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

4. Emerald City (Friday, Jan. 6, NBC) A dark “reimagining” of The Wizard of Oz that’s been kicked around for two years, with a smoldering Puerto-Rican Dorothy (Adria Arjona, True Detective) and a promisingly weird Wizard casting (Vincent D’Onofrio!).

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@KimballBennion Best Album: Mitski, Puberty 2 (Dead Oceans). The oft-mercurial New York musician showed us a newfound vulnerability in her latest album. Thankfully, it did not cool Mitski’s simmering disenchantment that still bubbles under the surface. It’s a record for 2016 if there ever was one. Best Local Album: Batty Blue, Peeling an Orange or Flattening a Sphere (Battyblue.Bandcamp.com). The Provo psychfolk band’s first full-length is weird, fun and messy—and a little messiness from Provo is never a bad thing. Best Show: Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams. The roots music mainstays’ show at The State Room in July was beautiful, fun and memorable. Their harmonies were so potent that they’re still swirling around in my head five months later. Most Impactful Loss: When Leonard Cohen died, it felt like a bit of our cultural capacity to self-examine and to tell ourselves the truth died with him. Leonard Cohen was great because he never let his shortcomings as a singer or performer keep him from putting his version of the truth out there, even if it sometimes took us a decade or so to fully appreciate it. Let’s hope we’re still able to now that he’s gone. The lyric that basically sums up 2016: “This is a low flying panic attack” (Radiohead, “Burn the Witch,” A Moon Shaped Pool).

BILL KOPP

BEN ALMAN

www.theroyalslc.com

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W

The ones in bigger mags and papers are often written by a committee. Editors make a list, poll their contributors and refine their lists. There’s pressure to maintain the illusion of authority, to demonstrate the accuracy of our goodness detectors and not miss anything that a rival publication wouldn’t. Consequently, they can be samey and lame. The best lists are the ones compiled by individual writers. The freelance warriors who dig through crates and jump feet-first into the Google rabbit hole for as long as it takes to find the song or album that gives us chills. So this year, City Weekly consulted our stable of tune addicts, giving them five categories plus one of their own choosing, and a scant 250-word limit to explain their choices—just to keep the wank from stretching on too long.

JAMES HOPE

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

The Final Countdown

ell, it’s been another year—blahblah-blahbitty-blah. Ubiquitous, obligatory, pedantic and rote, the year-end wrap-up piece is also a wank. All year long, music critics foist our opinions upon you, the readers. Yes, it’s our job. We’re the arbiters, tastemakers, hipster elite, operating under some self-imposed mandate to tell you if somethin’ rules or sucks. And you know what? We love it. We fester to tell you about the discoveries we make in record stores or online—or in the press releases that fill our in boxes (we still get credit for those, right?). Sometimes it’s because we believe we’re ordained prophets of culture, but mostly it’s because we like discussing our favorite thing with likeminded individuals. But year-end pieces, in many publications, aren’t really the same thing.

LASSE HOILE

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MUSIC

@the_musoscribe Best Album: Bill Pritchard, Mother Town Hall (Tapete). This British artist isn’t all that well known at home, and he’s almost unknown in the United States— but he’s big in France! His wry wordplay and winning melodies are on par with the best from Lowe, Costello and Difford/Tillbrook. Best Show: Esperanza Spalding at The Orange Peel in Asheville, N.C. This stunningly accomplished bassist/composer is nominally a jazz artist, but her tour in support of her fifth album Emily’s D+Evolution (Concord) is a groundbreaking synthesis of funk, rock, soul, R&B, hip-hop and—most notably—dramaturgy. Spalding live onstage is like nothing else. Most Impactful Loss: George Martin. Best remembered as the Beatles’ producer, Martin translated the unschooled musicians’ fertile ideas into workable—and consistently groundbreaking— sonic creations. Martin found success producing other artists as well, including America, Jeff Beck, Cheap Trick, Elton John and countless others. Most Anticipated Release of 2017: Former Porcupine Tree leader Steven Wilson has a critically acclaimed body of solo work. For next September’s follow-up to his masterful 2015 album Hand. Cannot. Erase. (Kscope), Wilson tells me in a Skype interview, “I plan on keeping things a little more concise and melodic this time … and [concentrating] a little more on the songwriting.”


BRIAN DUFFY

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@Stakerized Best Album: Leonard Cohen, You Want It Darker (Columbia). Best Local Album: It’s a tie between Skozey Fetisch’s Evidence (Resipiscent) and Purr Bats’ 444 (8ctopus Records). My two picks are subversive in very different ways. After last year’s Red Velvet Devil Worship (8ctopus Records), an attempt to exorcise reli-

gious demons, Purr Bats’ 444 is comprised of explorations of vocalist Kyrbir Is-p’s “Tornadic Temperament,” as one song is titled. Skozey Fetisch’s Evidence cassette, with its manipulated found-sounds, turns the listening experience on its ear with inexplicable snippets that are downright alien. Best Show: The Legendary Pink Dots lived up to their name with their latest album,

Pages of Aquarius (Metropolis), and their show is a psychedelic kaleidoscope, but I gotta go with Black Sabbath’s farewell tour. Their massive presence and sound proved they’re still masters of metal, the genre they invented. Best Local Show: Iceburn reunion show, July 16. On the 20th anniversary of their key work Meditavolutions (Revelation Records) and their first new release in 17 years,

The Heart of the Mountain Is a Fiery Phoenix (due in 2017), Iceburn’s blend of industrial noise, metal and free jazz has never seemed more relevant. Most Impactful Loss: David Bowie. Best Local Music Community Activism: Rock for Standing Rock, a two-day event with local bands and artists at Diabolical Records a few weeks ago.

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KARAOKE

StoriesBeyondTheMusic.com Best Album: Rod Stewart once told me, “I think it’s bloody stupid to compare albums.” Thanks for the opportunity to name-drop. I would say Aaron Lee Tasjan’s Silver Tears was the biggest shocker because I had no idea who he was. Best Show: Dawes’ performance at the Bijou Theater in Knoxville, Tenn., was so rousing, so infectious and so chockfull of great songs, that it became a veritable communal experience. Their latest album is oddly titled We’re All Gonna Die (HUB), but regardless, what a way to go! Most Impactful Loss: Paul Kantner, whose death seemed to be relatively obscured in the midst of the passing of such marquee artists as Bowie, Prince, Keith Emerson and Leonard Cohen. Kantner helped usher in the Summer of Love with the Jefferson Airplane, and with that feat alone became one of the most influential and important musicians of the ’60s and beyond. Long may you soar, Paul. Biggest Complaint: I continue to lament the loss of respect for the physical album and the ongoing inroads made by downloads and streams. Albums—whether CDs or LPs— are an art form, a physical achievement that’s more than sound in cyberspace. It’s the art, the graphics, the credits that underscore the sounds. Keep ’em coming. CW

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@CaptainSpringer Best Album: Still Corners’ Dead Blue (Sub Pop). You can feel the band’s previously attached sonic shackles fall to the ground with every song on this miraculous album. It’s innovative, nostalgic and a bit creepy all at the same time. Best Local Album: Rumble Gums’ Pool Party Palace. This ballsy release from the frenetic ensemble proves that locals can get just as weird as anyone from out of town. Think Mr. Bungle with more hip-hop. Best Show: Ryan Adams at Red Butte Gardens. There aren’t many artist/venue relationships that are as successful as the one Adams created with this beloved outdoor venue. His music pairs a little too perfectly with the setting sun and the cool mountain air. Best Local Show: Hive Riot at Velour. They’re a perfect mix of cutting-edge New York style and small-town dreams. It wasn’t until I caught their album release show when I fully realized Provo’s true role as a hotbed of dope-ass party music. Most Impactful Loss: David Bowie. I know I’m not the only one that was impacted by his death. He blurred the lines between scifi, fantasy and music in a way that no one else ever could; and for that I’ll always be grateful. Best Soundtrack: Stranger Things Vols. 1-2 (Lakeshore) by Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein. Just as the Netflix breakout hit of 2016 functioned as a visual homage to ’80s film, its synth-heavy score is equal parts John Carpenter and Tangerine Dream.

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THURSDAY 12.29 The Pimps of Joytime

What’s in a name? Well, everything at times. And when you refer to yourselves as The Pimps of Joytime, suffice it to say you’re not leaving an immediate impression up to the imagination. The Brooklynbased band practices a particular form of funk and dance music that’s made it a mainstay of DJ/dance culture for 10 years, thanks to a spirited sound and showbiz savvy that ensures every encounter is as memorable as it is musical. Indeed, leader Brian J comes across to audiences as both crazy and charismatic, depending on one’s perspective, but the band’s recent collaborations with such notables as Art and Cyril Neville of the Neville Brothers and jazz genius Roy Ayers speak to their musical merits. And while elements of Afrobeat, salsa, rock and electronica amp up their approach, it’s the band’s attitude and aptitude that ensure their appeal. (Lee Zimmerman) Park City Live, 427 Main, 8 p.m., $15-$30, 21+, ParkCityLive.net

The Fabulous Thunderbirds

The Fabulous Thunderbirds have kept the blues simmering for more than four decades, making it accessible by folding in elements of rock, soul and R&B. The group rose to commercial prominence in 1986 with MTV and radio hits “Tuff Enuff” and “Wrap It Up,” and remain a popular concert draw. Former T-birds include such genre luminaries as Jimmie Vaughan, Nick Curran and Duke Robillard, but only vocalist/blues harpist Kim Wilson remains from the original lineup. “I think you’ve got to give people their money’s worth,”

The Fabulous Thunderbirds

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Wilson told me in a July 2010 interview in Asheville, N.C. “Win or go home. You just give ’em all you got, and you can relax.” The T-birds aren’t really about relaxing, though. They’ve released more than 16 albums since their 1979 debut, Girls Go Wild. 2016’s Strong Like That (Severn) is their latest, and in its grooves can be heard the sound of an assured band with nothing left to prove. (Bill Kopp) Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 7:30 p.m., $29$79, EcclesCenter.org

FRIDAY 12.30

George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic

Growing up as a Kiss fan, I wanted everything associated with them: the records, the cheap iron-on transfers for my Hanes undershirts, the lunchbox—and, seein’ that it was issued by Kiss’ label, Casablanca Records, Parliament’s Live: The P-Funk Earth Tour (1977). I found it for five bucks at a Musicland years after its release. Just like Kiss’ Alive II, it was a doublealbum with a gatefold cover showing an

The Pimps of Joytime elaborate stage show. So I begged my mom to buy it for me. She tried to explain that the music was very different from Kiss’ caveman rock—but she lacked the words to explain funk to a 9-year-old. Plus, I was seduced by the spaceships, star-shaped instruments, lights, fog, a mysterious robed black dude (“I wonder if he knows Ace Frehley!”), and words like “Thumpasaurus,” “Funkenstein” (“I love Frankenstein, mom!”) and “Supergroova”—you know, the medley. So I took it home, dropped the needle and was so confused. It took several years, but fortunately I came to understand and love the far-out, funky sounds of George Clinton and his clan of kooks. Folks, New Year’s Eve starts a night early this year. Prepare to get funked up. (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $35 in advance, $40 day of show, DepotSLC.com

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Vince Herman, the de-facto leader of Leftover Salmon, once told this writer that his band’s brand of bluegrass is, in fact, a radio-friendly, commercial form of old-time mountain music. These days, Herman’s assertion finds broader meaning in a jam-band world where populist precepts have attracted a new generation of free-spirited music aficionados, fans who have found the fast-paced picking and upbeat rhythms in tune with their rowdy, devil-may-care sensibilities. Mainstays of the festival circuit, Leftover Salmon has staked a reputation as one of the more innovative outfits populating that so-called nu-grass movement. Oddly enough, the Boulder-based band refers to their eclectic mix of bluegrass, rock, country and zydeco as “polyethnic Cajun slamgrass,” and while that term might seem somewhat indecipherable to the novice, the band’s ardent admirers have maintained their loyalty over the course of nine albums and a 20-plusyear career. That’s a tasty recipe, indeed. (LZ) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 9 p.m., $40 in advance, $45 day of show, DepotSLC.com

Village People

WEDNESDAYSATURDAY 1.4-7 Village People

Other than Judas Priest’s Rob Halford, music’s other big gay surprise was the Village People. Many were fooled by both acts in spite of the evidence: Halford was always a leather daddy, and Priest’s songs were silly with gay references—especially “Raw Deal,” which came out (HAW!) the same year as the Village People. And those dudes fooled even more of us than Halford. I mean, they embodied iconic proto-’Murrican male role models: the cop, the soldier, the cowboy, the sailor, the construction worker, the biker and the assimilated Native ’Murrican who could be forgiven for bein’ a dirty savage because he’s obviously on our side now. And then all these dudes were dancing and singing along to “YMCA” (which is only about going to the gym, right?), “Macho Man” (hell yeah!) and “In the Navy” (goddamn, they’re patriots, too?). Lol, rofl, lmfao! Oh, ’Murrica. You funny. Anyway, I won’t pretend I wasn’t fooled. But I was only 5. I wanted to be all of those things when I grew up, and was still ignorant of the fact that sometimes a cop loves a cowboy. So all I saw was what really matters with these kings of disco: They embody diversity and fun and, costumes aside, being who you are. (RH) Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m. (6 p.m. on Sunday), $43-$85, EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

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THURSDAY 12.29 LIVE MUSIC

The Fabulous Thunderbirds (Park City Eccles Center) see p. 40 The Pimps of Joytime (Park City Live) see p. 40 The Green Leefs (The Royal)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar & Grill) Dustin Christensen + Joy and Eric + AM Bump Trio + Sam Payne Duo (Eve SLC, City Creek Center) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Therapy Thursdays feat. Fedde Le Grand (Sky)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke with TIYB (Club 90)

FRIDAY 12.30 LIVE MUSIC

Crook & The Bluff (The Hog Wallow) see p. 45

The Fingers (The Green Pig) Head for the Hills + Six Feet in the Pine (The State Room) see p. 46 Hooligans Brass Band + Crescent Super Band (EVE SLC, Salt Palace) George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic + Talia Keys (The Depot) see p. 40 Muscle Hawk + AM Bump Radio (EVE SLC, City Creek Center)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 12.31 LIVE MUSIC

Black & White New Year’s Eve Party feat. Deorro + SLiiNK Riggi & Piros + Bukini + Beatzsick + Heff + Stuzz + Doughboy + Fezill + Deadsun + Guilty Spark + Josh Volt + DawpleGvnger (The Great Saltair) Great Gatsby New Year’s Eve feat. DJ Cloud 9 (Summit Lounge) DJ Marcus Wing + DJ Justin Reid (UCCU Center) DJ Flash and Flare + Little Big Band + The Inevitables + DJ Juggy + DJ Lowpass + Vicious Beat + SL Steez

(EVE SLC, Salt Palace) Lady Teeth + Spooky Snack + GABI + Rich Girlz (Kilby Court) Leftover Salmon (The Depot) see p. 42 Mama J (Liquid Joe’s) NYE 2017 feat. Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Paparazzi NYE feat. DJ Delmaggio and DJ Erockalypze (Club Elevate) Tim Cord + Rust (The Royal) Zion Riot (Brewski’s)

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TUESDAY 1.3 LIVE MUSIC

Joyce Manor + The Hotelier + Crying (Kilby Court)

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WEDNESDAY 1.4 LIVE MUSIC

Village People (Park City Egyptian Theatre) see p. 42

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (Muse Music) DJ Birdman (Twist) DJ Kurtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge)

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DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 45

1.3

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12.29 THE OUBURG BROTHERS

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY

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WHISKEY & WINE TO WARM YOU UP!

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FEELING CHILLY?

So I had an evangelical Christian period as a teenager—mostly because my father scared the bejesus outta (and into) me during a summer spent in Carson City, Nev. It led to me spend one New Year’s Eve in a Rose Park-area Baptist church, holding hands with a bunch of people who were literally praying for the world to end while pretending to speak in tongues. Which, of course, was supremely disturbing … and also an adrenaline rush. A gig by Crook & The Bluff in the last 27-ish hours of 2016, what with that darkly trippy psych-apocalyptic carny Western thing they do, evokes similar feelings. Yes, even in an adult atheist. I know TC&TB aren’t gonna catalyze the Rapture, but I enjoy the queasy unease that goes with the notion—and the music, and the moment. “We’ll definitely have some atmosphere goin’ on,” frontdude Kirk Dath tells City Weekly. Look for a new EP soon, as well as music videos for re-recordings of “Devilish Deeds” and “Blood Black” from their brilliant album Down to the Styx. (Randy Harward) The Hog Wallow, 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, 9 p.m., $7, 21+, TheHogWallow.com


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46 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

FRIDAY 12.30

CONCERTS & CLUBS

GRAHAM GARDNER

Head for the Hills, Six Feet in the Pine

After opening for Hot Buttered Rum on their themed, two-night State Room stand last New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day, Head for the Hills is going it alone this year. The show caps off a year that saw the band perform at FloydFest, the Blue Ox Music Festival, Vertex and the Strawberry Music Festival, among others. There’s no Sunday best or one-piece ski suit night, though: Just the Colorado band’s new-school take on olde-tyme string-fueled Americana, which interpolates indie rock, jazz, hip-hop, folk and world music. And you don’t need a special outfit to enjoy that (y’hear, hipsters?). There is, however, a deal with Hotel RL (the Red Lion) for an $89/night room with late checkout in case you’re hungover—and breakfast, if you think you can keep it down. (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $20, 21+, TheStateRoomSLC.com

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VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

| CITY WEEKLY |

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 47

Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801468-1492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

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FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S TAVERN 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801521-3904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-268-2228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-7335567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-3828567, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801363-3638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed. LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland

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A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-3552287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801394-1713, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801566-3254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801261-2337, Live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435615-7200, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-953-6374, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, Karaoke Thurs.


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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

MEMO

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

| CITY WEEKLY |

MAY 26, 2016 | 49

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1. 1983 Tony-winning musical 2. Baldwin who spoofed Trump on "SNL" 3. Fine-tuned 4. Shocking swimmer 5. "Brideshead Revisited" novelist Waugh 6. It's ENE of Fiji 7. General on Chinese menus 8. Auction ending? 9. Suffix with Brooklyn or Japan 10. Previous to, in poetry 11. Channing and Art

48. Fertility clinic cell 50. ____ and flowed 51. Half of a 1960s pop group 55. Dunham of "Girls" 56. Brit's baby buggy 58. Cpl.'s inferior 59. Hit 2011 animated film 60. Mediterranean land: Abbr. 61. Go (for)

SUDOKU

DOWN

12. 2004 movie set in 2035 13. Bit of audiophile equipment 18. Org. associated with filmratings.com 22. Tickle 24. 1982 sci-fi film with a 2010 sequel 25. Pointer's statement 26. Easter activities 27. "Looking at it a different way," in texts 28. "The Chronicles of Vladimir ___" (YA book series about a vampire) 29. Inventor Whitney 33. Darken 35. Parades, with "out" 36. Spice Girl Halliwell 37. Burkina Faso neighbor 38. Undertaking 39. Tangle of hair 40. Palindromic houseware brand 43. Coat named for an Irish province 44. U.S. president who was the subject of a campaign biography written by his college friend Nathaniel Hawthorne 45. One of six areas on a Risk board 47. "Fingers crossed!"

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1. Superhero accessory 5. Lauder with a cosmetics empire 10. "Take ____ from me!" 14. First-aid gel 15. Florist's supply 16. Jamie of "M*A*S*H" 17. "Yes, go on ..." 19. Platte Valley native 20. Poli-____ (college major) 21. Gaza grp. 22. One of the ABC islands 23. Donna on "The Donna Reed Show" or Laura on "The Dick Van Dyke Show," e.g. 28. Iran's capital 30. Native Rwandan 31. Brand at the Daytona 500 32. Margarine 33. They're often marked "Damas" and "Caballeros" at a Mexican restaurant 34. Was left out at the office (or was unsuccessful solving 17-, 23-, 49- or 58-Across) 41. Complete makeovers 42. Have ____ to grind 43. Words before tree or creek 46. "... now ____ the future" 47. Not abandon, as principles 49. "Sexting in Suburbia" or "Too Young to Be a Dad," e.g. 52. Neighbors of Croats 53. "The Simpsons" shopkeeper 54. European peak 57. Oakland daily, for short 58. Initial power source 62. "____ homo" 63. Travelers' documents 64. Elizabeth of "Lone Star," 1996 65. What library patrons do 66. Arms flank it 67. Public transport option


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KENDRA BECKMAN

INSIDE /

An obedient dog is a happy dog. So pet owners who want the very best for their pooch should check out Doggie Mannerz—a local company that offers puppy training, private obedience classes, dog psychology lessons, doggie boot camp and more. “The best thing about working at Doggie Mannerz is the personal relationships that I’ve made with our clients and their dogs,” owner Kendra Beckman says. “Being a small company allows us to really get to know the clients—human and dog—and some of my best friends were previously clients. I love getting to see dogs that have been challenging for their owners become a well-balanced part of the family.” Beckman first got into dog training when her first pup, Bailey, was struggling with a lack of socialization and obedience. She started working with some other trainers, and then she came across Los Angeles-based Linn Boyke, who had trained with Cesar Milan. “Bailey and I made the cross-country drive to work with him and I was soon offered a job where I worked with Linn for a year,” she says. After that, Beckman moved to Chicago where she continued her training, and in 2007 she came to Salt Lake City and started her own business. One of her favorite parts of the company is the personal touch provided to both humans and their dogs. “During private lessons, we cater our training to fit your family’s needs, while dogs that attend our board and train program stay at my home and become a part of my everyday life.” She adds, “We also do a lot of training in public to help dogs with their skills in practical, real-world settings. On any given day, you might see us on a pack walk at Liberty Park, in a shop at City Creek, in the aisles

KENDRA BECKMAN

New Tricks

Beckman takes dogs all over town to socialize them and practice their obedience skills.

at Home Depot, or on a patio having lunch.” Doggie Mannerz’ training programs help pets in all stages of life. Puppy consultations last two hours and teach owners how to housebreak and crate train, as well as stop puppy play biting and reduce chewing. Lessons include four in-home sessions on housebreaking, crate training and basic commands. Dog psychology classes also take place in the owner’s home and are focused on the human side of the relationship—teaching owners how their dog thinks and learns, thereby bridging the communication gap between humans and dogs. Beckman also has a history of volunteering with animal shelters and rescue organizations. With three rescue dogs of her own, Beckman is passionate about supporting that community. “We love seeing dogs get a second chance and blossom in a forever home,” she says. n

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Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) As I was ruminating on your astrological omens for 2017, I came across a wildly relevant passage written by Rabbi Tzvi Freeman. It conveys a message I encourage you to memorize and repeat at least once a day for the next 365 days. Here it is: “Nothing can hold you back—not your childhood, not the history of a lifetime, not even the very last moment before now. In a moment you can abandon your past. And once abandoned, you can redefine it. If the past was a ring of futility, let it become a wheel of yearning that drives you forward. If the past was a brick wall, let it become a dam to unleash your power.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22) I hope you will be as well-grounded in 2017 as you have ever been—maybe even since your past life as a farmer. I trust you will go a long way toward mastering the arts of being earthy, practical and stable. To do this right, however, you should also work on a seemingly paradoxical task: cultivating a vigorous and daring imagination—as perhaps you did in one of your other past lives as an artist. In other words, your ability to succeed in the material world will thrive as you nurture your relationship with fantasy realms—and vice versa. If you want to be the boss of reality, dream big and wild—and vice versa.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Naturalist John Muir regarded nature as his church. For weeks at a time he lived outdoors, communing with the wilderness. Of course he noticed that not many others shared his passion. “Most people are on the world, not in it,” he wrote, “having no conscious sympathy or relationship to anything about them—undiffused, separate and rigidly alone like marbles of polished stone, touching but separate.” Is there anything about you that even partially fits that description, Aquarius? If so, I’m pleased to inform you that 2017 will be an excellent year to address the problem. You will have immense potential to become more intimate and tender with all of the component parts of the Great Mystery. What’s the opposite of loneliness?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Even if you don’t think of yourself as an artist, you are always working on a major art project: yourself. You might underestimate the creativity you call on as you shape the raw material of your experience into an epic story. Luckily, I’m here to impress upon you the power and the glory of this heroic effort. Is there anything more important? Not for you Leos. And I trust that in 2017 you will take your craftsmanship to the highest level ever. Keep this advice from author Nathan W. Morris in mind: “Edit your life frequently and ruthlessly. It’s your masterpiece, after all.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “The self in exile remains the self, as a bell unstruck for years is still a bell,” writes poet Jane Hirshfield. I suspect that these words are important for you to hear as you prepare for 2017. My sense is that in the past few months, your true self has been making its way back to the heart of life after a time of wandering on the outskirts. Any day now, a long-silent bell will start ringing to herald your full return. Welcome home!

Email your resume to jennifer@cityweekly.net

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 53

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In accordance with your astrological omens for 2017, I’ve taken a poem that Shel Silverstein wrote for kids and made it into your horoscope. It’ll serve as a light-hearted emblem of a challenging but fun task you should attend to in the coming months. Here it is: “I’ve never washed my shadow out in all the time I’ve had it. It TAURUS (April 20-May 20) According to Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami, “A certain was absolutely filthy I supposed, so I peeled it off the wall where type of perfection can only be realized through a limitless accu- it was leaning and stuck it in the washtub with the clothes. I put mulation of the imperfect.” Let’s amend that thought so it’s in soap and bleach and stuff. I let it soak for hours. I wrung it out exactly suitable for your use in 2017. Here’s the new, Taurus- and hung it out to dry. And whoever would have thunk that it specific version: “A messy, practical, beautiful type of perfection would have gone and shrunk, for now it’s so much littler than I.” can be realized through a patient, faithful, dogged accumulation of the imperfect.” To live up to the promise of this motto, make SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Walk your wisdom walk in 2017, Sagittarius. Excite us with your damn good use of every partial success. wisdom songs and gaze out at our broken reality with your wisdom eyes. Play your wisdom tricks and crack your wisdom jokes GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Gemini gymnast Marisa Dick has created a signature move that and erupt with your wisdom cures. The world needs you to be a has never been used by any other gymnast. To start her routine, radiant swarm of lovable, unpredictable wisdom! Your future she leaps up off a springboard and lands on the balance beam needs you to conjure up a steady stream of wisdom dreams and doing a full split. The technical term for this bold maneuver is wisdom exploits! And please note: You don’t have to wait until “a change-leg leap to free-cross split sit,” although its informal the wisdom is perfect. You shouldn’t worry about whether it’s name is “The Dick Move.” The International Federation of supremely practical. Your job is to trust your wisdom gut, to Gymnastics has certified it in its Code of Points, so it’s official. unleash your wisdom cry, to revel in your wisdom magic. During the coming months, I expect that you will also produce one-of-a-kind innovations in your own sphere.

Responsibilities include: Selling print and digital advertising to local and some regional businesses.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19) Donatello was a renowned Italian sculptor. His favorite piece was “Lo Zuccone,” a marble statue of the Biblical prophet Habakkuk. As Donatello carved his work-in-progress, he addressed it. “Speak, damn you! Talk to me,” he was heard to say on more than a few occasions. Did the stone respond? Judging from the beauty of the final product, I’d have to say yes. One art critic testified that “Lo Zuccone” is a “sublimely harrowing” tour de force, a triumph of “forceful expression,” and “one of the most important marble sculptures of the 15th century.” I suspect you will have Donatellolike powers of conversation in 2017, Aries. If anyone can communicate creatively with stones—and rivers and trees and animals and spirits and complicated humans, for that matter—it’ll be you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) French painter Henri Matisse (1869-1954) turned out to be one of the supremely influential artists of the 20th century. But he was still struggling to make a living well into his thirties. The public’s apathy toward his work demoralized him. At one point, he visited his dealer to reclaim one of his unsold paintings. It was time to give up on it, he felt, to take it off the market. But when he arrived at the gallery, his dealer informed him that it had finally been bought—and not by just any art collector, either. Its new owner was Pablo Picasso, an artist whom Matisse revered. I think it’s quite possible you will have comparable experiences in 2017, Virgo. Therefore: Don’t give up on yourself!

AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Seven Chilean poets were frustrated by their fellow citizens’ apathy toward the art of poetry. They sarcastically dramatized their chagrin by doing a performance for baboons. Authorities at the Santiago Zoo arranged for the poets’ safety, enclosing them in a protective cage within the baboons’ habitat. The audience seemed to be entertained, at times listening in rapt silence and at other times shrieking raucously. I’m sure you can empathize with the poets’ drastic action, Pisces. How many times have you felt you don’t get the appreciation you deserve? But I bet that will change in 2017. You won’t have to resort to performing for baboons.

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PHOTO

OF THE WEEK

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SENTEXT SOLUTIONS Advertising and Marketing Sales utahjobcenter.com

FOCUS WORKFORCES Warehouse Worker utahjobcenter.com

TEEMA JOBS Inside Sales Representative (B2B) utahjobcenter.com

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54 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET For more Employment Opportunities, go online to www.utahjobcenter.com

1-800-547-9169 (Dial 1) Or Check us out Online at MayTrucking.com

FSE EVENTS Event Marketing Assistant Entry Level utahjobcenter.com FAMILY FIRST LIFE Highest Paid Insurance Agents utahjobcenter.com

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ETRADE Financial Consultant utahjobcenter.com


Poets Corner

NEW YEAR’S

We should be sharing this It’s such a magic mist There’s so much news, so much new news So much new! Amazing changes Old is gone New as a fawn Far-ranging change Rearrange Familiar is strange Moving on Side by side coaster ride Take in together Changing weather Moving on...

Kenneth Corbet Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

Be More Awesome Than Last Year!

Price Drop! 3 bdrm. 2 bath Duplex! Hardwood floors, luxury heating, artistic details throughout! NOW $1395

Perfect 1 bdrm. w/ dishwasher, counter bar dining, track lighting, wall mounted A/C! $685

SOUTH SALT LAKE

WVC/MAGNA

Stunning 2 bdrm. 1.5 bath townhome! Hook-ups, private patio, swamp cooler! $745

Must Have 2 bdrm. 4-plex! Hook-ups, private balcony, pet friendly! $645

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VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446

Comfort Pets

The definition of comfort is simply the easing of a person’s feelings of grief or distress. We all know how to get our own comfort—from hugging a loved one to a grilled cheese sandwich and soup. It might come from a favorite quilt wrapped around you in front of a fireplace, or the purring of your favorite four-legged beast. “Comfort animals”—which are different than service pets—have become quite the rage in this decade, but, sadly, some people don’t find them so comforting. A comfort animal is at the core of rare claims by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) against Utah landlords. In my 32 years as a real estate broker, I can think of about a handful of cases that I’ve read about, so it’s pretty unusual to hear about a new case filing. HUD randomly tests landlords by sending in phony tenants or buyers to check if companies are complying with fair-housing laws. In this story, HUD has just announced that the owner and manager of the Pine Cove Apartments at 1243 E. Alameda Ave., has allegedly violated the Fair Housing Act by denying reasonable accommodation requests to potential renters with disabilities. A woman and her 10-pound dog were denied a lease, even though she had a doctor’s note stating the animal was there for emotional support. She was supposedly told by the landlord that other tenants are allergic to dogs or don’t like dogs. The complainant went to the proper authorities who conducted a sting operation at the property and each time it was found that there appeared to be discrimination going on against people with disabilities. The case will go to trial. If found guilty, the landlord could pay some big bucks in fines. Anyone can get a certificate online saying their favorite miniature pig, cat, dog, horse, snake or turtle is a comfort or assistance animal. For a landlord, a letter from a doctor is pretty clear evidence there’s a need for the animal. Know, though, that during this time of year when many people travel, airlines have strict rules for your comfort pets when traveling with you. Effective this fall, Delta Airlines prohibits warm-blooded animals on flights longer than 12 hours. If your flight is shorter, you can carry on a small pet that fits under your seat for a $125 fee. Other rules apply, depending on the size, weight and breed of the animal, so make sure to check those before planning your next trip. If you’re a landlord, don’t even think you can ban such an animal from your property if a tenant qualifies to lease. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

HAPPY 2017 EVERYONE! Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 32 years in the Land of Zion

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 3 years

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY Loan officer NMLS#243253 Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180

801-747-1206

HA PPY 20 17!

DECEMBER 29, 2016 | 55

Stunning 3 bdrm 2 bath townhome! Attached garage, stackable hookups, vaulted ceilings! $1295

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, UrbanUtah.com Chair, Downtown Merchants Association

| COMMUNITY |

LIBERTY PARK

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

HIGHLAND PARK

URBAN L I V I N

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &


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56 | DECEMBER 29, 2016

SKI TRUCK

Kids & Adults Used skis, boards, blades, cross country, packages with boots and fittings

Ask about our kids trade back…Name your PACKAGES & price

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IF U DON’T WANT TO PICK UP Your dog’s poop - - - I DO! $10/wk most yards Text 801.673.4372 CREDIT TROUBLE? NEED A CAR? Mark Miller Loan Center will get you in a car you deserve today. 801-506-1215 mmsloancenter.com

HANDEE SERVICE

Homer Repair and Improvement 100% Guaranteed since 1987 Call Frank 801-854-3900

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Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

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GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

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City Weekly Dec 29, 2016  

Photo Review

City Weekly Dec 29, 2016  

Photo Review