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VOICES

Newly tenured Mexican-American women model success for minorities on U of U campus. By Dylan Woolf Harris


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY HEAR THEM SOAR

Newly tenured MexicanAmerican women model success for minorities on U campus. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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SARAH ARNOFF

News, p. 12 When not proofing copy or snapping epic shots for City Weekly, Arnoff spends most of her time fighting off bouts of cabin fever and usually ends up in the wilds of rural Utah and Nevada when restlessness wins. “I’m always astounded by the amount of unique nature packed into Utah,” she says.

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SOAP BOX

NOVEMBER 1 7, 2 0 1 6 | V O L. 33 N0. 28

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover Story, Nov. 17, “Best of Utah”

Can we have a new category for Best/Entertaining use of social media, @CityWeekly? I get the feeling most people on the DABC don’t drink.

@JLMS_QKW Via Twitter

We are queering up this town! Thanks to @CityWeekly for honoring the work of @EqualityUtah in #Bestof Utah2016.

@TROYWILLIAMSUT Via Twitter

We are thrilled to have opened the latest issue of City Weekly to find that we won “Best Record Shop” for the FIRST TIME EVER! Thanks to all who voted.

Private Eye, Nov. 17 “Whoa Is Me”

Via Instagram

TERRI LEDDING

@RANDYSRECORDSHOP

Thanks for awarding Naloxone a Best of Utah 2016 award for our efforts to reduce overdose deaths across Utah! We’re honored.

@UTAHNALOXONE Via Twitter Good stuff.

I made it into @CityWeekly’s Best of Utah edition as the “Best Trail-Blazing Candidate” #UTPol

@MISTYKSNOW Via Twitter

Thank you Misty for being brave, strong and authentic. It’s just the beginning.

@MOIDMAN

@YAYBIGPRODUCTIONS Via Instagram @GovHerbert congrats on your @CityWeekly award! Worst Utahn is quite the accomplishment!

@ROSSCOLLIGAN Via Twitter

I guess you CAN win them all

Via Twitter

@VIRGILGLASS

Just wanted to give big props to my boy @benwinslow for 1 of 2 wins in @slcweekly’s #BestofUtah and proud to be voted 2nd.

@BIG_BUDAH

Thanks for the #Bestof Utah love for me and my @fox13 colleagues, @CityWeekly! I will always let you pet my beard ;)

@BENWINSLOW Via Twitter

Congratulations to @KatieMcKellar1, picked as “Best New Reporter on the Block.” Completely deserved!

@DAPHNECHEN_ Via Twitter

Best of Utah! Am I the only one who I saves it for reference to use all year till the new one comes out?

LAURA RENSHAW Via Twitter

Via Facebook John, I appreciate you talking about your first voting experience and the shock you felt when your candidate didn’t win. Your response to the election is also the best I have read thus far. When I see Trump, I see my abusive father and he has just been made president so it is taking me more time to adjust to a new reality. But as I am trying to concentrate on doing good and on the facts of his position, it is getting easier little by little. We can hope for the best … but prepare for the worst.

SUE STORY

Via Twitter I thought I had a shot this year …

@UTCRIMDEFROX

Via Facebook

The Ocho, Nov. 17, “8 just-dropped protest songs for a new America”

I have followed your outstanding “rag” since inception. When I moved back from SoCal in 1991, I especially missed the LA Weekly, then low and behold, there you were, different name than now, but I’ve been a loyal reader since and almost never miss one. I have saved pertinent articles and even issues over the years and I still go back to check if they’re still relevant or interesting. Thanks for all you do to keep the voice of reason and true journalism alive and it’s important especially now more than ever in my 65 years alert. Help us stay strong and informed. Thanks again for all you do.

Time to stop bitching and give him a chance!

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JARED STEERE

KAREN KERR

Deal with it!

GEORGE BOGDAN IOVA

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Absolutely beautiful article. No game over here!

RODGER POLYCHRONIS Via Facebook

And yet Hillary’s minions now want all residents in rural areas to only get 3/5 of a vote. So who are the real fascists?

MATT MORRIS Via Facebook

Dine, Nov. 17 “Thanks for Not Cooking”

Sounds like a real dick thing to do for people who would rather be at home with their family cooking with them rather than for a bunch of lazy gluttonous Americans.

RICHARD HUMBERG Via Facebook

How about I cook and let restaurant folks spend the day with their families, too?

PAX RASMUSSEN Via Facebook

Go Trump.

STEVE TIEDE

I think I’ll cook at home.

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JO RASMUSSEN

A Tribe Called Quest, “We The People.”

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STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Intern RHETT WILKINSON Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, BILL KOPP, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, BRYAN YOUNG, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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PRIVATE EY

When Tom Met Fidel

In late fall of 1993, our editor at that time, Tom Walsh, approached me in his usual, brusk fashion with a most unusual request. He said, in words to this effect, “So, uhh, why don’t you send me to Cuba? Or are you too cheap for that, too?” Walsh was this newspaper’s first full-time editor and he never once flinched at the chance to make me feel guilty about something, anything. “Yeah, right, Tom. Cuba. How are we supposed to afford that?” I replied. Aside from his predilection for poking me and everyone else, Walsh was the consummate professional journalist. “Like this,” he said. He’d somehow connected with a group called the Freedom to Travel Campaign that was running trips of likeminded U.S. citizens into Cuba from Canada and Mexico with the intent of drawing attention to what they deemed to be an illegal travel embargo. Walsh asked for $1,000, which included airfare from Mexico, a hotel room for a week and some meals. He’d pay his own way to Mexico, spend his own money in Cuba, wouldn’t ask us to bail him out if he got in trouble, and promised at least two cover stories upon his return. So we pulled the trigger and off he went. As a journalist (along with researchers), he was allowed passage into Cuba, but like everyone else, he was not supposed to spend money while there, thanks to a U.S. law titled “Trading with the Enemy.” They could all face fines or jail for spending money in Castro’s Cuba. I guess that’s why he never brought me a souvenir. But one must eat, so on Day 1, Walsh began breaking the law. If he ever got in trouble for that, I never knew. All I know is that he came back awed by what he experienced, and true to form, parlayed what he saw into two very fine cover stories for this newspaper (called The Private Eye in those days)—one detail-

ing daily vignettes of Cuban citizens and the other telling the story of the Freedom to Travel group. On their sixth day in Cuba, Castro met with the group, in part to recognize their civil disobedience of spending muchneeded American dollars in his country. He reassured them he respected the American people, not so much the American government. Walsh, due to security did not have a recorder or notepad, so he grabbed the only piece of paper in his pocket, and asked Castro to sign it, which he did, to the alarm of some. Castro jokingly said, “How will this affect your economy?” Thus, Walsh brought back two treasured items. The first was that piece of paper, a $10 bill autographed by El Presidente himself. As an elementary student in Cuba, and having never seen one, Castro once requested a $10 bill from Franklin Delano Roosevelt. FDR sent a kind, personal note instead that Castro held dear. Walsh then asked if the leader of the Central Committee was becoming open to capitalism and free enterprise. Castro replied, “We have made some compromises in an effort to alleviate difficulties during this special period, and we will make more. But we will never risk the survival of our socialist society, one based on solidarity and equality.” The second treasure was this: Walsh proved the notion that no newspaper was too small to do important stories, and if one is not brave (and he was), there is no point in being in journalism at all. We had gone to Cuba and back through our editor’s eyes. We became a bigger blip on the map. We will always owe him for that. I read Walsh’s stories again on Monday night. He wrote about the people of Cuba just 34 years after the revolution that placed Castro—who began his life as a revolutionary with just 80 followers—in power and in the crosshairs of world history. Castro was going gray, had paled and had adopted a nervous habit of rubbing his forehead when stressed. In the 23 years since the stories were written, the United States remains fully out of sync with the rest of the world on the matter of trade with, and travel to, Cuba.

B Y J O H N S A LT A S @johnsaltas

Just as Cuba has played pawn to the chess masters heading the Soviet Union and the United States, even to point of nearly leading to nuclear war, by 1993 Castro himself was bound to two different internal bands of Cubans. Many on one side relished the idea of normal relations with the United States and the resources that would come to their island. There was talk of liberalizing certain restrictions upon Cuban citizens. Conversely, attempts to do so were denounced by the Fidelistas, true believers in Fidel, one such fellow telling Walsh, “I didn’t work my entire life for nothing, to bow down to the vile dollar.” By the end of this week, Castro, who is referred to as a “master of image and myth” in his New York Times obit, will not only be dead but also buried. If you care to, have a mojito as the dictator himself would on such an occasion. You can celebrate his life or his death. Or not. But for nearly 60 years the people of Cuba, located just 90 miles from our borders, have lived knowing no other ruler. Their rock-steady concept of equality remains based in a social contract with all citizens. What comes now was perhaps forcast 23 years ago by Walsh, words as frozen in time as the ’56 DeSotos still running the streets of Havana. Regarding the solidarity of the Cuban people, one of the persons interviewed by Walsh said, “We have neighbors giving to neighbors, our society is not based on selfishness and greed. There is no true democracy where a few have too much and all the others have too little.” If you’d like to read those articles, visit CityWeekly.net. CW

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

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BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Local Headliners

The Deseret News has been all over the refugee issue, running a front-page story on an Ethiopian refugee family reuniting in Utah, another on “sanctuary cities” facing uncertain consequences, and then a local front story on Utah Syrian refugees giving thanks. So it was with some curiosity that The Salt Lake Tribune grabbed the front-page headline “Herbert: Utah needs to welcome refugees.” It had to take some guts for the governor to buck the GOP right-wing that had managed to persuade Mormons to vote for religious exclusivism in a president. Of course, House Speaker and Trumpian Greg Hughes equivocates, saying the president-elect was just “inartful” and didn’t really mean he’d ban Muslim immigration. Herbert was kind, and Maj. Brian Redd, director of the State Bureau of Investigation, was kinder. He has contacted some 1,026 refugees since February to help them settle in.

Sanctuary SLC

Then there’s the bad news. President-elect Donald Trump warns that he’ll pull federal funding from any city calling itself a “sanctuary city.” KUTV’s Heidi Hatch tried to get Salt Lake City to come out of the closet, but could get only something about it “looking like” a sanctuary city. Meanwhile, some two dozen cities around the country—Chicago, Seattle, New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Baltimore, Newark, N.J., and Providence, R.I.—have stood up against the potential federal immigration mandate. Maybe Salt Lake is running scared. Look how the Legislature treats it. Or maybe they read Breitbart News, which recently ran a refugee story that involved Philadelphia releasing a Dominican accused of child rape.

Conflicts of Interest

Now comes the rubber meeting the road. In other words, will Rep. Jason Chaffetz investigate the president-elect’s ethical conflicts? E.J. Dionne Jr. in The Washington Post asks all the pertinent questions, noting that Republicans have been deeply concerned about “ethics in government and the vast potential for corruption stemming from conflicts of interest.” Of course, that was during the campaign and they were talking about that nasty woman Hillary Clinton. Now they must be worried about foreign donations, Trump’s business holdings, his lack of disclosure about his tax returns, which is something Chaffetz has said is important. Dionne calls it Chaffetz’ “kimono policy,” or an open-up-and-showit-all policy. The chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee will be letting us know soon.

VA GARCIA

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HITS&MISSES

Two decades ago, Polynesian immigrant Pepa and his wife Meridian Taufui started a journey toward becoming one of Utah’s best examples of an iconic humanitarian, philanthropic couple. They migrated to America, became citizens, got jobs and raised a family. Today, they are pillars of kindness, generosity and hope to many of Salt Lake City’s homeless families. It wasn’t easy, but these thankful transplants have shown how important immigration can be to the growth of a kinder Utah—and America.

How did you get involved with The Road Home shelter?

Around 20 years ago, my wife Meridian and I began volunteering at The Road Home homeless shelter for the Thanksgiving holiday. Eventually we did it along with several of our nine children. At some point, I thought maybe we could do a little more. So, I called around and got some local businesses to help us by providing discounts for pizza and a movie in order to treat shelter clients with something different for the holiday.

But then your efforts started to grow.

I made a few more phone calls and found that the people at Le Bus would be willing to provide transportation. Then others offered to help. Some employees at Varian Medical Systems, where I work, joined in and we expanded the program, first to dinner and a movie, and then to a bigger activity and then dinner. At times we’ve been to Chuck-A-Rama and the Maverick Center, but more recently we’ve been going to the Loveland Living Planet Aquarium in Draper, followed by dinner at Golden Corral in Midvale.

How big has this gotten?

This year, 2016, thanks to help from Le Bus, Golden Corral, the aquarium, management at Varian and other private contributors, we were able to provide 180 adults and children with a five-hour Thanksgiving experience. We now have 19 members on our program committee, including 10 fellow Varian employees.

Before all the help, you and your wife got this program started by yourself. How did you get to this point?

I grew up on the island of Tonga. At age 22, I got a work permit and immigrated to California. My wife immigrated, first from Samoa to American Samoa, and then to the Bay Area of California. That’s where we met. Due to Ronald Reagan’s support of the Immigration Reform Act, we were given the opportunity to become American citizens, which we did in 1988. Eventually, we moved to lower Mill Creek, where the Utah cost of living and job opportunities enabled us to buy a house and begin to give back.

—STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE Nucle-aware With the Russians getting cocky and the Chinese itching to sow their expansionist oats, I’m starting to have The Day After dreams again. I live about two hours from a primary target; if a nuclear exchange took place one morning while I was at the office, what signs would let me know that something horrible had happened, and in what order would they take place? —Chris Blair

1200 S State St. 801-531-8182 / beernut.com www.facebook.com/thebeernut

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It would have been easy to read this question as merely a dark but diverting hypothetical until, oh, about the time the results started rolling in on election night. In January, we’ll hand the nuclear codes over to a guy who’s said he’s OK with an Asian nuke race and who couldn’t explain the nuclear triad if you drew him a picture. Meanwhile, his autocratic idol Vladimir Putin has just previewed a new fall line of ICBMs that TASS says can flatten Texas in record time. We can only hope some sage advisor will steer the president-elect back toward the conventional wisdom on using nuclear weaponry, namely “Don’t.” Me, I’m already nostalgic for the days when civilization seemed less likely to end with a bang than a whimper. But let’s press on. I take it you’re asking about the whole enchilada here: not some piddly North Korean warhead with just enough oomph to cross the Pacific, but a full-on thermonuclear conflict like Reagan used to joke about. For old times’ sake, we’ll assume our adversaries are the Russians and that their plan is, as in the ’80s, to achieve maximum devastation by detonating a one-megaton warhead about a mile and a half above the target—which (working from your two-hours figure) we’ll say is a population center a little more than 100 miles away from where you’ll be watching the show. Taking some of the zing out of this scenario is the existence of the Wireless Emergency Alert system, which in a high-stakes situation enables the White House to send out a geographically targeted heads-up via the cell network. Assuming the scary new Russian missiles are still trackable by radar, and that @realDonaldTrump doesn’t tweet the news first (“BIG mistake from loser Russians. Launching nukes? Sad!”), you’d become aware of the incoming warhead when the official POTUS-issued message showed up on your phone. So let’s further imagine you’re off the grid when the missiles are launched. If you’d gone camping for the weekend and weren’t getting any signal, how soon would you begin to suspect there might be a lot less civilization for you to eventually return to? Well, from 110 miles out, anything less than around 8,000 feet up—i.e., about a mile and a half off the ground—would be hidden by the curvature of the earth, meaning you might or might not see a flash right at the horizon. (Ideally you wouldn’t

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

The Science of Brewing...

be looking with binoculars, or your retinas could get zapped.) You’d be at the very edge of the range covered by a tech-disabling electromagnetic pulse (discussed here a few years back when EMP was the terror du jour for ninnies like Newt Gingrich); if you were in a running car, the dash lights would maybe flicker a bit. So you might have a feeling something big was going on, but you wouldn’t be able to tell just what. The next few seconds would clear up any ambiguity. A fireball would rapidly expand to a diameter of maybe 6,000 feet, continuing to grow as it rose into the air from the point of detonation—clearly visible above the horizon, in other words. Within a minute or so, a miles-high cloud of hot gases, water vapor and atomized debris would form and begin to flatten into the characteristic mushroom shape, confronting even the most optimistic of viewers with the severity of the situation. What would make the experience particularly eerie, though, is that none of the effects of the blast would reach you. At ground zero, the drastic change in air pressure would level buildings, and winds of hundreds of miles per hour would flay human flesh already scorched by third-degree radiation burns. But the blast wave and associated winds would peter out within 15 miles or so, sound waves would probably be damped down beyond detection en route, and an aerial explosion wouldn’t trigger any kind of tremor you might feel out in your neck of the woods. The apocalypse you’d witness would be still and silent. The big question is: What do you do next? You can’t stay out in the wild forever (depending on prevailing winds at various altitudes, fallout could be drifting your way within 16 hours in any case), and there’s no imagining the chaos that awaits you back in town. The human aftermath would likely hit your area hard, with busloads of refugees from the ruined city taxing medical and social services. And that’s not even to mention the long-term effects of radiation, or the skies darkening with soot in an early hint of the possible nuclear winter to come. Sweet dreams, Chris. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 11


SOCIAL JUSTICE

Silent Survivors

A women-only shelter might be insufficient to address the needs of street sex workers and the crime that often accompanies them. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

O

n State Street from 900 South to 2100 South in downtown Salt Lake City, along with blocks on North Temple, approximately 160 women live off commercial sex work. They are the most intractable end of the homeless conundrums that face the city and one that councilwoman Erin Mendenhall feels the time is right to address. That’s because with Salt Lake City committed to building four new shelters, including one specifically for women, she spies an opportunity to try to tackle the needs of these two key thoroughfares (only State Street is in her district), which both harbor high levels of crime. It’s a sub-population of Salt Lake’s homeless that has long been invisible. They survive in dilapidated motels, relying primarily on heroin to get them through lives already heavy with trauma and abuse histories. Sex work pays for dope and night-by-night rent for a room that costs cumulatively between $1,200-$1,500 a month. That each night they earn enough to get a room renders them housed, as far as federal regulations are concerned, despite the vicious circle they endure to stay there. As Mendenhall has tried to address the levels of crime that constituents have complained about in neighborhoods on and around State Street, she’s come to understand the complex challenges facing those who try to help women dealing with not only trauma histories and PTSD, but also abscesses from injecting drugs, violence, addiction, STIs and, in a minority of cases, mental illness. Mendenhall says she’s tired of accepting the political “status quo” that has kept State Street’s disturbing realities swept under the rug for so long. “I think we have some opportunities to do some significant change, without saying we’re just going to bulldoze it and they all move somewhere else.” She believes that the proposed redevelopment of State Street through the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City and future homeless resource centers are both tools that could address some of the needs she’s encountered. She initially hoped that the women-only shelter now being planned as one of the four new shelters might be the resource for street walkers, but the more she has dug into the topic, the more she realized that beyond emergency shelter, long-term services that are trauma-informed need to be provided for this population in a stand-alone facility. That was apparent when she met with street sex workers through Asian Association of Utah’s trafficking victim case manager Gina Salazar. They told her that they felt a shelter for them should be run only by women, and that it was critical to include mentoring staff who were survivors themselves. Street sex workers typically view The Road Home as unsafe, and some report being ostracized and, in a few cases, turned away from domestic violence shelters when they’ve sought help. Some of the women hoped such a facility

would provide them with the opportunity to work there as staff, so they could learn new skills while earning their keep. City Weekly asked Mendenhall to talk to a veteran of the street sex-work scene and 30-year heroin addict Donna Steele, who has lived at Palmer Court for the past two years. Steele wants to leave the low-income apartment complex run by The Road Home, in part because of its rampant cockroach problem. “I won’t walk State without heroin in my system,” Steele told Mendenhall. “I don’t get high off it. It’s so I can get out of bed and manage my day.” Steele told the councilwoman the biggest issue facing women such as her is being housed in the very area where they had “tricked” and used drugs for so long. “Until you get me out of this area, I’m not going to quit. You can’t expect me to,” she said. “I don’t think any of us has what it takes to get off heroin without being away from this area, our friends. It’s a comfort for us. I need to be away from this in order for me to try. I don’t stand a chance here.” Steele agreed that a women-only shelter would be unlikely to meet their highly complex needs. “Why don’t you just build one for sex workers only?” she asked. Sex workers could work there. “That could be their first job,” Steele told her, “and if they get caught out on State [doing sex work], they couldn’t work there.” Mendenhall said that was harsh. “You have Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall says the time to provide low-income to be harsh,” Steele replied. “Otherwise you have drugs and prostitution going on there.” housing with long-term support for sex workers is now. Steele told Mendenhall that street sex says. “Most of me says, ‘Let’s do something positive workers have to want to change. “We’re talking State where we’ve done really negative things.’ The feeling Street hookers here. Until they want to change, nothof that is much more fulfilling. So I don’t think coming’s going to change,” Steele said. pletely ripping them out of that area” is the answer. While there are medical services available, there is But, like Burbank, she says helping the women change no “cohesive service for that population,” Volunteers will benefit State and North Temple. “The guys, the of America Utah’s (VOAU) street outreach veteran Ed drug dealers, if there are positive things going on inSnoddy says. “Any time I’ve had any success is when stead of negative, they’re going to leave.” they’ve been very victimized, when another trauma Mendenhall told Steele “the time is now,” to protrumped their sexual abuse. That’s when you have a vide low-income housing with long-term support and short period of time to grab them,” and ask, he continoptions for trafficking victims and sex workers. “What ues, “Do you want to change?” But even then, where I want to achieve is going to need a separate facility,” can he put them? she acknowledges, that would probably only be built “We really don’t have the services they need,” VOAU’s with private funding. Unlike, say, VOAU’s $6-million, Director of Homeless Services Rob Wesemann says. 24-hour homeless youth resource center, “the culture “To me the sex workers is such a silent population,” around helping sex workers is a harder sell.” Snoddy says. They seldom appear in court for solicitThere are numerous models that Salt Lake City could ing, and because they are so adept at surviving, they draw on to provide refuge and services for sex workkeep under the radar. ers, including the Salvation Army’s Deborah’s Gate SLCPD’s head of the Organized Crime unit, Sgt. in Canada, which houses 150 survivors and provides Mike Burbank, says housing “only solves a small part wrap-around services, and Episcopal priest Becca of the equation. It relieves them of having to pay $50 a Stevens’ Thistle Farms, where former sex workers stay night. Beyond that, what’s it doing to get them out of in free housing for two years, support each other and the lifestyle? The bigger problem is dealing with abuse make candles to earn money. “They earn their money, and trauma from the past.” they police themselves, they support each other and Burbank agrees with Steele that location is key. “If they have to have boundaries,” Snoddy says. we don’t remove them from the problem in a large way, Wesemann is excited that there’s political interest we’re not helping.” He says that moving the sex workin trying to grapple with some of the issues that surers away from State Street, Main Street and North round many of the women living in State and North Temple, “would have a dramatic impact on the crime. Temple’s motels. With both politicians and law enRemoving prostitution, that would remove the drug forcement looking at the issues behind sex work, he dealers preying on these girls, it removes the johns argues that the community “can start to see a clear who may or may not be future problems.” Asian Association’s Salazar, a former sex worker, picture of what our clients need to actually get out of isn’t so sure. “Some parts of me would say ‘yes,’” she this cycle.” CW

SARAH ARNOFF

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NEWS


S NEofW the

Future of Travel Australian aviator David Mayman has promised investors that his personal jet packs will hit the market by mid-2017, though early adopters will pay about $250,000 for one, to fly a person at up to 60 mph for 10 minutes. The JB-10 (developed by Mayman and designer Nelson Tyler) has made about 400 test runs in Monaco and over downtown London and New York City, but the partners realize that ultimate success will require that the fuel tanks be downsized so that the craft can be powered electrically—and thus seek crowdfunding both for that model and a larger one to accommodate the Pentagon’s (Special Operations Command) tactical needs.

WEIRD

The Continuing Crisis The state agency Colorado Parks and Wildlife filed 21 criminal charges in October against the Squirrel Creek Wildlife Rescue center in Littleton, alleging that some of the orphaned and rehabbing animals Kendall Seifert houses are not being kept according to the state’s strict standards—and that Seifert’s 15-year-old center is also home to his popular swingers’ club (Scarlet Ranch) featuring weekend sex parties. One of the criminal charges suggests that rescue animals could be stressed by gazing at activity in the ranch’s bar area. Seifert said he will challenge the charges out of fear that many of the raccoons, foxes, song birds, coyotes, skunks, rabbits and squirrels he would have to relinquish would not find suitable facilities elsewhere.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit In a retail market long dominated by priests, “nonsectarian” funeral eulogizers now offer to give individually tailored remembrances of the deceased for a fee, according to an October report by a New York Post reporter who interviewed two local “celebrants,” who cited the declining appeal of “prayers.”

The Aristocrats! Motorist Kurt Jenkins, 56, was arrested in November in Boynton Beach, Fla., after a pedestrian said Jenkins, naked, motioned him to his car to take a look. The pedestrian said there were children in the area—and also that Jenkins appeared to have wires running from his genitals to an unidentified “electrical device.” n Among a stash of pornography found recently on the computer of Michael Ward, 70, were photos of humans having some sort of sex with “horses, dogs, [an] octopus and [an] eel,” according to a report of England’s Chelmsford Crown Court proceedings. A presentencing order forbade Ward to have contact with children under 16, but was silent about possible contact with fish or mollusks.

The Passing Parade At press time, “Bugs Bunny” and “Pink Panther” were on trial in St. Catharines, Ontario, on aggravated-assault charges from a Halloween 2015 bar fight in which “Dracula’s” ear was severely slashed with a broken bottle. “There was a lot of blood,” said a witness (but coming from Dracula, not being sucked out by Dracula). Update: The judge cleared Bugs, but was still deliberating on Panther. n The tardigrade is an ugly micro-organism that is perhaps the sturdiest animal on Earth, able to endure otherwise-impossible living conditions and (thanks to gene-sequencing) known to be composed of DNA not seen elsewhere. A Japanese company recently began selling an oversized, cuddlable tardigrade toy “plushie” authenticated by science’s leading tardigrade authority, professor Kazuharu Arakawa of Keio University.

A News of the Weird Classic (January 2013) The usual 20,000 or so visitors every year to Belgium’s 30-acre Verbeke Foundation art park are allowed to reserve a night inside the feature attraction: a 20-foot-long, 6-foot-high polyester replica of a human colon created by Dutch designer Joep Van Lieshout. The area at the end of the structure gives the installation its formal name, the Hotel CasAnus. The facility, though “cramped,” according to one prominent review, features heating, showers and double beds, and rents for the equivalent of about $150 a night (the rate in 2012). Thanks this week to Jim Doughtie, Gary Krupa and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 13

Medical Marvels Margaret Boemer’s baby LynLee was “born” twice. In an October Texas Children’s Hospital interview, doctors described how the need to rid Boemer’s fetus of a rapidly growing tumor required them, at Boemer’s 23rd week of pregnancy, to remove

Arkansas Chic Kristi Goss, 43, an assistant to a Garland County (Arkansas) judge, was arrested in October and charged with stealing nearly $200,000 in public funds, which she used to buy such things as a tuxedo for her dog, sequined throw pillows, a “diamond bracelet” (retailing for $128) and, of course, Arkansas Razorback football tickets.

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The Way the World Works Brittany Maynard, then 29, became “the face of the Right to Die movement” in 2014, according to a New York Post column, when she chose a legal physician-assisted suicide rather than awaiting the growth of her terminal brain tumor. In October, terminally ill California mother Stephanie Packer hoped to be “the face of the Right to Live movement” after revealing that her insurance company denied coverage for a drug that could extend her life— but at the same time disclosed that her suicide drugs are covered, and even disclosed her co-pay ($1.20).

Perspective A high-level policy document released by the Chinese government in September detailed plans to use technology to monitor citizen behavior to such a degree that each person would receive a “social credit” score (similar to a FICO score in the U.S. but covering a range of conduct beyond financial) that would be the basis for allotting perks such as government support in starting businesses and whether parents’ children are eligible for the best schools. “[K]eeping trust is glorious,” according to the document, and “good” behavior promotes a “harmonious socialist society.”

n The British retailer ASOS announced in August that 3-footlong clip-on dinosaur tails had sold out in one of its two models, although New York magazine, which reported it in the U.S., was, for obvious reasons, baffled about why.

Suspicions Confirmed San Francisco State University researchers revealed in April that no fungi or fecal bacteria were found on the seats of the city’s bus line or rapid transit trains (unlike their findings in 2011 before officials adopted easier-to-clean seats), but that a “rare” and “unusual” strain, called Pigmentiphaga was found—previously associated only with South Korean wastewater and the South China Sea. The city’s Department of Health said, of course, not to worry.

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n In November, in a remote area of Oregon’s Maury Mountains, a 69-year-old man killed an elk and dragged the carcass behind his off-road vehicle up a hill. According to the Crook County Sheriff’s office, the vehicle suddenly flipped over backward, and the man landed on, and was impaled by, the elk’s antlers. Fellow hunters summoned a helicopter, and the man has apparently survived.

the fetus completely from the uterus until it was “hanging out in the air” so that they could cut away the tumor and then reposition the fetus into the uterus. LynLee was “born” again by C-section 13 weeks later.

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n In St. Paul, Minn., a 25-year-old woman told police on Nov. 3 that she was involuntarily roughed up several hours after being voluntarily roughed up at Arnellia’s Bar’s weekly “Smack Fest”—in which female patrons competitively slap each other’s faces for three “rounds” under strict house rules. The woman said she spoke amicably with her opponent, but by closing time, the opponent and several friends, including men, punched and kicked her outside the bar. In other slapping news, a 71-year-old woman died in Lewes, England, in November while participating in a Chinese healing seminar that emphasizes being slapped repeatedly to rid the body of poisoned blood and toxins. The “healer,” Hongshi Xiao, charges clients around $900 to beat what he calls the “sha” out of them.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


In a week, you can

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If you’re 16 or over, here’s a Santa experience to remember. Come dressed in your favorite ’40s-inspired outfit and dance the night away! Small children are welcome if you call ahead, as Santa Claus is set to make an appearance at Christmas in the 1940s. There’s a white-elephant exchange ($5 limit), story time (“Twas the Night Before Christmas”) and a costume contest. You might want to check out the Utah Military History Group (Facebook. com/UtahMHG) to find an authentic costume. Kafeneio Coffeehouse, 258 W. 3300 South, 801-485-1282, Friday, Dec. 2, 5-10 p.m., free

PHOTO EDITING IN LIGHTROOM

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Do you want to create images that can sell an idea or influence a population? A simple image on Instagram can change the world, and you can learn how from lifestyle and adventure photographer Aaron Brimhall at Photography Post Editing in Lightroom. Beginner and professional users alike can benefit from his step-by-step demonstrations of editing his own work. The instruction is followed by a Q&A session in which you can learn everything from composition and exposure to equipment and how to grow your own personal or brand following. Be sure to bring your laptop with Lightroom installed and raw photos ready to edit. Impact Hub Salt Lake, 150 S. State, Ste. 1, 385-202-6008, Monday, Dec. 5, 6-8 p.m., $50-$100, Bit.ly/2fwKeIx

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Now you really have something to worry about: your health care. The Utah Health Policy Project helps navigate the unique and persistent challenges that face Utah, and how you can help create a system that works with or without the Affordable Care Act. The Affordable Car Act: Will a New President Make a Difference? includes a panel of experts including Lorena RiffoJenson, director of government contracts at Molina Healthcare; Robert Spendlove, Utah House of Representatives; and Austin Bordelon of Leavitt Partners. If there is a short window of bipartisan cooperation, what will they attempt to fix? And does the change of administration mean that challenges to the validity of the ACA will go away, or will health reform remain partisan and controversial for many more years? Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-433-2299, 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 7, $30, Bit.ly/2gpYw2q

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Eight ways to spot a “fake news” website:

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It begins with “CNN” and ends with “.com.”

7. Apply the above to “MS-

NBC,” “FoxNews” and “Facebook.”

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1. The headlines briefly restore your faith in humanity.


CHICANA V ICES Newly tenured Mexican-American women model success for minorities on U of U campus.

T

“These Chicana faculty have been nurtured on our campus and such was not always the case for women of color at the U,” she says in an email. “It is high time and it is something to be hailed, recognized and applauded.” While the women present unique success stories, they also share similar experiences. For this reason, the Chicana professors leaned on one another for support as they trudged toward tenure. They offered consoling shoulders at low moments; they enjoyed in each other’s victories when things went well. Valdez says they also relied on Martinez’ counsel. “[Theresa] was amazing, having been here and gone through that alone, which I can’t even imagine. She was really instrumental in checking in on us, making sure that we had what we needed to be able to get through the process,” Valdez says. “In terms of support, I don’t know if it would have been as successful without her having been there as the trailblazer for all of us.”

Activist scholar

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DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 15

On the afternoon following Donald J. Trump’s victorious presidential bid, two dozen high-schoolers of color jittered inside a Salt Lake City elementary library. The heightened racial rhetoric that both set apart and marred the 2016 campaign has lingered in the thoughts of many minorities, unsure of the real, post-election impact. The ballot results fueled commotion among these after-school program students—Latinos, Pacific Islanders and African Americans. To relieve possible stress pent up from the night before, organizers had the teens scurry outside to play kickball. Gutiérrez, an associate professor in the U College of Education, remained in the quiet room. She’s a faculty advisor with Mestizo Arts and Activism, a voluntary program designed to give youths the tools to guide their lives and their communities by creative and positive action. Gutiérrez planned to have the teens record their anxieties in journals after they’d returned from the kickball game. The MAA program was part of the body of work Gutiérrez presented to a committee in her tenure portfolio this year. She also helped create familyschool partnerships by engaging immigrant and refugee families to be involved in their children’s schooling. “Historically, particular populations have been marginalized in our school system,” she says of the family-school partnership. “This was a way to integrate families who oftentime don’t have a lot of former formalized contact in educational settings.” Raised in San Diego by parents who immigrated from Mexico, Gutiérrez continued her education at California State University San Marcos, then earned a master’s degree from Harvard and finally a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in educational psychology. She now calls Salt Lake City home. An activist scholar, Gutiérrez is proud that her work takes her into the community. Among budding students, she offers the scaffolding and encouragement that she sought but couldn’t often find in her youth. “Growing up, being told that I wouldn’t live past 21, being told I would amount to nothing throughout school, I know what not to do,” she says. “I’ve learned these hard lessons. So I always think about what are things that young people could be going through that I can support them in and make a difference. My work is about community engagement and it’s about making a difference in the everyday lives of young people versus just talking about it in theory.”

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heresa Martinez reflects on a time of dismay when a fellow University of Utah faculty member distributed to students copies of The Bell Curve, a controversial text that examines intelligence and economic class. She bristles at the memory. For Martinez, a sociology professor, the book lacked academic rigor. But beyond its dubious conclusions, she rejects the publication because it was seen as ammunition for propagators of the idea that certain races are intellectually inferior, and thus naturally fated for societal ills. Those were delicate days for Martinez, a newer face among the U faculty. She wanted support from her department, she says, which had gained a reputation for “eating its young.” Never had a Chicana earned tenure in the state, and as a Mexican-American woman, Martinez was keenly cognizant that she was a pioneer. It was the early 1990s and Martinez, too, started to develop a reputation: She was the Latina newcomer, who gutted dated premises about social injustice—theories that continued to resonate through U classrooms. “At first I tried to argue back. Some of them said, ‘Oh, she’s teaching radical ideas.’ There were people in my faculty that believed poor people were that way because they had no values. I was teaching things like, ‘No, it’s a structural issue,’” she says, adding, “The faculty at the time—some of them—were very rigid and very bigoted.” Without backing from department higher-ups, Martinez drifted to allies outside sociology, including administration. All the while, she forged on, an outcast in the establishment, with an eye on her tenure requirements and the ticking clock. After six years as an assistant professor, Martinez was up for review, an arduous quest for most professors, and especially true, one can imagine, for those feeling unsupported. Pressure mounted. The probationary period—usually seven years—allows professors time to compile an evaluative body of work, but in the interim, candidates plant roots that can be suddenly upended when they aren’t granted tenure. Those who are granted tenure are promoted and retained. “There’s this true sense of insecurity because you’re working for six years, and they can just kick you out. You’re living here, you’re raising a family, or you’re getting married or you’re buying a house, and people can just kick you out,” she says. Around 1996, the department, the chair and the dean, rejected Martinez’ tenure application. Not to be defeated, Martinez appealed to the University Promotion and Tenure Advisory Committee. Here she successfully made her case. This was followed by affirming votes from the vice president and then the president, as well. “It was a tough time. I got tenured against the wishes of my faculty,” she says. Feeling a mixture of relief and excitement, Martinez packed around her tenure letter, tangible proof of her accomplishment. This month marks the end of the U’s fall semester, as well as the 20year anniversary of Martinez’ uphill climb to academia’s vaunted tenure status. Looking back, she can track progress. The sociology department, she says, is revamped with an emphasis on social justice, for example. And the number of minority faculty has grown. This year, in fact, four more Chicana professors at the U achieved tenure, a milestone Martinez says should be celebrated. A tenure class that includes Leticia Alvarez Gutiérrez, Verónica Valdez, Lourdes Alberto and Lola Calderon serves as a fond reminder and watermark for Martinez that the university continues its course of diversification.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @DylantheHarris


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Verónica Valdez Learning language

Valdez, on sabbatical this semester, is also in the College of Education. She has honed her work on language. Valdez instructs ESL endorsement courses to future educators, and teaches graduate-level language classes that examine the convergence of language and community. She also studies how communities help students retain their home languages while learning English in schools. “I do a language and policy and planning course,” she adds, “that’s looking at language policy as a field and specifically what does it mean in terms of what the state of Utah is doing around language policy for [English language learners].” Her department is interdisciplinary, encompassing teachers of philosophy of education, sociology, anthropology, gender studies, immigration and refugee education, among other areas. This was the backdrop for Valdez’ tenure journey. “The benefit of that is that you get to think outside the box,” she says. “Just when you think you’ve got it, they pose questions that broaden your thinking about a topic.” But, according to Valdez, professors looking to “build those networks within your specialty area” can find it challenging to do in such a broad spectrum. She also works with a group of faculty that helps students apply social theories to K-12 and higher education. Through her own education, Valdez had no Latina faculty as an undergrad at Southwestern University in Texas or at Emporia State University in Kansas. Not until working on her doctoral degree at the University of Texas at Austin did she interact with faculty members of color. “I could see how much it enriched my own life. Because of that, I see the value of having a diverse faculty and what it means for the students. Not just in being able to see themselves but in terms of the kinds of questions that they’re asking and the kinds of support the faculty can give them—not just academically but also emotionally,” she says. Kathryn Stockton, associate vice president for equity and diversity, says another reason to cultivate a diverse faculty, in part, is because it will entice a diverse student body, which in turn aids student learning campuswide.

Theresa Martinez “Diversity is an intellectual issue,” she says. “That’s something that we underscore.” Citing a Scientific America study, Stockton notes that collective problem-solving improves when a group’s makeup is diverse. Her office oversees equity and diversity on campus, which reaches out to diverse students, runs the Center for Ethnic Student Affairs, offering LGBTQ resources, among many services. Stockton says almost a third of the latest incoming freshman class was non-foreign students of color. The equity and diversity office is also concerned with retaining talented tenured professors, but it’s not a simple task. After achieving tenure, the school lost one of the four recently tenured Chicana faculty when Calderon moved to an out-of-state institution. Recognizing its struggle to maintain a diverse faculty, the Office for Equity and Diversity organized a committee to try to get to the root of the problem. A few years ago, that board came up with a range of strategies to attract underrepresented faculty, including proffering enticing salary packages for qualified, top-level recruits. The office acknowledges that the faculty is neither as diverse as the student body nor the state of Utah. Its website echoes the notion that a diverse faculty will better serve the community, that “the success of our students can be enhanced by models and leaders of varied backgrounds, and that raising our institutional profile is linked to a climate of inclusivity, facilitated by a diverse campus community.” The campus the four Chicana professors navigated was more welcoming, perhaps, than the one Martinez experienced 20 years ago, but that’s not to say they didn’t experience alarming pushback from some students. In remarkably similar anecdotes, the Chicana professors say they have witnessed aggressive outbursts from students. The professors attribute these reactions to students’ attitudes about their race and gender. Gutiérrez says studies confirm their experiences weren’t abnormal. “Research shows that women of color actually are the most harassed [in academia],” she says. “So many microaggressions happen to us, and I’ve experienced that since Day 1.” In her earlier years, Valdez recalls a frightening encounter. She was confronted after class by an irate and intransigent student, who screamed


Indigenous author

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DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 17

Diversity in American Literature, a course that fulfills a general English requirement, attracts an array of students from all majors. Standing at the front of such classes, Alberto developed a habit of asking students whether they’ve never been taught by a faculty of color before. “The majority of hands go up,” she says. “They’re saying, ‘You’re the first faculty of color that I’ve had.’ It makes me sad.” For students who experience diversity in many facets of life, to then walk onto a homogenous campus, she argues, creates a subconscious message that is both untrue and harmful. “Our job at the U is to produce knowledge and then education students with that new knowledge,” Alberto says. “If people of color are not participating in that process, then you get the message that people of color must not produce knowledge, or that people of color must not be able to produce knowledge.” Not until students and colleagues see professors of color succeeding at the academy does this impression break down and dissolve away. Students from all walks benefit from being exposed to diversity, she says, and for students of color finding a mentor that can relate to their experiences can be the difference between success and failure. Alberto has kept in contact with Latino professors she met as an undergraduate at the University of California Riverside 20 years ago. These teachers helped mentor her and revealed to her a scope of possibilities.

“It just reflects the diversity of our world,” she says. Alberto earned tenure through the English department, which demands publication. Her book, titled Mexican-American Indigeneities, is scheduled for publication through NYU Press next year. The idea of a Mexican-American is often singular, she argues. They come from Mexico, and they all share certain characteristics including history or language. “But that’s not necessarily the case because Mexico is a very diverse place, and one of its greatest diversities is its indigenous populations,” she says. Her own lineage is Zapotec, indigenous people from Oaxaca, Mexico. That southern coastal state is home to 16 distinct indigenous populations. “I’m looking at how Chicano authors are depicting indigeneity,” she says. “But I’m also looking at how the authors themselves identify and what kind of arguments they’re making about indigeneity.” Writing the book was rewarding but isolating, she says. She had to dedicate time alone to research, write and rewrite. She also worked on conference papers and authored various articles. Alberto now is reevaluating her role and curriculum in a post-Trumpcampaign world. She sees an unprecedented fear in students who identify with groups that the campaign implied were holding back America from being great. The president-elect said at various times on the trail that he would bar all Muslims from entering the United States and deport 11 million undocumented immigrants. He also made eyebrow-raising claims that seemed to promote sexual assault against women. And Trump has been championed by the so-called “alt-right,” a pack of hardline conservatives that includes some white nationalists. Alberto says all her students could benefit in a class that has a refocused set of novels and discussions, a class that addresses the current political climate. A purpose the academy serves, she explains, is to broaden students experiences and understanding of the world they inhabit. “They’re not just here to get an A and move on with their business degree or their biology degree,” she says. “I need to teach them something about being human. So when they go out in the world, they’re not afraid to speak up, they’re not afraid to defend the other person’s rights. That they are speaking from a truly empathetic human experience.” CW

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at her inches away from her face, she says. Professors of color were commonly thrown into teaching diversity courses, which led some students to assume the instructor sought to push a personal agenda—not realizing these ideas and theories came from an established field of study. Valdez tried to calm the student and recommended he voice his concerns in writing. “When those kinds of things happen, you hope to have immediate intervention and backing from administration, instead of [responses like] ‘You need to deal with this. The student is right and you need to find a way to deal with it.’ Most of us were pretty much left alone to figure things out,” she says.

Leticia Alvarez Gutiérrez

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18 | DECEMBER 1, 2016

THURSDAY 12.1

FRIDAY 12.2

FRIDAY 12.2

Some conflicts seems inevitable. Will peace will ever come to the Middle East? Will Democrats and Republicans ever find common ground? Will Kanye West ever get along with anyone? Can you and your neighbor ever get along if he doesn’t stop gardening in the nude? Actually, the odds of a resolution for the above are far better than ever finding one when it comes to the war between the sexes. It clearly has to do with more than men learning to put the toilet seat down. John Gray’s ever-popular book Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus attempted to explore the underpinnings of that eternal struggle by defining the things that make males and females so dynamically different. While its ultimate goal was finding common ground, as a successful Off-Broadway play, it’s a source of reliable entertainment, an opportunity to laugh at our human foibles. If we can’t see the humor in ourselves, let’s at least embarrass our partner. Maybe? Mindy Cooper, the show’s director, provides her own perspective. “I watch audiences laugh, laugh harder and nod at each other to say, ‘Yup, that’s us,’” she says. “And I get to see them snuggle closer together in their seats and leave hand in hand. A shared evening of ideas for keeping your relationship strong, woven together with humor, pathos and universal stories.” Aw, that’s sweet. Can you say, “date night?” (Lee Zimmerman) Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus Live! @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 2, 8 p.m.; Dec. 3, 4 p.m. & 8 p.m., $50. ArtSaltLake.org

Storytelling, recalls Ballet West’s first ballet mistress Bene Arnold, came easily to Willam Christensen, the company’s founding director. Perhaps the greatest testament to his skills is The Nutcracker ballet, which has been packing Capitol Theatre seats for 61 years. Originally a small, one-act ballet performed by the world’s greatest European companies, The Nutcracker was re-imagined by Christensen in 1944, who turned the Christmas classic into a full-length performance for the San Francisco Ballet. It is this version that survives today on the stage of the Capitol Theatre. Through the decades, Christensen’s staging of the ballet has remained mostly untouched, though set designs and costumes have received periodic updates. This year marks the end of an era for Ballet West, as dancers perform for the last time with sets and costumes created under Christensen’s direction almost 30 years ago. Come next winter, the Rat King, the Sugar Plum Fairies and the magical castle will look just a little bit different. To celebrate The Nutcracker’s history—and to give audiences a sneak peek at the future production’s new look—the company presents Nutcracker Memories, a free exhibit on display at the Capitol Room in the Jessie Eccles Quinney Ballet Centre. Patrons can learn about this incredible cultural treasure, and see behind-the-scenes sketches from the new production. Meanwhile, families with young children won’t want to miss Ballet West’s on-stage Sugar Plum Parties, when young audience members can join characters from the ballet for refreshments and treats. (Katherine Pioli) Ballet West: The Nutcracker @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Dec. 2-26, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 p.m., $20-$88; Sugar Plum Party, $11. BalletWest.org

Jim Gaffigan has practically become America’s smartass uncle—the guy who pops in and jokes with the kids about how stupid something is, then participates because it’s the nice thing to do. For years, Gaffigan has built a career in stand-up comedy, becoming one of the most successful touring acts in America. But lately, he’s expanded his reach to television, like two seasons of The Jim Gaffigan Show on TV Land. “I thought it was great,” Gaffigan says in an email. “The show was gaining momentum, which is difficult because not a lot of people have cable, and finding TV Land was never easy for some people to do. Now I’m grateful that Season 2 is on Hulu so people can watch.” He also plays a leading role in the upcoming season of Fargo, adding to his TV duties along with being a contributor on CBS Sunday Morning. Ultimately, it’s his stand-up performances that drive him as he’s currently touring the country again. “I love stand-up comedy,” he says. “It’s amazing how I feel like I’m getting better at it. Fully Dressed is my fifth hour of stand-up that I’ve developed, and the experience as a comedian never disappoints. It’s always exciting and in certain places, like Salt Lake City, I know I’ll come up with some new material.” You can catch Gaffigan this week, bringing a set of entirely new material (and maybe another chat about Hot Pockets), as he visits SLC for “fry sauce. And the audiences.” (Gavin Sheehan) Jim Gaffigan @ Vivint SmartHome Arena, 301 W. South Temple, Dec. 2, 8 p.m., $37$57. JimGaffigan.com

Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus Live

Ballet West: The Nutcracker

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SATURDAY 12.3

Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse

To say that it has been an interesting year to be a member of the media covering American politics would be a nuclear understatement. From direct attacks by the man who will now be president to criticisms from members of the public that the media made his ascension too easy, reporters and pundits have found themselves on the defensive. Now that the election is behind us, huge questions remain about how journalists will cover a Donald Trump administration in an era when so many of the old rules no longer seem to apply. In an attempt to answer questions about this unprecedented political year in America’s life, New York Times journalists Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse decided to tour together, offering their unique perspectives and answering audience questions on what happens next. During a pre-election stop at the University of Chicago, Dowd described Trump as “post-substance”— and we all wonder what that portends. Dowd is now in her third decade as an op-ed columnist for the Times, and a Pulitzer Prize winner for her columns about the Bill Clinton/ Jennifer Lewinsky scandal. Her new book, The Year of Voting Dangerously: The Derangement of American Politics, collects her recent columns about Hillary Clinton and Trump. Hulse, the Times’ chief Washington correspondent, has been covering Congress for the paper since 2002. Together, they offer two distinct perspectives on the strange creatures who run our government, and how many of our worst nightmares—or desperate hopes—for the next four years might come true. (Scott Renshaw) Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse @ Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., $29-$79. EcclesCenter.org


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Emperor Trumpatine

Star Wars—and other geek pop culture—teaches us how to respond to dark political times. BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

P

resident Trump: It’s a phrase we’re all going to have to get used to. I don’t like it any more than you do— maybe even less so. There’s some solace in the knowledge that this isn’t going to automatically end with the world on fire, though it’s a distinct possibility. Master Yoda once said that the future is always in motion, but the past is set in stone—until we invent time travel, that is. Because of the insights offered by history, George Lucas was able to warn us about Trump and the political status quo even before it happened. He looked at how republics fell to empires all throughout history—fictional and otherwise. Armed with this knowledge, Lucas set out to give us a political parable in the hopes that we would take the lessons to heart and never let the dire situations he predicted become a reality. Trump was who Lucas was warning us about. And Lucas was learning from history. I know it sounds hyperbolic, but follow me through this one. “How do you turn over democracy to a tyrant with applause? Not with a coup, but with applause?” Lucas asked once when making Revenge of the Sith. “That is the story of Caesar, Napoleon and Hitler.” He went back to history and found how these tyrants took the reins of power from a populace that was happy to see them do it. But he also looked around at the political landscape and warned us about the frightening possibilities in the Star Wars prequels. In The Phantom Menace, wasn’t it terrifying to think that major industrial concerns like

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine “Past Tense: Parts 1 & 2” Captain Sisko and Dr. Bashir go back in time to the 2020s and take part in the “Bell Riots,” a populist backlash against the forces of wealth and capitalism that set the world on the path that led to the future of Star Trek.

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the Trade Federation had senate seats in this crumbling Republic? What tools did Palpatine use to rise to power? In addition to manipulating the monied interests, he used propaganda and the lies about the self-serving situations he created to assume command. And then he kept taking further steps as time wore on. Jar Jar Binks in Attack of the Clones represents the American electorate during this most recent election. He had a heart of solid gold and wanted to do the right thing to protect the values of the Republic, but he was lied to and manipulated, unable to tell truth from fiction. As a result, he set into motion the vote that would allow Palpatine to assume control as Emperor. How could he have realized? All he wanted to do was to make the world a better place. The Star Wars movies were there to tell us what to watch out for, but many just looked at them as entertainment. They can, however, still teach us how to deal with the next four years of Trump presidency. After

The Uncanny X-Men #141: “Days of Future Past” Chris Claremont and John Byrne begin looking at a dark future of registering citizens for being different.

Ian McDiarmid as Palpatine in the Star Wars prequel trilogy.

the prequels, we had A New Hope. Rogue One is coming out this month, and like Felicity Jones’ character Jyn Erso reminds us, “Rebellions are built on hope.” That’s not to say I’m advocating armed rebellion as we saw in the original trilogy. I’m saying that we need to resist the policies and politics that would turn us from Republic to Empire—but make no mistake, the comparison is apt. Steve Bannon, a senior Trump advisor, did compare himself recently to Darth Vader. And he said it like that was a good thing. Sometimes it seems like the only lesson we’ve learned is that we don’t learn lessons from history or the art based on it. But we don’t have to fall deeper into that pattern. America lost this time. The Empire struck back. But with new hope comes the promise of a return. CW

Batman: The Dark Knight Returns Frank Miller’s groundbreaking graphic novel explores the idea of grassroots power set against fascism.

The Lord of the Rings (books and films) Tolkien shows us an enemy intent on not harmonizing with nature and working to scour the land of goodness in a festering bog of volcanic-level global warming.


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Ben Steele exhibits oil paintings that mix classical Western images with fanciful pop culture in The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly at Modern West Fine Art (177 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3383, ModernWestFineArt.com), through Jan. 14, 2017.

THEATER

DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 21

Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, every Saturday, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Jim Gaffigan Vivint SmartHome Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 801-355-7328, Dec. 2, 8 p.m., VivintArena.com/Events/248 (see p. 18) John Crist Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 2-3, 7 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com The Joseph Richards Show, Ditta Caffe, 1560 E. 3300 South, 478-456-4424, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., JosephPatrickRichards.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Random Tangent Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801572-4144, Saturdays, 10 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com

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Ballet West: The Nutcracker Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Dec. 2-26, ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 18)

COMEDY & IMPROV

DANCE

Amahl and the Night Visitors Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-957-3322, Dec. 1-3, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 3 matinee, 2 p.m., GrandTheatreCompany.com The American West Symphony and Chorus of Sandy: Joy of the Season The Theatre at Mount Jordan, 9351 S. 300 East, Sandy, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m., $5-$10, AmericanWestSymphony.com NOVA Chamber Music: A Holiday in Paris Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Dec. 4, 3 p.m., NOVASLC.org Utah Chamber Artists: Rejoice and Be Merry Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-572-2010, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., UtahChamberArtists.org

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Amahl and the Night Visitors Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-957-3322, Dec. 1-3, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 3 matinee, 2 p.m., GrandTheatreCompany.com A Christmas Carol Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Dec. 23, times vary, HaleTheater.org A Fairly Potter Christmas Carol The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd, Ogden, 855944-2787, through Dec. 23, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Diary of a Worm, a Spider, and a Fly Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Dec. 2-28, times vary, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry, 435723-8392, through Dec. 17, Friday-Saturday & Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 3, 10 & 17 matinees, 2 p.m., HeritageTheatreUtah.com Oliver! Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, Ste. 205, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6961, Dec. 2-17, times vary, PioneerTheatre.org Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 2, 8 p.m.; Dec. 3, 4 p.m. & 8 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 18) Nutcracker: Men in Tights Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-2662600, through Dec. 31, DesertStar.biz Sister Act Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, days and times vary, through Dec. 3, HCT.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

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22 | DECEMBER 1, 2016

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LITERATURE

VISUAL ART

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Carma Sirrine: 10 Secrets for a Happy Marriage Barnes & Noble, 5249 S. State, Murray, 801-261-4040, Dec. 3, noon, BarnesAndNoble.com Jill Vanderwood: Santa’s Mysterious Boot The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Dec. 3, 11 a.m., KingsEnglish.com Tyler Knott Gregson and Sarah Linden: North Pole Ninjas: Mission: Christmas! The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Dec. 3, 2 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Melissa Bahen: Scandinavian Gatherings The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Dec. 6, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS TALKS & LECTURES

Curt Roberts Wattis Business Building, 1337 Edvalson St., Ogden, 801-626-7307, Dec. 1, noon, Weber.edu/SBE Pixar’s Dan Holland Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, 435-586-5432, Dec. 1, 7 p.m., SUU.edu/PVA Maureen Dowd & Carl Hulse Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., EcclesCenter.org (see p. 18) Debating the Electoral College WSU Shepherd Union Building, 3910 W. Campus Drive, Ogden, 801-626-6252, Dec. 5, 11 a.m., Weber.edu/WalkerInstitute

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Giving Tree Festival Community Celebration Miners’ Plaza, 405 Main, Park City, 435-901-7664, Dec. 3, 2-5 p.m., Facebook.com/ParkCityRotaryClub Salt Lake Arts Council Holiday Craft Market Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., SaltLakeArts.org Utah Winter Faire Legacy Events Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, 801-803-4131, Dec. 2-4, noon, UtahWinterFaire.com

SEASONAL EVENTS

Artspace Holiday Stroll Artspace City Center, 230 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 801-328-0703, Dec. 2, 6-9 p.m., AccessArt.org Breakfast with Santa Junior League of Salt Lake City, 526 E. 300 South, 801-328-1019, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, JLSLC.org Brunch with Santa Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel, 150 W. 500 South, Dec. 3, 10 & 17, 10 a.m.2 p.m., SheratonSaltLakeCityHotel.com Christmas in Color Ed Mayne Street, near Utah Olympic Oval, Kearns, through Dec. 31, MondayThursday, 5:30-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5:30-11 p.m., ChristmasInColor.net Christmas Village Ogden Amphitheater & City Hall Park, 343 E. 25th St., Ogden, 801-6298214, through Jan. 1, 5 p.m.-midnight, free, ChristmasVillageMap.OgdenCity.com Holiday Lights Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through Jan. 4, ArtAtTheMain.com Luminaria: Experience the Light Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, through Dec. 31, ThanksgivingPoint.org Trees of Diversity Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley, 801-9655100, through Dec. 31, Cultural Celebration.org

“A” Gallery Holiday Event 1321 S. 2100 East, 801583-4800, Dec. 2, 6-9 p.m., AGalleryOnline.com A Perspective on Memory: Paintings by Rebecca Reeder Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Dec. 1, SLCPL.org Alyce Carrier: Old Work Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-3284201, through Jan. 14, UtahMOCA.org Artspace Holiday Stroll Artspace City Center, 230 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 801-328-0703, Dec. 2, 6-9 p.m., AccessArt.org Ben Steele: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3383, through Jan. 14, 2017, ModernWestFineArt.com (see p. 21) The Book of Love: Mixed Media Artwork by Todd Anderson Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Dec. 9, SLCPL.org Bridgette Meinhold: Under the Same Sky MAR Gallery 436 Main, Park City, 435-649-3001, through Dec. 24, GalleryMAR.com Day Without Art Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Salt Lake City, 801581-7332, Dec. 1, UMFA.Utah.edu Drew Conrad: The Desert Is A Good Place To Die CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 385215-6768, through Jan. 13, CUArtCenter.org Glass At The Garden Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, 801-585-0556, through Dec. 18, RedButteGarden.org Glorious Nature: Photography by Paul J. Marto Jr. Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Dec. 29, SLCPL.org Holly Manneck: Popped & Twisted Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Salt Lake City, 435-6498882, through Jan. 8, KimballArtCenter.org Jazmine Martinez: Ciclo Vital Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, Salt Lake City, 801-596-0500, through Jan. 14, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Megan Gibbons: Beyond the Narrative Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, through Jan. 13, Monday-Friday; reception Dec. 2, 6-9 p.m., VisualArts.Utah.org Mike Lee: Digital Mirror: Selfie Consciousness Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-328-4201, through Dec. 17, UtahMOCA.org Object[ed]: Shaping Sculpture in Contemporary Art Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Dec. 17, UtahMOCA.org Peter Everett: Transmutation CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 385-215-6768, through Jan. 13, CUArtCenter.org Rick Whitson: From Souks to the Sahara: Visions of Morocco Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake city, 801-594-8640, through Jan. 7, SLCPL.org Stephanie Leitch: Interstices Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, 435-283-3456, through Jan. 27, GranaryArtCenter.org Western Landscapes 1859-1978 David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, Salt Lake City, 801-583-8143, Tuesday-Friday, 1-5:30 p.m., through Jan. 6, DavidDeeFineArts.com Work in Progress Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, through Jan. 14, UtahMOCA.org


RESTAURANT REVIEW

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TABLE X

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medium-rare, as requested, and the crispy latke was a welcome change from the ubiquitous mashed spuds most places serve. I was less impressed by another meat entrée. It’s true that the Christiansen Family Farm Berkshire pork shoulder ($32) was brimming with fantastic flavor. On the other hand, it couldn’t have been more than 3 ounces—a third of that being fat. Granted, it was melt-in-the-mouth fat, but still fat. I loved the accompanying celeriac pave and smear of liquefied red cabbage, but the dish seemed skimpy for the price. I’d say the same for my wife’s Alaskan black cod ($32), unfortunately, which I’d estimate was a 2or 3-ounce portion. It looked lonely, served in a large ceramic bowl with barbecue white beans and fermented pepper slaw. For the record, I don’t go to restaurants expecting enormous Utah-size portions, but I felt a bit mugged by the ungenerous size of these two $32 main dishes. Desserts ($9) are anything but routine; no molten lava cakes here. Think more along the lines of rocchetta cheese with preserved fruits, buckwheat and ash, or a pumpkin parfait with Drake Family Farm goat cheese yogurt and maple crunch. We thoroughly enjoyed the chefs’ zucchini bread served with molasses ice cream and flaxseed granola, which went surprisingly well with my Chartreuse. With a menu that changes almost daily and a trio of very talented and committed chefs, I’ll be watching to see how this bold new restaurant evolves. CW

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available. Matching 3-ounce wine pairings are an additional $20. If you’re ordering à la carte, however, the bill can add up quickly. A plate of four Wheat Thin-size English rye biscuits with smoked Berkshire pork head cheese and dollops of crème fraiche is $7—not exactly a bargain or plentiful portion, but very tasty indeed. A Jerusalem artichoke appetizer with sunflower seeds and microgreens ($10) is simple but delicious. And I highly recommend the tartare made with Morgan Valley lamb ($12). I wasn’t totally convinced I wanted lamb tartare, given the unappealing flavor of lamb fat. However, chefs here use very lean, high-quality minced raw lamb and serve it with carrots and hints of Worcestershire. It’s divine. While dining, guests have a view of the open kitchen, and anyone who wants an upclose-and-personal look can commandeer a seat at the kitchen counter. The three chefs are always present (or have been during my visits) and frequently take part in service, both expediting and sometimes delivering entrées to tables. Not that it’s really necessary, since the service is superb to begin with. The wine list isn’t vast, but there are some really interesting options like the Redentore pinot grigio from the Veneto, Italy, region that I fell in love with. Cocktails, craft beers, liquor and cordials are also available. I rarely see Chartreuse offered in restaurants, and couldn’t pass up a splash for an after-dinner drink. “There’s a lot of brown on that plate!” was one guest’s summation of the Jones Creek boneless New York steak ($30) I ordered. It was true. The seared steak served on a brown plate with potato and black garlic latke and charred, browned zucchini wasn’t too eye-pleasing. But eating it was another matter. The steak was cooked perfectly

B e er, P izza &

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ith the opening of Table X, its owners/chefs/partners are out to debunk the notion of “too many chefs” in the kitchen. With three of them—Mike Blocher, Nick Fahs and David Barboza—I’m guessing that egos have to be checked at the door. All kitchen staffs must work as teams, but with a trifecta of bosses at the helm simultaneously, I’m curious to see how this trio works together over time. So far, so good, it seems. We’re getting somewhat spoiled here in Utah with eye-popping restaurants becoming de rigueur, and Table X is no exception. From the towering original wood-barrel ceiling to the modern, largely black-andwhite color scheme, this eatery has loads of visual appeal. In the 1930s, the building housed produce from local farms before the space became a cheese factory. Spacious and airy, the über-contemporary interior is the creation of designer Andrea Beecher. It’s a look that could almost be called audacious. Ceilings aside, it bucks the trendy reclaimed woods and natural materials that seem to be all the rage. The lack of restroom doors—there are doors on the stalls—strikes me as bold. Functional décor like 10-foot-high black banquets make a statement, and that statement isn’t about being shy. Adjacent to the restaurant itself is a culinary garden and greenhouse, where the chefs can source fresh herbs, flowers and produce year-round. Fahs says they “plan to preserve certain items from the garden to be available at times during the year when they’re unable to grow them.” Making and fermenting kimchi from cabbage for their kimchi egg appetizer ($10) with crispy pork, pork broth and alliums is one such way of preserving garden goodness. There’s an interesting service aspect here that I don’t recall seeing outside of Michelin three-star restaurants in Europe: Tables are adorned with black napkins for guests, but silverware doesn’t appear until after guests have ordered. Why have a spoon on the table if a spoon isn’t required? It’s a small thing, but I like it. I also like the fresh bread and house-whipped butter that appear at the beginning of each meal. The sourdough bread is ethereal; Chef Blocher oversees its baking. Table X is not cheap. However, the chefs’ tasting menu seems to me to be a downright steal. It’s only available for the full table, but is priced at a mere $55 for a fivecourse tasting with a vegetarian option

LOCAL OWNED


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FOOD MATTERS

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On Wednesday, Dec. 14, Craft Lake City and Argentina’s Best Empanadas (357 S. 200 East, Salt Lake City, ArgentinasBestSLC.com) join forces to present an empanada-making workshop. The hands-on event is taught by Ana Valdemoros, founder of Argentina’s Best, who began selling freshly baked empanadas at the Downtown Farmers Market in 2006 before opening her own storefront downtown. Participants can learn the basics of filling and folding empanadas, and take a dozen home to bake. “I’m so excited to teach this workshop and share my most favorite thing in the world,” Valdemoros says via email. The class starts at 6:30 p.m. and costs $35 per person. Online pre-registration is required; visit CraftLakeCity.com/Workshops.

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Copper Cane Wines & Provisions (CopperCane.com) is the main feature at the next Silver Fork Lodge (11332 Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Brighton, SilverForkLodge.com) wine-pairing dinner on Monday, Dec. 12. Regional representative Scott Sheer joins the event to share his knowledge about vino from the Copper Cane portfolio, which includes Elouan pinot noir, Beran zinfandel and Carne Humana. The five-course dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. for $60 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Silver Fork Lodge also offers special lodging deals to wine dinner attendees. For event reservations, call 801-533-9977.

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Hop to It

The remarkable rise of IPAs. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

n tandem with the flowering of the North American craft-brewing industry over the past couple of decades, the India Pale Ale (IPA) has become the “it” beer of brew aficionados. It is by far the largest category at festivals, and is by leaps and bounds the industry’s most popular style. According to the Brewers Association’s 2014 Craft Beer U.S. Market Review, sales of session IPAs were up 450 percent from the previous year. Additionally, more than 100 new brands were introduced, and imperial IPAs outnumbered amber ales. Well, what are IPAs, and how did they become so popular? Their origin dates back to the 18th century, and to the occupation of India by British colonists. Then, as now, the Brits loved their ales. Attempts were made to ship British ales to expatriates and colonists in India and elsewhere. However, delicate English ales didn’t fare well in casks on the open seas or in hot climates. After

months at sea, the ales would usually arrive at their destination flat and sour. After many attempts by the British navy at various methods of storing and shipping beer to the colonies, a solution was found. Surprisingly, it came in the form of a beer recipe, not new technology for shipping or storage. In the 1790s, a London brewer named George Hodgson surmised that by adding extra hops and extra alcohol to his standard pale ale, it might better withstand the difficult voyage to India. It worked. The additional hops and higher alcohol levels helped stabilize the brews during their long journeys to the colonies, and thus became known as India Pale Ale. In recent years, I’ve detected an aspect of machismo among some IPA drinkers and producers. It’s somewhat akin to hot-wing-eating contests, where the goal is to find how incendiary you can go. There seems to be no limit on the amount of hops some brewers are willing to put into their IPAs, sometimes forgetting that good beer—like good food—is all about balance, not about how much you can handle. Thanks to the IPA’s hops, it’s an intentionally bitter beer and anything but bland. Here in Utah, there are plenty of excellent IPAs being made. Due to its relatively high alcohol content—usually

26 | DECEMBER 1, 2016

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DRINK around 5.5-7.5 percent alcohol by volume— it’s often sold in large-bottle format. Here are some worth seeking out: Uinta Brewing Co. Hop Nosh IPA is a good example of the American IPA style, with a cloudy amber color and a sturdy white head. This unfiltered beer is rich with sweet-smelling hops, malts and grains, and citrus notes on the back end of a sip. With an alcohol level of 8 percent, Red Rock Brewing Co. Elephino is an intense double IPA that is double dryhopped on whole leaf Amarillo hops—a well-balanced and beautiful brew. Epic Brewing Hopulent IPA is part of the brewery’s “Elevated” series at 8.4 percent ABV. The first impression has grassy hop and grapefruit aromas followed by herb and dough flavors on the palate. It’s a big, complex beer with a pleasant malt-to-hops ratio. A good example of a relaxed, easydrinking session IPA is Squatters Off Duty IPA at 6.5 percent ABV. Classic citrus and piney flavors are present, along with subtle malt sweetness. I like the restraint of this IPA; it’s not one that smacks the drinker upside the head with hops. Dozens more IPAs are being made here by local craft brewers. Get out and try ’em all. CW


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GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Franck’s Restaurant

6001 S. State St. Murray | 801-263-8889 cafetrangonline.com

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If you’re craving amazing fine dining cuisine in Holladay, head over to Franck’s. For an appetizer, the wild-mushroom tart is splendid, as is the goat-cheese crème brûlée. There’s a nod to France on the restaurant’s menu with threecheese fondue, as well as New World specialties such as organic Southern-fried chicken, pan-seared sea bass and smoked duck breast and confit leg. Franck’s take on meatloaf is slowly braised pulled pork, veal and chicken in a blueberry-lavender sauce. Don’t miss out on their not-so-traditional take on steak: Wagyu sirloin steak served with porcini purée, crimini mushrooms and blackberries. 6263 S. Holladay Blvd., Holladay, 801-274-6264, FrancksFood.com

Pizzeria Limone

Since it opened, customers have been raving about Pizzeria Limone’s menu of Neapolitan pizza with a twist, premium gelato and fresh salads. Try artisan pies such as the Viola with blackberries, Parmigiano Reggiano, prosciutto, house marinara and fresh mozzarella; the caprese with fresh and aged mozzarella, fresh red onions and garlic, balsamic and tomatoes; or a classic Margherita. Salad options include the tre sorelle with pear and pistachios, Italiano with pepperoncinis, Caesar and caprese. All of the salads come with crosta, which is crispy, chewy pizza crust served with olive oil and Parmesan. There is also a great selection of European sparkling waters and sodas available. Try the fantastic limone, raspberry, vanilla or chocolate gelato for dessert. Multiple locations, PizzeriaLimone.net

Stella Grill

Soups, salads and sandwiches here are reminiscent of the fare at Red Butte Café and Desert Edge Brewery, which are owned by the same restaurant group. The French onion soup—dripping with melted Gruyère cheese—is top-notch, and both the grilled Reuben and the Italian dip (a variation on the French dip sandwich but with grilled peppers and onion, mozzarella, spicy balsamic and roasted pepper au jus), are dependable choices for lunch or a light dinner. There is much to like: friendly, efficient service, a pleasant atmosphere and excellent dishes at very fair prices. 4291 S. 900 East, Millcreek, 801-288-0051, StellaGrill.com

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“Sabor” means flavor or taste in Spanish—an apt name for this fairly new Layton restaurant, as its dishes are packed with robust flavors, even though there isn’t much on the menu that you’d actually find in Mexico. As at most MexicanAmerican eateries, they offer combination plates with a choice of one, two or three entrées, plus rice and beans. The shredded beef taco is not a street-style taco, but a large, soft corn tortilla brimming with juicy, tender shredded beef— tastier than anything I’ve put in my mouth in quite some time. The tamal, too, was delicious: masa stuffed with perfectly seasoned beef picadillo. Normally, camarones a la diabla is a devilishly spicy dish of shrimp bathed in a fiery chile sauce; at this restaurant, however, the un-traditional shrimp and mushrooms simmered in a creamy, fairly mild mojo de ajo sauce was quite delectable. A more authentic-tasting dish is the chicken mole: grilled boneless chicken in a sweetand-spicy peanut and chocolate sauce that comes with rice, beans and grilled plantains on the side. If the food dished up at Café Sabor sounds appealing to you, it’s easy enough to hop the FrontRunner and disembark at Layton Station for a delicious Mexican-American meal. Reviewed Sept. 22. 200 S. Main, Layton, 385-245-1636, CafeSabor.com

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XMAS FLICKS

Christmas Stalkings

CINEMA

Holiday horror might be the most horrible subgenre. BY DAVID RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @davidmriedel

TRISTAR PICTURES

W

hat’s to love about Christmas? The rampant commercialization? The long shopping lines and traffic that result from said commercialization? Or putting up with relatives who always remind you why you see them only once a year? That’s why we need more Christmas horror flicks. If we’re going to be miserable, we might as well have the shit scared out of us, too. Sure, many Christmas horror movies are just as bad as (and often worse than) socalled classic Christmas films, but a select group is decent-ish—even creepy! Take the following five films, starting with It’s a Wonderful Life. On its face, it’s a feel-good picture. But, really, it’s a horror movie. Don’t let the happy ending fool you. For example, the main character is rewarded for saving his brother from drowning by losing his hearing. The old pharmacist accidentally poisons a bunch of people. The town asshole, Mr. Potter (Lionel Barrymore), tells George Bailey (James Stewart) he’d be worth more dead than alive. George attempts suicide. Then there’s the ne plus ultra of horror: Bad acting. The child playing George’s daughter gives the worst line reading in movie history (for real; I study these things) when she tells him every time a bell rings an angel gets its wings. It’s a Wonderful Life was a box office bomb during its original release. I wonder what kept viewers away? Sappy Frank Capra movies aside, there’s more traditional horror out there. If you don’t want to watch James Stewart (nearly) drown, perhaps you’d be more comfortable watching sorority sisters menaced by a nameless killer? That’s the premise of Bob Clark’s Black Christmas (Clark also directed A Christmas Story, Porky’s and Baby Geniuses; his was an unusually varied career). It’s the standard t h e r e ’s - a - s t a l k e r on-t he -phone -a ndhe’s-inside-the-house routine, but it has

the added bonus of good performances by Olivia Hussey (a long way from Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet), Margot Kidder and Keir Dullea, and a built-in gnarly 1970s vibe. Plus, Clark knew something about atmosphere (or at least horror atmosphere; skip Baby Geniuses unless you’re looking for unintentional horror). Black Christmas is just plain creepy. You’ll never look at a rocking chair the same way. And stay away from the remake. Back in 1984, Silent Night, Deadly Night started a national frenzy when people saw its onesheet depicting Santa’s arm gripping an axe as he descended a chimney. Church groups and Reagan Democrats were aghast: Santa kills people? Silent Night, Deadly Night was pulled early from cinemas over the furor. It turns out everyone who got bent out of shape by its premise was wrong— Santa doesn’t kill people. A deranged dope dressed as Santa kills people. But just how is the movie? In a word: Garbage. It contains every rotten ’80s slasher trope, including attempted rape, gratuitous nudity and graphic deaths. But it also features the fake Santa yelling “Naughty!” before each kill, which is mildly amusing if not particularly inspired. By the way, this piece of crap spawned four sequels. Here’s a poser: Do movies released in June that take place during Christmas count as Christmas movies? If so, Gremlins falls under the Christmas horror umbrella. There isn’t much to write about Gremlins that hasn’t been written before, but for those who think it’s not a horror film, remember: One gremlin explodes in a microwave, an elderly woman is shot into the stratosphere by an

Silent Night, Deadly Night out-of-control stair lift, and one character’s father breaks his neck and dies in a chimney (off-screen, but still). Gremlins is nasty, mean-spirited, features Howie Mandel and—along with Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom the same year—inspired the PG-13 rating. Its horror bona fides are legit. That brings us to Krampus, one of the few horror films that did better with critics than with audiences. Based on a Bavarian folktale about a weird goat-devil thing that punishes bad children, director Michael Dougherty (who made the superior Trick ’r Treat, which is about Easter or something) goes for horror-comedy and ends up with too little of either. Pro tip: If you’re going to cast David Koechner and Conchata Ferrell, make their characters funny, not the kind of people you’d like to murder. Max (Emjay Anthony) is all about Christmas, but when things don’t go his way Christmas Eve, he tears up a letter to Santa and accidentally summons the title character who then turns Max’s family into mincemeat. Krampus has a dark ending and some chills, but when you’re watching it and wonder how this movie attracted A-listers Toni Collette and Adam Scott, it ain’t really doing its job. That means it’s your job, budding filmmakers of the world, to come up with the scariest Christmas flick you can. My suggestion: Santa Claus flips out and kills everyone in Anytown, U.S.A., because some brat forgot to set out cookies and milk for him. Or better yet: The milk went bad and causes Santa to suffer paranoid delusions that result in mass slaughter. Hop to it; I plan to revise this list next year, so screenplays are due by March 31. Happy holidays! CW


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. INCARNATE [not yet reviewed] A scientist (Aaron Eckhart) tries to use his ability to enter other people’s subconscious to help a demon-possessed boy. Opens Dec. 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BLOOD BROTHER At Main Library, Dec. 1, 6 p.m. (NR) HARRY & SNOWMAN At Park City Film Series, Dec 2-3, 6 p.m. & Dec. 4, 8 p.m. (NR) MOTLEY’S LAW At Main Library, Dec. 6, 7 p.m. (NR) REMEMBERING THE MAN At Main Library, Dec. 1, 8:30 p.m. (NR) RENT: SING-ALONG VERSION At Main Library, Dec. 1, 3 p.m. (PG-13)

LOVING BBB.5 Jeff Nichols’ film—about the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision, brought by white Virginia man Richard Loving (Joel Edgerton) and his “colored” wife, Mildred (Ruth Negga), that rendered antimiscegenation laws unconstitutional—now feels like the movie these times demand. Nichols’ approach is defined by restraint; there’s a particular grace to the way he introduces Richard and Mildred as already a couple, and no operatic drama accompanies the scene of their arrest. The simple realities of the Lovings’ lives—built on the simple,

MOANA BBB.5 Formulas like the Disney animated musical are formulas because they work. Here, the story is built around 15-year-old Polynesian chieftain’s daughter Moana (Auli’i Cravalho), who recognizes peril facing her island home and sets out on the sea to find the lost demigod Maui (Dwayne Johnson). Directors John Musker and Ron Clements (The Little Mermaid) build a self-aware joke out of Maui’s observation that “if you wear a dress, and you have an animal sidekick, you’re a princess,” while also avoiding any romantic interest and building Moana’s character exclusively around her heroic journey. But the filmmakers also understand the value of great songs, with Lin-Manuel Miranda and Mark Mancina contributing to a powerful, satisfying soundtrack. While Johnson’s charms help lift the familiar story beats, Moana could have been designed around a checklist—and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. (PG)—SR NOCTURNAL ANIMALS BBB There are fascinating, deeply unsettling ideas percolating through writer/director Tom Ford’s psychological drama, but I can’t shake the sense that he doesn’t entirely pull off the execution. Amy Adams plays Susan, a New York art gallery manager who receives a package from her ex-husband, Edward (Jake Gyllenhaal) enclosing his long-gestating first novel, containing a deeply unsettling story. Ford spins the narrative between Susan’s present, her flashbacks and the novel’s story, addressing a compelling notion about masculine power, from self-identification as protector to its manifestation in women’s relationship choices. If only it seemed that Ford could shed his focus on stylish exteriors—and provocatively eye-catching bits like the opening montage—to really dig into Adams’ character. The final scene could pack a powerful punch, if it didn’t sometimes feel that Ford’s more interested in a thesis than a story about people. (R)—SR

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ALLIED BBB A few detours into Robert Zemeckis’ trademark sentimentality aside, Allied could easily be a romantic war drama recently rediscovered from the 1940s. There’s a wonderfully old-fashioned feel to the tale of the Canadian intelligence operative (Brad Pitt) and the French resistance fighter (Marion Cotillard) who team up to assassinate a Nazi official … in, yes, Casablanca. A year later, now married and living in London, their loyalties are called into question by the RAF. There are a few good bits of stuff blowing up, but the war action mostly takes a backseat to emotional turmoil that inevitably occurs when spies, whose lives depend on successful lies, must trust one another. Zemeckis judiciously balances psychological and physical suspense, ending up with an elegant potboiler that seems to hail from a cinematic era when silences heavy with suspicion spoke louder than words. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

THE EAGLE HUNTRESS BBB.5 There’s a heartening example of parents encouraging their daughter to develop her talents, flying the face of masculine tradition, in Otto Bell’s grin-inducing Mongolia-set documentary. Aisholpan is a happy 13-year-old who idolizes her father and wants to follow in his footsteps using trained eagles to hunt foxes and rabbits. This ancient tradition has always been men-only, but Aisholpan, her parents and even her eagle-hunter grandfather don’t care. Like a Hollywood underdog story, the film is edited and scored with an eye for drama and humor, as Aisholpan and her dad capture an eaglet, practice for a regional competition and ultimately go hunting. Bell showcases the harsh natural beauty of western Mongolia and conveys the rigors of eagle hunting, but his main focus is a young girl’s blissful empowerment under the tutelage of her proud father. You’ll be proud, too. (G)—EDS

beautiful performance by Negga and Edgerton—become the narrative base. As the real-life Lovings are shown at the end of the film in an iconic Life magazine photo, it’s hard not to think about the hard work ahead in our own time, and the kind of love that becomes too big not to change the world. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

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CURRENT RELEASES

Santa Willie Soke—was an enjoyably tart morsel of bittersweet candy, the sequel only duplicates the vulgarity, not the hilarity. This time, Willie and elfin partner Marcus (Tony Cox) plan to rob a charity on Christmas Eve, aided by Willie’s mother (Kathy Bates). Thurman Merman (Brett Kelly), the simple-minded fat kid from the original, is back, too, now 21 years old but still amusingly stupid. Gone is the original creative team, replaced by director Mark Waters (steadily declining since Mean Girls) and scribes Johnny Rosenthal and Shauna Cross. Though the ribald dialogue offers moments of perverse pleasure, they’re always just moments, and the uninspired screenplay smells of desperation. (R)—Eric D. Snider

BAD SANTA 2 BB It’s a delicate art, making a film that offends and entertains in equal measure, and Bad Santa 2 botches it. Where its 2003 predecessor— with Billy Bob Thornton as alcoholic, safe-cracking department-store

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FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: DECEMBER 2ND - DECEMBER 8TH

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BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

‘Toon Under

TV

Watch It Save It Screw It

Pacific Heat isn’t quite Archer; Shut Eye is another Hulu winner. Pacific Heat Friday, Dec. 2 (Netflix)

Series Debut: Much has already been written about how animated Australian import Pacific Heat looks a hell of a lot like long-running American series Archer—and now here’s one more, damn it. First of all, the animation isn’t as slick as Archer’s; Pacific Heat more resembles a haphazard Microsoft Paint attempt at a tribute than a calculated rip-off. Second, the real stoopid-genius of Archer lies in its writing and voice talents, which are among the best on TV, cartoon or otherwise. The Gold Coast law-enforcement agents of Pacific Heat aren’t particularly clever or distinct, and every joke can be seen coming from a kilometer away. You could blame an Aussie/American disconnect, but remember Danger 5? That was some Down Under funny—time to bring it back, Netflix!

Mr. Neighbor’s House Friday, Dec. 2 (Adult Swim)

Special: You probably know actor Brian Huskey as “that guy” from People of Earth, Veep, Another Period, Childrens Hospital and a hundred other bizarro-comedy series and movies. Mr. Neighbor’s House could be the first time Huskey has played a lead role, and he’s disturbingly perfect as slowly coming-unglued children’s show host who internally seethes like Patrick Bateman stuck with Mr. Rogers’ shitty sweater and shittier puppets. Unfortunately, Mr. Neighbor’s House (which was created by Huskey and fellow alt-comedy vet Jason Mantzoukas) has been sitting in Adult Swim purgatory for more than a year, and only one episode of what could have been a hilarious series was produced. So, enjoy Mr. Neighbor’s “31st Annual 5th Birthday Party” and wonder what’s going on at Adult Swim programming these days.

The Royals Sunday, Dec. 4 (E!)

Season Premiere: Sexy glam-trash soap opera The Royals is the only non-reality show on E!, as well as the network’s lone offering that isn’t an insult to anyone with an IQ over

50 (has The Soup really been gone a year? Sigh). Queen Helena (Elizabeth Hurley), Princess Eleanor (Alexandra Park) and the rest of the fictional British royal family have been locked in a tawdry, shifting power struggle for the throne for two seasons now, and the unexpected return of presumeddead Prince Robert (Max Brown, replete with fake castaway beard) at the outset of Season 3 further complicates an already sticky wicket (hey, I tried). Catch up on The Royals over the holidays on Amazon Prime; the accents will fool your family into thinking you’re watching some proper PBS fare.

Shut Eye Wednesday, Dec. 7 (Hulu)

Series Debut: A dark dramedy about a Los Angeles crime syndicate of gypsy psychics? Well played, Hulu. Charlie (Jeffrey Donovan, Burn Notice) is a cynical fortune-teller conman desperate to get out of the gypsies’ racket and start his own racket with his wife (KaDee Strickland, Secrets & Lies), ripping suckers off as an independent businessman, because ’Merica. The idea of grifter couple trying to get out from under the thumb of a ruthless psychic mafia is intriguing enough, but Shut Eye throws in another twist: When Charlie sustains a beat-down head injury that enables him to experience (seemingly, at least) real clairvoyant visions, the career fraud suddenly has a new outlook on life—not that gypsy mob bosses Fonso (Angus Sampson) and Rita (Isabella Rossellini) care; their only interest is in retaining their star crystalballer and his cash flow. Another left-field winner from Hulu.

Pacific Heat (Netflix)

Hairspray Live! Wednesday, Dec. 7 (NBC)

Special: John Waters got it right in 1988 with the original Hairspray movie—how many unnecessary and increasingly watered-down stage and film versions need to be made? Apparently one more, because current broadcast network TV is more about nostalgia and cheap stunts than original concepts and risk-taking (did ya hear that Hulu has a series about a psychic crime syndicate, NBC?). Ariana Grande, Kristin Chenoweth, Andrea Martin, Martin Short, Derek Hough, Harvey Fierstein, Jennifer Hudson, Dove Cameron, Garrett Clayton, Maddie Baillio, Ephraim Sykes, Shahadi Wright Joseph, Billy Eichner, Sean Hayes and Rosie O’Donnell make up the Who’s Who of Who Cares? cast, and every remaining trace of Waters’ subversive undertones will surely have been scrubbed out by airtime. At least he’ll get a check.

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

2 | DECEMBER 1, 2016

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Thursday 12/1

Nathan Maretsky was to highlight house and techno music, but it evolved to be solely “about focusing on music that is not as popular in the scheme of all electronic music.” Recess is also meant to be a welcoming environment. “It’s kind of blossomed into this positive thing with a consistent crowd and a good vibe; in the three years we’ve been doing this, there’s never been a fight or altercation.” Recess Club also prides itself on welcoming touring talent. Tonight, Maretsky is geeking out about the imminent appearance of two of his biggest influences, Bristol-based DJ Will Clarke and L.A. DJ Sage Armstrong. As for his own music, Maretsky describes his approach as “freestyle.” He likes to read the crowd and anticipate the type of music they’ll want to hear on a given night. His stage name provides a clue to his sonic tendencies: A low-pass filter is like a bouncer that lifts the velvet rope only for low-frequency sounds, like bootyshaking bass. “My general style always has a funk, disco and hiphop influence,” he says. “It’s definitely geared toward women. If the women are dancing, then the dudes will start dancing.” The formula is working for him. Maretsky recently signed with Jeremy Moreland’s V2AM and L.A.-based indie label Killpop Records, and is set to release a single, “I Hate Milk,” in two weeks. When the next season of Recess Club starts up, the DJ invites everyone to check it out. “Anybody who’s interested should just feel free to come out. It’s a very judgement-free kind of environment.” CW

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hile pop culture would have us believe that tales of up-and-coming DJs originate from a small town and culminate in the neon underworld of the Los Angeles club scene, DJ Nate Lowpass (Nathan Maretsky) found his success in the opposite direction when he relocated from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City. “I arrived here with a bag of records and a trash bag full of clothes,” he says. Maretsky’s in a bit of a rush when we first meet up at Club Elevate for his weekly set, but it gives me a moment to take in the fluid way he sets up his turntables and the rest of his DJ gear. He is a man of intense focus, but the way he laughs and cracks jokes with bar staff as he’s priming his equipment hints that this focus comes from a place of creative joy. Once he feels confident with the setup, he retires to the club’s back room, where the thumping bass and kaleidoscopic lights are a bit less prominent. Maretsky, 30, is a California native who spent his formative years hitting up downtown raves and clubs. This lifestyle prompted some of his friends to purchase turntables, which flipped a switch. “Buying records is an addictive habit,” he says. “I’ve been a drummer my whole life, so the rhythmic side of mixing is what really sucked me in.” When asked how he went from an L.A. club goer to a successful DJ in SLC, Maretsky pauses before responding. “I came out here because my mom lives here. I got mixed up with the wrong people when I was out there,” he says. “I ended up with a crazy drug habit when I was 18 or 19. I was strung out and homeless.” As with most recovering addicts, he describes a moment of clarity that spurred him to take action. “I was able to see that if I kept doing this, I was going to die.” Maretsky’s expression turns somber as he reflects. He looks like a man who faced down something terrible, defeated it and is moving on. He speaks with a discipline and focus that he’ll demonstrate during his bass-heavy, rhythm-centric, structured set later tonight. “Within 24 hours, I had left my job, my girlfriend, my apartment, my friends and about 80 percent of my belongings,” he says. Something else he left behind was his habit. “In February, I’ll be celebrating 10 years sober.” He spent his first year in Salt Lake City attending recovery meetings and working “early as shit” unloading trucks. Eventually, he scraped up enough money to get his own DJ equipment. “I was able to convince my dad to help me buy my own set of turntables,” he recalls. When Maretsky wasn’t working or mixing records in his basement, he spent most of his time hanging out at Mechanized, a now-defunct record store that used to be a haunt for local DJs during the early 2000s. “All the big DJs were working there at the time, and that’s how I met all the key players,” he says. Three years ago, Maretsky and fellow DJ Al Cardenas started Recess Club, a regular Thursday-night event at Club Elevate (although the 2016 season has wrapped up). The concept, he says,


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Auto Reverse Have cassettes come back for good? BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

L

ast year, I found five brand-new tape recorders in my mom’s garage. She’s not a music fan, and doesn’t know where they came from. Who listens to cassettes anymore? I thought, as I set one of the players in my trunk. I still have a box of cassettes. Some just never made the conversion cut. Others are random acquisitions, like Stab Yourself in the Heart Because Love is Bullsh*t—a mixtape curated and hand-painted by NYC band Ancient History as supplemental press kit material. Or there’s a collection of field recordings made by late local treasure Bob Moss in Los Angeles circa 2002. But mostly, they’re old homemade tapes kept for sentimental reasons—mixtapes from old friends, recordings of juvenile prank calls or a memory of my father when I still liked him. Lately the box is overflowing because, just like vinyl, tapes seem to be making a comeback. It’s been happening since at least 2006, according to Steve Stepp of National Audio Company Inc.—the last of the large cassette-duplication and supply companies. Noticing an uptick in cassette interest from indie bands and labels, Stepp began buying up his competitors’ duplication equipment, cartridges, tape, spools and cases as they gave up on the industry. A decade later, the Springfield, Mo.-based company handles “about 95 percent” of cassette duplications, from the tiniest independent labels to majorlabel conglomerate Universal Music Group. NAC even nurtures their competition, helping supply them in order to keep the format alive. “We call it the Retro Revolution,” Stepp tells City Weekly in a telephone interview. It certainly seems like an insurrection, when many artists and labels decrease the amount of physical product runs, or eschew them altogether. Digital formats make it possible to have massive collections

without worrying about where to store the music—and streaming all but eliminates the need for digital storage. So who even needs a physical product, unless, you know, they’re special, like limited-edition CD packages, 180-gram vinyl … or these tapes. But is it really an audio insurrection? Adam Tye of SLC’s Diabolical Records says that the cassette resurgence had its boom “two or three years ago,” with boutique indie label Burger Records leading the charge. He’s not saying cassettes are over. He simply figures they’ve peaked, but they’ll stick around since they make sense for smaller bands “because of the low cost.” Then again, vinyl’s still hot—and it’s significantly more costly. Stepp reckons cassettes will remain popular for the same reason: “People want something they can hold in their hand, so they can read the lyrics and the liner notes.” Plus, he says, cassettes offer the same analog quality as vinyl. And an advantage that cassettes have over wax is that “every play of an LP degrades it, whereas magnetic tape … if you play it hundreds of times, you might only rub off some of the oxide.” Tye, whose shop specializes in vinyl but also sells cassettes, says vinyl’s sound is superior, but “it is what it is. We’re not huge gear heads or audiophiles.” It boils down to the content, not format; it’s the music that matters. And Tye is enthusiastic about local music in any form it takes, rattling off a list of favorite cassette releases by local labels Hel Audio (“phenomenal!”) and City of Dis (“same!”) as well as local bands like Choir Boy, Chalk and Wicked Bears. “Stag Hare released an incredible four-tape masterpiece that comes in an amazing package. It’s stunning,” he says. But how’s the demand? Stepp notes new manufacturers keep popping up, and orders are sufficient to keep NAC and its competitors busy. But from a retail perspective, Tye says the demand is “minimal. I think people like the idea a lot more than they like actually buying, collecting and listening to cassettes.” Whether or not cassettes are back is hard to say—and probably doesn’t matter. Streaming is the future. But you can’t deny the charm of an old box of cassettes that you hang onto because one day, for whatever reason, you might want to reach into that box and touch the past. CW


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THURSDAY 12.1 David Bazan

Formerly the prime mover of Pedro the Lion and Headphones, songwriter and musician David Bazan went solo in 2008. He’s since released a DVD and three solo albums; 2016’s Blanco is his latest. A compilation of songs recorded and released individually as part of his online Bazan Monthly project, Blanco has a decidedly thematic flow, and he often performs the album in its entirety. Though he plays his share of clubs, Bazan is a strong proponent of house concerts like the one he brings to an as-of-yet-undisclosed location this week. “You’re in someone’s living room, there’s 40 strangers and they’re all invested in this thing that’s secret, in a way,” he tells City Weekly in a phone interview. “And that’s really fun.” House shows, he continues, offer more for performers and fans alike. On his end, Bazan can skip the afternoon soundcheck, and show up only 5-10 minutes early. “With just that much setup—I’m able to have just as cathartic a time playing music for 70 or 80 minutes than I would with three hours of prep and hanging around.” Where they both win is the fact that “there’s the bonus of a level of intimacy that you can’t get at a venue.” (Bill Kopp) House concert (location revealed after ticket purchase). 8 p.m., $25, UndertowTickets.com

Dragonette

RANDY HARWARD

CABARET

LIVE

FRIDAY 12.2 Dragonette, Gibbz

The music of Toronto electronic dance music trio Dragonette is so polished and fine-tuned that you want to see them perform live to discover whether there are any sharper edges. They’re celebrating their 11th year with last month’s release of their fourth album, Royal Blues (Dragonette Inc.), and are perhaps best known for their recording of the song “Hello” by French producer/DJ Martin Solveig with him on his fifth album, Smash (Mercury, 2011). The song was given a workout by being featured on TV shows 90210, The Vampire Diaries and Gossip Girl, and on Tim Hortons ads in Canada. It’s catchy but, geez, you don’t wanna beat this Dragonette into the ground. Gibbz is not a Bee Gee, but rather the nom de tune of singer/producer Mike Gibney, whose debut EP is fittingly titled Who Gibbz a F#@$. (Brian Staker) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $15, 21+, Facebook.com/ MetroMusicHall GABE AYALA

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Quiet Riot

Do you recall the first time you heard Quiet Riot? For me, it was on a fifth-grade field trip to a carnival. Fresh off the bus, anticipating junk food, rickety rides and the potential (innocent) union of me and New Girl, Kevin DuBrow’s bellowing rasp set the tone: “CUM OOON FEEEEL THE NOOOIZE! GIRLS ROCK YOUR BOYS!” New Girl declined my offer to be her boyfriend, but Quiet Riot led me to glamrockers Slade (“Noize,” you see, is a cover) and gave me a classic song tied to a sunny childhood memory. What’s more, the band’s second single “Metal Health (Bang Your Head),” also became a certified classic, and both tunes heralded the mid-’80s dominance of arena rock—still a personal favorite genre. Sadly, QR never matched their six-time platinum success of that year, but they plowed ahead, weathering 22 lineup changes since late guitar legend Randy Rhoads formed the band in 1975. DuBrow overdosed in 2009, and his best replacement, Love/Hate’s Jizzy Pearl, left the band this year, replaced by Seann Nicols (Adler’s Appetite). In fact, the only remaining member of the Metal Health lineup is drummer Frankie Banali. Whenever that happens, it’s kind of a bummer—but eventually it’ll be true for every band. Nobody lives forever, and only the songs survive. (Randy Harward) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $20 in advance, $25 day of show, 21+, LiquidJoes.net


FRIDAYSATURDAY 12.2-3

LIVE

Tinsley Ellis

Relax, this isn’t Pinhead from Clive Barker’s Hellraiser come to wreak musical damnation. But there is a slight similarity between the horror villain and this New Haven, Conn., indie-rock trio featuring Speedy Ortiz drummer Mike Falcone. The band manages to contain the artsy touches of Speedy with the anger of punk rock on

Hellrazor

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Tinsley Ellis their newest release, Satan Smile (New Professor Music). The title seems perfectly timed to coincide with an episode in the reality shitshow that is 2010s American history—and which might find Beelzebub himself beaming (but, for the rest of us, it’s a consummate WTF moment). The disc leads off with “A Cool Mill,” a swing for the fences in the “cash rules” postmodern punditry sweepstakes, then flows into the post-grunge number “Allergic” before it slows down with the third song, “Covered in Shit.” It’s tactical sequencing, cagey in a Stephen Malkmus way, and sinister in that Hellrazor’s hooks—kinda like Pinhead’s— really grab you. And this is no catch-andrelease. (BS) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5 suggested donation, Facebook.com/DiabolicalSLC

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TUESDAY 12.6

HOME OF THE

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“Can Blue Men Sing the Whites?” That was the question famously asked by Britain’s legendary musical misfits the Bonzo Dog Band. And while the irony is all too obvious, it does help define an era when bands from the U.K. famously appropriated black blues and refashioned it in their own image. Ironically, that’s the music that initially inspired Tinsley Ellis. Weaned on the sounds of The Rolling Stones, Cream, The Yardbirds and The Animals, he then chose to explore its origins after witnessing a concert by the late, great B.B. King. Nowadays, with a career in full flush and albums of consistent quality released on one of America’s foremost blues label, Alligator Records, Ellis himself is setting the standard. Billboard magazine noted, “Nobody has released more consistently excellent blues albums than Atlanta’s Tinsley Ellis. He sings like a man possessed and wields a mean lead guitar.” Bonzo Dog Band, you have your answer. (Lee Zimmerman) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $19-$34, EgyptianTheatreCompany.org


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DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 39

12.05 OPEN BLUES JAM

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12.01 MICHAEL DALLIN

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FEELING CHILLY?

It’s the age of the self-taught musician, and there are few who have burst onto the scene with the impetus of DJ/producer/musician Porter Robinson. Before age 20, Robinson received attention on an international level when he was included in Billboard‘s “21 Under 21” list as well as other DJ indices. Now, before the cusp of a quarter-century, he is touring on his second fulllength release, Shelter, with fellow 20-something and musical cohort Madeon, who appears on the release. The concept album has been made into a short animated film- following the narrative of Rin, a young girl who lives her life inside a futuristic simulation—a story that has implications on the way we live our lives online now. Openers include San Holo, Danger, Fakear and Robotaki. (Brian Staker) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $22-$32, TheComplexSLC.com


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THURSDAY 12.1 LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael Band (Garage on Beck) Black Bess and the Butchers (Gracie’s) David Bazan (secret location) see p. 36 Earthestra (Gallivan Center) Michael Dallin (Hog Wallow) Slick Velveteens + Diotima + White Fire (Kilby Court) The Tribe of I + Show Me Island + From the Sun + The Anchorage (The Urban Lounge) Will Baxter Band (Twist)

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Dance Evolution with DJ/DC (Metro Music Hall) DJ Dolph (Downstairs PC) Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar & Grill) Housepitality feat. Funkee Boss (Downstairs PC) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Reggae Thursday: Skanks Roots Project (The Royal) Therapy Thursdays feat. Ephwurd (Sky)

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40 | DECEMBER 1, 2016

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

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MONDAY 12.5

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

TUESDAY 12.6

The 7th Annual Lower Lights Christmas (Kingsbury Hall) American Festival Chorus & Orchestra (DeJoria Center) Famous Last Words + The Funeral Portrait + Versus Me (The Loading Dock) GENTRI + American Festival Chorus (DeJoria Center) Sara Watkins + River Whyless (The State Room) see above Smoke Signals + We Gave It Hell + The Wake Of An Arsonist (Club X) Winter Battle of the Bands (Velour)

QUIT SMOKING Give your family the gift of good health.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Karaoke Church with DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

This holiday season is the perfect one to

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck)

Sara Watkins has made music most of her life. She began at the tender age of 8 when she, her brother Sean and Chris Thile formed the bluegrass band Nickel Creek. She’s been at it ever since, shifting through a string of ensembles—WPA, Mutual Admiration Society and the Watkins Family Hour—although her most distinctive work has found her on her own. While her latest album, Young In All the Wrong Ways, sounds like a soul-baring experience, emphasizing relationships that have been tattered and torn, she insists her life is far more satisfying than these songs imply. “Sometimes you lose track of some of the simple niceties of the job,” she says. “I get to play with some great bands. I get to go to great places, and it pays really well. I feel very lucky to be so attached to this thing I’ve gotten to do my whole life.” (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $23, 21+, TheStateRoomSLC.com


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57. "Hook" role 58. Suffix with sentimental 59. Dent or crack 60. "____ Mine" (George Harrison autobiography) 61. See 64-Down 63. Rejections 64. With 61-Down, 1986 Tom Cruise film

Last week’s answers

| CITY WEEKLY |

DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 43

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWN 1. Pep rally cries 2. Tons 3. "Give that ____ cigar!" 4. Like some navels 5. Flutter, as one's eyes 6. Hardly 100% 7. Periods of time 8. "Get cracking!" 9. Political comedian with the 1973 album "Sing a Song of Watergate" 10. Suffix with winter 11. Veto

12. 1300 hours, to a civilian 13. NFL positions: Abbr. 18. Double ____ Oreos 22. New Agey sounds 24. Staple of a vegan diet 25. "____ go bragh!" 27. Took courses 28. Failed to 29. "Git along" little critter 30. "Golf Begins at Forty" author 31. Southpaw's opposite 32. Justice Kagan 33. Conductor Seiji 34. Belong 38. Recoiled slightly, as from an oncoming punch 39. Like first editions, often 40. ____ prof. 43. "What have we here?!" 45. It may be splashed on 47. In a precise manner 48. Alternative to -enne 49. "____ only known!" 53. Duchess of Cambridge, to friends 55. Spoken test 56. Bumps hard

ANTIGRAM

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ACROSS 1. Help for motorcycle daredevils 5. eBay action 8. Key of Mozart's Symphony No. 40 14. Jai ____ 15. In the manner of 16. Giving off, as confidence 17. 62-Across of "on the sly" 19. Natural history museum attractions 20. Get the ball rolling 21. Flue problem 23. Like a button? 26. Writes 2 + 7 = 10, e.g. 31. 62-Across of "no fair to trees" 33. "The Wizard ____" (comic strip) 35. Chick-____-A (chicken restaurant franchise) 36. Fence alternative 37. Sharp turn 38. 62-Across of "real fun" 41. Actress Vardalos 42. Playwright Fugard 44. "N.Y. State of Mind" rapper 45. What Yale became in 1969 46. 62-Across of "I won't hear this" 50. "It's ____ guess" 51. List-ending abbr. 52. Poe's "The ____ of Amontillado" 54. They may be French 58. "Put me down as a maybe" 62. Term used to describe a rearrangement of letters in a word or phrase to create its opposite meaning 65. John's "Pulp Fiction" costar 66. "Not ____ shabby!" 67. Identify 68. On a "What's Hot" list 69. Special feeling? 70. "If all ____ fails ..."

Š 2016

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A Hand Up

Longtime Salt Lake City residents might have already heard about Guadalupe School, a nonprofit organization designed to meet the educational needs of refugee and immigrant families in the lower socio-economic bracket. But what you might be unaware of is the degree to which this school is changing lives. “A lot of people know that we help out an immigrant population in Rose Park, but they might not know how,” Cassie Bingham, the school’s communications specialist, says. In fact, Guadalupe School currently has five programs targeted at all ages. Though it was originally founded as an English as a Second Language (ESL) program in 1966, it has evolved significantly since then. Now there is an in-home program for parents with babies, focusing on parenting skills; a toddler program for children ages 2-3 in which kids can receive literacy-based care every week; a preschool program designed to ensure school readiness with structured small and large groups; a charter school program for elementary-school-age children, focusing on literacy, college-readiness, physical exercise and art; and an adult education program. The latter also offers more than ESL, including U.S. citizenship classes, some childcare, limited transportation and snacks. “The program is aimed at providing a route for future success for people who don’t have normal access to things that more affluent peers would have,” Bingham says. By hitting the needs of all age groups, Guadalupe School is helping multiple generations of people at the same time. “I like working toward a unified cause, like community social good,” says Bingham, who is in her second year with Guadalupe School and also works as part of the development team. Bingham loves the

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school’s motto: Transforming lives through education. “That’s a really noble cause; I don’t know who wouldn’t want to work toward something like that,” she says. The public charter school at Guadalupe, which currently serves 300 students, also provides unique learning experiences for kids. Recent field trips included a visit to the State Capitol, This Is the Place Heritage Park and Tracy Aviary. Unique learning opportunities also arose when the folks at Intermountain Therapy Animals brought in a few dogs and trainers to see the kids this past fall. For those who need a little extra help, there’s an after-school program for tutoring and enrichment activities. If readers are interested in supporting Guadalupe School, check them out online and watch for their fundraisers throughout the year. All proceeds from events go to the school. Those interested at volunteering or donating can also reach out to them through the website. n

Guadalupe School 1385 N. 1200 West, Salt Lake City 801-531-6100 Facebook.com/GuadalupeSchoolSLC GuadSchool.org

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A journalist dared composer John Cage to “summarize himself in a nutshell.” Cage said, “Get yourself out of whatever cage you find yourself in.” He might have added, “Avoid the nutshells that anyone tries to put you in.” This is always fun work to attend to, of course, but I especially recommend it to you Sagittarians right now. You’re in the time of year that’s close to the moment when you first barged out of your mom’s womb, where you had been housed for months. The coming weeks will be an excellent phase to attempt a similar if somewhat less extravagant trick.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Are your collaborative projects (including the romantic kind) evolving at a slower pace than you expected? Have they not grown as deep and strong as you’ve wished they would? If so, I hope you’re perturbed about it. Maybe that will motivate you to stop tolerating the stagnation. Here’s my recommendation: Don’t adopt a more serious and intense attitude. Instead, get loose and frisky. Inject a dose of blithe spirits into your togetherness, maybe even some high jinks and rowdy experimentation. The cosmos has authorized you to initiate ingenious surprises.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Hundreds of years ago, the Catholic Church’s observance of Lent imposed a heavy burden. During this six-week period, extending from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, believers were expected to cleanse their sins through acts of self-denial. For example, they weren’t supposed to eat meat on Fridays. Their menus could include fish, however. And this loophole was expanded even further in the 17th century when the Church redefined beavers as being fish. (They swim well, after all.) I’m in favor of you contemplating a new loophole in regard to your own self-limiting behaviors, Capricorn. Is there a taboo you observe that no longer makes perfect sense? Out of habit, do you deny yourself a pleasure or indulgence that might actually be good for you? Wriggle free of the constraints.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) I don’t recommend that you buy a cat-o’-nine-tails and whip yourself in a misguided effort to exorcize your demons. The truth is, those insidious troublemakers exult when you abuse yourself. They draw perverse sustenance from it. In fact, their strategy is to fool you into treating yourself badly. So, no. If you hope to drive away the saboteurs huddled in the sacred temple of your psyche, your best bet is to shower yourself with tender care, even luxurious blessings. The pests won’t like that, and—if you commit to this crusade for an extended time—they will eventually flee.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Nobel Prize-winning novelist Gabriel García Márquez loved yellow roses. He often had a fresh bloom on his writing desk AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “The Pacific Ocean was overflowing the borders of the map,” wrote as he worked, placed there every morning by his wife Mercedes Pablo Neruda in his poem “The Sea.” “There was no place to put it,” Barcha. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you he continued. “It was so large, wild and blue that it didn’t fit anywhere. to consider initiating a comparable ritual. Is there a touch of That’s why it was left in front of my window.” This passage is a lyrical beauty you would like to inspire you on a regular basis? It there approximation of what your life could be like in 2017. In other words, a poetic gesture you could faithfully perform for a person you lavish, elemental, expansive experiences will be steadily available to love? you. Adventures that might have seemed impossibly big and unwieldy VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) in the past will be just the right size. And it all begins soon. “For a year I watched as something entered and then left my body,” testified Jane Hirshfield in her poem “The Envoy.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “I have a deep fear of being too much,” writes poet Michelle K. “That What was that mysterious something? Terror or happiness? one day I will find my someone, and they will realize that I am a hur- She didn’t know. Nor could she decipher “how it came in” or ricane. That they will step back and be intimidated by my muchness.” “how it went out.” It hovered “where words could not reach Given the recent astrological omens, Pisces, I wouldn’t be shocked if it. It slept where light could not go.” Her experience led her you’ve been having similar feelings. But now here’s the good news: to conclude that “There are openings in our lives of which we Given the astrological omens of the next nine months, I suspect the know nothing.” I bring this meditation to your attention, Virgo, odds will be higher than usual that you’ll encounter brave souls who’ll because I suspect you are about to tune in to a mysterious openbe able to handle your muchness. They may or may not be soulmates ing. But unlike Hirshfield, I think you’ll figure out what it is. And or your one-and-only. I suggest you welcome them as they are, with then you will respond to it with verve and intelligence. all of their muchness. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) A reporter at Vanity Fair once asked David Bowie, “What do you ARIES (March 21-April 19) “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow,” consider your greatest achievement?” Bowie didn’t name any wrote naturalist Henry David Thoreau in Walden, “to keep an of his albums, videos, or performances. Rather, he answered, appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquain- “Discovering morning.” I suspect that you Libras will attract tance among the pines.” I’d love to see you summon that level of and generate marvels if you experiment with accomplishments commitment to your important rendezvous in the coming weeks, like that in the coming weeks. So yes, try to discover or redisAries. Please keep in mind, though, that your “most important cover morning. Delve into the thrills of beginnings. Magnify rendezvous” are more likely to be with wild things, unruly wisdom, your appreciation for natural wonders that you usually take for or primal breakthroughs than with pillars of stability, committee granted. Be seduced by sources that emanate light and heat. Gravitate toward what’s fresh, blossoming, just-in-its-earlymeetings, and business-as-usual. stages. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) For you Tauruses, December is “I Accept and Love and Celebrate SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Myself Exactly How I Am Right Now” Month. To galvanize yourself, According to traditional astrology, you Scorpios are not prone play around with this declaration by Oscar-winning Taurus actress to optimism. You’re more often portrayed as connoisseurs of Audrey Hepburn: “I’m a long way from the human being I’d like to smoldering enigmas and shadowy intrigue and deep questions. be, but I’ve decided I’m not so bad after all.” Here are other thoughts But one of the most creative and successful Scorpios of the 20th to draw on during the festivities: 1. “If you aren’t good at loving century did not completely fit this description. French artist yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone.” (Barbara De Claude Monet was renowned for his delightful paintings of Angelis). 2. “The hardest challenge is to be yourself in a world where sensuous outdoor landscapes. “Every day I discover even more everyone is trying to make you be somebody else.” (E. E. Cummings). beautiful things,” he testified. “It is intoxicating me, and I want 3. “To accept ourselves as we are means to value our imperfections as to paint it all. My head is bursting.” Monet is your patron saint in much as our perfections.” (Sandra Bierig). 4. “We cannot change the coming weeks. You will have more potential to see as he did than you’ve had in a long time. anything until we accept it.” (Carl Jung).


Poets Corner

he night crept upon and from the corner of my eye- saw the sky, did I…saw the sky. Slowly I walked unto my fate, had a date, did I… with the church. What’s worse..was that she’d stand me up, all alone I would wait with my mind in a cup of whiskey that burned my very lips to the touch, so much, did it…so much. The bells struck ‘leven as I gazed up at Heaven, so far away it seemed before me. I cursed and I stumbled, the sky I heard rumble, I took a tumble down the steps of the Madeleine. On the steps of the Madeleine I said a prayer, but no one was there as I sat well aware that the ‘morrow would come just as days were the same ‘had my own self to blame all the same, all the same. On the steps of the Madeleine I prayed.

Douglas Heinl Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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Despite the fact that Salt Lake County needs about 8,000 rental properties right now and that the mayor’s office still hasn’t announced where she’s planning to open four new homeless shelters, the building boom of apartments in the Capitol City is nonstop. Here’s a list of what’s growing on our skyline: 165 units on 200 East between 100 and 200 South; 200 units at 400 South and 400 East; 277 apartments at 100 South between 500 and 600 West; 158 units at 260 S. 500 East; and 300 rentals and retail space at the old Wonder Bread Building at 750 E. 400 South. When added up, all of that construction will only put 1,300 new units into the housing market. There is a massive new project going up directly behind West High School called Hardware Village. At the core of this sizable piece of land is the old Salt Lake Hardware Building which will anchor new office, rental and retail spaces. Luckily for this developer, there’s a FrontRunner station at ground level and a Trax station above it on the North Temple viaduct. The first phase of 10 acres of this new micro neighborhood opened mid-November as the newly built 4th West apartments. It’s going to be just one piece of what the builder sees as an urban resort, with brownstone used throughout, and apartments with a roof pool, clubhouse and test kitchen. You might also picture this area as where the old Carriage Horse barns were located when Temple Square was surrounded by buggies for hire. There will be a ground floor lounge area featuring a full bar area and community dining space. Sadly, though, the developer hasn’t been able to attract a bodega or grocery store to the area, so for now the huge development will be a food desert for residents. The second phase of 4th West is set to be ready by May of 2017 and a 10-story tower will start once those apartments are finished. One of the buildings will connect to the pedestrian plaza at the North Temple viaduct. And an old UTA-owned parcel was secured to use as a dog park in return for bathrooms for train and bus operators. There are several hotels in the works for conventioneers and visitors, including a 190-room hotel mixed with 38 condos at 200 South and Regent Street, and a 160-room project next door to a new apartment building at 200 South between 200 and 300 West. We’re going to need this now that, once again, Forbes has named Utah the best state for business and Salt Lake City the fastest growing city in America. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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801-747-1206

DECEMBER 1, 2016 | 47

Great Deal 2 bdrm. four-plex! Hookups, private patio, pet friendly! $645

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, UrbanUtah.com Chair, Downtown Merchants Association

| COMMUNITY |

WEST SALT LAKE

G

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

HIGHLAND PARK

URBAN L I V I N

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

48 | DECEMBER 1, 2016

WORDS

SHATTERED SCREEN?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

VOICEOVER WORKSHOP WE’LL FIX YOUR DEVICE AND DO IT RIGHT

IPHIXIT.COM 801-742-1349

in SLC!! Learn to earn HAPPY HOLIDAYS www.voscott.com/workshops.html

FOLLOW US ON SNAPCHAT @CITYWEEKLY

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

SKI TRUCK

Kids & Adults Used skis, boards, blades, cross country, packages with boots and fittings

Ask about our kids trade back…Name your PACKAGES & price

USED-YOUR CHOICE $188+ NEW FROM $288+ WEST OF FAIRPARK IN OLD HIGHLAND GOLF BLDG.

1260 WEST ON NORTH TEMPLE ST., SALT LAKE CITY Half way between Downtown and Airport on 100 north, just north of the 3 tall smoke stacks FREE SKI, BOARD MUSEUM

WWW.SKITRUCK.COM OR CALL 801-595-0919

THE BACKSTOP For Rates Call: 801.413.0947

W US FOLLON O GRAM INSTA

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

Y EKL

CWE @SL

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

WE SUE LAWYERS Barker Law Office, LLC | 2870 S. State

801-486-9636

IF U DON’T WANT TO PICK UP Your dog’s poop - - - I DO! $10/wk most yards Text 801.673.4372 CREDIT TROUBLE? NEED A CAR? Mark Miller Loan Center will get you in a car you deserve today. 801-506-1215 mmsloancenter.com

DIVORCE ONLY $297 Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com Free Consult 801-981-4478

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

ENCHANTED HANDS De-Stress/Pain Relief Experts 801-635-7790 www.MassagebyGeri.weebly.com

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

I want to pick up your DOG POOP

801-673-4372

$10/week for up to 3000 Sq feet

ch.bron28@gmail.com

TOP DOLLAR PAID

For your car, truck or van. Running or not, lost title.

NEW WINDSHIELDS Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

I CAN HELP!

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-560-9933

801-414-4103

CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

AWINDSHIELDREPLACEM ENT.COM

Certificates available in

City Weekly Dec 1, 2016  

Chicana Voices

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